WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell therapy trials

  1. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  2. Cell therapy in dilated cardiomyopathy: from animal models to clinical trials

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    C. del Corsso

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy can be the end-stage form and common denominator of several cardiac disorders of known cause, such as hypertensive, ischemic, diabetic and Chagasic diseases. However, some individuals have clinical findings, such as an increase in ventricular chamber size and impaired contractility (classical manifestations of dilated cardiomyopathy even in the absence of a diagnosed primary disease. In these patients, dilated cardiomyopathy is classified as idiopathic since its etiology is obscure. Nevertheless, regardless of all of the advances in medical, pharmacological and surgical procedures, the fate of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (of idiopathic or of any other known cause is linked to arrhythmic episodes, severe congestive heart failure and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. In this review, we will summarize present data on the use of cell therapies in animal models of dilated cardiomyopathies and will discuss the few clinical trials that have been published so far involving patients affected by this disease. The animal models discussed here include those in which the cardiomyopathy is produced by genetic manipulation and those in which disease is induced by chemical or infectious agents. The specific model used clearly creates restrictions to translation of the proposed cell therapy to clinical practice, insofar as most of the clinical trials performed to date with cell therapy have used autologous cells. Thus, translation of genetic models of dilated cardiomyopathy may have to wait until the use of allogeneic cells becomes more widespread in clinical trials of cell therapies for cardiac diseases.

  3. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ...] Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy... Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), gene and cellular therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders...

  4. Comment on: "Cell Therapy for Heart Disease: Trial Sequential Analyses of Two Cochrane Reviews"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellini, Greta; Nielsen, Emil Eik; Gluud, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Trial Sequential Analysis is a frequentist method to help researchers control the risks of random errors in meta-analyses (1). Fisher and colleagues used Trial Sequential Analysis on cell therapy for heart diseases (2). The present article discusses the usefulness of Trial Sequential Analysis and...

  5. Oversight and Management of a Cell Therapy Clinical Trial Network: Experience and Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Moyé, Lemuel A.; Sayre, Shelly L.; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C.; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A.; Skarlatos, Sonia I.

    2011-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This arti...

  6. Bone marrow stromal cell therapy for ischemic stroke: A meta-analysis of randomized control animal trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Wang, Yuexiang; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Ghimire, Saruna; Wellik, Kay E; Qu, Wenchun

    2017-04-01

    Background Results of animal studies assessing efficacy of bone marrow stromal cell therapy for ischemic stroke remain inconsistent. Aims The aims are to assess efficacy of bone marrow stromal cell therapy for ischemic stroke in animal studies. Methods Randomized controlled animal trials assessing efficacy of bone marrow stromal cell therapy were eligible. Stroke therapy academic industry round table was used to assess methodologic quality of included studies. Primary outcomes were total infarction volume and modified Neurological Severity Score. Multiple prespecified sensitivity analyses and subgroup analyses were conducted. Random effects models were used for meta-analysis. Results Thirty-three randomized animal trials were included with a total of 796 animals. The median quality score was 6 (interquartile range, 5-7). Bone marrow stromal cell therapy decreased total infarction volume (standardized mean difference, 0.897; 95% confidence interval, 0.553-1.241; P animals treated with bone marrow stromal cell and controls was 2.47 (95% confidence interval, 1.84-3.11; P animal studies. Conclusions Bone marrow stromal cell therapy significantly decreased total infarction volume and increased neural functional recovery in randomized controlled animal models of ischemic stroke.

  7. Landscape of current and emerging cell therapy clinical trials in the UK: current status, comparison to global trends and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Isabelle; Green, Emma; Sharpe, Michaela; Herbert, Chris; Hyllner, Johan; Mount, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Cell Therapy Clinical Trial and Preclinical Research databases have been established by the Cell Therapy Catapult to document current and future cell therapy clinical trials in the UK. We identified 41 ongoing trials in April 2014, an increase of seven trials from April 2013. In addition, we identified 45 late-stage preclinical research projects. The majority of the clinical trials are early phase, primarily led by academic groups. The leading therapeutic areas are cancer, cardiology and neurology. The trends in the UK are also seen globally. As the field matures, more later phase and commercial studies will emerge and the challenges will likely evolve into how to manufacture sufficient cell quantities, manage complex logistics for multi-center trials and control cost.

  8. Phase I clinical trial of fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer.

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    Takeshi Ishikawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that less-differentiated T cells are ideal for adoptive T cell transfer therapy (ACT and that fibronectin CH296 (FN-CH296 together with anti-CD3 resulted in cultured cells that contain higher amounts of less-differentiated T cells. In this phase I clinical trial, we build on these prior results by assessing the safety and efficacy of FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS: Patients underwent fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy up to six times every two weeks and the safety and antitumor activity of the ACT were assessed. In order to determine immune function, whole blood cytokine levels and the number of peripheral regulatory T cells were analyzed prior to ACT and during the follow up. RESULTS: Transferred cells contained numerous less-differentiated T cells greatly represented by CD27+CD45RA+ or CD28+CD45RA+ cell, which accounted for approximately 65% and 70% of the total, respectively. No ACT related severe or unexpected toxicities were observed. The response rate among patients was 22.2% and the disease control rate was 66.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The results obtained in this phase I trial, indicate that FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy was very well tolerated with a level of efficacy that is quite promising. We also surmise that expanding T cell using CH296 is a method that can be applied to other T- cell-based therapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN UMIN000001835.

  9. Clinical trials for stem cell therapies

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    Lomax Geoff

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, clinical trials with stem cells have taken the emerging field in many new directions. While numerous teams continue to refine and expand the role of bone marrow and cord blood stem cells for their vanguard uses in blood and immune disorders, many others are looking to expand the uses of the various types of stem cells found in bone marrow and cord blood, in particular mesenchymal stem cells, to uses beyond those that could be corrected by replacing cells in their own lineage. Early results from these trials have produced mixed results often showing minor or transitory improvements that may be attributed to extracellular factors. More research teams are accelerating the use of other types of adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells for diseases where beneficial outcome could result from either in-lineage cell replacement or extracellular factors. At the same time, the first three trials using cells derived from pluripotent cells have begun.

  10. Cell Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease

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    Hoda Madani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Recently, cell therapy has sparked a revolution in ischemic heart disease that will in the future help clinicians to cure patients. Earlier investigations in animal models and clinical trials have suggested that positive paracrine effects such as neoangiogenesis and anti-apoptotic can improve myocardial function. In this regard the Royan cell therapy center designed a few trials in collaboration with multi hospitals such as Baqiyatallah, Shahid Lavasani, Tehran Heart Center, Shahid rajaee, Masih daneshvari, Imam Reza, Razavi and Sasan from 2006. Their results were interesting. However, cardiac stem cell therapy still faces great challenges in optimizing the treatment of patients. Keyword: Cardiovascular disease, Cell therapy.  

  11. Stem cell therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus: a review of recent clinical trials

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    Couri Carlos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell therapy is one of the most promising treatments for the near future. It is expected that this kind of therapy can ameliorate or even reverse some diseases. With regard to type 1 diabetes, studies analyzing the therapeutic effects of stem cells in humans began in 2003 in the Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto - SP USP, Brazil, and since then other centers in different countries started to randomize patients in their clinical trials. Herein we summarize recent data about beta cell regeneration, different ways of immune intervention and what is being employed in type 1 diabetic patients with regard to stem cell repertoire to promote regeneration and/or preservation of beta cell mass. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT was a 7-year longitudinal study that demonstrated the importance of the intensive insulin therapy when compared to conventional treatment in the development of chronic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. This study also demonstrated another important issue: there is a reverse relationship between C-peptide levels (endogenous indicator of insulin secretion chronic complications - that is, the higher the C-peptide levels, the lower the incidence of nephropathy, retinopathy and hypoglycemia. From such data, beta cell preservation has become an additional target in the management of T1DM 1.

  12. Safety and effectiveness of stem cell therapies in early-phase clinical trials in stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Anjali; Choy, Fong Chan; Howell, Stuart; Hillier, Susan; Chan, Fiona; Hamilton-Bruce, Monica A; Koblar, Simon A

    2017-08-30

    Stem cells have demonstrated encouraging potential as reparative therapy for patients suffering from post-stroke disability. Reperfusion interventions in the acute phase of stroke have shown significant benefit but are limited by a narrow window of opportunity in which they are beneficial. Thereafter, rehabilitation is the only intervention available. The current review summarises the current evidence for use of stem cell therapies in stroke from early-phase clinical trials. The safety and feasibility of administering different types of stem cell therapies in stroke seem to be reasonably proven. However, the effectiveness needs still to be established through bigger clinical trials with more pragmatic clinical trial designs that address the challenges raised by the heterogeneous nature of stroke per se, as well those due to unique characteristics of stem cells as therapeutic agents.

  13. Modulation of Autoimmune T-Cell Memory by Stem Cell Educator Therapy: Phase 1/2 Clinical Trial.

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    Delgado, Elias; Perez-Basterrechea, Marcos; Suarez-Alvarez, Beatriz; Zhou, Huimin; Revuelta, Eva Martinez; Garcia-Gala, Jose Maria; Perez, Silvia; Alvarez-Viejo, Maria; Menendez, Edelmiro; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Tang, Ruifeng; Zhu, Zhenlong; Hu, Wei; Moss, Thomas; Guindi, Edward; Otero, Jesus; Zhao, Yong

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that causes a deficit of pancreatic islet β cells. The complexities of overcoming autoimmunity in T1D have contributed to the challenges the research community faces when devising successful treatments with conventional immune therapies. Overcoming autoimmune T cell memory represents one of the key hurdles. In this open-label, phase 1/phase 2 study, Caucasian T1D patients (N = 15) received two treatments with the Stem Cell Educator (SCE) therapy, an approach that uses human multipotent cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (CB-SCs). SCE therapy involves a closed-loop system that briefly treats the patient's lymphocytes with CB-SCs in vitro and returns the "educated" lymphocytes (but not the CB-SCs) into the patient's blood circulation. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01350219. Clinical data demonstrated that SCE therapy was well tolerated in all subjects. The percentage of naïve CD4(+) T cells was significantly increased at 26 weeks and maintained through the final follow-up at 56 weeks. The percentage of CD4(+) central memory T cells (TCM) was markedly and constantly increased at 18 weeks. Both CD4(+) effector memory T cells (TEM) and CD8(+) TEM cells were considerably decreased at 18 weeks and 26 weeks respectively. Additional clinical data demonstrated the modulation of C-C chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expressions on naïve T, TCM, and TEM cells. Following two treatments with SCE therapy, islet β-cell function was improved and maintained in individuals with residual β-cell function, but not in those without residual β-cell function. Current clinical data demonstrated the safety and efficacy of SCE therapy in immune modulation. SCE therapy provides lasting reversal of autoimmune memory that could improve islet β-cell function in Caucasian subjects. Obra Social "La Caixa", Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Red de Investigación Renal, European Union FEDER Funds, Principado de

  14. Regulatory landscape for cell therapy--EU view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBlane, James W

    2015-09-01

    This article addresses regulation of cell therapies in the European Union (EU), covering cell sourcing and applications for clinical trials and marketing authorisation applications. Regulatory oversight of cell sourcing and review of applications for clinical trials with cell therapies are handled at national level, that is, separately with each country making its own decisions. For clinical trials, this can lead to different decisions in different countries for the same trial. A regulation is soon to come into force that will address this and introduce a more efficient clinical trial application process. However, at the marketing authorisation stage, the process is pan-national: the Committee for Human Medicinal Products (CHMP) is responsible for giving the final scientific opinion on all EU marketing authorisation applications for cell therapies: favourable scientific opinions are passed to the European Commission (EC) for further consultation and, if successful, grant of a marketing authorisation valid in all 28 EU countries. In its review of applications for marketing authorisations (MAAs) for cell therapies, the CHMP is obliged to consult the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT), who conduct detailed scientific assessments of these applications, with assessment by staff from national regulatory authorities and specialist advisors to the regulators. Copyright © 2015.

  15. Stem cell therapy for ischemic heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Lu, Kai; Zhu, Jinyun; Wang, Jian'an

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart diseases, especially the myocardial infarction, is a major hazard problem to human health. Despite substantial advances in control of risk factors and therapies with drugs and interventions including bypass surgery and stent placement, the ischemic heart diseases usually result in heart failure (HF), which could aggravate social burden and increase the mortality rate. The current therapeutic methods to treat HF stay at delaying the disease progression without repair and regeneration of the damaged myocardium. While heart transplantation is the only effective therapy for end-stage patients, limited supply of donor heart makes it impossible to meet the substantial demand from patients with HF. Stem cell-based transplantation is one of the most promising treatment for the damaged myocardial tissue. Key recent published literatures and ClinicalTrials.gov. Stem cell-based therapy is a promising strategy for the damaged myocardial tissue. Different kinds of stem cells have their advantages for treatment of Ischemic heart diseases. The efficacy and potency of cell therapies vary significantly from trial to trial; some clinical trials did not show benefit. Diverged effects of cell therapy could be affected by cell types, sources, delivery methods, dose and their mechanisms by which delivered cells exert their effects. Understanding the origin of the regenerated cardiomyocytes, exploring the therapeutic effects of stem cell-derived exosomes and using the cell reprogram technology to improve the efficacy of cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases. Recently, stem cell-derived exosomes emerge as a critical player in paracrine mechanism of stem cell-based therapy. It is promising to exploit exosomes-based cell-free therapy for ischemic heart diseases in the future. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Oversight and management of a cell therapy clinical trial network: experience and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyé, Lemuel A; Sayre, Shelly L; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2011-09-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This article describes the Network's challenges as it initiated three protocols in a polarized cultural atmosphere at a time when oversight bodies were positioning themselves for the tightest vigilance of promising new therapies. Effective strategies involving ongoing education, open communication, and relationship building with the oversight community are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Summary of major radiation fractionation and chemotherapy trials for organ preservation therapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Parsons, James T; Greene, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    To review radiation fractionation and chemotherapy trials for patients undergoing organ preservation therapy for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Radiation therapy fractionation and chemotherapy trial results as well as historical evidence are systematically reviewed. Trial results, which involve nearly 30,000 patients, have been interpreted, compared, and presented in a structured manner to demonstrate the changing approaches in treatment over the years from the 1960s to the present. The review includes data from the split-course radiation therapy era, meta-analyses of chemotherapy and radiation therapy fractionation trials, cetuximab trials, "triple-drug trials," and modern trials of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This summary will be useful to clinicians making treatment decisions today and to investigators designing trials in the future. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoover-Plow J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-Plow, Yanqing GongDepartments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Joseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1 improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2 identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3 development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress.Keywords: mobilization, expansion, homing, survival, engraftment

  19. Cell-Based Therapies Used to Treat Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease: A Systematic Review of Animal Studies and Human Clinical Trials

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    David Oehme

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain and degenerative disc disease are a significant cause of pain and disability worldwide. Advances in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies, particularly the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells and intervertebral disc chondrocytes, have led to the publication of numerous studies and clinical trials utilising these biological therapies to treat degenerative spinal conditions, often reporting favourable outcomes. Stem cell mediated disc regeneration may bridge the gap between the two current alternatives for patients with low back pain, often inadequate pain management at one end and invasive surgery at the other. Through cartilage formation and disc regeneration or via modification of pain pathways stem cells are well suited to enhance spinal surgery practice. This paper will systematically review the current status of basic science studies, preclinical and clinical trials utilising cell-based therapies to repair the degenerate intervertebral disc. The mechanism of action of transplanted cells, as well as the limitations of published studies, will be discussed.

  20. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Peris, Ketty

    2015-11-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy is an effective and safe noninvasive treatment for low-risk basal cell carcinoma, with the advantage of an excellent cosmetic outcome. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy in basal cell carcinoma is supported by substantial research and clinical trials. In this article, we review the procedure, indications and clinical evidences for the use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

  1. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell therapies include (a) the limited source of engraftable stem cells, (b) the presence of optimal time window for stem cell therapies, (c) inherited limitation of stem cells in terms of growth, trophic support, and differentiation potential, and (d) possible transplanted cell-mediated adverse effects, such as tumor formation. Here, we discuss recent advances that overcome these hurdles in adult stem cell therapy for stroke. PMID:27733032

  2. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  3. Gene therapy clinical trials worldwide to 2017: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Samantha L; Amaya, Anais K; Alexander, Ian E; Edelstein, Michael; Abedi, Mohammad R

    2018-03-25

    To date, almost 2600 gene therapy clinical trials have been completed, are ongoing or have been approved worldwide. Our database brings together global information on gene therapy clinical activity from trial databases, official agency sources, published literature, conference presentations and posters kindly provided to us by individual investigators or trial sponsors. This review presents our analysis of clinical trials that, to the best of our knowledge, have been or are being performed worldwide. As of our November 2017 update, we have entries on 2597 trials undertaken in 38 countries. We have analysed the geographical distribution of trials, the disease indications (or other reasons) for trials, the proportions to which different vector types are used, and the genes that have been transferred. Details of the analyses presented, and our searchable database are available via The Journal of Gene Medicine Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website at: http://www.wiley.co.uk/genmed/clinical. We also provide an overview of the progress being made in gene therapy clinical trials around the world, and discuss key trends since the previous review, namely the use of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for the treatment of cancer and advancements in genome editing technologies, which have the potential to transform the field moving forward. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Stem cell therapy to treat heart ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali Qayyum, Abbas; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Kastrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    (CABG), morbidity and mortality is still high in patients with CAD. Along with PCI and CABG or in patients without options for revascularization, stem cell regenerative therapy in controlled trials is a possibility. Stem cells are believed to exert their actions by angiogenesis and regeneration...... of cardiomyocytes. Recently published clinical trials and meta-analysis of stem cell studies have shown encouraging results with increased left ventricle ejection fraction and reduced symptoms in patients with CAD and heart failure. There is some evidence of mesenchymal stem cell being more effective compared...... to other cell types and cell therapy may be more effective in patients with known diabetes mellitus. However, further investigations are warranted....

  5. Risk of discontinuation of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cecile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) constitute a class of innovative products that encompasses gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). There is an increased investment of commercial and non-commercial sponsors in this field and a growing number of ATMPs randomized clinical trials (RCT) and patients enrolled in such trials. RCT generate data to prove the efficacy of a new therapy, but the discontinuation of RCTs wastes scarce resources. Our objective is to identify the number and characteristics of discontinued ATMPs trials in order to evaluate the rate of discontinuation. We searched for ATMPs trials conducted between 1999 to June 2015 using three databases, which are Clinicaltrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT). We selected the ATMPs trials after elimination of the duplicates. We identified the disease areas and the sponsors as commercial or non-commercial organizations. We classified ATMPs by type and trial status, that is, ongoing, completed, terminated, discontinued, and prematurely ended. Then, we calculated the rate of discontinuation. Between 1999 and June 2015, 143 withdrawn, terminated, or prematurely ended ATMPs clinical trials were identified. Between 1999 and June 2013, 474 ongoing and completed clinical trials were identified. Therefore, the rate of discontinuation of ATMPs trials is 23.18%, similar to that for non-ATMPs drugs in development. The probability of discontinuation is, respectively, 27.35, 16.28, and 16.34% for cell therapies, gene therapies, and TEP. The highest discontinuation rate is for oncology (43%), followed by cardiology (19.2%). It is almost the same for commercial and non-commercial sponsors; therefore, the discontinuation reason may not be financially driven. No failure risk rate per development phase is available for ATMPs. The discontinuation rate may prove helpful when assessing the

  6. A phase I/II trial to evaluate the safety, feasibility and activity of salvage therapy consisting of the mTOR inhibitor Temsirolimus added to standard therapy of Rituximab and DHAP for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large cell B-Cell lymphoma – the STORM trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Memmer, Marie Luise; Dreyling, Martin; Hess, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The current standard treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large cell B-Cell lymphoma (DLBCL) primarily consists of intensified salvage therapy and, if the disease is chemo-sensitive, high dose therapy followed with autologous stem cell transplantation. In the rituximab era however, this treatment approach has shown only limited benefit. In particular, patients relapsing after rituximab-containing primary treatment have an adverse prognosis, especially if this occurs within the first year after therapy or if the disease is primarily refractory. Therefore there is an ultimate need for improved salvage treatment approaches. The STORM study is a prospective, multicentre phase I/II study to evaluate the safety, feasibility and activity of salvage therapy consisting of the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus added to the standard therapy rituximab and DHAP for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL. The primary objective of the phase I of the trial is to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of temsirolimus in combination with rituximab and DHAP. The secondary objective is to demonstrate that stem cells can be mobilized during this regimen in patients scheduled to proceed to high dose therapy. In phase II, the previously established maximum tolerated dose of temsirolimus will be used. The primary objective is to evaluate the overall response rate (ORR) in patients with relapsed DLBCL. The secondary objective is to evaluate progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity. The study will be accompanied by an analysis of lymphoma subtypes determined by gene expression analysis (GEP). The STORM trial evaluates the safety, feasibility and activity of salvage therapy consisting of the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus added to standard therapy of rituximab and DHAP for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL. It also might identify predictive markers for this treatment modality. ClinicalTrials.gov http

  7. Dose and Fractionation in Radiation Therapy of Curative Intent for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramroth, Johanna; Cutter, David J.; Darby, Sarah C. [Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Higgins, Geoff S. [Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); McGale, Paul [Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Taylor, Carolyn W., E-mail: carolyn.taylor@ndph.ox.ac.uk [Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: The optimum dose and fractionation in radiation therapy of curative intent for non-small cell lung cancer remains uncertain. We undertook a published data meta-analysis of randomized trials to examine whether radiation therapy regimens with higher time-corrected biologically equivalent doses resulted in longer survival, either when given alone or when given with chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eligible studies were randomized comparisons of 2 or more radiation therapy regimens, with other treatments identical. Median survival ratios were calculated for each comparison and pooled. Results: 3795 patients in 25 randomized comparisons of radiation therapy dose were studied. The median survival ratio, higher versus lower corrected dose, was 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.22) when radiation therapy was given alone and 0.83 (95% CI 0.71-0.97) when it was given with concurrent chemotherapy (P for difference=.001). In comparisons of radiation therapy given alone, the survival benefit increased with increasing dose difference between randomized treatment arms (P for trend=.004). The benefit increased with increasing dose in the lower-dose arm (P for trend=.01) without reaching a level beyond which no further survival benefit was achieved. The survival benefit did not differ significantly between randomized comparisons where the higher-dose arm was hyperfractionated and those where it was not. There was heterogeneity in the median survival ratio by geographic region (P<.001), average age at randomization (P<.001), and year trial started (P for trend=.004), but not for proportion of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (P=.2). Conclusions: In trials with concurrent chemotherapy, higher radiation therapy doses resulted in poorer survival, possibly caused, at least in part, by high levels of toxicity. Where radiation therapy was given without chemotherapy, progressively higher radiation therapy doses resulted in progressively longer survival, and no

  8. Dose and Fractionation in Radiation Therapy of Curative Intent for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramroth, Johanna; Cutter, David J.; Darby, Sarah C.; Higgins, Geoff S.; McGale, Paul; Partridge, Mike; Taylor, Carolyn W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The optimum dose and fractionation in radiation therapy of curative intent for non-small cell lung cancer remains uncertain. We undertook a published data meta-analysis of randomized trials to examine whether radiation therapy regimens with higher time-corrected biologically equivalent doses resulted in longer survival, either when given alone or when given with chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eligible studies were randomized comparisons of 2 or more radiation therapy regimens, with other treatments identical. Median survival ratios were calculated for each comparison and pooled. Results: 3795 patients in 25 randomized comparisons of radiation therapy dose were studied. The median survival ratio, higher versus lower corrected dose, was 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.22) when radiation therapy was given alone and 0.83 (95% CI 0.71-0.97) when it was given with concurrent chemotherapy (P for difference=.001). In comparisons of radiation therapy given alone, the survival benefit increased with increasing dose difference between randomized treatment arms (P for trend=.004). The benefit increased with increasing dose in the lower-dose arm (P for trend=.01) without reaching a level beyond which no further survival benefit was achieved. The survival benefit did not differ significantly between randomized comparisons where the higher-dose arm was hyperfractionated and those where it was not. There was heterogeneity in the median survival ratio by geographic region (P<.001), average age at randomization (P<.001), and year trial started (P for trend=.004), but not for proportion of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (P=.2). Conclusions: In trials with concurrent chemotherapy, higher radiation therapy doses resulted in poorer survival, possibly caused, at least in part, by high levels of toxicity. Where radiation therapy was given without chemotherapy, progressively higher radiation therapy doses resulted in progressively longer survival, and no

  9. Multimodal hypoxia imaging and intensity modulated radiation therapy for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: the HIL trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askoxylakis Vasileios

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy, preferably combined with chemotherapy, is the treatment standard for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The tumor response to different therapy protocols is variable, with hypoxia known to be a major factor that negatively influences treatment effectiveness. Visualisation of tumor hypoxia prior to the use of modern radiation therapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, might allow optimized dose applications to the target volume, leading to improvement of therapy outcome. 18 F-fluoromisonidazole dynamic positron emission tomography and computed tomography (18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional magnetic resonance imaging (functional MRI are attractive options for imaging tumor hypoxia. Methods/design The HIL trial is a single centre study combining multimodal hypoxia imaging with 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI, with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in patients with inoperable stage III NSCLC. 15 patients will be recruited in the study. All patients undergo initial FDG PET-CT and serial 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI before treatment, at week 5 of radiotherapy and 6 weeks post treatment. Radiation therapy is performed as inversely planned IMRT based on 4D-CT. Discussion Primary objectives of the trial are to characterize the correlation of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for tumor hypoxia imaging in NSCLC and evaluate possible effects of radiation therapy on tumor re-oxygenation. Further objectives include the generation of data regarding the prognostic value of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for locoregional control, progression free survival and overall survival of NSCLC treated with IMRT, which will form the basis for larger clinical trials focusing on possible interactions between tumor oxygenation and radiotherapy outcome. Trial registration The ClinicalTrials.gov protocol ID is NCT01617980

  10. Cell-based Therapy for Acute Organ Injury: Preclinical Evidence and On-going Clinical Trials Using Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsel, Antoine; Zhu, Ying-gang; Gennai, Stephane; Hao, Qi; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jae W.

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients often suffer from multiple organ failures involving lung, kidney, liver or brain. Genomic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches highlight common injury mechanisms leading to acute organ failure. This underlines the need to focus on therapeutic strategies affecting multiple injury pathways. The use of adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) may represent a promising new therapeutic approach as increasing evidence shows that MSC can exert protective effects following injury through the release of pro-mitotic, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory soluble factors. Furthermore, they can mitigate metabolomic and oxidative stress imbalance. In this work, we review the biological capabilities of MSC and the results of clinical trials using MSC as therapy in acute organ injuries. Although preliminary results are encouraging, more studies concerning safety and efficacy of MSC therapy are needed to determine their optimal clinical use. PMID:25211170

  11. Regulations in the United States for cell transplantation clinical trials in neurological diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zhu; Yuanqing Tan; Qi Gu; Weifang Han; Zhongwen Li; Jason S Meyer; Baoyang Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to use a systematic approach to evaluate the current utilization, safety, and effectiveness of cell therapies for neurological diseases in human. And review the present regulations, considering United States (US) as a representative country, for cell transplantation in neurological disease and discuss the challenges facing the field of neurology in the coming decades. Methods:A detailed search was performed in systematic literature reviews of cellular‐based therapies in neurological diseases, using PubMed, web of science, and clinical trials. Regulations of cell therapy products used for clinical trials were searched from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Results: Seven most common types of cell therapies for neurological diseases have been reported to be relatively safe with varying degrees of neurological recovery. And a series of regulations in US for cellular therapy was summarized including preclinical evaluations, sourcing material, stem cell manufacturing and characterization, cell therapy product, and clinical trials. Conclusions:Stem cell‐based therapy holds great promise for a cure of such diseases and will value a growing population of patients. However, regulatory permitting activity of the US in the sphere of stem cells, technologies of regenerative medicine and substitutive cell therapy are selective, theoretical and does not fit the existing norm and rules. Compiled well‐defined regulations to guide the application of stem cell products for clinical trials should be formulated.

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy as new treatment for clear cell sarcoma: Trial on different animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andoh, Tooru; Fujimoto, Takuya; Sudo, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Epstein, Alan L.; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare malignant tumor with a poor prognosis. In our previous study, the tumor disappeared under boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on subcutaneously-transplanted CCS-bearing animals. In the present study, the tumor disappeared under this therapy on model mice intramuscularly implanted with three different human CCS cells. BNCT led to the suppression of tumor-growth in each of the different model mice, suggesting its potentiality as an alternative to, or integrative option for, the treatment of CCS. - Highlights: • BNCT with the use of L-BPA was applied for three human clear cell sarcoma (CCS) cell lines. • BNCT trial was performed on a newly established intramuscularly CCS-bearing animal model. • A significant decrease of the tumor-volume was seen by single BNCT with the use of L-BPA. • A multiple BNCT application would be required for controlling the growth of any residual tumors

  13. Clinical trials for stem cell transplantation: when are they needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pham, Phuc

    2016-04-27

    In recent years, both stem cell research and the clinical application of these promising cells have increased rapidly. About 1000 clinical trials using stem cells have to date been performed globally. More importantly, more than 10 stem cell-based products have been approved in some countries. With the rapid growth of stem cell applications, some countries have used clinical trials as a tool to diminish the rate of clinical stem cell applications. However, the point at which stem cell clinical trials are essential remains unclear. This commentary discusses when stem cell clinical trials are essential for stem cell transplantation therapies.

  14. Clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China

    OpenAIRE

    Bingshan Liu; Yongping Song; Delong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Novel immunotherapeutic agents targeting tumor-site microenvironment are revolutionizing cancer therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells are widely studied for cancer immunotherapy. CD19-specific CAR-T cells, tisagenlecleucel, have been recently approved for clinical application. Ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in hematological and solid malignancies. In addition to trials of single-target CAR-T cells, simultaneous...

  15. Alternative Cell Sources to Adult Hepatocytes for Hepatic Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Eugenia; Gómez-Lechón, María José; Tolosa, Laia

    2017-01-01

    Adult hepatocyte transplantation is limited by scarce availability of suitable donor liver tissue for hepatocyte isolation. New cell-based therapies are being developed to supplement whole-organ liver transplantation, to reduce the waiting-list mortality rate, and to obtain more sustained and significant metabolic correction. Fetal livers and unsuitable neonatal livers for organ transplantation have been proposed as potential useful sources of hepatic cells for cell therapy. However, the major challenge is to use alternative cell sources for transplantation that can be derived from reproducible methods. Different types of stem cells with hepatic differentiation potential are eligible for generating large numbers of functional hepatocytes for liver cell therapy to treat degenerative disorders, inborn hepatic metabolic diseases, and organ failure. Clinical trials are designed to fully establish the safety profile of such therapies and to define target patient groups and standardized protocols.

  16. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Therapy for Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Based on animal studies, adult mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising for the treatment of pancreatitis. However, the best type of this form of cell therapy and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Methods. We searched the PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Clinical Trials.gov websites for studies using MSCs as a therapy for both acute and chronic pancreatitis published until September 2017. Results. We identified 276 publications; of these publications, 18 met our inclusion criteria. In animal studies, stem cell therapy was applied more frequently for acute pancreatitis than for chronic pancreatitis. No clinical trials were identified. MSC therapy ameliorated pancreatic inflammation in acute pancreatitis and pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis. Bone marrow and umbilical cord MSCs were the most frequently administered cell types. Due to the substantial heterogeneity among the studies regarding the type, source, and dose of MSCs used, conducting a meta-analysis was not feasible to determine the best type of MSCs. Conclusion. The available data were insufficient for determining the best type of MSCs for the treatment of acute or chronic pancreatitis; therefore, clinical trials investigating the use of MSCs as therapy for pancreatitis are not warranted.

  17. Clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingshan; Song, Yongping; Liu, Delong

    2017-10-23

    Novel immunotherapeutic agents targeting tumor-site microenvironment are revolutionizing cancer therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells are widely studied for cancer immunotherapy. CD19-specific CAR-T cells, tisagenlecleucel, have been recently approved for clinical application. Ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in hematological and solid malignancies. In addition to trials of single-target CAR-T cells, simultaneous and sequential CAR-T cells are being studied for clinical applications. Multi-target CAR-engineered T cells are also entering clinical trials. T cell receptor-engineered CAR-T and universal CAR-T cells represent new frontiers in CAR-T cell development. In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of CAR constructs and registered clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China and provided a quick glimpse of the landscape of CAR-T studies in China.

  18. Gene and cell therapy for children--new medicines, new challenges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Karen F; Bobby Gaspar, H

    2014-06-01

    The range of possible gene and cell therapy applications is expanding at an extremely rapid rate and advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are currently the hottest topic in novel medicines, particularly for inherited diseases. Paediatric patients stand to gain enormously from these novel therapies as it now seems plausible to develop a gene or cell therapy for a vast number of inherited diseases. There are a wide variety of potential gene and cell therapies in various stages of development. Patients who received first gene therapy treatments for primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are reaching 10 and 15 years post-treatment, with robust and sustained immune recovery. Cell therapy clinical trials are underway for a variety of tissues including corneal, retinal and muscle repair and islet cell transplantation. Various cell therapy approaches are also being trialled to enhance the safety of bone marrow transplants, which should improve survival rates in childhood cancers and PIDs. Progress in genetic engineering of lymphocyte populations to target and kill cancerous cells is also described. If successful these ATMPs may enhance or replace the existing chemo-ablative therapy for several paediatric cancers. Emerging applications of gene therapy now include skin and neurological disorders such as epidermolysis bullosa, epilepsy and leukodystrophy. Gene therapy trials for haemophilia, muscular dystrophy and a range of metabolic disorders are underway. There is a vast array of potential advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), and these are likely to be more cost effective than existing medicines. However, the first clinical trials have not been without setbacks and some of the key adverse events are discussed. Furthermore, the arrival of this novel class of therapies brings many new challenges for the healthcare industry. We present a summary of the key non-clinical factors required for successful delivery of these potential treatments. Technological advances

  19. Stem cell therapy for the systemic right ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Ming-Sing; Ohye, Richard G

    2017-11-01

    In specific forms of congenital heart defects and pulmonary hypertension, the right ventricle (RV) is exposed to systemic levels of pressure overload. The RV is prone to failure in these patients because of its vulnerability to chronic pressure overload. As patients with a systemic RV reach adulthood, an emerging epidemic of RV failure has become evident. Medical therapies proven for LV failure are ineffective in treating RV failure. Areas covered: In this review, the pathophysiology of the failing RV under pressure overload is discussed, with specific emphasis on the pivotal roles of angiogenesis and oxidative stress. Studies investigating the ability of stem cell therapy to improve angiogenesis and mitigate oxidative stress in the setting of pressure overload are then reviewed. Finally, clinical trials utilizing stem cell therapy to prevent RV failure under pressure overload in congenital heart disease will be discussed. Expert commentary: Although considerable hurdles remain before their mainstream clinical implementation, stem cell therapy possesses revolutionary potential in the treatment of patients with failing systemic RVs who currently have very limited long-term treatment options. Rigorous clinical trials of stem cell therapy for RV failure that target well-defined mechanisms will ensure success adoption of this therapeutic strategy.

  20. Clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingshan Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Novel immunotherapeutic agents targeting tumor-site microenvironment are revolutionizing cancer therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-engineered T cells are widely studied for cancer immunotherapy. CD19-specific CAR-T cells, tisagenlecleucel, have been recently approved for clinical application. Ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in hematological and solid malignancies. In addition to trials of single-target CAR-T cells, simultaneous and sequential CAR-T cells are being studied for clinical applications. Multi-target CAR-engineered T cells are also entering clinical trials. T cell receptor-engineered CAR-T and universal CAR-T cells represent new frontiers in CAR-T cell development. In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of CAR constructs and registered clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China and provided a quick glimpse of the landscape of CAR-T studies in China.

  1. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for chronic myocardial ischemia (MyStromalCell Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue represents an abundant, accessible source of multipotent adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs). Animal studies have suggested that ADSCs have the potential to differentiate in vivo into endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. This makes ADSCs a promising new cell source...... for regenerative therapy to replace injured tissue by creating new blood vessels and cardiomyocytes in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. The aim of this special report is to review the present preclinical data leading to clinical stem cell therapy using ADSCs in patients with ischemic heart disease....... In addition, we give an introduction to the first-in-man clinical trial, MyStromalCell Trial, which is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using culture-expanded ADSCs obtained from adipose-derived cells from abdominal adipose tissue and stimulated with VEGF-A(165) the week...

  2. Stem Cell Therapy for Erectile Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Ethan L; Terlecki, Ryan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jackson, John; Atala, Anthony

    2018-04-06

    The prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) is substantial and continues to rise. Current therapeutics for ED consist of oral medications, intracavernosal injections, vacuum erection devices, and penile implants. While such options may manage the disease state, none of these modalities, however, restore function. Stem cell therapy has been evaluated for erectile restoration in animal models. These cells have been derived from multiple tissues, have varied potential, and may function via local engraftment or paracrine signaling. Bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSC) and adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) have both been used in these models with noteworthy effects. Herein, we will review the pathophysiology of ED, animal models, current and novel stem-cell based therapeutics, clinical trials and areas for future research. The relevant literature and contemporary data using keywords, "stem cells and erectile dysfunction" was reviewed. Examination of evidence supporting the association between erectile dysfunction and adipose derived stem cells, bone marrow derived stem cells, placental stem cells, urine stem cells and stem cell therapy respectively. Placental-derived stem cells and urine-derived stem cells possess many similar properties as BMSC and ASC, but the methods of acquisition are favorable. Human clinical trials have already demonstrated successful use of stem cells for improvement of erectile function. The future of stem cell research is constantly being evaluated, although, the evidence suggests a place for stem cells in erectile dysfunction therapeutics. Matz EL, Terlecki R, Zhang Y, et al. Stem Cell Therapy for Erectile Dysfunction. Sex Med Rev 2018;XX:XXX-XXX. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Alpha Stem Cell Clinic: a model for evaluating and delivering stem cell-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trounson, Alan; DeWitt, Natalie D; Feigal, Ellen G

    2012-01-01

    Cellular therapies require the careful preparation, expansion, characterization, and delivery of cells in a clinical environment. There are major challenges associated with the delivery of cell therapies and high costs that will limit the companies available to fully evaluate their merit in clinical trials, and will handicap their application at the present financial environment. Cells will be manufactured in good manufacturing practice or near-equivalent facilities with prerequisite safety practices in place, and cell delivery systems will be specialized and require well-trained medical and nursing staff, technicians or nurses trained to handle cells once delivered, patient counselors, as well as statisticians and database managers who will oversee the monitoring of patients in relatively long-term follow-up studies. The model proposed for Alpha Stem Cell Clinics will initially use the capacities and infrastructure that exist in the most advanced tertiary medical clinics for delivery of established bone marrow stem cell therapies. As the research evolves, they will incorporate improved procedures and cell preparations. This model enables commercialization of medical devices, reagents, and other products required for cell therapies. A carefully constructed cell therapy clinical infrastructure with the requisite scientific, technical, and medical expertise and operational efficiencies will have the capabilities to address three fundamental and critical functions: 1) fostering clinical trials; 2) evaluating and establishing safe and effective therapies, and 3) developing and maintaining the delivery of therapies approved by the Food and Drug Administration, or other regulatory agencies.

  4. Recent advances in cell-based therapy for Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Cooper, Oliver; Vinuela, Angel

    2008-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss recent advances in the field of cell therapy for Parkinson disease (PD). They compare and contrast recent clinical trials using fetal dopaminergic neurons. They attribute differences in cell preparation techniques, cell type specification, and immunosuppression...

  5. Gene and cell therapy for children — New medicines, new challenges?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Karen F.; Bobby Gaspar, H.

    2014-01-01

    The range of possible gene and cell therapy applications is expanding at an extremely rapid rate and advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are currently the hottest topic in novel medicines, particularly for inherited diseases. Paediatric patients stand to gain enormously from these novel therapies as it now seems plausible to develop a gene or cell therapy for a vast number of inherited diseases. There are a wide variety of potential gene and cell therapies in various stages of development. Patients who received first gene therapy treatments for primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are reaching 10 and 15 years post-treatment, with robust and sustained immune recovery. Cell therapy clinical trials are underway for a variety of tissues including corneal, retinal and muscle repair and islet cell transplantation. Various cell therapy approaches are also being trialled to enhance the safety of bone marrow transplants, which should improve survival rates in childhood cancers and PIDs. Progress in genetic engineering of lymphocyte populations to target and kill cancerous cells is also described. If successful these ATMPs may enhance or replace the existing chemo-ablative therapy for several paediatric cancers. Emerging applications of gene therapy now include skin and neurological disorders such as epidermolysis bullosa, epilepsy and leukodystrophy. Gene therapy trials for haemophilia, muscular dystrophy and a range of metabolic disorders are underway. There is a vast array of potential advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), and these are likely to be more cost effective than existing medicines. However, the first clinical trials have not been without setbacks and some of the key adverse events are discussed. Furthermore, the arrival of this novel class of therapies brings many new challenges for the healthcare industry. We present a summary of the key non-clinical factors required for successful delivery of these potential treatments. Technological advances

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Antiretroviral Therapy Initiated One Week after Tuberculosis Therapy in Patients with CD4 Counts < 200 Cells/μL: TB-HAART Study, a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wondwossen Amogne

    Full Text Available Given the high death rate the first two months of tuberculosis (TB therapy in HIV patients, it is critical defining the optimal time to initiate combination antiretroviral therapy (cART.A randomized, open-label, clinical trial comparing efficacy and safety of efavirenz-based cART initiated one week, four weeks, and eight weeks after TB therapy in patients with baseline CD4 count < 200 cells/μL was conducted. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality rate at 48 weeks. The secondary endpoints were hepatotoxicity-requiring interruption of TB therapy, TB-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, new AIDS defining illnesses, CD4 counts, HIV RNA levels, and AFB smear conversion rates. All analyses were intention-to-treat.We studied 478 patients with median CD4 count of 73 cells/μL and 5.2 logs HIV RNA randomized to week one (n = 163, week four (n = 160, and week eight (n = 155. Sixty-four deaths (13.4% occurred in 339.2 person-years. All-cause mortality rates at 48 weeks were 25 per 100 person-years in week one, 18 per 100 person-years in week four and 15 per 100 person-years in week eight (P = 0.2 by the log-rank test. All-cause mortality incidence rate ratios in subgroups with CD4 count below 50 cells/μL versus above were 2.8 in week one (95% CI 1.2-6.7, 3.1 in week four (95% CI 1.2-8.6 and 5.1 in week eight (95% CI 1.8-16. Serum albumin < 3 gms/dL (adjusted HR, aHR = 2.3 and CD4 < 50 cells/μL (aHR = 2.7 were independent predictors of mortality. Compared with similar subgroups from weeks four and eight, first-line TB treatment interruption was high in week one deaths (P = 0.03 and in the CD4 subgroup <50 cells/μL (P = 0.02.Antiretroviral therapy one week after TB therapy doesn't improve overall survival. Despite increased mortality with CD4 < 50 cells/μL, we recommend cART later than the first week of TB therapy to avoid serious hepatotoxicity and treatment interruption.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 01315301.

  7. Combination stem cell therapy for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichim Thomas E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with congestive heart failure (CHF that are not eligible for transplantation have limited therapeutic options. Stem cell therapy such as autologous bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, or purified cells thereof has been used clinically since 2001. To date over 1000 patients have received cellular therapy as part of randomized trials, with the general consensus being that a moderate but statistically significant benefit occurs. Therefore, one of the important next steps in the field is optimization. In this paper we discuss three ways to approach this issue: a increasing stem cell migration to the heart; b augmenting stem cell activity; and c combining existing stem cell therapies to recapitulate a "therapeutic niche". We conclude by describing a case report of a heart failure patient treated with a combination stem cell protocol in an attempt to augment beneficial aspects of cord blood CD34 cells and mesenchymal-like stem cells.

  8. Engineered T Cells for the Adoptive Therapy of B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Koehler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL remains an incurable disease due to the high risk of relapse, even after complete remission, raising the need to control and eliminate residual tumor cells in long term. Adoptive T cell therapy with genetically engineered specificity is thought to fulfil expectations, and clinical trials for the treatment of CLL are initiated. Cytolytic T cells from patients are redirected towards CLL cells by ex vivo engineering with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which binds to CD19 on CLL cells through an antibody-derived domain and triggers T cell activation through CD3ζ upon tumor cell engagement. Redirected T cells thereby target CLL cells in an MHC-unrestricted fashion, secret proinflammatory cytokines, and eliminate CD19+ leukaemia cells with high efficiency. Cytolysis of autologous CLL cells by patient's engineered T cells is effective, however, accompanied by lasting elimination of healthy CD19+ B-cells. In this paper we discuss the potential of the strategy in the treatment of CLL, the currently ongoing trials, and the future challenges in the adoptive therapy with CAR-engineered T cells.

  9. Imaging: Guiding the Clinical Translation of Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Patricia K.; Lan, Feng; Wang, Yongming; Wu, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have been touted as the holy grail of medical therapy with promises to regenerate cardiac tissue, but it appears the jury is still out on this novel therapy. Using advanced imaging technology, scientists have discovered that these cells do not survive nor engraft long-term. In addition, only marginal benefit has been observed in large animal studies and human trials. However, all is not lost. Further application of advanced imaging technology will help scientists unravel the mysteries of stem cell therapy and address the clinical hurdles facing its routine implementation. In this review, we will discuss how advanced imaging technology will help investigators better define the optimal delivery method, improve survival and engraftment, and evaluate efficacy and safety. Insights gained from this review may direct the development of future preclinical investigations and clinical trials. PMID:21960727

  10. CAR-T Cells: A Systematic Review and Mixed Methods Analysis of the Clinical Trial Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, David; Arshad, Zeeshaan; Smith, James; Stanic, Tijana; Holländer, Georg; Brindley, David

    2018-02-07

    CAR-T cells are a promising new therapy that offer significant advantages compared with conventional immunotherapies. This systematic review and clinical trial landscape identifies and critiques published CAR-T cell clinical trials and examines the critical factors required to enable CAR-T cells to become a standard therapy. A review of the literature was conducted to identify suitable studies from the MEDLINE and Ovid bibliographic databases. The literature and database searches identified 20 studies for inclusion. The average number of participants per clinical trial examined was 11 patients. All studies included in this systematic review investigated CAR-T cells and were prospective, uncontrolled clinical studies. Leukemia is the most common cancer subtype and accounts for 57.4% (n = 120) of disease indications. The majority of studies used an autologous cell source (85%, n = 17) rather than an allogeneic cell source. Translational challenges encompass technical considerations relating to CAR-T cell development, manufacturing practicability, clinical trial approaches, CAR-T cell quality and persistence, and patient management. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A guide to manufacturing CAR T cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vormittag, Philipp; Gunn, Rebecca; Ghorashian, Sara; Veraitch, Farlan S

    2018-02-17

    In recent years, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells have been used as a treatment for haematological malignancies in several phase I and II trials and with Kymriah of Novartis and Yescarta of KITE Pharma, the first CAR T cell therapy products have been approved. Promising clinical outcomes have yet been tempered by the fact that many therapies may be prohibitively expensive to manufacture. The process is not yet defined, far from being standardised and often requires extensive manual handling steps. For academia, big pharma and contract manufacturers it is difficult to obtain an overview over the process strategies and their respective advantages and disadvantages. This review details current production processes being used for CAR T cells with a particular focus on efficacy, reproducibility, manufacturing costs and release testing. By undertaking a systematic analysis of the manufacture of CAR T cells from reported clinical trial data to date, we have been able to quantify recent trends and track the uptake of new process technology. Delivering new processing options will be key to the success of the CAR-T cells ensuring that excessive manufacturing costs do not disrupt the delivery of exciting new therapies to the wide possible patient cohort. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials with misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, T.H.; Stetz, J.; Phillips, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the progressive clinical trials of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, misonidazole, in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Presentation is made of all the schemas of the recently completed and currently active RTOG Phase II and Phase III studies. Detailed information is provided on the clinical toxicity of the Phase II trials, specifically regarding neurotoxicity. With limitations in drug total dose, a variety of dose schedules have proven to be tolerable, with a moderate incidence of nausea and vomiting and mild peripheral neuropathy or central neuropathy. No other organ toxicity has been seen, specifically no liver, renal or bone marrow toxicities. An additional Phase III malignant glioma trial in the Brain Tumor Study Group is described

  13. Genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells: recent advances in the gene therapy of inherited diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueren, Juan A; Guenechea, Guillermo; Casado, José A; Lamana, María Luisa; Segovia, José C

    2003-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells constitute a rare population of precursor cells with remarkable properties for being used as targets in gene therapy protocols. The last years have been particularly productive both in the fields of gene therapy and stem cell biology. Results from ongoing clinical trials have shown the first unquestionable clinical benefits of immunodeficient patients transplanted with genetically modified autologous stem cells. On the other hand, severe side effects in a few patients treated with gene therapy have also been reported, indicating the usefulness of further improving the vectors currently used in gene therapy clinical trials. In the field of stem cell biology, evidence showing the plastic potential of adult hematopoietic stem cells and data indicating the multipotency of adult mesenchymal precursor cells have been presented. Also, the generation of embryonic stem cells by means of nuclear transfer techniques has appeared as a new methodology with direct implications in gene therapy.

  14. Stem Cell Therapy for Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel eGonzales-Portillo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatments for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE have been limited. The aim of this paper is to offer translational research guidance on stem cell therapy for neonatal HIE by examining clinically relevant animal models, practical stem cell sources, safety and efficacy of endpoint assays, as well as a general understanding of modes of action of this cellular therapy. In order to do so, we discuss the clinical manifestations of HIE, highlighting its overlapping pathologies with stroke providing insights on the potential of cell therapy, currently investigated in stroke, for HIE. To this end, we draw guidance from recommendations outlined in Stem cell Therapeutics as an Emerging Paradigm for Stroke or STEPS, which have been recently modified to Baby STEPS to cater for the neonatal symptoms of HIE. These guidelines recognized that neonatal HIE exhibits distinct disease symptoms from adult stroke in need of an innovative translational approach that facilitates the entry of cell therapy in the clinic. Finally, new information about recent clinical trials, and insights into combination therapy are provided with the vision that stem cell therapy may benefit from available treatments, such as hypothermia, already being tested in children diagnosed with HIE.

  15. Is High Dose Therapy Superior to Conventional Dose Therapy as Initial Treatment for Relapsed Germ Cell Tumors? The TIGER Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren R. Feldman, Robert Huddart, Emma Hall, Jörg Beyer, Thomas Powles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic germ cell tumours (GCTs are usually cured with cisplatin based chemotherapy and standard treatment algorithms are established. However when this treatment fails and the disease relapses, standard treatment is much more uncertain. Both conventional dose therapy (CDT and high dose therapy (HDT are widely used, due to the lack of conclusive data supporting one specific approach. A recent retrospective analysis focusing on this population suggested a significant benefit for HDT. Retrospective analyses are prone to bias, and therefore while this data is provocative it is by no mean conclusive. For this reason the international community is supporting a prospective randomised trial in this area comparing CDT(TIP with sequential HDT (TICE. The planned open labelled randomised phase III study (TIGER is due to open in 2011 and will recruit 390 patients to detect a 13% difference in 2 year progression free survival (primary endpoint. It is hoped that this large study will conclusively resolve the uncertainty which currently exists.

  16. Hormone therapy in ovarian granulosa cell tumors: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, Hannah S.; van Lonkhuijzen, Luc R. C. W.; Limpens, Jacqueline; van der Velden, Jacobus; Buist, Marrije R.

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review assessed the effectiveness of hormone therapy (HT) in patients with a granulosa cell tumor (GCT) of the ovary. Medline (OVID), EMBASE (OVID), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), prospective trial registers and PubMed (as supplied by publisher-subset)

  17. [Gene therapy and cell transplantation for Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Shin-ichi

    2005-11-01

    Increasing enthusiasm in the field of stem cell research is raising the hope of novel cell replacement therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD), but it also raises both scientific and ethical concerns. In most cases, dopaminergic cells are transplanted ectopically into the striatum instead of the substantia nigra. If the main mechanism underlying any observed functional recovery with these cell replacement therapies is restoration of dopaminergic neurotransmission, then viral vector-mediated gene delivery of dopamine-synthesizing enzymes is a more straight forward approach. The development of a recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector is making gene therapy for PD a feasible therapeutic option in the clinical arena. Efficient and long-term expression of genes for dopamine-synthesizing enzymes in the striatum restored local dopamine production and allowed behavioral recovery in animal models of PD. A clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, an enzyme that converts L-dopa to dopamine, is underway. With this strategy patients would still need to take L-dopa to control their PD symptoms, however, dopamine production could be regulated by altering the dose of L-dopa. Another AAV vector-based clinical trial is also ongoing in which the subthalamic nucleus is transduced to produce inhibitory transmitters.

  18. CAR T-Cell Therapies in Glioblastoma: A First Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Denis; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Stupp, Roger; Linette, Gerald P; Posey, Avery D; June, Carl H

    2018-02-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The current standard of care for newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients includes surgery to the extent, temozolomide combined with radiotherapy, and alternating electric fields therapy. After recurrence, there is no standard therapy and survival is less than 9 months. Recurrent glioblastoma offers a unique opportunity to investigate new treatment approaches in a malignancy known for remarkable genetic heterogeneity, an immunosuppressive microenvironment, and a partially permissive anatomic blood-brain barrier. Results from three first-in-man chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell trials targeting IL13Rα2, Her2/CMV, and EGFRvIII have recently been reported. Each one of these trials addresses important questions, such as T-cell trafficking to CNS, engraftment and persistence, tumor microenvironment remodeling, and monitoring of glioma response to CAR T cells. Objective radiologic responses have been reported. Here, we discuss and summarize the results of these trials and suggest opportunities for the field. Clin Cancer Res; 24(3); 535-40. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Integration of genomics, proteomics, and imaging for cardiac stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Hyung J.; Wilson, Kitch O.; Huang, Mei; Wu, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac stem cell therapy is beginning to mature as a valid treatment for heart disease. As more clinical trials utilizing stem cells emerge, it is imperative to establish the mechanisms by which stem cells confer benefit in cardiac diseases. In this paper, we review three methods - molecular cellular imaging, gene expression profiling, and proteomic analysis - that can be integrated to provide further insights into the role of this emerging therapy. (orig.)

  20. Predictors of ventricular remodelling in patients with reperfused acute myocardial infarction and left ventricular dysfunction candidates for bone marrow cell therapy: insights from the BONAMI trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, Alain; Lemarchand, Patricia; Delasalle, Beatrice; Lamirault, Guillaume; Trochu, Jean-Noel; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Lairez, Olivier; Roncalli, Jerome; Sportouch-Duckan, Catherine; Piot, Christophe; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Neuder, Yannick; Richardson, Marjorie; Lebon, Alain; Teiger, Emmanuel; Hossein-Foucher, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Few data are available regarding the relation of left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony to remodelling after acute myocardial infarction (MI) and stem cell therapy. We evaluated the 1-year time course of both LV mechanical dyssynchrony and remodelling in patients enrolled in the BONAMI trial, a randomized, multicenter controlled trial assessing cell therapy in patients with reperfused MI. Patients with acute MI and ejection fraction (EF) ≤ 45 % were randomized to cell therapy or to control and underwent thallium single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), radionuclide angiography, and echocardiography at baseline, 3 months, and 1 year. Eighty-three patients with a comprehensive 1-year follow-up were included. LV dyssynchrony was assessed by the standard deviation (SD) of the LV phase histogram using radionuclide angiography. Remodelling was defined as a 20 % increase in LV end-systolic volume index (LVESVI) at 1 year. At baseline, LVEF, wall motion score index, and perfusion defect size were significantly impaired in the 43 patients (52 %) with LV remodelling (all p < 0.001), without significant increase in LV mechanical dyssynchrony. During follow-up, there was a progressive increase in LV SD (p = 0.01). Baseline independent predictors of LV remodelling were perfusion SPECT defect size (p = 0.001), LVEF (p = 0.01) and a history of hypertension (p = 0.043). Bone marrow cell therapy did not affect the time-course of LV remodelling and dyssynchrony. LV remodelling 1 year after reperfused MI is associated with progressive LV dyssynchrony and is related to baseline infarct size and ejection fraction, without impact of cell therapy on this process. (orig.)

  1. Predictors of ventricular remodelling in patients with reperfused acute myocardial infarction and left ventricular dysfunction candidates for bone marrow cell therapy: insights from the BONAMI trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manrique, Alain [Nuclear Medicine, CHU de Caen, Caen (France); Universite de Caen Normandie, EA 4650, Caen (France); CHU de Caen et GIP Cyceron, Caen cedex 6 (France); Lemarchand, Patricia; Delasalle, Beatrice; Lamirault, Guillaume; Trochu, Jean-Noel; Le Tourneau, Thierry [L' Institut du thorax, INSERM, UMR1087, Nantes (France); CNRS, UMR 6291, Nantes (France); Universite de Nantes, Nantes (France); CHU de Nantes, Nantes (France); Lairez, Olivier; Roncalli, Jerome [Institut CARDIOMET-Toulouse, Cardiac Imaging Center, CIC Biotherapies, CHU de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Sportouch-Duckan, Catherine; Piot, Christophe [Universite Montpellier, Institut de Genomique Fonctionnelle, INSERM U661, CNRS UMR 5203, Montpellier (France); Clinique du Millenaire, Montpellier (France); Le Corvoisier, Philippe [Hopital Henri Mondor, INSERM, Centre d' Investigation Clinique 1430 et U955 equipe 3, Creteil (France); Neuder, Yannick [CHU de Grenoble, Pole Thorax et Vaisseaux, Grenoble (France); Richardson, Marjorie [CHRU Lille, Service d' Explorations Fonctionnelles Cardiovasculaires, Hopital Cardiologique, Lille (France); Lebon, Alain [CHU de Caen, Service de Cardiologie, Caen (France); Teiger, Emmanuel [Hopital Henri Mondor, AP-HP, Unite de Cardiologie Interventionnelle et Federation de Cardiologie, Creteil (France); Hossein-Foucher, Claude [Hopital Salengro CHRU de Lille, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Lille (France); Universite de Lille 2, UFR de Medecine, Lille (France)

    2016-04-15

    Few data are available regarding the relation of left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony to remodelling after acute myocardial infarction (MI) and stem cell therapy. We evaluated the 1-year time course of both LV mechanical dyssynchrony and remodelling in patients enrolled in the BONAMI trial, a randomized, multicenter controlled trial assessing cell therapy in patients with reperfused MI. Patients with acute MI and ejection fraction (EF) ≤ 45 % were randomized to cell therapy or to control and underwent thallium single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), radionuclide angiography, and echocardiography at baseline, 3 months, and 1 year. Eighty-three patients with a comprehensive 1-year follow-up were included. LV dyssynchrony was assessed by the standard deviation (SD) of the LV phase histogram using radionuclide angiography. Remodelling was defined as a 20 % increase in LV end-systolic volume index (LVESVI) at 1 year. At baseline, LVEF, wall motion score index, and perfusion defect size were significantly impaired in the 43 patients (52 %) with LV remodelling (all p < 0.001), without significant increase in LV mechanical dyssynchrony. During follow-up, there was a progressive increase in LV SD (p = 0.01). Baseline independent predictors of LV remodelling were perfusion SPECT defect size (p = 0.001), LVEF (p = 0.01) and a history of hypertension (p = 0.043). Bone marrow cell therapy did not affect the time-course of LV remodelling and dyssynchrony. LV remodelling 1 year after reperfused MI is associated with progressive LV dyssynchrony and is related to baseline infarct size and ejection fraction, without impact of cell therapy on this process. (orig.)

  2. Toward precision manufacturing of immunogene T-cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Melenhorst, J Joseph; Fraietta, Joseph A

    2018-05-01

    Cancer can be effectively targeted using a patient's own T cells equipped with synthetic receptors, including chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that redirect and reprogram these lymphocytes to mediate tumor rejection. Over the past two decades, several strategies to manufacture genetically engineered T cells have been proposed, with the goal of generating optimally functional cellular products for adoptive transfer. Based on this work, protocols for manufacturing clinical-grade CAR T cells have been established, but these complex methods have been used to treat only a few hundred individuals. As CAR T-cell therapy progresses into later-phase clinical trials and becomes an option for more patients, a major consideration for academic institutions and industry is developing robust manufacturing processes that will permit scaling-out production of immunogene T-cell therapies in a reproducible and efficient manner. In this review, we will discuss the steps involved in cell processing, the major obstacles surrounding T-cell manufacturing platforms and the approaches for improving cellular product potency. Finally, we will address the challenges of expanding CAR T-cell therapy to a global patient population. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The clinical relevance of cell-based therapy for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    or progenitor cells presents an alternative approach, which aims at repairing the anatomical components of the urethral continence mechanism. In vitro expanded progenitor cells isolated from muscle biopsies have been most intensely investigated, and both preclinical trials and a few clinical trials have......Stress urinary incontinence is a common disorder affecting the quality of life for millions of women worldwide. Effective surgical procedures involving synthetic permanent meshes exist, but significant short- and long-term complications occur. Cell-based therapy using autologous stem cells...... provided proof of concept for the idea. An initial enthusiasm caused by positive results from early clinical trials has been dampened by the recognition of scientific irregularities. At the same time, the safety issue for cell-based therapy has been highlighted by the appearance of new and comprehensive...

  4. Clinical trial registration in physical therapy journals: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Abraham Samuel; Veluswamy, Sundar Kumar; Rao, Pratiksha Tilak; Maiya, Arun G

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trial registration has become an important part of editorial policies of various biomedical journals, including a few physical therapy journals. However, the extent to which editorial boards enforce the need for trial registration varies across journals. The purpose of this study was to identify editorial policies and reporting of trial registration details in MEDLINE-indexed English-language physical therapy journals. This study was carried out using a cross-sectional design. Editorial policies on trial registration of MEDLINE-indexed member journals of the International Society of Physiotherapy Journal Editors (ISPJE) (Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, Journal of Hand Therapy, Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Journal of Physiotherapy [formerly Australian Journal of Physiotherapy], Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Manual Therapy, Physical Therapy, Physical Therapy in Sport, Physiotherapy, Physiotherapy Research International, Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, and Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia) were reviewed in April 2013. Full texts of reports of clinical trials published in these journals between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2012, were independently assessed for information on trial registration. Among the 13 journals, 8 recommended trial registration, and 6 emphasized prospective trial registration. As of April 2013, 4,618 articles were published between January 2008 and December 2012, of which 9% (417) were clinical trials and 29% (121/417) of these reported trial registration details. A positive trend in reporting of trial registration was observed from 2008 to 2012. The study was limited to MEDLINE-indexed ISPJE member journals. Editorial policies on trial registration of physical therapy journals and a rising trend toward reporting of trial registration details indicate a positive momentum toward trial registration. Physical therapy journal editors need to show

  5. Cell Based Therapies: At Crossroads to find the right Cell source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of newer Cell Based therapies for various diseases and disorders which have limited therapeutic options, is on the rise with clinical trials on cell based therapies being registered all over the world every now and then. However a dilemma arises when it comes to the choosing the ideal source of Stem cells for therapy. Clinical applications of Hematopoietic Stem cells Transplantation (HSCT in the form of Bone Marrow Transplantation has been in practice since the 1950s (1 for malignant and non malignant haematological disorders and even for auto-immune disorders (since 1977 (2, with several reports on successful outcomes after HSCT. The dilemma in HSCT is whether to use allogeneic or autologous sources. While allogeneic sources have the advantage of the graft being devoid of cancer cells, as they are from a healthy donor, they have the risk of life-long Immunosuppression. Autologous Source is advantageous as it needs no immunosuppression but the risk of relapse is high. In adult stem cells, there have been several studies which have demonstrated the various levels of safety and efficacy of both Allogeneic and autologous adult cell sources for application in diseases of the cornea, Spinal Cord, Heart, Liver etc. Each time, a study is published, the patients and the physicians are thrown into a state of perplexity on which source of cell could offer the best possible solution to the various diseases. Next hopping onto Human Embryonic Stem cells, though they were discovered in 1998, the first Human Embryonic Stem cell trial was approved by the FDA in January 2009 but it could hit the road only in October 2010 (3. The trial was for spinal cord injury and a year later, the trial came to a halt in November 2011 when the company, which was financing and pursuing the trial, announced the discontinuation of the trial due to financial reasons (4. However it is worthwhile to note that it was the financial compulsion which led to the

  6. [Prerequisite for hematopoietic cellular therapy programs to set up chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy (CAR T-cells): Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Ferrand, Christophe; Chalandon, Yves; Ballot, Caroline; Castilla Llorente, Cristina; Deschamps, Marina; Gauthier, Jordan; Labalette, Myriam; Larghero, Jérôme; Maheux, Camille; Moreau, Anne-Sophie; Varlet, Pauline; Pétillon, Marie-Odile; Pinturaud, Marine; Rubio, Marie Thérèse; Chabannon, Christian

    2017-12-01

    CAR T-cells are autologous or allogeneic human lymphocytes that are genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor targeting an antigen expressed on tumor cells such as CD19. CAR T-cells represent a new class of medicinal products, and belong to the broad category of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMPs), as defined by EC Regulation 2007-1394. Specifically, they are categorized as gene therapy medicinal products. Although CAR T-cells are cellular therapies, the organization for manufacturing and delivery is far different from the one used to deliver hematopoietic cell grafts, for different reasons including their classification as medicinal products. Currently available clinical observations were mostly produced in the context of trials conducted either in the USA or in China. They demonstrate remarkable efficacy for patients presenting advanced or poor-prognosis hematological malignancies, however with severe side effects in a significant proportion of patients. Toxicities can and must be anticipated and dealt with in the context of a full coordination between the clinical cell therapy ward in charge of the patient, and the neighboring intensive care unit. The present workshop aimed at identifying prerequisites to be met in order for French hospitals to get efficiently organized and fulfill sponsors' expectations before initiation of clinical trials designed to investigate CAR T-cells. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Chelation therapy after the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy: results of a unique trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Maria D.; Escolar, Esteban; Lamas, Gervasio A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review EDTA chelation therapy has been in off-label use for the treatment of atherosclerosis. We review the results of the first large-scale randomized trial of this treatment. Recent findings The trial to assess chelation therapy was a $30 million National Institutes of Health-funded study of the safety and efficacy of EDTA-based chelation infusions in 1708 post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients. The trial to assess chelation therapy demonstrated a significant (P = 0.035) 18% reduction in a combined primary endpoint of death, MI, stroke, coronary revascularization, or hospitalization for angina. In diabetic patients the benefit was more extreme, with a 41% relative reduction in risk (P = 0.0002) and a 43% reduction in total mortality (P = 0.011). Safety data were favorable. A reduction of oxidative stress by chelation of toxic metals has been proposed as a possible mechanism of action. Summary Recent research suggests that EDTA chelation may be a well-tolerated and effective treatment for post-MI patients. Future replication and mechanistic studies are important prior to implementation in all post-MI patients. PMID:25023079

  8. Rational Autologous Cell Sources For Therapy of Heart Failure - Vehicles and Targets For Gene and RNA Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampinen, Milla; Vento, Antti; Laurikka, Jari; Nystedt, Johanna; Mervaala, Eero; Harjula, Ari; Kankuri, Esko

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the possibilities for intraoperative processing and isolation of autologous cells, particularly atrial appendage-derived cells (AADCs) and cellular micrografts, and their straightforward use in cell transplantation for heart failure therapy. We review the potential of autologous tissues to serve as sources for cell therapy and consider especially those tissues that are used in surgery but from which the excess is currently discarded as surgical waste. We compare the inculture expanded cells to the freshly isolated ones in terms of evidence-based cost-efficacy and their usability as gene- and RNA therapy vehicles. We also review how financial and authority-based decisions and restrictions sculpt the landscape for patients to participate in academic-based trials. Finally, we provide an insight example into AADCs isolation and processing for epicardial therapy during coronary artery bypass surgery.

  9. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell (Car T Cell Therapy In Hematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Ataca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well demonstrated that immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and cause less off-target toxicities. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR modified T cells. On July 1, 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted ‘breakthrough therapy’ designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the beneficiaries of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical-clinical studies, effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy.

  10. EBV-positive immunodeficiency lymphoma after alemtuzumab-CHOP therapy for peripheral T-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Coenen, Jules L.; Boers, James E.; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.; Rosati, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Chemotherapy with alemtuzumab and the combination of cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, oncovin, and prednisone (CHOP) has become experimental trial therapy for aggressive T-cell lymphoma. Several multicenter phase 3 trials; will incorporate this scheme. As part of an ongoing phase 2 trial in which we

  11. Steady advance of stem cell therapies: report from the 2011 World Stem Cell Summit, Pasadena, California, October 3-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Melanie

    2011-12-01

    Stem cell research and related therapies (including regenerative medicine and cellular therapies) could have a significant near-term impact on worldwide public health and aging. One reason is the industry's strong linkage between policy, science, industry, and patient advocacy, as was clear in the attendance and programming at the 7(th) annual World Stem Cell Summit held in Pasadena, California, October 3-5, 2011. A special conference session sponsored by the SENS Foundation discussed how stem cell therapies are being used to extend healthy life span. Stem cells are useful not only in cell-replacement therapies, but also in disease modeling, drug discovery, and drug toxicity screening. Stem cell therapies are currently being applied to over 50 diseases, including heart, lung, neurodegenerative, and eye disease, cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Dozens of companies are developing therapeutic solutions that are in different stages of clinical use and clinical trials. Some high-profile therapies include Dendreon's Provenge for prostate cancer, Geron's first-ever embryonic stem cell trials for spinal cord injury, Fibrocell's laViv cellular therapy for wrinkles, and well-established commercial skin substitutes (Organogenesis' Apligraf and Advanced BioHealing's Dermagraft). Stem cell policy issues under consideration include medical tourism, standards for large-scale stem cell manufacturing, and lingering ethical debates over the use of embryonic stem cells. Contemporary stem cell science advances include a focus on techniques for the direct reprogramming of cells from one lineage to another without returning to pluripotency as an intermediary step, improved means of generating and characterizing induced pluripotent cells, and progress in approaches to neurodegenerative disease.

  12. Engineering Therapeutic T Cells: From Synthetic Biology to Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esensten, Jonathan H; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Lim, Wendell A

    2017-01-24

    Engineered T cells are currently in clinical trials to treat patients with cancer, solid organ transplants, and autoimmune diseases. However, the field is still in its infancy. The design, and manufacturing, of T cell therapies is not standardized and is performed mostly in academic settings by competing groups. Reliable methods to define dose and pharmacokinetics of T cell therapies need to be developed. As of mid-2016, there are no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved T cell therapeutics on the market, and FDA regulations are only slowly adapting to the new technologies. Further development of engineered T cell therapies requires advances in immunology, synthetic biology, manufacturing processes, and government regulation. In this review, we outline some of these challenges and discuss the contributions that pathologists can make to this emerging field.

  13. Adoptive regulatory T cell therapy: challenges in clinical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safinia, Niloufar; Sagoo, Pervinder; Lechler, Robert; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2010-08-01

    The identification and characterisation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) has recently opened up exciting opportunities for Treg cell therapy in transplantation. In this review, we outline the basic biology of Tregs and discuss recent advances and challenges for the identification, isolation and expansion of these cells for cell therapy. Tregs of thymic origin have been shown to be key regulators of immune responses in mice and humans, preventing autoimmunity, graft-versus-host disease and organ graft rejection in the transplantation setting. To date, a variety of different methods to isolate and expand Tregs ex vivo have been advocated. Although promising, relatively few clinical trials of human Treg cell infusion have been initiated. Many key questions about Treg cell therapy still remain and here we provide an in-depth analysis and highlight the challenges and opportunities for immune intervention with Treg-based therapeutics in clinical transplantation.

  14. Stem cells for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis modeling and therapy: myth or fact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coatti, G C; Beccari, M S; Olávio, T R; Mitne-Neto, M; Okamoto, O K; Zatz, M

    2015-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease whose pathophysiology is poorly understood. Aiming to better understand the cause of motor neuron death, the use of experimental cell-based models increased significantly over the past years. In this scenario, much knowledge has been generated from the study of motor neurons derived from embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. These methods, however, have advantages and disadvantages, which must be balanced on experimental design. Preclinical studies provide valuable information, making it possible to combine diverse methods to build an expanded knowledge of ALS pathophysiology. In addition to using stem cells as experimental models for understanding disease mechanism, these cells had been quoted for therapy in ALS. Despite ethical issues involved in its use, cell therapy with neural stem cells stands out. A phase I clinical trial was recently completed and a phase II is on its way, attesting the method's safety. In another approach, mesenchymal stromal cells capable of releasing neuroregulatory and anti-inflammatory factors have also been listed as candidates for cell therapy for ALS, and have been admitted as safe in a phase I trial. Despite recent advances, application of stem cells as an actual therapy for ALS patients is still in debate. Here, we discuss how stem cells have been useful in modeling ALS and address critical topics concerning their therapeutic use, such as administration protocols, injection site, cell type to be administered, type of transplantation (autologous vs. allogeneic) among other issues with particular implications for ALS therapy. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  15. From Genomics to Gene Therapy: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Meet Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Akitsu; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The advent of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has opened up numerous avenues of opportunity for cell therapy, including the initiation in September 2014 of the first human clinical trial to treat dry age-related macular degeneration. In parallel, advances in genome-editing technologies by site-specific nucleases have dramatically improved our ability to edit endogenous genomic sequences at targeted sites of interest. In fact, clinical trials have already begun to implement this technology to control HIV infection. Genome editing in iPS cells is a powerful tool and enables researchers to investigate the intricacies of the human genome in a dish. In the near future, the groundwork laid by such an approach may expand the possibilities of gene therapy for treating congenital disorders. In this review, we summarize the exciting progress being made in the utilization of genomic editing technologies in pluripotent stem cells and discuss remaining challenges toward gene therapy applications.

  16. Dynamic imaging for CAR-T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami-Shahri, Nia; Papa, Sophie

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy is entering the mainstream for the treatment of CD19(+)cancers. As is does we learn more about resistance to therapy and the role, risks and management of toxicity. In solid tumour CAR therapy research the route to the clinic is less smooth with a wealth of challenges facing translating this, potentially hugely valuable, therapeutic option for patients. As we strive to understand our successes, and navigate the challenges, having a clear understanding of how adoptively transferred CAR-T-cells behavein vivoand in human trials is invaluable. Harnessing reporter gene imaging to enable detection and tracking of small numbers of CAR-T-cells after adoptive transfer is one way by which we can accomplish this. The compatibility of certain reporter gene systems with tracers available routinely in the clinic makes this approach highly useful for future appraisal of CAR-T-cell success in humans. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  17. Chimeric antigen receptors for adoptive T cell therapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxue Fan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, conventional therapies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML have high failure and relapse rates. Thus, developing new strategies is crucial for improving the treatment of AML. With the clinical success of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapies against B-lineage malignancies, many studies have attempted to translate the success of CAR T cell therapy to other malignancies, including AML. This review summarizes the current advances in CAR T cell therapy against AML, including preclinical studies and clinical trials, and discusses the potential AML-associated surface markers that could be used for further CAR technology. Finally, we describe strategies that might address the current issues of employing CAR T cell therapy in AML.

  18. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Washio, Kaoru; Iwata, Takanori; Okano, Teruo; Ishikawa, Isao

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, governments have placed regulations on stem cell transplantation therapies. It is important for the clinicians to understand the relevant risks and governmental regulations. This paper describes the ongoing clinical studies, basic research, risks, and governmental controls related to stem cell transplantation therapy. Then, one clinical study is introduced as an example of a government-approved periodontal cell transplantation therapy. PMID:22315604

  19. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Yoshida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, governments have placed regulations on stem cell transplantation therapies. It is important for the clinicians to understand the relevant risks and governmental regulations. This paper describes the ongoing clinical studies, basic research, risks, and governmental controls related to stem cell transplantation therapy. Then, one clinical study is introduced as an example of a government-approved periodontal cell transplantation therapy.

  20. Fast neutron therapy for squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck region: results of a randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Orr, J.A.; Arnott, S.J.; Jack, W.J.; Kerr, G.R.; Williams, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A randomized trial of fast neuron therapy compared with 4MV photons for patients with head and neck cancer is reported. One hundred and sixty-eight patients were recruited between 1977 and 1984. The minimum follow-up is 2 years. Three patients were withdrawn before treatment began. Eighty-five were allocated to neutron therapy and 80 to receive photon therapy. All patients had squamous cell cancers in one of four primary sites: oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx. Local tumor control was similar in both groups: 44.7% after neutrons and 45.0% after photons. Salvage surgery was performed on 18 patients in each treatment group for residual or recurrent cancer. Acute radiation reactions of the mucous membranes were significantly more severe after photons. The number of patients with serious late reactions was greater after neutron therapy but the difference was not statistically significant. There were six deaths related to late morbidity after neutron therapy but none after photon therapy. Survival was better after photon therapy but the difference compared with the neutron group failed to reach statistical significance. When intercurrent deaths are excluded, the difference is less marked. Photon therapy was clearly better in terms of disease-free survival giving a 2-year local disease-free rate of 41.3% (s.e. 5.5%) compared with 29.4% (s.e. 4.9%) after neutrons

  1. Core journals that publish clinical trials of physical therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Moseley, Anne M; Sherrington, Catherine; Maher, Christopher G; Herbert, Robert D; Elkins, Mark R

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to identify core journals in physical therapy by identifying those that publish the most randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions, provide the highest-quality reports of randomized controlled trials, and have the highest journal impact factors. This study was an audit of a bibliographic database. All trials indexed in the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) were analyzed. Journals that had published at least 80 trials were selected. The journals were ranked in 4 ways: number of trials published; mean total PEDro score of the trials published in the journal, regardless of publication year; mean total PEDro score of the trials published in the journal from 2000 to 2009; and 2008 journal impact factor. The top 5 core journals in physical therapy, ranked by the total number of trials published, were Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clinical Rehabilitation, Spine, British Medical Journal (BMJ), and Chest. When the mean total PEDro score was used as the ranking criterion, the top 5 journals were Journal of Physiotherapy, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Stroke, Spine, and Clinical Rehabilitation. When the mean total PEDro score of the trials published from 2000 to 2009 was used as the ranking criterion, the top 5 journals were Journal of Physiotherapy, JAMA, Lancet, BMJ, and Pain. The most highly ranked physical therapy-specific journals were Physical Therapy (ranked eighth on the basis of the number of trials published) and Journal of Physiotherapy (ranked first on the basis of the quality of trials). Finally, when the 2008 impact factor was used for ranking, the top 5 journals were JAMA, Lancet, BMJ, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, and Thorax. There were no significant relationships among the rankings on the basis of trial quality, number of trials, or journal impact factor. Physical therapists who are trying to keep up-to-date by reading the best

  2. Anti-B cell antibody therapies for inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Jayne, David R W

    2014-01-01

    Several monoclonal antibodies targeting B cells have been tested as therapeutics for inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We review important observations from randomized clinical trials regarding the efficacy and safety of anti-B cell antibody-based therapies for rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus...... and functions in rheumatic disorders. Future studies should also evaluate how to maintain disease control by means of conventional and/or biologic immunosuppressants after remission-induction with anti-B cell antibodies....

  3. Manufacturing Cell Therapies Using Engineered Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeen, Amr A; Saha, Krishanu

    2017-10-01

    Emerging manufacturing processes to generate regenerative advanced therapies can involve extensive genomic and/or epigenomic manipulation of autologous or allogeneic cells. These cell engineering processes need to be carefully controlled and standardized to maximize safety and efficacy in clinical trials. Engineered biomaterials with smart and tunable properties offer an intriguing tool to provide or deliver cues to retain stemness, direct differentiation, promote reprogramming, manipulate the genome, or select functional phenotypes. This review discusses the use of engineered biomaterials to control human cell manufacturing. Future work exploiting engineered biomaterials has the potential to generate manufacturing processes that produce standardized cells with well-defined critical quality attributes appropriate for clinical testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Stem cell therapy for retinal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, José Mauricio; Mendonça, Luisa; Brant, Rodrigo; Abud, Murilo; Regatieri, Caio; Diniz, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss about current knowledge about stem cell (SC) therapy in the treatment of retinal degeneration. Both human embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell has been growth in culture for a long time, and started to be explored in the treatment of blinding conditions. The Food and Drug Administration, recently, has granted clinical trials using SC retinal therapy to treat complex disorders, as Stargardt’s dystrophy, and patients with geographic atrophy, providing good outcomes. This study’s intent is to overview the critical regeneration of the subretinal anatomy through retinal pigment epithelium transplantation, with the goal of reestablish important pathways from the retina to the occipital cortex of the brain, as well as the differentiation from pluripotent quiescent SC to adult retina, and its relationship with a primary retinal injury, different techniques of transplantation, management of immune rejection and tumorigenicity, its potential application in improving patients’ vision, and, finally, approaching future directions and challenges for the treatment of several conditions. PMID:25621115

  5. Psychological therapies for sickle cell disease and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anie, Kofi A; Green, John

    2015-05-08

    Sickle cell disease comprises a group of genetic blood disorders. It occurs when the sickle haemoglobin gene is inherited from both parents. The effects of the condition are: varying degrees of anaemia which, if severe, can reduce mobility; a tendency for small blood capillaries to become blocked causing pain in muscle and bone commonly known as 'crises'; damage to major organs such as the spleen, liver, kidneys, and lungs; and increased vulnerability to severe infections. There are both medical and non-medical complications, and treatment is usually symptomatic and palliative in nature. Psychological interventions for individuals with sickle cell disease might complement current medical treatment, and studies of their efficacy have yielded encouraging results. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review. To examine the evidence that psychological interventions improve the ability of people with sickle cell disease to cope with their condition. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and the Internet, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 17 February 2015. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing psychological interventions with no (psychological) intervention in people with sickle cell disease. Both authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. Twelve studies were identified in the searches and seven of these were eligible for inclusion in the review. Five studies, involving 260 participants, provided data for analysis. One study showed that cognitive behaviour therapy significantly reduced the affective component of pain (feelings about pain), mean difference -0.99 (95% confidence interval -1.62 to -0.36), but

  6. Stem Cell Therapy: A Promising Therapeutic Method for Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liansheng; Xu, Weilin; Li, Tao; Chen, Jingyin; Shao, Anwen; Yan, Feng; Chen, Gao

    2018-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is one type of the most devastating cerebrovascular diseases worldwide, which causes high morbidity and mortality. However, efficient treatment is still lacking. Stem cell therapy has shown good neuroprotective and neurorestorative effect in ICH and is a promising treatment. In this study, our aim was to review the therapeutic effects, strategies, related mechanisms and safety issues of various types of stem cell for ICH treatment. Numerous studies had demonstrated the therapeutic effects of diverse stem cell types in ICH. The potential mechanisms include tissue repair and replacement, neurotrophy, promotion of neurogenesis and angiogenesis, anti-apoptosis, immunoregulation and anti-inflammation and so forth. The microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS) can also influence the effects of stem cell therapy. The detailed therapeutic strategies for ICH treatment such as cell type, the number of cells, time window, and the routes of medication delivery, varied greatly among different studies and had not been determined. Moreover, the safety issues of stem cell therapy for ICH should not be ignored. Stem cell therapy showed good therapeutic effect in ICH, making it a promising treatment. However, safety should be carefully evaluated, and more clinical trials are required before stem cell therapy can be extensively applied to clinical use.

  7. Endogenous T-Cell Therapy: Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Cassian; Lizee, Greg; Schueneman, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy represents a robust means of augmenting the tumor-reactive effector population in patients with cancer by adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded T cells. Three approaches have been developed to achieve this goal: the use of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes or tumor-infiltrating lymphocytess extracted from patient biopsy material; the redirected engineering of lymphocytes using vectors expressing a chimeric antigen receptor and T-cell receptor; and third, the isolation and expansion of often low-frequency endogenous T cells (ETCs) reactive to tumor antigens from the peripheral blood of patients. This last form of adoptive transfer of T cells, known as ETC therapy, requires specialized methods to isolate and expand from peripheral blood the very low-frequency tumor-reactive T cells, methods that have been developed over the last 2 decades, to the point where such an approach may be broadly applicable not only for the treatment of melanoma but also for that of other solid tumor malignancies. One compelling feature of ETC is the ability to rapidly deploy clinical trials following identification of a tumor-associated target epitope, a feature that may be exploited to develop personalized antigen-specific T-cell therapy for patients with almost any solid tumor. With a well-validated antigen discovery pipeline in place, clinical studies combining ETC with agents that modulate the immune microenvironment can be developed that will transform ETC into a feasible treatment modality.

  8. Building for Biology: A Gene Therapy Trial Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Taylor-Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we examine the construction of the infrastructure for a Phase II gene therapy trial for Cystic Fibrosis (CF. Tracing the development of the material technologies and physical spaces used in the trial, we show how the trial infrastructure took form at the uncertain intersection of scientific norms, built environments, regulatory negotiations, patienthood, and the biologies of both disease and therapy. We define infrastructures as material and immaterial (including symbols and affect composites that serve a selective distributive purpose and facilitate projects of making and doing. There is a politics to this distributive action, which is itself twofold, because whilst infrastructures enable and delimit the movement of matter, they also mediate the very activity for which they provide the grounds. An infrastructural focus allows us to show how purposeful connections are made in a context of epistemic and regulatory uncertainty. The gene therapy researchers were working in a context of multiple uncertainties, regarding not only how to do gene therapy, but also how to anticipate and enact ambiguous regulatory requirements in a context of limited resources (technical, spatial, and financial. At the same time, the trial infrastructure had to accommodate Cystic Fibrosis biology by bridging the gap between pathology and therapy. The consortium’s approach to treating CF required that they address concerns about contamination and safety while finding a way of getting a modified gene product into the lungs of the trial participants.

  9. Maintenance therapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: current status and future implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Socinski, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance therapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer has been an area of intense investigation. Maintenance therapy has been divided into two broad categories: continuation maintenance when the chemotherapy or targeted agent was part of a defined number of cycles of combination therapy and in the absence of disease progression is continued as a single agent or switch maintenance when a third agent is initiated after four cycles of platinum-based double-agent chemotherapy in the absence of disease progression. Two monoclonal antibodies, cetuximab and bevacizumab, are used as continuation maintenance, but the incremental benefit of the maintenance therapy with these agents is undetermined. Phase III trials have not revealed an overall survival benefit for continuation maintenance chemotherapy, and this approach should be considered investigational. Phase III trials have demonstrated an improvement in overall survival with switch maintenance therapy with pemetrexed compared with placebo in patients with nonsquamous histology and erlotinib compared with placebo. Phase III trials have not revealed an improvement in quality of life with maintenance therapy. In the trials of maintenance therapy, 30 to 40% of patients enrolled in the observation or placebo arm did not receive second-line therapy, and among the patients who did receive second-line therapy, there was significant heterogeneity in the therapy. The development of maintenance therapy has raised issues about the role of treatment-free intervals in routine clinical care, trial design issues such as the optimal endpoint, the ethics of a placebo arm, and the implications of maintenance therapy for first-line trials.

  10. TU-G-BRB-00: Clinical Trials in Proton and Particle Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy, in particular, and ion therapy, just beginning, are becoming an increasing focus of attention in clinical radiation oncology and medical physics. Both modalities have been criticized of lacking convincing evidence from randomized trials proving their efficacy, justifying the higher costs involved in these therapies. This session will provide an overview of the current status of clinical trials in proton therapy, including recent developments in ion therapy. As alluded to in the introductory talk by Dr. Schulte, opinions are diverging widely as to the usefulness and need for clinical trials in particle therapy and the challenge of equipoise. The lectures will highlight some of the challenges that surround clinical trials in particle therapy. One, presented by Dr. Choy from UT Southwestern, is that new technology and even different types of particles such as helium and carbon ions are introduced into this environment, increasing the phase space of clinical variables. The other is the issue of medical physics quality assurance with physical phantoms, presented by Mrs. Taylor from IROC Houston, which is more challenging because 3D and 4D image guidance and active delivery techniques are in relatively early stages of development. The role of digital phantoms in developing clinical treatment planning protocols and as a QA tool will also be highlighted by Dr. Lee from NCI. The symposium will be rounded off by a panel discussion among the Symposium speakers, arguing pro or con the need and readiness for clinical trials in proton and ion therapy. Learning Objectives: To get an update on the current status of clinical trials allowing or mandating proton therapy. Learn about the status of planned clinical trials in the U.S. and worldwide involving ion therapy. Discuss the challenges in the design and QA of clinical trials in particle therapy. Learn about existing and future physical and computational anthropomorphic phantoms for charged particle clinical trial

  11. Cell banking for regulatory T cell-based therapy: strategies to overcome the impact of cryopreservation on the Treg viability and phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołąb, Karolina; Grose, Randall; Placencia, Veronica; Wickrema, Amittha; Solomina, Julia; Tibudan, Martin; Konsur, Evelyn; Ciepły, Kamil; Marek-Trzonkowska, Natalia; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Millis, J Michael; Fung, John; Witkowski, Piotr

    2018-02-09

    The first clinical trials with adoptive Treg therapy have shown safety and potential efficacy. Feasibility of such therapy could be improved if cells are cryopreserved and stored until optimal timing for infusion. Herein, we report the evaluation of two cell-banking strategies for Treg therapy: 1) cryopreservation of CD4 + cells for subsequent Treg isolation/expansion and 2) cryopreservation of ex-vivo expanded Tregs (CD4 + CD25 hi CD127 lo/- cells). First, we checked how cryopreservation affects cell viability and Treg markers expression. Then, we performed Treg isolation/expansion with the final products release testing. We observed substantial decrease in cell number recovery after thawing and overnight culture. This observation might be explained by the high percentage of necrotic and apoptotic cells found just after thawing. Furthermore, we noticed fluctuations in percentage of CD4 + CD25 hi CD127 - and CD4 + FoxP3 + cells obtained from cryopreserved CD4 + as well as Treg cells. However, after re-stimulation Tregs expanded well, presented a stable phenotype and fulfilled the release criteria at the end of expansions. Cryopreservation of CD4 + cells for subsequent Treg isolation/expansion and cryopreservation of expanded Tregs with re-stimulation and expansion after thawing, are promising solutions to overcome detrimental effects of cryopreservation. Both of these cell-banking strategies for Treg therapy can be applied when designing new clinical trials.

  12. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells: a novel therapy for solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengnan Yu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T cell therapy is a newly developed adoptive antitumor treatment. Theoretically, CAR-T cells can specifically localize and eliminate tumor cells by interacting with the tumor-associated antigens (TAAs expressing on tumor cell surface. Current studies demonstrated that various TAAs could act as target antigens for CAR-T cells, for instance, the type III variant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII was considered as an ideal target for its aberrant expression on the cell surface of several tumor types. CAR-T cell therapy has achieved gratifying breakthrough in hematological malignancies and promising outcome in solid tumor as showed in various clinical trials. The third generation of CAR-T demonstrates increased antitumor cytotoxicity and persistence through modification of CAR structure. In this review, we summarized the preclinical and clinical progress of CAR-T cells targeting EGFR, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, and mesothelin (MSLN, as well as the challenges for CAR-T cell therapy.

  13. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  14. Adoptive Cell Therapies for Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin James Bielamowicz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common and most aggressive primary brain malignancy and, as it stands, is virtually incurable. With the current standard-of-care, maximum feasible surgical resection followed by radical radiotherapy and adjuvant temozolomide, survival rates are at a median of 14.6 months from diagnosis in molecularly unselected patients(1. Collectively, the current knowledge suggests that the continued tumor growth and survival is in part due to failure to mount an effective immune response. While this tolerance is subtended by the tumor being utterly self, it is to a great extent due to local and systemic immune compromise mediated by the tumor. Different cell modalities including lymphokine-activated killer (LAK cells, natural killer (NK cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL, and transgenic chimeric antigen receptor (CAR- or αβ T cell receptor (TCR grafted T cells are being explored to recover and or redirect the specificity of the cellular arm of the immune system towards the tumor complex. Promising phase I/II trials of such modalities have shown early indications of potential efficacy while maintaining a favorable toxicity profile. Efficacy will need to be formally tested in phase II/III clinical trials. Given the high morbidity and mortality of GBM, it is imperative to further investigate and possibly integrate such novel cell-based therapies into the current standards-of-care and herein we collectively assess and critique the state-of-the-knowledge pertaining to these efforts.

  15. Adoptive Cell Therapies for Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielamowicz, Kevin; Khawja, Shumaila; Ahmed, Nabil

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive primary brain malignancy and, as it stands, is virtually incurable. With the current standard of care, maximum feasible surgical resection followed by radical radiotherapy and adjuvant temozolomide, survival rates are at a median of 14.6 months from diagnosis in molecularly unselected patients (1). Collectively, the current knowledge suggests that the continued tumor growth and survival is in part due to failure to mount an effective immune response. While this tolerance is subtended by the tumor being utterly “self,” it is to a great extent due to local and systemic immune compromise mediated by the tumor. Different cell modalities including lymphokine-activated killer cells, natural killer cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and transgenic chimeric antigen receptor or αβ T cell receptor grafted T cells are being explored to recover and or redirect the specificity of the cellular arm of the immune system toward the tumor complex. Promising phase I/II trials of such modalities have shown early indications of potential efficacy while maintaining a favorable toxicity profile. Efficacy will need to be formally tested in phase II/III clinical trials. Given the high morbidity and mortality of GBM, it is imperative to further investigate and possibly integrate such novel cell-based therapies into the current standards-of-care and herein we collectively assess and critique the state-of-the-knowledge pertaining to these efforts. PMID:24273748

  16. From Molecular Biology to Clinical Trials: Toward Personalized Colorectal Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Sabina; Zwenger, Ariel O; Croce, María V; Abba, Martín C; Lacunza, Ezequiel

    2016-06-01

    During the past years, molecular studies through high-throughput technologies have led to the confirmation of critical alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) and the discovery of some new ones, including mutations, DNA methylations, and structural chromosomal changes. These genomic alterations might act in concert to dysregulate specific signaling pathways that normally exert their functions on critical cell phenotypes, including the regulation of cellular metabolism, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Targeted therapy against key components of altered signaling pathways has allowed an improvement in CRC treatment. However, a significant percentage of patients with CRC and metastatic CRC will not benefit from these targeted therapies and will be restricted to systemic chemotherapy. Mechanisms of resistance have been associated with specific gene alterations. To fully understand the nature and significance of the genetic and epigenetic defects in CRC that might favor a tumor evading a given therapy, much work remains. Therefore, a dynamic link between basic molecular research and preclinical studies, which ultimately constitute the prelude to standardized therapies, is very important to provide better and more effective treatments against CRC. We present an updated revision of the main molecular features of CRC and their associated therapies currently under study in clinical trials. Moreover, we performed an unsupervised classification of CRC clinical trials with the aim of obtaining an overview of the future perspectives of preclinical studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High dose therapy with autologous stem cell support in malignant disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holte, H.; Kvaloey, S.O.; Engan, T.

    1996-01-01

    New biomedical knowledge may improve the diagnostic procedures and treatment provided by the Health Services, but at additional cost. In a social democratic health care system, the hospital budgets have no room for expensive, new procedures or treatments, unless these are funded through extra allocation from the central authorities. High dose therapy with autologous stem cell support in malignant disorders is an example of a new and promising, but rather expensive treatment, but its role in cancer therapy has yet to be established. The indications for testing high dose therapy with autologous stem cell support in various malignancies are discussed, with emphasis on the principles for deciding which categories of disease should have priority. The authors suggest some malignant disorder for which high dose therapy with stem cell support should be explored versus conventional treatment in randomized prospective trials. 8 refs., 1 tab

  18. Immunoglobulin therapy in hematologic neoplasms and after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Masumi; Berger, Melvin; Gale, Robert Peter; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2018-03-01

    Immunoglobulins are used to prevent or reduce infection risk in primary immune deficiencies and in settings which exploit its anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory effects. Rigorous proof of immunoglobulin efficacy in persons with lympho-proliferative neoplasms, plasma cell myeloma, and persons receiving hematopoietic cell transplants is lacking despite many clinical trials. Further, there are few consensus guidelines or algorithms for use in these conditions. Rapid development of new therapies targeting B-cell signaling and survival pathways and increased use of chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy will likely result in more acquired deficiencies of humoral immunity and infections in persons with cancer. We review immunoglobulin formulations and discuss efficacy and potential adverse effects in the context of preventing infections and in graft-versus-host disease. We suggest an algorithm for evaluating acquired deficiencies of humoral immunity in persons with hematologic neoplasms and recommend appropriate use of immunoglobulin therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Targeted therapy for localized non-small-cell lung cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paleiron N

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas Paleiron,1 Olivier Bylicki,2 Michel André,1 Emilie Rivière,1 Frederic Grassin,1 Gilles Robinet,3 Christos Chouaïd4 On behalf of the GFPC Group 1Chest Department, HIA Clermont Tonnerre, Brest, 2Chest Department, HIA Percy, Clamart, 3Chest Department, CHU de Brest, Brest, 4GRC OncoEst, Université Paris XII, Paris, France Abstract: Targeted therapies have markedly improved the management of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, but their efficacy in localized NSCLC is less well established. The aim of this review is to analyze trials of targeted therapies in localized NSCLC. In patients with wild-type EGFR, tyrosine kinase inhibitors have shown no efficacy in Phase III trials. Few data are available for EGFR-mutated localized NSCLC, as routine biological profiling is not recommended. Available studies are small, often retrospectives, and/or conducted in a single-center making it difficult to draw firm conclusions. Ongoing prospective Phase III trials are comparing adjuvant tyrosine kinase inhibitor administration versus adjuvant chemotherapy. By analogy with the indication of bevacizumab in advanced NSCLC, use of antiangiogenic agents in the perioperative setting is currently restricted to nonsquamous NSCLC. Several trials of adjuvant or neoadjuvant bevacizumab are planned or ongoing, but for the moment there is no evidence of efficacy. Data on perioperative use of biomarkers in early-stage NSCLC come mainly from small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies. Assessment of customized adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy in localized NSCLC (with or without oncogenic driver mutations is a major challenge. Keywords: targeted therapy, non-small-cell lung cancer, adjuvant, neo-adjuvant, surgery 

  20. Cancer stem cells and differentiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiong; Jin, Xun; Kim, Hyunggee

    2017-10-01

    Cancer stem cells can generate tumors from only a small number of cells, whereas differentiated cancer cells cannot. The prominent feature of cancer stem cells is its ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple types of cancer cells. Cancer stem cells have several distinct tumorigenic abilities, including stem cell signal transduction, tumorigenicity, metastasis, and resistance to anticancer drugs, which are regulated by genetic or epigenetic changes. Like normal adult stem cells involved in various developmental processes and tissue homeostasis, cancer stem cells maintain their self-renewal capacity by activating multiple stem cell signaling pathways and inhibiting differentiation signaling pathways during cancer initiation and progression. Recently, many studies have focused on targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate malignancies by regulating stem cell signaling pathways, and products of some of these strategies are in preclinical and clinical trials. In this review, we describe the crucial features of cancer stem cells related to tumor relapse and drug resistance, as well as the new therapeutic strategy to target cancer stem cells named "differentiation therapy."

  1. Clinical performance of stem cell therapy in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ran; Meng, Qinghua; Dong, Jinling; Li, Juan; Yao, Qinwei; Zhu, Yueke; Yu, Hongwei

    2018-05-10

    Stem cell therapy has been applied in the treatment of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). However, its clinical efficiency is still debatable. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the clinical efficiency of stem cell therapy in the treatment of ACLF. The Cochrane Library, OVID, EMBASE, and PUBMED were searched to December 2017. Both randomized and non-randomized studies, assessing stem cell therapy in patients with ACLF, were included. The outcome measures were total bilirubin (TBIL), alanine transaminase (ALT), international normalized ratio (INR), albumin (ALB), and the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score. The quality of evidence was assessed by GRADEpro. Four randomized controlled trials and six non-randomized controlled trials were included. The TBIL levels significantly decreased at 1-, 3-, 12-month after the stem cell therapy (p = 0.0008; p = 0.04; p = 0.007). The ALT levels decreased significantly compared with the control group in the short-term (p stem cell therapy and control groups (p = 0.008). Further subgroup analysis for 3-month clinical performance according to the stem cell types have also been performed. This study suggests that the clinical outcomes of stem cell therapy were satisfied in patients with ACLF in the short-term. MSCs may be better than BM-MNCs in the stem cells transplantation of ACLF. However, more attention should focus on clinical trials in large-volume centers.

  2. Bcl-2 antisense therapy in B-cell malignant proliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanan-Khan, Asher; Czuczman, Myron S

    2004-08-01

    Overexpression of Bcl-2 oncogene has been clinically associated with an aggressive clinical course, chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance, and poor survival in patients with malignant B-cell disorders. Patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma have limited therapeutic options. Preclinical and early clinical data have shown that Bcl-2 oncoprotein can be decreased by Bcl-2 antisense therapy. Also, downregulation of Bcl-2 protein can result in reversal of chemotherapy resistance and improved antitumor activity of biologic agents. Various clinical trials are evaluating the role of targeting Bcl-2 as a mechanism to enhance the antitumor potential of chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Early results from these clinical studies are encouraging and confirm the proof of principle for antisense therapy. As current data mature, these trials will hopefully validate preliminary results and establish Bcl-2 antisense as an important addition to the current armamentarium used in the treatment of patients with B-cell neoplasms.

  3. Imaging and Data Acquisition in Clinical Trials for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FitzGerald, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Fitzgerald@umassmed.edu [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Followill, David S. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Galvin, James [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Philadelphia, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Knopp, Michael V. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Ohio, Wexner Medical Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core St. Louis, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Rosen, Mark A. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Washington University School of Medicine–Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Shankar, Lalitha K. [National Cancer Institute, Clinical Radiation Oncology Branch, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Laurie, Fran [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Cicchetti, M. Giulia; Moni, Janaki [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Coleman, C. Norman; Deye, James A.; Capala, Jacek; Vikram, Bhadrasain [National Cancer Institute, Clinical Radiation Oncology Branch, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Cancer treatment evolves through oncology clinical trials. Cancer trials are multimodal and complex. Assuring high-quality data are available to answer not only study objectives but also questions not anticipated at study initiation is the role of quality assurance. The National Cancer Institute reorganized its cancer clinical trials program in 2014. The National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) was formed and within it was established a Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Organization. This organization is Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, consisting of 6 quality assurance centers that provide imaging and radiation therapy quality assurance for the NCTN. Sophisticated imaging is used for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management as well as for image-driven technologies to plan and execute radiation treatment. Integration of imaging and radiation oncology data acquisition, review, management, and archive strategies are essential for trial compliance and future research. Lessons learned from previous trials are and provide evidence to support diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy data acquisition in NCTN trials.

  4. Imaging and Data Acquisition in Clinical Trials for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald, Thomas J.; Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann; Followill, David S.; Galvin, James; Knopp, Michael V.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Rosen, Mark A.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Shankar, Lalitha K.; Laurie, Fran; Cicchetti, M. Giulia; Moni, Janaki; Coleman, C. Norman; Deye, James A.; Capala, Jacek; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment evolves through oncology clinical trials. Cancer trials are multimodal and complex. Assuring high-quality data are available to answer not only study objectives but also questions not anticipated at study initiation is the role of quality assurance. The National Cancer Institute reorganized its cancer clinical trials program in 2014. The National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) was formed and within it was established a Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Organization. This organization is Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, consisting of 6 quality assurance centers that provide imaging and radiation therapy quality assurance for the NCTN. Sophisticated imaging is used for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management as well as for image-driven technologies to plan and execute radiation treatment. Integration of imaging and radiation oncology data acquisition, review, management, and archive strategies are essential for trial compliance and future research. Lessons learned from previous trials are and provide evidence to support diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy data acquisition in NCTN trials.

  5. Exploiting natural killer group 2D receptors for CAR T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, Benjamin; Cook, W James; Murad, Joana; Graber, David J; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Lonez, Caroline; Gilham, David E; Sentman, Charles L; Agaugue, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are genetically engineered proteins that combine an extracellular antigen-specific recognition domain with one or several intracellular T-cell signaling domains. When expressed in T cells, these CARs specifically trigger T-cell activation upon antigen recognition. While the clinical proof of principle of CAR T-cell therapy has been established in hematological cancers, CAR T cells are only at the early stages of being explored to tackle solid cancers. This special report discusses the concept of exploiting natural killer cell receptors as an approach that could broaden the specificity of CAR T cells and potentially enhance the efficacy of this therapy against solid tumors. New data demonstrating feasibility of this approach in humans and supporting the ongoing clinical trial are also presented.

  6. Clinical translation of stem cell therapy in traumatic brain injury: the potential of encapsulated mesenchymal cell biodelivery of glucagon-like peptide-1

    OpenAIRE

    Heile, Anna; Brinker, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury remains a major cause of death and disability; it is estimated that annually 10 million people are affected. Preclinical studies have shown the potential therapeutic value of stem cell therapies. Neuroprotective as well as regenerative properties of stem cells have been suggested to be the mechanism of action in preclinical studies. However, up to now stem cell therapy has not been studied extensively in clinical trials. This article summarizes the current experimental ...

  7. [Proangiogenic cell-based therapy for treatment of ischemic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2009-11-01

    The application of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) cell-based therapy for regenerative medicine constitutes a promising therapeutic avenue for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Based on experimental studies demonstrating that bone marrow-, blood- or tissue-derived stem/progenitor cells improve the functional recovery after ischemia, clinical trials were initiated to address this new therapeutic concept. Although autolougous cell therapy was shown to improve perfusion and function of ischemic tissues, a number of issues remain to be adressed. The nature of the mobilizing, migratory and homing signals, and the mechanisms of action need to be identified and further defined. In addition, strategies to enhance homing, survival and therapeutic potential of EPC need to be developped to improve therapeutic effect and counteract EPC dysfunction in aged patients with cardiovascular risk factors. The present review article will discuss the mechanisms of action of different types of adult stem cells and several approaches to improve their therapeutic efficiency.

  8. Advances in Bone Marrow Stem Cell Therapy for Retinal Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna S.; Moisseiev, Elad; Bauer, Gerhard; Anderson, Johnathon D.; Grant, Maria B.; Zam, Azhar; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Werner, John S.; Nolta, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    The most common cause of untreatable vision loss is dysfunction of the retina. Conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma remain leading causes of untreatable blindness worldwide. Various stem cell approaches are being explored for treatment of retinal regeneration. The rationale for using bone marrow stem cells to treat retinal dysfunction is based on preclinical evidence showing that bone marrow stem cells can rescue degenerating and ischemic retina. These stem cells have primarily paracrine trophic effects although some cells can directly incorporate into damaged tissue. Since the paracrine trophic effects can have regenerative effects on multiple cells in the retina, the use of this cell therapy is not limited to a particular retinal condition. Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells are being explored in early clinical trials as therapy for various retinal conditions. These bone marrow stem cells include mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear cells and CD34+ cells. Autologous therapy requires no systemic immunosuppression or donor matching. Intravitreal delivery of CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells appears to be tolerated and is being explored since some of these cells can home into the damaged retina after intravitreal administration. The safety of intravitreal delivery of mesenchymal stem cells has not been well established. This review provides an update of the current evidence in support of the use of bone marrow stem cells as treatment for retinal dysfunction. The potential limitations and complications of using certain forms of bone marrow stem cells as therapy are discussed. Future directions of research include methods to optimize the therapeutic potential of these stem cells, non-cellular alternatives using extracellular vesicles, and in vivo high-resolution retinal imaging to detect cellular changes in the retina following cell therapy. PMID:27784628

  9. Role of chemotherapy and targeted therapy in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaka, Misako; Gadgeel, Shirish M

    2018-01-01

    Adjuvant platinum based chemotherapy is accepted as standard of care in stage II and III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and is often considered in patients with stage IB disease who have tumors ≥ 4 cm. The survival advantage is modest with approximately 5% at 5 years. Areas covered: This review article presents relevant data regarding chemotherapy use in the perioperative setting for early stage NSCLC. A literature search was performed utilizing PubMed as well as clinical trial.gov. Randomized phase III studies in this setting including adjuvant and neoadjuvant use of chemotherapy as well as ongoing trials on targeted therapy and immunotherapy are also discussed. Expert commentary: With increasing utilization of screening computed tomography scans, it is possible that the percentage of early stage NSCLC patients will increase in the coming years. Benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy in early stage NSCLC patients remain modest. There is a need to better define patients most likely to derive survival benefit from adjuvant therapy and spare patients who do not need adjuvant chemotherapy due to the toxicity of such therapy. Trials for adjuvant targeted therapy, including adjuvant EGFR-TKI trials and trials of immunotherapy drugs are ongoing and will define the role of these agents as adjuvant therapy.

  10. Stroke and the Cell Therapy Saga: Towards a Safe, Swift and Efficient Utilization of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    The first clinical trials of cell therapy in stroke were first published in the 2000s and consisted of neural stems cells transplanted via the intracerebral pathway. Since mesenchymal stem cells showed similar capacities to differentiate into neural cells and allowed autologous cell transplantation, they were then preferentially studied, including diabetes and hypertension. More recently, bone marrow derived mononuclear cells were successfully transplanted in stroke with no need of culture processing, and simple collection by density gradient centrifugation rendering them immediately ready for use. They improve post-stroke neurological deficit in rodents and clinical trials have shown the feasibility of intra-arterial or intravenous administration. The underlying mechanisms are not yet understood. We investigated the therapeutic potential of peripheral blood derived mononuclear cells (PB-MNC) harvested from diabetic patients and stimulated by ephrin-B2 (PB-MNC+). We showed that intravenously injected PB-MNC+ after cerebral ischemia reduced infarct volume at day 3, increased cell proliferation in the peri-infarct area and the subventricular zone, decreased microglial cell density, and upregulated TGF-β expression. At D14, microvessel density was increased and functional recovery enhanced, whereas plasma levels of BDNF were increased in treated mice. Ephrin-B2 induced phenotype switching of PB-MNC by upregulating genes controlling cell proliferation, inflammation and angiogenesis, as confirmed by adhesion and Matrigel assays. PB-MNC+ transplantation in stroke is a promising approach and should be investigated for the development of rapid, non-invasive bedside cell therapy strategies in stroke.(Presented at the 1944th Meeting, July 19, 2017).

  11. A Phase 2 Trial of Concurrent Chemotherapy and Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results and Reflections Following Early Closure of a Single-Institution Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Henderson, Randal [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Pham, Dat; Cury, James D.; Bajwa, Abubakr [Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); D' Agostino, Harry [Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Flampouri, Stella; Huh, Soon; Li, Zuofeng [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McCook, Barry [Department of Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Nichols, Romaine C. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Proton therapy has been shown to reduce radiation dose to organs at risk (OAR) and could be used to safely escalate the radiation dose. We analyzed outcomes in a group of phase 2 study patients treated with dose-escalated proton therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for stage 3 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From 2009 through 2013, LU02, a phase 2 trial of proton therapy delivering 74 to 80 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction with concurrent chemotherapy for stage 3 NSCLC, was opened to accrual at our institution. Due to slow accrual and competing trials, the study was closed after just 14 patients (stage IIIA, 9 patients; stage IIIB, 5 patients) were accrued over 4 years. During that same time period, 55 additional stage III patients were treated with high-dose proton therapy, including 7 in multi-institutional proton clinical trials, 4 not enrolled due to physician preference, and 44 who were ineligible based on strict entry criteria. An unknown number of patients were ineligible for enrollment due to insurance coverage issues and thus were treated with photon radiation. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 52 months. Results: Two-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 57% and 25%, respectively. Median lengths of overall survival and progression-free survival were 33 months and 14 months, respectively. There were no acute grade 3 toxicities related to proton therapy. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and pulmonary toxicity each occurred in 1 patient. Conclusions: Dose-escalated proton therapy with concurrent chemotherapy was well tolerated with encouraging results among a small cohort of patients. Unfortunately, single-institution proton studies may be difficult to accrue and consideration for pragmatic and/or multicenter trial design should be considered when developing future proton clinical trials.

  12. A Prospective Clinical Trial Combining Radiation Therapy With Systemic Immunotherapy in Metastatic Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiniker, Susan M., E-mail: shiniker@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Reddy, Sunil A. [Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Maecker, Holden T.; Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B.; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael [Human Immune Monitoring Center, Institute for Immunity, Transplantation, and Infection, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Swetter, Susan M. [Department of Dermatology, Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Dermatology Service, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California (United States); Saha, Saurabh [Atlas Venture, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Shura, Lei; Knox, Susan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Local radiation therapy (RT) combined with systemic anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated protein-4 immunotherapy may enhance induction of systemic antimelanoma immune responses. The primary objective of the present trial was to assess the safety and efficacy of combining ipilimumab with RT in patients with stage IV melanoma. The secondary objectives included laboratory assessment of induction of antimelanoma immune responses. Methods and Materials: In our prospective clinical trial, 22 patients with stage IV melanoma were treated with palliative RT and ipilimumab for 4 cycles. RT to 1 to 2 disease sites was initiated within 5 days after starting ipilimumab. Patients had ≥1 nonirradiated metastasis measuring ≥1.5 cm available for response assessment. Tumor imaging studies were obtained at baseline, 2 to 4 weeks after cycle 4 of ipilimumab, and every 3 months until progression. Laboratory immune response parameters were measured before and during treatment. Results: Combination therapy was well-tolerated without unexpected toxicities. Eleven patients (50.0%) experienced clinical benefit from therapy, including complete and partial responses and stable disease at median follow-up of 55 weeks. Three patients (27.3%) achieved an ongoing systemic complete response at a median follow-up of 55 weeks (range 32-65), and 3 (27.3%) had an initial partial response for a median of 40 weeks. Analysis of immune response data suggested a relationship between elevated CD8-activated T-cells and response. Conclusion: This is the second prospective clinical trial of treatment of metastatic melanoma using the combination of RT and systemic immunotherapy and the first using this sequence of therapy. The results from the present trial demonstrate that a subset of patients may benefit from combination therapy, arguing for continued clinical investigation of the use of RT combined with immunotherapy, including programmed cell death 1 inhibitors, which might have the

  13. A Prospective Clinical Trial Combining Radiation Therapy With Systemic Immunotherapy in Metastatic Melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiniker, Susan M.; Reddy, Sunil A.; Maecker, Holden T.; Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B.; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Swetter, Susan M.; Saha, Saurabh; Shura, Lei; Knox, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Local radiation therapy (RT) combined with systemic anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated protein-4 immunotherapy may enhance induction of systemic antimelanoma immune responses. The primary objective of the present trial was to assess the safety and efficacy of combining ipilimumab with RT in patients with stage IV melanoma. The secondary objectives included laboratory assessment of induction of antimelanoma immune responses. Methods and Materials: In our prospective clinical trial, 22 patients with stage IV melanoma were treated with palliative RT and ipilimumab for 4 cycles. RT to 1 to 2 disease sites was initiated within 5 days after starting ipilimumab. Patients had ≥1 nonirradiated metastasis measuring ≥1.5 cm available for response assessment. Tumor imaging studies were obtained at baseline, 2 to 4 weeks after cycle 4 of ipilimumab, and every 3 months until progression. Laboratory immune response parameters were measured before and during treatment. Results: Combination therapy was well-tolerated without unexpected toxicities. Eleven patients (50.0%) experienced clinical benefit from therapy, including complete and partial responses and stable disease at median follow-up of 55 weeks. Three patients (27.3%) achieved an ongoing systemic complete response at a median follow-up of 55 weeks (range 32-65), and 3 (27.3%) had an initial partial response for a median of 40 weeks. Analysis of immune response data suggested a relationship between elevated CD8-activated T-cells and response. Conclusion: This is the second prospective clinical trial of treatment of metastatic melanoma using the combination of RT and systemic immunotherapy and the first using this sequence of therapy. The results from the present trial demonstrate that a subset of patients may benefit from combination therapy, arguing for continued clinical investigation of the use of RT combined with immunotherapy, including programmed cell death 1 inhibitors, which might have the

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa El-Badri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with significant morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular, nervous, and renal complications. Attempts to cure diabetes mellitus using islet transplantation have been successful in providing a source for insulin secreting cells. However, limited donors, graft rejection, the need for continued immune suppression, and exhaustion of the donor cell pool prompted the search for a more sustained source of insulin secreting cells. Stem cell therapy is a promising alternative for islet transplantation in type 2 diabetic patients who fail to control hyperglycemia even with insulin injection. Autologous stem cell transplantation may provide the best outcome for those patients, since autologous cells are readily available and do not entail prolonged hospital stays or sustained immunotoxic therapy. Among autologous adult stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs therapy has been applied with varying degrees of success in both animal models and in clinical trials. This review will focus on the advantages of MSCs over other types of stem cells and the possible mechanisms by which MSCs transplant restores normoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients. Sources of MSCs including autologous cells from diabetic patients and the use of various differentiation protocols in relation to best transplant outcome will be discussed.

  15. Adjuvant therapy for locally advanced renal cell cancer: A systematic review with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Carmen SP

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adjuvant trials have been undertaken in an attempt to reduce the risk of recurrence among patients who undergo surgical resection for locally advanced renal cancer. However, no clear benefit has been identified to date. This systematic review was conducted to examine the exact role of adjuvant therapy in renal cancer setting. Methods Randomized controlled trials were searched comparing adjuvant therapy (chemotherapy, vaccine, immunotherapy, biochemotherapy versus no active treatment after surgery among renal cell cancer patients. Outcomes were overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, and severe toxicities. Risk ratios (RR, hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using a fixed-effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was measured by I2. Different strategies of adjuvant treatment were evaluated separately. Results Ten studies (2,609 patients were included. Adjuvant therapy provided no benefits in terms of OS (HR 1.07; 95%CI 0.89 to 1.28; P = 0.48 I2 = 0% or DFS (HR 1.03; 95%CI 0.87 to 1.21; P = 0.77 I2 = 15% when compared to no treatment. No subgroup analysis (immunotherapy, vaccines, biochemotherapy and hormone therapy had relevant results. Toxicity evaluation depicted a significantly higher frequency of serious adverse events in the adjuvant group. Conclusions This analysis provided no support for the hypothesis that the agents studied provide any clinical benefit for renal cancer patients although they increase the risk of toxic effects. Randomized trials are underway to test targeted therapies, which might open a new therapeutic frontier. Until these trials yield results, no adjuvant therapy can be recommended for patients who undergo surgical resection for renal cell cancer.

  16. Cell Therapy Applications for Retinal Vascular Diseases: Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna S

    2016-04-01

    Retinal vascular conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, remain leading causes of vision loss. No therapy exists to restore vision loss resulting from retinal ischemia and associated retinal degeneration. Tissue regeneration is possible with cell therapy. The goal would be to restore or replace the damaged retinal vasculature and the retinal neurons that are damaged and/or degenerating from the hypoxic insult. Currently, various adult cell therapies have been explored as potential treatment. They include mesenchymal stem cells, vascular precursor cells (i.e., CD34+ cells, hematopoietic cells or endothelial progenitor cells), and adipose stromal cells. Preclinical studies show that all these cells have a paracrine trophic effect on damaged ischemic tissue, leading to tissue preservation. Endothelial progenitor cells and adipose stromal cells integrate into the damaged retinal vascular wall in preclinical models of diabetic retinopathy and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Mesenchymal stem cells do not integrate as readily but appear to have a primary paracrine trophic effect. Early phase clinical trials have been initiated and ongoing using mesenchymal stem cells or autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells injected intravitreally as potential therapy for diabetic retinopathy or retinal vein occlusion. Adipose stromal cells or pluripotent stem cells differentiated into endothelial colony-forming cells have been explored in preclinical studies and show promise as possible therapies for retinal vascular disorders. The relative safety or efficacy of these various cell therapies for treating retinal vascular disorders have yet to be determined.

  17. Combining cell transplants or gene therapy with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Nathan C; Starr, Philip A; Larson, Paul S; Ostrem, Jill L; Marks, William J; Lim, Daniel A

    2015-02-01

    Cell transplantation and gene therapy each show promise to enhance the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, because cell transplantation and gene therapy generally require direct delivery to the central nervous system, clinical trial design involves unique scientific, ethical, and financial concerns related to the invasive nature of the procedure. Typically, such biologics have been tested in PD patients who have not received any neurosurgical intervention. Here, we suggest that PD patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) device implantation are an ideal patient population for the clinical evaluation of cell transplantation and gene therapy. Randomizing subjects to an experimental group that receives the biologic concurrently with the DBS implantation-or to a control group that receives the DBS treatment alone-has several compelling advantages. First, this study design enables the participation of patients likely to benefit from DBS, many of whom simultaneously meet the inclusion criteria of biologic studies. Second, the need for a sham neurosurgical procedure is eliminated, which may reduce ethical concerns, promote patient recruitment, and enhance the blinding of surgical trials. Third, testing the biologic by "piggybacking" onto an established, reimbursable procedure should reduce the cost of clinical trials, which may allow a greater number of biologics to reach this critical stage of research translation. Finally, this clinical trial design may lead to combinatorial treatment strategies that provide PD patients with more durable control over disabling motor symptoms. By combining neuromodulation with biologics, we may also reveal important treatment paradigms relevant to other diseases of the brain. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Potential of Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany E. Marei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is one of the major health problems worldwide. The only FDA approved anti-thrombotic drug for acute ischemic stroke is the tissue plasminogen activator. Several studies have been devoted to assessing the therapeutic potential of different types of stem cells such as neural stem cells (NSCs, mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived NSCs as treatments for ischemic stroke. The results of these studies are intriguing but many of them have presented conflicting results. Additionally, the mechanism(s by which engrafted stem/progenitor cells exert their actions are to a large extent unknown. In this review, we will provide a synopsis of different preclinical and clinical studies related to the use of stem cell-based stroke therapy, and explore possible beneficial/detrimental outcomes associated with the use of different types of stem cells. Due to limited/short time window implemented in most of the recorded clinical trials about the use of stem cells as potential therapeutic intervention for stroke, further clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of the intervention in a longer time window after cellular engraftments are still needed.

  19. Stem cells therapy for ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Letizia; Vescovi, Angelo; Cantello, Roberto; Gelati, Maurizio; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Despite knowledge on the molecular basis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) having quickly progressed over the last few years, such discoveries have not yet translated into new therapeutics. With the advancement of stem cell technologies there is hope for stem cell therapeutics as novel treatments for ALS. We discuss in detail the therapeutic potential of different types of stem cells in preclinical and clinical works. Moreover, we address many open questions in clinical translation. SC therapy is a potentially promising new treatment for ALS and the need to better understand how to develop cell-based experimental treatments, and how to implement them in clinical trials, becomes more pressing. Mesenchymal stem cells and neural fetal stem cells have emerged as safe and potentially effective cell types, but there is a need to carry out appropriately designed experimental studies to verify their long-term safety and possibly efficacy. Moreover, the cost-benefit analysis of the results must take into account the quality of life of the patients as a major end point. It is our opinion that a multicenter international clinical program aime d at fine-tuning and coordinating transplantation procedures and protocols is mandatory.

  20. Clinical Trials of Immunogene Therapy for Spontaneous Tumors in Companion Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Claudio Glikin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the important progress obtained in the treatment of some pets’ malignancies, new treatments need to be developed. Being critical in cancer control and progression, the immune system’s appropriate modulation may provide effective therapeutic options. In this review we summarize the outcomes of published immunogene therapy veterinary clinical trials reported by many research centers. A variety of tumors such as canine melanoma, soft tissue sarcomas, osteosarcoma and lymphoma, feline fibrosarcoma, and equine melanoma were subjected to different treatment approaches. Both viral and mainly nonviral vectors were used to deliver gene products as cytokines, xenogeneic tumor associated antigens, specific ligands, and proapoptotic regulatory factors. In some cases autologous, allogenic, or xenogeneic transgenic cytokine producing cells were assayed. In general terms, minor or no adverse collateral effects appeared during this kind of therapies and treated patients usually displayed a better course of the disease (longer survival, delayed or suppressed recurrence or metastatic spread, and improvement of the quality of life. This suggests the utility of these methodologies as standard adjuvant treatments. The encouraging outcomes obtained in companion animals support their ready application in veterinary clinical oncology and serve as preclinical proof of concept and safety assay for future human gene therapy trials.

  1. Gene therapy for sickle cell disease: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Selami; Uchida, Naoya; Tisdale, John F

    2018-05-30

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common life-threatening monogenic diseases affecting millions of people worldwide. Allogenic hematopietic stem cell transplantation is the only known cure for the disease with high success rates, but the limited availability of matched sibling donors and the high risk of transplantation-related side effects force the scientific community to envision additional therapies. Ex vivo gene therapy through globin gene addition has been investigated extensively and is currently being tested in clinical trials that have begun reporting encouraging data. Recent improvements in our understanding of the molecular pathways controlling mammalian erythropoiesis and globin switching offer new and exciting therapeutic options. Rapid and substantial advances in genome engineering tools, particularly CRISPR/Cas9, have raised the possibility of genetic correction in induced pluripotent stem cells as well as patient-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, these techniques are still in their infancy, and safety/efficacy issues remain that must be addressed before translating these promising techniques into clinical practice. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Radiotherapeutic management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). An overview based on the clinical trials of the radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.F.; Byhardt, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Recent clinical trials clarified the role of radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The evolution of this research is illustrated by a systemic succession of studies conducted during the last twenty years by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). This article reviews past and present RTOG research efforts in NSCLC. For unresectable NSCLS, major research themes have included radiation dose intensification using both standard and altered fractionation (hyperfractionation or accelerated fraction RT), treatment intensification using combined modality RT and chemotherapy (CT), as well as noncytotoxic adjuvants to RT. These trials have shown that treatment intensification can yield improved survival with acceptable toxicity. Local control and survival was improved with induction CT followed by standard RT to 60 Gy. Current studies will evaluate the timing and sequencing of CT and RT and the combination of CT with altered fractionation RT. Hypoxic cell sensitizers and nonspecific immune stimulants, two noncytotoxic adjuvants to RT, have shown no survival benefit. Biologic response modifiers, including recombinant interferon-beta, will also be evaluated as adjuvants to standard RT, based on interferon-beta radiosensitization observed in the laboratory and clinical investigations suggesting improved survival. Overall, RTOG studies have demonstrated small, but definite, incremental improvements in treatment outcome in NSCLS and provide a solid foundation on which to develop future investigations. (N.K.) 51 refs

  3. Concise Review: Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Cells, A Promising Cell Source for Therapy of Heart Failure: Where Do We Stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouadon, Elodie; Moore-Morris, Thomas; Smit, Nicoline W; Chatenoud, Lucienne; Coronel, Ruben; Harding, Sian E; Jourdon, Philippe; Lambert, Virginie; Rucker-Martin, Catherine; Pucéat, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is still a major cause of hospitalization and mortality in developed countries. Many clinical trials have tested the use of multipotent stem cells as a cardiac regenerative medicine. The benefit for the patients of this therapeutic intervention has remained limited. Herein, we review the pluripotent stem cells as a cell source for cardiac regeneration. We more specifically address the various challenges of this cell therapy approach. We question the cell delivery systems, the immune tolerance of allogenic cells, the potential proarrhythmic effects, various drug mediated interventions to facilitate cell grafting and, finally, we describe the pathological conditions that may benefit from such an innovative approach. As members of a transatlantic consortium of excellence of basic science researchers and clinicians, we propose some guidelines to be applied to cell types and modes of delivery in order to translate pluripotent stem cell cardiac derivatives into safe and effective clinical trials. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  4. Exercise therapy, manual therapy, or both, for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a factorial randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxter G David

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-pharmacological, non-surgical interventions are recommended as the first line of treatment for osteoarthritis (OA of the hip and knee. There is evidence that exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and improving function in patients with knee OA, some evidence that exercise therapy is effective for hip OA, and early indications that manual therapy may be efficacious for hip and knee OA. There is little evidence as to which approach is more effective, if benefits endure, or if providing these therapies is cost-effective for the management of this disorder. The MOA Trial (Management of OsteoArthritis aims to test the effectiveness of two physiotherapy interventions for improving disability and pain in adults with hip or knee OA in New Zealand. Specifically, our primary objectives are to investigate whether: 1. Exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy improves disability at 12 months; 2. Manual physiotherapy versus no manual therapy improves disability at 12 months; 3. Providing physiotherapy programmes in addition to usual care is more cost-effective than usual care alone in the management of osteoarthritis at 24 months. Methods This is a 2 × 2 factorial randomised controlled trial. We plan to recruit 224 participants with hip or knee OA. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive either: (a a supervised multi-modal exercise therapy programme; (b an individualised manual therapy programme; (c both exercise therapy and manual therapy; or, (d no trial physiotherapy. All participants will continue to receive usual medical care. The outcome assessors, orthopaedic surgeons, general medical practitioners, and statistician will be blind to group allocation until the statistical analysis is completed. The trial is funded by Health Research Council of New Zealand Project Grants (Project numbers 07/199, 07/200. Discussion The MOA Trial will be the first to investigate the effectiveness and cost

  5. CAR T Cell Therapy for Glioblastoma: Recent Clinical Advances and Future Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Stephen J; Desai, Arati S; Linette, Gerald P; June, Carl H; O'Rourke, Donald M

    2018-03-02

    In patients with certain hematologic malignancies, the use of autologous T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has led to unprecedented clinical responses. Although progress in solid tumors has been elusive, recent clinical studies have demonstrated the feasibility and safety of CAR T cell therapy for glioblastoma. In addition, despite formidable barriers to T cell localization and effector function in glioblastoma, signs of efficacy have been observed in select patients. In this review, we begin with a discussion of established obstacles to systemic therapy in glioblastoma and how these may be overcome by CAR T cells. We continue with a summary of previously published CAR T cell trials in GBM, and end by outlining the key therapeutic challenges associated with the use of CAR T cells in this disease.

  6. Regulation of Clinical Trials with Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Matthias; Anliker, Brigitte; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schuele, Silke

    2015-01-01

    In the European Union, clinical trials for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products are regulated at the national level, in contrast to the situation for a Marketing Authorisation Application, in which a centralised procedure is foreseen for these medicinal products. Although based on a common understanding regarding the regulatory requirement to be fulfilled before conduct of a clinical trial with an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product, the procedures and partly the scientific requirements for approval of a clinical trial application differ between the European Union Member States. This chapter will thus give an overview about the path to be followed for a clinical trial application and the subsequent approval process for an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product in Germany and will describe the role of the stakeholders that are involved. In addition, important aspects of manufacturing, quality control and non-clinical testing of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in the clinical development phase are discussed. Finally, current and future approaches for harmonisation of clinical trial authorisation between European Union Member States are summarised.

  7. Cell therapy in myocardial infarction: emphasis on the role of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Yuxiang; Bogaert, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Despite tremendous progress in myocardial infarct (MI) treatment, mortality rates remain substantial. Permanent loss of cardiomyocytes after ischemic injury, results in irreversible loss of myocardial contractility, reduction in ventricular performance, and may initiate the development of dilated heart failure. The discovery that pluripotent progenitor cells bear the capacity to differentiate to mature cardiac cells raised the hope of cell-based regenerative medicine. Engraftment of stem cells in the damaged myocardium, repair and functional improvement appeared suddenly a nearby reality. Promising results in animal models, and preliminary studies reporting the feasibility and safety of adult stem cell therapy in MI patients led to the first double-blinded randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The initial great enthusiasm for this paradigm shift in MI treatment has been tempered by the mainly negative or modestly positive study findings. Before new, larger clinical trials can be initiated, a number of critical questions and issues need to be considered starting with a scrutinized analysis of currently available data to extending our knowledge of the mechanism of scarless myocardial regeneration. Cardiac cell therapy necessitates a multidisciplinary approach, whereby imaging, in particular MRI, and the input of the imaging specialist is crucial to the success of cardiac cell regenerative medicine. MRI is an appealing technique for cell trafficking depicting engraftment, differentiation and survival. Endomyocardial cell administration can be achieved safely with MR fluoroscopy and MRI is without any doubt the most accurate and reproducible technique to measure study end-points. (orig.)

  8. Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet--an international collaborative clinical trials network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyler, Jay S; Greenbaum, Carla J; Lachin, John M; Leschek, Ellen; Rafkin-Mervis, Lisa; Savage, Peter; Spain, Lisa

    2008-12-01

    Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet is an international consortium of clinical research centers aimed at the prevention or delay of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The fundamental goal of TrialNet is to counter the T1D disease process by immune modulation and/or enhancement of beta cell proliferation and regeneration. To achieve this goal, TrialNet researchers are working to better understand the natural history of the disease, to identify persons at risk, and to clinically evaluate novel therapies that balance potential risks and benefits. The particular focus is on studies of preventive measures. In addition, TrialNet evaluates therapies in individuals with newly diagnosed T1D with preserved beta cell function to help determine the risk/benefit profile and gain an initial assessment of potential efficacy in preservation of beta cell function, so that promising agents can be studied in prevention trials. In addition, TrialNet evaluates methodologies that enhance the conduct of its clinical trials, which includes tests of outcome assessment methodology, the evaluation of surrogate markers, and mechanistic studies laying the foundation for future clinical trials.

  9. Risk of adverse events with bevacizumab addition to therapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai XX

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Xi-Xi Lai, Ren-Ai Xu, Yu-Ping Li, Han Yang Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Background: Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor ligand, has shown survival benefits in the treatment of many types of malignant tumors, including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the risk of the most clinically relevant adverse events related to bevacizumab in advanced NSCLC.Methods: Databases from PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library up to August 2015, were searched to identify relevant studies. We included prospective randomized controlled Phase II/III clinical trials that compared therapy with or without bevacizumab for advanced NSCLC. Summary relative risk (RR and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random effects or fixed effects according to the heterogeneity among included trials.Results: A total of 3,745 patients from nine clinical trials were included in the meta-analysis. Summary RRs showed a statistically significant bevacizumab-associated increased risk in three of the adverse outcomes studied: proteinuria (RR =7.55, hypertension (RR =5.34, and hemorrhagic events (RR =2.61. No statistically significant differences were found for gastrointestinal perforation (P=0.60, arterial and venous thromboembolic events (P=0.35 and P=0.92, respectively, or fatal events (P=0.29.Conclusion: The addition of bevacizumab to therapy in advanced NSCLC did significantly increase the risk of proteinuria, hypertension, and hemorrhagic events but not arterial/venous thromboembolic events, gastrointestinal perforation, or fatal adverse events. Keywords: toxicities, angiogenesis inhibitors, non-small-cell lung carcinoma, meta-analysis, safety

  10. Personalizing Therapy in Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaruz, Liza C.; Burns, Timothy F.; Ramfidis, Vasilis S.; Socinski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The recognition that non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is not a single disease entity, but rather a collection of distinct molecularly driven neoplasms, has permanently shifted the therapeutic landscape of NSCLC to a personalized approach. This personalization of NSCLC therapy is typified by the dramatic response rates seen in EGFR mutant NSCLC when treated with targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and in ALK translocation–driven NSCLC when treated with ALK inhibitors. Targeted therapeutic approaches in NSCLC necessitate consideration of more invasive biopsy techniques aimed at providing sufficient tissue for both histological determination and molecular profiling in all patients with stage IV disease both at the time of diagnosis and at the time of disease progression. Comprehensive genotyping efforts have identified oncogenic drivers in 62% lung adenocarcinomas and an increasing proportion of squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. The identification of these oncogenic drivers and the triage of patients to clinical trials evaluating novel targeted therapeutic approaches will increasingly mold a landscape of personalized lung cancer therapy where each genotype has an associated targeted therapy. This review outlines the state of personalized lung cancer therapy as it pertains to individual NSCLC genotypes. PMID:24258572

  11. Anti-EGFRvIII Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Modified T Cells for Adoptive Cell Therapy of Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Pei-pei; Li, Ming; Li, Tian-fang; Han, Shuang-yin

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most devastating brain tumors with poor prognosis and high mortality. Although radical surgical treatment with subsequent radiation and chemotherapy can improve the survival, the efficacy of such regimens is insufficient because the GBM cells can spread and destroy normal brain structures. Moreover, these non-specific treatments may damage adjacent healthy brain tissue. It is thus imperative to develop novel therapies to precisely target invasive tumor cells without damaging normal tissues. Immunotherapy is a promising approach due to its capability to suppress the growth of various tumors in preclinical model and clinical trials. Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using T cells engineered with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting an ideal molecular marker in GBM, e.g. epidermal growth factor receptor type III (EGFRvIII) has demonstrated a satisfactory efficacy in treating malignant brain tumors. Here we summarize the recent progresses in immunotherapeutic strategy using CAR-modified T cells oriented to EGFRvIII against GBM. PMID:28302023

  12. Immunomodulatory Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy in Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Heyes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to summarize contemporary evidence of the in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in promoting vascularized composite allotransplant (VCA tolerance. An extensive literature review was performed to identify pertinent articles of merit. Prospective preclinical trials in mammal subjects receiving VCA (or skin allograft with administration of MSCs were reviewed. Prospective clinical trials with intravascular delivery of MSCs in human populations undergoing solid organ transplant were also identified and reviewed. Sixteen preclinical studies are included. Eleven studies compared MSC monotherapy to no therapy; of these, ten reported improved graft survival, which was statistically significantly prolonged in eight. Eight studies analyzed allograft survival with MSC therapy as an adjunct to proven immunosuppressive regimens. In these studies, daily immunosuppression was transiently delivered and then stopped. In all studies, treatment-free graft survival was statistically significantly prolonged in animals that received MSC therapy. MSCs have been safely administered clinically and their use in renal transplant clinical trials provides evidence that they improve allograft transplant tolerance in clinical practice. There is potential for MSC induction therapy to overcome many of the obstacles to widespread VCA in clinical practice. Preclinical studies are needed before MSC-induced VCA tolerance becomes a clinical reality.

  13. Treatment paradigms for advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer in the era of multiple lines of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Socinski, Mark A

    2009-02-01

    The duration of first-line and the timing of second-line therapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer has been an area of recent investigation. Five trials have been performed that have investigated shorter (3-4 cycles) versus longer duration of platinum-based therapy; four trials revealed an equivalent overall survival with the shorter duration of therapy, and one trial revealed superior survival with the longer duration of therapy. The toxicity and quality of life data has either been equivalent or favored the shorter duration of therapy. Two trials have investigated the timing of a second-line therapy after completion of four cycles of platinum-based therapy versus the standard treatment paradigm of initiating second-line therapy upon disease progression. Both of these trials have revealed a statistically significant improvement in the progression-free survival, and a trend towards improved survival for the earlier use of second-line therapy. Only 50 to 60% of patients on the standard treatment arm initiated second-line therapy, and the promising results observed are most likely related to the fact that a higher percentage of patients received second-line therapy on the experimental arm. Several trials have investigated maintenance chemotherapy, and these trials have not revealed a survival benefit probably due to the fact that many patients experience disease progression or unacceptable toxicity during the initial or maintenance therapy. The addition of a targeted agent (bevacizumab or cetuximab) to the initial chemotherapy and the continuation of the targeted agent after completion of the chemotherapy have yielded superior overall survival in comparison to chemotherapy alone. The incremental benefit of the maintenance therapy with the targeted agent is unknown.

  14. Systemic Therapy for Merkel Cell Carcinoma: What’s on the Horizon?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowits, Guilherme [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Department of Medical Oncology, Center for Head and Neck Oncology, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2014-05-16

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer that usually affects elderly patients. Despite being uncommon, incidence has been steadily increasing over the last two decades, likely due to increased awareness, better diagnostic methods and aging of the population. It is currently one of the most lethal cutaneous malignancies, with a five-year overall survival of approximately 50%. With the better understanding of the molecular pathways that lead to the development of Merkel cell carcinoma, there has been an increasing excitement and optimism surrounding novel targeted therapies, in particular to immunotherapy. Some of the concepts surrounding the novel targeted therapies and currently ongoing clinical trials are reviewed here.

  15. Systemic Therapy for Merkel Cell Carcinoma: What’s on the Horizon?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowits, Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer that usually affects elderly patients. Despite being uncommon, incidence has been steadily increasing over the last two decades, likely due to increased awareness, better diagnostic methods and aging of the population. It is currently one of the most lethal cutaneous malignancies, with a five-year overall survival of approximately 50%. With the better understanding of the molecular pathways that lead to the development of Merkel cell carcinoma, there has been an increasing excitement and optimism surrounding novel targeted therapies, in particular to immunotherapy. Some of the concepts surrounding the novel targeted therapies and currently ongoing clinical trials are reviewed here

  16. Adjuvant therapy in renal cell carcinoma: does higher risk for recurrence improve the chance for success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figlin, R A; Leibovich, B C; Stewart, G D; Negrier, S

    2018-02-01

    The success of targeted therapies, including inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway or the mammalian target of rapamycin, in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma led to interest in testing their efficacy in the adjuvant setting. Results from the first trials are now available, with other studies due to report imminently. This review provides an overview of adjuvant targeted therapy in renal cell carcinoma, including interpretation of currently available conflicting data and future direction of research. We discuss the key differences between the completed targeted therapy adjuvant trials, and highlight the importance of accurately identifying patients who are likely to benefit from adjuvant treatment. We also consider reasons why blinded independent radiology review and treatment dose may prove critical for adjuvant treatment success. The implications of using disease-free survival as a surrogate end point for overall survival from the patient perspective and measurement of health benefit have recently been brought into focus and are discussed. Finally, we discuss how the ongoing adjuvant trials with targeted therapies and checkpoint inhibitors may improve our understanding and ability to prevent tumor recurrence after nephrectomy in the future.

  17. No evidence for the use of stem cell therapy for tendon disorders : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, Haiko I M F L; Moen, Maarten H; Haisma, Hidde J; Winters, Marinus

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stem cells have emerged as a new treatment option for tendon disorders. We systematically reviewed the current evidence for stem cell therapy in tendon disorders. METHODS: Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, cohort studies and case series with a minimum of 5 cases were

  18. mTOR in squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus: a potential target for molecular therapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; ten Kate, F. J. W.; Offerhaus, G. J. A.; van Diest, P. J.; Borel Rinkes, I. H. M.; van Hillegersberg, R.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an important regulator of protein translation and cell proliferation, is activated in various malignancies. In a randomised controlled trial of advanced renal cell carcinoma patients, targeted therapy to mTOR by means of rapamycin analogues has been

  19. Randomized Controlled Trials in Music Therapy: Guidelines for Design and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) plays a powerful role in today's healthcare industry. At the same time, it is important that multiple types of evidence contribute to music therapy's knowledge base and that the dialogue of clinical effectiveness in music therapy is not dominated by the biomedical hierarchical model of evidence-based practice. Whether or not one agrees with the hierarchical model of evidence in the current healthcare climate, RCTs can contribute important knowledge to our field. Therefore, it is important that music therapists are prepared to design trials that meet current methodological standards and, equally important, are able to respond appropriately to those design aspects that may not be feasible in music therapy research. To provide practical guidelines to music therapy researchers for the design and implementation of RCTs as well as to enable music therapists to be well-informed consumers of RCT evidence. This article reviews key design aspects of RCTs and discusses how to best implement these standards in music therapy trials. A systematic presentation of basic randomization methods, allocation concealment strategies, issues related to blinding in music therapy trials and strategies for implementation, the use of treatment manuals, types of control groups, outcome selection, and sample size computation is provided. Despite the challenges of meeting all key design demands typical of an RCT, it is possible to design rigorous music therapy RCTs that accurately estimate music therapy treatment benefits.

  20. CAR T-Cell therapy can lead to long-lasting remissions in patients with lymphoma | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    More than three years after treatment, some clinical trial participants who received CAR T-cell therapy for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma remain in remission. These results are reported in a paper in Molecular Therapy by James Kochenderfer, M.D., of CCR's Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch. “This raises the possibility that CAR T cells can be curative for diffuse large B cell lymphoma,” Kochenderfer says.

  1. Preparations for the next generation of clinical trials with proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newhauser, W.D.; Smith, A.R.; Fitzek, M.; Ibbott, G.; Munzenrider, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: As proton radiation therapy centers become more widely available, we anticipate an increase in clinical proton therapy research, e.g. clinical trials to compare the efficacy of proton therapy with that of conformal photon therapy. In this presentation, we explore some of the quality assurance (QA) work that will be necessary to support multi-institution clinical trials to include facilities in Europe, Asia and the United States. Specifically, we shall concentrate on three areas pertaining to practical clinical proton dosimetry for which clear, concise, and coherent guidance is needed. First, the existing proton therapy dosimetry protocols (e.g. ICRU Report 59, IAEA TRS-398) provide general methods that are well suited for adoption in proton therapy. Many additional techniques are required in order to implement dosimetry in a contemporary proton clinic. For example, special situations arise for small fields including those for radiosurgery and ocular treatments, and for rotational therapy. Fortunately, this additional information is emerging from various proton therapy centers. For example, Vatnitsky et al. described the dosimetry of small beams, Newhauser et al. described absolute proton dosimetry techniques for radiosurgery and for ocular beams. Newhauser et al. also reported on a general formalism and practical methods for dosimetry measurements in a rotational proton gantry. Our aim is to discuss some specific needs for the standardization of these tasks, which will be essential in achieving adequate uniformity in multi-institution clinical trials. Second, we will discuss means to standardize of writing the physics QA portion of protocols for multi-institution clinical trials, through which a statistically significant number of patient outcomes may be obtained more rapidly. Surprisingly, only two multi-institution proton clinical trials have been undertaken (a skull base sarcoma trial and a prostate cancer trial, both shared between MGH and Loma Linda

  2. Economic analysis of the TAX 317 trial: docetaxel versus best supportive care as second-line therapy of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighl, Natasha B; Shepherd, Frances A; Kwong, Rita; Burkes, Ronald L; Feld, Ronald; Goodwin, Pamela J

    2002-03-01

    To determine the cost-effectiveness (CE) of second-line docetaxel compared with best supportive care (BSC) in the TAX 317 trial, a randomized clinical trial of second-line chemotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer. A retrospective CE analysis of the TAX 317 trial was undertaken, evaluating direct medical costs of therapy from the viewpoint of Canada's public health care system. Costs were derived in 1999 Canadian dollars, and resource use was determined through prospective trial data. The incremental survival benefit in the docetaxel arm over BSC was 2 months (P =.047). The CE of docetaxel was $57,749 per year of life gained. For patients treated with docetaxel 75 mg/m(2), the CE was $31,776 per year of life gained. In univariate sensitivity analyses, CE estimates were most sensitive to changes in survival, ranging from $18,374 to $117,434 with 20% variation in survival at the recommended dose. The largest cost center in both arms was hospitalization, followed by the cost of drugs, investigations, radiotherapy, and community care. BSC patients had fewer hospitalizations than patients in the chemotherapy arm and were more often palliated at home. Although the decision to treat should not be based on economic considerations alone, our CE estimate of $31,776 per year of life gained (at the currently recommended dose of docetaxel) is within an acceptable range of health care expenditures, and the total costs of therapy are similar to those of second-line palliative chemotherapy for other solid tumors.

  3. The changing landscape of peripheral T-cell lymphoma in the era of novel therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Lionel; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are the most common sub-entity of mature T-cell lymphomas, and apart from particular presentations, share a poor prognosis with frequent short-term, agressive, and chemorefractory relapses. Because of the rarity and also the heterogeneity of the disease, we lack randomized clinical trials. However, to date, neither intensification of frontline chemotherapy or autologous transplant has led to any improvement of survival, and the standard CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicine, vincristine, and prednisone) regimen remains the most employed as induction therapy. In the past few years, new chemotherapeutic agents, with the capability to encompass the resistance to conventional chemotherapy, such as pralatrexate or bendamustine, have been evaluated. Furthermore, identification of cell surface molecular markers (CD52, CD30, CCR4) has led to the development of new monoclonal antibodies. Similarly, the better comprehension of physiopathological mechanisms and detection of deregulated intracellular pathways encouraged the use of novel therapies such as histone deacetylase inhibitors or immunomodulatory drugs. Some of these compounds have been approved for relapse, and are currently evaluated upfront in ongoing clinical trials. Despite these efforts, the global prognosis still remains much inferior to those of B-cell lymphomas, highlighting the necessity of multicenter clinical trials. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. B-cell-depleting Therapy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Sanz, Iñaki; Bosch, Xavier; Stone, John H.; Khamashta, Munther A.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of a new class of agents (B-cell-depleting therapies) has opened a new era in the therapeutic approach to systemic lupus erythematosus, with belimumab being the first drug licensed for use in systemic lupus erythematosus in more than 50 years. Four agents deserve specific mention: rituximab, ocrelizumab, epratuzumab, and belimumab. Controlled trials have shown negative results for rituximab, promising results for epratuzumab, and positive results for belimumab. Despite these negative results, rituximab is the most-used agent in patients who do not respond or are intolerant to standard therapy and those with life-threatening presentations. B-cell-depleting agents should not be used in patients with mild disease and should be tailored according to individual patient characteristics, including ethnicity, organ involvement, and the immunological profile. Forthcoming studies of B-cell-directed strategies, particularly data from investigations of off-label rituximab use and postmarketing studies of belimumab, will provide new insights into the utility of these treatments in the routine management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22444096

  5. Infrapatellar Fat Pad Stem Cells: From Developmental Biology to Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo J. F. C. do Amaral

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal cell type to be used for cartilage therapy should possess a proven chondrogenic capacity, not cause donor-site morbidity, and should be readily expandable in culture without losing their phenotype. There are several cell sources being investigated to promote cartilage regeneration: mature articular chondrocytes, chondrocyte progenitors, and various stem cells. Most recently, stem cells isolated from joint tissue, such as chondrogenic stem/progenitors from cartilage itself, synovial fluid, synovial membrane, and infrapatellar fat pad (IFP have gained great attention due to their increased chondrogenic capacity over the bone marrow and subcutaneous adipose-derived stem cells. In this review, we first describe the IFP anatomy and compare and contrast it with other adipose tissues, with a particular focus on the embryological and developmental aspects of the tissue. We then discuss the recent advances in IFP stem cells for regenerative medicine. We compare their properties with other stem cell types and discuss an ontogeny relationship with other joint cells and their role on in vivo cartilage repair. We conclude with a perspective for future clinical trials using IFP stem cells.

  6. Infrapatellar Fat Pad Stem Cells: From Developmental Biology to Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Amaral, Ronaldo J F C; Almeida, Henrique V; Kelly, Daniel J; O'Brien, Fergal J; Kearney, Cathal J

    2017-01-01

    The ideal cell type to be used for cartilage therapy should possess a proven chondrogenic capacity, not cause donor-site morbidity, and should be readily expandable in culture without losing their phenotype. There are several cell sources being investigated to promote cartilage regeneration: mature articular chondrocytes, chondrocyte progenitors, and various stem cells. Most recently, stem cells isolated from joint tissue, such as chondrogenic stem/progenitors from cartilage itself, synovial fluid, synovial membrane, and infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) have gained great attention due to their increased chondrogenic capacity over the bone marrow and subcutaneous adipose-derived stem cells. In this review, we first describe the IFP anatomy and compare and contrast it with other adipose tissues, with a particular focus on the embryological and developmental aspects of the tissue. We then discuss the recent advances in IFP stem cells for regenerative medicine. We compare their properties with other stem cell types and discuss an ontogeny relationship with other joint cells and their role on in vivo cartilage repair. We conclude with a perspective for future clinical trials using IFP stem cells.

  7. Phase 2 Trial of De-intensified Chemoradiation Therapy for Favorable-Risk Human Papillomavirus–Associated Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Amdur, Robert J.; Tepper, Joel; Qaqish, Bahjat; Green, Rebecca; Aumer, Shannon L.; Hayes, Neil; Weiss, Jared; Grilley-Olson, Juneko; Zanation, Adam; Hackman, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a prospective, multi-institutional, phase 2 study of a substantial decrease in concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) intensity as primary treatment for favorable-risk, human papillomavirus–associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The major inclusion criteria were: (1) T0 to T3, N0 to N2c, M0; (2) human papillomavirus or p16 positive; and (3) minimal/remote smoking history. Treatment was limited to 60 Gy intensity modulated radiation therapy with concurrent weekly intravenous cisplatinum (30 mg/m"2). The primary study endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate based on required biopsy of the primary site and dissection of pretreatment positive lymph node regions, regardless of radiographic response. Power computations were performed for the null hypothesis that the pCR rate is 87% and n=40, resulting in a type 1 error of 14.2%. Secondary endpoint measures included physician-reported toxicity (Common Toxicity Terminology for Adverse Events, CTCAE), patient-reported symptoms (PRO-CTCAE), and modified barium swallow studies. Results: The study population was 43 patients. The pCR rate was 86% (37 of 43). The incidence of CTCAE grade 3/4 toxicity and PRO-CTCAE severe/very severe symptoms was as follows: mucositis 34%/45%, general pain 5%/48%, nausea 18%/52%, vomiting 5%/34%, dysphagia 39%/55%, and xerostomia 2%/75%. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were 11%. Thirty-nine percent of patients required a feeding tube for a median of 15 weeks (range, 5-22 weeks). There were no significant differences in modified barium swallow studies before and after CRT. Conclusions: The pCR rate with decreased intensity of therapy with 60 Gy of IMRT and weekly low-dose cisplatinum is very high in favorable-risk oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, with evidence of decreased toxicity compared with standard therapies. (ClinicalTrials.gov) ID: (NCT01530997).

  8. Phase 2 Trial of De-intensified Chemoradiation Therapy for Favorable-Risk Human Papillomavirus–Associated Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chera, Bhishamjit S., E-mail: bchera@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Amdur, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida School of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Shands Cancer Center, University of Florida School of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Tepper, Joel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Qaqish, Bahjat [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Green, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Aumer, Shannon L. [Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Hayes, Neil; Weiss, Jared; Grilley-Olson, Juneko [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Zanation, Adam; Hackman, Trevor [Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); and others

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To perform a prospective, multi-institutional, phase 2 study of a substantial decrease in concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) intensity as primary treatment for favorable-risk, human papillomavirus–associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The major inclusion criteria were: (1) T0 to T3, N0 to N2c, M0; (2) human papillomavirus or p16 positive; and (3) minimal/remote smoking history. Treatment was limited to 60 Gy intensity modulated radiation therapy with concurrent weekly intravenous cisplatinum (30 mg/m{sup 2}). The primary study endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate based on required biopsy of the primary site and dissection of pretreatment positive lymph node regions, regardless of radiographic response. Power computations were performed for the null hypothesis that the pCR rate is 87% and n=40, resulting in a type 1 error of 14.2%. Secondary endpoint measures included physician-reported toxicity (Common Toxicity Terminology for Adverse Events, CTCAE), patient-reported symptoms (PRO-CTCAE), and modified barium swallow studies. Results: The study population was 43 patients. The pCR rate was 86% (37 of 43). The incidence of CTCAE grade 3/4 toxicity and PRO-CTCAE severe/very severe symptoms was as follows: mucositis 34%/45%, general pain 5%/48%, nausea 18%/52%, vomiting 5%/34%, dysphagia 39%/55%, and xerostomia 2%/75%. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were 11%. Thirty-nine percent of patients required a feeding tube for a median of 15 weeks (range, 5-22 weeks). There were no significant differences in modified barium swallow studies before and after CRT. Conclusions: The pCR rate with decreased intensity of therapy with 60 Gy of IMRT and weekly low-dose cisplatinum is very high in favorable-risk oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, with evidence of decreased toxicity compared with standard therapies. (ClinicalTrials.gov) ID: (NCT01530997).

  9. Large-scale Isolation of Highly Pure "Untouched" Regulatory T Cells in a GMP Environment for Adoptive Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Doreen; Puan, Kia Joo; Starke, Mireille; Lai, Tuck Siong; Soh, Melissa Yan Ling; Karunanithi, Iyswariya; San Luis, Boris; Poh, Tuang Yeow; Yusof, Nurhashikin; Yeap, Chun Hsien; Phang, Chew Yen; Chye, Willis Soon Yuan; Chan, Marieta; Koh, Mickey Boon Chai; Goh, Yeow Tee; Bertin-Maghit, Sebastien; Nardin, Alessandra; Ho, Liam Pock; Rotzschke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy is an emerging treatment strategy for a number of serious diseases. Regulatory T (Treg) cells represent 1 cell type of particular interest for therapy of inflammatory conditions, as they are responsible for controlling unwanted immune responses. Initial clinical trials of adoptive transfer of Treg cells in patients with graft-versus-host disease were shown to be safe. However, obtaining sufficient numbers of highly pure and functional Treg cells with minimal contamination remains a challenge. We developed a novel approach to isolate "untouched" human Treg cells from healthy donors on the basis of negative selection using the surface markers CD49d and CD127. This procedure, which uses an antibody cocktail and magnetic beads for separation in an automated system (RoboSep), was scaled up and adapted to be compatible with good manufacturing practice conditions. With this setup we performed 9 Treg isolations from large-scale leukapheresis samples in a good manufacturing practice facility. These runs yielded sufficient numbers of "untouched" Treg cells for immediate use in clinical applications. The cell preparations consisted of viable highly pure FoxP3-positive Treg cells that were functional in suppressing the proliferation of effector T cells. Contamination with CD4 effector T cells was cell types did not exceed 2% in the final product. Remaining isolation reagents were reduced to levels that are considered safe. Treg cells isolated with this procedure will be used in a phase I clinical trial of adoptive transfer into leukemia patients developing graft-versus-host disease after stem cell transplantation.

  10. Gene Therapy With Regulatory T Cells: A Beneficial Alliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moanaro Biswas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy aims to replace a defective or a deficient protein at therapeutic or curative levels. Improved vector designs have enhanced safety, efficacy, and delivery, with potential for lasting treatment. However, innate and adaptive immune responses to the viral vector and transgene product remain obstacles to the establishment of therapeutic efficacy. It is widely accepted that endogenous regulatory T cells (Tregs are critical for tolerance induction to the transgene product and in some cases the viral vector. There are two basic strategies to harness the suppressive ability of Tregs: in vivo induction of adaptive Tregs specific to the introduced gene product and concurrent administration of autologous, ex vivo expanded Tregs. The latter may be polyclonal or engineered to direct specificity to the therapeutic antigen. Recent clinical trials have advanced adoptive immunotherapy with Tregs for the treatment of autoimmune disease and in patients receiving cell transplants. Here, we highlight the potential benefit of combining gene therapy with Treg adoptive transfer to achieve a sustained transgene expression. Furthermore, techniques to engineer antigen-specific Treg cell populations, either through reprogramming conventional CD4+ T cells or transferring T cell receptors with known specificity into polyclonal Tregs, are promising in preclinical studies. Thus, based upon these observations and the successful use of chimeric (IgG-based antigen receptors (CARs in antigen-specific effector T cells, different types of CAR-Tregs could be added to the repertoire of inhibitory modalities to suppress immune responses to therapeutic cargos of gene therapy vectors. The diverse approaches to harness the ability of Tregs to suppress unwanted immune responses to gene therapy and their perspectives are reviewed in this article.

  11. Biomarkers of cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity related to CAR-T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenguang; Han, Weidong

    2018-01-01

    Severe cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity following chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy can be life-threatening in some cases, and management of those toxicities is still a great challenge for physicians. Researchers hope to understand the pathophysiology of CRS and neurotoxicity, and identify predictive biomarkers that can forecast those toxicities in advance. Some risk factors for severe CRS and/or neurotoxicity including patient and treatment characteristics have been identified in multiple clinical trials of CAR-T cell therapy. Moreover, several groups have identified some predictive biomarkers that are able to determine beforehand which patients may suffer severe CRS and/or neurotoxicity during CAR-T cell therapy, facilitating testing of early intervention strategies for those toxicities. However, further studies are needed to better understand the biology and related risk factors for CRS and/or neurotoxicity, and determine if those identified predictors can be extrapolated to other series. Herein, we review the pathophysiology of CRS and neurotoxicity, and summarize the progress of predictive biomarkers to improve CAR-T cell therapy in cancer.

  12. CAR-T cell therapy in gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma: From bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Zimu; Peng, Meiyu; Fu, Shuyu; Xue, Zhenyi; Zhang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a genetically engineered receptor that combines a scFv domain, which specifically recognizes the tumor-specific antigen, with T cell activation domains. CAR-T cell therapies have demonstrated tremendous efficacy against hematologic malignancies in many clinical trials. Recent studies have extended these efforts to the treatment of solid tumors. However, the outcomes of CAR-T cell therapy for solid tumors are not as remarkable as the outcomes have been for hematologic malignancies. A series of hurdles has arisen with respect to CAR-T cell-based immunotherapy, which needs to be overcome to target solid tumors. The major challenge for CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors is the selection of the appropriate specific antigen to demarcate the tumor from normal tissue. In this review, we discuss the application of CAR-T cells to gastrointestinal and hepatic carcinomas in preclinical and clinical research. Furthermore, we analyze the usefulness of several specific markers in the study of gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma.

  13. Pre-Clinical Cell-Based Therapy for Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehic, Amer; Utheim, Øygunn Aass; Ommundsen, Kristoffer; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2015-08-28

    The cornea is essential for normal vision by maintaining transparency for light transmission. Limbal stem cells, which reside in the corneal periphery, contribute to the homeostasis of the corneal epithelium. Any damage or disease affecting the function of these cells may result in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). The condition may result in both severe pain and blindness. Transplantation of ex vivo cultured cells onto the cornea is most often an effective therapeutic strategy for LSCD. The use of ex vivo cultured limbal epithelial cells (LEC), oral mucosal epithelial cells, and conjunctival epithelial cells to treat LSCD has been explored in humans. The present review focuses on the current state of knowledge of the many other cell-based therapies of LSCD that have so far exclusively been explored in animal models as there is currently no consensus on the best cell type for treating LSCD. Major findings of all these studies with special emphasis on substrates for culture and transplantation are systematically presented and discussed. Among the many potential cell types that still have not been used clinically, we conclude that two easily accessible autologous sources, epidermal stem cells and hair follicle-derived stem cells, are particularly strong candidates for future clinical trials.

  14. Comparison of manual therapy and exercise therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Heering, A.; Lubbe, N. van der; Vel, C.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a manual therapy program compared with an exercise therapy program in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. METHODS: A single-blind, randomized clinical trial of 109 hip OA patients was carried out in the outpatient clinic for physical therapy of

  15. Regulatory dendritic cell therapy: from rodents to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raïch-Regué, Dalia; Glancy, Megan; Thomson, Angus W

    2014-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are highly-specialized, bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells that induce or regulate innate and adaptive immunity. Regulatory or "tolerogenic" DC play a crucial role in maintaining self tolerance in the healthy steady-state. These regulatory innate immune cells subvert naïve or memory T cell responses by various mechanisms. Regulatory DC (DCreg) also exhibit the ability to induce or restore T cell tolerance in many animal models of autoimmune disease or transplant rejection. There is also evidence that adoptive transfer of DCreg can regulate T cell responses in non-human primates and humans. Important insights gained from in vitro studies and animal models have led recently to the development of clinical grade human DCreg, with potential to treat autoimmune disease or enhance transplant survival while reducing patient dependency on immunosuppressive drugs. Phase I trials have been conducted in type-1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, with results that emphasize the feasibility and safety of DCreg therapy. This mini-review will outline how observations made using animal models have been translated into human use, and discuss the challenges faced in further developing this form of regulatory immune cell therapy in the fields of autoimmunity and transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Hydroxychloroquine on Immune Activation and Disease Progression Among HIV-Infected Patients Not Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Nicholas I.; Goodall, Ruth L.; Dunn, David T.; Franzen, Samuel; Collaco-Moraes, Yolanda; Gazzard, Brian G.; Williams, Ian G.; Fisher, Martin J.; Winston, Alan; Fox, Julie; Orkin, Chloe; Herieka, Elbushra A.; Ainsworth, Jonathan G.; Post, Frank A.; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Kelleher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Context Therapies to decrease immune activation might be of benefit in slowing HIV disease progression. Objective To determine whether hydroxychloroquine decreases immune activation and slows CD4 cell decline. Design, Setting, and Patients Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial performed at 10 HIV outpatient clinics in the United Kingdom between June 2008 and February 2011. The 83 patients enrolled had asymptomatic HIV infection, were not taking antiretroviral therapy, and had CD4 cell counts greater than 400 cells/μL. Intervention Hydroxychloroquine, 400 mg, or matching placebo once daily for 48 weeks. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome measure was change in the proportion of activated CD8 cells (measured by the expression of CD38 and HLA-DR surface markers), with CD4 cell count and HIV viral load as secondary outcomes. Analysis was by intention to treat using mixed linear models. Results There was no significant difference in CD8 cell activation between the 2 groups (−4.8% and −4.2% in the hydroxychloroquine and placebo groups, respectively, at week 48; difference, −0.6%; 95% CI, −4.8% to 3.6%; P=.80). Decline in CD4 cell count was greater in the hydroxychloroquine than placebo group (−85 cells/μL vs −23 cells/μL at week 48; difference, −62 cells/μL; 95% CI, −115 to −8; P=.03). Viral load increased in the hydroxychloroquine group compared with placebo (0.61 log10 copies/mL vs 0.23 log10 copies/mL at week 48; difference, 0.38 log10 copies/mL; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.63; P=.003). Antiretroviral therapy was started in 9 patients in the hydroxychloroquine group and 1 in the placebo group. Trial medication was well tolerated, but more patients reported influenza-like illness in the hydroxychloroquine group compared with the placebo group (29% vs 10%; P=.03). Conclusion Among HIV-infected patients not taking antiretroviral therapy, the use of hydroxychloroquine compared with placebo did not reduce CD8 cell activation but did result in

  17. Salvage therapy for CLL and the role of stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribben, John G

    2005-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease and, notwithstanding the excellent remission rates now achieved with purine analogs and monoclonal antibodies, the vast majority of patients with CLL are destined to relapse after primary treatment. The management of relapsed CLL patients is then dependent upon a number of factors, most importantly age, performance status, previous therapy administered, the response and duration of response to such therapy, and time from last therapy. Although prior therapy and response to such therapy are important factors in determining next therapy, it is often difficult to determine their importance from published studies. Furthermore, the goal of therapy, whether palliative or aggressive, must also be weighed into the decision when deciding on the next line of treatment. With many potential treatments available, the sequence of treatments and the timing of procedures such as stem cell transplantation remain controversial and are the focus of ongoing clinical trials.

  18. Radiation therapy following targeted therapy in oligometastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Faure, Marjorie; Rybikowski, Stanislas; Dermeche, Slimane; Tyran, Marguerite; Calderon, Benoit; Thomassin, Jeanne; Walz, Jochen; Salem, Naji

    2015-11-01

    Up to 40% of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with initially localized disease eventually develop metastasis following nephrectomy. The current standard of care for metastatic RCC (mRCC) is targeted therapy. However, complete response remains rare. A state of oligometastatic disease may exist, in which metastases are present in a limited number of locations; such cases may benefit from metastasis-directed local therapy, based on the evidence supporting resection of limited-volume metastases, allowing for improved disease control. We retrospectively analyzed 7 cases of response of RCC metastases, in patients treated with targeted therapies followed by radiation therapy (RT) of residual metastatic lesions in Paoli-Calmettes Institute (Marseille, France). We analyzed disease response rates, response to sequential strategy, relapse at the irradiated locations and disease evolution. The median follow-up was 34.1 months (range, 19.2-54.5 months). No progression at the irradiated sites was observed. A total of 5 patients had stable disease at the irradiated locations at the last follow-up; 3 remained in complete remission at the assessment, and 2 were stable. Excellent local response and clinical benefit may be achieved without added toxicity. In conclusion, sequential therapeutic strategies with RT following systemic treatment using sunitinib appear to be highly effective in patients with progressive mRCC and prompt the conduction of further confirmatory trials.

  19. Recent advances in post autologous transplantation maintenance therapies in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperla, Narendranath; Fenske, Timothy S; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Lymphomas constitute the second most common indication for high dose therapy (HDT) followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT). The intent of administering HDT in these heterogeneous disorders varies from cure (e.g., in relapsed aggressive lymphomas) to disease control (e.g., most indolent lymphomas). Regardless of the underlying histology or remission status at transplantation, disease relapse remains the number one cause of post auto-HCT therapy failure and mortality. The last decade has seen a proliferation of clinical studies looking at prevention of post auto-HCT therapy failure with various maintenance strategies. The benefit of such therapies is in turn dependent on disease histology and timing of transplantation. In relapsed, chemosensitive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), although post auto-HCT maintenance rituximab seems to be safe and feasible, it does not provide improved survival outcomes and is not recommended. The preliminary results with anti- programmed death -1 (PD-1) antibody therapy as post auto-HCT maintenance in DLBCL is promising but requires randomized validation. Similarly in follicular lymphoma, maintenance therapies including rituximab following auto-HCT should be considered investigational and offered only on a clinical trial. Rituximab maintenance results in improved progression-free survival but has not yet shown to improve overall survival in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), but given the poor prognosis with post auto-HCT failure in MCL, maintenance rituximab can be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ongoing trials evaluating the efficacy of post auto-HCT maintenance with novel compounds (e.g., immunomodulators, PD-1 inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors and bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors) will likely change the practice landscape in the near future for B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas patients following HDT and auto-HCT. PMID:26421260

  20. Targeting insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes via immune modulation of cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (CB-SCs) in stem cell educator therapy: phase I/II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Jiang, Zhaoshun; Zhao, Tingbao; Ye, Mingliang; Hu, Chengjin; Zhou, Huimin; Yin, Zhaohui; Chen, Yana; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Shanfeng; Shen, Jie; Thaker, Hatim; Jain, Summit; Li, Yunxiang; Diao, Yalin; Chen, Yingjian; Sun, Xiaoming; Fisk, Mary Beth; Li, Heng

    2013-07-09

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide and creating a significant burden on health systems, highlighting the need for the development of innovative therapeutic approaches to overcome immune dysfunction, which is likely a key factor in the development of insulin resistance in T2D. It suggests that immune modulation may be a useful tool in treating the disease. In an open-label, phase 1/phase 2 study, patients (N=36) with long-standing T2D were divided into three groups (Group A, oral medications, n=18; Group B, oral medications+insulin injections, n=11; Group C having impaired β-cell function with oral medications+insulin injections, n=7). All patients received one treatment with the Stem Cell Educator therapy in which a patient's blood is circulated through a closed-loop system that separates mononuclear cells from the whole blood, briefly co-cultures them with adherent cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (CB-SCs), and returns the educated autologous cells to the patient's circulation. Clinical findings indicate that T2D patients achieve improved metabolic control and reduced inflammation markers after receiving Stem Cell Educator therapy. Median glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) in Group A and B was significantly reduced from 8.61%±1.12 at baseline to 7.25%±0.58 at 12 weeks (P=2.62E-06), and 7.33%±1.02 at one year post-treatment (P=0.0002). Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) demonstrated that insulin sensitivity was improved post-treatment. Notably, the islet beta-cell function in Group C subjects was markedly recovered, as demonstrated by the restoration of C-peptide levels. Mechanistic studies revealed that Stem Cell Educator therapy reverses immune dysfunctions through immune modulation on monocytes and balancing Th1/Th2/Th3 cytokine production. Clinical data from the current phase 1/phase 2 study demonstrate that Stem Cell Educator therapy is a safe approach that produces lasting improvement in

  1. Art Therapy and Cognitive Processing Therapy for Combat-Related PTSD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Melissa; Decker, Kathleen P.; Kruk, Kerry; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2016-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial was designed to determine if art therapy in conjunction with Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) was more effective for reducing symptoms of combat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than CPT alone. Veterans (N = 11) were randomized to receive either individual CPT, or individual CPT in conjunction with individual…

  2. Translating Stem Cell Research to Cardiac Disease Therapies: Pitfalls and Prospects for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael R.; Myerburg, Robert J.; Francis, Darrel P.; Cole, Graham D.; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, there have been numerous stem cell studies focused on cardiac diseases, ranging from proof-of-concept to phase 2 trials. This series of articles focuses on the legacy of these studies and the outlook for future treatment of cardiac diseases with stem cell therapies. The first section by Rosen and Myerburg is an independent review that analyzes the basic science and translational strategies supporting the rapid advance of stem cell technology to the clinic, the philosophies behind them, trial designs, and means for going forward that may impact favorably on progress. The second and third sections were collected in response to the initial section of this review. The commentary by Francis and Cole discusses the Rosen and Myerburg review and details how trial outcomes can be affected by noise, poor trial design (particularly the absence of blinding), and normal human tendencies toward optimism and denial. The final, independent article by Marbán takes a different perspective concerning the potential for positive impact of stem cell research applied to heart disease and future prospects for its clinical application. PMID:25169179

  3. Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  4. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gene & Cell Therapy Defined Gene therapy and cell therapy are overlapping fields of biomedical research that aim to repair the direct cause of genetic diseases. Read More Gene & Cell Therapy FAQ's Read the most common questions raised by ...

  5. Unicentric study of cell therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/pulmonary emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Tadeu Ribeiro-Paes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available João Tadeu Ribeiro-Paes1, Aldemir Bilaqui2, Oswaldo T Greco2, Milton Artur Ruiz2, Monica Y Marcelino3, Talita Stessuk1, Carolina A de Faria3, Mario R Lago21Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP, Campus de Assis, Assis, SP, Brazil; 2Cardiovascular Diseases Institute (IMC, São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil; 3Inter-units Biotechnology Post Graduation Program, USP-IPT-I, Butantan, São Paulo, SP, BrazilAbstract: Within the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD spectrum, lung emphysema presents, as a primarily histopathologic feature, the destruction of pulmonary parenchyma and, accordingly, an increase in the airflow obstruction distal to the terminal bronchiole. Notwithstanding the significant advances in prevention and treatment of symptoms, no effective or curative therapy has been accomplished. In this context, cellular therapy with stem cells (SCs arises as a new therapeutic approach, with a wide application potential. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of SCs infusion procedure in patients with advanced COPD (stage IV dyspnea. After selection, patients underwent clinical examination and received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, immediately prior to the bone marrow harvest. The bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC were isolated and infused into a peripheral vein. The 12-month follow-up showed a significant improvement in the quality of life, as well as a clinical stable condition, which suggest a change in the natural process of the disease. Therefore, the proposed methodology in this study for BMMC cell therapy in sufferers of advanced COPD was demonstrated to be free of significant adverse effects. Although a larger sample and a greater follow-up period are needed, it is possible to infer that BMMC cell therapy introduces an unprecedented change in the course or in the natural history of emphysema, inhibiting or slowing the progression of disease. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT

  6. Induction of multi-functional T cells in a phase I clinical trial of dendritic cell immunotherapy in hepatitis C virus infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Li

    Full Text Available We have previously reported a world-first phase I clinical trial to treat HCV patients using monocyte-derived dendritic cells (Mo-DC loaded with HCV-specific lipopeptides. While the brief treatment proved to be safe, it failed to reduce the viral load and induced only transient cell-mediated immune responses, measured by IFNγ ELIspot. Here we reanalysed the PBMC samples from this trial to further elucidate the immunological events associated with the Mo-DC therapy. We found that HCV-specific single- and multi-cytokine secreting T cells were induced by the Mo-DC immunotherapy in some patients, although at irregular intervals and not consistently directed to the same HCV antigen. Despite the vaccination, the responses were generally poor in quality and comprised of primarily single-cytokine secreting cells. The frequency of FOXP3(+ regulatory T cells (Treg fluctuated following DC infusion and eventually dropped to below baseline by week 12, an interesting trend suggesting that the vaccination may have resulted in a more subtle outcome than was initially apparent. Our data suggested that Mo-DC therapy induced complex immune responses in vivo that may or may not lead to clinical benefit.

  7. ‘Third wave’ cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy for major depressive disorder. A protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsen Janus Christian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most interventions for depression have shown small or no effects. ‘Third wave‘ cognitive therapy and mentalization-based therapy have both gained some ground as treatments of psychological problems. No randomised trial has compared the effects of these two interventions for patients with major depression. Methods/ design We plan a randomised, parallel group, assessor-blinded superiority clinical trial. During two years we will include 84 consecutive adult participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder. The participants will be randomised to either ‘third wave‘ cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy. The primary outcome will be the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at cessation of treatment at 18 weeks. Secondary outcomes will be the proportion of patients with remission, Symptom Checklist 90 Revised, Beck’s Depression Inventory, and The World Health Organisation-Five Well-being Index 1999. Discussion Interventions for depression have until now shown relatively small effects. Our trial results will provide knowledge about the effects of two modern psychotherapeutic interventions. Trial registration ClinicalTrials: NCT01070134

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell-based gene therapy: A promising therapeutic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Mozhdeh; Abasi, Elham; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stromal cells that exist in bone marrow, fat, and so many other tissues, and can differentiate into a variety of cell types including osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, as well as myocytes and neurons. Moreover, they have great capacity for self-renewal while maintaining their multipotency. Their capacity for proliferation and differentiation, in addition to their immunomodulatory activity, makes them very promising candidates for cell-based regenerative medicine. Moreover, MSCs have the ability of mobilization to the site of damage; therefore, they can automatically migrate to the site of injury via their chemokine receptors following intravenous transplantation. In this respect, they can be applied for MSC-based gene therapy. In this new therapeutic method, genes of interest are introduced into MSCs via viral and non-viral-based methods that lead to transgene expression in them. Although stem cell-based gene therapy is a relatively new strategy, it lights a new hope for the treatment of a variety of genetic disorders. In the near future, MSCs can be of use in a vast number of clinical applications, because of their uncomplicated isolation, culture, and genetic manipulation. However, full consideration is still crucial before they are utilized for clinical trials, because the number of studies that signify the advantageous effects of MSC-based gene therapy are still limited.

  9. Stem cell therapy. Use of differentiated pluripotent stem cells as replacement therapy for treating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Ira J; Daley, George Q; Goldman, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) directed to various cell fates holds promise as source material for treating numerous disorders. The availability of precisely differentiated PSC-derived cells will dramatically affect blood component and hematopoietic stem cell therapies and should facilitate......, and industry is critical for generating new stem cell-based therapies....... treatment of diabetes, some forms of liver disease and neurologic disorders, retinal diseases, and possibly heart disease. Although an unlimited supply of specific cell types is needed, other barriers must be overcome. This review of the state of cell therapies highlights important challenges. Successful...

  10. Skin Stem Cells in Skin Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollapour Sisakht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Preclinical and clinical research has shown that stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many diseases. This article describes skin stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications. Evidence Acquisition Compared with conventional methods, cell therapy reduces the surgical burden for patients because it is simple and less time-consuming. Skin cell therapy has been developed for variety of diseases. By isolation of the skin stem cell from the niche, in vitro expansion and transplantation of cells offers a surprising healing capacity profile. Results Stem cells located in skin cells have shown interesting properties such as plasticity, transdifferentiation, and specificity. Mesenchymal cells of the dermis, hypodermis, and other sources are currently being investigated to promote regeneration. Conclusions Because skin stem cells are highly accessible from autologous sources and their immunological profile is unique, they are ideal for therapeutic approaches. Optimization of administrative routes requires more investigation own to the lack of a standard protocol.

  11. Reinventing clinical trials: a review of innovative biomarker trial designs in cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ja-An; He, Pei

    2015-06-01

    Recently, new clinical trial designs involving biomarkers have been studied and proposed in cancer clinical research, in the hope of incorporating the rapid growing basic research into clinical practices. Journal articles related to various biomarkers and their role in cancer clinical trial, articles and books about statistical issues in trial design, and regulatory website, documents, and guidance for submission of targeted cancer therapies. The drug development process involves four phases. The confirmatory Phase III is essential in regulatory approval of a special treatment. Regulatory agency has restrictions on confirmatory trials 'using adaptive designs'. No rule of thumb to pick the most appropriate design for biomarker-related trials. Statistical issues to solve in new designs. Regulatory acceptance of the 'newly proposed trial designs'. Biomarker-related trial designs that can resolve the statistical issues and satisfy the regulatory requirement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. nduced pluripotent stem cells and cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu İskender

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells are derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst-stage embryo. They hold a huge promise for cell therapy with their self-renewing ability and pluripotency, which is known as the potential to differentiate into all cell types originating from three embryonic germ layers. However, their unique pluripotent feature could not be utilised for therapeutic purposes due to the ethical and legal problems during derivation. Recently, it was shown that the cells from adult tissues could be reverted into embryonic state, thereby restoring their pluripotent feature. This has strenghtened the possiblity of directed differentition of the reprogrammed somatic cells into the desired cell types in vitro and their use in regenerative medicine. Although these cells were termed as induced pluripotent cells, the mechanism of pluripotency has yet to be understood. Still, induced pluripotent stem cell technology is considered to be significant by proposing novel approaches in disease modelling, drug screening and cell therapy. Besides their self-renewing ability and their potential to differentiate into all cell types in a human body, they arouse a great interest in scientific world by being far from the ethical concerns regarding their embryonic counterparts and their unique feature of being patient-specific in prospective cell therapies. In this review, induced pluripotent stem cell technology and its role in cell-based therapies from past to present will be discussed. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 550-561

  13. Application of HSVtk suicide gene to X-SCID gene therapy: Ganciclovir treatment offsets gene corrected X-SCID B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Toru; Kumaki, Satoru; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Onodera, Masafumi; Sato, Miki; Du, Wei; Sasahara, Yoji; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a serious adverse effect of uncontrolled clonal T cell proliferation due to insertional mutagenesis of retroviral vector was reported in X-SCID gene therapy clinical trial. To offset the side effect, we have incorporated a suicide gene into therapeutic retroviral vector for selective elimination of transduced cells. In this study, B-cell lines from two X-SCID patients were transduced with bicistronic retroviral vector carrying human γc chain cDNA and Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. After confirmation of functional reconstitution of the γc chain, the cells were treated with ganciclovir (GCV). The γc chain positive cells were eliminated under low concentration without cytotoxicity on untransduced cells and have not reappeared at least for 5 months. Furthermore, the γc chain transduced cells were still sensitive to GCV after five months. These results demonstrated the efficacy of the suicide gene therapy although further in vivo studies are required to assess feasibility of this approach in clinical trial

  14. Regulatory Oversight of Cell and Gene Therapy Products in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Anthony; Agbanyo, Francisca; Wang, Jian; Rosu-Myles, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Health Canada regulates gene therapy products and many cell therapy products as biological drugs under the Canadian Food and Drugs Act and its attendant regulations. Cellular products that meet certain criteria, including minimal manipulation and homologous use, may be subjected to a standards-based approach under the Safety of Human Cells, Tissues and Organs for Transplantation Regulations. The manufacture and clinical testing of cell and gene therapy products (CGTPs) presents many challenges beyond those for protein biologics. Cells cannot be subjected to pathogen removal or inactivation procedures and must frequently be administered shortly after final formulation. Viral vector design and manufacturing control are critically important to overall product quality and linked to safety and efficacy in patients through concerns such as replication competence, vector integration, and vector shedding. In addition, for many CGTPs, the value of nonclinical studies is largely limited to providing proof of concept, and the first meaningful data relating to appropriate dosing, safety parameters, and validity of surrogate or true determinants of efficacy must come from carefully designed clinical trials in patients. Addressing these numerous challenges requires application of various risk mitigation strategies and meeting regulatory expectations specifically adapted to the product types. Regulatory cooperation and harmonisation at an international level are essential for progress in the development and commercialisation of these products. However, particularly in the area of cell therapy, new regulatory paradigms may be needed to harness the benefits of clinical progress in situations where the resources and motivation to pursue a typical drug product approval pathway may be lacking.

  15. Results of two randomised clinical trials of neutron therapy in rectal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Arnott, S.J.; Jack, W.J.L.; Orr, J.A.; Kerr, G.R.; Williams, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two clinical trials of neutron therapy were instituted to compare fast neutron therapy with megavoltage therapy in inoperable adenocarcinoma of the rectum and in postoperative recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum and to evaluate local tumour control, radiation morbidity and survival rates. In both rectal trials, complete local regression and persistent local control of tumour were similar in each treatment group. Survival was poor and so there is little long-term experience of tumour control and morbidity. The possibility that the relatively poor penetration of the neutron beam had an adverse effect on the results of neutron therapy should be considered. (Auth.)

  16. Hydroxyurea therapy contributes to infertility in adult men with sickle cell disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBaun, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    Hydroxyurea therapy, a chemotherapeutic agent, is the only US FDA approved therapy for the prevention of vaso-occlusive pain in sickle cell disease (SCD). The National Institutes of Health has sponsored two Phase III randomized, placebo-controlled trials, initially in adults, and subsequently in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). Despite the overwhelming evidence that hydroxyurea therapy is beneficial to children and adults with SCA, individuals with SCA and their families express reservations about its use, in part because of the concerns about fertility, particularly in men. As adolescent boys with SCD are now expected to reach their reproductive years, a new concern is emerging about the role of hydroxyurea therapy as a barrier to their progeny. This review will systemically evaluate compromised fertility in men with SCD, and the evidence that hydroxyurea therapy is associated with further decreasing fertility in men with SCD.

  17. Congestive Heart Failure Cardiopoietic Regenerative Therapy (CHART-1) trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartunek, Jozef; Davison, Beth; Sherman, Warren; Povsic, Thomas; Henry, Timothy D; Gersh, Bernard; Metra, Marco; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Hajjar, Roger; Behfar, Atta; Homsy, Christian; Cotter, Gad; Wijns, William; Tendera, Michal; Terzic, Andre

    2016-02-01

    Cardiopoiesis is a conditioning programme that aims to upgrade the cardioregenerative aptitude of patient-derived stem cells through lineage specification. Cardiopoietic stem cells tested initially for feasibility and safety exhibited signs of clinical benefit in patients with ischaemic heart failure (HF) warranting definitive evaluation. Accordingly, CHART-1 is designed as a large randomized, sham-controlled multicentre study aimed to validate cardiopoietic stem cell therapy. Patients (n = 240) with chronic HF secondary to ischaemic heart disease, reduced LVEF (Heart Failure Questionnaire score, 6 min walk test, LV end-systolic volume, and LVEF at 9 months. The secondary efficacy endpoint is the time to cardiovascular death or worsening HF at 12 months. Safety endpoints include mortality, readmissions, aborted sudden deaths, and serious adverse events at 12 and 24 months. The CHART-1 clinical trial is powered to examine the therapeutic impact of lineage-directed stem cells as a strategy to achieve cardiac regeneration in HF populations. On completion, CHART-1 will offer a definitive evaluation of the efficacy and safety of cardiopoietic stem cells in the treatment of chronic ischaemic HF. NCT01768702. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  18. Progress of stem/progenitor cell-based therapy for retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhimin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yuyao; Zhang, Dandan; Shen, Bingqiao; Luo, Min; Gu, Ping

    2017-05-10

    Retinal degeneration (RD), such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa, is one of the leading causes of blindness. Presently, no satisfactory therapeutic options are available for these diseases principally because the retina and retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) do not regenerate, although wet AMD can be prevented from further progression by anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Nevertheless, stem/progenitor cell approaches exhibit enormous potential for RD treatment using strategies mainly aimed at the rescue and replacement of photoreceptors and RPE. The sources of stem/progenitor cells are classified into two broad categories in this review, which are (1) ocular-derived progenitor cells, such as retinal progenitor cells, and (2) non-ocular-derived stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and mesenchymal stromal cells. Here, we discuss in detail the progress in the study of four predominant stem/progenitor cell types used in animal models of RD. A short overview of clinical trials involving the stem/progenitor cells is also presented. Currently, stem/progenitor cell therapies for RD still have some drawbacks such as inhibited proliferation and/or differentiation in vitro (with the exception of the RPE) and limited long-term survival and function of grafts in vivo. Despite these challenges, stem/progenitor cells represent the most promising strategy for RD treatment in the near future.

  19. Stem cell therapy for diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K O Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy holds immense promise for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced pluripotent stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, have become an area of intense study. Recent advances in stem cell therapy may turn this into a realistic treatment for diabetes in the near future.

  20. CAR T Cells in Trials: Recent Achievements and Challenges that Remain in the Production of Modified T Cells for Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhl, Ulrike; Arsenieva, Stanislava; Holzinger, Astrid; Abken, Hinrich

    2018-04-05

    The adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells is attracting growing interest for the treatment of malignant diseases. Early trials with anti-CD19 CAR T cells have achieved spectacular remissions in B-cell leukemia and lymphoma, so far refractory, very recently resulting in the Food and Drug Administration approval of CD19 CAR T cells for therapy. With further applications and increasing numbers of patients, the reproducible manufacture of high-quality clinical-grade CAR T cells is becoming an ever greater challenge. New processing techniques, quality-control mechanisms, and logistic developments are required to meet both medical needs and regulatory restrictions. This paper summarizes the state-of-the-art in manufacturing CAR T cells and the current challenges that need to be overcome to implement this type of cell therapy in the treatment of a variety of malignant diseases and in a greater number of patients.

  1. Improving CART-Cell Therapy of Solid Tumors with Oncolytic Virus-Driven Production of a Bispecific T-cell Engager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Anna; Fajardo, Carlos Alberto; Posey, Avery D; Shaw, Carolyn; Da, Tong; Young, Regina M; Alemany, Ramon; June, Carl H; Guedan, Sonia

    2018-05-01

    T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CART) have shown significant promise in clinical trials to treat hematologic malignancies, but their efficacy in solid tumors has been limited. Oncolytic viruses have the potential to act in synergy with immunotherapies due to their immunogenic oncolytic properties and the opportunity of incorporating therapeutic transgenes in their genomes. Here, we hypothesized that an oncolytic adenovirus armed with an EGFR-targeting, bispecific T-cell engager (OAd-BiTE) would improve the outcome of CART-cell therapy in solid tumors. We report that CART cells targeting the folate receptor alpha (FR-α) successfully infiltrated preestablished xenograft tumors but failed to induce complete responses, presumably due to the presence of antigen-negative cancer cells. We demonstrated that OAd-BiTE-mediated oncolysis significantly improved CART-cell activation and proliferation, while increasing cytokine production and cytotoxicity, and showed an in vitro favorable safety profile compared with EGFR-targeting CARTs. BiTEs secreted from infected cells redirected CART cells toward EGFR in the absence of FR-α, thereby addressing tumor heterogeneity. BiTE secretion also redirected CAR-negative, nonspecific T cells found in CART-cell preparations toward tumor cells. The combinatorial approach improved antitumor efficacy and prolonged survival in mouse models of cancer when compared with the monotherapies, and this was the result of an increased BiTE-mediated T-cell activation in tumors. Overall, these results demonstrated that the combination of a BiTE-expressing oncolytic virus with adoptive CART-cell therapy overcomes key limitations of CART cells and BiTEs as monotherapies in solid tumors and encourage its further evaluation in human trials. Cancer Immunol Res; 6(5); 605-16. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Adoptive cell therapy with autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and low-dose Interleukin-2 in metastatic melanoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellebaek Eva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adoptive cell therapy may be based on isolation of tumor-specific T cells, e.g. autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL, in vitro activation and expansion and the reinfusion of these cells into patients upon chemotherapy induced lymphodepletion. Together with high-dose interleukin (IL-2 this treatment has been given to patients with advanced malignant melanoma and impressive response rates but also significant IL-2 associated toxicity have been observed. Here we present data from a feasibility study at a Danish Translational Research Center using TIL adoptive transfer in combination with low-dose subcutaneous IL-2 injections. Methods This is a pilot trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00937625 including patients with metastatic melanoma, PS ≤1, age Results Low-dose IL-2 considerably decreased the treatment related toxicity with no grade 3–4 IL-2 related adverse events. Objective clinical responses were seen in 2 of 6 treated patients with ongoing complete responses (30+ and 10+ months, 2 patients had stable disease (4 and 5 months and 2 patients progressed shortly after treatment. Tumor-reactivity of the infused cells and peripheral lymphocytes before and after therapy were analyzed. Absolute number of tumor specific T cells in the infusion product tended to correlate with clinical response and also, an induction of peripheral tumor reactive T cells was observed for 1 patient in complete remission. Conclusion Complete and durable responses were induced after treatment with adoptive cell therapy in combination with low-dose IL-2 which significantly decreased toxicity of this therapy.

  3. Usage of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Cell-based Therapy: Advantages and Disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jung; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2017-03-01

    The use of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in cell-based therapy has attracted extensive interest in the field of regenerative medicine, and it shows applications to numerous incurable diseases. hMSCs show several superior properties for therapeutic use compared to other types of stem cells. Different cell types are discussed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages, with focus on the characteristics of hMSCs. hMSCs can proliferate readily and produce differentiated cells that can substitute for the targeted affected tissue. To maximize the therapeutic effects of hMSCs, a substantial number of these cells are essential, requiring extensive ex vivo cell expansion. However, hMSCs have a limited lifespan in an in vitro culture condition. The senescence of hMSCs is a double-edged sword from the viewpoint of clinical applications. Although their limited cell proliferation potency protects them from malignant transformation after transplantation, senescence can alter various cell functions including proliferation, differentiation, and migration, that are essential for their therapeutic efficacy. Numerous trials to overcome the limited lifespan of mesenchymal stem cells are discussed.

  4. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Halachic Considerations for Enrolling in an Experimental Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendler, Rabbi Moshe D.; Loike, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The transition of new biotechnologies into clinical trials is a critical step in approving a new drug or therapy in health care. Ethically recruiting appropriate volunteers for these clinical trials can be a challenging task for both the pharmaceutical companies and the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper we analyze the Jewish halachic perspectives of volunteering for clinical trials by focusing on an innovative technology in reproductive medicine, mitochondrial replacement therapy. The halachic perspective encourages individuals to volunteer for such clinical trials under the ethical principles of beneficence and social responsibility, when animal studies have shown that health risks are minimal. PMID:26241230

  5. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Halachic Considerations for Enrolling in an Experimental Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabbi Moshe D. Tendler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The transition of new biotechnologies into clinical trials is a critical step in approving a new drug or therapy in health care. Ethically recruiting appropriate volunteers for these clinical trials can be a challenging task for both the pharmaceutical companies and the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper we analyze the Jewish halachic perspectives of volunteering for clinical trials by focusing on an innovative technology in reproductive medicine, mitochondrial replacement therapy. The halachic perspective encourages individuals to volunteer for such clinical trials under the ethical principles of beneficence and social responsibility, when animal studies have shown that health risks are minimal.

  6. Potential mechanisms for cell-based gene therapy to treat HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-02-01

    An estimated 35 million people are infected with HIV worldwide. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has reduced the morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients but efficacy requires strict adherence and the treatment is not curative. Most importantly, the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains and drug toxicity can restrict the long-term therapeutic efficacy in some patients. Therefore, novel treatment strategies that permanently control or eliminate the virus and restore the damaged immune system are required. Gene therapy against HIV infection has been the topic of intense investigations for the last two decades because it can theoretically provide such a durable anti-HIV control. In this review we discuss two major gene therapy strategies to combat HIV. One approach aims to kill HIV-infected cells and the other is based on the protection of cells from HIV infection. We discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms for candidate approaches to permanently block HIV infection, including the latest strategies and future therapeutic applications. Hematopoietic stem cell-based gene therapy for HIV/AIDS may eventually become an alternative for standard ART and should ideally provide a functional cure in which the virus is durably controlled without medication. Recent results from preclinical research and early-stage clinical trials support the feasibility and safety of this novel strategy.

  7. TU-G-BRB-05: Panel Discussion: Clinical Trials in Proton and Ion Therapy - Are We Ready?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, R.

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy, in particular, and ion therapy, just beginning, are becoming an increasing focus of attention in clinical radiation oncology and medical physics. Both modalities have been criticized of lacking convincing evidence from randomized trials proving their efficacy, justifying the higher costs involved in these therapies. This session will provide an overview of the current status of clinical trials in proton therapy, including recent developments in ion therapy. As alluded to in the introductory talk by Dr. Schulte, opinions are diverging widely as to the usefulness and need for clinical trials in particle therapy and the challenge of equipoise. The lectures will highlight some of the challenges that surround clinical trials in particle therapy. One, presented by Dr. Choy from UT Southwestern, is that new technology and even different types of particles such as helium and carbon ions are introduced into this environment, increasing the phase space of clinical variables. The other is the issue of medical physics quality assurance with physical phantoms, presented by Mrs. Taylor from IROC Houston, which is more challenging because 3D and 4D image guidance and active delivery techniques are in relatively early stages of development. The role of digital phantoms in developing clinical treatment planning protocols and as a QA tool will also be highlighted by Dr. Lee from NCI. The symposium will be rounded off by a panel discussion among the Symposium speakers, arguing pro or con the need and readiness for clinical trials in proton and ion therapy. Learning Objectives: To get an update on the current status of clinical trials allowing or mandating proton therapy. Learn about the status of planned clinical trials in the U.S. and worldwide involving ion therapy. Discuss the challenges in the design and QA of clinical trials in particle therapy. Learn about existing and future physical and computational anthropomorphic phantoms for charged particle clinical trial

  8. Stem cell therapy in spinal trauma: Does it have scientific validity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvinder Singh Chhabra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based interventions aim to use special regenerative cells (stem cells to facilitate neuronal function beyond the site of the injury. Many studies involving animal models of spinal cord injury (SCI suggest that certain stem cell-based therapies may restore function after SCI. Currently, in case of spinal cord injuries, new discoveries with clinical implications have been continuously made in basic stem cell research, and stem cell-based approaches are advancing rapidly toward application in patients. There is a huge base of preclinical evidence in vitro and in animal models which suggests the safety and clinical efficacy of cellular therapies after SCI. Despite this, data from clinical studies is not very encouraging and at times confounding. Here, we have attempted to cover preclinical and clinical evidence base dealing with safety, feasibility and efficacy of cell based interventions after SCI. The limitations of preclinical data and the reasons underlying its failure to translate in a clinical setting are also discussed. Based on the evidence base, it is suggested that a multifactorial approach is required to address this situation. Need for standardized, stringently designed multi-centric clinical trials for obtaining validated proof of evidence is also highlighted.

  9. Stem Cell Therapy for Congestive Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunduz E

    2011-01-01

    engraft in sufficient numbers to differentiate to the cardiac myocytes and restore functionality in these akinetic areas. Hematopoietic stem cells consist can differentiate to skeletal and myocardial cells when cultured under appropriate conditions [4]. Strauer et al [5] reported that intracoronary bone marrow stem cell therapy improves ventricular performance, quality of life and survival in patients with chronic heart failure. Hamano et al [6] showed in 5 patients that autologous bone marrow cells can be injected safely during a by-pass operation into areas of ischemic myocardium. Brehm et al [7] have treated 23 patients with acute cardiac infarction using autologous mononuclear bone marrow cells. Ozbaran et al [8] transplanted peripheral blood stem cells into areas of injury with open-heart surgery in six patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. There are also meta-analysis on ongoing clinical trials performed. Abdel-Latif et al [9] described a statistically significant improvement in ejection fraction, reduction in infarct size and left ventricular end-systolic volume in 18 patients treated with either unseparated bone marrow cells, bone marrow mesenchymal and mobilized peripheral blood cells. Martin-Rendon et al ­­ focused on 13 randomized studies encompassing 811 participants on bone marrow therapy for post acute infarction. Improvement in LVEF, decrease in left ventricular and systolic and end diastolic volumes and infarct size were observed. The reason for choice of intravenous route was being the standard way of giving hematopoietic stem cells by hematologists. We tried to decide the availibility of this route for indications other than hematological diseases. Although trapping of stem cells in the pulmonary vascular bed is a drawback of intravenous route and the question of whether the patient would have been more benefited by intracoronary or intramyocardial route remains unanswered, we think intravenous route may still have some role according to our own

  10. Immunomodulatory Nature and Site Specific Affinity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: a Hope in Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Lotfinegad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunosuppressive ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, their differentiation properties to various specialized tissue types, ease of in vitro and in vivo expansion and specific migration capacity, make them to be tested in different clinical trials for the treatment of various diseases. The immunomodulatory effects of MSCs are less identified which probably has high clinically significance. The clinical trials based on primary research will cause better understanding the ability of MSCs in immunomodulatory applications and site specific migration in the optimization of therapy. So, this review focus on MSCs functional role in modulating immune responses, their ability in homing to tumor, their potency as delivery vehicle and their medical importance.

  11. Immunomodulatory Nature and Site Specific Affinity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: a Hope in Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfinegad, Parisa; Shamsasenjan, karim; Movassaghpour, Aliakbar; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppressive ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), their differentiation properties to various specialized tissue types, ease of in vitro and in vivo expansion and specific migration capacity, make them to be tested in different clinical trials for the treatment of various diseases. The immunomodulatory effects of MSCs are less identified which probably has high clinically significance. The clinical trials based on primary research will cause better understanding the ability of MSCs in immunomodulatory applications and site specific migration in the optimization of therapy. So, this review focus on MSCs functional role in modulating immune responses, their ability in homing to tumor, their potency as delivery vehicle and their medical importance. PMID:24409403

  12. Lentiviral hematopoietic cell gene therapy for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Nathalie; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Bougnères, Pierre; Schmidt, Manfred; Kalle, Christof Von; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Aubourg, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a severe genetic demyelinating disease caused by a deficiency in ALD protein, an adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter encoded by the ABCD1 gene. When performed at an early stage of the disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) can arrest the progression of cerebral demyelinating lesions. To overcome the limitations of allogeneic HCT, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy strategy aiming to perform autologous transplantation of lentivirally corrected cells was developed. We demonstrated the preclinical feasibility of HSC gene therapy for ALD based on the correction of CD34+ cells from X-ALD patients using an HIV1-derived lentiviral vector. These results prompted us to initiate an HSC gene therapy trial in two X-ALD patients who had developed progressive cerebral demyelination, were candidates for allogeneic HCT, but had no HLA-matched donors or cord blood. Autologous CD34+ cells were purified from the peripheral blood after G-CSF stimulation, genetically corrected ex vivo with a lentiviral vector encoding wild-type ABCD1 cDNA, and then reinfused into the patients after they had received full myeloablative conditioning. Over 3 years of follow-up, the hematopoiesis remained polyclonal in the two patients treated with 7-14% of granulocytes, monocytes, and T and B lymphocytes expressing the lentivirally encoded ALD protein. There was no evidence of clonal dominance or skewing based on the retrieval of lentiviral insertion repertoire in different hematopoietic lineages by deep sequencing. Cerebral demyelination was arrested 14 and 16months, respectively, in the two treated patients, without further progression up to the last follow-up, a clinical outcome that is comparable to that observed after allogeneic HCT. Longer follow-up of these two treated patients and HSC gene therapy performed in additional ALD patients are however needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of lentiviral HSC

  13. Cancer Trials Ireland (ICORG) 06-34: A multi-centre clinical trial using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy to reduce the toxicity of palliative radiation for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Ronan L; Armstrong, John G; Thirion, Pierre; Dunne, Mary; Finn, Marie; Small, Cormac; Byrne, Mary; O'Shea, Carmel; O'Sullivan, Lydia; Shannon, Aoife; Kelly, Emma; Hacking, Dayle J

    2018-05-01

    Cancer Trials Ireland (ICORG) 06-34: A multi-centre clinical trial using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy to reduce the toxicity of palliative radiation for lung cancer. NCT01176487. Trials of radiation therapy for the palliation of intra-thoracic symptoms from locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have concentrated on optimising fractionation and dose schedules. In these trials, the rates of oesophagitis induced by this "palliative" therapy have been unacceptably high. In contrast, this non-randomised, single-arm trial was designed to assess if more technically advanced treatment techniques would result in equivalent symptom relief and reduce the side-effect of symptomatic oesophagitis. Thirty-five evaluable patients with symptomatic locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC were treated using a three-dimensional conformal technique (3-DCRT) and standardised dose regimens of 39 Gy in 13 fractions, 20 Gy in 5 fractions or 17 Gy in 2 fractions. Treatment plans sought to minimise oesophageal dose. Oesophagitis was recorded during treatment, at two weeks, one month and three months following radiation therapy and 3-6 monthly thereafter. Mean dose to the irradiated oesophagus was calculated for all treatment plans. Five patients (14%) had experienced grade 2 oesophagitis or dysphagia or both during treatment and 2 other patients had these side effects at the 2-week follow-up. At follow-up of one month after therapy, there was no grade two or higher oesophagitis or dysphagia reported. 22 patients were eligible for assessment of late toxicity. Five of these patients reported oesophagitis or dysphagia (one had grade 3 dysphagia, two had grade 2 oesophagitis, one of whom also had grade 2 dysphagia). Quality of Life (QoL) data at baseline and at 1-month follow up were available for 20 patients. At 1-month post radiation therapy, these patients had slightly less trouble taking a short walk, less shortness of breath, did not feel as weak, had

  14. Chemotherapy and molecular target therapy combined with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy has been established as standard treatment approach for locally advanced head and neck cancer, esophageal cancer and so on through randomized clinical trials. However, radiation-related morbidity such as acute toxicity also increased as treatment intensity has increased. In underlining mechanism for enhancement of normal tissue reaction in chemo-radiation therapy, chemotherapy enhanced radiosensitivity of normal tissues in addition to cancer cells. Molecular target-based drugs combined with radiation therapy have been expected as promising approach that makes it possible to achieve cancer-specific enhancement of radiosensitivity, and clinical trials using combined modalities have been performed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In order to obtain maximum radiotherapeutic gain, a detailed understanding of the mechanism underlying the interaction between radiation and Molecular target-based drugs is indispensable. Among molecular target-based drugs, inhibitors targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its signal transduction pathways have been vigorously investigated, and mechanisms regarding the radiosensitizing effect have been getting clear. In addition, the results of randomized clinical trials demonstrated that radiation therapy combined with cetuximab resulted in improvement of overall and disease-specific survival rate compared with radiation therapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer. In this review, clinical usefulness of chemo-radiation therapy and potential molecular targets for potentiation of radiation-induced cell killing are summarized. (author)

  15. Bone marrow and bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells therapy for the chronically ischemic myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waksman, Ron; Baffour, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Bone marrow stem cells have been shown to differentiate into various phenotypes including cardiomyocytes, vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Bone marrow stem cells are mobilized and home in to areas of injured myocardium where they are involved in tissue repair. In addition, bone marrow secretes multiple growth factors, which are essential for angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. In some patients, these processes are not enough to avert clinical symptoms of ischemic disease. Therefore, in vivo administration of an adequate number of stem cells would be a significant therapeutic advance. Unfractionated bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells, which contain both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells may be more appropriate for cell therapy. Studies in animal models suggest that implantation of different types of stem cells improve angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, tissue perfusion as well as left ventricular function. Several unanswered questions remain. For example, the optimal delivery approach, dosage and timing of the administration of cell therapy as well as durability of improvements need to be studied. Early clinical studies have demonstrated safety and feasibility of various cell therapies in ischemic disease. Randomized, double blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials need to be completed to determine the effectiveness of stem cell

  16. Pro-angiogenic cell-based therapy for the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2012-10-01

    Pro-angiogenic cell therapy has emerged as a promising option to treat patients with acute myocardial infarction or with critical limb ischemia. Exciting pre-clinical studies have prompted the initiation of numerous clinical trials based on administration of stem/progenitor cells with pro-angiogenic potential. Most of the clinical studies performed so far have used bone marrow-derived or peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells and showed, overall, a modest but significant benefit on tissue remodeling and function in patients with ischemic diseases. These mixed results pave the way for the development of strategies to overcome the limitation of autologous cell therapy and to propose more efficient approaches. Such strategies include pretreatment of cells with activators to augment cell recruitment and survival in the ischemic target area and/or the improvement of cell functions such as their paracrine ability to release proangiogenic factors and vasoactive molecules. In addition, efforts should be directed towards stimulation of both angiogenesis and vessel maturation, the development of a composite product consisting of stem/progenitor cells encapsulated in a biomaterial and the use of additional sources of regenerative cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Most Trial Eligibility Criteria and Patient Baseline Characteristics Do Not Modify Treatment Effect in Trials Using Targeted Therapies for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anton Wulf; Tarp, Simon; Furst, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if variations in trial eligibility criteria and patient baseline characteristics could be considered effect modifiers of the treatment response when testing targeted therapies (biological agents and targeted synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs....... Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated from the response rates and compared among the trial eligibility criteria/patient baseline characteristics of interest. Comparisons are presented as the Ratio of Odds Ratios (ROR). RESULTS: Sixty-two trials (19,923 RA patients) were included in the primary analyses...... using ACR20 response. Overall, targeted therapies constituted an effective treatment (OR 3.96 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.41 to 4.60). The majority of the trial eligibility criteria and patient baseline characteristics did not modify treatment effect. The added benefit of targeted therapies was lower...

  18. CAR-T cell therapy in ovarian cancer: from the bench to the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinxin; Cai, Han; Zhao, Ling; Ning, Li; Lang, Jinghe

    2017-09-08

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and is responsible for most gynecological cancer deaths. Apart from conventional surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, chimeric antigen receptor-modified T (CAR-T) cells as a representative of adoptive cellular immunotherapy have received considerable attention in the research field of cancer treatment. CARs combine antigen specificity and T-cell-activating properties in a single fusion molecule. Several preclinical experiments and clinical trials have confirmed that adoptive cell immunotherapy using typical CAR-engineered T cells for OC is a promising treatment approach with striking clinical efficacy; moreover, the emerging CAR-Ts targeting various antigens also exert great potential. However, such therapies have side effects and toxicities, such as cytokine-associated and "on-target, off-tumor" toxicities. In this review, we systematically detail and highlight the present knowledge of CAR-Ts including the constructions, vectors, clinical applications, development challenges, and solutions of CAR-T-cell therapy for OC. We hope to provide new insight into OC treatment for the future.

  19. Hydroxyurea Therapy for Children With Sickle Cell Anemia in Sub-Saharan Africa: Rationale and Design of the REACH Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Patrick T; Tshilolo, Léon; Santos, Brigida; Tomlinson, George A; Stuber, Susan; Latham, Teresa; Aygun, Banu; Obaro, Stephen K; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Williams, Thomas N; Odame, Isaac; Ware, Russell E

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited hematological disorder that causes a large but neglected global health burden, particularly in Africa. Hydroxyurea represents the only available disease-modifying therapy for SCA, and has proven safety and efficacy in high-resource countries. In sub-Saharan Africa, there is minimal use of hydroxyurea, due to lack of data, absence of evidence-based guidelines, and inexperience among healthcare providers. A partnership was established between investigators in North America and sub-Saharan Africa, to develop a prospective multicenter research protocol designed to provide data on the safety, feasibility, and benefits of hydroxyurea for children with SCA. The Realizing Effectiveness Across Continents with Hydroxyurea (REACH, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01966731) trial is a prospective, phase I/II open-label dose escalation study of hydroxyurea that will treat a total of 600 children age 1-10 years with SCA: 150 at each of four different clinical sites within sub-Saharan Africa (Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, and Uganda). The primary study endpoint will be severe hematological toxicities that occur during the fixed-dose treatment phase. REACH has an adaptive statistical design that allows for careful assessment of toxicities to accurately identify a safe hydroxyurea dose. REACH will provide data that address critical gaps in knowledge for the treatment of SCA in sub-Saharan Africa. By developing local expertise with the use of hydroxyurea and helping to establish treatment guidelines, the REACH trial results will have the potential to transform care for children with SCA in Africa. © 2015 The Authors. Pediatric Blood & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Randomized Trial of Asprin as Adjuvant Therapy for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0268 TITLE: Randomized Trial of Asprin as Adjuvant Therapy for Node-Positive Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Eric Winer CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Boston, MA 02215 REPORT DATE: OCTOBER 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: ANNUAL PREPARED FOR...CONTRACT NUMBER Randomized Trial of Asprin as Adjuvant Therapy for Node- Positive Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  1. The Challenges of First-in-Human Stem Cell Clinical Trials: What Does This Mean for Ethics and Institutional Review Boards?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger A. Barker

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based clinical interventions are increasingly advancing through preclinical testing and approaching clinical trials. The complexity and diversity of these approaches, and the confusion created by unproven and untested stem cell-based “therapies,” create a growing need for a more comprehensive review of these early-stage human trials to ensure they place the patients at minimal risk of adverse events but are also based on solid evidence of preclinical efficacy with a clear scientific rationale for that effect. To address this issue and supplement the independent review process, especially that of the ethics and institutional review boards who may not be experts in stem cell biology, the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR has developed a set of practical questions to cover the major issues for which clear evidence-based answers need to be obtained before approving a stem cell-based trial. Keywords: human stem cell-derived interventions, early phase clinical trials, institutional review and ethics boards, review process, guidelines

  2. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrefai MT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad T Alrefai,1–3 Divya Murali,4 Arghya Paul,4 Khalid M Ridwan,1,2 John M Connell,1,2 Dominique Shum-Tim1,2 1Division of Cardiac Surgery, 2Division of Surgical Research, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Abstract: Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. Keywords: stem cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac surgery, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, heart, scaffolds, organoids, cell sheet and tissue engineering

  3. Mutational and putative neoantigen load predict clinical benefit of adoptive T cell therapy in melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauss, Martin; Donia, Marco; Harbst, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) is a highly intensive immunotherapy regime that has yielded remarkable response rates and many durable responses in clinical trials in melanoma; however, 50-60% of the patients have no clinical benefit. Here, we searched for predictive biomarkers to ACT in melanoma. ...

  4. Interruption of antiretroviral therapy and risk of cardiovascular disease in persons with HIV-1 infection: exploratory analyses from the SMART trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew N; Carr, Andrew; Neuhaus, Jacquie

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SMART trial found a raised risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in patients undergoing CD4+ T cell-count guided intermittent antiretroviral therapy (ART) compared with patients on continuous ART. Exploratory analyses were performed to better understand the reasons for this ...

  5. Effect of anti-IgE therapy on food allergen specific T cell responses in eosinophil associated gastrointestinal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prussin Calman

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-IgE therapy inhibits mast cell and basophil activation, blocks IgE binding to both FcεRI and CD23 and down regulates FcεRI expression by antigen (Ag presenting cells (APCs. In addition to its classical role in immediate hypersensitivity, IgE has been shown in vitro to facilitate Ag presentation of allergens, whereby APC bound IgE preferentially takes up allergens for subsequent processing and presentation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether anti-IgE therapy, by blocking facilitated Ag presentation in vivo, attenuates allergen specific Th2 cell responses. Methods To test this hypothesis, food allergen specific T cell responses were examined during a 16-week clinical trial of omalizumab in nine subjects with eosinophilic gastroenteritis and food sensitization. Allergen specific T cell responses were measured using carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester dye dilution coupled with intracellular cytokine staining and polychromatic flow cytometry. Four independent indices of allergen specific T cell response (proliferation, Ag dose response, precursor frequency, and the ratio of Th2:Th1 cytokine expression were determined. Results Eight of the 9 subjects had measurable food allergen specific responses, with a median proliferation index of 112-fold. Allergen specific T cell proliferation was limited to CD4 T cells, whereas CD8 T cell did not proliferate. Food allergen specific responses were Th2 skewed relative to tetanus specific responses in the same subjects. In contradistinction to the original hypothesis, anti-IgE treatment did not diminish any of the four measured indices of allergen specific T cell response. Conclusions In sum, using multiple indices of T cell function, this study failed to demonstrate that anti-IgE therapy broadly or potently inhibits allergen specific T cell responses. As such, these data do not support a major role for IgE facilitated Ag presentation augmenting allergen specific T cell

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Acceptance-Based Behavior Therapy and Cognitive Therapy for Test Anxiety: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lily A.; Forman, Evan M.; Herbert, James D.; Hoffman, Kimberly L.; Yuen, Erica K.; Goetter, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Many university students suffer from test anxiety that is severe enough to impair performance. Given mixed efficacy results of previous cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) trials and a theoretically driven rationale, an acceptance-based behavior therapy (ABBT) approach was compared to traditional CBT (i.e., Beckian cognitive therapy; CT) for the…

  7. Advanced therapy medicinal products: current and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cécile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are innovative therapies that encompass gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products. These therapies are expected to bring important health benefits, but also to substantially impact the pharmaceuticals budget. The aim of this study was to characterise the ATMPs in development and discuss future implications in terms of market access. Clinical trials were searched in the following databases: EudraCT (EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials), ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform of the World Health Organization). Trials were classified by category of ATMP as defined by European regulation EC No. 1394/2007, as well as by development phase and disease area. The database search identified 939 clinical trials investigating ATMPs (85% ongoing, 15% completed). The majority of trials were in the early stages (Phase I, I/II: 64.3%, Phase II, II/III: 27.9%, Phase 3: 6.9%). Per category of ATMP, we identified 53.6% of trials for somatic cell therapies, 22.8% for tissue-engineered products, 22.4% for gene therapies, and 1.2% for combined products (incorporating a medical device). Disease areas included cancer (24.8%), cardiovascular diseases (19.4%), musculoskeletal (10.5%), immune system and inflammation (11.5%), neurology (9.1%), and others. Of the trials, 47.2% enrolled fewer than 25 patients. Due to the complexity and specificity of ATMPs, new clinical trial methodologies are being considered (e.g., small sample size, non-randomised trials, single-arm trials, surrogate endpoints, integrated protocols, and adaptive designs). Evidence generation post-launch will become unavoidable to address payers' expectations. ATMPs represent a fast-growing field of interest. Although most of the products are in an early development phase, the combined trial phase and the potential to cure severe chronic conditions suggest that ATMPs may reach the market earlier than

  8. Analysis of the clonal repertoire of gene-corrected cells in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruzynski, Anna; Glimm, Hanno; Schmidt, Manfred; Kalle, Christof von

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy-based clinical phase I/II studies using integrating retroviral vectors could successfully treat different monogenetic inherited diseases. However, with increased efficiency of this therapy, severe side effects occurred in various gene therapy trials. In all cases, integration of the vector close to or within a proto-oncogene contributed substantially to the development of the malignancies. Thus, the in-depth analysis of integration site patterns is of high importance to uncover potential clonal outgrowth and to assess the safety of gene transfer vectors and gene therapy protocols. The standard and nonrestrictive linear amplification-mediated PCR (nrLAM-PCR) in combination with high-throughput sequencing exhibits technologies that allow to comprehensively analyze the clonal repertoire of gene-corrected cells and to assess the safety of the used vector system at an early stage on the molecular level. It enables clarifying the biological consequences of the vector system on the fate of the transduced cell. Furthermore, the downstream performance of real-time PCR allows a quantitative estimation of the clonality of individual cells and their clonal progeny. Here, we present a guideline that should allow researchers to perform comprehensive integration site analysis in preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential Strategies to Address the Major Clinical Barriers Facing Stem Cell Regenerative Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Patricia K; Neofytou, Evgenios; Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-11-01

    Although progress continues to be made in the field of stem cell regenerative medicine for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, significant barriers to clinical implementation still exist. To summarize the current barriers to the clinical implementation of stem cell therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease and to discuss potential strategies to overcome them. Information for this review was obtained through a search of PubMed and the Cochrane database for English-language studies published between January 1, 2000, and July 25, 2016. Ten randomized clinical trials and 8 systematic reviews were included. One of the major clinical barriers facing the routine implementation of stem cell therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease is the limited and inconsistent benefit observed thus far. Reasons for this finding are unclear but may be owing to poor cell retention and survival, as suggested by numerous preclinical studies and a small number of human studies incorporating imaging to determine cell fate. Additional studies in humans using imaging to determine cell fate are needed to understand how these factors contribute to the limited efficacy of stem cell therapy. Treatment strategies to address poor cell retention and survival are under investigation and include the following: coadministration of immunosuppressive and prosurvival agents, delivery of cardioprotective factors packaged in exosomes rather than the cells themselves, and use of tissue-engineering strategies to provide structural support for cells. If larger grafts are achieved using these strategies, it will be imperative to carefully monitor for the potential risks of tumorigenicity, immunogenicity, and arrhythmogenicity. Despite important achievements to date, stem cell therapy is not yet ready for routine clinical implementation. Significant research is still needed to address the clinical barriers outlined herein before the next wave of large clinical trials is under way.

  10. Continuation maintenance therapy with S-1 in chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Seiichiro; Karayama, Masato; Inui, Naoki; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Kuroishi, Shigeki; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Yokomura, Koshi; Koshimizu, Naoki; Toyoshima, Mikio; Imokawa, Shiro; Asada, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Masafumi; Yamada, Takashi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-08-01

    Objectives Maintenance therapy is a standard therapeutic strategy in non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer. However, there is no consensus regarding the benefit of maintenance therapy for patients with squamous cell lung cancer. We assessed maintenance therapy with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine agent, following induction therapy with carboplatin and S-1 in patients with squamous cell lung cancer. Methods In this phase II trial, chemotherapy-naïve patients with squamous cell lung cancer were enrolled to induction therapy with four cycles of carboplatin (at an area under the curve of 5 on day 1) and S-1 (80 mg/m(2)/day on days 1-14) in a 28-day cycle. Patients who achieved disease control after induction therapy received maintenance therapy with S-1 in a 21-day cycle until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival after administration of maintenance therapy. Results Fifty-one patients were enrolled in the study. The median progression-free survival from the start of maintenance therapy was 3.0 months (95 % confidence interval, 2.5-3.5). The most common toxicities associated with maintenance therapy were anemia, thrombocytopenia, and fatigue, but they were not severe. Conclusion S-1 maintenance therapy might be a feasible treatment option in patients with squamous cell lung cancer.

  11. Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy vs No Therapy in Mild to Moderate Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Carl E; Patel, Smitaa; Ives, Natalie; Rick, Caroline E; Dowling, Francis; Woolley, Rebecca; Wheatley, Keith; Walker, Marion F; Sackley, Catherine M

    2016-03-01

    It is unclear whether physiotherapy and occupational therapy are clinically effective and cost-effective in Parkinson disease (PD). To perform a large pragmatic randomized clinical trial to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy and occupational therapy in PD. The PD REHAB Trial was a multicenter, open-label, parallel group, controlled efficacy trial. A total of 762 patients with mild to moderate PD were recruited from 38 sites across the United Kingdom. Recruitment took place between October 2009 and June 2012, with 15 months of follow-up. Participants with limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) were randomized to physiotherapy and occupational therapy or no therapy. The primary outcome was the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) Scale score at 3 months after randomization. Secondary outcomes were health-related quality of life (assessed by Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 and EuroQol-5D); adverse events; and caregiver quality of life. Outcomes were assessed before trial entry and then 3, 9, and 15 months after randomization. Of the 762 patients included in the study (mean [SD] age, 70 [9.1] years), 381 received physiotherapy and occupational therapy and 381 received no therapy. At 3 months, there was no difference between groups in NEADL total score (difference, 0.5 points; 95% CI, -0.7 to 1.7; P = .41) or Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 summary index (0.007 points; 95% CI, -1.5 to 1.5; P = .99). The EuroQol-5D quotient was of borderline significance in favor of therapy (-0.03; 95% CI, -0.07 to -0.002; P = .04). The median therapist contact time was 4 visits of 58 minutes over 8 weeks. Repeated-measures analysis showed no difference in NEADL total score, but Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 summary index (diverging 1.6 points per annum; 95% CI, 0.47 to 2.62; P = .005) and EuroQol-5D score (0.02; 95% CI, 0.00007 to 0.03; P = .04) showed small differences in favor of therapy. There was no difference in

  12. Art Therapy and Cognitive Processing Therapy for Combat-Related PTSD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Melissa; Decker, Kathleen P.; Kruk, Kerry; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2018-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial was designed to determine if art therapy in conjunction with Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) was more effective for reducing symptoms of combat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than CPT alone. Veterans (N = 11) were randomized to receive either individual CPT, or individual CPT in conjunction with individual art therapy. PTSD Checklist–Military Version and Beck Depression Inventory–II scores improved with treatment in both groups with no significant difference in improvement between the experimental and control groups. Art therapy in conjunction with CPT was found to improve trauma processing and veterans considered it to be an important part of their treatment as it provided healthy distancing, enhanced trauma recall, and increased access to emotions. PMID:29332989

  13. Enrichment of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells facilitates transduction for stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kismet; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kaufman, Michael L; Cooper, Aaron R; Masiuk, Katelyn; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to treat this illness without the major immunological complications associated with allogeneic transplantation. However, transduction efficiency by β-globin lentiviral vectors using CD34-enriched cell populations is suboptimal and large vector production batches may be needed for clinical trials. Transducing a cell population more enriched for HSC could greatly reduce vector needs and, potentially, increase transduction efficiency. CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, comprising ∼1%-3% of all CD34(+) cells, were isolated from healthy cord blood CD34(+) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing an antisickling form of beta-globin (CCL-β(AS3) -FB). Isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells were able to generate progeny over an extended period of long-term culture (LTC) compared to the CD34(+) cells and required up to 40-fold less vector for transduction compared to bulk CD34(+) preparations containing an equivalent number of CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells. Transduction of isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells was comparable to CD34(+) cells measured by quantitative PCR at day 14 with reduced vector needs, and average vector copy/cell remained higher over time for LTC initiated from CD34(+) /38(-) cells. Following in vitro erythroid differentiation, HBBAS3 mRNA expression was similar in cultures derived from CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells or unfractionated CD34(+) cells. In vivo studies showed equivalent engraftment of transduced CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells when transplanted in competition with 100-fold more CD34(+) /CD38(+) cells. This work provides initial evidence for the beneficial effects from isolating human CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells to use significantly less vector and potentially improve transduction for HSC gene therapy. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  14. Cabozantinib Versus Everolimus in Patients with Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results of a Randomised Phase III Trial (METEOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Choueiri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The METEOR trial of cabozantinib versus everolimus in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC was reported by Prof Choueiri at the European Cancer Congress 2015. This presentation follows the publication in the New England Journal of Medicine of the METEOR trial back-to-back with the CheckMate 025 trial of nivolumab versus everolimus in the same patient setting. Excitingly, these trials demonstrated, for the first time, significant benefits over the standard of care for heavily pre-treated patients with advanced RCC. Cabozantinib, an oral multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI aims to address the challenge of resistance to targeted therapy with TKIs. While the METEOR trial has not yet reached its final analysis of overall survival (OS, the clear progression-free survival (PFS benefit, acceptable safety profile, and similar tolerability to other TKIs shown by cabozantinib indicate that this represents a promising new treatment option for second-line or subsequent therapy for patients with advanced RCC.

  15. Regional Delivery of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Praveen; Petrocca, Fabio

    2017-07-18

    Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-cells are T-cells with recombinant receptors targeted to tumor antigens. CAR-T cell therapy has emerged as a mode of immunotherapy and is now being extensively explored in hematologic cancer. In contrast, CAR-T cell use in solid tumors has been hampered by multiple obstacles. Several approaches have been taken to circumvent these obstacles, including the regional delivery of CAR-T cells. Regional CAR-T cell delivery can theoretically compensate for poor T-cell trafficking and tumor antigen specificity while avoiding systemic toxicity associated with intravenous delivery. We reviewed completed clinical trials for the treatment of glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer and examined the data in these studies for safety, efficacy, and potential advantages that regional delivery may confer over systemic delivery. Our appraisal of the available literature revealed that regional delivery of CAR-T cells in both glioblastoma and hepatic colorectal metastases was generally well tolerated and efficacious in select instances. We propose that the regional delivery of CAR-T cells is an area of potential growth in the solid tumor immunotherapy, and look towards future clinical trials in head and neck cancer, mesothelioma, and peritoneal carcinomatosis as the use of this technique expands.

  16. Regional Delivery of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Sridhar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR T-cells are T-cells with recombinant receptors targeted to tumor antigens. CAR-T cell therapy has emerged as a mode of immunotherapy and is now being extensively explored in hematologic cancer. In contrast, CAR-T cell use in solid tumors has been hampered by multiple obstacles. Several approaches have been taken to circumvent these obstacles, including the regional delivery of CAR-T cells. Regional CAR-T cell delivery can theoretically compensate for poor T-cell trafficking and tumor antigen specificity while avoiding systemic toxicity associated with intravenous delivery. We reviewed completed clinical trials for the treatment of glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer and examined the data in these studies for safety, efficacy, and potential advantages that regional delivery may confer over systemic delivery. Our appraisal of the available literature revealed that regional delivery of CAR-T cells in both glioblastoma and hepatic colorectal metastases was generally well tolerated and efficacious in select instances. We propose that the regional delivery of CAR-T cells is an area of potential growth in the solid tumor immunotherapy, and look towards future clinical trials in head and neck cancer, mesothelioma, and peritoneal carcinomatosis as the use of this technique expands.

  17. Focus on Adoptive T Cell Transfer Trials in Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liat Hershkovitz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive Cell Transfer (ACT of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TIL in combination with lymphodepletion has proven to be an effective treatment for metastatic melanoma patients, with an objective response rate in 50%–70% of the patients. It is based on the ex vivo expansion and activation of tumor-specific T lymphocytes extracted from the tumor and their administration back to the patient. Various TIL-ACT trials, which differ in their TIL generation procedures and patient preconditioning, have been reported. In the latest clinical studies, genetically engineered peripheral T cells were utilized instead of TIL. Further improvement of adoptive T cell transfer depends on new investigations which seek higher TIL quality, increased durable response rates, and aim to treat more patients. Simplifying this therapy may encourage cancer centers worldwide to adopt this promising technology. This paper focuses on the latest progress regarding adoptive T cell transfer, comparing the currently available protocols and discussing their advantages, disadvantages, and implication in the future.

  18. Two is better than one: advances in pathogen-boosted immunotherapy and adoptive T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Gang; Schauder, David M; Zander, Ryan; Cui, Weiguo

    2017-09-01

    The recent tremendous successes in clinical trials take cancer immunotherapy into a new era and have attracted major attention from both academia and industry. Among the variety of immunotherapy strategies developed to boost patients' own immune systems to fight against malignant cells, the pathogen-based and adoptive cell transfer therapies have shown the most promise for treating multiple types of cancer. Pathogen-based therapies could either break the immune tolerance to enhance the effectiveness of cancer vaccines or directly infect and kill cancer cells. Adoptive cell transfer can induce a strong durable antitumor response, with recent advances including engineering dual specificity into T cells to recognize multiple antigens and improving the metabolic fitness of transferred cells. In this review, we focus on the recent prospects in these two areas and summarize some ongoing studies that represent potential advancements for anticancer immunotherapy, including testing combinations of these two strategies.

  19. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials using music therapy for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrázová, Marcela; Celec, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Music therapy is a promising approach widening the potential applications of psychotherapy. Music influences both, psychologic and physiologic parameters, and children are especially responsive to this form of therapy. Many aspects of its action mechanisms remain to be elucidated, underscoring the need for evidence-based medicine (EBM) for clinical use of music therapy. This review seeks to highlight some of the issues of music therapy research and to initiate a discussion about the need for international multicenter cooperation to bring scientifically sound evidence of the benefits of music therapy in pediatric patients. Scientific bibliographic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials on use of music therapy for children. Identified articles were evaluated according to criteria for scientific quality. Twenty-eight studies were identified. Most of the trials were biased by the number of participants, and some trials showed the need to improve design of control groups. Indeed, the novelty of this area of study has produced a large number of different studies (with variability in diagnoses, interventions, control groups, duration, and/or outcome parameters), and there is a need for a more homogeneous and systematic approach. Available studies highlight the need to address reproducibility issues. This analysis identifies the need for a subsequent series of clinical studies on the efficacy of music in the pediatric population, with more focus on eligibility criteria with respect to EBM and reproducibility.

  20. Membrane-lipid therapy: A historical perspective of membrane-targeted therapies - From lipid bilayer structure to the pathophysiological regulation of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribá, Pablo V

    2017-09-01

    Our current understanding of membrane lipid composition, structure and functions has led to the investigation of their role in cell signaling, both in healthy and pathological cells. As a consequence, therapies based on the regulation of membrane lipid composition and structure have been recently developed. This novel field, known as Membrane Lipid Therapy, is growing and evolving rapidly, providing treatments that are now in use or that are being studied for their application to oncological disorders, Alzheimer's disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, diabetes, obesity, and neuropathic pain. This field has arisen from relevant discoveries on the behavior of membranes in recent decades, and it paves the way to adopt new approaches in modern pharmacology and nutrition. This innovative area will promote further investigation into membranes and the development of new therapies with molecules that target the cell membrane. Due to the prominent roles of membranes in the cells' physiology and the paucity of therapeutic approaches based on the regulation of the lipids they contain, it is expected that membrane lipid therapy will provide new treatments for numerous pathologies. The first on-purpose rationally designed molecule in this field, minerval, is currently being tested in clinical trials and it is expected to enter the market around 2020. However, it seems feasible that during the next few decades other membrane regulators will also be marketed for the treatment of human pathologies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. [PARAMOUNT trial: clinical meaning of continuous maintenance therapy in lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridelli, Cesare

    2015-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide across both sex. Patients with Advanced -NSCLC (A-NSCLC) do not have curative treatment options, so the primary endpoint of every therapeutic decision aims to prolong survival, improving or maintain a good Quality of Life (QoL). Histology could represent a positive predictive factor for patients with Non squamous NSCLC (Nsq-NSCLC) respect to pemetrexed treatment. Pemetrexed is an antifolate that inhibits primarily thymidylate synthase (TS), together with dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. Pemetrexed in combination with cisplatin is approved in the first line setting and as monotherapy in the switch or continuous maintenance of Non Squamous A-NSCLC. Maintenance therapy is a widely used therapeutic option in other solid and hematologic malignancies, but in the A-NSCLC represent an innovative approach. The rationale in this new setting of patients is based on the evidence that patients who benefit from an initial induction therapy platinum based may benefit from maintenance therapy with the third generation agent dropping the platinum drug after four to six cycles. We can define two types of maintenance therapy: continuation maintenance and switch maintenance. Major results in prolonging Overall Survival (OS) was reported with the continuation maintenance strategy as in the PARAMOUNT trial.

  2. Stem cell therapy in spinal cord injury: Hollow promise or promising science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Goel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI remains one of the most physically, psychologically and socially debilitating conditions worldwide. While rehabilitation measures may help limit disability to some extent, there is no effective primary treatment yet available. The efficacy of stem cells as a primary therapeutic option in spinal cord injury is currently an area under much scrutiny and debate. Several laboratory and some primary clinical studies into the use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells or embryonic stem cell-derived oligodentrocyte precursor cells have shown some promising results in terms of remyelination and regeneration of damaged spinal nerve tracts. More recently,laboratory and early clinical experiments into the use of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells, a type of glial cell derived from olfactory bulb and mucosa have provided some phenomenal preliminary evidence as to their neuroregenerative and neural bridging capacity. This report compares and evaluates some current research into selected forms of embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell therapy as well as olfactory ensheathing cell therapy in SCI, and also highlights some legal and ethical issues surrounding their use. While early results shows promise, more rigorous large scaleclinical trials are needed to shed light on the safety, efficacy and long term viability of stem cell and cellular transplant techniques in SCI.

  3. Hydroxyurea Therapy for Children With Sickle Cell Anemia in Sub‐Saharan Africa: Rationale and Design of the REACH Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshilolo, Léon; Santos, Brigida; Tomlinson, George A.; Stuber, Susan; Latham, Teresa; Aygun, Banu; Obaro, Stephen K.; Olupot‐Olupot, Peter; Williams, Thomas N.; Odame, Isaac; Ware, Russell E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited hematological disorder that causes a large but neglected global health burden, particularly in Africa. Hydroxyurea represents the only available disease‐modifying therapy for SCA, and has proven safety and efficacy in high‐resource countries. In sub‐Saharan Africa, there is minimal use of hydroxyurea, due to lack of data, absence of evidence‐based guidelines, and inexperience among healthcare providers. Procedure A partnership was established between investigators in North America and sub‐Saharan Africa, to develop a prospective multicenter research protocol designed to provide data on the safety, feasibility, and benefits of hydroxyurea for children with SCA. Results The Realizing Effectiveness Across Continents with Hydroxyurea (REACH, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01966731) trial is a prospective, phase I/II open‐label dose escalation study of hydroxyurea that will treat a total of 600 children age 1–10 years with SCA: 150 at each of four different clinical sites within sub‐Saharan Africa (Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, and Uganda). The primary study endpoint will be severe hematological toxicities that occur during the fixed‐dose treatment phase. REACH has an adaptive statistical design that allows for careful assessment of toxicities to accurately identify a safe hydroxyurea dose. Conclusions REACH will provide data that address critical gaps in knowledge for the treatment of SCA in sub‐Saharan Africa. By developing local expertise with the use of hydroxyurea and helping to establish treatment guidelines, the REACH trial results will have the potential to transform care for children with SCA in Africa. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26275071

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  5. Emerging treatment options for refractory angina pectoris: ranolazine, shock wave treatment, and cell-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennari, Marco; Gambini, Elisa; Bassetti, Beatrice; Capogrossi, Maurizio; Pompilio, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    A challenge of modern cardiovascular medicine is to find new, effective treatments for patients with refractory angina pectoris, a clinical condition characterized by severe angina despite optimal medical therapy. These patients are not candidates for surgical or percutaneous revascularization. Herein we review the most up-to-date information regarding the modern approach to the patient with refractory angina pectoris, from conventional medical management to new medications and shock wave therapy, focusing on the use of endothelial precursor cells (EPCs) in the treatment of this condition. Clinical limitations of the efficiency of conventional approaches justify the search for new therapeutic options. Regenerative medicine is considered the next step in the evolution of organ replacement therapy. It is driven largely by the same health needs as transplantation and replacement therapies, but it aims further than traditional approaches, such as cell-based therapy. Increasing knowledge of the role of circulating cells derived from bone marrow (EPCs) on cardiovascular homeostasis in physiologic and pathologic conditions has prompted the clinical use of these cells to relieve ischemia. The current state of therapeutic angiogenesis still leaves many questions unanswered. It is of paramount importance that the treatment is delivered safely. Direct intramyocardial and intracoronary administration has demonstrated acceptable safety profiles in early trials, and may represent a major advance over surgical thoracotomy. The combined efforts of bench and clinical researchers will ultimately answer the question of whether cell therapy is a suitable strategy for treatment of patients with refractory angina.

  6. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 02-29: A Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Full-Dose Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgical Resection and Consolidative Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suntharalingam, Mohan; Paulus, Rebecca; Edelman, Martin J.; Krasna, Mark; Burrows, Whitney; Gore, Elizabeth; Wilson, Lynn D.; Choy, Hak

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mediastinal nodal clearance (MNC) rates after induction chemotherapy and concurrent, full-dose radiation therapy (RT) in a phase II trimodality trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0229). Patients and Methods: Patients (n=57) with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (pathologically proven N2 or N3) were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of weekly carboplatin (AUC = 2.0) and paclitaxel 50 mg/m 2 . Concurrent RT was prescribed, with 50.4 Gy to the mediastinum and primary tumor and a boost of 10.8 Gy to all gross disease. The mediastinum was pathologically reassessed after completion of chemoradiation. The primary endpoint of the study was MNC, with secondary endpoints of 2-year overall survival and postoperative morbidity/mortality. Results: The grade 3/4 toxicities included hematologic 35%, gastrointestinal 14%, and pulmonary 23%. Forty-three patients (75%) were evaluable for the primary endpoint. Twenty-seven patients achieved the primary endpoint of MNC (63%). Thirty-seven patients underwent resection. There was a 14% incidence of grade 3 postoperative pulmonary complications and 1 30-day, postoperative grade 5 toxicity (3%). With a median follow-up of 24 months for all patients, the 2-year overall survival rate was 54%, and the 2-year progression-free survival rate was 33%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 75% for those who achieved nodal clearance, 52% for those with residual nodal disease, and 23% for those who were not evaluable for the primary endpoint (P=.0002). Conclusions: This multi-institutional trial confirms the ability of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation with full-dose RT to sterilize known mediastinal nodal disease.

  7. Potential role of herbal remedies in stem cell therapy: proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

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    Udalamaththa, Vindya Lankika; Jayasinghe, Chanika Dilumi; Udagama, Preethi Vidya

    2016-08-11

    Stem cell therapy has revolutionized modern clinical therapy with the potential of stem cells to differentiate into many different cell types which may help to replace different cell lines of an organism. Innumerous trials are carried out to merge new scientific knowledge and techniques with traditional herbal extracts that may result in less toxic, affordable, and highly available natural alternative therapeutics. Currently, mesenchyamal stromal cell (MSC) lines are treated with individual and mixtures of crude herbal extracts, as well as with purified compounds from herbal extracts, to investigate the mechanisms and effects of these on stem cell growth and differentiation. Human MSCs (hMSCs) possess multilineage, i.e., osteogenic, neurogenic, adipogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic, differentiation abilities. The proliferative and differentiation properties of hMSCs treated with herbal extracts have shown promise in diseases such as osteoporosis, neurodegenerative disorders, and other tissue degenerative disorders. Well characterized herbal extracts that result in increased rates of tissue regeneration may be used in both stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for replacement therapy, where the use of scaffolds and vesicles with enhanced attaching and proliferative properties could be highly advantageous in the latter. Although the clinical application of herbal extracts is still in progress due to the variability and complexity of bioactive constituents, standardized herbal preparations will strengthen their application in the clinical context. We have critically reviewed the proliferative and differentiation effects of individual herbal extracts on hMSCs mainly derived from bone marrow and elaborated on the plausible underlying mechanisms of action. To be fruitfully used in reparative and regenerative therapy, future directions in this area of study should (i) make use of hMSCs derived from different non-traditional sources, including medical waste material

  8. [Clinical Tests Testing New Therapies for Stargardt Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousal, B; Ďuďáková, Ľ; Hlavatá, L; Lišková, P

    2016-02-01

    To provide information on currently ongoing clinical trials for Stargardt disease. We have searched the clinical trial register (www.clinicaltrials.gov) for the keyword "Stargardt" and list active ongoing studies. There are currently eight registered clinical trials enrolling patients with Stargardt disease; all in phase I or II aiming at four mechanisms of action: inhibition of the production of vitamin A toxic dimers, gene therapy restoring wild type transcription of the ABCA4 gene, neuroprotection preventing retinal cells from oxidative damage, and replacement of the damaged retinal pigment epithelium using stem cell therapy. The basic prerequisite for enrolment in the vast majority of clinical trials is confirmation of the clinical diagnosis by mutational analysis. The wide variety of therapies that are registered as clinical trials for Stargardt disease significantly raises the possibility that effective treatments will be available in the near future for this currently incurable condition and that molecular genetic testing should be increasingly considered. Stargardt disease, clinical trial, ABCA4, mutation.

  9. Development of a manualized protocol of massage therapy for clinical trials in osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ather

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trial design of manual therapies may be especially challenging as techniques are often individualized and practitioner-dependent. This paper describes our methods in creating a standardized Swedish massage protocol tailored to subjects with osteoarthritis of the knee while respectful of the individualized nature of massage therapy, as well as implementation of this protocol in two randomized clinical trials. Methods The manualization process involved a collaborative process between methodologic and clinical experts, with the explicit goals of creating a reproducible semi-structured protocol for massage therapy, while allowing some latitude for therapists’ clinical judgment and maintaining consistency with a prior pilot study. Results The manualized protocol addressed identical specified body regions with distinct 30- and 60-min protocols, using standard Swedish strokes. Each protocol specifies the time allocated to each body region. The manualized 30- and 60-min protocols were implemented in a dual-site 24-week randomized dose-finding trial in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, and is currently being implemented in a three-site 52-week efficacy trial of manualized Swedish massage therapy. In the dose-finding study, therapists adhered to the protocols and significant treatment effects were demonstrated. Conclusions The massage protocol was manualized, using standard techniques, and made flexible for individual practitioner and subject needs. The protocol has been applied in two randomized clinical trials. This manualized Swedish massage protocol has real-world utility and can be readily utilized both in the research and clinical settings. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970008 (18 August 2009

  10. Bcl-2 antisense therapy in B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanan-Khan, Asher

    2005-07-01

    Bcl-2 is an apoptosis regulating protein, overexpression of which is associated with chemotherapy resistant disease, aggressive clinical course, and poor survival in patients with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Overexpression of Bcl-2 protein results in an aberrant intrinsic apoptotic pathway that confers a protective effect on malignant cells against a death signal (e.g., chemotherapy or radiotherapy). Downregulation of this oncoprotein, thus, represents a possible new way to target clinically aggressive disease. Preclinical studies have shown that this oncoprotein can be effectively decreased by Bcl-2 antisense in malignant lymphoid cells and can reverse chemotherapy resistance, as well as enhance the anti-apoptotic potential of both chemotherapeutic and biologic agents. Ongoing clinical trials are exploring the role of Bcl-2 downregulation with oblimersen (Bcl-2 antisense) in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma. Early results from these studies are promising and support the proof of the principle. As these studies are completed and mature data emerges, the role of Bcl-2 antisense therapy in the treatment of B-cell malignancies will become clearer.

  11. Hair regrowth in alopecia areata patients following Stem Cell Educator therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanjia; Yan, Baoyong; Wang, Hepeng; Li, Heng; Li, Quanhai; Zhao, Dong; Chen, Yana; Zhang, Ye; Li, Wenxia; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Shanfeng; Shen, Jie; Li, Yunxiang; Guindi, Edward; Zhao, Yong

    2015-04-20

    Alopecia areata (AA) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases and targets the hair follicles, with high impact on the quality of life and self-esteem of patients due to hair loss. Clinical management and outcomes are challenged by current limited immunosuppressive and immunomodulating regimens. We have developed a Stem Cell Educator therapy in which a patient's blood is circulated through a closed-loop system that separates mononuclear cells from the whole blood, allows the cells to briefly interact with adherent human cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (CB-SC), and returns the "educated" autologous cells to the patient's circulation. In an open-label, phase 1/phase 2 study, patients (N = 9) with severe AA received one treatment with the Stem Cell Educator therapy. The median age was 20 years (median alopecic duration, 5 years). Clinical data demonstrated that patients with severe AA achieved improved hair regrowth and quality of life after receiving Stem Cell Educator therapy. Flow cytometry revealed the up-regulation of Th2 cytokines and restoration of balancing Th1/Th2/Th3 cytokine production in the peripheral blood of AA subjects. Immunohistochemistry indicated the formation of a "ring of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1)" around the hair follicles, leading to the restoration of immune privilege of hair follicles and the protection of newly generated hair follicles against autoimmune destruction. Mechanistic studies revealed that co-culture with CB-SC may up-regulate the expression of coinhibitory molecules B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and programmed death-1 receptor (PD-1) on CD8β(+)NKG2D(+) effector T cells and suppress their proliferation via herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) ligands and programmed death-1 ligand (PD-L1) on CB-SCs. Current clinical data demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the Stem Cell Educator therapy for the treatment of AA. This innovative approach produced lasting improvement in hair regrowth in

  12. Understanding positional cues in salamander limb regeneration: implications for optimizing cell-based regenerative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine D. McCusker

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine has reached the point where we are performing clinical trials with stem-cell-derived cell populations in an effort to treat numerous human pathologies. However, many of these efforts have been challenged by the inability of the engrafted populations to properly integrate into the host environment to make a functional biological unit. It is apparent that we must understand the basic biology of tissue integration in order to apply these principles to the development of regenerative therapies in humans. Studying tissue integration in model organisms, where the process of integration between the newly regenerated tissues and the ‘old’ existing structures can be observed and manipulated, can provide valuable insights. Embryonic and adult cells have a memory of their original position, and this positional information can modify surrounding tissues and drive the formation of new structures. In this Review, we discuss the positional interactions that control the ability of grafted cells to integrate into existing tissues during the process of salamander limb regeneration, and discuss how these insights could explain the integration defects observed in current cell-based regenerative therapies. Additionally, we describe potential molecular tools that can be used to manipulate the positional information in grafted cell populations, and to promote the communication of positional cues in the host environment to facilitate the integration of engrafted cells. Lastly, we explain how studying positional information in current cell-based therapies and in regenerating limbs could provide key insights to improve the integration of cell-based regenerative therapies in the future.

  13. Historical Perspective on the Current Renaissance for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Donald B

    2017-10-01

    Gene therapy using hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has developed over the past 3 decades, with progressive improvements in the efficacy and safety. Autologous transplantation of HSC modified with murine gammaretroviral vectors first showed clinical benefits for patients with several primary immune deficiencies, but some of these patients suffered complications from vector-related genotoxicity. Lentiviral vectors have been used recently for gene addition to HSC and have yielded clinical benefits for primary immune deficiencies, metabolic diseases, and hemoglobinopathies, without vector-related complications. Gene editing using site-specific endonucleases is emerging as a promising technology for gene therapy and is moving into clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Choice of Cell Source in Cell-Based Therapies for Retinal Damage due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar John

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex disorder that affects primarily the macula involving the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE but also to a certain extent the photoreceptor layer and the retinal neurons. Cell transplantation is a promising option for AMD and clinical trials are underway using different cell types. Methods. We hypothesize that instead of focusing on a particular cell source for concurrent regeneration of all the retinal layers and also to prevent exhaustive research on an array of cell sources for regeneration of each layer, the choice should depend on, precisely, which layer is damaged. Results. Thus, for a damage limited to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE layer, the choice we suggest would be RPE cells. When the damage extends to rods and cones, the choice would be bone marrow stem cells and when retinal neurons are involved, relatively immature stem cell populations with an inherent capacity to yield neuronal lineage such as hematopoietic stem cells, embryonic stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells can be tried. Conclusion. This short review will prove to be a valuable guideline for those working on cell therapy for AMD to plan their future directions of research and therapy for this condition.

  15. Modified T-cells (using TCR and CTAs, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR and other molecular tools in recent gene therapy

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    A.S. Odiba

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy by the transfer of cloned TCRs that are isolated from tumor penetrating T-cells becomes a possibility through NY-ESOc259; a human-derived affinity-enhanced TCR that provides a level of sufficiency in long-term safety and efficacy. NY-ESOc259 recognizes a peptide common to CTAs (LAGE-1 and NY-ESO-1 in melanoma. Risks associated with insertion related transformation in gene therapy have been alleviated through strategies that include the engineering of transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALEN, RNA-guided nucleases (CRISPR/Cas9, Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN. Cancer immunotherapy based on the genetic modification of autologous T-cells (dependent on the engineered autologous CD8+ T-cells, designed to distinguish and destroy cells bearing tumor-specific antigens via a CAR is able to exterminate B-cell leukemias and lymphomas that are resilient to conventional therapies. A tool with a very large reservoir of potentials in molecular therapy strategy is the Pluripotent Stem Cells (PSC, with pluripotency factors that include Klf4, Sox2, c-Myc, Oct4, differentiating into disease-associated cell phenotypes of three germ layers, comprising of mesoderm (e.g. cardiac cells, blood and muscle, endoderm (liver, pancreas and ectoderm (epidermis, neurons. It finds good application in disease modelling as well as therapeutic options in the restoration of CGD by using AAVS1 as the vector where the therapeutic cassette is integrated into the locus to restore superoxide production in the granulocytes. Fascinatingly, Clinical trial involving iPSC are already underway where scientists have plans to use iPSC-derived cells to treat macular degeneration (a devastating age-related eye disease. Application of these findings has redefined incurable diseases disorders as curable. Keywords: Clinical trials, Disorders, Gene therapy, Molecular biology, Pharmacotherapy, Vector

  16. Stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease: the demise of alchemy and rise of pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadczyk, T; Faulkner, A; Madeddu, P

    2013-05-01

    Regenerative medicine holds great promise as a way of addressing the limitations of current treatments of ischaemic disease. In preclinical models, transplantation of different types of stem cells or progenitor cells results in improved recovery from ischaemia. Furthermore, experimental studies indicate that cell therapy influences a spectrum of processes, including neovascularization and cardiomyogenesis as well as inflammation, apoptosis and interstitial fibrosis. Thus, distinct strategies might be required for specific regenerative needs. Nonetheless, clinical studies have so far investigated a relatively small number of options, focusing mainly on the use of bone marrow-derived cells. Rapid clinical translation resulted in a number of small clinical trials that do not have sufficient power to address the therapeutic potential of the new approach. Moreover, full exploitation has been hindered so far by the absence of a solid theoretical framework and inadequate development plans. This article reviews the current knowledge on cell therapy and proposes a model theory for interpretation of experimental and clinical outcomes from a pharmacological perspective. Eventually, with an increased association between cell therapy and traditional pharmacotherapy, we will soon need to adopt a unified theory for understanding how the two practices additively interact for a patient's benefit. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Merkel cell carcinoma: Epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Teresa; Leiter, Ulrike; Garbe, Claus

    2017-12-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive skin cancer with a neuroendocrine phenotype. Incidence varies according to the geographic regions but is overall increasing. Different risk factors have been identified namely advanced age, immunosuppression, and ultraviolet light exposure. An association between MCC and polyomavirus infection is known. However, the exact mechanism that leads to carcinogenesis is yet to be fully understood. Surgery when feasible is the recommended treatment for localized disease, followed by adjuvant radiation or chemoradiation. In the metastatic setting, chemotherapy has been the standard treatment. However, two recently published trials with immune checkpoint inhibitors in first and second line showed promising results with a tolerable safety profile and these might become the standard therapy shortly. Somatostatin receptors are expressed in many MCC but such expression is not associated with disease severity. Presently there are no biomarkers predictive of response that could help to better select patients to these new therapies, and additional research is essential.

  18. Cellular Therapies Clinical Research Roadmap: lessons learned on how to move a cellular therapy into a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseph, Stacy; Tappitake, Darah; Armant, Myriam; Wesselschmidt, Robin; Derecho, Ivy; Draxler, Rebecca; Wood, Deborah; Centanni, John M

    2015-04-01

    A clinical research roadmap has been developed as a resource for researchers to identify critical areas and potential pitfalls when transitioning a cellular therapy product from the research laboratory, by means of an Investigational New Drug (IND) application, into early-phase clinical trials. The roadmap describes four key areas: basic and preclinical research, resource development, translational research and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and IND assembly and submission. Basic and preclinical research identifies a new therapeutic concept and demonstrates its potential value with the use of a model of the relevant disease. During resource development, the appropriate specialists and the required expertise to bring this product into the clinic are identified (eg, researchers, regulatory specialists, GMP manufacturing staff, clinicians and clinical trials staff, etc). Additionally, the funds required to achieve this goal (or a plan to procure them) are identified. In the next phase, the plan to translate the research product into a clinical-grade therapeutic is developed. Finally regulatory approval to start the trial must be obtained. In the United States, this is done by filing an IND application with the Food and Drug Administration. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-funded Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies program has facilitated the transition of a variety of cellular therapy products from the laboratory into Phase1/2 trials. The five Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies facilities have assisted investigators by performing translational studies and GMP manufacturing to ensure that cellular products met release specifications and were manufactured safely, reproducibly and at the appropriate scale. The roadmap resulting from this experience is the focus of this article. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Antipyretic therapy in critically ill patients with established sepsis: a trial sequential analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongheng Zhang

    Full Text Available antipyretic therapy for patients with sepsis has long been debated. The present study aimed to explore the beneficial effect of antipyretic therapy for ICU patients with sepsis.systematic review and trial sequential analysis of randomized controlled trials.Pubmed, Scopus, EBSCO and EMBASE were searched from inception to August 5, 2014.Mortality was dichotomized as binary outcome variable and odds ratio (OR was chosen to be the summary statistic. Pooled OR was calculated by using DerSimonian and Laird method. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed by using the statistic I2. Trial sequential analysis was performed to account for the small number of trials and patients.A total of 6 randomized controlled trials including 819 patients were included into final analysis. Overall, there was no beneficial effect of antipyretic therapy on mortality risk in patients with established sepsis (OR: 1.02, 95% CI: 0.50-2.05. The required information size (IS was 2582 and our analysis has not yet reached half of the IS. The Z-curve did not cross the O'Brien-Fleming α-spending boundary or reach the futility, indicating that the non-significant result was probably due to lack of statistical power.our study fails to identify any beneficial effect of antipyretic therapy on ICU patients with established diagnosis of sepsis. Due to limited number of total participants, more studies are needed to make a conclusive and reliable analysis.

  20. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

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    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  1. Technological progress and challenges towards cGMP manufacturing of human pluripotent stem cells based therapeutic products for allogeneic and autologous cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasalizadeh, Saeed; Baharvand, Hossein

    2013-12-01

    Recent technological advances in the generation, characterization, and bioprocessing of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have created new hope for their use as a source for production of cell-based therapeutic products. To date, a few clinical trials that have used therapeutic cells derived from hESCs have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but numerous new hPSC-based cell therapy products are under various stages of development in cell therapy-specialized companies and their future market is estimated to be very promising. However, the multitude of critical challenges regarding different aspects of hPSC-based therapeutic product manufacturing and their therapies have made progress for the introduction of new products and clinical applications very slow. These challenges include scientific, technological, clinical, policy, and financial aspects. The technological aspects of manufacturing hPSC-based therapeutic products for allogeneic and autologous cell therapies according to good manufacturing practice (cGMP) quality requirements is one of the most important challenging and emerging topics in the development of new hPSCs for clinical use. In this review, we describe main critical challenges and highlight a series of technological advances in all aspects of hPSC-based therapeutic product manufacturing including clinical grade cell line development, large-scale banking, upstream processing, downstream processing, and quality assessment of final cell therapeutic products that have brought hPSCs closer to clinical application and commercial cGMP manufacturing. © 2013.

  2. A Phase I Clinical Trial of AZD1775 in Combination With Neoadjuvant Weekly Docetaxel and Cisplatin Before Definitive Therapy in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: The WEE1 tyrosine kinase regulates G2/M transition and maintains genomic stability, particularly in p53-deficient tumors which require DNA repair after genotoxic therapy. There is a need to exploit the role of WEE1 inhibition in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) mostly driven by tumor-suppressor loss. This completed phase I clinical trial represents the first published clinical experience using the WEE1 inhibitor, AZD1775, with cisplatin and docetaxel.

  3. Stem cell therapies in preclinical models of stroke. Is the aged brain microenvironment refractory to cell therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, Raluca Elena; Balseanu, Adrian Tudor; Bogdan, Catalin; Slevin, Mark; Petcu, Eugen; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2017-08-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease demanding vigorous search for new therapies. Initial enthusiasm to stimulate restorative processes in the ischemic brain by means of cell-based therapies has meanwhile converted into a more balanced view recognizing impediments that may be related to unfavorable age-associated environments. Recent results using a variety of drug, cell therapy or combination thereof suggest that, (i) treatment with Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) in aged rats has primarily a beneficial effect on functional outcome most likely via supportive cellular processes such as neurogenesis; (ii) the combination therapy, G-CSF with mesenchymal cells (G-CSF+BM-MSC or G-CSF+BM-MNC) did not further improve behavioral indices, neurogenesis or infarct volume as compared to G-CSF alone in aged animals; (iii) better results with regard to integration of transplanted cells in the aged rat environment have been obtained using iPS of human origin; (iv) mesenchymal cells may be used as drug carriers for the aged post-stroke brains. While the middle aged brain does not seem to impair drug and cell therapies, in a real clinical practice involving older post-stroke patients, successful regenerative therapies would have to be carried out for a much longer time. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Towards the standardization of stem cell therapy studies for ischemic heart diseases: Bridging the gap between animal models and the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Fábio; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Ferreira-Martins, João; Ferreira, Rita; Falcão-Pires, Inês; Vitorino, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Today there is an increasing demand for heart transplantations for patients diagnosed with heart failure. Though, shortage of donors as well as the large number of ineligible patients hurdle such treatment option. This, in addition to the considerable number of transplant rejections, has driven the clinical research towards the field of regenerative medicine. Nonetheless, to date, several stem cell therapies tested in animal models fall by the wayside and when they meet the criteria to clinical trials, subjects often exhibit modest improvements. A main issue slowing down the admission of such therapies in the domain of human trials is the lack of protocol standardization between research groups, which hampers comparison between different approaches as well as the lack of thought regarding the clinical translation. In this sense, given the large amount of reports on stem cell therapy studies in animal models reported in the last 3years, we sought to evaluate their advantages and limitations towards the clinical setting and provide some suggestions for the forthcoming investigations. We expect, with this review, to start a new paradigm on regenerative medicine, by evoking the debate on how to plan novel stem cell therapy studies with animal models in order to achieve more consistent scientific production and accelerate the admission of stem cell therapies in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cellulite and extracorporeal Shockwave therapy (CelluShock-2009 - a Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joest Beatrice

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulite is a widespread problem involving females' buttocks and thighs based on the female specific anatomy. Given the higher number of fat cells stored in female fatty tissue in contrast to males, and the aging process of connective tissue leads to an imbalance between lipogenesis and lipolysis with subsequent large fat cells bulging the skin. In addition, microcirculatory changes have been suggested, however remain largely unknown in a controlled clinical setting. We hypothesize that the combination of extracorporeal shockwave and a daily gluteal muscle strength program is superior to the gluteal muscle strength program alone in cellulite. Methods/Design Study design: Randomized-controlled trial. IRB approval was granted at Hannover Medical School, Germany on May 22, 2009. For allocation of participants, a 1:1 ratio randomization was performed using opaque envelopes for the concealment of allocation. Reporting: according to CONSORT 2010. Eligible patients were females aged 18 or over and 65 or younger with cellulite with documented cellulite 1°-4° according to the Nürnberger score. Exclusion criteria were suspected or evident pregnancy, no cellulite, no informed consent or age under 18 years or above 65 years. Patients were recruited by advertisements in local regional newspapers and via the Internet. Analysis: Intention-to-treat. Outcome parameters: a Photonumeric severity scale, b Nürnberger Score, c circumference measurements, d capillary blood flow, e tissue oxygen saturation, f postcapillary venous blood flow. Intervention group: Six sessions of extracorporeal focused shock wave for six sessions (2000 impulses, 0,25 mJ/m2 every 1-2 weeks at both gluteal and thigh regions plus a specific gluteal strength exercise training. Control group: Six sessions of sham extracorporeal focused shock wave for six sessions (2000 impulses, 0,01 mJ/m2 every 1-2 weeks at both gluteal and thigh regions plus a specific gluteal

  6. Efficacy of targeted therapy for advanced renal cell carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wei

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature on the efficacy of the targeted therapies in the treatment of advanced RCC and, via an indirect comparison, to provide an optimal treatment among these agents. A systematic search of Medline, Scopus, Cochrane Library and Clinical Trials unpublished was performed up to Jan 1, 2015 to identify eligible randomized trials. Outcomes of interest assessing a targeted agent included progression free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS and objective response rate (ORR. Thirty eligible randomized controlled studies, total twentyfourth trails (5110 cases and 4626 controls were identified. Compared with placebo and IFN-α, single vascular epithelial growth factor (receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and mammalian target of rapamycin agent (VEGF(r-TKI & mTOR inhibitor were associated with improved PFS, improved OS and higher ORR, respectively. Comparing sorafenib combination vs sorafenib, there was no significant difference with regard to PFS and OS, but with a higher ORR. Comparing single or combination VEGF(r-TKI & mTOR inhibitor vs BEV + IFN-α, there was no significant difference with regard to PFS, OS, or ORR. Our network ITC meta-analysis also indicated a superior PFS of axitinib and everolimus compared to sorafenib. Our data suggest that targeted therapy with VEGF(r-TKI & mTOR inhibitor is associated with superior efficacy for treating advanced RCC with improved PFS, OS and higher ORR compared to placebo and IFN-α. In summary, here we give a comprehensive overview of current targeted therapies of advanced RCC that may provide evidence for the adequate targeted therapy selecting.

  7. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging for cardiac gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Tamaki, Nagara

    2007-01-01

    In the field of cardiac gene therapy, angiogenic gene therapy has been most extensively investigated. The first clinical trial of cardiac angiogenic gene therapy was reported in 1998, and at the peak, more than 20 clinical trial protocols were under evaluation. However, most trials have ceased owing to the lack of decisive proof of therapeutic effects and the potential risks of viral vectors. In order to further advance cardiac angiogenic gene therapy, remaining open issues need to be resolved: there needs to be improvement of gene transfer methods, regulation of gene expression, development of much safer vectors and optimisation of therapeutic genes. For these purposes, imaging of gene expression in living organisms is of great importance. In radionuclide reporter gene imaging, ''reporter genes'' transferred into cell nuclei encode for a protein that retains a complementary ''reporter probe'' of a positron or single-photon emitter; thus expression of the reporter genes can be imaged with positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography. Accordingly, in the setting of gene therapy, the location, magnitude and duration of the therapeutic gene co-expression with the reporter genes can be monitored non-invasively. In the near future, gene therapy may evolve into combination therapy with stem/progenitor cell transplantation, so-called cell-based gene therapy or gene-modified cell therapy. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is now expected to contribute in providing evidence on the usefulness of this novel therapeutic approach, as well as in investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neovascularisation and safety issues relevant to further progress in conventional gene therapy. (orig.)

  8. Clinical Cell Therapy Guidelines for Neurorestoration (IANR/CANR 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongyun; Young, Wise; Chen, Lin; Feng, Shiqing; Zoubi, Ziad M. Al; Sharma, Hari Shanker; Saberi, Hooshang; Moviglia, Gustavo A.; He, Xijing; Muresanu, Dafin F.; Sharma, Alok; Otom, Ali; Andrews, Russell J.; Al-Zoubi, Adeeb; Bryukhovetskiy, Andrey S.; Chernykh, Elena R.; Domańska-Janik, Krystyna; Jafar, Emad; Johnson, W. Eustace; Li, Ying; Li, Daqing; Luan, Zuo; Mao, Gengsheng; Shetty, Ashok K.; Siniscalco, Dario; Skaper, Stephen; Sun, Tiansheng; Wang, Yunliang; Wiklund, Lars; Xue, Qun; You, Si-Wei; Zheng, Zuncheng; Dimitrijevic, Milan R.; Masri, W. S. El; Sanberg, Paul R.; Xu, Qunyuan; Luan, Guoming; Chopp, Michael; Cho, Kyoung-Suok; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Wu, Ping; Liu, Kai; Mobasheri, Hamid; Ohtori, Seiji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Han, Fabin; Feng, Yaping; Zhang, Shaocheng; Lu, Yingjie; Zhang, Zhicheng; Rao, Yaojian; Tang, Zhouping; Xi, Haitao; Wu, Liang; Shen, Shunji; Xue, Mengzhou; Xiang, Guanghong; Guo, Xiaoling; Yang, Xiaofeng; Hao, Yujun; Hu, Yong; Li, Jinfeng; AO, Qiang; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Zhiwen; Lu, Ming; Li, Tong

    2018-01-01

    Cell therapy has been shown to be a key clinical therapeutic option for central nervous system diseases or damage. Standardization of clinical cell therapy procedures is an important task for professional associations devoted to cell therapy. The Chinese Branch of the International Association of Neurorestoratology (IANR) completed the first set of guidelines governing the clinical application of neurorestoration in 2011. The IANR and the Chinese Association of Neurorestoratology (CANR) collaborated to propose the current version “Clinical Cell Therapy Guidelines for Neurorestoration (IANR/CANR 2017)”. The IANR council board members and CANR committee members approved this proposal on September 1, 2016, and recommend it to clinical practitioners of cellular therapy. These guidelines include items of cell type nomenclature, cell quality control, minimal suggested cell doses, patient-informed consent, indications for undergoing cell therapy, contraindications for undergoing cell therapy, documentation of procedure and therapy, safety evaluation, efficacy evaluation, policy of repeated treatments, do not charge patients for unproven therapies, basic principles of cell therapy, and publishing responsibility. PMID:29637817

  9. Childhood asthma clusters and response to therapy in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Timothy S; Lemanske, Robert F; Mauger, David T; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Sorkness, Christine A; Szefler, Stanley J; Gangnon, Ronald E; Page, C David; Jackson, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Childhood asthma clusters, or subclasses, have been developed by computational methods without evaluation of clinical utility. To replicate and determine whether childhood asthma clusters previously identified computationally in the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) are associated with treatment responses in Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network clinical trials. A cluster assignment model was determined by using SARP participant data. A total of 611 participants 6 to 18 years old from 3 CARE trials were assigned to SARP pediatric clusters. Primary and secondary outcomes were analyzed by cluster in each trial. CARE participants were assigned to SARP clusters with high accuracy. Baseline characteristics were similar between SARP and CARE children of the same cluster. Treatment response in CARE trials was generally similar across clusters. However, with the caveat of a smaller sample size, children in the early-onset/severe-lung function cluster had best response with fluticasone/salmeterol (64% vs 23% 2.5× fluticasone and 13% fluticasone/montelukast in the Best ADd-on Therapy Giving Effective Responses trial; P = .011) and children in the early-onset/comorbidity cluster had the least clinical efficacy to treatments (eg, -0.076% change in FEV1 in the Characterizing Response to Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist and Inhaled Corticosteroid trial). In this study, we replicated SARP pediatric asthma clusters by using a separate, large clinical trials network. Early-onset/severe-lung function and early-onset/comorbidity clusters were associated with differential and limited response to therapy, respectively. Further prospective study of therapeutic response by cluster could provide new insights into childhood asthma treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Trial Watch: Immunotherapy plus radiation therapy for oncological indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchelli, Erika; Bloy, Norma; Aranda, Fernando; Buqué, Aitziber; Cremer, Isabelle; Demaria, Sandra; Eggermont, Alexander; Formenti, Silvia Chiara; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Spisek, Radek; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Malignant cells succumbing to some forms of radiation therapy are particularly immunogenic and hence can initiate a therapeutically relevant adaptive immune response. This reflects the intrinsic antigenicity of malignant cells (which often synthesize a high number of potentially reactive neo-antigens) coupled with the ability of radiation therapy to boost the adjuvanticity of cell death as it stimulates the release of endogenous adjuvants from dying cells. Thus, radiation therapy has been intensively investigated for its capacity to improve the therapeutic profile of several anticancer immunotherapies, including (but not limited to) checkpoint blockers, anticancer vaccines, oncolytic viruses, Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, cytokines, and several small molecules with immunostimulatory effects. Here, we summarize recent preclinical and clinical advances in this field of investigation.

  11. Nonclinical safety strategies for stem cell therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Michaela E., E-mail: michaela_sharpe@yahoo.com [Investigative Toxicology, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Ltd, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, CT13 9NJ (United Kingdom); Morton, Daniel [Exploratory Drug Safety, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc, Cambridge, 02140 (United States); Rossi, Annamaria [Investigative Toxicology, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Ltd, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, CT13 9NJ (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology, especially the development of the induced pluripotent stem cell techniques, have generated tremendous enthusiasm and efforts to explore the therapeutic potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapies are being considered for the treatment of degenerative diseases, inflammatory conditions, cancer and repair of damaged tissue. The safety of a stem cell therapy depends on many factors including the type of cell therapy, the differentiation status and proliferation capacity of the cells, the route of administration, the intended clinical location, long term survival of the product and/or engraftment, the need for repeated administration, the disease to be treated and the age of the population. Understanding the product profile of the intended therapy is crucial to the development of the nonclinical safety study design.

  12. Nonclinical safety strategies for stem cell therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, Michaela E.; Morton, Daniel; Rossi, Annamaria

    2012-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology, especially the development of the induced pluripotent stem cell techniques, have generated tremendous enthusiasm and efforts to explore the therapeutic potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapies are being considered for the treatment of degenerative diseases, inflammatory conditions, cancer and repair of damaged tissue. The safety of a stem cell therapy depends on many factors including the type of cell therapy, the differentiation status and proliferation capacity of the cells, the route of administration, the intended clinical location, long term survival of the product and/or engraftment, the need for repeated administration, the disease to be treated and the age of the population. Understanding the product profile of the intended therapy is crucial to the development of the nonclinical safety study design.

  13. Cell therapy for intervertebral disc repair: advancing cell therapy from bench to clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LM Benneker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration is a major cause of pain and disability; yet therapeutic options are limited and treatment often remains unsatisfactory. In recent years, research activities have intensified in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated encouraging results. Nonetheless, the translation of new biological therapies into clinical practice faces substantial barriers. During the symposium "Where Science meets Clinics", sponsored by the AO Foundation and held in Davos, Switzerland, from September 5-7, 2013, hurdles for translation were outlined, and ways to overcome them were discussed. With respect to cell therapy for IVD repair, it is obvious that regenerative treatment is indicated at early stages of disc degeneration, before structural changes have occurred. It is envisaged that in the near future, screening techniques and non-invasive imaging methods will be available to detect early degenerative changes. The promises of cell therapy include a sustained effect on matrix synthesis, inflammation control, and prevention of angio- and neuro-genesis. Discogenic pain, originating from "black discs" or annular injury, prevention of adjacent segment disease, and prevention of post-discectomy syndrome were identified as prospective indications for cell therapy. Before such therapy can safely and effectively be introduced into clinics, the identification of the patient population and proper standardisation of diagnostic parameters and outcome measurements are indispensable. Furthermore, open questions regarding the optimal cell type and delivery method need to be resolved in order to overcome the safety concerns implied with certain procedures. Finally, appropriate large animal models and well-designed clinical studies will be required, particularly addressing safety aspects.

  14. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  15. Recruitment of Participants to a Clinical Trial of Botanical Therapy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Harris E.; McVary, Kevin T.; Meleth, Sreelatha; Stavris, Karen; Downey, Joe; Kusek, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The timely recruitment of study participants is a critical component of successful trials. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common nonmalignant urologic condition among older men, is characterized by lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Successful recruitment methods for a trial of medical therapy for BPH, Medical Therapy of Prostate Symptoms (MTOPS), were mass mailing and advertising. The Complementary and Alternative Medicines Trial for Urological Symptoms (CAMUS) was designed to evaluate a botanical therapy, saw palmetto, for the treatment of BPH. The objective of this study was to evaluate recruitment strategies for CAMUS and to contrast the baseline characteristics of CAMUS participants with those recruited to a similar trial using conventional medical therapy. Design CAMUS is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to evaluate the effects of saw palmetto given at escalating doses over an 18-month period on relief from LUTS. Subjects The target enrollment goal was 350 men with LUTS from 11 clinical centers over a 12-month period. The recruitment techniques used and participants contacted, screened, and randomized through each technique were obtained from the clinical centers. Baseline characteristics of the CAMUS participants were compared with participants in the MTOPS trial who met the CAMUS eligibility criteria for LUTS. Results The target enrollment goal was achieved in 11 months. The overall monthly recruitment rate per site was 3.7 and ranged from 2.4 to 8.0. The most successful recruitment methods were mass mailing and advertising, which accounted for 39% and 35% of the study participants, respectively. In comparison to MTOPS participants, CAMUS participants were younger, more highly educated, more diverse, and had less severe urinary symptoms. Conclusions Successful recruitment methods for CAMUS were similar to those in MTOPS. The use of botanical therapy attracted a less symptomatic and more educated

  16. Recruitment of participants to a clinical trial of botanical therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeannette Y; Foster, Harris E; McVary, Kevin T; Meleth, Sreelatha; Stavris, Karen; Downey, Joe; Kusek, John W

    2011-05-01

    The timely recruitment of study participants is a critical component of successful trials. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common nonmalignant urologic condition among older men, is characterized by lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Successful recruitment methods for a trial of medical therapy for BPH, Medical Therapy of Prostate Symptoms (MTOPS), were mass mailing and advertising. The Complementary and Alternative Medicines Trial for Urological Symptoms (CAMUS) was designed to evaluate a botanical therapy, saw palmetto, for the treatment of BPH. The objective of this study was to evaluate recruitment strategies for CAMUS and to contrast the baseline characteristics of CAMUS participants with those recruited to a similar trial using conventional medical therapy. CAMUS is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to evaluate the effects of saw palmetto given at escalating doses over an 18-month period on relief from LUTS. The target enrollment goal was 350 men with LUTS from 11 clinical centers over a 12-month period. The recruitment techniques used and participants contacted, screened, and randomized through each technique were obtained from the clinical centers. Baseline characteristics of the CAMUS participants were compared with participants in the MTOPS trial who met the CAMUS eligibility criteria for LUTS. The target enrollment goal was achieved in 11 months. The overall monthly recruitment rate per site was 3.7 and ranged from 2.4 to 8.0. The most successful recruitment methods were mass mailing and advertising, which accounted for 39% and 35% of the study participants, respectively. In comparison to MTOPS participants, CAMUS participants were younger, more highly educated, more diverse, and had less severe urinary symptoms. Successful recruitment methods for CAMUS were similar to those in MTOPS. The use of botanical therapy attracted a less symptomatic and more educated study population.

  17. Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Patients With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Results of Phase I/IIa Clinical Trial

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Rychmach, P.; Drahorádová, I.; Konrádová, Šimona; Růžičková, Kateřina; Voříšek, Ivan; Forostyak, Serhiy; Homola, A.; Bojar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2017), s. 647-658 ISSN 0963-6897 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-06958S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : clinical trial * cell-based therapy * stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 3.006, year: 2016

  18. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Kruser, Tim J.; Traynor, Anne M.; Khuntia, Deepak; Yang, David T.; Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Wiederholt, Peggy A.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Hoang, Tien; Jeraj, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials: All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m 2 and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [ 18 F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [ 61 Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results: Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions: The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging demonstrates

  19. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyflot, Matthew J., E-mail: nyflot@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cadence Cancer Center at Delnor Hospital, Geneva, Illinois (United States); Traynor, Anne M. [Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Khuntia, Deepak [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Yang, David T. [Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery-Otolaryngology, H& N Surgery Division, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Wiederholt, Peggy A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Gentry, Lindell R. [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Hoang, Tien [Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Jeraj, Robert [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); and others

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials: All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m{sup 2} and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [{sup 61}Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results: Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions: The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging

  20. CT-guided intratumoral gene therapy in non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauczor, H.U.; Heussel, C.P.; Thelen, M.; Schuler, M.; Huber, C.; Weymarn, A. von; Bongartz, G.; Rochlitz, C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to prove the principle of CT-guided gene therapy by intratumoral injection of a tumor suppressor gene as an alternative treatment approach of incurable non-small-cell lung cancer. In a prospective clinical phase I trial six patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and a mutation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 were treated by CT-guided intratumoral gene therapy. Ten milliliters of a vector solution (replication-defective adenovirus with complete wild-type p53 cDNA) were injected under CT guidance. In four cases the vector solution was completely applied to the tumor center, whereas in two cases 2 ml aliquots were injected into different tumor areas. For the procedure the scan room had been approved as a biosafety cabinet. Gene transfer was assessed by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction in biopsy specimens obtained under CT guidance 24-48 h after therapy. Potential therapeutic efficacy was evaluated on day 28 after treatment using spiral CT. The CT-guided gene therapy was easily performed in all six patients without intervention-related complications. Besides flu-like symptoms, no significant adverse effects of gene therapy were noted. Three of the four patients with central injection exhibited gene transfer in the posttreatment biopsy. Gene transfer could not be proven in the two patients with multiple 2 ml injections. After 28 days, four of the six patients showed stable disease at the treated tumor site, whereas other tumor manifestations progressed. Computed tomography-guided injections are an adequate and easy-to-perform procedure for intratumoral gene therapy. (orig.)

  1. The TOPSHOCK study: Effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diercks Ron L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of the rehabilitation program for patellar tendinopathy. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy originally used focused shockwaves. Several years ago a new kind of shockwave therapy was introduced: radial shockwave therapy. Studies that investigate the effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy as treatment for patellar tendinopathy are scarce. Therefore the aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy as treatments for patellar tendinopathy. Methods/design The TOPSHOCK study (Tendinopathy Of Patella SHOCKwave is a two-armed randomised controlled trial in which the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy are directly compared. Outcome assessors and patients are blinded as to which treatment is given. Patients undergo three sessions of either focused shockwave therapy or radial shockwave therapy at 1-week intervals, both in combination with eccentric decline squat training. Follow-up measurements are scheduled just before treatments 2 and 3, and 1, 4, 7 and 12 weeks after the final treatment. The main outcome measure is the Dutch VISA-P questionnaire, which asks for pain, function and sports participation in subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Secondary outcome measures are pain determined with a VAS during ADL, sports and decline squats, rating of subjective improvement and overall satisfaction with the treatment. Patients will also record their sports activities, pain during and after these activities, and concurrent medical treatment on a weekly basis in a web-based diary. Results will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion

  2. Combination cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells for brain stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Razi, Zahra; Delavari, Somayeh; Shakibajahromi, Benafsheh; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Kazemi, Sepehr; Semsar, Maryam

    2015-05-01

    Brain stroke is the second most important events that lead to disability and morbidity these days. Although, stroke is important, there is no treatment for curing this problem. Nowadays, cell therapy has opened a new window for treating central nervous system disease. In some previous studies the Mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we have designed an experiment to assess the combination cell therapy (Mesenchymal and Neural stem cells) effects on brain stroke. The Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adult rat bone marrow and the neural stem cells were isolated from ganglion eminence of rat embryo 14 days. The Mesenchymal stem cells were injected 1 day after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and the neural stem cells transplanted 7 day after MCAO. After 28 days, the neurological outcomes and brain lesion volumes were evaluated. Also, the activity of Caspase 3 was assessed in different groups. The group which received combination cell therapy had better neurological examination and less brain lesion. Also the combination cell therapy group had the least Caspase 3 activity among the groups. The combination cell therapy is more effective than Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and neural stem cell therapy separately in treating the brain stroke in rats.

  3. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME therapy following stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stokes Emma

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patients with acute stroke will be randomised into either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will receive routine therapy and additional lower limb exercise therapy in the form of family assisted exercises. The control group will receive routine therapy with no additional formal input from their family members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, post intervention and followed up at three months using a series of standardised outcome measures. A secondary aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the family mediated exercise programme on the person with stroke and the individual(s assisting in the delivery of exercises using a qualitative methodology. The study has gained ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committees of each of the clinical sites involved in the study. Discussion This study will evaluate a structured programme of exercises that can be delivered to people with stroke by their 'family members/friends'. Given that the progressive increase in the population of older people is likely to lead to an increased prevalence of stroke in the future, it is important to reduce the burden of this illness on the individual, the family and society. Family mediated exercises can maximise the carry over outside formal physiotherapy sessions, giving patients the opportunity for informal practice. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the US NIH Clinical trials registry (NCT00666744

  4. Wound healing in cell studies and animal model experiments by low level laser therapy; Were clinical studies justified? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, C.; Criens-Poublon, L. J.; Cockrell, C. T.; de Haan, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    Based on results of cell studies and animal experiments, clinical trials with Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) were performed, which finally did not demonstrate a beneficial effect on outcome of wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the evidence from cell studies and animal

  5. Beyond the antigen receptor: editing the genome of T-cells for cancer adoptive cellular therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angharad eLloyd

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent early-stage clinical trials evaluating the adoptive transfer of patient CD8+ T-cells re-directed with antigen receptors recognising tumours have shown very encouraging results. These reports provide strong support for further development of the therapeutic concept as a curative cancer treatment. In this respect combining the adoptive transfer of tumour-specific T-cells with therapies that increase their anti-tumour capacity is viewed as a promising strategy to improve treatment outcome. The ex-vivo genetic engineering step that underlies T-cell re-direction offers a unique angle to combine antigen receptor delivery with the targeting of cell intrinsic pathways that restrict T-cell effector functions. Recent progress in genome editing technologies such as protein- and RNA-guided endonucleases raise the possibility of disrupting gene expression in T-cells in order to enhance effector functions or to bypass tumour immune suppression. This approach would avoid the systemic administration of compounds that disrupt immune homeostasis, potentially avoiding autoimmune adverse effects, and could improve the efficacy of T-cell based adoptive therapies.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 quantitative cell microculture as a measure of antiviral efficacy in a multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscus, S A; DeGruttola, V; Gupta, P; Katzenstein, D A; Meyer, W A; LoFaro, M L; Katzman, M; Ragni, M V; Reichelderfer, P S; Coombs, R W

    1995-02-01

    A quantitative cell microculture assay (QMC) was used to measure the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-associated titer in 109 subjects rolled in an open-label phase I/II study of didanosine monotherapy or combination therapy with zidovudine. The titer was inversely correlated with CD4+ cell count at baseline (r = .37, P = .001). After 12 weeks of therapy, subjects showed a significant decreases in virus titer and those with the highest baseline virus titers had the greatest increase in CD4+ cell number (r = .430, P = .002). The QMC assay was more sensitive (98%) for assessing the antiretroviral effect of therapy than was immune complex-dissociated HIV p24 antigen (32%) or plasma culture (3.4%). Estimated sample sizes for phase I/II clinical trials were derived using the within-subject QMC SD of .72 log10 infectious units per 10(6) PMBC.

  7. Subdissociative intranasal ketamine plus standard pain therapy versus standard pain therapy in the treatment of paediatric sickle cell disease vaso-occlusive crises in resource-limited settings: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, James R; Sawe, Hendry Robert; Mfinanga, Juma A; Nshom, Ernest; Helm, Ethan; Moore, Charity G; Runyon, Michael S; Reynolds, Stacy L

    2017-07-10

    Pediatric sickle cell disease, highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, carries great morbidity and mortality risk. Limited resources and monitoring make management of acute vaso-occlusive crises challenging. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of subdissociative intranasal ketamine as a cheap, readily available and easily administered adjunct to standard pain therapy. We hypothesise that subdissociative, intranasal ketamine may significantly augment current approaches to pain management in resource-limited settings in a safe and cost-effective manner. This is a multicentred, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolling children 4-16 years of age with sickle cell disease and painful vaso-occlusive pain crises. Study sites include two sub-Saharan teaching and referral hospitals with acute intake areas. All patients receive standard analgesic therapy during evaluation. Patients randomised to the treatment arm receive 1 mg/kg intranasal ketamine at onset of therapy, while placebo arm participants receive volume-matched intranasal normal saline. All participants and clinical staff are blinded to the treatment allocation. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Primary endpoints are changes in self-report pain scales (Faces Pain Scale-Revised) at 30, 60 and 120 minutes and rates of adverse events. Secondary endpoints include hospital length of stay, total analgesia use and quality of life assessment 2-3 weeks postintervention. The research methods for this study have been approved by the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board Institutional Review Board (IRB2015-07), the Tanzanian National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR/HQ/R.8a/Vol. IX/2299), Muhimbili National Hospital IRB (MNH/IRB/I/2015/14) and the Tanzanian Food and Drugs Authority (TFDA0015/CTR/0015/9). Data reports will be provided to the Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) periodically throughout the study as well as all reports of adverse events. All

  8. Vessel-associated stem cells from skeletal muscle: From biology to future uses in cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancricca, Cristina; Mirabella, Massimiliano; Gliubizzi, Carla; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Gidaro, Teresa; Morosetti, Roberta

    2010-06-26

    Over the last years, the existence of different stem cells with myogenic potential has been widely investigated. Besides the classical skeletal muscle progenitors represented by satellite cells, numerous multipotent and embryologically unrelated progenitors with a potential role in muscle differentiation and repair have been identified. In order to conceive a therapeutic approach for degenerative muscle disorders, it is of primary importance to identify an ideal stem cell endowed with all the features for a possible use in vivo. Among all emerging populations, vessel-associated stem cells are a novel and promising class of multipotent progenitors of mesodermal origin and with high myogenic potential which seem to best fit all the requirements for a possible cell therapy. In vitro and in vivostudies have already tested the effectiveness and safety of vessel-associated stem cells in animal models. This leads to the concrete possibility in the future to start pilot human clinical trials, hopefully opening the way to a turning point in the treatment of genetic and acquired muscle disorders.

  9. G-CSF therapy with mobilization of bone marrow stem cells for myocardial recovery after acute myocardial infarction - a relevant treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, R.S.; Kastrup, J.

    2008-01-01

    -CSF treatment. Current controversies in interpretation of the results include 1) importance of direct cardiac effect of G-CSF vs indirect through bone marrow stem and progenitor cell mobilization, 2) importance of timing of G-CSF therapy, 3) importance of G-CSF dose, and 4) importance of cell types mobilized...... from the bone-marrow. Cell-based therapies to improve cardiac function remain promising and further experimental and clinical studies are warranted to determine the future role of G-CSF Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6......This review of adjunctive therapy with subcutaneous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) focus on the cardioprotective effects and potential mechanisms of G-CSF and discuss the therapeutic potential of G-CSF. All clinical trials published...

  10. Transplantation of umbilical cord blood-derived cells for novel indications in regenerative therapy or immune modulation: a scoping review of clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iafolla, Marco A J; Tay, Jason; Allan, David S

    2014-01-01

    Although used mainly for transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells in the treatment of blood disorders, umbilical cord blood (UCB)-based therapies are now being used increasingly for novel applications in nonhematopoietic diseases and as a form of cellular regenerative therapy or immune modulation. We performed a systematic scoping review by searching Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for published articles, and we searched www.clinicaltrials.com and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to describe the breadth of published studies and ongoing clinical activity in umbilical cord-based cellular therapy for regenerative therapy and immune modulation. The most commonly published area of expertise in the use of UCB-derived cellular transplantation for novel indications is for neurological disorders and this remains the most active area of study in ongoing registered trials. An increasingly broad range of disorders, however, are reflected in ongoing registered trials, which suggests greater activity, interest, and investment in UCB-derived cellular therapy. Interestingly, adult patients compose the majority of patients reported in published reports and registered ongoing clinical studies continue to enroll predominantly adult subjects. Geographically, Asian countries appear most active in UCB-derived cellular therapy and our analysis of ongoing studies suggests this trend will likely continue. Regular assessment of published and ongoing activity in UCB transplantation for emerging novel indications will be critical for informing UCB banking establishments and funding agencies to guide changes in banking practices related to emerging trends in cell therapy. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Global Harmonization of Quality Assurance Naming Conventions in Radiation Therapy Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melidis, Christos, E-mail: christos.melidis@eortc.be [European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer–Radiation Oncology Group (EORTC-ROG), Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance (RTQA), Brussels (Belgium); Bosch, Walther R. [Washington University, representing Advanced Technology Consortium, Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Izewska, Joanna [Dosimetry Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Zubizarreta, Eduardo [Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Ulin, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Representing Quality Assurance Review Center, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Ishikura, Satoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University, Representing Japan Clinical Oncology Group, RTQA, Tokyo (Japan); Followill, David [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Representing Radiological Physics Center, RTQA, Houston, Texas (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Representing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTQA, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, representing TransTasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) Cancer Research, Newcastle (Australia); Besuijen, Deidre [North West Cancer Centre, Representing TROG Cancer Research, Newcastle (Australia); Clark, Clark H. [Department of Medical Physics, St. Luke' s Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey and National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex, representing Radiation Therapy Trials Quality Assurance (RTTQA) (United Kingdom); Miles, Elizabeth; Aird, Edwin [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood, Middlesex representing RTTQA (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To review the various radiation therapy quality assurance (RTQA) procedures used by the Global Clinical Trials RTQA Harmonization Group (GHG) steering committee members and present the harmonized RTQA naming conventions by amalgamating procedures with similar objectives. Methods and Materials: A survey of the GHG steering committee members' RTQA procedures, their goals, and naming conventions was conducted. The RTQA procedures were classified as baseline, preaccrual, and prospective/retrospective data capture and analysis. After all the procedures were accumulated and described, extensive discussions took place to come to harmonized RTQA procedures and names. Results: The RTQA procedures implemented within a trial by the GHG steering committee members vary in quantity, timing, name, and compliance criteria. The procedures of each member are based on perceived chances of noncompliance, so that the quality of radiation therapy planning and treatment does not negatively influence the trial measured outcomes. A comparison of these procedures demonstrated similarities among the goals of the various methods, but the naming given to each differed. After thorough discussions, the GHG steering committee members amalgamated the 27 RTQA procedures to 10 harmonized ones with corresponding names: facility questionnaire, beam output audit, benchmark case, dummy run, complex treatment dosimetry check, virtual phantom, individual case review, review of patients' treatment records, and protocol compliance and dosimetry site visit. Conclusions: Harmonized RTQA harmonized naming conventions, which can be used in all future clinical trials involving radiation therapy, have been established. Harmonized procedures will facilitate future intergroup trial collaboration and help to ensure comparable RTQA between international trials, which enables meta-analyses and reduces RTQA workload for intergroup studies.

  12. The Challenges of First-in-Human Stem Cell Clinical Trials: What Does This Mean for Ethics and Institutional Review Boards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Roger A; Carpenter, Melissa K; Forbes, Stuart; Goldman, Steven A; Jamieson, Catriona; Murry, Charles E; Takahashi, Jun; Weir, Gordon

    2018-05-08

    Stem cell-based clinical interventions are increasingly advancing through preclinical testing and approaching clinical trials. The complexity and diversity of these approaches, and the confusion created by unproven and untested stem cell-based "therapies," create a growing need for a more comprehensive review of these early-stage human trials to ensure they place the patients at minimal risk of adverse events but are also based on solid evidence of preclinical efficacy with a clear scientific rationale for that effect. To address this issue and supplement the independent review process, especially that of the ethics and institutional review boards who may not be experts in stem cell biology, the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) has developed a set of practical questions to cover the major issues for which clear evidence-based answers need to be obtained before approving a stem cell-based trial. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of early personal-history characteristics on the Pace of Aging: implications for clinical trials of therapies to slow aging and extend healthspan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsky, Daniel W; Caspi, Avshalom; Cohen, Harvey J; Kraus, William E; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2017-08-01

    Therapies to extend healthspan are poised to move from laboratory animal models to human clinical trials. Translation from mouse to human will entail challenges, among them the multifactorial heterogeneity of human aging. To inform clinical trials about this heterogeneity, we report how humans' pace of biological aging relates to personal-history characteristics. Because geroprotective therapies must be delivered by midlife to prevent age-related disease onset, we studied young-adult members of the Dunedin Study 1972-73 birth cohort (n = 954). Cohort members' Pace of Aging was measured as coordinated decline in the integrity of multiple organ systems, by quantifying rate of decline across repeated measurements of 18 biomarkers assayed when cohort members were ages 26, 32, and 38 years. The childhood personal-history characteristics studied were known predictors of age-related disease and mortality, and were measured prospectively during childhood. Personal-history characteristics of familial longevity, childhood social class, adverse childhood experiences, and childhood health, intelligence, and self-control all predicted differences in cohort members' adulthood Pace of Aging. Accumulation of more personal-history risks predicted faster Pace of Aging. Because trials of anti-aging therapies will need to ascertain personal histories retrospectively, we replicated results using cohort members' retrospective personal-history reports made in adulthood. Because many trials recruit participants from clinical settings, we replicated results in the cohort subset who had recent health system contact according to electronic medical records. Quick, inexpensive measures of trial participants' early personal histories can enable clinical trials to study who volunteers for trials, who adheres to treatment, and who responds to anti-aging therapies. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Interpreting survival data from clinical trials of surgery versus stereotactic body radiation therapy in operable Stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Pamela; Keogan, Kathleen; Crabtree, Traves; Colditz, Graham; Broderick, Stephen; Puri, Varun; Meyers, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    To identify the variability of short- and long-term survival outcomes among closed Phase III randomized controlled trials with small sample sizes comparing SBRT (stereotactic body radiation therapy) and surgical resection in operable clinical Stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Clinical Stage I NSCLC patients who underwent surgery at our institution meeting the inclusion/exclusion criteria for STARS (Randomized Study to Compare CyberKnife to Surgical Resection in Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer), ROSEL (Trial of Either Surgery or Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Early Stage (IA) Lung Cancer), or both were identified. Bootstrapping analysis provided 10,000 iterations to depict 30-day mortality and three-year overall survival (OS) in cohorts of 16 patients (to simulate the STARS surgical arm), 27 patients (to simulate the pooled surgical arms of STARS and ROSEL), and 515 (to simulate the goal accrual for the surgical arm of STARS). From 2000 to 2012, 749/873 (86%) of clinical Stage I NSCLC patients who underwent resection were eligible for STARS only, ROSEL only, or both studies. When patients eligible for STARS only were repeatedly sampled with a cohort size of 16, the 3-year OS rates ranged from 27 to 100%, and 30-day mortality varied from 0 to 25%. When patients eligible for ROSEL or for both STARS and ROSEL underwent bootstrapping with n=27, the 3-year OS ranged from 46 to 100%, while 30-day mortality varied from 0 to 15%. Finally, when patients eligible for STARS were repeatedly sampled in groups of 515, 3-year OS narrowed to 70-85%, with 30-day mortality varying from 0 to 4%. Short- and long-term survival outcomes from trials with small sample sizes are extremely variable and unreliable for extrapolation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genome Therapy of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 iPS Cells for Development of Autologous Stem Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuanzheng; Guo, Xiuming; Santostefano, Katherine; Wang, Yanlin; Reid, Tammy; Zeng, Desmond; Terada, Naohiro; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Xia, Guangbin

    2016-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by expanded Cytosine-Thymine-Guanine (CTG) repeats in the 3'-untranslated region (3' UTR) of the Dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene, for which there is no effective therapy. The objective of this study is to develop genome therapy in human DM1 induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to eliminate mutant transcripts and reverse the phenotypes for developing autologous stem cell therapy. The general approach involves targeted insertion of polyA signals (PASs) upstream of DMPK CTG repeats, which will lead to premature termination of transcription and elimination of toxic mutant transcripts. Insertion of PASs was mediated by homologous recombination triggered by site-specific transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-induced double-strand break. We found genome-treated DM1 iPS cells continue to maintain pluripotency. The insertion of PASs led to elimination of mutant transcripts and complete disappearance of nuclear RNA foci and reversal of aberrant splicing in linear-differentiated neural stem cells, cardiomyocytes, and teratoma tissues. In conclusion, genome therapy by insertion of PASs upstream of the expanded DMPK CTG repeats prevented the production of toxic mutant transcripts and reversal of phenotypes in DM1 iPS cells and their progeny. These genetically-treated iPS cells will have broad clinical application in developing autologous stem cell therapy for DM1.

  16. Innovating cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs in an era of successful standard of care therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole

    2017-11-01

    Evolving cystic fibrosis 'standards of care' have influenced recent cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs for new therapies; care additions/improvements will require innovative trial designs to maximize feasibility and efficacy detection. Three cystic fibrosis therapeutic areas (pulmonary exacerbations, Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections, and reduced cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator [CFTR] protein function) differ with respect to the duration for which recognized 'standards of care' have been available. However, developers of new therapies in all the three areas are affected by similar challenges: standards of care have become so strongly entrenched that traditional placebo-controlled studies in cystic fibrosis populations likely to benefit from newer therapies have become less and less feasible. Today, patients/clinicians are more likely to entertain participation in active-comparator trial designs, that have substantial challenges of their own. Foremost among these are the selection of 'valid' active comparator(s), estimation of a comparator's current clinical efficacy (required for testing noninferiority hypotheses), and effective blinding of commercially available comparators. Recent and future cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs will have to creatively address this collateral result of successful past development of effective cystic fibrosis therapies: patients and clinicians are much less likely to accept simple, placebo-controlled studies to evaluate future therapies.

  17. NHLBI's program for VAD therapy for moderately advanced heart failure: the REVIVE-IT pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, J Timothy; Mann, Douglas L

    2010-11-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are used to bridge heart failure patients to transplantation, to allow their own hearts to recover, or as permanent ("destination") therapy. To date, the use of VADs has been limited to late-stage heart failure patients because of the associated device risks. In 2008, a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) working group met to evaluate the treatment of heart failure using VADs and to advise the institute on how therapy for heart failure may be best advanced by clinical trials involving the devices. Recognizing the improvements in VAD technology and in patient care and selection over the past decade, the working group recommended that a trial be performed to assess the use of chronic VAD therapy in patients who are less ill than those currently eligible for destination therapy. The hypothesis proposed for the trial is that VAD therapy may improve both survival and quality of life in moderately advanced heart failure patients who are neither inotrope-dependent nor exercise-intolerant and have not yet developed serious consequences such as malnourishment, end-organ damage, and immobility. Based on the group's recommendations, NHLBI issued an RFP in 2009 for the REVIVE-IT Pilot Trail, which will serve to test the hypothesis and inform the pivotal trial. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Optimizing hydroxyurea therapy for sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Russell E

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyurea has proven efficacy in numerous clinical trials as a disease-modifying treatment for patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but is currently under-used in clinical practice. To improve the effectiveness of hydroxyurea therapy, efforts should be directed toward broadening the clinical treatment indications, optimizing the daily dosage, and emphasizing the benefits of early and extended treatment. Here, various issues related to hydroxyurea treatment are discussed, focusing on both published evidence and clinical experience. Specific guidance is provided regarding important but potentially unfamiliar aspects of hydroxyurea treatment for SCA, such as escalating to maximum tolerated dose, treating in the setting of cerebrovascular disease, switching from chronic transfusions to hydroxyurea, and using serial phlebotomy to alleviate iron overload. Future research directions to optimize hydroxyurea therapy are also discussed, including personalized dosing based on pharmacokinetic modeling, prediction of fetal hemoglobin responses based on pharmacogenomics, and the risks and benefits of hydroxyurea for non-SCA genotypes and during pregnancy/lactation. Another critical initiative is the introduction of hydroxyurea safely and effectively into global regions that have a high disease burden of SCA but limited resources, such as sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, and India. Final considerations emphasize the long-term goal of optimizing hydroxyurea therapy, which is to help treatment become accepted as standard of care for all patients with SCA. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  19. Benefit of particle therapy in re-irradiation of head and neck patients. Results of a multicentric in silico ROCOCO trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eekers, Daniëlle B P; Roelofs, Erik; Jelen, Urszula; Kirk, Maura; Granzier, Marlies; Ammazzalorso, Filippo; Ahn, Peter H; Janssens, Geert O R J; Hoebers, Frank J P; Friedmann, Tobias; Solberg, Timothy; Walsh, Sean; Troost, Esther G C; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    In this multicentric in silico trial we compared photon, proton, and carbon-ion radiotherapy plans for re-irradiation of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) regarding dose to tumour and doses to surrounding organs at risk (OARs). Twenty-five HNSCC patients with a second new or recurrent cancer after previous irradiation (70Gy) were included. Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and ion therapy (IMIT) re-irradiation plans to a second subsequent dose of 70Gy were compared to photon therapy delivered with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). When comparing IMIT and IMPT to VMAT, the mean dose to all investigated 22 OARs was significantly reduced for IMIT and to 15 out of 22 OARs (68%) using IMPT. The maximum dose to 2% volume (D 2 ) of the brainstem and spinal cord were significantly reduced using IMPT and IMIT compared to VMAT. The data are available on www.cancerdata.org. In this ROCOCO in silico trial, a reduction in mean dose to OARs was achieved using particle therapy compared to photons in the re-irradiation of HNSCC. There was a dosimetric benefit favouring carbon-ions above proton therapy. These dose reductions may potentially translate into lower severe complication rates related to the re-irradiation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy and safety of regenerative cell therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension in animal models: a preclinical systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Colin M; Zhai, Alex; Lalu, Manoj M; Welsh, Christopher; Levac, Brendan M; Fergusson, Dean; McIntyre, Lauralyn; Stewart, Duncan J

    2016-05-25

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease (15 cases per million) that is characterized by widespread loss of the pulmonary microcirculation and elevated pulmonary vascular resistance leading to pathological right ventricular remodeling and ultimately right heart failure. Regenerative cell therapies (i.e., therapies involving cells with stem or progenitor-like properties) could potentially restore the effective lung microcirculation and provide a curative therapy for PAH. Preclinical evidence suggests that regenerative cell therapy using endothelial progenitor cells or mesenchymal stem cells may be beneficial in the treatment of PAH. These findings have led to the completion of a small number of human clinical trials, albeit with modest effect compared to animal studies. The objective of this systematic review is to compare the efficacy and safety of regenerative cell therapies in preclinical models of PAH as well as assess study quality to inform future clinical studies. We will include preclinical studies of PAH in which a regenerative cell type was administered and outcomes compared to a disease control. The primary outcome will be pulmonary hemodynamics as assessed by measurement of right ventricular systolic pressure and/or mean pulmonary arterial pressure. Secondary outcomes will include mortality, survival, right ventricular remodeling, pulmonary vascular resistance, cardiac output, cardiac index, pulmonary acceleration time, tricuspid annular systolic excursion, and right ventricular wall thickness. Electronic searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases will be constructed and reviewed by the Peer Review of Electronic Search Strategies (PRESS) process. Search results will be screened independently in duplicate. Data from eligible studies will be extracted, pooled, and analyzed using random effects models. Risk of bias will be assessed using the SYstematic Review Centre for Laboratory animal Experimentation (SYRCLE) risk of bias tool, and

  1. Yohimbine Enhancement of Exposure Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.A.J.; Rosenfield, D.; Davis, M.L.; Julian, K.; Handelsman, P.R.; Otto, M.W.; Tuerk, P.; Shiekh, M.; Rosenfield, B.; Hofmann, S.G.; Powers, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preclinical and clinical trials suggest that yohimbine may augment extinction learning without significant side effects. However, previous clinical trials have only examined adults with specific phobias. Yohimbine has not yet been investigated in the augmentation of exposure therapy for

  2. Adaptive T cell responses induced by oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus-granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor therapy expanded by dendritic cell and cytokine-induced killer cell adoptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun; Gwin, William R; Zhou, Xinna; Wang, Xiaoli; Huang, Hongyan; Jiang, Ni; Zhou, Lei; Agarwal, Pankaj; Hobeika, Amy; Crosby, Erika; Hartman, Zachary C; Morse, Michael A; H Eng, Kevin; Lyerly, H Kim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose : Although local oncolytic viral therapy (OVT) may enhance tumor lysis, antigen release, and adaptive immune responses, systemic antitumor responses post-therapy are limited. Adoptive immunotherapy with autologous dendritic cells (DC) and cytokine-induced killer cells (DC-CIK) synergizes with systemic therapies. We hypothesized that OVT with Herpes Simplex Virus-granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (HSV-GM-CSF) would induce adaptive T cell responses that could be expanded systemically with sequential DC-CIK therapy. Patients and Methods : We performed a pilot study of intratumoral HSV-GM-CSF OVT followed by autologous DC-CIK cell therapy. In addition to safety and clinical endpoints, we monitored adaptive T cell responses by quantifying T cell receptor (TCR) populations in pre-oncolytic therapy, post-oncolytic therapy, and after DC-CIK therapy. Results : Nine patients with advanced malignancy were treated with OVT (OrienX010), of whom seven experienced stable disease (SD). Five of the OVT treated patients underwent leukapheresis, generation, and delivery of DC-CIKs, and two had SD, whereas three progressed. T cell receptor sequencing of TCR β sequences one month after OVT therapy demonstrates a dynamic TCR repertoire in response to OVT therapy in the majority of patients with the systematic expansion of multiple T cell clone populations following DC-CIK therapy. This treatment was well tolerated and long-term event free and overall survival was observed in six of the nine patients. Conclusions : Strategies inducing the local activation of tumor-specific immune responses can be combined with adoptive cellular therapies to expand the adaptive T cell responses systemically and further studies are warranted.

  3. Rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy vs. cognitive behaviour therapy for depression: study protocol for a randomised controlled superiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvenegaard, Morten; Watkins, Ed R; Poulsen, Stig; Rosenberg, Nicole K; Gondan, Matthias; Grafton, Ben; Austin, Stephen F; Howard, Henriette; Moeller, Stine B

    2015-08-11

    Cognitive behavioural therapy is an effective treatment for depression. However, one third of the patients do not respond satisfactorily, and relapse rates of around 30 % within the first post-treatment year were reported in a recent meta-analysis. In total, 30-50 % of remitted patients present with residual symptoms by the end of treatment. A common residual symptom is rumination, a process of recurrent negative thinking and dwelling on negative affect. Rumination has been demonstrated as a major factor in vulnerability to depression, predicting the onset, severity, and duration of future depression. Rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy is a psychotherapeutic treatment targeting rumination. Because rumination plays a major role in the initiation and maintenance of depression, targeting rumination with rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy may be more effective in treating depression and reducing relapse than standard cognitive behavioural therapy. This study is a two-arm pragmatic randomised controlled superiority trial comparing the effectiveness of group-based rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy with the effectiveness of group-based cognitive behavioural therapy for treatment of depression. One hundred twenty-eight patients with depression will be recruited from and given treatment in an outpatient service at a psychiatric hospital in Denmark. Our primary outcome will be severity of depressive symptoms (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression) at completion of treatment. Secondary outcomes will be level of rumination, worry, anxiety, quality of life, behavioural activation, experimental measures of cognitive flexibility, and emotional attentional bias. A 6-month follow-up is planned and will include the primary outcome measure and assessment of relapse. The clinical outcome of this trial may guide clinicians to decide on the merits of including rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy in the treatment of depression in

  4. Cell-Based Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kitada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell transplantation is a strategy with great potential for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and many types of stem cells, including neural stem cells and embryonic stem cells, are considered candidates for transplantation therapy. Mesenchymal stem cells are a great therapeutic cell source because they are easy accessible and can be expanded from patients or donor mesenchymal tissues without posing serious ethical and technical problems. They have trophic effects for protecting damaged tissues as well as differentiation ability to generate a broad spectrum of cells, including dopamine neurons, which contribute to the replenishment of lost cells in Parkinson's disease. This paper focuses mainly on the potential of mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic cell source and discusses their potential clinical application in Parkinson's disease.

  5. Randomized trial of time-limited interruptions of protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy (ART vs. continuous therapy for HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Firnhaber

    Full Text Available The clinical outcomes of short interruptions of PI-based ART regimens remains undefined.A 2-arm non-inferiority trial was conducted on 53 HIV-1 infected South African participants with viral load 450 cells/µl on stavudine (or zidovudine, lamivudine and lopinavir/ritonavir. Subjects were randomized to a sequential 2, 4 and 8-week ART interruptions or b continuous ART (cART. Primary analysis was based on the proportion of CD4 count >350 cells(c/ml over 72 weeks. Adherence, HIV-1 drug resistance, and CD4 count rise over time were analyzed as secondary endpoints.The proportions of CD4 counts >350 cells/µl were 82.12% for the intermittent arm and 93.73 for the cART arm; the difference of 11.95% was above the defined 10% threshold for non-inferiority (upper limit of 97.5% CI, 24.1%; 2-sided CI: -0.16, 23.1. No clinically significant differences in opportunistic infections, adverse events, adherence or viral resistance were noted; after randomization, long-term CD4 rise was observed only in the cART arm.We are unable to conclude that short PI-based ART interruptions are non-inferior to cART in retention of immune reconstitution; however, short interruptions did not lead to a greater rate of resistance mutations or adverse events than cART suggesting that this regimen may be more forgiving than NNRTIs if interruptions in therapy occur.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00100646.

  6. T-Cell Subsets Predict Mortality in Malnourished Zambian Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline C Chisenga

    Full Text Available To estimate the prognostic value of T-cell subsets in Zambian patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART, and to assess the impact of a nutritional intervention on T-cell subsets.This was a sub-study of a randomised clinical trial of a nutritional intervention for malnourished adults initiating ART. Participants in a randomised controlled trial (NUSTART trial were enrolled between April and December 2012. Participants received lipid-based nutritional supplement either with or without additional vitamins and minerals. Immunophenotyping was undertaken at baseline and, in survivors, after 12 weeks of ART to characterize T-cell subsets using the markers CD3, CD4, CD8, CD45RA, CCR7, CD28, CD57, CD31, α4β7, Ki67, CD25 and HLA-DR. Univariate and multivariate survival analysis was performed, and responses to treatment were analysed using the Wicoxon rank-sum test.Among 181 adults, 36 (20% died by 12 weeks after starting ART. In univariate analysis, patients who died had fewer proliferating, more naïve and fewer gut homing CD4+ T-cells compared to survivors; and more senescent and fewer proliferating CD8+ T-cells. In a multivariate Cox regression model high naïve CD4+, low proliferating CD4+, high senescent CD8+ and low proliferating CD8+ subsets were independently associated with increased risk of death. Recent CD4+ thymic emigrants increased less between recruitment and 12 weeks of ART in the intervention group compared to the control group.Specific CD4+ T-cell subsets are of considerable prognostic significance for patients initiating ART in Zambia, but only thymic output responded to this nutritional intervention.

  7. Melodic intonation therapy in chronic aphasia: Evidence from a pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. van der Meulen (Ineke); W.M.E. van de Sandt-Koenderman (Mieke); Heijenbrok, M.H. (Majanka H.); E.G. Visch-Brink (Evy); Ribber, G.M. (Gerard M.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMelodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) is a language production therapy for severely nonfluent aphasic patients using melodic intoning and rhythm to restore language. Although many studies have reported its beneficial effects on language production, randomized controlled trials (RCT) examining

  8. The effect of massage therapy and/or exercise therapy on subacute or long-lasting neck pain--the Stockholm neck trial (STONE): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillgate, Eva; Bill, Anne-Sylvie; Côté, Pierre; Viklund, Peter; Peterson, Anna; Holm, Lena W

    2015-09-16

    Neck pain is a major health problem in populations worldwide and an economic burden in modern societies due to its high prevalence and costs in terms of health care expenditures and lost productivity. Massage and exercise therapy are widely used management options for neck pain. However, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding their effectiveness for subacute and long-lasting neck pain. This study protocol describes a randomized controlled trial aiming to determine the effect of massage and/or exercise therapy on subacute and long-lasting neck pain over the course of 1 year. A randomized controlled trial in which at least 600 study participants with subacute or long-lasting nonspecific neck pain will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of four treatment arms: massage therapy (A), exercise therapy (B), exercise therapy plus massage therapy (C) and advice to stay active (D). The study has an E-health approach, and study participants are being recruited through advertising with a mix of traditional and online marketing channels. Web-based self-report questionnaires measure the main outcomes at 7, 12, 26 and 52 weeks after inclusion. The primary outcomes are a clinically important improvement in pain intensity and pain-related disability at follow-up, measured with a modified version of the Chronic Pain Questionnaire (CPQ). The secondary outcomes are global improvement, health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), sick leave, drug consumption and healthcare utilization. Adverse events are measured by questionnaires at return visits to the clinic, and automated text messages (SMSes) survey neck pain intensity and pain-related disability every week over one year. The results of this study will provide clinicians and stakeholders much needed knowledge to plan medical care for subacute and long-lasting neck pain disorders. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN01453590. Date of registration: 3 July 2014.

  9. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  10. Occupational therapy for elderly : evidence mapping of randomised controlled trials from 2004-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voigt-Radloff, S; Ruf, G.; Vogel, A.; van Nes, F.; Hüll, M.

    OBJECTIVE: Previous systematic reviews on occupational therapy for elderly included studies until 2003. The present evidence mapping summarizes recent evidence for the efficacy of occupational therapy with older persons based on randomised controlled trials from 2004-2012. METHOD: An electronic

  11. Guided Web-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Perfectionism: Results From Two Different Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozental, Alexander; Shafran, Roz; Wade, Tracey D; Kothari, Radha; Egan, Sarah J; Ekberg, Linda; Wiss, Maria; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard

    2018-04-26

    Perfectionism can become a debilitating condition that may negatively affect functioning in multiple areas, including mental health. Prior research has indicated that internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy can be beneficial, but few studies have included follow-up data. The objective of this study was to explore the outcomes at follow-up of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy with guided self-help, delivered as 2 separate randomized controlled trials conducted in Sweden and the United Kingdom. In total, 120 participants randomly assigned to internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy were included in both intention-to-treat and completer analyses: 78 in the Swedish trial and 62 in the UK trial. The primary outcome measure was the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, Concern over Mistakes subscale (FMPS CM). Secondary outcome measures varied between the trials and consisted of the Clinical Perfectionism Questionnaire (CPQ; both trials), the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9; Swedish trial), the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7; Swedish trial), and the 21-item Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21; UK trial). Follow-up occurred after 6 months for the UK trial and after 12 months for the Swedish trial. Analysis of covariance revealed a significant difference between pretreatment and follow-up in both studies. Intention-to-treat within-group Cohen d effect sizes were 1.21 (Swedish trial; 95% CI 0.86-1.54) and 1.24 (UK trial; 95% CI 0.85-1.62) for the FMPS CM. Furthermore, 29 (59%; Swedish trial) and 15 (43%; UK trial) of the participants met the criteria for recovery on the FMPS CM. Improvements were also significant for the CPQ, with effect sizes of 1.32 (Swedish trial; 95% CI 0.97-1.66) and 1.49 (UK trial; 95% CI 1.09-1.88); the PHQ-9, effect size 0.60 (95% CI 0.28-0.92); the GAD-7, effect size 0.67 (95% CI 0.34-0.99); and the DASS-21, effect size 0.50 (95% CI 0.13-0.85). The results are promising for the use of

  12. CARs and other T cell therapies for MM: The clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhof, Sophia; Hudecek, Michael; Smith, Eric L

    2018-06-01

    Harnessing the endogenous immune system to eliminate malignant cells has long been an intriguing approach. After considerable success in the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells have entered early clinical evaluation in the field of multiple myeloma (MM). The choice of suitable non-CD19 target antigens is challenging and a variety of myeloma-associated surface molecules have been under preclinical investigation. Most recent clinical protocols have focused on targeting B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), and early results are promising. The trials differ in receptor constructs, patient selection, dosing strategies and conditioning chemotherapy and will thus pave the way to eventually define the optimal parameters. Other sources for autologous T-cell therapy of MM include affinity-enhanced T-cell receptor-modified cells and marrow infiltrating lymphocytes. In summary, adoptive T-cell transfer for the treatment of MM is still in its infancy, but if early response rates indicate durability, will be a paradigm changing therapeutic modality for the treatment of MM. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Molecular and cell-based therapies for muscle degenerations: a road under construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Emanuele; Annibali, Daniela; Cassano, Marco; Crippa, Stefania; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    Despite the advances achieved in understanding the molecular biology of muscle cells in the past decades, there is still need for effective treatments of muscular degeneration caused by muscular dystrophies and for counteracting the muscle wasting caused by cachexia or sarcopenia. The corticosteroid medications currently in use for dystrophic patients merely help to control the inflammatory state and only slightly delay the progression of the disease. Unfortunately, walkers and wheel chairs are the only options for such patients to maintain independence and walking capabilities until the respiratory muscles become weak and the mechanical ventilation is needed. On the other hand, myostatin inhibition, IL-6 antagonism and synthetic ghrelin administration are examples of promising treatments in cachexia animal models. In both dystrophies and cachectic syndrome the muscular degeneration is extremely relevant and the translational therapeutic attempts to find a possible cure are well defined. In particular, molecular-based therapies are common options to be explored in order to exploit beneficial treatments for cachexia, while gene/cell therapies are mostly used in the attempt to induce a substantial improvement of the dystrophic muscular phenotype. This review focuses on the description of the use of molecular administrations and gene/stem cell therapy to treat muscular degenerations. It reviews previous trials using cell delivery protocols in mice and patients starting with the use of donor myoblasts, outlining the likely causes for their poor results and briefly focusing on satellite cell studies that raise new hope. Then it proceeds to describe recently identified stem/progenitor cells, including pluripotent stem cells and in relationship to their ability to home within a dystrophic muscle and to differentiate into skeletal muscle cells. Different known features of various stem cells are compared in this perspective, and the few available examples of their use in

  14. Interventions for treating painful sickle cell crisis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Peña-Martí, Guiomar E; Comunián-Carrasco, Gabriella; Martí-Peña, Arturo J

    2009-01-21

    Sickle cell disease is a group of genetic haemoglobin disorders. All over the world, about 300,000 children with these disorders are born each year. Acute sickle cell pain episodes are the most common cause of hospitalisation. Pregnancy in women with sickle cell disease is associated with an increased incidence of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The painful crisis is a severe complication of this illness, and it requires several interventions: packed red cell transfusion, fluid replacement therapy, analgesic drugs, oxygen therapy and steroids; but the approach is not standardised. To assess the effectiveness and safety of different regimens of packed red cell transfusion, oxygen therapy, fluid replacement therapy, analgesic drugs, and steroids for the treatment of painful sickle cell crisis during pregnancy. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (December 2007), the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register (October 2007), LILACS database (1982 to December 2007) and the following web sites: ClinicalTrials.gov (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) (December 5, 2007); Current Controlled Trials (http://controlled-trials.com/) (December 5, 2007), and Sistema de Información Esencial en Terapéutica y Salud (http://www.icf.uab.es/informacion/Papyrus/sietes.asp) (December 1, 2007). We also handsearched the European Haematology Association conference (June 2007), the American Society of Hematology conference (December 2007) and reference lists of all retrieved articles. We intended to include randomised clinical trials. We intended to summarise data by standard Cochrane Collaboration methodologies. We could not find any randomised clinical trials on interventions (packed red cell transfusion, oxygen therapy, fluid replacement therapy, analgesic drugs, and steroids) for the treatment of painful sickle cell crisis during pregnancy. This review found no randomised clinical trials on the safety and

  15. Trial Characteristics as Contextual Factors when Evaluating Targeted Therapies in Patients with Psoriatic Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Christine; Jørgensen, Tanja S; Skougaard, Marie

    2018-01-01

    (PsA) and psoriasis (8 biologics and apremilast). The effect of targeted therapies was analyzed in the two psoriatic conditions combined by using drug retention as common outcome, and separately by using ACR20 for PsA and PASI75 for psoriasis. We explored potential effect modification of trial...... characteristics in stratified and meta-regression analyses. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated and compared among the trial eligibility criteria via the Ratio of Odds Ratios (ROR). RESULTS: Forty-eight PsA and psoriasis trials (51 comparisons, 17,737 patients) were eligible. Overall retention was OR 2.16 (1.70 to 2.......75) with higher odds for PsA trials compared with psoriasis trials (ROR = 2.55 [1.64 to 3.97]). The eligibility criteria "targeted therapy history", "minimum required disease duration", "required negative rheumatoid factor", and "required CASPAR criteria" were of importance for achieving ACR20 in PsA...

  16. Rotterdam Aphasia Therapy Study (RATS – 3: “The efficacy of intensive cognitive-linguistic therapy in the acute stage of aphasia”; design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouwens Femke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aphasia is a severely disabling condition occurring in 20 to 25% of stroke patients. Most patients with aphasia due to stroke receive speech and language therapy. Methodologically sound randomised controlled trials investigating the effect of specific interventions for patients with aphasia following stroke are scarce. The currently available evidence suggests that intensive speech and language therapy is beneficial for restoration of communication, but the optimal timing of treatment is as yet unclear. In the Rotterdam Aphasia Therapy Study-3 we aim to test the hypothesis that patients with aphasia due to stroke benefit more from early intensive cognitive-linguistic therapy than from deferred regular language therapy. Methods/design In a single blinded, multicentre, randomised controlled trial, 150 patients with first ever aphasia due to stroke will be randomised within two weeks after stroke to either early intensive cognitive-linguistic therapy (Group A or deferred regular therapy (Group B. Group A will start as soon as possible, at the latest two weeks after stroke, with a four week period of one hour a day treatment with cognitive-linguistic therapy. In Group B professional speech and language therapy is deferred for four weeks. After this period, patients will follow the conventional procedure of speech and language therapy. Participants will be tested with an extensive linguistic test battery at four weeks, three months and six months after inclusion. Primary outcome measure is the difference in score between the two treatment groups on the Amsterdam-Nijmegen Everyday Language Test, a measure of everyday verbal communication, four weeks after randomisation. Trial registration This trial is registered in the Dutch Trial Register (http://www.trialregister.nl, NTR3271.

  17. The effect of hormone replacement therapy on serum homocysteine levels in perimenopausal women : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, AE; Bak, AAA; Lindemans, J; Planellas, J; Bennink, HJTC; Hofman, A; Grobbee, DE; Witteman, JCM

    2001-01-01

    Serum homocysteine levels may be lowered by hormone replacement therapy, but randomized controlled trial data are scarce. We performed a single center randomized placebo-controlled trial to assess the 6 months effect of hormone replacement therapy compared with placebo on fasting serum homocysteine

  18. Sociodemographic analysis of patients in radiation therapy oncology group clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, Robert M.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Porter, Arthur T.; Roach, M.; Streeter, Oscar; Cox, James D.; Bondy, Melissa L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the degree to which the sociodemographic characteristics of patients enrolled in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trails are representative of the general population. Methods and Materials: Sociodemographic data were collected on 4016 patients entered in 33 open RTOG studies between July 1991 and June 1994. The data analyzed included educational attainment, age, gender, and race. For comparison, we obtained similar data from the U.S. Department of Census. We also compared our RTOG data with Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data for patients who received radiation therapy, to determine how RTOG patients compared with cancer patients in general, and with patients with cancers at sites typically treated with radiotherapy. Results: Overall, the sociodemographic characteristics of patients entered in RTOG trials were similar to those of the Census data. We found that, in every age group of African-American men and at nearly every level of educational attainment, the proportion of RTOG trial participants mirrored the proportion in the census data. Significant differences were noted only in the youngest category of African-American men, where the RTOG accrues more in the lower educational categories and fewer with college experience. For African-American women, we found a similar pattern in every age group and at each level of educational attainment. As with men, RTOG trials accrued a considerably larger proportion of younger, less educated African-American women than the census reported. Using SEER for comparison, the RTOG enrolled proportionately more African-American men to trials all cancer sites combined, and for prostate and head and neck cancer. In head and neck trials, the RTOG enrolled nearly twice as many African-American men than would be predicted by SEER data. In lung cancer trials, RTOG underrepresented African-American men significantly; however, there was no difference for brain cancer trials. There were

  19. Detailed analysis of the clinical effects of cell therapy for thoracolumbar spinal cord injury: an original study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alok Sharma,1 Nandini Gokulchandran,1 Hemangi Sane,2 Prerna Badhe,1 Pooja Kulkarni,2 Mamta Lohia,3 Anjana Nagrajan,3 Nancy Thomas3 1Department of Medical Services and Clinical Research, 2Department of Research and Development, 3Department of Neurorehabilitation, NeuroGen Brain and Spine Institute, Surana Sethia Hospital and Research Centre, Chembur, Mumbai, India Background: Cell therapy is amongst the most promising treatment strategies in spinal cord injury (SCI because it focuses on repair. There are many published animal studies and a few human trials showing remarkable results with various cell types. The level of SCI determines whether paraplegia or quadriplegia is present, and greatly influences recovery. The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of the clinical effects and long-term safety of intrathecal administration of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells, along with changes in functional independence and quality of life in patients with thoracolumbar SCI. Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of a clinical study in which a nonrandomized sample of 110 patients with thoracolumbar SCI underwent autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell transplantation intrathecally and subsequent neurorehabilitation, with a mean follow-up of 2 years ± 1 month. Changes on any parameters were recorded at follow-up. The data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon's signed-rank test and McNemar's test. Functional Independence Measure and American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA scores were recorded, and a detailed neurological assessment was performed. Results: Overall improvement was seen in 91% of patients, including reduction in spasticity, partial sensory recovery, and improvement in trunk control, postural hypotension, bladder management, mobility, activities of daily living, and functional independence. A significant association of these symptomatic improvements with the cell therapy intervention was established

  20. Cell Connections by Tunneling Nanotubes: Effects of Mitochondrial Trafficking on Target Cell Metabolism, Homeostasis, and Response to Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Intercellular communications play a major role in tissue homeostasis and responses to external cues. Novel structures for this communication have recently been described. These tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) consist of thin-extended membrane protrusions that connect cells together. TNTs allow the cell-to-cell transfer of various cellular components, including proteins, RNAs, viruses, and organelles, such as mitochondria. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are both naturally present and recruited to many different tissues where their interaction with resident cells via secreted factors has been largely documented. Their immunosuppressive and repairing capacities constitute the basis for many current clinical trials. MSCs recruited to the tumor microenvironment also play an important role in tumor progression and resistance to therapy. MSCs are now the focus of intense scrutiny due to their capacity to form TNTs and transfer mitochondria to target cells, either in normal physiological or in pathological conditions, leading to changes in cell energy metabolism and functions, as described in this review. PMID:28659978

  1. Cell Connections by Tunneling Nanotubes: Effects of Mitochondrial Trafficking on Target Cell Metabolism, Homeostasis, and Response to Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Luce Vignais

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular communications play a major role in tissue homeostasis and responses to external cues. Novel structures for this communication have recently been described. These tunneling nanotubes (TNTs consist of thin-extended membrane protrusions that connect cells together. TNTs allow the cell-to-cell transfer of various cellular components, including proteins, RNAs, viruses, and organelles, such as mitochondria. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are both naturally present and recruited to many different tissues where their interaction with resident cells via secreted factors has been largely documented. Their immunosuppressive and repairing capacities constitute the basis for many current clinical trials. MSCs recruited to the tumor microenvironment also play an important role in tumor progression and resistance to therapy. MSCs are now the focus of intense scrutiny due to their capacity to form TNTs and transfer mitochondria to target cells, either in normal physiological or in pathological conditions, leading to changes in cell energy metabolism and functions, as described in this review.

  2. Future prospects of therapeutic clinical trials in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maliha; Mansoor, Armaghan-e-Rehman; Kadia, Tapan M

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a markedly heterogeneous hematological malignancy that is most commonly seen in elderly adults. The response to current therapies to AML is quite variable, and very few new drugs have been recently approved for use in AML. This review aims to discuss the issues with current trial design for AML therapies, including trial end points, patient enrollment, cost of drug discovery and patient heterogeneity. We also discuss the future directions in AML therapeutics, including intensification of conventional therapy and new drug delivery mechanisms; targeted agents, including epigenetic therapies, cell cycle regulators, hypomethylating agents and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy; and detail of the possible agents that may be incorporated into the treatment of AML in the future. PMID:27771959

  3. Perspectives on Regulatory T Cell Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst-Kepper, Michael; Kröger, Andrea; Garritsen, Henk S P; Buer, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Adoptive transfer in animal models clearly indicate an essential role of CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T (T(reg)) cells in prevention and treatment of autoimmune and graft-versus-host disease. Thus, T(reg) cell therapies and development of drugs that specifically enhance T(reg) cell function and development represent promising tools to establish dominant tolerance. So far, lack of specific markers to differentiate human T(reg) cells from activated CD4+ CD25+ effector T cells, which also express FOXP3 at different levels, hampered such an approach. Recent identification of the orphan receptor glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP or LRRC32) as T(reg) cell-specific key molecule that dominantly controls FOXP3 via a positive feedback loop opens up new perspectives for molecular and cellular therapies. This brief review focuses on the role of GARP as a safeguard of a complex regulatory network of human T(reg) cells and its implications for regulatory T cell therapies in autoimmunity and graft-versus-host disease.

  4. The controversial origin of pericytes during angiogenesis - Implications for cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis and cell-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocki, Anna; Beyer, Sebastian; Jung, Friedrich; Raghunath, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Pericytes reside within the basement membrane of small vessels and are often in direct cellular contact with endothelial cells, fulfilling important functions during blood vessel formation and homeostasis. Recently, these pericytes have been also identified as mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells, and especially their specialized subpopulation of pericytes, represent promising candidates for therapeutic angiogenesis applications, and have already been widely applied in pre-clinical and clinical trials. However, cell-based therapies of ischemic diseases (especially of myocardial infarction) have not resulted in significant long-term improvement. Interestingly, pericytes from a hematopoietic origin were observed in embryonic skin and a pericyte sub-population expressing leukocyte and monocyte markers was described during adult angiogenesis in vivo. Since mesenchymal stem cells do not express hematopoietic markers, the latter cell type might represent an alternative pericyte population relevant to angiogenesis. Therefore, we sourced blood-derived angiogenic cells (BDACs) from monocytes that closely resembled hematopoietic pericytes, which had only been observed in vivo thus far. BDACs displayed many pericytic features and exhibited enhanced revascularization and functional tissue regeneration in a pre-clinical model of critical limb ischemia. Comparison between BDACs and mesenchymal pericytes indicated that BDACs (while resembling hematopoietic pericytes) enhanced early stages of angiogenesis, such as endothelial cell sprouting. In contrast, mesenchymal pericytes were responsible for blood vessel maturation and homeostasis, while reducing endothelial sprouting.Since the formation of new blood vessels is crucial during therapeutic angiogenesis or during integration of implants into the host tissue, hematopoietic pericytes (and therefore BDACs) might offer an advantageous addition or even an alternative for cell-based therapies.

  5. T cell receptor (TCR-transgenic CD8 lymphocytes rendered insensitive to transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling mediate superior tumor regression in an animal model of adoptive cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quatromoni Jon G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor antigen-reactive T cells must enter into an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, continue to produce cytokine and deliver apoptotic death signals to affect tumor regression. Many tumors produce transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ, which inhibits T cell activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity. In a murine model of adoptive cell therapy, we demonstrate that transgenic Pmel-1 CD8 T cells, rendered insensitive to TGFβ by transduction with a TGFβ dominant negative receptor II (DN, were more effective in mediating regression of established B16 melanoma. Smaller numbers of DN Pmel-1 T cells effectively mediated tumor regression and retained the ability to produce interferon-γ in the tumor microenvironment. These results support efforts to incorporate this DN receptor in clinical trials of adoptive cell therapy for cancer.

  6. Bone regeneration: stem cell therapies and clinical studies in orthopaedics and traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Rosset, Philippe; Müller, Ingo; Giordano, Rosaria; Bunu, Carmen; Layrolle, Pierre; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Luyten, Frank P

    2011-06-01

    Regenerative medicine seeks to repair or replace damaged tissues or organs, with the goal to fully restore structure and function without the formation of scar tissue. Cell based therapies are promising new therapeutic approaches in regenerative medicine. By using mesenchymal stem cells, good results have been reported for bone engineering in a number of clinical studies, most of them investigator initiated trials with limited scope with respect to controls and outcome. With the implementation of a new regulatory framework for advanced therapeutic medicinal products, the stage is set to improve both the characterization of the cells and combination products, and pave the way for improved controlled and well-designed clinical trials. The incorporation of more personalized medicine approaches, including the use of biomarkers to identify the proper patients and the responders to treatment, will be contributing to progress in the field. Both translational and clinical research will move the boundaries in the field of regenerative medicine, and a coordinated effort will provide the clinical breakthroughs, particularly in the many applications of bone engineering. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. A randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in patients with prostate cancer during androgen deprivation therapy: rationale and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorsen, Lene; Nilsen, Tormod S; Raastad, Truls; Courneya, Kerry S; Skovlund, Eva; Fosså, Sophie D

    2012-01-01

    Studies indicate that strength training has beneficial effects on clinical health outcomes in prostate cancer patients during androgen deprivation therapy. However, randomized controlled trials are needed to scientifically determine the effectiveness of strength training on the muscle cell level. Furthermore, close examination of the feasibility of a high-load strength training program is warranted. The Physical Exercise and Prostate Cancer (PEPC) trial is designed to determine the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in non-metastatic prostate cancer patients after high-dose radiotherapy and during ongoing androgen deprivation therapy. Patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy for 9-36 months combined with external high-dose radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer are randomized to an exercise intervention group that receives a 16 week high-load strength training program or a control group that is encouraged to maintain their habitual activity level. In both arms, androgen deprivation therapy is continued until the end of the intervention period. Clinical outcomes are body composition (lean body mass, bone mineral density and fat mass) measured by Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry, serological outcomes, physical functioning (muscle strength and cardio-respiratory fitness) assessed with physical tests and psycho-social functioning (mental health, fatigue and health-related quality of life) assessed by questionnaires. Muscle cellular outcomes are a) muscle fiber size b) regulators of muscle fiber size (number of myonuclei per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells and myonuclei positive for androgen receptors and proteins involved in muscle protein degradation and muscle hypertrophy) and c) regulators of muscle fiber function such as proteins involved in cellular stress and mitochondrial function. Muscle cellular outcomes are measured on muscle cross sections and

  8. Prednisolone Trial: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of prednisolone for women with idiopathic recurrent miscarriage and raised levels of uterine natural killer (uNK cells in the endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drury Jo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic recurrent miscarriage is defined as 3 consecutive pregnancy losses with no contributing features found on investigations. At present there are no treatments of proven efficacy for idiopathic recurrent miscarriage. Uterine natural killer (uNK cells, the most predominant leucocyte in the endometrium are adjacent to foetal trophoblast cells and thought to be involved in implantation. The exact mechanisms of how uNK cells affect implantation are not clear but are probably through the regulation of angiogenesis. Multiple studies have shown an association between high density of uterine natural killer cells and recurrent miscarriage. We have shown that prednisolone reduces the number of uNK cells in the endometrium. The question remains as to whether reducing the number of uNK cells improves pregnancy outcome. Methods We propose a randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled trial of prednisolone with a pilot phase to assess feasibility of recruitment, integrity of trial procedures, and to generate data to base future power calculations. The primary aim is to investigate whether prednisolone therapy during the first trimester of pregnancy is able to improve live birth rates in patients with idiopathic recurrent miscarriage and raised uNK cells in the endometrium. Secondary outcomes include conception rate, karyotype of miscarriage, miscarriages (first and second trimester, stillbirths, pregnancy complications, gestational age at delivery, congenital abnormality and side effects of steroids. The trial has 2 stages: i screening of non-pregnant women and ii randomisation of the pregnant cohort. All patients who fit the inclusion criteria ( Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN28090716

  9. Cell-based therapies and imaging in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengel, Frank M; Schachinger, Volker; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2005-12-01

    Cell therapy for cardiac repair has emerged as one of the most exciting and promising developments in cardiovascular medicine. Evidence from experimental and clinical studies is increasing that this innovative treatment will influence clinical practice in the future. But open questions and controversies with regard to the basic mechanisms of this therapy continue to exist and emphasise the need for specific techniques to visualise the mechanisms and success of therapy in vivo. Several non-invasive imaging approaches which aim at tracking of transplanted cells in the heart have been introduced. Among these are direct labelling of cells with radionuclides or paramagnetic agents, and the use of reporter genes for imaging of cell transplantation and differentiation. Initial studies have suggested that these molecular imaging techniques have great potential. Integration of cell imaging into studies of cardiac cell therapy holds promise to facilitate further growth of the field towards a broadly clinically useful application.

  10. Cell-based therapies and imaging in cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengel, Frank M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Munich (Germany); Schachinger, Volker; Dimmeler, Stefanie [University of Frankfurt, Department of Molecular Cardiology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2005-12-01

    Cell therapy for cardiac repair has emerged as one of the most exciting and promising developments in cardiovascular medicine. Evidence from experimental and clinical studies is increasing that this innovative treatment will influence clinical practice in the future. But open questions and controversies with regard to the basic mechanisms of this therapy continue to exist and emphasise the need for specific techniques to visualise the mechanisms and success of therapy in vivo. Several non-invasive imaging approaches which aim at tracking of transplanted cells in the heart have been introduced. Among these are direct labelling of cells with radionuclides or paramagnetic agents, and the use of reporter genes for imaging of cell transplantation and differentiation. Initial studies have suggested that these molecular imaging techniques have great potential. Integration of cell imaging into studies of cardiac cell therapy holds promise to facilitate further growth of the field towards a broadly clinically useful application. (orig.)

  11. [Bibliometrics study on indications of acupuncture therapy based on foreign acupuncture clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Tong, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Ying-Kai; Rong, Pei-Jing; Wang, Hong-Cai

    2012-10-01

    In the present paper, the authors make a bibliometrics study on clinical indications of acupuncture therapy based on the published foreign articles about acupuncture clinical trials collected from PubMed database and Excerpta Medica database (EMbase). In 1996, 64 acupuncture indications were declared by WHO in Milan conference. But in recent 15 years, clinical trials have been conducted extensively in the foreign countries. Till now, 77 new indications for acupuncture therapy have been found in the foreign journals. The authors recommended that 29 indications (knee osteoarthritis, critique age problems, muscular fasciae ache, anxiety, etc.) should be added to the first class, 4 indications (irritable bowel syndrome, malposition, backache, simple obesity) should be upgraded from the second class to the first class, and the other 3 indications (childbirth pain, male and female barren) should be upgraded from the third class to the first class due to their application frequency in clinical trials. Increase of clinical indications reflects extensive application of acupuncture therapy and may help providing a better service for people's health.

  12. Niacin therapy and the risk of new-onset diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, Christina; Taylor, Allen J; Nguyen, Peter; McCoy, Cody; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Preiss, David

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that niacin treatment raises glucose levels in patients with diabetes and may increase the risk of developing diabetes. We undertook a meta-analysis of published and unpublished data from randomised trials to confirm whether an association exists between niacin and new-onset diabetes. We searched Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, from 1975 to 2014, for randomised controlled trials of niacin primarily designed to assess its effects on cardiovascular endpoints and cardiovascular surrogate markers. We included trials with ≥50 non-diabetic participants and average follow-up of ≥24 weeks. Published data were tabulated and unpublished data sought from investigators. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for new-onset diabetes with random-effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity between trials was assessed using the I(2) statistic. In 11 trials with 26 340 non-diabetic participants, 1371 (725/13 121 assigned niacin; 646/13 219 assigned control) were diagnosed with diabetes during a weighted mean follow-up of 3.6 years. Niacin therapy was associated with a RR of 1.34 (95% CIs 1.21 to 1.49) for new-onset diabetes, with limited heterogeneity between trials (I(2)=0.0%, p=0.87). This equates to one additional case of diabetes per 43 (95% CI 30 to 70) initially non-diabetic individuals who are treated with niacin for 5 years. Results were consistent regardless of whether participants received background statin therapy (p for interaction=0.88) or combined therapy with laropiprant (p for interaction=0.52). Niacin therapy is associated with a moderately increased risk of developing diabetes regardless of background statin or combination laropiprant therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Cupping therapy versus acupuncture for pain-related conditions: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials and trial sequential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-Jing; Cao, Hui-Juan; Li, Xin-Lin; Yang, Xiao-Ying; Lai, Bao-Yong; Yang, Guo-Yang; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Both cupping therapy and acupuncture have been used in China for a long time, and their target indications are pain-related conditions. There is no systematic review comparing the effectiveness of these two therapies. To compare the beneficial effectiveness and safety between cupping therapy and acupuncture for pain-related conditions to provide evidence for clinical practice. Protocol of this review was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42016050986). We conducted literature search from six electronic databases until 31st March 2017. We included randomized trials comparing cupping therapy with acupuncture on pain-related conditions. Methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated by risk of bias tool. Mean difference, risk ratio, risk difference and their 95% confidence interval were used to report the estimate effect of the pooled results through meta-analysis or the results from each individual study. Trial sequential analysis (TSA) was applied to adjust random errors and calculate the sample size. Twenty-three randomized trials with 2845 participants were included covering 12 pain-related conditions. All included studies were of poor methodological quality. Three meta-analyses were conducted, which showed similar clinical beneficial effects of cupping therapy and acupuncture for the rate of symptom improvement in cervical spondylosis (RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.26; n = 646), lateral femoral cutaneous neuritis (RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.22; n = 102) and scapulohumeral periarthritis (RR 1.31, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.51; n = 208). Results from other outcomes (such as visual analogue and numerical rating scale) in each study also showed no statistical significant difference between these two therapies for all included pain-related conditions. The results of TSA for cervical spondylosis demonstrated that the current available data have not reached a powerful conclusion. No serious adverse events related to cupping therapy or acupuncture was found in included

  14. Targeted therapies for locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2013-12-01

    Most patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) present with advanced or metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Given the low prevalence of oncogenic driver mutations in SCC, I do not routinely perform molecular testing. The times that I perform molecular testing in SCC are for patients with SCC and a light or never smoking history, adenosquamous histology, or when the histological diagnosis is not definitive. For patients with a good performance status and adequate organ function, a platinum doublet is the standard therapy, and I generally use carboplatin and gemcitabine or carboplatin and paclitaxel. In the second-line setting for patients who are chemotherapy candidates, I will use docetaxel on a weekly or every three week schedule. Erlotinib is a treatment option in the third-line setting. My preference is for patients to participate in clinical trials because the development of novel therapies for patients with SCC has been slow compared with nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer. Ongoing investigations into the genomics of SCC will hopefully identify driver mutations or alterations in pathways essential for oncogenesis and tumor growth and will lead to the development of targeted therapies. The complexity of the genomics of SCC will make the development of targeted therapies challenging.

  15. Systemic therapy for vulval Erosive Lichen Planus (the 'hELP' trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Rosalind C; Murphy, Ruth; Bratton, Daniel J; Sydes, Matthew R; Wilkes, Sally; Nankervis, Helen; Dowey, Shelley; Thomas, Kim S

    2016-01-04

    Erosive lichen planus affecting the vulva (ELPV) is a relatively rare, chronic condition causing painful raw areas in the vulvovaginal region. Symptoms are pain and burning, which impact upon daily living. There is paucity of evidence regarding therapy. A 2012 Cochrane systematic review found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in this field. Topically administered corticosteroids are the accepted first-line therapy: however, there is uncertainty as to which second-line treatments to use. Several systemic agents have been clinically noted to show promise for ELPV refractory to topically administered corticosteroids but there is no RCT evidence to support these. The 'hELP' study is a RCT with an internal pilot phase designed to provide high-quality evidence. The objective is to test whether systemic therapy in addition to standard topical therapy is a beneficial second-line treatment for ELPV. Adjunctive systemic therapies used are hydroxychloroquine, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. Topical therapy plus a short course of prednisolone given orally is considered the comparator intervention. The trial is a four-armed, open-label, pragmatic RCT which uses a blinded independent clinical assessor. To provide 80 % power for each comparison, 96 participants are required in total. The pilot phase aims to recruit 40 participants. The primary clinical outcome is the proportion of patients achieving treatment success at 6 months. 'Success' is defined by a composite measure of Patient Global Assessment score of 0 or 1 on a 4-point scale plus improvement from baseline on clinical photographs scored by a clinician blinded to treatment allocation. Secondary clinical outcomes include 6-month assessment of: (1) Reduction in pain/soreness; (2) Global assessment of disease; (3) Response at other affected mucosal sites; (4) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores; (5) Sexual function; (6) Health-related quality of life using 'Short Form 36' and 'Skindex

  16. Trial Protocol: Cognitive functional therapy compared with combined manual therapy and motor control exercise for people with non-specific chronic low back pain: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belache, Fabiana Terra Cunha; Souza, Cíntia Pereira de; Fernandez, Jessica; Castro, Julia; Ferreira, Paula Dos Santos; Rosa, Elizana Rodrigues de Sousa; Araújo, Nathalia Cristina Gimenez de; Reis, Felipe José Jandre; Almeida, Renato Santos de; Nogueira, Leandro Alberto Calazans; Correia, Luís Cláudio Lemos; Meziat-Filho, Ney

    2018-06-11

    Chronic low back pain is a public health problem, and there is strong evidence that it is associated with a complex interaction of biopsychosocial factors. Cognitive functional therapy is an intervention that deals with potentially modifiable multidimensional aspects of pain (eg, provocative cognitive, movement and lifestyle behaviours). There is evidence (from a single randomised, controlled trial) that cognitive functional therapy is better than combined manual therapy and motor control exercise. However, this study had significant methodological shortcomings including the failure to carry out an intention-to-treat analysis and a considerable loss of follow-up of participants. It is important to replicate this study in another domain through a randomised clinical trial with similar objectives but correcting these methodological shortcomings. To investigate the efficacy of cognitive functional therapy compared to combined manual therapy and exercise on pain and disability at 3 months in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. Two-group, randomised, multicentre controlled trial with blinded assessors. One hundred and forty-eight participants with chronic low back pain that has persisted for >3months and no specific spinal pathology will be recruited from the school clinic of the Centro Universitário Augusto Motta and a private clinic in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Four to 10 sessions of cognitive functional therapy. The physiotherapists who will treat the participants in the cognitive functional therapy group have previously attended 2 workshops with two different tutors of the method. Such physiotherapists have completed 106 hours of training, including workshops and patient examinations, as well as conducting a pilot study under the supervision of another physiotherapist with>3 years of clinical experience in cognitive functional therapy. Four to 10 sessions of combined manual therapy and motor control exercises. Participants in the combined

  17. Fifty Years of Research in ARDS. Cell-based Therapy for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Biology and Potential Therapeutic Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffey, John G; Matthay, Michael A

    2017-08-01

    On the basis of several preclinical studies, cell-based therapy has emerged as a potential new therapeutic for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Of the various cell-based therapy options, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord have the most experimental data to support their potential efficacy for lung injury from both infectious and noninfectious causes. Mechanistically, MSCs exert their beneficial effects by release of paracrine factors, microvesicles, and transfer of mitochondria, all of which have antiinflammatory and pro-resolving effects on injured lung endothelium and alveolar epithelium, including enhancing the resolution of pulmonary edema by up-regulating sodium-dependent alveolar fluid clearance. MSCs also have antimicrobial effects mediated by release of antimicrobial factors and by up-regulating monocyte/macrophage phagocytosis. Phase 2a clinical trials to establish safety in ARDS are in progress, and two phase 1 trials did not report any serious adverse events. Several issues need further study, including: determining the optimal methods for large-scale production, reconstitution of cryopreserved cells for clinical use, defining cell potency assays, and determining the therapeutic potential of conditioned media derived from MSCs. Because ARDS is a heterogeneous syndrome, targeting MSCs to patients with ARDS with a more hyperinflammatory endotype may further enhance their potential for efficacy.

  18. Manual therapy compared with physical therapy in patients with non-specific neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneweg, Ruud; van Assen, Luite; Kropman, Hans; Leopold, Huco; Mulder, Jan; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-01-01

    Manual therapy according to the School of Manual Therapy Utrecht (MTU) is a specific type of passive manual joint mobilization. MTU has not yet been systematically compared to other manual therapies and physical therapy. In this study the effectiveness of MTU is compared to physical therapy, particularly active exercise therapy (PT) in patients with non-specific neck pain. Patients neck pain, aged between 18-70 years, were included in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial with a one-year follow-up. Primary outcome measures were global perceived effect and functioning (Neck Disability Index), the secondary outcome was pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale for Pain). Outcomes were measured at 3, 7, 13, 26 and 52 weeks. Multilevel analyses (intention-to-treat) were the primary analyses for overall between-group differences. Additional to the primary and secondary outcomes the number of treatment sessions of the MTU group and PT group was analyzed. Data were collected from September 2008 to February 2011. A total of 181 patients were included. Multilevel analyses showed no statistically significant overall differences at one year between the MTU and PT groups on any of the primary and secondary outcomes. The MTU group showed significantly lower treatment sessions compared to the PT group (respectively 3.1 vs. 5.9 after 7 weeks; 6.1 vs. 10.0 after 52 weeks). Patients with neck pain improved in both groups without statistical significantly or clinically relevant differences between the MTU and PT groups during one-year follow-up. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00713843.

  19. Clinical translation and regulatory aspects of CAR/TCR-based adoptive cell therapies-the German Cancer Consortium approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krackhardt, Angela M; Anliker, Brigitte; Hildebrandt, Martin; Bachmann, Michael; Eichmüller, Stefan B; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Renner, Matthias; Uharek, Lutz; Willimsky, Gerald; Schmitt, Michael; Wels, Winfried S; Schüssler-Lenz, Martina

    2018-04-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified by TCRs or CARs represents a highly attractive novel therapeutic strategy to treat malignant diseases. Various approaches for the development of such gene therapy medicinal products (GTMPs) have been initiated by scientists in recent years. To date, however, the number of clinical trials commenced in Germany and Europe is still low. Several hurdles may contribute to the delay in clinical translation of these therapeutic innovations including the significant complexity of manufacture and non-clinical testing of these novel medicinal products, the limited knowledge about the intricate regulatory requirements of the academic developers as well as limitations of funds for clinical testing. A suitable good manufacturing practice (GMP) environment is a key prerequisite and platform for the development, validation, and manufacture of such cell-based therapies, but may also represent a bottleneck for clinical translation. The German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) and the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI) have initiated joint efforts of researchers and regulators to facilitate and advance early phase, academia-driven clinical trials. Starting with a workshop held in 2016, stakeholders from academia and regulatory authorities in Germany have entered into continuing discussions on a diversity of scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory aspects, as well as the benefits and risks of clinical application of CAR/TCR-based cell therapies. This review summarizes the current state of discussions of this cooperative approach providing a basis for further policy-making and suitable modification of processes.

  20. NHLBI’s Program for VAD Therapy for Moderately Advanced Heart Failure: The REVIVE-IT Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, J. Timothy; Mann, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    Background VADs are used to bridge heart failure patients to transplantation, to allow their own hearts to recover, or as permanent (“destination”) therapy. To date, the use of VADs has been limited to late-stage heart failure patients because of the associated device risks. In 2008, an NHLBI working group met to evaluate the treatment of heart failure using VADs and to advise the institute on how therapy for heart failure may be best advanced by clinical trials involving the devices. Discussion and Recommendations Recognizing the improvements in VAD technology and in patient care and selection over the past decade, the working group recommended that a trial be performed to assess the use of chronic VAD therapy in patients who are less ill than those currently eligible for destination therapy. The hypothesis proposed for the trial is that VAD therapy may improve both survival and quality of life in moderately advanced heart failure patients who are neither inotrope-dependent nor exercise-intolerant and have not yet developed serious consequences such as malnourishment, end-organ damage, and immobility. Based on the group’s recommendations, NHLBI issued an RFP in 2009 for the REVIVE-IT Pilot Trail which will serve to test the hypothesis and inform the pivotal trial. PMID:21055648

  1. Gaze-Contingent Music Reward Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarov, Amit; Pine, Daniel S; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2017-07-01

    Patients with social anxiety disorder exhibit increased attentional dwelling on social threats, providing a viable target for therapeutics. This randomized controlled trial examined the efficacy of a novel gaze-contingent music reward therapy for social anxiety disorder designed to reduce attention dwelling on threats. Forty patients with social anxiety disorder were randomly assigned to eight sessions of either gaze-contingent music reward therapy, designed to divert patients' gaze toward neutral stimuli rather than threat stimuli, or to a control condition. Clinician and self-report measures of social anxiety were acquired pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 3-month follow-up. Dwell time on socially threatening faces was assessed during the training sessions and at pre- and posttreatment. Gaze-contingent music reward therapy yielded greater reductions of symptoms of social anxiety disorder than the control condition on both clinician-rated and self-reported measures. Therapeutic effects were maintained at follow-up. Gaze-contingent music reward therapy, but not the control condition, also reduced dwell time on threat, which partially mediated clinical effects. Finally, gaze-contingent music reward therapy, but not the control condition, also altered dwell time on socially threatening faces not used in training, reflecting near-transfer training generalization. This is the first randomized controlled trial to examine a gaze-contingent intervention in social anxiety disorder. The results demonstrate target engagement and clinical effects. This study sets the stage for larger randomized controlled trials and testing in other emotional disorders.

  2. Music therapy for mood disturbance during hospitalization for autologous stem cell transplantation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassileth, Barrie R; Vickers, Andrew J; Magill, Lucanne A

    2003-12-15

    High-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) is a commonly used treatment for hematologic malignancies. The procedure causes significant psychological distress and no interventions have been demonstrated to improve mood in these patients. Music therapy has been shown to improve anxiety in a variety of acute medical settings. In the current study, the authors determined the effects of music therapy compared with standard care on mood during inpatient stays for HDT/ASCT. Patients with hematologic malignancy admitted for HDT/ASCT at two sites (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Ireland Cancer Center in Cleveland, Ohio) were randomized to receive music therapy given by trained music therapists or standard care. Outcome was assessed at baseline and every 3 days after randomization using the Profile of Mood States. Of 69 patients registered in the study, follow-up data were available for 62 (90%). During their inpatient stay, patients in the music therapy group scored 28% lower on the combined Anxiety/Depression scale (P = 0.065) and 37% lower (P = 0.01) on the total mood disturbance score compared with controls. Music therapy is a noninvasive and inexpensive intervention that appears to reduce mood disturbance in patients undergoing HDT/ASCT. Copyright 2003 American Cancer Society.

  3. Advances in molecular-based personalized non-small-cell lung cancer therapy: targeting epidermal growth factor receptor and mechanisms of resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jotte, Robert M; Spigel, David R

    2015-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapies, directed against the features of a given tumor, have allowed for a personalized approach to the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The reversible epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib had undergone turbulent clinical development until it was discovered that these agents have preferential activity in patients with NSCLC harboring activating EGFR mutations. Since then, a number of phase 3 clinical trials have collectively shown that EGFR-TKI monotherapy is more effective than combination chemotherapy as first-line therapy for EGFR mutation-positive advanced NSCLC. The next generation of EGFR-directed agents for EGFR mutation-positive advanced NSCLC is irreversible TKIs against EGFR and other ErbB family members, including afatinib, which was recently approved, and dacomitinib, which is currently being tested in phase 3 trials. As research efforts continue to explore the various proposed mechanisms of acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI therapy, agents that target signaling pathways downstream of EGFR are being studied in combination with EGFR TKIs in molecularly selected advanced NSCLC. Overall, the results of numerous ongoing phase 3 trials involving the EGFR TKIs will be instrumental in determining whether further gains in personalized therapy for advanced NSCLC are attainable with newer agents and combinations. This article reviews key clinical trial data for personalized NSCLC therapy with agents that target the EGFR and related pathways, specifically based on molecular characteristics of individual tumors, and mechanisms of resistance

  4. Multimodal manual therapy vs. pharmacological care for management of tension type headache: A meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa-Jiménez, Juan A; Lozano-López, Cristina; Angulo-Díaz-Parreño, Santiago; Rodríguez-Fernández, Ángel L; De-la-Hoz-Aizpurua, Jose L; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, Cesar

    2015-12-01

    Manual therapies are generally requested by patients with tension type headache. To compare the efficacy of multimodal manual therapy vs. pharmacological care for the management of tension type headache pain by conducting a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, EBSCO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Collaboration Trials Register, PEDro and SCOPUS were searched from their inception until June 2014. All randomized controlled trials comparing any manual therapy vs. medication care for treating tension type headache adults were included. Data were extracted and methodological quality assessed independently by two reviewers. We pooled headache frequency as the main outcome and also intensity and duration. The weighted mean difference between manual therapy and pharmacological care was used to determine effect sizes. Five randomized controlled trials met our inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled analyses found that manual therapies were more effective than pharmacological care in reducing frequency (weighted mean difference -0.8036, 95% confidence interval -1.66 to -0.44; three trials), intensity (weighted mean difference -0.5974, 95% confidence interval -0.8875 to -0.3073; five trials) and duration (weighted mean difference -0.5558, 95% confidence interval -0.9124 to -0.1992; three trials) of the headache immediately after treatment. No differences were found at longer follow-up for headache intensity (weighted mean difference -0.3498, 95% confidence interval -1.106 to 0.407; three trials). Manual therapies were associated with moderate effectiveness at short term, but similar effectiveness at longer follow-up for reducing headache frequency, intensity and duration in tension type headache than pharmacological medical drug care. However, due to the heterogeneity of the interventions, these results should be considered with caution at this stage. © International Headache

  5. Establishing Evidence-Based Indications for Proton Therapy: An Overview of Current Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Mark V., E-mail: mmishra@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aggarwal, Sameer [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Knight, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Miami Cancer Institute at Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Florida (United States); Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To review and assess ongoing proton beam therapy (PBT) clinical trials and to identify major gaps. Methods and Materials: Active PBT clinical trials were identified from (clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Platform Registry. Data on clinical trial disease site, age group, projected patient enrollment, expected start and end dates, study type, and funding source were extracted. Results: A total of 122 active PBT clinical trials were identified, with target enrollment of >42,000 patients worldwide. Ninety-six trials (79%), with a median planned sample size of 68, were classified as interventional studies. Observational studies accounted for 21% of trials but 71% (n=29,852) of planned patient enrollment. The most common PBT clinical trials focus on gastrointestinal tract tumors (21%, n=26), tumors of the central nervous system (15%, n=18), and prostate cancer (12%, n=15). Five active studies (lung, esophagus, head and neck, prostate, breast) will randomize patients between protons and photons, and 3 will randomize patients between protons and carbon ion therapy. Conclusions: The PBT clinical trial portfolio is expanding rapidly. Although the majority of ongoing studies are interventional, the majority of patients will be accrued to observational studies. Future efforts should focus on strategies to encourage optimal patient enrollment and retention, with an emphasis on randomized, controlled trials, which will require support from third-party payers. Results of ongoing PBT studies should be evaluated in terms of comparative effectiveness, as well as incremental effectiveness and value offered by PBT in comparison with conventional radiation modalities.

  6. Present and future of allogeneic natural killer cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okjae eLim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the anti-tumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions.

  7. Examining the bleeding incidences associated with targeted therapies used in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, MacKenzie; Hansen, Elizabeth; Chablani, Lipika; Guancial, Elizabeth

    2017-12-01

    A systematic review was conducted to illustrate the bleeding risks associated with targeted therapies used in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Eligible studies included phase II, III, or IV clinical trials using pazopanib, sunitinib, cabozantinib, lenvatinib, everolimus, temsirolimus, bevacizumab, axitinib, and/or sorafenib in the setting of mRCC. Types of bleeding event(s), bleeding event frequency, and incidence of thrombocytopenia were collected from the relevant articles. ClinicalTrials.gov was also searched for incidence of "Serious bleeding adverse effects" reported in these trials. The incidences of bleeding events ranged from 1 to 36%, and incidences of thrombocytopenia ranged from 2 to 78%. Available serious bleeding adverse events ranged from 1 to 7%. The highest percentage of bleeding incidences were seen with bevacizumab, while the lowest percentage of bleeding incidences were seen with axitinib. All of the included trials were of high quality per Jadad scoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Priming of the Cells: Hypoxic Preconditioning for Stem Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng Z; Zhu, Yan-Bing; Zhang, James Y; McCrary, Myles R; Wang, Song; Zhang, Yong-Bo; Yu, Shan-Ping; Wei, Ling

    2017-10-05

    Stem cell-based therapies are promising in regenerative medicine for protecting and repairing damaged brain tissues after injury or in the context of chronic diseases. Hypoxia can induce physiological and pathological responses. A hypoxic insult might act as a double-edged sword, it induces cell death and brain damage, but on the other hand, sublethal hypoxia can trigger an adaptation response called hypoxic preconditioning or hypoxic tolerance that is of immense importance for the survival of cells and tissues. This review was based on articles published in PubMed databases up to August 16, 2017, with the following keywords: "stem cells," "hypoxic preconditioning," "ischemic preconditioning," and "cell transplantation." Original articles and critical reviews on the topics were selected. Hypoxic preconditioning has been investigated as a primary endogenous protective mechanism and possible treatment against ischemic injuries. Many cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of hypoxic preconditioning have been identified. In cell transplantation therapy, hypoxic pretreatment of stem cells and neural progenitors markedly increases the survival and regenerative capabilities of these cells in the host environment, leading to enhanced therapeutic effects in various disease models. Regenerative treatments can mobilize endogenous stem cells for neurogenesis and angiogenesis in the adult brain. Furthermore, transplantation of stem cells/neural progenitors achieves therapeutic benefits via cell replacement and/or increased trophic support. Combinatorial approaches of cell-based therapy with additional strategies such as neuroprotective protocols, anti-inflammatory treatment, and rehabilitation therapy can significantly improve therapeutic benefits. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress regarding cell types and applications in regenerative medicine as well as future applications.

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy Plus Bright Light Therapy for Adolescent Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradisar, Michael; Dohnt, Hayley; Gardner, Greg; Paine, Sarah; Starkey, Karina; Menne, Annemarie; Slater, Amy; Wright, Helen; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Weaver, Edward; Trenowden, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate cognitive-behavior therapy plus bright light therapy (CBT plus BLT) for adolescents diagnosed with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Design: Randomized controlled trial of CBT plus BLT vs. waitlist (WL) control with comparisons at pre- and post-treatment. There was 6-month follow-up for the CBT plus BLT group only. Setting: Flinders University Child & Adolescent Sleep Clinic, Adelaide, South Australia. Patients: 49 adolescents (mean age 14.6 ± 1.0 y, 53% males) diagnosed with DSPD; mean chronicity 4 y 8 months; 16% not attending school. Eighteen percent of adolescents dropped out of the study (CBT plus BLT: N = 23 vs WL: N = 17). Interventions: CBT plus BLT consisted of 6 individual sessions, including morning bright light therapy to advance adolescents' circadian rhythms, and cognitive restructuring and sleep education to target associated insomnia and sleep hygiene. Measurements and Results: DSPD diagnosis was performed via a clinical interview and 7-day sleep diary. Measurements at each time-point included online sleep diaries and scales measuring sleepiness, fatigue, and depression symptoms. Compared to WL, moderate-to-large improvements (d = 0.65-1.24) were found at post-treatment for CBT plus BLT adolescents, including reduced sleep latency, earlier sleep onset and rise times, total sleep time (school nights), wake after sleep onset, sleepiness, and fatigue. At 6-month follow-up (N = 15), small-to-large improvements (d = 0.24-1.53) continued for CBT plus BLT adolescents, with effects found for all measures. Significantly fewer adolescents receiving CBT plus BLT met DPSD criteria at post-treatment (WL = 82% vs. CBT plus BLT = 13%, P sleep and daytime impairments in the immediate and long-term. Studies evaluating the treatment effectiveness of each treatment component are needed. Clinical Trial Information: Australia – New Zealand Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12610001041044. Citation: Gradisar M; Dohnt H; Gardner G; Paine S; Starkey

  10. Preclinical and clinical experience in vascular gene therapy: advantages over conservative/standard therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikol, S; Huehns, T Y

    2001-04-01

    No systemic pharmacological treatment has been shown to convincingly reduce the incidence of restenosis after angioplasty or increase the formation of collaterals in ischemic tissue in patients. The lack of success of many pharmaceutical agents in reducing restenosis rates or in inducing angiogenesis post-angioplasty and following stent implantation has encouraged the development of new technological treatment approaches. Gene therapy is a novel strategy with the potential to prevent some of the sequelae after arterial injury, particularly cell proliferation, and to induce growth of new vessels or remodeling of pre-existing vessel branches, which may help patients with critical ischemia. Gene therapy strategies have the advantage of minimizing systemic side effects and may have a long-term effect as the encoded protein is released. Most clinical trials investigating gene therapy for vascular disease have been uncontrolled phase I and IIa trials. Gene therapy into vessels with the genes for growth factors has been demonstrated to be feasible and efficient. Local drug delivery devices have been used in combination with gene therapy in several trials to maximize safety and efficiency. Data from experimental animal work indicates that gene therapy may modify intimal hyperplasia after arterial injury, but there are few clinical trials on restenosis in patients. Preliminary clinical results show only limited success in altering restenosis rates. In vitro and experimental in vivo investigations into gene therapy for angiogenesis demonstrate increased formation of collaterals and functional improvement of limb ischemia. There is some evidence of increased collateral formation and clinical improvement in patients with critical limb ischemia. Results of placebo-controlled and double-blind trials of gene therapy for vascular disease are awaited.

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, Hugo; Gustafsson, Tore; Lunden, Charlotte; Henrikson, Oskar; Fattahi, Kidjan; Johnsson, Erik; Westin, Vendela Zetterqvist; Carlbring, Per; Maki-Torkko, Elina; Kaldo, Viktor; Andersson, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Our aim in this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects on global tinnitus severity of 2 Internet-delivered psychological treatments, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), in guided self-help format. Method: Ninety-nine participants (mean age = 48.5 years; 43% female) who were…

  12. Feasibility of Exploiting Celution^ System in Autologous Cell Therapy in Dokkyo Medical University Hospital:Safety and Reproducibility

    OpenAIRE

    Ken-ichi, Inoue; Hiroshi, Nomura; Ryoichi, Sohma; Kazumi, Akimoto; Naohiko, Kobayashi; Takao, Kamai; Tomonori, Yamanishi; Isao, Taguchi; Hiroki, Asato; Teruo, Inoue; Tomoyuki, Mitsumori; Hideki, Iwaguro; Ken-ichiro, Yoshida; Research Support Center, Dokkyo Medical University School Of Medicine:Center For Regenerative Medicine, Dokkyo Medical University School Of Medicine; Center For Regenerative Medicine, Dokkyo Medical University School Of Medicine:Department Of Plastic And Reconstructive Surgery, Dokkyo Medical University School Of Medicine

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, we established the Center for Regenerative Medicine in Dokkyo Medical University Hospital, and are now preparing the necessary equipment and preclinical evidence for cell therapy. Liposuction is a commonly used procedure in plastic surgery and the lipoaspirate is discarded as a medical waste. However, the lipoaspirate is known to contain abundant mesenchymal stem cells, and thus, it is currently one of the most feasible options of regenerative medicine. Several ongoing clinical trial...

  13. Oncolytic vaccinia therapy of squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yong A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel therapies are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC of the head and neck. Historically, vaccinia virus was administered widely to humans as a vaccine and led to the eradication of smallpox. We examined the therapeutic effects of an attenuated, replication-competent vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68 as an oncolytic agent against a panel of six human head and neck SCC cell lines. Results All six cell lines supported viral transgene expression (β-galactosidase, green fluorescent protein, and luciferase as early as 6 hours after viral exposure. Efficient transgene expression and viral replication (>150-fold titer increase over 72 hrs were observed in four of the cell lines. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1, GLV-1h68 was highly cytotoxic to the four cell lines, resulting in ≥ 90% cytotoxicity over 6 days, and the remaining two cell lines exhibited >45% cytotoxicity. Even at a very low MOI of 0.01, three cell lines still demonstrated >60% cell death over 6 days. A single injection of GLV-1h68 (5 × 106 pfu intratumorally into MSKQLL2 xenografts in mice exhibited localized intratumoral luciferase activity peaking at days 2–4, with gradual resolution over 10 days and no evidence of spread to normal organs. Treated animals exhibited near-complete tumor regression over a 24-day period without any observed toxicity, while control animals demonstrated rapid tumor progression. Conclusion These results demonstrate significant oncolytic efficacy by an attenuated vaccinia virus for infecting and lysing head and neck SCC both in vitro and in vivo, and support its continued investigation in future clinical trials.

  14. Stem Cell Therapy: An emerging science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Muhammad M.

    2007-01-01

    The research on stem cells is advancing knowledge about the development of an organism from a single cell and to how healthy cells replace damaged cells in adult organisms. Stem cell therapy is emerging rapidly nowadays as a technical tool for tissue repair and replacement. The purpose of this review to provide a framework of understanding for the challenges behind translating fundamental stem cell biology and its potential use into clinical therapies, also to give an overview on stem cell research to the scientists of Saudi Arabia in general. English language MEDLINE publications from 1980 through January 2007 for experimental, observational and clinical studies having relation with stem cells with different diseases were reviewed. Approximately 85 publications were reviewed based on the relevance, strength and quality of design and methods, 36 publications were selected for inclusion. Stem cells reside in a specific area of each tissue where they may remain undivided for several years until they are activated by disease or tissue injury. The embryonic stem cells are typically derived from four or five days old embryos and they are pluripotent. The adult tissues reported to contain stem cells brain, bone marrow, peripheral blood, blood vessels, skeletal muscle, skin and liver. The promise of stem cell therapies is an exciting one, but significant technical hurdles remain that will only be overcome through years of intensive research. (author)

  15. Protocol for the saMS trial (supportive adjustment for multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy to supportive listening for adjustment to multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCrone Paul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an incurable, chronic, potentially progressive and unpredictable disease of the central nervous system. The disease produces a range of unpleasant and debilitating symptoms, which can have a profound impact including disrupting activities of daily living, employment, income, relationships, social and leisure activities, and life goals. Adjusting to the illness is therefore particularly challenging. This trial tests the effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioural intervention compared to Supportive Listening to assist adjustment in the early stages of MS. Methods/Design This is a two arm randomized multi-centre parallel group controlled trial. 122 consenting participants who meet eligibility criteria will be randomly allocated to receive either Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Supportive Listening. Eight one hour sessions of therapy (delivered over a period of 10 weeks will be delivered by general nurses trained in both treatments. Self-report questionnaire data will be collected at baseline (0 weeks, mid-therapy (week 5 of therapy, post-therapy (15 weeks and at six months (26 weeks and twelve months (52 weeks follow-up. Primary outcomes are distress and MS-related social and role impairment at twelve month follow-up. Analysis will also consider predictors and mechanisms of change during therapy. In-depth interviews to examine participants' experiences of the interventions will be conducted with a purposively sampled sub-set of the trial participants. An economic analysis will also take place. Discussion This trial is distinctive in its aims in that it aids adjustment to MS in a broad sense. It is not a treatment specifically for depression. Use of nurses as therapists makes the interventions potentially viable in terms of being rolled out in the NHS. The trial benefits from incorporating patient input in the development and evaluation stages. The trial will provide important information about the

  16. Anti EGFR therapy in the treatment of non-metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: The current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rony Benson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC accounts for a large oncologic burden in the developing countries. In patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer multimodality treatment is warranted. Radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy has long been considered the standard for patients with disease involving the oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. However, addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy increases treatment related toxicity by many folds and compliance rates decrease. In this context a systemic therapy, which when used concurrent with radiation with favorable toxicity profile is of great importance for improving disease control in locally advanced HNSCC. Anti-epithelial growth factor receptor targeted therapy emerged as a potential treatment option. In recent years many trials were conducted to find the optimum treatment option with the combination of these targeted agents. The initial trials showed excellent results with minimal morbidity and led to great enthusiasm across the globe to incorporate these regimens as a standard of care. However, subsequently many trials failed to maintain such results and now there is little agreement to the initial results achieved with these drugs. Based on the current evidence we cannot recommend the replacement of cisplatin with targeted therapy in concurrent setting. It may be considered in patients with altered renal parameters, hypersensitivity or intolerance to cisplatin. The addition of targeted therapy in addition to chemotherapy in the concurrent setting can’t also be recommended as the benefit is doubtful and is associated with a significant increase in toxicity.

  17. Market access pathways for cell therapies in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémuzat, Cécile; Toumi, Mondher; Jørgensen, Jesper; Kefalas, Panos

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapies can be classified into three main categories of products: advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), ATMPs prepared on a non-routine basis (hospital exemptions), and minimally manipulated cells. Despite the benefits that cell therapies can bring to patients, they are subject to complex pathways to reach the market in France. The objective of this study was to identify and describe routes to market access for cell therapies in France and how these vary by regulatory status. The research was structured following five main steps: (1) identification of the French regulatory framework for cell therapies; (2) identification of the health products categorised as cell therapies in France; (3) mapping of the market access pathways per category of cell therapy; (4) validation of findings by interviewing experts; and (5) development of a roadmap summarising market access pathways for cell therapies in France. The secondary research methodology included a comprehensive literature review conducted on websites of French public health institutions, complemented by a research for peer-reviewed articles, abstracts, and grey literature. Different market access pathways are possible depending on the cell therapy category. For ATMPs, market access pathways depend on the licensing status of the therapy. Licensed ATMPs followed the same market access pathways as 'conventional' pharmaceuticals, whereas not-yet-licensed ATMPs can be funded via a specific financial allowance under the framework of a Temporary Authorisation for Use procedure or various research programmes. For new ATMPs that are associated with a separate medical device (not considered as 'combined ATMPs') or associated with a new medical procedure, additional pathways will apply for the medical device and/or medical procedure to be reimbursed in the ambulatory settings or at hospital. The most likely funding option for ATMPs prepared on a non-routine basis is outside the diagnosis-related group (DRG

  18. The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) therapy - a perspective on cell biological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2017-10-26

    Recent clinical trials of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation have demonstrated procedural safety and clinical proof of principle with a modest indication of benefit in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While replacement therapy remained unrealistic, the clinical efficacy of this therapeutic option could be potentially enhanced if we could better decipher the mechanisms underlying some of the beneficial effects of transplanted cells, and work toward augmenting or combining these in a strategic manner. Novel ways whereby MSCs could act in modifying disease progression should also be explored. In this review, I discuss the known, emerging and postulated mechanisms of action underlying effects that transplanted MSCs may exert to promote motor neuron survival and/or to encourage regeneration in ALS. I shall also speculate on how transplanted cells may alter the diseased environment so as to minimize non-neuron cell autonomous damages by immune cells and astrocytes.

  19. High-dose vitamin D in Addison's disease regulates T-cells and monocytes: A pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna-Martinez, Marissa; Filmann, Natalie; Bogdanou, Dimitra; Shoghi, Firouzeh; Huenecke, Sabine; Schubert, Ralf; Herrmann, Eva; Koehl, Ulrike; Husebye, Eystein S; Badenhoop, Klaus

    2018-05-01

    On the basis of the immunomodulatory actions of vitamin D (VD), we investigated the effects of high-dose VD therapy over a 3 mo period on the immune response in patients with Addison's disease (AD). This randomized, controlled, crossover trial included 13 patients with AD who received either cholecalciferol (4000 IU/d) for 3 mo followed by 3 mo placebo oil or the sequential alternative placebo followed by verum. Glucocorticoid replacement doses remained stable. The primary outcome measures were changes in 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D 3 ) levels and immune cells including T helper cells (Th; CD3 + CD4 + ), late-activated Th cells (CD3 + CD4 + HLA-DR + ), regulatory T cells (CD3 + CD4 + CD25 bright CD127 dim/neg ), cytotoxic T cells (Tc; CD3 + CD8 + ), late-activated Tc cells (CD3 + CD8 + HLA-DR + ), and monocytes. The explorative analysis included the correlation of changes with VD-related gene polymorphisms and 21-hydroxylase antibody titers. Ten of 13 patients (77%) were VD deficient. Median 25(OH)D 3 concentrations increased significantly to 41.5 ng/ml (median changes: 19.95 ng/ml; P = 0.0005) after 3 mo of cholecalciferol treatment. Within the T-cells, only the late-activated Th (median changes: 1.6%; P = 0.02) and late-activated Tc cells (median changes: 4.05%; P = 0.03) decreased, whereas monocytes (median changes: 1.05%; P = 0.008) increased after VD therapy. T-cell changes were associated with two polymorphisms (CYP27B1-rs108770012 and VDR-rs10735810), but no changes in the 21-hydroxylase antibody titers were observed. Three months of treatment with cholecalciferol achieved sufficient 25(OH)D 3 levels and can regulate late-activated T-cells and monocytes in patients with AD. Explorative analysis revealed potential genetic contributions. This pilot trial provides novel insights about immunomodulation in AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The efficacy of maggot debridement therapy - a review of comparative clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarchi, K.; Jemec, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    in a variety of ulcers. However, comparative clinical trials and in particular randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of MDT are sparse. A systematic search in the literature showed three randomized clinical trials and five non randomized studies evaluating the efficacy of sterile Lucilia......, including hydrocolloid, hydrogel and saline moistened gauze. However, the design of the studies was suboptimal, with important differences in the use of other therapies, such as compression, that may influence both debridement and healing between the compared groups, as well as inappropriately short follow...

  1. Massage Therapy for Pain and Function in Patients With Arthritis: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicole L; Churilla, James R

    2017-09-01

    Massage therapy is gaining interest as a therapeutic approach to managing osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. To date, there have been no systematic reviews investigating the effects of massage therapy on these conditions. Systematic review was used. The primary aim of this review was to critically appraise and synthesize the current evidence regarding the effects of massage therapy as a stand-alone treatment on pain and functional outcomes among those with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Relevant randomized controlled trials were searched using the electronic databases Google Scholar, MEDLINE, and PEDro. The PEDro scale was used to assess risk of bias, and the quality of evidence was assessed with the GRADE approach. This review found seven randomized controlled trials representing 352 participants who satisfied the inclusion criteria. Risk of bias ranged from four to seven. Our results found low- to moderate-quality evidence that massage therapy is superior to nonactive therapies in reducing pain and improving certain functional outcomes. It is unclear whether massage therapy is more effective than other forms of treatment. There is a need for large, methodologically rigorous randomized controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of massage therapy as an intervention for individuals with arthritis.

  2. Experiences of a long-term randomized controlled prevention trial in a maiden environment: Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahu Mati

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventive drugs require long-term trials to show their effectiveness or harms and often a lot of changes occur during post-marketing studies. The purpose of this article is to describe the research process in a long-term randomized controlled trial and discuss the impact and consequences of changes in the research environment. Methods The Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial (EPHT, originally planned to continue for five years, was planned in co-operation with the Women's International Study of Long-Duration Oestrogen after Menopause (WISDOM in the UK. In addition to health outcomes, EPHT was specifically designed to study the impact of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT on health services utilization. Results After EPHT recruited in 1999–2001 the Women's Health Initiative (WHI in the USA decided to stop the estrogen-progestin trial after a mean of 5.2 years in July 2002 because of increased risk of breast cancer and later in 2004 the estrogen-only trial because HT increased the risk of stroke, decreased the risk of hip fracture, and did not affect coronary heart disease incidence. WISDOM was halted in autumn 2002. These decisions had a major influence on EPHT. Conclusion Changes in Estonian society challenged EPHT to find a balance between the needs of achieving responses to the trial aims with a limited budget and simultaneously maintaining the safety of trial participants. Flexibility was the main key for success. Rapid changes are not limited only to transiting societies but are true also in developed countries and the risk must be included in planning all long-term trials. The role of ethical and data monitoring committees in situations with emerging new data from other studies needs specification. Longer funding for preventive trials and more flexibility in budgeting are mandatory. Who should prove the effectiveness of an (old drug for a new preventive indication? In preventive drug trials companies may

  3. CHAMP: Cognitive behaviour therapy for health anxiety in medical patients, a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal health anxiety, also called hypochondriasis, has been successfully treated by cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT in patients recruited from primary care, but only one pilot trial has been carried out among those attending secondary medical clinics where health anxiety is likely to be more common and have a greater impact on services. The CHAMP study extends this work to examine both the clinical and cost effectiveness of CBT in this population. Method/Design The study is a randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms and equal randomization of 466 eligible patients (assuming a 20% drop-out to an active treatment group of 5-10 sessions of cognitive behaviour therapy and to a control group. The aim at baseline, after completion of all assessments but before randomization, was to give a standard simple explanation of the nature of health anxiety for all participants. Subsequently the control group was to receive whatever care might usually be available in the clinics, which is normally a combination of clinical assessment, appropriate tests and reassurance. Those allocated to the active treatment group were planned to receive between 5 and 10 sessions of an adapted form of cognitive behaviour therapy based on the Salkovskis/Warwick model, in which a set of treatment strategies are chosen aimed at helping patients understand the factors that drive and maintain health anxiety. The therapy was planned to be given by graduate research workers, nurses or other health professionals trained for this intervention whom would also have their competence assessed independently during the course of treatment. The primary outcome is reduction in health anxiety symptoms after one year and the main secondary outcome is the cost of care after two years. Discussion This represents the first trial of adapted cognitive behaviour therapy in health anxiety that is large enough to test not only the clinical benefits of treatment but also

  4. A single-arm phase II trial of pazopanib in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer with non-squamous histology with disease progression on bevacizumab containing therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jared M; Villaruz, Liza C; Socinski, Mark A; Ivanova, Anastasia; Grilley-Olson, Juneko; Dhruva, Nirav; Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2014-11-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy with bevacizumab is a standard therapy for patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with non-squamous (NS) histology. Mechanisms of resistance to bevacizumab include increased VEGF signaling or activation of VEGF receptors. Pazopanib is a multi-targeted VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase with single agent activity in NSCLC. Stage IIIB/IV patients with adequate organ function, who progressed on a bevacizumab containing therapy were eligible if it had been ≤8 weeks since the last bevacizumab treatment. The primary end-point was disease control rate (DCR), defined as partial or complete response, or stable disease for ≥12 weeks. Patients were assessed radiographically every 2 cycles (6 weeks). A Simon 2-stage design was used, and if in the first stage ≤4 of 17 patients experienced disease control the trial was to have been stopped for futility. An unplanned analysis was performed after 15 patients were evaluable secondary to slow accrual. Between December 2010 and November 2013, 15 patients were treated on trial. The median age was 61 years (range 39-74), and all patients had stage IV disease. Of the 15 patients, 4 discontinued therapy prior to cycle 2 evaluation due to adverse events (n=3) and medical illness (n=1), 5 patients had progressive disease, 4 patients had stable disease for <12 weeks, and 2 patients had stable disease for ≥12 weeks. No responses were observed. The DCR observed was 13% (2/15), and the trial did not meet the criteria to proceed to the second stage. Episodes of grade 3 treatment related toxicities observed included: increased ALT (n=2), increased AST (n=1), anorexia (n=3), fatigue (n=3), hypertension (n=1), infection (n=1), mucositis (n=2), nausea (n=3), pericardial effusion (n=1), and vomiting (n=1). Pazopanib has limited activity in NSCLC-NS in patients who have experienced disease progression on bevacizumab. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative effectiveness of Tai Chi versus physical therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Few remedies effectively treat long-term pain and disability from knee osteoarthritis. Studies suggest that Tai Chi alleviates symptoms, but no trials have directly compared Tai Chi with standard therapies for osteoarthritis. Objective: To compare Tai Chi with standard physical therapy f...

  6. Two-Stage Priming of Allogeneic Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Phase I Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis D Kottaridis

    Full Text Available Human Natural Killer (NK cells require at least two signals to trigger tumor cell lysis. Absence of ligands providing either signal 1 or 2 provides NK resistance. We manufactured a lysate of a tumour cell line which provides signal 1 to resting NK cells without signal 2. The tumor-primed NK cells (TpNK lyse NK resistant Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML blasts expressing signal 2 ligands. We conducted a clinical trial to determine the toxicity of TpNK cell infusions from haploidentical donors. 15 patients with high risk AML were screened, 13 enrolled and 7 patients treated. The remaining 6 either failed to respond to re-induction chemotherapy or the donor refused to undergo peripheral blood apheresis. The conditioning consisted of fludarabine and total body irradiation. This was the first UK trial of a cell therapy regulated as a medicine. The complexity of Good Clinical Practice compliance was underestimated and led to failures requiring retrospective independent data review. The lessons learned are an important aspect of this report. There was no evidence of infusional toxicity. Profound myelosuppression was seen in the majority (median neutrophil recovery day 55. At six months follow-up, three patients treated in Complete Remission (CR remained in remission, one patient infused in Partial Remission had achieved CR1, two had relapsed and one had died. One year post-treatment one patient remained in CR. Four patients remained in CR after treatment for longer than their most recent previous CR. During the 2 year follow-up six of seven patients died; median overall survival was 400 days post infusion (range 141–910. This is the first clinical trial of an NK therapy in the absence of IL-2 or other cytokine support. The HLA-mismatched NK cells survived and expanded in vivo without on-going host immunosuppression and appeared to exert an anti-leukemia effect in 4/7 patients treated.ISRCTN trial registry ISRCTN11950134.

  7. The effectiveness and cost-evaluation of manual therapy and physical therapy in patients with sub-acute and chronic non specific neck pain. Rationale and design of a Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Assen Luite

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manual Therapy applied to patients with non specific neck pain has been investigated several times. In the Netherlands, manual therapy as applied according to the Utrecht School of Manual Therapy (MTU has not been the subject of a randomized controlled trial. MTU differs in diagnoses and treatment from other forms of manual therapy. Methods/Design This is a single blind randomized controlled trial in patients with sub-acute and chronic non specific neck pain. Patients with neck complaints existing for two weeks (minimum till one year (maximum will participate in the trial. 180 participants will be recruited in thirteen primary health care centres in the Netherlands. The experimental group will be treated with MTU during a six week period. The control group will be treated with physical therapy (standard care, mainly active exercise therapy, also for a period of six weeks. Primary outcomes are Global Perceived Effect (GPE and functional status (Neck Disability Index (NDI-DV. Secondary outcomes are neck pain (Numeric Rating Scale (NRS, Eurocol, costs and quality of life (SF36. Discussion This paper presents details on the rationale of MTU, design, methods and operational aspects of the trial. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00713843

  8. Investigation progress of imaging techniques monitoring stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jun; An Rui

    2006-01-01

    Recently stem cell therapy has showed potential clinical application in diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, malignant tumor and trauma. Efficient techniques of non-invasively monitoring stem cell transplants will accelerate the development of stem cell therapies. This paper briefly reviews the clinical practice of stem cell, in addition, makes a review of monitoring methods including magnetic resonance and radionuclide imaging which have been used in stem cell therapy. (authors)

  9. The TOPSHOCK study: effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, Henk; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L

    2011-10-11

    Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of the rehabilitation program for patellar tendinopathy. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy originally used focused shockwaves. Several years ago a new kind of shockwave therapy was introduced: radial shockwave therapy. Studies that investigate the effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy as treatment for patellar tendinopathy are scarce. Therefore the aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy as treatments for patellar tendinopathy. The TOPSHOCK study (Tendinopathy Of Patella SHOCKwave) is a two-armed randomised controlled trial in which the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy are directly compared. Outcome assessors and patients are blinded as to which treatment is given. Patients undergo three sessions of either focused shockwave therapy or radial shockwave therapy at 1-week intervals, both in combination with eccentric decline squat training. Follow-up measurements are scheduled just before treatments 2 and 3, and 1, 4, 7 and 12 weeks after the final treatment. The main outcome measure is the Dutch VISA-P questionnaire, which asks for pain, function and sports participation in subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Secondary outcome measures are pain determined with a VAS during ADL, sports and decline squats, rating of subjective improvement and overall satisfaction with the treatment. Patients will also record their sports activities, pain during and after these activities, and concurrent medical treatment on a weekly basis in a web-based diary. Results will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The TOPSHOCK study is the first randomised controlled trial that

  10. Highly active antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors does not confer a unique CD4 cell benefit. The AVANTI and INCAS Study Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-07

    To determine if triple combination therapy, particularly including HIV protease inhibitors (PI), confers an unique immunological benefit that is independent of reductions of plasma viral load (pVL). The correlation between changes from baseline in CD4 cell count and pVL was examined at all time points up to 52 weeks in three randomized clinical trials (AVANTI-2, AVANTI-3 and INCAS) that compared dual nucleoside therapy with triple combination therapy. Individual pVL and CD4 cell counts changes from baseline were entered into multivariate linear regression models for patients receiving double therapy and for those receiving triple therapy including a PI and/or a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), and the null hypothesis was tested. After 52 weeks of therapy, the relationship between changes from baseline CD4 cell count and pVL was independent of whether patients were assigned double or triple therapy (P = 0.23 and 0.69 for intercept and slope, respectively), or whether patients were assigned triple therapy including a PI or triple therapy including an NNRTI (P = 0.92 and 0.95, respectively). Less than 5% of patients ever had 'discordant' increases in both CD4 cell count and pVL compared with baseline, and this proportion was unrelated to the class of therapy used. 'Discordant' decreases from baseline in both parameters were observed in up to 35% of individuals. The correlation between pVL and CD4 cell count changes from baseline improved over time on therapy, regardless of the therapeutic regimen involved. The data provide no evidence for a CD4 cell count benefit of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) unique to triple therapy or PI-containing regimens.

  11. The Efficacy of Single-Agent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Biologically Selected Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 19 Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guifang; Gao, Shunji; Sheng, Zhixin; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of first-generation single-agent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients with known EGFR mutation status, we undertook this pooled analysis. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, the Science Citation Index, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings. Out of 2,129 retrieved articles, 19 RCTs enrolling 2,016 patients with wild-type EGFR tumors and 1,034 patients with mutant EGFR tumors were identified. For these EGFR mutant patients, single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy improved progression-free survival (PFS) over chemotherapy: the summary hazard ratios (HRs) were 0.41 (p well as chemotherapy in the first-line setting (HR = 1.65, p = 0.03) and in the second-/third-line setting (HR = 1.27, p = 0.006). No statistically significant difference was observed in terms of overall survival (OS). Using platinum-based doublet chemotherapy as a common comparator, indirect comparison showed the superior efficacy of single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy over EGFR-TKIs added to chemotherapy in PFS [HR = 1.35 (1.03, 1.77), p = 0.03]. Additionally, a marginal trend towards the same direction was found in the OS analysis [HR = 1.16 (0.99, 1.35), p = 0.06]. Interestingly, for those EGFR wild-type tumors, single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy was inferior to EGFR-TKIs added to chemotherapy in PFS [HR = 0.38 (0.33, 0.44), p chemotherapy. However, single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy was inferior to chemotherapy in PFS for those EGFR wild-type patients. Single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy could improve PFS over the combination of EGFR-TKIs and chemotherapy in these EGFR mutant patients. However, EGFR-TKIs combined with chemotherapy could provide additive PFS and OS benefit over single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy in those EGFR wild-type patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Interleukin-2 therapy in patients with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D; Lévy, Y; Losso, M H; Babiker, A; Collins, G; Cooper, D A; Darbyshire, J; Emery, S; Fox, L; Gordin, F; Lane, H C; Lundgren, J D; Mitsuyasu, R; Neaton, J D; Phillips, A; Routy, J P; Tambussi, G; Wentworth, D

    2009-10-15

    Used in combination with antiretroviral therapy, subcutaneous recombinant interleukin-2 raises CD4+ cell counts more than does antiretroviral therapy alone. The clinical implication of these increases is not known. We conducted two trials: the Subcutaneous Recombinant, Human Interleukin-2 in HIV-Infected Patients with Low CD4+ Counts under Active Antiretroviral Therapy (SILCAAT) study and the Evaluation of Subcutaneous Proleukin in a Randomized International Trial (ESPRIT). In each, patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who had CD4+ cell counts of either 50 to 299 per cubic millimeter (SILCAAT) or 300 or more per cubic millimeter (ESPRIT) were randomly assigned to receive interleukin-2 plus antiretroviral therapy or antiretroviral therapy alone. The interleukin-2 regimen consisted of cycles of 5 consecutive days each, administered at 8-week intervals. The SILCAAT study involved six cycles and a dose of 4.5 million IU of interleukin-2 twice daily; ESPRIT involved three cycles and a dose of 7.5 million IU twice daily. Additional cycles were recommended to maintain the CD4+ cell count above predefined target levels. The primary end point of both studies was opportunistic disease or death from any cause. In the SILCAAT study, 1695 patients (849 receiving interleukin-2 plus antiretroviral therapy and 846 receiving antiretroviral therapy alone) who had a median CD4+ cell count of 202 cells per cubic millimeter were enrolled; in ESPRIT, 4111 patients (2071 receiving interleukin-2 plus antiretroviral therapy and 2040 receiving antiretroviral therapy alone) who had a median CD4+ cell count of 457 cells per cubic millimeter were enrolled. Over a median follow-up period of 7 to 8 years, the CD4+ cell count was higher in the interleukin-2 group than in the group receiving antiretroviral therapy alone--by 53 and 159 cells per cubic millimeter, on average, in the SILCAAT study and ESPRIT, respectively. Hazard ratios for opportunistic disease or death from

  13. Allogeneic tumor cell vaccines: the promise and limitations in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsan, Sanjay; Patel, Jaina M; Bozeman, Erica N; Imasuen, Imade E; He, Sara; Daniels, Danielle; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality rate associated with cancer and its resistance to conventional treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy has led to the investigation of a variety of anti-cancer immunotherapies. The development of novel immunotherapies has been bolstered by the discovery of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), through gene sequencing and proteomics. One such immunotherapy employs established allogeneic human cancer cell lines to induce antitumor immunity in patients through TAA presentation. Allogeneic cancer immunotherapies are desirable in a clinical setting due to their ease of production and availability. This review aims to summarize clinical trials of allogeneic tumor immunotherapies in various cancer types. To date, clinical trials have shown limited success due potentially to extensive degrees of inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity found among cancer patients. However, these clinical results provide guidance for the rational design and creation of more effective allogeneic tumor immunotherapies for use as monotherapies or in combination with other therapies.

  14. Comparative effectiveness of injection therapies in lateral epicondylitis: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Thøger Persson; Bartels, Else Marie; Ellingsen, Torkell; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Fredberg, Ulrich; Bliddal, Henning; Christensen, Robin

    2013-06-01

    Injection therapy with glucocorticoids has been used since the 1950s as a treatment strategy for lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow). Lately, several novel injection therapies have become available. To assess the comparative effectiveness and safety of injection therapies in patients with lateral epicondylitis. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Randomized controlled trials comparing different injection therapies for lateral epicondylitis were included provided they contained data for change in pain intensity (primary outcome). Trials were assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Network (random effects) meta-analysis was applied to combine direct and indirect evidence within and across trial data using the final end point reported in the trials, and results for the arm-based network analyses are reported as standardized mean differences (SMDs). Seventeen trials (1381 participants; 3 [18%] at low risk of bias) assessing injection with 8 different treatments-glucocorticoid (10 trials), botulinum toxin (4 trials), autologous blood (3 trials), platelet-rich plasma (2 trials), and polidocanol, glycosaminoglycan, prolotherapy, and hyaluronic acid (1 trial each)-were included. Pooled results (SMD [95% confidence interval]) showed that beyond 8 weeks, glucocorticoid injection was no more effective than placebo (-0.04 [-0.45 to 0.35]), but only 1 trial (which did not include a placebo arm) was at low risk of bias. Although botulinum toxin showed marginal benefit (-0.50 [-0.91 to -0.08]), it caused temporary paresis of finger extension, and all trials were at high risk of bias. Both autologous blood (-1.43 [-2.15 to -0.71]) and platelet-rich plasma (-1.13 [-1.77 to -0.49]) were also statistically superior to placebo, but only 1 trial was at low risk of bias. Prolotherapy (-2.71 [-4.60 to -0.82]) and hyaluronic acid (-5.58 [-6.35 to -4.82]) were both more efficacious than placebo, whereas polidocanol (0.39 [-0.42 to 1.20]) and glycosaminoglycan (-0.32 [-1.02 to 0

  15. The role of radiation therapy in pediatric oncology as assessed by cooperative clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angio, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Major advances have been made in pediatric oncology, and many are due to the advent of the cooperative clinical trial. This important research tool was originally developed for the testing of various therapeutic strategies for the management of children with acute leukemia. Such trials were eminently successful, as the consistently better long-term survival rates for children with this hitherto uniformly lethal disease can attest. The method soon found favor for the investigation of patients with so-called solid tumors. These trails were originally concerned with the elucidation of the value of various chemotherapeutic agents. Radiation therapists soon became involved, however, and this discipline became more heavily represented in study design and data analyses. Much radiation therapy information has been gained, some through prospective, randomized clinical investigations and some through retrospective reviews of roentgen therapy as it was employed in protocols accenting other aspects of care. Voluminous, important radiation therapy data have been deduced through the latter retrospective kinds of analyses, but this review will be confined largely to the published results of prospective, randomized cooperative clinical trials where radiation therapy was a governing variable. Certain investigations of historical interest will also be cited together with other results that established important principles even though not so rigorous in design

  16. Core domain and outcome measurement sets for shoulder pain trials are needed: Systematic review of physical therapy trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Page (Matthew J.); J.E. McKenzie (Joanne E.); S.E. Green (Sally E.); D.E. Beaton (Dorcas E.); N.B. Jain (Nitin B.); M. Lenza (Mario); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); S. Surace (Stephen); J. Deitch (Jessica); R. Buchbinder (Rachelle)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To explore the outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in published randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions for shoulder pain (rotator cuff disease, adhesive capsulitis, or nonspecific shoulder pain). Study Design and Setting We included

  17. How we make cell therapy in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montemurro T

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tiziana Montemurro, Mariele Viganò, Silvia Budelli, Elisa Montelatici, Cristiana Lavazza, Luigi Marino, Valentina Parazzi, Lorenza Lazzari, Rosaria GiordanoCell Factory, Unit of Cell Therapy and Cryobiology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, ItalyAbstract: In the 21st century scenario, new therapeutic tools are needed to take up the social and medical challenge posed by the more and more frequent degenerative disorders and by the aging of population. The recent category of advanced therapy medicinal products has been created to comprise cellular, gene therapy, and tissue engineered products, as a new class of drugs. Their manufacture requires the same pharmaceutical framework as for conventional drugs and this means that industrial, large-scale manufacturing process has to be adapted to the peculiar characteristics of cell-containing products. Our hospital took up the challenge of this new path in the early 2000s; and herein we describe the approach we followed to set up a pharmaceutical-grade facility in a public hospital context, with the aim to share the solutions we found to make cell therapy compliant with the requirements for the production and the quality control of a high-standard medicinal product.Keywords: advanced therapy medicinal product, good manufacturing practices, stem cells

  18. Brief Strategic Family Therapy versus Treatment as Usual: Results of a Multisite Randomized Trial for Substance Using Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Michael S.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Horigian, Viviana E.; Rohrbaugh, Michael; Shoham, Varda; Bachrach, Ken; Miller, Michael; Burlew, Kathleen A.; Hodgkins, Candy; Carrion, Ibis; Vandermark, Nancy; Schindler, Eric; Werstlein, Robert; Szapocznik, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT; an evidence-based family therapy) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) as provided in community-based adolescent outpatient drug abuse programs. Method: A randomized effectiveness trial in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network compared BSFT to…

  19. Randomized Controlled Trial of Problem-Solving Therapy for Minor Depression in Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellis, Zvi D.; McGinty, Jean; Tierney, Lynda; Jordan, Cindy; Burton, Jean; Misener, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Data are presented from a pilot research program initiated to develop, refine, and test the outcomes of problem-solving therapy that targets the needs of older adults with minor depression in home care settings. Method: A pilot randomized clinical trial compares the impact of problem-solving therapy for home care to treatment as usual…

  20. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal antigens. MSCs have the capacity to differentiate into a wide variety of distinct cell lineages and to suppress immune responses in vitro and in vivo. The main goal of this thesis was to study the s...

  1. Lymphoma immunotherapy: vaccines, adoptive cell transfer and immunotransplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Joshua; Levy, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Therapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma has benefited greatly from basic science and clinical research such that chemotherapy and monoclonal antibody therapy have changed some lymphoma subtypes from uniformly lethal to curable, but the majority of lymphoma patients remain incurable. Novel therapies with less toxicity and more specific targeting of tumor cells are needed and immunotherapy is among the most promising of these. Recently completed randomized trials of idiotype vaccines and earlier-phase trials of other vaccine types have shown the ability to induce antitumor T cells and some clinical responses. More recently, trials of adoptive transfer of antitumor T cells have demonstrated techniques to increase the persistence and antitumor effect of these cells. Herein, we discuss lymphoma immunotherapy clinical trial results and what lessons can be taken to improve their effect, including the combination of vaccination and adoptive transfer in an approach we have dubbed ‘immunotransplant’. PMID:20636025

  2. Proton beam therapy in non-small cell lung cancer: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada H

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hideyuki Harada, Shigeyuki Murayama Radiation and Proton Therapy Center, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi, Shizuoka, Japan Abstract: This review summarizes the past and present status of proton beam therapy (PBT for lung cancer. PBT has a unique characteristic called the Bragg peak that enables a reduction in the dose of normal tissue around the tumor, but is sensitive to the uncertainties of density changes. The heterogeneity in electron density for thoracic lesions, such as those in the lung and mediastinum, and tumor movement according to respiration necessitates respiratory management for PBT to be applied in lung cancer patients. There are two types of PBT – a passively scattered approach and a scanning approach. Typically, a passively scattered approach is more robust for respiratory movement and a scanning approach could result in a more conformal dose distribution even when the tumor shape is complex. Large tumors of centrally located lung cancer may be more suitably irradiated than with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT. For a locally advanced lung cancer, PBT can spare the lung and heart more than photon IMRT. However, no randomized controlled trial has reported differences between PBT and IMRT or SBRT for early-stage and locally advanced lung cancers. Therefore, a well-designed controlled trial is warranted. Keywords: proton beam therapy, non-small cell lung cancer, survival, SBRT, IMRT

  3. Stem cell route to neuromuscular therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Terence A

    2003-02-01

    As applied to skeletal muscle, stem cell therapy is a reincarnation of myoblast transfer therapy that has resulted from recent advances in the cell biology of skeletal muscle. Both strategies envisage the reconstruction of damaged muscle from its precursors, but stem cell therapy employs precursors that are earlier in the developmental hierarchy. It is founded on demonstrations of apparently multipotential cells in a wide variety of tissues that can assume, among others, a myogenic phenotype. The main demonstrated advantage of such cells is that they are capable of colonizing many tissues, including skeletal and cardiac muscle via the blood vascular system, thereby providing the potential for a body-wide distribution of myogenic progenitors. From a practical viewpoint, the chief disadvantage is that such colonization has been many orders of magnitude too inefficient to be useful. Proposals for overcoming this drawback are the subject of much speculation but, so far, relatively little experimentation. This review attempts to give some perspective to the status of the stem cell as a therapeutic instrument for neuromuscular disease and to identify issues that need to be addressed for application of this technology.

  4. Psychological therapy for inpatients receiving acute mental health care: A systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Charlotte; Karatzias, Thanos; Dickson, Adele; Harper, Sean; Dougall, Nadine; Hutton, Paul

    2018-04-16

    The effectiveness of psychological therapies for those receiving acute adult mental health inpatient care remains unclear, partly because of the difficulty in conducting randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in this setting. The aim of this meta-analysis was to synthesize evidence from all controlled trials of psychological therapy carried out with this group, to estimate its effects on a number of important outcomes and examine whether the presence of randomization and rater blinding moderated these estimates. A systematic review and meta-analysis of all controlled trials of psychological therapy delivered in acute inpatient settings was conducted, with a focus on psychotic symptoms, readmissions or emotional distress (anxiety and depression). Studies were identified through ASSIA, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO using a combination of the key terms 'inpatient', 'psychological therapy', and 'acute'. No restriction was placed on diagnosis. The moderating effect of the use of assessor-blind RCT methodology was examined via subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Overall, psychological therapy was associated with small-to-moderate improvements in psychotic symptoms at end of therapy but the effect was smaller and not significant at follow-up. Psychological therapy was also associated with reduced readmissions, depression, and anxiety. The use of single-blind randomized controlled trial methodology was associated with significantly reduced benefits on psychotic symptoms and was also associated with reduced benefits on readmission and depression; however, these reductions were not statistically significant. The provision of psychological therapy to acute psychiatric inpatients is associated with improvements; however, the use of single-blind RCT methodology was associated with reduced therapy-attributable improvements. Whether this is a consequence of increased internal validity or reduced external validity is unclear. Trials with both high internal and

  5. Efficient Ex Vivo Engineering and Expansion of Highly Purified Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Populations for Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonari, Erika; Desantis, Giacomo; Petrillo, Carolina; Boccalatte, Francesco E; Lidonnici, Maria Rosa; Kajaste-Rudnitski, Anna; Aiuti, Alessandro; Ferrari, Giuliana; Naldini, Luigi; Gentner, Bernhard

    2017-04-11

    Ex vivo gene therapy based on CD34 + hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has shown promising results in clinical trials, but genetic engineering to high levels and in large scale remains challenging. We devised a sorting strategy that captures more than 90% of HSC activity in less than 10% of mobilized peripheral blood (mPB) CD34 + cells, and modeled a transplantation protocol based on highly purified, genetically engineered HSCs co-infused with uncultured progenitor cells. Prostaglandin E 2 stimulation allowed near-complete transduction of HSCs with lentiviral vectors during a culture time of less than 38 hr, mitigating the negative impact of standard culture on progenitor cell function. Exploiting the pyrimidoindole derivative UM171, we show that transduced mPB CD34 + CD38 - cells with repopulating potential could be expanded ex vivo. Implementing these findings in clinical gene therapy protocols will improve the efficacy, safety, and sustainability of gene therapy and generate new opportunities in the field of gene editing. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy in advanced biliary tract carcinoma: a pooled analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Florian; Schmid, Roland M

    2014-01-01

    In biliary tract cancer, gemcitabine platinum (GP) doublet palliative chemotherapy is the current standard treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze recent trials, even those small and nonrandomized, and identify superior new regimens. Trials published in English between January 2000 and January 2014 were analyzed, as well as ASCO abstracts from 2010 to 2013. In total, 161 trials comprising 6,337 patients were analyzed. The pooled results of standard therapy GP (no fluoropyrimidine, F, or other drug) were as follows: the median response rate (RR), tumor control rate (TCR), time to tumor progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 25.9 and 63.5%, and 5.3 and 9.5 months, respectively. GFP triplets as well as G-based chemotherapy plus targeted therapy were significantly superior to GP concerning tumor control (TCR, TTP) and OS, with no difference in RR. Triplet combinations of GFP as well as G-based chemotherapy with (predominantly EGFR) targeted therapy are most effective concerning tumor control and survival.

  7. Stem Cell Therapy in Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2016-08-01

    a novel approach to many diseases. SUMMARY: Wound healing therapies continue to rapidly evolve, with advances in basic science and engineering research heralding the development of new therapies, as well as ways to modify existing treatments. Stem cell-based therapy is one of the most promising therapeutic concepts for wound healing. Advances in stem cell biology have enabled researchers and clinicians alike with access to cells capable of actively modulating the healing response.  KEYWORDS: wound healing, tissue regeneration, stem cells therapy

  8. Radiation Therapy Intensification for Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamoah, Kosj [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Showalter, Timothy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Ohri, Nitin, E-mail: ohri.nitin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To systematically review the outcomes of randomized trials testing radiation therapy (RT) intensification, including both dose escalation and/or the use of altered fractionation, as a strategy to improve disease control for a number of malignancies. Methods and Materials: We performed a literature search to identify randomized trials testing RT intensification for cancers of the central nervous system, head and neck, breast, lung, esophagus, rectum, and prostate. Findings were described qualitatively. Where adequate data were available, pooled estimates for the effect of RT intensification on local control (LC) or overall survival (OS) were obtained using the inverse variance method. Results: In primary central nervous system tumors, esophageal cancer, and rectal cancer, randomized trials have not demonstrated that RT intensification improves clinical outcomes. In breast cancer and prostate cancer, dose escalation has been shown to improve LC or biochemical disease control but not OS. Radiation therapy intensification may improve LC and OS in head and neck and lung cancers, but these benefits have generally been limited to studies that did not incorporate concurrent chemotherapy. Conclusions: In randomized trials, the benefits of RT intensification have largely been restricted to trials in which concurrent chemotherapy was not used. Novel strategies to optimize the incorporation of RT in the multimodality treatment of solid tumors should be explored.

  9. Cellular therapies: Day by day, all the way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atilla, Erden; Kilic, Pelin; Gurman, Gunhan

    2018-04-18

    Tremendous effort and knowledge have elucidated a new era of 'cellular therapy,' also called "live" or "living" drugs. There are currently thousands of active clinical trials that are ongoing, seeking hope for incurable conditions thanks to the increased accessibility and reliability of gene editing and cellular reprogramming. Accomplishments in various adoptive T cell immunotherapies and chimeric antigen receptor (CART) T cell therapies oriented researchers to the field. Cellular therapies are believed to be the next generation of curative therapeutics in many ways, the classification and nomenclature for these applications have not yet reached a consensus. Trends in recent years are moving towards making tissues and cell processes only in centers with production permits. It is quite promising that competent authorities have increased licensing activities of tissue and cell establishments in their countries, under good practice (GxP) rules, and preclinical and clinical trials involving cell-based therapies have led to significant investments. Despite the initiatives undertaken and the large budgets that have been allocated, only limited success has been achieved in cellular therapy compared to conventional drug development. Cost, and cost effectiveness, are important issues for these novel therapies to meet unmet clinical needs, and there are still many scientific, translational, commercializational, and ethical questions that do not have answers. The main objectives of this review is to underline the current position of cellular therapies in research, highlight the timely topic of immunotherapy and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell treatment, and compile information related to regulations and marketing of cellular therapeutic approaches worldwide. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stem cells: sources and therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Monti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical, lexical and conceptual issues embedded in stem cell biology are reviewed from technical, ethical, philosophical, judicial, clinical, economic and biopolitical perspectives. The mechanisms assigning the simultaneous capacity to self-renew and to differentiate to stem cells (immortal template DNA and asymmetric division are evaluated in the light of the niche hypothesis for the stemness state. The induction of cell pluripotency and the different stem cells sources are presented (embryonic, adult and cord blood. We highlight the embryonic and adult stem cell properties and possible therapies while we emphasize the particular scientific and social values of cord blood donation to set up cord blood banks. The current scientific and legal frameworks of cord blood banks are reviewed at an international level as well as allogenic, dedicated and autologous donations. The expectations and the challenges in relation to present-day targeted diseases like diabetes mellitus type I, Parkinson's disease and myocardial infarction are evaluated in the light of the cellular therapies for regenerative medicine.

  12. Management of patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: focus on adoptive T-cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perna SK

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Serena Kimi Perna,1 Leslie E Huye,1,† Barbara Savoldo1,2 1Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, 2Department of Pediatrics, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX, USA  †Leslie E Huye passed away on January 1st, 2015 Abstract: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL represents a heterogeneous group of malignancies with high diversity in terms of biology, clinical responses, and prognosis. Standard therapy regimens produce a 5-year relative survival rate of only 69%, with the critical need to increase the treatment-success rate of this patient population presenting at diagnosis with a median age of 66 years and many comorbidities. The evidence that an impaired immune system favors the development of NHL has opened the stage for new therapeutics, and specifically for the adoptive transfer of ex vivo-expanded antigen-specific T-cells. In this review, we discuss how T-cells specific for viral-associated antigens, nonviral-associated antigens expressed by the tumor, T-cells redirected through the expression of chimeric antigen receptors, and transgenic T-cell receptors against tumor cells have been developed and used in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with NHLs. Keywords: adoptive immunotherapy, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR, transgenic T-cell receptors 

  13. Characteristics, applications and prospects of mesenchymal stem cells in cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadix, Juan A; Zugaza, José L; Gálvez-Martín, Patricia

    2017-05-10

    Recent advances in the field of cell therapy and regenerative medicine describe mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as potential biological products due to their ability to self-renew and differentiate. MSCs are multipotent adult cells with immunomodulatory and regenerative properties, and, given their therapeutic potential, they are being widely studied in order to evaluate their viability, safety and efficacy. In this review, we describe the main characteristics and cellular sources of MSCs, in addition to providing an overview of their properties and current clinical applications, as well offering updated information on the regulatory aspects that define them as somatic cell therapy products. Cell therapy based on MSCs is offered nowadays as a pharmacological alternative, although there are still challenges to be addressed in this regard. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Aging and stem cell therapy: AMPK as an applicable pharmacological target for rejuvenation of aged stem cells and achieving higher efficacy in stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorraminejad-Shirazi, Mohammadhossein; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Kardeh, Bahareh; Estedlal, Alireza; Kardeh, Sina; Monabati, Ahmad

    2017-10-19

    In recent years, tissue regeneration has become a promising field for developing stem cell-based transplantation therapies for human patients. Adult stem cells are affected by the same aging mechanisms that involve somatic cells. One of the mechanisms involved in cellular aging is hyperactivation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and disruption of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Aging of stem cells results in their impaired regenerative capacity and depletion of stem cell pools in adult tissue, which results in lower efficacy of stem cell therapy. By utilizing an effective therapeutic intervention for aged stem cells, stem cell therapy can become more promising for future application. mTORC1 inhibition is a practical approach to preserve the stem cell pool. In this article, we review the dynamic interaction between sirtuin (silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog) 1, AMPK, and mTORC1. We propose that using AMPK activators such as 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide, A769662, metformin, and oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) are practical ways to be employed for achieving better optimized results in stem cell-based transplantation therapies. Copyright © 2017 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sensor-augmented pump therapy lowers HbA(1c) in suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes; a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanides, J.; Nørgaard, K.; Bruttomesso, D.; Mathieu, C.; Frid, A.; Dayan, C. M.; Diem, P.; Fermon, C.; Wentholt, I. M. E.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; DeVries, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of sensor-augmented pump therapy vs. multiple daily injection therapy in patients with suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes. In this investigator-initiated multi-centre trial (the Eurythmics Trial) in eight outpatient centres in Europe, we randomized 83 patients with

  16. Durvalumab: a potential maintenance therapy in surgery-ineligible non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafique MR

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Shafique, Lary A Robinson, Scott Antonia Department of Thoracic Oncology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and the most common cause of cancer-related death. Non-small-cell lung cancer comprises ~87% of newly diagnosed cases of lung cancer, and nearly one-third of these patients have stage III disease. Despite improvements in the treatment of stage IV lung cancer, particularly with the introduction and dissemination of checkpoint inhibitors, very little progress has been made in the treatment of stage III lung cancer. In this article, we discuss the general staging criteria and treatment options for stage III lung cancer. We review how concurrent radiation and chemotherapy can have immunomodulatory effects, supporting the rationale for incorporating immunotherapy into existing treatment paradigms. Finally, we discuss the results of the PACIFIC trial and implications for the treatment of stage III lung cancer. In the PACIFIC trial, adding durvalumab as a maintenance therapy following the completion of chemoradiotherapy improved progression-free survival in patients with locally advanced unresectable stage III lung cancer. On the strength of these results, durvalumab has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in this setting, representing the first advance in the treatment of stage III lung cancer in nearly a decade. Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer, maintenance therapy, staging, immunotherapy, chemoradiation, surgery-ineligible, durvalumab

  17. Interleukin-2 therapy in patients with HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrams, D.; Lévy, Y.; Losso, M. H.; Babiker, A.; Collins, G.; Cooper, D. A.; Darbyshire, J.; Emery, S.; Fox, L.; Gordin, F.; Lane, H. C.; Lundgren, J. D.; Mitsuyasu, R.; Neaton, J. D.; Phillips, A.; Routy, J. P.; Tambussi, G.; Wentworth, D.; Aagaard, B.; Aragon, E.; Arnaiz, J.; Borup, L.; Clotet, B.; Dragsted, U.; Fau, A.; Gey, D.; Grarup, J.; Hengge, U.; Herrero, P.; Jansson, P.; Jensen, B.; Jensen, K.; Juncher, H.; Lopez, P.; Lundgren, J.; Matthews, C.; Mollerup, D.; Pearson, M.; Reilev, S.; Tillmann, K.; Varea, S.; Angus, B.; Cordwell, B.; Dodds, W.; Fleck, S.; Grijsen, M.; Lange, J.; Langebeek, N.; Reiss, P.; van der Horst, C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Used in combination with antiretroviral therapy, subcutaneous recombinant interleukin-2 raises CD4+ cell counts more than does antiretroviral therapy alone. The clinical implication of these increases is not known. METHODS: We conducted two trials: the Subcutaneous Recombinant, Human

  18. Cell-based therapy technology classifications and translational challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Natalie M.; Ward, Stephen J.; Kefalas, Panos; Hyllner, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapies offer the promise of treating and altering the course of diseases which cannot be addressed adequately by existing pharmaceuticals. Cell therapies are a diverse group across cell types and therapeutic indications and have been an active area of research for many years but are now strongly emerging through translation and towards successful commercial development and patient access. In this article, we present a description of a classification of cell therapies on the basis of their underlying technologies rather than the more commonly used classification by cell type because the regulatory path and manufacturing solutions are often similar within a technology area due to the nature of the methods used. We analyse the progress of new cell therapies towards clinical translation, examine how they are addressing the clinical, regulatory, manufacturing and reimbursement requirements, describe some of the remaining challenges and provide perspectives on how the field may progress for the future. PMID:26416686

  19. Stem cells in clinical trials for treatment of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Henry

    2016-01-01

    After decades of basic science research involving the testing of regenerative strategies in animal models of retinal degenerative diseases, a number of clinical trials are now underway, with additional trials set to begin shortly. These efforts will evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of cell-based products in the eyes of patients with a number of retinal conditions, notably including age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and Stargardt's disease. This review considers the scientific work and early trials with fetal cells and tissues that set the stage for the current clinical investigatory work, as well the trials themselves, specifically those either now completed, underway or close to initiation. The cells of interest include retinal pigment epithelial cells derived from embryonic stem or induced pluripotent stem cells, undifferentiated neural or retinal progenitors or cells from the vascular/bone marrow compartment or umbilical cord tissue. Degenerative diseases of the retina represent a popular target for emerging cell-based therapeutics and initial data from early stage clinical trials suggest that short-term safety objectives can be met in at least some cases. The question of efficacy will require additional time and testing to be adequately resolved.

  20. Mirror therapy in children with hemiparesis: a randomized observer-blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchez, Roselyn; Jequier Gygax, Marine; Roches, Sylvie; Fluss, Joel; Jacquier, David; Ballabeni, Pierluigi; Grunt, Sebastian; Newman, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    To determine the efficacy of mirror therapy in children with hemiparesis. The design was an observer-blinded parallel-group randomized controlled trial (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number 48748291). Randomization was computer-generated, 1:1 allocation to mirror therapy or comparison groups. The settings were home-based intervention and tertiary centre assessments. Participants were 90 children with hemiparesis aged 7 to 17 years. Intervention was 15 minutes per day of simultaneous arm training, 5 days a week, for 5 weeks. The mirror therapy group used a mirror; those in the comparison group looked at their paretic limb. Assessments comprised measures of upper limb strength, function (Melbourne Assessment 2), daily performance (ABILHAND-Kids), and sensory function at weeks 0 (T0 ), 5 (T1 ), and 10 (T2 ). There were no significant differences in outcomes and their progression over time between the mirror therapy and comparison groups. Post-hoc intention-to-treat analyses showed significant improvements in both groups for grasp strength (T0 -T1 +12.6%), pinch strength (T0 -T2 +9.1%), upper limb function in terms of accuracy (T0 -T2 +2.7%) and fluency (T0 -T2 +5.0%), as well as daily performance (T0 -T2 +16.6%). Per protocol analyses showed additional improvements in dexterity (T0 -T2 +4.0%). The use of the mirror illusion during therapy had no significant effect on treatment outcomes. However, 5 weeks of daily simultaneous arm training significantly improved paretic upper limb strength, function, and daily use. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  1. Isolation and characterization of exosome from human embryonic stem cell-derived c-myc-immortalized mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Ruenn Chai; Yeo, Ronne Wee Yeh; Padmanabhan, Jayanthi; Choo, Andre; De Kleijn, Dominique P V; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are currently the cell type of choice in many cell therapy trials. The number of therapeutic applications for MSCs registered as product IND submissions with the FDA and initiation of registered clinical trials has increased substantially in recent years, in particular

  2. Novel treatment strategies for feline chronic kidney disease: A critical look at the potential of mesenchymal stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, J M; Dow, S W

    2015-06-01

    Stem cell therapy is an innovative field of scientific investigation with tremendous potential for clinical application that holds promise for the treatment of a variety of diseases in veterinary medicine. Based on the known desirable properties of mesenchymal stem cells, the therapy has potential for treatment of both acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease in cats. This review details terminology commonly used in this field of study, sources of mesenchymal stem cells and their proposed mechanism of action particularly as it relates to renal repair. Studies performed in rodent models of chronic kidney disease and feline clinical trial results are also summarized with the aim of providing an overview of the current status of this treatment modality and its potential for the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Initiation of a phase-I trial of neutron capture therapy at the MIT research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A.; Yam, Chun-Shan

    1995-01-01

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the New England Medical Center (NEMC), and Boston University Medical Center (BUMC) initiated a phase-1 trial of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on September 6, 1994, at the 5-MW(thermal) MIT research reactor (MITR). A novel form of experimental cancer therapy, BNCT is being developed for certain types of highly malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma and melanoma. The results of the phase-1 trials on patients with tumors in the legs or feet are described

  4. Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Internet Therapy, Group Therapy and A Waiting List Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Eduard J; Bögels, Susan M; Oort, Frans J; Meijer, Anne Marie

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) in adolescents. A randomized controlled trial of CBTI in group therapy (GT), guided internet therapy (IT), and a waiting list (WL), with assessments at baseline, directly after treatment (post-test), and at 2 months follow-up. Diagnostic interviews were held at the laboratory of the Research Institute of Child Development and Education at the University of Amsterdam. Treatment for GT occurred at the mental health care center UvAMinds in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. One hundred sixteen adolescents (mean age = 15.6 y, SD = 1.6 y, 25% males) meeting DSM-IV criteria for insomnia, were randomized to IT, GT, or WL. CBTI of 6 weekly sessions, consisted of psychoeducation, sleep hygiene, restriction of time in bed, stimulus control, cognitive therapy, and relaxation techniques. GT was conducted in groups of 6 to 8 adolescents, guided by 2 trained sleep therapists. IT was applied through an online guided self-help website with programmed instructions and written feedback from a trained sleep therapist. Sleep was measured with actigraphy and sleep logs for 7 consecutive days. Symptoms of insomnia and chronic sleep reduction were measured with questionnaires. Results showed that adolescents in both IT and GT, compared to WL, improved significantly on sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, and total sleep time at post-test, and improvements were maintained at follow-up. Most of these improvements were found in both objective and subjective measures. Furthermore, insomnia complaints and symptoms of chronic sleep reduction also decreased significantly in both treatment conditions compared to WL. Effect sizes for improvements ranged from medium to large. A greater proportion of participants from the treatment conditions showed high end-state functioning and clinically significant improvement after treatment and at follow-up compared to WL. This study is the first randomized

  5. Systematic reviews of randomised clinical trials examining the effects of psychotherapeutic interventions versus "no intervention" for acute major depressive disorder and a randomised trial examining the effects of "third wave" cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based treatment for acute major

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian

    2014-01-01

    systematic reviews with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses using The Cochrane Collaboration methodology examining the effects of cognitive therapy and psycho-dynamic therapy for major depressive disorder. We developed a thorough treatment protocol for a randomised trial with low risks of bias...... therapy versus mentalisation-based treatment for major depressive disorder. The first systematic review included five randomised trials examining the effects of psychodynamic therapy versus "no intervention' for major depressive disorder. Altogether the five trials randomised 365 participants who in each...... this result. The second systematic review included 12 randomised trials examining the effects of cognitive therapy versus "no intervention" for major depressive disorder. Altogether a total of 669 participants were randomised. All trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed that cognitive therapy...

  6. A randomized trial evaluating a block-replacement regimen during radioiodine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen J; Grupe, Peter; Boel-Jørgensen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Eur J Clin Invest 2010 ABSTRACT: Background  Lack of consensus regarding the antithyroid drug regimen in relation to radioiodine ((131) I) therapy of hyperthyroidism prompted this randomized trial comparing two strategies. Design  Patients with Graves' disease (GD, n = 51) or toxic nodular goitre...

  7. Variation in use of targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma: Results from a Dutch population-based registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Groot, S.; Sleijfer, S.; Redekop, W. K.; Oosterwijk, E.; Haanen, J. B. A. G.; Kiemeney, L. A. L. M.; Uyl-de Groot, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    For patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), targeted therapies have entered the market since 2006. The aims of this study were to evaluate the uptake and use of targeted therapies for mRCC in The Netherlands, examine factors associated with the prescription of targeted therapies in daily clinical practice and study their effectiveness in terms of overall survival (OS). Two cohorts from PERCEPTION, a population-based registry of mRCC patients, were used: a 2008–2010 Cohort (n = 645) and a 2011–2013 Cohort (n = 233). Chi-squared tests for trend were used to study time trends in the use of targeted therapy. Patients were grouped based on the eligibility criteria of the SUTENT trial, the trial that led to sunitinib becoming standard of care, to investigate the use of targeted therapies amongst patients fulfilling those criteria. Multi-level logistic regression was used to identify patient subgroups that are less likely to receive targeted therapies. Approximately one-third of patients fulfilling SUTENT trial eligibility criteria did not receive any targeted therapy (29 % in the 2008–2010 Cohort; 35 % in the 2011–2013 Cohort). Patients aged 65+ years were less likely to receive targeted therapy in both cohorts and different risk groups (odds ratios range between 0.84–0.92); other factors like number of metastatic sites were of influence in some subgroups. Amongst treated patients, there was a decreasing trend in sunitinib use over time (p = 0.0061), and an increasing trend in pazopanib use (p = 0.0005). Targeted therapies have largely replaced interferon-alfa as first-line standard of care. Nevertheless, many eligible patients in Dutch daily practice did not receive targeted therapies despite their ability to improve survival. Reasons for their apparent underutilisation should be examined more carefully. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2395-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  8. Hepatic veno-occlusive disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: update on defibrotide and other current investigational therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, V T; Revta, C; Richardson, P G

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also known as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), remains one of the most serious and common complications after myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Clinical diagnosis of hepatic VOD is based on the clinical triad of (1) painful hepatomegaly, (2) hyperbilirubinemia and (3) unexplained fluid retention. While milder cases usually resolve spontaneously, severe VOD is associated with a grim prognosis. Defibrotide (DF), a polydisperse mixture of single-stranded oligonucleotide with antithrombotic and fibrinolytic effects on microvascular endothelium, has emerged as an effective and safe therapy for patients with severe VOD. Multiple studies, including a recent large international multicenter phase II clinical trial, have demonstrated 30-60% complete remission rates with DF, even among patients with severe VOD and multiorgan failure. This article will review our current understanding of hepatic VOD, and update the clinical trial experience with DF and other potential therapies for this feared transplant complication.

  9. Use of Human Cadaveric Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cell Therapy of a Chronic Radiation-Induced Skin Lesion: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portas, M.; Coppola, A.; Mansilla, E.; Drago, H.; Dubner, D.; Radl, A.; Di Giorgio, M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute and late radiation-induced injury on skin and subcutaneous tissues are associated with substantial morbidity in radiation therapy, interventional procedures and also are of concern in the context of nuclear or radiological accidents. Pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of acutely responding epithelial tissues and damage to vascular endothelial micro-vessels. Efforts for medical management of severe radiation-induced lesions have been made. Nevertheless, the development of strategies to promote wound healing, including stem cell therapy, is required. From 1997 to 2014, over 248 patients were referred to the Radio-pathology Committee of Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Burns Hospital) for the diagnosis and therapy of radiation-induced localized lesions. As part of the strategies for the management of severe cases, there is an ongoing research and development protocol on 'Translational Clinical Trial phases I/II to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adult mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow for the treatment of large burns and radiological lesions'. The object of this work was to describe the actions carried out by the Radio-pathology Committee of the Burns Hospital in a chronic case with more than 30 years of evolution without positive response to conventional treatments. The approach involved the evaluation of the tissular compromise of the lesion, the prognosis and the personalized treatment, including regenerative therapy. (authors)

  10. Changes in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors With Immediate Versus Deferred Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation Among HIV-Positive Participants in the START (Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Sharma, Shweta; Achhra, Amit C

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: HIV infection and certain antiretroviral therapy (ART) medications increase atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, mediated, in part, through traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied cardiovascular disease risk factor changes in the START...... (Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment) trial, a randomized study of immediate versus deferred ART initiation among HIV-positive persons with CD4+ cell counts >500 cells/mm3. Mean change from baseline in risk factors and the incidence of comorbid conditions were compared between groups....... The characteristics among 4685 HIV-positive START trial participants include a median age of 36 years, a CD4 cell count of 651 cells/mm3, an HIV viral load of 12 759 copies/mL, a current smoking status of 32%, a median systolic/diastolic blood pressure of 120/76 mm Hg, and median levels of total cholesterol of 168 mg...

  11. Can the outcomes of mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy for myocardial infarction be improved? Providing weapons and armour to cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Andrey A; Udalova, Daria V; Pliss, Michael G; Galagudza, Michael M

    2017-04-01

    Use of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation after myocardial infarction (MI) has been found to have infarct-limiting effects in numerous experimental and clinical studies. However, recent meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials on MSC-based MI therapy have highlighted the need for improving its efficacy. There are two principal approaches for increasing therapeutic effect of MSCs: (i) preventing massive MSC death in ischaemic tissue and (ii) increasing production of cardioreparative growth factors and cytokines with transplanted MSCs. In this review, we aim to integrate our current understanding of genetic approaches that are used for modification of MSCs to enable their improved survival, engraftment, integration, proliferation and differentiation in the ischaemic heart. Genetic modification of MSCs resulting in increased secretion of paracrine factors has also been discussed. In addition, data on MSC preconditioning with physical, chemical and pharmacological factors prior to transplantation are summarized. MSC seeding on three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds facilitates formation of both intercellular connections and contacts between cells and the extracellular matrix, thereby enhancing cell viability and function. Use of genetic and non-genetic approaches to modify MSC function holds great promise for regenerative therapy of myocardial ischaemic injury. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Role of massage therapy on reduction of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in term and preterm neonates: a review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Bhawan Deep; Kabra, Nandkishor S; Balasubramanian, Haribalakrishna

    2017-09-13

    Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (NNH) is one of the leading causes of admissions in nursery throughout the world. It affects approximately 2.4-15% of neonates during the first 2 weeks of life. To evaluate the role of massage therapy for reduction of NNH in both term and preterm neonates. The literature search was done for various randomized control trials (RCTs) by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and EMBASE. This review included total of 10 RCTs (two in preterm neonates and eight in term neonates) that fulfilled inclusion criteria. In most of the trials, Field massage was given. Six out of eight trials reported reduction in bilirubin levels in term neonates. However, only one trial (out of two) reported significant reduction in bilirubin levels in preterm neonates. Both trials in preterm neonates and most of the trials in term neonates (five trials) reported increased stool frequencies. Role of massage therapy in the management of NNH is supported by the current evidence. However, due to limitations of the trials, current evidences are not sufficient to use massage therapy for the management of NNH in routine practice.

  13. Genetically modified T cells in cancer therapy: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Sharpe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumours use many strategies to evade the host immune response, including downregulation or weak immunogenicity of target antigens and creation of an immune-suppressive tumour environment. T cells play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and, recently, strategies to genetically modify T cells either through altering the specificity of the T cell receptor (TCR or through introducing antibody-like recognition in chimeric antigen receptors (CARs have made substantial advances. The potential of these approaches has been demonstrated in particular by the successful use of genetically modified T cells to treat B cell haematological malignancies in clinical trials. This clinical success is reflected in the growing number of strategic partnerships in this area that have attracted a high level of investment and involve large pharmaceutical organisations. Although our understanding of the factors that influence the safety and efficacy of these therapies has increased, challenges for bringing genetically modified T-cell immunotherapy to many patients with different tumour types remain. These challenges range from the selection of antigen targets and dealing with regulatory and safety issues to successfully navigating the routes to commercial development. However, the encouraging clinical data, the progress in the scientific understanding of tumour immunology and the improvements in the manufacture of cell products are all advancing the clinical translation of these important cellular immunotherapies.

  14. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy as a Treatment for Chronic Tinnitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    McKenna, L.; Marks, E. M.; Hallsworth, C. A.; Schaette, R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tinnitus is experienced by up to 15% of the population and can lead to significant disability and distress. There is rarely a medical or surgical target and psychological therapies are recommended. We investigated whether mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) could offer an effective new therapy for tinnitus. METHODS: This single-site randomized controlled trial compared MBCT to intensive relaxation training (RT) for chronic, distressing tinnitus in adults. Both treatments in...

  15. Preliminary results for avelumab plus axitinib as first-line therapy in patients with advanced clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma (JAVELIN Renal 100): an open-label, dose-finding and dose-expansion, phase 1b trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueiri, Toni K; Larkin, James; Oya, Mototsugu; Thistlethwaite, Fiona; Martignoni, Marcella; Nathan, Paul; Powles, Thomas; McDermott, David; Robbins, Paul B; Chism, David D; Cho, Daniel; Atkins, Michael B; Gordon, Michael S; Gupta, Sumati; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Compagnoni, Anna; Fowst, Camilla; di Pietro, Alessandra; Rini, Brian I

    2018-04-01

    The combination of an immune checkpoint inhibitor and a VEGF pathway inhibitor to treat patients with advanced renal-cell carcinoma might increase the clinical benefit of these drugs compared with their use alone. Here, we report preliminary results for the combination of avelumab, an IgG1 monoclonal antibody against the programmed cell death protein ligand PD-L1, and axitinib, a VEGF receptor inhibitor approved for second-line treatment of advanced renal-cell carcinoma, in treatment-naive patients with advanced renal-cell carcinoma. The JAVELIN Renal 100 study is an ongoing open-label, multicentre, dose-finding, and dose-expansion, phase 1b study, done in 14 centres in the USA, UK, and Japan. Eligible patients were aged 18 years or older (≥20 years in Japan) and had histologically or cytologically confirmed advanced renal-cell carcinoma with clear-cell component, life expectancy of at least 3 months, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 1 or less, received no previous systemic treatment for advanced renal cell carcinoma, and had a resected primary tumour. Patients enrolled into the dose-finding phase received 5 mg axitinib orally twice daily for 7 days, followed by combination therapy with 10 mg/kg avelumab intravenously every 2 weeks and 5 mg axitinib orally twice daily. Based on the pharmacokinetic data from the dose-finding phase, ten additional patients were enrolled into the dose-expansion phase and assigned to this regimen. The other patients in the dose-expansion phase started taking combination therapy directly. The primary endpoint was dose-limiting toxicities in the first 4 weeks (two cycles) of treatment with avelumab plus axitinib. Safety and antitumour activity analyses were done in all patients who received at least one dose of avelumab or axitinib. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02493751. Between Oct 30, 2015, and Sept 30, 2016, we enrolled six patients into the dose-finding phase and 49 into the

  16. Statin therapy and clinical outcomes in myocardial infarction patients complicated by acute heart failure : insights from the EPHESUS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; Rossignol, Patrick; Murin, Jan; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Lamiral, Zohra; Krum, Henry; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Pitt, Bertram; Zannad, Faiez

    Several clinical trials have shown that in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), statin therapy improves cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, but in these trials patients with acute heart failure (HF) were excluded or only a few were included. In patients with chronic HF, statin therapy does not

  17. Effects of cognitive therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy in patients with major depressive disorder: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, J C; Hansen, J L; Simonsen, S; Simonsen, E; Gluud, C

    2012-07-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetime at tremendous suffering and cost. Cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy are treatment options, but their effects have only been limitedly compared in systematic reviews. Using Cochrane systematic review methodology we compared the benefits and harm of cognitive therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy for major depressive disorder. Trials were identified by searching the Cochrane Library's CENTRAL, Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, Psychlit, PsycInfo, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2010. Continuous outcome measures were assessed by mean difference and dichotomous outcomes by odds ratio. We conducted trial sequential analysis to control for random errors. We included seven trials randomizing 741 participants. All trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis of the four trials reporting data at cessation of treatment on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression showed no significant difference between the two interventions [mean difference -1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.35 to 0.32]. Meta-analysis of the five trials reporting data at cessation of treatment on the Beck Depression Inventory showed comparable results (mean difference -1.29, 95% CI -2.73 to 0.14). Trial sequential analysis indicated that more data are needed to definitively settle the question of a differential effect. None of the included trial reported on adverse events. Randomized trials with low risk of bias and low risk of random errors are needed, although the effects of cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy do not seem to differ significantly regarding depressive symptoms. Future trials should report on adverse events.

  18. Changes in T-cell subsets after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.J.; Rafla, S.; Youssef, E.; Selim, H.; Salloum, N.; Chuang, J.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The T-cell subsets of 129 patients with cancer were counted before and after radiation therapy. The cells were labeled with monoclonal antibodies that were specific for each type of T cell. Significant changes after therapy were decreases in the proportion of T-helper/inducer cells, pan-T cells, and in the ratio of T-helper/inducer to T-suppressor/cytotoxic cells. There was an increase in the percentage of T-suppressor/cytotoxic cells. When the site of the primary cancer was considered, genitourinary cancer and cancer of the head and neck both showed a decreased percentage of T-helper/inducer cells and a reduced ratio of T-helper/inducer to T-suppressor/cytotoxic cells. The percentage of pan-T cells in head and neck cancer and the ratio of T-helper/inducer to T-suppressor/cytotoxic cells in breast cancer were decreased. The percentage of T-helper cells was particularly decreased by radiation therapy in advanced stages of cancer, in higher grade tumors, and in larger tumors. The absolute numbers of various T-cell subsets were decreased in all groups

  19. Trial-Based Cost-Utility Analysis of Icotinib versus Gefitinib as Second-Line Therapy for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxiang; Zhang, Hongmei; Shi, Jinning; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Xiuwei; Yang, Jian; Zhai, Qizhi; Ma, Aixia

    2016-01-01

    Our objective is to compare the cost-utility of icotinib and gefitinib for the second-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from the perspective of the Chinese healthcare system. Model technology was applied to assess the data of randomized clinical trials and the direct medical costs from the perspective of the Chinese healthcare system. Five-year quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and incremental cost-utility ratios (ICURs) were calculated. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA) were performed. Our model suggested that the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 4.2 months in the icotinib group and 3.5 months in the gefitinib group while they were 4.6 months and 3.4 months, respectively, in the trials. The 5-year QALYs was 0.279 in the icotinib group and 0.269 in the gefitinib group, and the according medical costs were $10662.82 and $13127.57. The ICUR/QALY of icotinib versus gefitinib presented negative in this study. The most sensitive parameter to the ICUR was utility of PFS, ranging from $-1,259,991.25 to $-182,296.61; accordingly the icotinib treatment consistently represented a dominant cost-utility strategy. The icotinib strategy, as a second-line therapy for advanced NSCLC patients in China, is the preferred strategy relative to gefitinib because of the dominant cost-utility. In addition, icotinib shows a good curative effect and safety, resulting in a strong demand for the Chinese market.

  20. Trial-Based Cost-Utility Analysis of Icotinib versus Gefitinib as Second-Line Therapy for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Zhang

    Full Text Available Our objective is to compare the cost-utility of icotinib and gefitinib for the second-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC from the perspective of the Chinese healthcare system.Model technology was applied to assess the data of randomized clinical trials and the direct medical costs from the perspective of the Chinese healthcare system. Five-year quality-adjusted life years (QALYs and incremental cost-utility ratios (ICURs were calculated. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA were performed.Our model suggested that the median progression-free survival (PFS was 4.2 months in the icotinib group and 3.5 months in the gefitinib group while they were 4.6 months and 3.4 months, respectively, in the trials. The 5-year QALYs was 0.279 in the icotinib group and 0.269 in the gefitinib group, and the according medical costs were $10662.82 and $13127.57. The ICUR/QALY of icotinib versus gefitinib presented negative in this study. The most sensitive parameter to the ICUR was utility of PFS, ranging from $-1,259,991.25 to $-182,296.61; accordingly the icotinib treatment consistently represented a dominant cost-utility strategy.The icotinib strategy, as a second-line therapy for advanced NSCLC patients in China, is the preferred strategy relative to gefitinib because of the dominant cost-utility. In addition, icotinib shows a good curative effect and safety, resulting in a strong demand for the Chinese market.

  1. Adoptive T cell therapy: Addressing challenges in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Cassian

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adoptive T cell therapy involves the ex vivo selection and expansion of effector cells for the treatment of patients with cancer. In this review, the advantages and limitations of using antigen-specific T cells are discussed in counterpoint to vaccine strategies. Although vaccination strategies represent more readily available reagents, adoptive T cell therapy provides highly selected T cells of defined phenotype, specificity and function that may influence their biological behavior in vivo. Adoptive T cell therapy offers not only translational opportunities but also a means to address fundamental issues in the evolving field of cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Cancer clinical trials in persons with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Richard F

    2017-01-01

    The era of modern HIV therapeutics is well underway. The cancer and infectious disease epidemiology of HIV disease has markedly altered as populations are availed to the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ARV). The types of cancers occurring among those with HIV infection has broadened but the case burden in absolute numbers is very low relative to the background population. There are fewer incident cases of the AIDS-defining cancers (aggressive B-cell lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcoma, and cervical cancer). There is an increased risk for certain non-AIDS-defining cancers, but these occur somewhat sporadically relative to clinical trial enrollment. The changing epidemiology of cancer in HIV poses challenges as well as opportunities for participation of persons with HIV in cancer therapy clinical trials. There are excellent examples of cancer trials that inform cancer therapy for patients with HIV infection. Examples include those from HIV-specific trials and from trials mainly focused on the background population that included patients with HIV infection. Interpretation of clinical trials to guide therapy for those with HIV infection and cancer largely depends on data that does not include HIV-infected patients. The ability to extend clinical trial findings to populations not included in clinical trials remains problematic for a variety of populations, including those with HIV or AIDS. Careful prioritization of studies designed to bridge this gap is needed. However, there are published studies that serve as excellent examples bridging these gaps and the portfolio of cancer therapy trials underway will inform HIV and cancer better than at any time in the past.

  3. Stem cell and gene therapies for diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calne, Roy Y; Gan, Shu Uin; Lee, Kok Onn

    2010-03-01

    In this Perspectives article, we comment on the progress in experimental stem cell and gene therapies that might one day become a clinical reality for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced pluripotent stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, have become an area of intense study. Finally, gene therapy shows some promise for the generation of insulin-producing cells. Here, we discuss two of the most frequently used approaches: in vitro gene delivery into cells which are then transplanted into the recipient and direct delivery of genes in vivo.

  4. A Rapid Cell Expansion Process for Production of Engineered Autologous CAR-T Cell Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tangying Lily; Pugach, Omar; Somerville, Robert; Rosenberg, Steven A; Kochenderfer, James N; Better, Marc; Feldman, Steven A

    2016-12-01

    The treatment of B-cell malignancies by adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CD19 CAR-T) has proven to be a highly successful therapeutic modality in several clinical trials. 1-6 The anti-CD19 CAR-T cell production method used to support initial trials relied on numerous manual, open process steps, human serum, and 10 days of cell culture to achieve a clinical dose. 7 This approach limited the ability to support large multicenter clinical trials, as well as scale up for commercial cell production. Therefore, studies were completed to streamline and optimize the original National Cancer Institute production process by removing human serum from the process in order to minimize the risk of viral contamination, moving process steps from an open system to functionally closed system operations in order to minimize the risk of microbial contamination, and standardizing additional process steps in order to maximize process consistency. This study reports a procedure for generating CD19 CAR-T cells in 6 days, using a functionally closed manufacturing process and defined, serum-free medium. This method is able to produce CD19 CAR-T cells that are phenotypically and functionally indistinguishable from cells produced for clinical trials by the previously described production process.

  5. Current status and developments in gene therapy for thalassemia and sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Yannaki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available β-thalassemias and sickle cell anemia (SCA are the most common monogenic diseases worldwide for which curative treatments remain a desired goal. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT, - the only curative treatment currently available for hemoglobinopaties-, has a narrow application window whereas it incurs several immunological risks. Gene therapy (GT, that is the autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+, represents a promising new therapeutic strategy which is anticipated to reestablish effective hemoglobin production and render patients transfusion- and drug- independent without the immunological complications that normally accompany allo-HCT. Prior to the application of GT for hemoglobinopathies in the clinic, many years of extensive preclinical research were spent for the optimization of the gene transfer tools and conditions. To date, three GT clinical trials for β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD have been conducted or are in progress and 3 cases of transfusion independence in thalassemic β0/βΕ patients have been reported. In the present review, the prerequisites for successful implementation of GT, the tough pathway of GT for hemoglobinopathies towards the clinic and the knowledge gained from the first clinical trials as well as the remaining questions and challenges, will be discussed. Overall, after decades of research including achievements but pitfalls as well, the path to GT of human patients with hemoglobinopathies is currently open and highly promising...

  6. Stem cell therapy to protect and repair the developing brain: a review of mechanisms of action of cord blood and amnion epithelial derived cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie eCastillo-Melendez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the research, clinical and wider community there is great interest in the use of stem cells to reduce the progression, or indeed repair brain injury. Perinatal brain injury may result from acute or chronic insults sustained during fetal development, during the process of birth, or in the newborn period. The most readily identifiable outcome of perinatal brain injury is cerebral palsy, however this is just one consequence in a spectrum of mild to severe neurological deficits. As we review, there are now clinical trials taking place worldwide targeting cerebral palsy with stem cell therapies. It will likely be many years before strong evidence-based results emerge from these trials. With such trials underway, it is both appropriate and timely to address the physiological basis for the efficacy of stem-like cells in preventing damage to, or regenerating, the newborn brain. Appropriate experimental animal models are best placed to deliver this information. Cell availability, the potential for immunological rejection, ethical and logistical considerations, together with the propensity for native cells to form terratomas, make it unlikely that embryonic or fetal stem cells will be practical. Fortunately, these issues do not pertain to the use of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs, or umbilical cord blood (UCB stem cells that are readily and economically obtained from the placenta and umbilical cord discarded at birth. These cells have the potential for transplantation to the newborn where brain injury is diagnosed or even suspected. We will explore the novel characteristics of hAECs and undifferentiated UCB cells, as well as UCB-derived endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem cells, and how immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory properties are principal mechanisms of action that are common to these cells, and which in turn may ameliorate the cerebral hypoxia and inflammation that are final pathways in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain

  7. Long-Lasting Complete Responses in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma after Adoptive Cell Therapy with Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes and an Attenuated IL2 Regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke; Donia, Marco; Ellebæk, Eva

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Adoptive cell transfer therapy (ACT) based on autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has achieved impressive clinical results in several phase I and II trials performed outside of Europe. Although transient, the toxicities associated with high-dose (HD) bolus IL2 classically...

  8. Effect of Metoprolol Versus Carvedilol on Outcomes in MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin H; Ruwald, Anne-Christine H; Jøns, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to compare the effects of metoprolol and carvedilol in the MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) study.......This study sought to compare the effects of metoprolol and carvedilol in the MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) study....

  9. A prospective randomized controlled multicenter trial comparing antibiotic therapy with appendectomy in the treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis (APPAC trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paajanen, Hannu; Grönroos, Juha M; Rautio, Tero; Nordström, Pia; Aarnio, Markku; Rantanen, Tuomo; Hurme, Saija; Dean, Kirsti; Jartti, Airi; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Sand, Juhani; Salminen, Paulina

    2013-02-08

    Although the standard treatment of acute appendicitis (AA) consists of an early appendectomy, there has recently been both an interest and an increase in the use of antibiotic therapy as the primary treatment for uncomplicated AA. However, the use of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of uncomplicated AA is still controversial. The APPAC trial is a randomized prospective controlled, open label, non-inferiority multicenter trial designed to compare antibiotic therapy (ertapenem) with emergency appendectomy in the treatment of uncomplicated AA. The primary endpoint of the study is the success of the randomized treatment. In the antibiotic treatment arm successful treatment is defined as being discharged from the hospital without the need for surgical intervention and no recurrent appendicitis during a minimum follow-up of one-year (treatment efficacy). Treatment efficacy in the operative treatment arm is defined as successful appendectomy evaluated to be 100%. Secondary endpoints are post-intervention complications, overall morbidity and mortality, the length of hospital stay and sick leave, treatment costs and pain scores (VAS, visual analoque scale). A maximum of 610 adult patients (aged 18-60 years) with a CT scan confirmed uncomplicated AA will be enrolled from six hospitals and randomized by a closed envelope method in a 1:1 ratio either to undergo emergency appendectomy or to receive ertapenem (1 g per day) for three days continued by oral levofloxacin (500 mg per day) plus metronidazole (1.5 g per day) for seven days. Follow-up by a telephone interview will be at 1 week, 2 months and 1, 3, 5 and 10 years; the primary and secondary endpoints of the trial will be evaluated at each time point. The APPAC trial aims to provide level I evidence to support the hypothesis that approximately 75-85% of patients with uncomplicated AA can be treated with effective antibiotic therapy avoiding unnecessary appendectomies and the related operative morbidity, also resulting

  10. Premise and promise of mesenchymal stem cell-based therapies in clinical vascularized composite allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Riccardo; Gorantla, Vijay S; Plock, Jan A

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, clinical vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) has enabled functional and quality of life restoration in a wide range of indications secondary to devastating tissue loss. However, the spectre of toxicity and long-term complications of chronic immunosuppression has curtailed the momentum of VCA. This study summarizes the literature evidence behind successful mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based cell therapies highlighting their multipronged immunomodulatory, restorative and regenerative characteristics with special emphasis towards VCA applications. Experimental and clinical studies in solid organs and VCA have confirmed that MSCs facilitate immunosuppression-free allograft survival or tolerance, stimulate peripheral nerve regeneration, attenuate ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and improve tissue healing after surgery. It has been hypothesized that MSC-induced long-term operational tolerance in experimental VCA is mediated by induction of mixed donor-specific chimerism and regulatory T-cell mechanisms. All these characteristics of MSCs could thus help expand the scope and clinical feasibility of VCA. Cellular therapies, especially those focusing on MSCs, are emerging in solid organ transplantation including VCA. Although some clinical trials have begun to assess the effects of MSCs in solid organ transplantation, much scientific domain remains uncharted, especially for VCA.

  11. Primary ICD-therapy in patients with advanced heart failure: selection strategies and future trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Zugck, Christian; Nelles, Manfred; Schellberg, Dieter; Remppis, Andrew; Katus, Hugo

    2008-09-01

    For allocation of primary ICD-therapy, a possible lower limit of inclusion criteria--defining overly advanced heart failure--is less well investigated. Also, a multi-variable approach to stratification beyond ejection fraction (LVEF) appears warranted. We examined whether adding a selection limit of peak VO(2) trials based on real-life data for this high risk cohort. In our prospective clinical registry 1,926 patients with systolic CHF were recruited consecutively since 1994. Of these patients, 292 met the selection criteria described above. The mean age was 57.6 +/- 9.5 years, 83% were male, 37% had ischemic cardiomyopathy and 28% received primary ICD-therapy. All cause mortality was considered as end point. Median follow-up was 45 (18-86) months. ICD was not a significant predictor of outcome either for the entire population, or grouped according to aetiology of CHF. Still, 3-year mortality was 15% (ICD-patients) Vs. 28% (non-ICD-patients); P = 0.05; under combination medical therapy. Inversely, in ICD-patients medical combination therapy conveyed a significant survival benefit (P < 0.001). Consequently, the number-needed-to-treat was eight under combination therapy and the size estimate amounts to 300 patients for a prospective trial in this cohort. A cut-off of LVEF therapy. Our results indicate the need for a specific randomized trial in this cohort. The according mortality data and a size estimate are provided.

  12. Progress toward cell-directed therapy for phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, CO

    2009-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most common inborn errors of metabolism with an annual incidence of approximately 1:16,000 live births in North America. Contemporary therapy relies upon lifelong dietary protein restriction and supplementation with phenylalanine-free medical foods. This therapy is expensive and unpalatable; dietary compliance is difficult to maintain throughout life. Non-adherence to the diet is associated with learning disabilities, adult-onset neurodegenerative disease, and maternal PKU syndrome. The fervent dream of many individuals with PKU is a more permanent cure for this disease. This paper will review ongoing efforts to develop viable cell-directed therapies, in particular cell transplantation and gene therapy, for the treatment of PKU. PMID:18498375

  13. Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy for Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0593 TITLE: Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy for Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis PRINCIPAL...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/15/2011 - 08/14/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy for Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis 5a...4 Title of the Grant: Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy for Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis Award number: W81XWH-11-1-0593 Principal Investigator

  14. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells, early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium, using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration, timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury, single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications.

  15. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress T-Cell Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-06-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcomes compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of preinvasive foci. We investigated the effects of radiation therapy in p48(Cre);LSL-Kras(G12D) (KC) and p48(Cre);LSLKras(G12D);LSL-Trp53(R172H) (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from radiation treated invasive and preinvasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8(+) T cells than controls, and greater numbers of CD4(+) T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. A neutralizing antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Radiation treatment causes macrophages

  16. Recovery and functional activity of mononuclear bone marrow and peripheral blood cells after different cell isolation protocols used in clinical trials for cell therapy after acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beem, Rachel T.; Hirsch, Alexander; Lommerse, Ingrid M.; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; Noort, Willy A.; Biemond, Bart J.; Piek, Jan J.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Voermans, Carlijn

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Clinical trials showed contradictory results in functional recovery after intracoronary infusion of autologous mononuclear (bone marrow) cells in patients with acute myocardial infarction. A recent study suggests that this might be related to the isolation protocol used. In The Netherlands, a

  17. The role of amputation as an outcome measure in cellular therapy for critical limb ischemia: implications for clinical trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl Gregory J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells have been ascribed an important therapeutic role in No-Option Critical limb Ischemia (NO-CLI. One primary endpoint for evaluating NO-CLI therapy is major amputation (AMP, which is usually combined with mortality for AMP-free survival (AFS. Only a trial which is double blinded can eliminate physician and patient bias as to the timing and reason for AMP. We examined factors influencing AMP in a prospective double-blinded pilot RCT (2:1 therapy to control of 48 patients treated with site of service obtained bone marrow cells (BMAC as well as a systematic review of the literature. Methods Cells were injected intramuscularly in the CLI limbs as either BMAC or placebo (peripheral blood. Six month AMP rates were compared between the two arms. Both patient and treating team were blinded of the assignment in follow-up examinations. A search of the literature identified 9 NO-CLI trials, the control arms of which were used to determine 6 month AMP rates and the influence of tissue loss. Results Fifteen amputations occurred during the 6 month period, 86.7% of these during the first 4 months. One amputation occurred in a Rutherford 4 patient. The difference in amputation rate between patients with rest pain (5.6% and those with tissue loss (46.7%, irrespective of treatment group, was significant (p = 0.0029. In patients with tissue loss, treatment with BMAC demonstrated a lower amputation rate than placebo (39.1% vs. 71.4%, p = 0.1337. The Kaplan-Meier time to amputation was longer in the BMAC group than in the placebo group (p = 0.067. Projecting these results to a pivotal trial, a bootstrap simulation model showed significant difference in AFS between BMAC and placebo with a power of 95% for a sample size of 210 patients. Meta-analysis of the literature confirmed a difference in amputation rate between patients with tissue loss and rest pain. Conclusions BMAC shows promise in improving AMP

  18. Phase I/II Trial of Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation with a Three-Dimensional Woven-Fabric Scaffold for Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Baba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine is emerging as a promising option, but the potential of autologous stem cells has not been investigated well in clinical settings of periodontal treatment. In this clinical study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of a new regenerative therapy based on the surgical implantation of autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with a biodegradable three-dimensional (3D woven-fabric composite scaffold and platelet-rich plasma (PRP. Ten patients with periodontitis, who required a surgical procedure for intrabony defects, were enrolled in phase I/II trial. Once MSCs were implanted in each periodontal intrabony defect, the patients were monitored during 36 months for a medical exam including laboratory tests of blood and urine samples, changes in clinical attachment level, pocket depth, and linear bone growth (LBG. All three parameters improved significantly during the entire follow-up period (p<0.0001, leading to an average LBG of 4.7 mm after 36 months. Clinical mobility measured by Periotest showed a decreasing trend after the surgery. No clinical safety problems attributable to the investigational MSCs were identified. This clinical trial suggests that the stem cell therapy using MSCs-PRP/3D woven-fabric composite scaffold may constitute a novel safe and effective regenerative treatment option for periodontitis.

  19. Design and Methodology of the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Gervasio A.; Goertz, Christine; Boineau, Robin; Mark, Daniel B.; Rozema, Theodore; Nahin, Richard L.; Drisko, Jeanne A.; Lee, Kerry L.

    2011-01-01

    The Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) is an NIH-sponsored, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, 2×2 factorial clinical trial testing the benefits and risks of 40 infusions of a multi-component Na2EDTA-chelation solution compared with placebo, and of an oral, high-dose multivitamin and mineral supplement. TACT has randomized and will follow 1708 patients for an average of approximately 4 years. The primary endpoint is a composite of all cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, and hospitalization for angina. A 900 patient substudy will examine quality of life outcomes. The trial is designed to have >85% power to detect a 25% relative reduction in the primary endpoint for each treatment factor. Enrollment began in September 2003 and completed in October 2010. PMID:22172430

  20. Real-Time Predictions of Reservoir Size and Rebound Time during Antiretroviral Therapy Interruption Trials for HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L Hill

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the efficacy of novel reservoir-reducing treatments for HIV is challenging. The limited ability to sample and quantify latent infection means that supervised antiretroviral therapy (ART interruption studies are generally required. Here we introduce a set of mathematical and statistical modeling tools to aid in the design and interpretation of ART-interruption trials. We show how the likely size of the remaining reservoir can be updated in real-time as patients continue off treatment, by combining the output of laboratory assays with insights from models of reservoir dynamics and rebound. We design an optimal schedule for viral load sampling during interruption, whereby the frequency of follow-up can be decreased as patients continue off ART without rebound. While this scheme can minimize costs when the chance of rebound between visits is low, we find that the reservoir will be almost completely reseeded before rebound is detected unless sampling occurs at least every two weeks and the most sensitive viral load assays are used. We use simulated data to predict the clinical trial size needed to estimate treatment effects in the face of highly variable patient outcomes and imperfect reservoir assays. Our findings suggest that large numbers of patients-between 40 and 150-will be necessary to reliably estimate the reservoir-reducing potential of a new therapy and to compare this across interventions. As an example, we apply these methods to the two "Boston patients", recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants who experienced large reductions in latent infection and underwent ART-interruption. We argue that the timing of viral rebound was not particularly surprising given the information available before treatment cessation. Additionally, we show how other clinical data can be used to estimate the relative contribution that remaining HIV+ cells in the recipient versus newly infected cells from the donor made to the

  1. A protocol proposition of cell therapy for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Paes, J T; Stessuk, T; Marcelino, M; Faria, C; Marinelli, T; Ribeiro-Paes, M J

    2014-01-01

    The main feature of pulmonary emphysema is airflow obstruction resulting from the destruction of the alveolar walls distal to the terminal bronchioles. Existing clinical approaches have improved and extended the quality of life of emphysema patients. However, no treatment currently exists that can change the disease course and cure the patient. The different therapeutic approaches that are available aim to increase survival and/or enhance the quality of life of emphysema patients. In this context, cell therapy is a promising therapeutic approach with great potential for degenerative pulmonary diseases. In this protocol proposition, all patients will be submitted to laboratory tests, such as evaluation of heart and lung function and routine examinations. Stem cells will be harvested by means of 10 punctures on each anterior iliac crest, collecting a total volume of 200mL bone marrow. After preparation, separation, counting and labeling (optional) of the mononuclear cells, the patients will receive an intravenous infusion from the pool of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells (BMMC). This article proposes a rational and safe clinical cellular therapy protocol which has the potential for developing new projects and can serve as a methodological reference for formulating clinical application protocols related to the use of cellular therapy in COPD. This study protocol was submitted and approved by the Brazilian National Committee of Ethics in Research (CONEP - Brazil) registration number 14764. It is also registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01110252). Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of Human Cadaveric Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cell Therapy of a Chronic Radiation-Induced Skin Lesion: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portas, M; Mansilla, E; Drago, H; Dubner, D; Radl, A; Coppola, A; Di Giorgio, M

    2016-09-01

    Acute and late radiation-induced injury on skin and subcutaneous tissues are associated with substantial morbidity in radiation therapy, interventional procedures and also are of concern in the context of nuclear or radiological accidents. Pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of acutely responding epithelial tissues and damage to vascular endothelial microvessels. Efforts for medical management of severe radiation-induced lesions have been made. Nevertheless, the development of strategies to promote wound healing, including stem cell therapy, is required. From 1997 to 2014, over 248 patients were referred to the Radiopathology Committee of Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Burns Hospital) for the diagnosis and therapy of radiation-induced localized lesions. As part of the strategies for the management of severe cases, there is an ongoing research and development protocol on 'Translational Clinical Trial phases I/II to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adult mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow for the treatment of large burns and radiological lesions'. The object of this work was to describe the actions carried out by the Radiopathology Committee of the Burns Hospital in a chronic case with more than 30 years of evolution without positive response to conventional treatments. The approach involved the evaluation of the tissular compromise of the lesion, the prognosis and the personalized treatment, including regenerative therapy. © World Health Organisation 2016. All rights reserved. The World Health Organization has granted Oxford University Press permission for the reproduction of this article.

  3. Cell therapy worldwide: an incipient revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Mahendra; Mason, Chris; Solomon, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The regenerative medicine field is large, diverse and active worldwide. A variety of different organizational and product models have been successful, and pioneering entrepreneurs have shown both what can work and, critically, what does not. Evolving regulations, novel funding mechanisms combined with new technological breakthroughs are keeping the field in a state of flux. The field struggles to cope with the lack of infrastructure and investment, it nevertheless has evolved from its roots in human stem cell therapy and tissue and organ transplants to a field composed of a variety of products from multiple cell sources with approval for use in numerous countries. Currently, tens of thousands of patients have been treated with some kind of cell therapy.

  4. Efficient and Fast Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapies have been used for repairing damaged brain tissue and helping functional recovery after brain injury. Aberrance neurogenesis is related with brain injury, and multipotential neural stem cells from human embryonic stem (hES cells provide a great promise for cell replacement therapies. Optimized protocols for neural differentiation are necessary to produce functional human neural