WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell therapy research

  1. Translational research of adult stem cell therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gen; Suzuki

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure(CHF) secondary to chronic coronary artery disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Its prevalence is increasing despite advances in medical and device therapies. Cell based therapies generating new cardiomyocytes and vessels have emerged as a promising treatment to reverse functional deterioration and prevent the progression to CHF. Functional efficacy of progenitor cells isolated from the bone marrow and the heart have been evaluated in preclinical large animal models. Furthermore, several clinical trials using autologous and allogeneic stem cells and progenitor cells have demonstrated their safety in humans yet their clinical relevance is inconclusive. This review will discuss the clinical therapeutic applications of three specific adult stem cells that have shown particularly promising regenerative effects in preclinical studies, bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell, heart derived cardiosphere-derived cell and cardiac stem cell. We will also discuss future therapeutic approaches.

  2. Gene therapy and stem cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases today: a model for translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Valentin; Sanz, Javier

    2007-02-01

    Clinical trials looking at ways to promote myocardial regeneration have reported that the administered therapies have either neutral effects or modest benefits of questionable impact. These somewhat disappointing results should emphasize the need for translational research, with bidirectional feedback between the basic research laboratory and the clinical arena. Such a translational pathway is illustrated by the quest to find an effective therapy for restenosis, which culminated in the development of sirolimus. At this point a move away from the bedside and a return to the bench seems necessary to better understand the mechanisms of action of progenitor cells and stimulating factors. Without such basic knowledge research might be prematurely discouraged and the opportunity to fully understand the true potential of cardiovascular regenerative therapy might be missed. PMID:17230204

  3. Stem cell research: cloning, therapy and scientific fraud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnak, A J; Chudley, A E

    2006-10-01

    Stem cell research has generated intense excitement, awareness, and debate. Events in the 2005-2006 saw the rise and fall of a South Korean scientist who had claimed to be the first to clone a human embryonic stem cell line. From celebration of the potential use of stem cells in the treatment of human disease to disciplinary action taken against the disgraced scientists, the drama has unfolded throughout the world media. Prompted by an image of therapeutic cloning presented on a South Korean stamp, a brief review of stem cell research and the events of the Woo-suk Hwang scandal are discussed. PMID:16965321

  4. Suggestions on standardization of clinical research and application of cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu-ze WU

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy,aiming at the regeneration of tissues or organs following diseases or injuries,has become the most active part in the field of biological therapy.Although some achievements have been made in China,clinical researches and applications of cell therapy remained to be standardized for the lack of corresponding regulations enacted by State Health-Care Administration Department.For promoting the development of regenerative medicine,protecting patients′ rights during medical treatment,and preventing from potential ethical disputes,suggestions are made and discussed in present paper for correcting and improving the present disorders following an analysis of features and current status of cell therapy.

  5. RADIATION THERAPY ONCOLOGY GROUP TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH PROGRAM STEM CELL SYMPOSIUM : INCORPORATING STEM CELL HYPOTHESES INTO CLINICAL TRIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodward, Wendy A.; Bristow, Robert G.; Clarke, Michael F.; Coppes, Robert P.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Duda, Dan G.; Fike, John R.; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Hill, Richard P.; Jordan, Craig T.; Milas, Luka; Pajonk, Frank; Curran, Walter J.; Dicker, Adam P.; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2009-01-01

    At a meeting of the Translation Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group held in early 2008, attendees focused on updating the current state of knowledge in cancer stem cell research and discussing ways in which this knowledge can be translated into clinical use across all disease si

  6. Single-Cell Sequencing Technology in Oncology: Applications for Clinical Therapies and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baixin Ye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular heterogeneity is a fundamental characteristic of many cancers. A lack of cellular homogeneity contributes to difficulty in designing targeted oncological therapies. Therefore, the development of novel methods to determine and characterize oncologic cellular heterogeneity is a critical next step in the development of novel cancer therapies. Single-cell sequencing (SCS technology has been recently employed for analyzing the genetic polymorphisms of individual cells at the genome-wide level. SCS requires (1 precise isolation of the single cell of interest; (2 isolation and amplification of genetic material; and (3 descriptive analysis of genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic data. In addition to targeted analysis of single cells isolated from tumor biopsies, SCS technology may be applied to circulating tumor cells, which may aid in predicting tumor progression and metastasis. In this paper, we provide an overview of SCS technology and review the current literature on the potential application of SCS to clinical oncology and research.

  7. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Translational Research Program Stem Cell Symposium: Incorporating Stem Cell Hypotheses into Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At a meeting of the Translation Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group held in early 2008, attendees focused on updating the current state of knowledge in cancer stem cell research and discussing ways in which this knowledge can be translated into clinical use across all disease sites. This report summarizes the major topics discussed and the future directions that research should take. Major conclusions of the symposium were that the flow cytometry of multiple markers in fresh tissue would remain the standard technique of evaluating cancer-initiating cells and that surrogates need to be developed for both experimental and clinical use.

  8. Shining Light on the Sprout of Life: Optogenetics Applications in Stem Cell Research and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzapour Delavar, Hadi; Karamzadeh, Arezou; Pahlavanneshan, Saghar

    2016-06-01

    Optogenetics is the integration of genetics and optics to achieve gain or loss of function of well-defined events in specific cells of living tissue. As a versatile tool, upon light illumination, it allows fast control of precisely defined events in biological systems from single cell to different parts of whole tissue in freely moving animals. Taking advantage of this method, a multitude of studies have been published to understand brain functions and dysfunctions. Although from the beginning, it has been used to target neurons within the neural networks and to understand how specific neurons contribute to brain function, it gradually has been extended to other fields of biology such as stem cell research and therapy. With a combination of optogenetics and stem cells, new opportunities were opened up in stem cell biology and also its integration in new circuit as a cell-based treatment strategy for more common disorders like neurodegenerative and cardiovascular one. Recently, some studies showed that engineered stem cells expressing exogenous light-activated opsins can be used in stem cell biology including tracking the differentiation of stem cells, functional analysis of embryonic stem cell-derived graft, and testing the functional integration of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons. With the advent of non-invasive approach, such as transcranial excitation or inhibition, optogenetics also holds promise for non-invasive control of engineered stem cell. PMID:26920546

  9. Stem cell research and therapy in the Islamic republic of Iran: pioneering in the Islamic world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miremadi, Tahereh; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Aghdami, Nasser; Gharanfoli, Mohsen; Vasei, Mohammad; Kouhkan, Azam; Baharvand, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    In the early 2000s, the Iranian stem cell research and technology had a relatively strong start that benefited from religious blessings, political and public support, as well as scientific endeavors on the part of non-governmental and public research organizations and universities. Later on, it developed a dynamic niche market of public, private start-up, and spin-off companies and organizations that pioneered in the Islamic world in terms of ISI papers, clinical trials, and cell therapy. However, at present, it faces new challenges stemming from the insufficient finance and a comprehensive law and regulation structure to keep its momentum. To remedy this situation, the scientific community and other stakeholders need to have a series of shared long-time goals and try to build consensus on how to achieve them through nationally approved policy documents. PMID:22816315

  10. Boganmeldelse - Music Therapy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    . Alligevel følger her en anbefaling af bogen: for musikterapeuter er det en bog, man ikke kommer uden om. Music Therapy Research, på dansk Musikterapiforskning, er en gennemrevideret, ja faktisk nyudgivelse, af bogen Music Therapy Research: Quantitative and Qualitative Perspectives, som udkom i 1995. Også...

  11. The Role of Large Animal Studies in Cardiac Regenerative Therapy Concise Review of Translational Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Sung Uk; Yeung, Alan C.; Ikeno, Fumiaki

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have long been developed for cardiovascular research. These animal models have been helpful in understanding disease, discovering potential therapeutics, and predicting efficacy. Despite many efforts, however, translational study has been underestimated. Recently, investigations have identified stem cell treatment as a potentially promising cell therapy for regenerative medicine, largely because of the stem cell's ability to differentiate into many functional cell types. Stem ce...

  12. Research progress in animal models and stem cell therapy for Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabin Han,1,2 Wei Wang1, Chao Chen1 1Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, 2Department of Neurology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital/The Affiliated Liaocheng Hospital, Taishan Medical University, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD causes degeneration of brain neurons and leads to memory loss and cognitive impairment. Since current therapeutic strategies cannot cure the disease, stem cell therapy represents a powerful tool for the treatment of AD. We first review the advances in molecular pathogenesis and animal models of AD and then discuss recent clinical studies using small molecules and immunoglobulins to target amyloid-beta plaques for AD therapy. Finally, we discuss stem cell therapy for AD using neural stem cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, embryonic stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cell from bone marrow, umbilical cord, and umbilical cord blood. In particular, patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells are proposed as a future treatment for AD. Keywords: amyloid-beta plaque, neurofibrillary tangle, neural stem cell, olfactory ensheathing cell, mesenchymal stem cell, induced pluripotent stem cell

  13. Massage Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Massage therapy has been notably effective in preventing prematurity, enhancing growth of infants, increasing attentiveness, decreasing depression and aggression, alleviating motor problems, reducing pain, and enhancing immune function. This review covers massage therapy research from the last decade, as an update to the American Psychologist 1998…

  14. Stem cell therapy for diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, K. O.; Gan, S U; Calne, R Y

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy holds immense promise for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced plu...

  15. Massage therapy research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research. PMID:27502797

  16. Research progress in animal models and stem cell therapy for Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Han F; Wang W.; Chen C

    2014-01-01

    Fabin Han,1,2 Wei Wang1, Chao Chen1 1Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, 2Department of Neurology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital/The Affiliated Liaocheng Hospital, Taishan Medical University, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) causes degeneration of brain neurons and leads to memory loss and cognitive impairment. Since current therapeutic strategies cannot cure the disease, stem cell therapy represents a powerful tool for the ...

  17. Translational research on advanced therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Belardelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fostering translational research of advanced therapies has become a major priority of both scientific community and national governments. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP are a new medicinal product category comprising gene therapy and cell-based medicinal products as well as tissue engineered medicinal products. ATMP development opens novel avenues for therapeutic approaches in numerous diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are important bottlenecks for their development due to the complexity of the regulatory framework, the high costs and the needs for good manufacturing practice (GMP facilities and new end-points for clinical experimentation. Thus, a strategic cooperation between different stakeholders (academia, industry and experts in regulatory issues is strongly needed. Recently, a great importance has been given to research infrastructures dedicated to foster translational medicine of advanced therapies. Some ongoing European initiatives in this field are presented and their potential impact is discussed.

  18. Stem cell therapy for diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K O Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy holds immense promise for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced pluripotent stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, have become an area of intense study. Recent advances in stem cell therapy may turn this into a realistic treatment for diabetes in the near future.

  19. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Clinical Trials Information Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy Terminology Gene Therapy & Cell Therapy Breakthroughs FAQs Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy Defined Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy for Diseases Sites of ...

  20. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M. S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the poten...

  1. State-of-the-art on basic and applied stem cell therapy; Stem Cell Research Italy-International Society for Cellular Therapy Europe, Joint Meeting, Montesilvano (PE)-Italy, June 10-12, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalco, Dario; Pandolfi, Assunta; Galderisi, Umberto

    2012-03-20

    Over 160 stem cell-based therapeutic products are undergoing development for the treatment of several diseases, ranging from cardiac and artery diseases to immune and neurodegenerative pathologies, including diabetes, spinal cord injury. Therefore, stem cell therapy plays a key role for developing new cell-based drugs for the future molecular and regenerative medicine. The second meeting organized by Stem Cell Research Italy (SCR Italy) and by the International Society for Cellular Therapy-Europe (ISCT) in Montesilvano/Città S. Angelo (Pescara)-Italy, on June 10th-12th, 2011, focused on the state-of-the-art of stem cell therapy and associated novel findings on stem cell research ( www.stemcellitaly.org ). PMID:22035042

  2. Induced pluripotent stem cells in research and therapy of diseases: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Noori Daloii

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Differentiated cells can change to embryonic stem cells by reprograming. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs has revolutionized the field of regenerative and personalized medicine. iPSCs can self-renew and differentiate into many cell types. iPSC cells offer a potentially unlimited source for targeted differentiation. Through the expression of a set of transcription factors, iPSCs can be generated from different kinds of embryonic and adult cells. This technology for the first time enabled the researchers to take differentiated cells from an individual, and convert them to another cell type of interest, which is particularly to that person. When the set of master transcription factors containing OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and MYC is expressed ectopically in somatic cells, the transcriptional network is propelled to organize itself in such a way as to maintenance a pluripotent state. Since iPSCs are similar to Embryonic Stem Cell (ESC, they can be considered as sources for modeling different diseases. iPSCs which are induced from somatic cells of patient can be useful for screening and drugs selection, and also introduce treatment via grafting the cells. Although this technology has been successful in different fields, the tumorigenesis of viral vectors during induction of reprogramming is a major challenge. Nevertheless, iPSCs are valuable for clinical applications and research. By discovery of these cells many challenges related to the safety, efficacy, and bioethics of ESCs are solved. Pluripotency is defined in two aspect of functional and molecular, by which functional regards the capacity of cell is generate three kinds of embryonic layers and germ line, and molecular aspect regards the identifying of molecules and genes that support functional features. Identification of these genes has been placed at the center of fields related to development and stem cell research. In this review, we discuss the process of generation of these

  3. Adult Stem Cells and Diabetes Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ilgun, Handenur; Kim, Joseph William; Luo, LuGuang

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that diabetes will be the fourth most prevalent disease by 2050. Developing a new therapy for diabetes is a challenge for researchers and clinicians in field. Many medications are being used for treatment of diabetes however with no conclusive and effective results therefore alternative therapies are required. Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for diabetes therapy, and it has involved embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, and pluripotent stem cell...

  4. Controlling micro- and nano-environment of tumor and stem cells for novel research and therapy of brain cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher Lloyd

    The use of modern technologies in cancer research has engendered a great deal of excitement. Many of these advanced approaches involve in-depth mathematical analyses of the inner working of cells, via genomic and proteomic analyses. However these techniques may not be ideal for the study of complex cell phenotypes and behaviors. This dissertation explores cancer and potential therapies through phenotypic analysis of cell behaviors, an alternative approach. We employ this experimental framework to study brain cancer (glioma), a particularly formidable example of this diverse ailment. Through the application of micro- and nanotechnology, we carefully control the surrounding environments of cells to understand their responses to various cues and to manipulate their behaviors. Subsequently we obtain clinically relevant information that allows better understanding of glioma, and enhancement of potential therapies. We first aim to address brain tumor dispersal, through analysis of cell migration. Utilizing nanometer-scale topographic models of the extracellular matrix, we study the migratory response of glioma cells to various stimuli in vitro. Second, we implement knowledge gained from these investigations to define characteristics of tumor progression in patients, and to develop treatments inhibiting cell migration. Next we use microfluidic and nanotopographic models to study the behaviors of stem cells in vitro. Here we attempt to improve their abilities to deliver therapeutic proteins to cancer, an innovative treatment approach. We analyze the multi-step process by which adipose-derived stem cells naturally home to tumor sites, and identify numerous environmental perturbations to enhance this behavior. Finally, we attempt to demonstrate that these cell culture-based manipulations can enhance the localization of adipose stem cells to glioma in vivo using animal models. Throughout this work we utilize environmental cues to analyze and induce particular behaviors in

  5. Cell therapy of pseudarthrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bastos Filho, Ricardo; Lermontov, Simone; Borojevic, Radovan; Schott, Paulo Cezar; Gameiro, Vinicius Schott; José Mauro GRANJEIRO

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficiency of cell therapy for pseudarthrosis. Implant of the bone marrow aspirate was compared to mononuclear cells purified extemporaneously using the Sepax® equipment. Methods Six patients with nonunion of the tibia or femur were treated. Four received a percutaneous infusion of autologous bone marrow aspirated from the iliac crest, and two received autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells separated from the aspirate with the Sepax®. The primary fixation ...

  6. Research Progress of Targeted Therapy in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Caicun

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is characterized by the highest incidence of solid tumor-related brain metastases, which are reported the incidence ranged 20% to 65%. This is also one of the reasons why it can cause significant mortality. Molecular targeted therapy plays a major role in the management of brain metastases in lung cancer. Targeted agents have become the novel methods for the treatment of lung cancer with brain metastases beyond the whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and chemo...

  7. Cell and gene therapy in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiniello-Wilks, R; Rasko, J E J

    2007-01-01

    The expansion of human cells to produce cell therapeutic products for the treatment of disease is, with few exceptions, an experimental therapy. Because cell therapies involve a biological product, often with some genetic or other modification, they require extensive pre-clinical research and development. Cell therapy production processes and premises require licensing by the Therapeutic Goods Administration. In this review, timed to coincide with the international meetings of the ISCT and ISSCR in Australia, we describe some promising cell therapies currently under development. PMID:17464751

  8. Advances in corneal cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuest, Matthias; Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Peh, Gary Swee-Lim; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2016-09-01

    Corneal integrity is essential for visual function. Transplantation remains the most common treatment option for advanced corneal diseases. A global donor material shortage requires a search for alternative treatments. Different stem cell populations have been induced to express corneal cell characteristics in vitro and in animal models. Yet before their application to humans, scientific and ethical issues need to be solved. The in vitro propagation and implantation of primary corneal cells has been rapidly evolving with clinical practices of limbal epithelium transplantation and a clinical trial for endothelial cells in progress, implying cultivated ocular cells as a promising option for the future. This review reports on the latest developments in primary ocular cell and stem cell research for corneal therapy. PMID:27498943

  9. Towards personalized regenerative cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Lin; Bolund, Lars; Luo, Yonglun

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with the capacity of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, and can be isolated from several adult tissues. However, isolating MSCs from adult tissues for cell therapy is hampered by the invasive procedure, the rarity of the cells and their...... attenuated proliferation capacity when cultivated and expanded in vitro. Human MSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) have now evolved as a promising alternative cell source for MSCs and regenerative medicine. Several groups, including ours, have reported successful derivation of...... functional iPSC-MSCs and applied these cells in MSC-based therapeutic testing. Still, the current experience and understanding of iPSC-MSCs with respect to production methods, safety and efficacy are primitive. In this review, we highlight the methodological progress in iPSC-MSC research, describing the...

  10. Stem cells:Sources, and regenerative therapies in dental research and practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lobna; Abdel; Aziz; Aly

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are considered to be among the principle scientific breakthroughs of the twentieth century for the future of medicine, and considered to be an important weapon to fight against diseases, particularly those that have resisted the efforts of science for a long time. Human dental tissues have limited potentials to regenerate but the discovery of dental stem cells have developed new and surprising scenario in regenerative dentistry. Stem cell treatments are one example of thepossibility using adult cells sourced from patients’ own bodies’ means that it can be expected that in the near future such treatments may become routine at dental practices. The hope is that it will become possible to regenerate bone and dental tissues including the periodontal ligament, dental pulp and enamel, and that the creation of new teeth may also become feasible. In view of this possibility of achieving restoration with regenerative medicine, it can be considered that a new era of dentistry is beginning. Thus the aim of this review is to give dental professionals a brief overview of different stem cells sources and the latest findings and their implications for improving oral health and treating certain conditions of the human mouth and face.

  11. Generating intestinal tissue from stem cells: potential for research and therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Jonathan C; Wells, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal resection and malformations in adult and pediatric patients result in devastating consequences. Unfortunately, allogeneic transplantation of intestinal tissue into patients has not been met with the same measure of success as the transplantation of other organs. Attempts to engineer intestinal tissue in vitro include disaggregation of adult rat intestine into subunits called organoids, harvesting native adult stem cells from mouse intestine and spontaneous generation of intestinal ...

  12. Dr. Josef Steiner Cancer Research Prize Lecture: the role of physiological cell death in neoplastic transformation and in anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, A

    1999-05-17

    Cell death is a physiological process which is required for normal development and existence of multi-cellular organisms. Physiological cell death, or apoptosis, is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Abnormalities in this process are implicated as a cause or contributing factor in a variety of diseases. Inhibition of apoptosis can promote neoplastic transformation, particularly in combination with dysregulated cell-cycle control, and can influence the response of tumour cells to anti-cancer therapy. Molecular biological and biochemical approaches are used to find missing cell-death regulators and to define signalling cascades, while experiments in genetically modified mice will identify the essential function of these molecules. Discoveries from cell death research should provide clues for designing therapies for a variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders, auto-immunity and cancer. PMID:10225436

  13. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical s...

  14. Cell therapy: A comparison of adult and embryonic stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla; Kozubenko, Nataliya

    Lille : organizátor symposia, 2010. S1-1-S1-1. [European Symposium on Stem Cell Research for Stroke . 04.05.2010-05.05.2010, Lille] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : cell therapy * stem cells

  15. Cell Therapies for Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yue; Fisher, James E.; Lillegard, Joseph B.; Rodysill, Brian; Amiot, Bruce; Nyberg, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    Cell therapies, which include bioartificial liver support and hepatocyte transplantation, have emerged as potential treatments for a variety of liver diseases. Acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure, and inherited metabolic liver diseases are examples of liver diseases that have been successfully treated with cell therapies at centers around the world. Cell therapies also have the potential for wide application in other liver diseases, including non-inherited liver diseases...

  16. Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2011-01-01

    The spontaneous recovery observed in the early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) is substituted with a later progressive course and failure of endogenous processes of repair and remyelination. Although this is the basic rationale for cell therapy, it is not clear yet to what degree the MS brain is amenable for repair and whether cell therapy has an advantage in comparison to other strategies to enhance endogenous remyelination. Central to the promise of stem cell therapy is the therapeutic pl...

  17. Cell Therapies for Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Fisher, James E.; Lillegard, Joseph B.; Rodysill, Brian; Amiot, Bruce; Nyberg, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell therapies, which include bioartificial liver support and hepatocyte transplantation, have emerged as potential treatments for a variety of liver diseases. Acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure, and inherited metabolic liver diseases are examples of liver diseases that have been successfully treated with cell therapies at centers around the world. Cell therapies also have the potential for wide application in other liver diseases, including non-inherited liver diseases and liver cancer, and in improving the success of liver transplantation. Here we briefly summarize current concepts of cell therapy for liver diseases. PMID:22140063

  18. Utilization of APPswe/PS1dE9 Transgenic Mice in Research of Alzheimer's Disease: Focus on Gene Therapy and Cell-Based Therapy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Malm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most extensively used transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD is APPswe/PS1dE9 mice, which over express the Swedish mutation of APP together with PS1 deleted in exon 9. These mice show increase in parenchymal Aβ load with Aβ plaques starting from the age of four months, glial activation, and deficits in cognitive functions at the age of 6 months demonstrated by radial arm water maze and 12-13 months seen with Morris Water Maze test. As gene transfer technology allows the delivery of DNA into target cells to achieve the expression of a protective or therapeutic protein, and stem cell transplantation may create an environment supporting neuronal functions and clearing Aβ plaques, these therapeutic approaches alone or in combination represent potential therapeutic strategies that need to be tested in relevant animal models before testing in clinics. Here we review the current utilization of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice in testing gene transfer and cell transplantation aimed at improving the protection of the neurons against Aβ toxicity and also reducing the brain levels of Aβ. Both gene therapy and cell based therapy may be feasible therapeutic approaches for human AD.

  19. Research Progress of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Molecular-Targeted Therapy in Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyou Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular target therapy has become a new approach in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The sensitivity of lung cancer to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs has been found to be associated with gene mutationss in the tyrosine kinase domain of RGFR. However, not all EGFR gene mutationss are sensitive to EGFR-TKIs. The review was conducted to study the research progress of EGFR mutations and the sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs and the mechanism of resistance of molecular target therapy in NSCLC.

  20. Research Progress of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Molecular-Targeted Therapy in Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiaoyou; Feng Jifeng

    2014-01-01

    Molecular target therapy has become a new approach in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The sensitivity of lung cancer to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) has been found to be associated with gene mutationss in the tyrosine kinase domain of RGFR. However, not all EGFR gene mutationss are sensitive to EGFR-TKIs. The review was conducted to study the research progress of EGFR mutations and the sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs and the mechanism of resistance of molecular target therapy in NSCLC.

  1. Characterization and comparison of "Standard" and "Young" tumor infiltrating lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy at a Danish Translational Research Institution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Junker, Niels; Ellebaek, Eva;

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) with ex vivo expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in combination with IL-2 is an effective treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma. Modified protocols of cell expansion may allow treatment of most enrolled patients and improve the efficacy of adoptively...... transferred cells. The aim of this study was to establish and validate the novel "Young TIL" method at our institution and perform a head-to-head comparison of clinical grade products generated with this protocol opposed to the conventional "Standard TIL", that we are currently using in a pilot ACT trial for...... melanoma patients. Our results confirm that "Young TILs" display an earlier differentiation state, with higher CD27 and lower CD56 expression. In addition, CD8(+) TILs expressing CD27 had longer telomeres compared to the CD27(-) . A recently described subset of NK cells, endowed with a high expression of...

  2. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical studies have demonstrated correction of disease-causing mutations in a number of hematological, neuronal and muscular disorders. This review aims to summarize these recent advances with a focus on iPSC generation techniques, as well as gene modification methods. We will then further discuss some of the main obstacles remaining to be overcome before successful application of human pluripotent stem cell-based therapy arrives in the clinic and what the future of stem cell research may look like. PMID:23353080

  3. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  4. Concise Review: Stem Cell Therapy for Muscular Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Ling, Vivian B.; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophy by providing cells that can both deliver functional muscle proteins and replenish the stem cell pool. This article reviews the current state of research on myogenic stem cells and identifies the important challenges that must be addressed as stem cell therapy is brought to the clinic.

  5. Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Takehara, Naofumi

    2013-01-01

    A great numbers of cardiovascular disease patients all over the world are suffering in the poor outcomes. Under this situation, cardiac regeneration therapy to reorganize the postnatal heart that is defined as a terminal differentiated-organ is a very important theme and mission for human beings. However, the temporary success of several clinical trials using usual cell types with uncertain cell numbers has provided the transient effect of cell therapy to these patients. We therefore should r...

  6. nduced pluripotent stem cells and cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu İskender

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells are derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst-stage embryo. They hold a huge promise for cell therapy with their self-renewing ability and pluripotency, which is known as the potential to differentiate into all cell types originating from three embryonic germ layers. However, their unique pluripotent feature could not be utilised for therapeutic purposes due to the ethical and legal problems during derivation. Recently, it was shown that the cells from adult tissues could be reverted into embryonic state, thereby restoring their pluripotent feature. This has strenghtened the possiblity of directed differentition of the reprogrammed somatic cells into the desired cell types in vitro and their use in regenerative medicine. Although these cells were termed as induced pluripotent cells, the mechanism of pluripotency has yet to be understood. Still, induced pluripotent stem cell technology is considered to be significant by proposing novel approaches in disease modelling, drug screening and cell therapy. Besides their self-renewing ability and their potential to differentiate into all cell types in a human body, they arouse a great interest in scientific world by being far from the ethical concerns regarding their embryonic counterparts and their unique feature of being patient-specific in prospective cell therapies. In this review, induced pluripotent stem cell technology and its role in cell-based therapies from past to present will be discussed. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 550-561

  7. [Outlook: Future therapy of renal cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Lothar; Miller, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Targeted therapies have fundamentally altered the therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Sunitinib today is an internationally recommended reference standard in first-line therapy; other drugs such as Temsirolimus, Everolimus, Bevacizumab (in combination with Interferon-alpha) and Sorafenib are part of the therapeutic arsenal. Practitioners thus have now more and better therapeutic options at hand, leading to a significantly improved prognosis for mRCC patients. Numerous ongoing research activities aim at the improvement of the benefits of the new compounds in the metastatic situation or application earlier in the course of the disease. Key aspects of future development in RCC are the optimization of the current therapy options by developing new targeted therapies, the search for the best combinations and sequences including the role of nephrectomy and the assessment in the adjuvant or neo-adjuvant setting. The following contribution provides an overview of ongoing studies, thus giving insight into the future therapy of RCC. PMID:20164673

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  9. Low Reactive Level Laser Therapy for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Kushibiki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low reactive level laser therapy (LLLT is mainly focused on the activation of intracellular or extracellular chromophore and the initiation of cellular signaling by using low power lasers. Over the past forty years, it was realized that the laser therapy had the potential to improve wound healing and reduce pain and inflammation. In recent years, the term LLLT has become widely recognized in the field of regenerative medicine. In this review, we will describe the mechanisms of action of LLLT at a cellular level and introduce the application to mesenchymal stem cells and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs therapies. Finally, our recent research results that LLLT enhanced the MSCs differentiation to osteoblast will also be described.

  10. CELL RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    REVIEWSInducible resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis in B cells…………………………………ROTHSTEIN Thomas L (245)Executionary pathway for apoptosis: lessons from mutant mice………………………………………WOO Minna, Razqallah Hakem, Tak W Mak (267)The SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase: Signaling mechanisms and biological functions…………………………………QU Cheng Kui (279)REGULAR ARTICLESTemperature dependent expression of cdc2 and cyclin B1 in spermatogenic cells during spermatogenesis…………………………KONG Wei Hua, Zheng GU, Jining LU, Jiake TSO (289)Transgenic mice overexpressing γ-aminobutyric acid transporter subtype I develop obesity…………………………………MA Ying Hua, Jia Hua HU, Xiao Gang ZHOU, Ruo Wang ZENG, Zhen Tong MEI, Jian FEI, Li He GUO (303)Genetic aberration in primary hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation between p53 gene mutation and loss-of-heterozygosity on chromosome 16q21-q23 and 9p21-p23………………………………………WANG Gang, Chang Hui HUANG, Yan ZHAO, Ling CAI, Ying WANG, Shi Jin XIU, Zheng Wen JIANG, Shuang YANG, Xin Tai ZHAO, Wei HUANG, Jian Ren GU (311)Identification and genetic mapping of four novel genes that regulate leaf deve- lopment in Arabidopsis………………………………………………SUN Yue, Wei ZHANG, Feng Ling LI, Ying Li GUO, Tian Lei LIU, Hai HUANG (325)NOTICE FOR CONTRIBUTORS…………………………………(337)CONTENTS of Vol. 10, 2000…………………………………………………(338)

  11. Teaching Art Therapy Research: A Brief Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Donna H.; St. John, Patricia; Ball, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    During the analysis of a survey of art therapy educators in 2001 (St. John, Kaiser, & Ball, 2004), issues of importance to art therapy and art therapy research education emerged. As a follow-up, the authors interviewed educators attending the 2002 Annual Conference of the American Art Therapy Association (AATA) to gain an understanding of their…

  12. Cancer Stem Cells, Cancer Cell Plasticity and Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be ...

  13. Historical Research in Music Therapy. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Alan L., Ed.; Davis, William B., Ed.; Heller, George N., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This bibliography, produced by the American Music Therapy Association, represents a collection of research articles and publications over the past 50 years of music therapy's history. It is organized by author.

  14. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Periodontal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Su-Hwan; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Lee, Yong-Moo

    2010-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a major cause of tooth loss and characterized by inflammation of tooth-supporting structures. Recently, the association between periodontal disease and other health problems has been reported, the importance of treating periodontal disease for general health is more emphasized. The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is regeneration of damaged periodontal tissues. The development of adult stem cell research enables to improve the cell-based tissue engineering for perio...

  15. Limbal Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kringlegarden, Hilde Grane

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted today that stem cells in the adult corneal epithelium is located to the limbus. No specific marker of limbal epithelial cells (LESCs) has been identified, yet many have been suggested, including ΔNp63α, ABCG2, vimentin and notch 1. Negative markers include amongst others the differentiation markers Ck3 and Ck12. The lack of an identified specific marker elucidates the need for establishment of more exact molecular markers of LESCs. Limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) may ...

  16. Integrating Research Competencies in Massage Therapy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, Glenn M.

    The massage therapy profession is currently engaged in a competency-based education movement that includes an emphasis on promoting massage therapy research competencies (MTRCs). A systems-based model for integrating MTRCs into massage therapy education was therefore proposed. The model and an accompanying checklist describe an approach to…

  17. Molecular Profiling to Optimize Treatment in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Review of Potential Molecular Targets for Radiation Therapy by the Translational Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therapeutic decisions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been mainly based on disease stage, performance status, and co-morbidities, and rarely on histological or molecular classification. Rather than applying broad treatments to unselected patients that may result in survival increase of only weeks to months, research efforts should be, and are being, focused on identifying predictive markers for molecularly targeted therapy and determining genomic signatures that predict survival and response to specific therapies. The availability of such targeted biologics requires their use to be matched to tumors of corresponding molecular vulnerability for maximum efficacy. Molecular markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), K-ras, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) represent potential parameters guide treatment decisions. Ultimately, identifying patients who will respond to specific therapies will allow optimal efficacy with minimal toxicity, which will result in more judicious and effective application of expensive targeted therapy as the new paradigm of personalized medicine develops.

  18. Molecular Profiling to Optimize Treatment in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Review of Potential Molecular Targets for Radiation Therapy by the Translational Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ausborn, Natalie L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Le, Quynh Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Saha, Debabrata [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simko, Jeff [Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Story, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Torossian, Artour [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Lu, Bo, E-mail: bo.lu@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Therapeutic decisions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been mainly based on disease stage, performance status, and co-morbidities, and rarely on histological or molecular classification. Rather than applying broad treatments to unselected patients that may result in survival increase of only weeks to months, research efforts should be, and are being, focused on identifying predictive markers for molecularly targeted therapy and determining genomic signatures that predict survival and response to specific therapies. The availability of such targeted biologics requires their use to be matched to tumors of corresponding molecular vulnerability for maximum efficacy. Molecular markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), K-ras, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) represent potential parameters guide treatment decisions. Ultimately, identifying patients who will respond to specific therapies will allow optimal efficacy with minimal toxicity, which will result in more judicious and effective application of expensive targeted therapy as the new paradigm of personalized medicine develops.

  19. Progress and prospects in stem cell therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-ling XU; Fei YI; Hui-ze PAN; Shun-lei DUAN; Zhi-chao DING; Guo-hong YUAN; Jing QU

    2013-01-01

    In the past few years,progress being made in stem cell studies has incontestably led to the hope of developing cell replacement based therapy for diseases deficient in effective treatment by conventional ways.The induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are of great interest of cell therapy research because of their unrestricted self-renewal and differentiation potentials.Proof of principle studies have successfully demonstrated that iPSCs technology would substantially benefit clinical studies in various areas,including neurological disorders,hematologic diseases,cardiac diseases,liver diseases and etc.On top of this,latest advances of gene editing technologies have vigorously endorsed the possibility of obtaining disease-free autologous cells from patient specific iPSCs.Here in this review,we summarize current progress of stem cell therapy research with special enthusiasm in iPSCs studies.In addition,we compare current gene editing technologies and discuss their potential implications in clinic application in the future.

  20. Stem Cell Therapy: A New Treatment for Burns?

    OpenAIRE

    Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Marc G. Jeschke; Mohammed Al Shehab; Anna Arno; Blit, Patrick H.; Smith, Alexandra H.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising new approach in almost every medicine specialty. This vast, heterogeneous family of cells are now both naturally (embryonic and adult stem cells) or artificially obtained (induced pluripotent stem cells or iPSCs) and their fates have become increasingly controllable, thanks to ongoing research in this passionate new field. We are at the beginning of a new era in medicine, with multiple applications for stem cell therapy, not only as a monotherapy, ...

  1. Current Status of Cell Therapies in Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Oh Young

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in adults. Recovery after stroke is usually limited as there is no definite therapy to restore lost brain function. Cell therapy is an emerging paradigm in stroke therapy for patients with fixed neurologic deficits. Cell therapy for stroke may be greatly different from cell therapy for other disease conditions; the complexity of central nervous system structures and functions may limit its effectiveness. Recently, there have been several clini...

  2. Sensitization of (colon) cancer cells to death receptor related therapies A report from the FP6-ONCODEATH research consortium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pintzas, A.; Zhivotovsky, B.; Workman, P.; Clarke, P.A.; Linardopoulos, S.; Martinou, J.C.; Lacal, J.C.; Robine, S.; Nasioulas, G.; Anděra, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 7 (2012), s. 458-466. ISSN 1538-4047 Grant ostatní: EK(XE) LSHC-CT-2006-037278 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cancer * death receptors * kinase inhibitors * mitochondria * targeted therapies Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.287, year: 2012

  3. Stem cell therapy: From bench to bedside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several countries have increased efforts to develop medical countermeasures to protect against radiation toxicity due to acts of bio-terrorism as well as cancer treatment. Both acute radiation injuries and delayed effects such as cutaneous effects and impaired wound repair depend, to some extent, on angiogenesis deficiency. Vascular damage influences levels of nutrients, oxygen available to skin tissue and epithelial cell viability. Consequently, the evolution of radiation lesions often becomes uncontrolled and surgery is the final option-amputation leading to a disability. Therefore, the development of strategies designed to promote healing of radiation injuries is a major therapeutic challenge. Adult mesenchymal stem cell therapy has been combined with surgery in some cases and not in others and successfully applied in patients with accidental radiation injuries. Although research in the field of radiation skin injury management has made substantial progress in the past 10 y, several strategies are still needed in order to enhance the beneficial effect of stem cell therapy and to counteract the deleterious effect of an irradiated tissue environment. This review summarises the current and evolving advances concerning basic and translational research based on stem cell therapy for the management of radiological burns. (authors)

  4. Stem cells: sources and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Manuela; Perotti, Cesare; Del Fante, Claudia; Cervio, Marila; Redi, Carlo Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The historical, lexical and conceptual issues embedded in stem cell biology are reviewed from technical, ethical, philosophical, judicial, clinical, economic and biopolitical perspectives. The mechanisms assigning the simultaneous capacity to self-renew and to differentiate to stem cells (immortal template DNA and asymmetric division) are evaluated in the light of the niche hypothesis for the stemness state. The induction of cell pluripotency and the different stem cells sources are presented (embryonic, adult and cord blood). We highlight the embryonic and adult stem cell properties and possible therapies while we emphasize the particular scientific and social values of cord blood donation to set up cord blood banks. The current scientific and legal frameworks of cord blood banks are reviewed at an international level as well as allogenic, dedicated and autologous donations. The expectations and the challenges in relation to present-day targeted diseases like diabetes mellitus type I, Parkinson's disease and myocardial infarction are evaluated in the light of the cellular therapies for regenerative medicine. PMID:23283430

  5. Video micro analysis in music therapy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla; Oldfield, Amelia; Plahl, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Three music therapy researchers from three different countries who have recently completed their PhD theses will each briefly discuss the role of video analysis in their investigations. All three of these research projects have involved music therapy work with children, some of whom were...... and qualitative approaches to data collection. In addition, participants will be encouraged to reflect on what types of knowledge can be gained from video analyses and to explore the general relevance of video analysis in music therapy research....

  6. Three-dimensional approach to stem cell therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Il-Hoan; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2002-01-01

    Recent progress in stem cell research is opening a new hope for cell therapy in regenerative medicine. Two breakthroughs were made in the stem cell era, one, new discoveries in multi-potentiality of adult stem cells beyond the traditionally appreciated extent, and the other, establishment of pluripotent stem cell from human embryo. In addition to the newly identified multi-potentiality of adult stem cells, their ability to be trans-differentiated toward other tissue types (stem cell plasticit...

  7. Cell therapy in femur fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regenerative medicine has opened another opportunity for effective consolidation and rapid recovery of patients with traumatic injuries. We present a 46 year-old white male patient with a history of traffic accident. A middle third left femur fracture was diagnosed and plain radiographs showed IV grade comminution. He was released after 20 days of hospitalization with persistent pain despite of pain medication every 4-6 hours. Cell therapy was prescribed and it was performed on outpatient basis. After 48 hours the improvement was increased progressively, stability was achieved and pain disappeared in the fracture site, this was a symptom present since the accident. 8 weeks after cell therapy, radiological improvement was observed. In general, his evolution was considered satisfactory for the fast recovery and its incorporation into social life. This is the first patient in Artemisa province who underwent this new type of therapy and as far as we know at the time of this writing, it is also the first reported in the scientific literature in Cuba

  8. Stem cell therapy vs. ethics and religion

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Paula Melo Paulon; Sloth, Stine Hesselholt

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are somatic cells that can go through two different kinds of divisions. Symmetric division allows them to divide into undifferentiated cells, whilst asymmetric division produces one undifferentiated cell and a sister cell that will differentiate later on. Human stem cell therapy (HSCT) is a controversial theme in the religious, political, legal, ethical and scientific worlds. Although it is believed by many scientists that stem cell therapy will be able to cure life-threatening dis...

  9. Cell therapy of refractory Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, O V; Parfenov, A I; Shcherbakov, P L; Ruchkina, I N; Konoplyannikov, A G

    2013-11-01

    We analyzed medium-term efficiency and safety of biological therapy of Crohn's disease, in particular transplantation of allogenic mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells and anticytokine therapy with selective immunosuppressive agents. It was found that both methods of biological therapy of refractory Crohn's disease resulted in clinical and in some cases endoscopic remission. In most cases, clinical remission was maintained without steroid hormone therapy. Thus, both methods produce comparable clinical results. It was concluded that transplantation of mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells could be considered as a promising method in the therapy of refractory Crohn's disease comparable by its efficiency with infliximab therapy. PMID:24319711

  10. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  11. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive 'tracking' of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to stem cell imaging

  12. RESEARCH DESIGNS IN SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Research is designed to answer a question or to describe a phenomenon in a scientific process. Sports physical therapists must understand the different research methods, types, and designs in order to implement evidence‐based practice. The purpose of this article is to describe the most common research designs used in sports physical therapy research and practice. Both experimental and non‐experimental methods will be discussed.

  13. Information on Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Information on Stem Cell Research Research @ NINDS Stem Cell Highlights Submit a hESC ... found here: Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells NINDS Stem Cell Research on Campus The Intramural Research Program of NINDS ...

  14. The Cell Therapy Catapult: growing a U.K. cell therapy industry generating health and wealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Keith; Foster, Emma Palmer

    2013-12-01

    In a recent report on the regenerative medicine sector, the U.K. House of Lords made several recommendations to enable the United Kingdom to become a global leader in this important industry. Its recommendations in this regard were many and various, covering the regulatory system, clinical trials, manufacturing, funding, approval, and reimbursement. In its mission to tackle what it sees as three main types of barriers to the development of the cell therapy industry in the United Kingdom, the Cell Therapy Catapult is tackling many of these issues. Established as a center of excellence in the United Kingdom in 2012, the Cell Therapy Catapult is a research organization expected to grow to a team of around 100 experts. Its core financing of £ 70 million over the next 5 years is provided by the Technology Strategy Board, the United Kingdom's innovation agency, and with additional contract research income and access to collaborative funds, the Catapult expects to build up to annual revenues of around £ 30 million. Along with its sister Catapult programs in other areas of the economy, the Cell Therapy Catapult was established after identification of the massive early-stage expertise the country has, as well as an acute market failure-the lack of expertise to translate early-stage cell therapy research into commercial success. In this article, in addition to showing our progress so far, we will discuss the hurdles the industry faces-grouped into business, manufacturing/supply chain issues, and clinical/regulatory issues-and what we are doing to help the United Kingdom leap over them. PMID:24304073

  15. Present and future cell therapies for pancreatic beta cell replenishment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Domínguez-Bendala; Camillo Ricordi

    2012-01-01

    If only at a small scale,islet transplantation has successfully addressed what ought to be the primary endpoint of any cell therapy:the functional replenishment of damaged tissue in patients.After years of less-thanoptimal approaches to immunosuppression,recent advances consistently yield long-term graft survival rates comparable to those of whole pancreas transplantation.Limited organ availability is the main hurdle that stands in the way of the widespread clinical utilization of this pioneering intervention.Progress in stem cell research over the past decade,coupled with our decades-long experience with islet transplantation,is shaping the future of cell therapies for the treatment of diabetes.Here we review the most promising avenues of research aimed at generating an inexhaustible supply of insulin-producing cells for islet regeneration,including the differentiation of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells of embryonic and adult origin along the beta cell lineage and the direct reprogramming of non-endocrine tissues into insulin-producing cells.

  16. The clinical applicability of music therapy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    practitioners in all three areas (and beyond) can demonstrate, through previous and current research, that the music therapy service and interventions they provide are relevant and effective (Ansdell, Pavicevic & Proctor, 2004; Gold, Voracek and Wigram, 2004; Vink, 2003; Wigram 2002). Documentation of research...

  17. Potential benefits of cell therapy in coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Casamassimi, Amelia; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Zullo, Alberto; Infante, Teresa; Napoli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest both in basic and clinical research regarding the field of cell therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD). Several preclinical models of CHD have suggested that regenerative properties of stem and progenitor cells might help restoring myocardial functions in the event of cardiac diseases. Here, we summarize different types of stem/progenitor cells that have been tested in experimental and clinical settings of cardiac regeneration, from embryonic stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Then, we provide a comprehensive description of the most common cell delivery strategies with their major pros and cons and underline the potential of tissue engineering and injectable matrices to address the crucial issue of restoring the three-dimensional structure of the injured myocardial region. Due to the encouraging results from preclinical models, the number of clinical trials with cell therapy is continuously increasing and includes patients with CHD and congestive heart failure. Most of the already published trials have demonstrated safety and feasibility of cell therapies in these clinical conditions. Several studies have also suggested that cell therapy results in improved clinical outcomes. Numerous ongoing clinical trials utilizing this therapy for CHD will address fundamental issues concerning cell source and population utilized, as well as the use of imaging techniques to assess cell homing and survival, all factors that affect the efficacy of different cell therapy strategies. PMID:23834957

  18. Stem Cell Therapy for Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Michler, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the publication of a large number of clinical trials primarily using bone marrow-derived stem cells as the injected cell. These “first-generation” clinical trials have advanced our understanding and shown us that (1) cell therapy is safe, (2) cell therapy has been modestly effective, and (3) in humans, bone marrow-derived stem cells do not transdifferentiate into cardiomyocytes or new blood vessels (or at least in sufficient numbers to have any effect).

  19. Cell Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Morizane, Asuka; Takahashi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In Parkinson’s disease (PD), dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra are degenerated and lost. Cell therapy for PD replaces the lost dopamine neurons by transplanting donor dopamine neural progenitor cells. Cell therapy for PD has been performed in the clinic since the 1980s and uses donor cells from the mesencephalon of aborted embryos. Regenerative medicine for PD using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology is drawing attention, because it offers a limitless and more advantageous ...

  20. Cell-based therapy technology classifications and translational challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Natalie M; Ward, Stephen J; Kefalas, Panos; Hyllner, Johan

    2015-10-19

    Cell therapies offer the promise of treating and altering the course of diseases which cannot be addressed adequately by existing pharmaceuticals. Cell therapies are a diverse group across cell types and therapeutic indications and have been an active area of research for many years but are now strongly emerging through translation and towards successful commercial development and patient access. In this article, we present a description of a classification of cell therapies on the basis of their underlying technologies rather than the more commonly used classification by cell type because the regulatory path and manufacturing solutions are often similar within a technology area due to the nature of the methods used. We analyse the progress of new cell therapies towards clinical translation, examine how they are addressing the clinical, regulatory, manufacturing and reimbursement requirements, describe some of the remaining challenges and provide perspectives on how the field may progress for the future. PMID:26416686

  1. Cell Therapy in Chagas Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Campos de Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease which is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is an important cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America. In later stages chagasic cardiomyopathy is associated with congestive heart failure which is often refractory to medical therapy. In these individuals heart transplantation has been attempted. However, this procedure is fraught with many problems attributable to the surgery and the postsurgical administration of immunosuppressive drugs. Studies in mice suggest that the transplantation of bone-marrow-derived cells ameliorates the inflammation and fibrosis in the heart associated with this infection. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging reveals that bone marrow transplantation ameliorates the infection induced right ventricular enlargement. On the basis of these animal studies the safety of autologous bone marrow transplantation has been assessed in patients with chagasic end-stage heart disease. The initial results are encouraging and more studies need to be performed.

  2. Novel insights in basic and applied stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalco, Dario; Giordano, Antonio; Galderisi, Umberto

    2012-05-01

    The achievement of novel findings in stem cell research were the subject of the meeting organized by Stem Cell Research Italy (SCR Italy) and by the International Society for Cellular Therapy-Europe (ISCT). Stem cell therapy represents great promise for the future of molecular and regenerative medicine. The use of several types of stem cells is a real opportunity to provide a valid approach to curing several untreatable human diseases. Before it is suitable for clinical applications, stem cell biology needs to be investigated further and in greater detail. Basic stem cell research could provide exact knowledge regarding stem cell action mechanisms, and pre-clinical research on stem cells on an in vivo model of disease provides scientific evidence for future human applications. Applied stem cell research is a promising new approach to handling several diseases. Along with tissue engineering, it offers a new and promising discipline that can help to manage human pathologies through stem cell therapy. All of these themes were discussed in this meeting, covering stem cell subtypes with their newest basic and applied research. PMID:21780112

  3. The Use of Pluripotent Stem Cell for Personalized Cell Therapies against Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Yeong Ha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there are a number of weaknesses for clinical use, pluripotent stem cells are valuable sources for patient-specific cell therapies against various diseases. Backed-up by a huge number of basic researches, neuronal differentiation mechanism is well established and pluripotent stem cell therapies against neurological disorders are getting closer to clinical application. However, there are increasing needs for standardization of the sourcing pluripotent stem cells by establishing stem cell registries and banking. Global harmonization will accelerate practical use of personalized therapies using pluripotent stem cells.

  4. [Retinal Cell Therapy Using iPS Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masayo

    2016-03-01

    Progress in basic research, starting with the work on neural stem cells in the middle 1990's to embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells at present, will lead the cell therapy (regenerative medicine) of various organs, including the central nervous system to a big medical field in the future. The author's group transplanted iPS cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell sheets to the eye of a patient with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in 2014 as a clinical research. Replacement of the RPE with the patient's own iPS cell-derived young healthy cell sheet will be one new radical treatment of AMD that is caused by cellular senescence of RPE cells. Since it was the first clinical study using iPS cell-derived cells, the primary endpoint was safety judged by the outcome one year after surgery. The safety of the cell sheet has been confirmed by repeated tumorigenisity tests using immunodeficient mice, as well as purity of the cells, karyotype and genetic analysis. It is, however, also necessary to prove the safety by clinical studies. Following this start, a good strategy considering cost and benefit is needed to make regenerative medicine a standard treatment in the future. Scientifically, the best choice is the autologous RPE cell sheet, but autologous cell are expensive and sheet transplantation involves a risky part of surgical procedure. We should consider human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched allogeneic transplantation using the HLA 6 loci homozyous iPS cell stock that Prof. Yamanaka of Kyoto University is working on. As the required forms of donor cells will be different depending on types and stages of the target diseases, regenerative medicine will be accomplished in a totally different manner from the present small molecule drugs. Proof of concept (POC) of photoreceptor transplantation in mouse is close to being accomplished using iPS cell-derived photoreceptor cells. The shortest possible course for treatment

  5. Nonclinical safety strategies for stem cell therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Michaela E., E-mail: michaela_sharpe@yahoo.com [Investigative Toxicology, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Ltd, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, CT13 9NJ (United Kingdom); Morton, Daniel [Exploratory Drug Safety, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc, Cambridge, 02140 (United States); Rossi, Annamaria [Investigative Toxicology, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Ltd, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, CT13 9NJ (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology, especially the development of the induced pluripotent stem cell techniques, have generated tremendous enthusiasm and efforts to explore the therapeutic potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapies are being considered for the treatment of degenerative diseases, inflammatory conditions, cancer and repair of damaged tissue. The safety of a stem cell therapy depends on many factors including the type of cell therapy, the differentiation status and proliferation capacity of the cells, the route of administration, the intended clinical location, long term survival of the product and/or engraftment, the need for repeated administration, the disease to be treated and the age of the population. Understanding the product profile of the intended therapy is crucial to the development of the nonclinical safety study design.

  6. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric... public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations.'' The purpose... therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders regarding best practices related to cell and...

  7. Cell-Based Therapies for Diabetic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Bernardi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, accumulating experimental evidence supports the notion that diabetic patients may greatly benefit from cell-based therapies, which include the use of adult stem and/or progenitor cells. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells and the circulating pool of endothelial progenitor cells have so far been the most studied populations of cells proposed for the treatment of vascular complications affecting diabetic patients. We review the evidence supporting their use in this setting, the therapeutic benefits that these cells have shown so far as well as the challenges that cell-based therapies in diabetic complications put out.

  8. Stem Cell Therapy and Breast Cancer Treatment: Review of Stem Cell Research and Potential Therapeutic Impact Against Cardiotoxicities Due to Breast Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Thomas E.; George, Jon C.

    2014-01-01

    A new problem has emerged with the ever-increasing number of breast cancer survivors. While early screening and advances in treatment have allowed these patients to overcome their cancer, these treatments often have adverse cardiovascular side effects that can produce abnormal cardiovascular function. Chemotherapeutic and radiation therapy have both been linked to cardiotoxicity; these therapeutics can cause a loss of cardiac muscle and deterioration of vascular structure that can eventually ...

  9. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford R Hirsch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network's Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our thought process in approaching sequential therapy of mRCC and the use of real-world data to inform our approach. We also highlight the evolving literature that will impact practicing oncologists in the near future.

  10. Stem cell therapy to treat heart ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Kastrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    (CABG), morbidity and mortality is still high in patients with CAD. Along with PCI and CABG or in patients without options for revascularization, stem cell regenerative therapy in controlled trials is a possibility. Stem cells are believed to exert their actions by angiogenesis and regeneration of...... cardiomyocytes. Recently published clinical trials and meta-analysis of stem cell studies have shown encouraging results with increased left ventricle ejection fraction and reduced symptoms in patients with CAD and heart failure. There is some evidence of mesenchymal stem cell being more effective compared to...... other cell types and cell therapy may be more effective in patients with known diabetes mellitus. However, further investigations are warranted....

  11. Cell therapy for intervertebral disc repair: advancing cell therapy from bench to clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LM Benneker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration is a major cause of pain and disability; yet therapeutic options are limited and treatment often remains unsatisfactory. In recent years, research activities have intensified in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated encouraging results. Nonetheless, the translation of new biological therapies into clinical practice faces substantial barriers. During the symposium "Where Science meets Clinics", sponsored by the AO Foundation and held in Davos, Switzerland, from September 5-7, 2013, hurdles for translation were outlined, and ways to overcome them were discussed. With respect to cell therapy for IVD repair, it is obvious that regenerative treatment is indicated at early stages of disc degeneration, before structural changes have occurred. It is envisaged that in the near future, screening techniques and non-invasive imaging methods will be available to detect early degenerative changes. The promises of cell therapy include a sustained effect on matrix synthesis, inflammation control, and prevention of angio- and neuro-genesis. Discogenic pain, originating from "black discs" or annular injury, prevention of adjacent segment disease, and prevention of post-discectomy syndrome were identified as prospective indications for cell therapy. Before such therapy can safely and effectively be introduced into clinics, the identification of the patient population and proper standardisation of diagnostic parameters and outcome measurements are indispensable. Furthermore, open questions regarding the optimal cell type and delivery method need to be resolved in order to overcome the safety concerns implied with certain procedures. Finally, appropriate large animal models and well-designed clinical studies will be required, particularly addressing safety aspects.

  12. Stem cell therapies for treating osteoarthritis: prescient or premature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Banks, Tania A

    2014-12-01

    There has been unprecedented interest in recent years in the use of stem cells as therapy for an array of diseases in companion animals. Stem cells have already been deployed therapeutically in a number of clinical settings, in particular the use of mesenchymal stem cells to treat osteoarthritis in horses and dogs. However, an assessment of the scientific literature highlights a marked disparity between the purported benefits of stem cell therapies and their proven abilities as defined by rigorously controlled scientific studies. Although preliminary data generated from clinical trials in human patients are encouraging, therapies currently available to treat animals are supported by very limited clinical evidence, and the commercialisation of these treatments may be premature. This review introduces the three main types of stem cells relevant to veterinary applications, namely, embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells, and draws together research findings from in vitro and in vivo studies to give an overview of current stem cell therapies for the treatment of osteoarthritis in animals. Recent advances in tissue engineering, which is proposed as the future direction of stem cell-based therapy for osteoarthritis, are also discussed. PMID:25457267

  13. Participatory Action Research: Integrating Community Occupational Therapy Practice and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Lynn; Trentham, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Projects involving mental health clients receiving occupational therapy and senior citizens engaged in capacity building illustrate steps in the participatory action research (PAR) process: issue identification and planning; investigation and action; action, reflection, and modification cycles; and knowledge creation and change. Challenges and…

  14. Stem cell research in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyi SUN; Shi ZUO

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view that adult human liver tumors, mainly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), arise from mature cell types has been challenged in recent dec-ades. The results of several studies suggest that HCC can be derived from liver stem cells. There are four levels of cells in the liver stem cell lineage: hepatocytes, hepatic stem cells/oval cells, bone marrow stem cells and hepato-pancreas stem cells. However, whether HCC is resulted from the differentiation block of stem cells and, moreover, which liver stem cell lineage is the source cell of hepatocarcinogenesis remain controversial. In this review, we focus on the current status of liver stem cell research and their roles in carcinogenesis of HCC, in order to explore new approaches for stem cell therapy of HCC.

  15. Introduction to Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Biehl, Jesse K.; Russell, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells have the ability to differentiate into specific cell types. The two defining characteristics of a stem cell are perpetual self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into a specialized adult cell type. There are two major classes of stem cells: pluripotent that can become any cell in the adult body, and multipotent that are restricted to becoming a more limited population of cells. Cell sources, characteristics, differentiation and therapeutic applications are discussed. Stem cel...

  16. Research Findings on Radiation Hormesis and Radon Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation hormesis research in Japan to determine the validity of Luckey's claims has revealed information on the health effects of low-level radiation. The scientific data of animal tests we obtained and successful results actually brought by radon therapy on human patients show us a clearer understanding of the health effects of low-level radiation. We obtained many animal test results and epidemiological survey data through our research activities cooperating with more than ten universities in Japan, categorized as follows: 1. suppression of cancer by enhancement of the immune system based on gene activation; 2. rejuvenation and suppression of aging by increasing cell membrane permeability and enzyme syntheses; 3. adaptive response by activation of gene expression on DNA repair and cell apoptosis; 4. pain relief and stress moderation by hormone formation in the brain and central nervous system; 5. avoidance and therapy of obstinate diseases by enhancing damage control systems and form one formation

  17. The Importance of Research in Educating About Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara L. Wheeler

    2014-01-01

    In this "Essay" article, the author explores some ways in which music therapy research is important in educating people—music therapists and those outside of music therapy—about music therapy. There are different levels and types of research, and different levels are appropriate at different points in the development of music therapy in a country. However, some type of music therapy research is important for the development of music therapy in all cases and in all situations and all countries...

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mundra, Vaibhav; Gerling, Ivan C.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells which have self-renewal capacity and differentiation potential into several mesenchymal lineages including bones, cartilages, adipose tissues and tendons. MSCs may repair tissue injuries and prevent immune cell activation and proliferation. Immunomodulation and secretion of growth factors by MSCs have led to realizing the true potential of MSC-based cell therapy. The use of MSCs as immunomdulators has been explored in cell/organ t...

  19. Stem cell therapy. Use of differentiated pluripotent stem cells as replacement therapy for treating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Ira J; Daley, George Q; Goldman, Steven A;

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) directed to various cell fates holds promise as source material for treating numerous disorders. The availability of precisely differentiated PSC-derived cells will dramatically affect blood component and hematopoietic stem cell therapies and should facilitate......, and industry is critical for generating new stem cell-based therapies....... treatment of diabetes, some forms of liver disease and neurologic disorders, retinal diseases, and possibly heart disease. Although an unlimited supply of specific cell types is needed, other barriers must be overcome. This review of the state of cell therapies highlights important challenges. Successful...

  20. Market access pathways for cell therapies in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémuzat, Cécile; Toumi, Mondher; Jørgensen, Jesper; Kefalas, Panos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and objective Cell therapies can be classified into three main categories of products: advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), ATMPs prepared on a non-routine basis (hospital exemptions), and minimally manipulated cells. Despite the benefits that cell therapies can bring to patients, they are subject to complex pathways to reach the market in France. The objective of this study was to identify and describe routes to market access for cell therapies in France and how these vary by regulatory status. Methodology The research was structured following five main steps: (1) identification of the French regulatory framework for cell therapies; (2) identification of the health products categorised as cell therapies in France; (3) mapping of the market access pathways per category of cell therapy; (4) validation of findings by interviewing experts; and (5) development of a roadmap summarising market access pathways for cell therapies in France. The secondary research methodology included a comprehensive literature review conducted on websites of French public health institutions, complemented by a research for peer-reviewed articles, abstracts, and grey literature. Results Different market access pathways are possible depending on the cell therapy category. For ATMPs, market access pathways depend on the licensing status of the therapy. Licensed ATMPs followed the same market access pathways as ‘conventional’ pharmaceuticals, whereas not-yet-licensed ATMPs can be funded via a specific financial allowance under the framework of a Temporary Authorisation for Use procedure or various research programmes. For new ATMPs that are associated with a separate medical device (not considered as ‘combined ATMPs’) or associated with a new medical procedure, additional pathways will apply for the medical device and/or medical procedure to be reimbursed in the ambulatory settings or at hospital. The most likely funding option for ATMPs prepared on a non

  1. Induced pluripotent stem cells, new tools for drug discovery and new hope for stem cell therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yanhong

    2009-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer or therapeutic cloning has provided great hope for stem cell-based therapies. However therapeutic cloning has been experiencing both ethical and technical difficulties. Recent breakthrough studies using a combination of four factors to reprogram human somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells without using embryos or eggs led to an important revolution in stem cell research. Comparative analysis of human induced pluripotent stem cells and human embryonic stem cel...

  2. [Research Progress of EGFR-TKI Therapy for Patients with Central Nervous System 
Metastases from Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yinghua; Xin, Tao

    2016-08-20

    Approximately half of all patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) develop central nervous system metastases during the course of their disease which indicate poor prognosis. A part of NSCLC patients demonstrates activating epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) mutations who represent effectiveness and well tolerance of EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) therapy. Although the systemic efficacy of targeted agents is established, the efficacy of central nervous system (CNS) metastases is not as well characterized. In this article, we review recent data on the use of EGFR inhibitors for treatment of patients with NSCLC and CNS metastases. PMID:27561797

  3. Improving translation success of cell-based therapies in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, Jennifer J; Herrmann, Marietta; Evans, Christopher H; Miclau, Theodore; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Richards, R Geoff

    2016-01-01

    There is a clear discrepancy between the growth of cell therapy and tissue engineering research in orthopaedics over the last two decades and the number of approved clinical therapies and products available to patients. At the 2015 annual meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society, a workshop was held to highlight important considerations from the perspectives of an academic scientist, clinical researcher, and industry representative with the aim of helping researchers to successfully translate their ideas into clinical and commercial reality. Survey data acquired from workshop participants indicated an overall positive opinion on the future potential of cell-based therapies to make a significant contribution to orthopaedic medicine. The survey also indicated an agreement on areas requiring improvement in the development of new therapies, specifically; increased support for fundamental research and education and improved transparency of regulatory processes. This perspectives article summarises the content and conclusions of the workshop and puts forward suggestions on how translational success of cell-based therapies in orthopaedics may be achieved. PMID:26403666

  4. Cell therapy and wound healing - state of art and perspectives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smetana, Karel; Dvořánková, B.; Labský, Jiří; Holíková, Z.

    Daejon : Pai Chai University, 2002 - (Kim, H.; Kim, T.; Park, J.), s. 77-80 [International Symposium on Advanced Materials /4./. Daejon (KR), 03.06.2002-07.06.2002] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065; GA ČR GA203/00/1310; GA AV ČR IBS4050005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : epidermal stem cell * cell therapy * wound healing Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  5. Modeling Local Control After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Report From the Elekta Collaborative Lung Research Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment option for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using data collected by the Elekta Lung Research Group, we generated a tumor control probability (TCP) model that predicts 2-year local control after SBRT as a function of biologically effective dose (BED) and tumor size. Methods and Materials: We formulated our TCP model as follows: TCP = e[BED10−c∗L−TCD50]/k ÷ (1 + e[BED10−c∗L−TCD50]/k), where BED10 is the biologically effective SBRT dose, c is a constant, L is the maximal tumor diameter, and TCD50 and k are parameters that define the shape of the TCP curve. Least-squares optimization with a bootstrap resampling approach was used to identify the values of c, TCD50, and k that provided the best fit with observed actuarial 2-year local control rates. Results: Data from 504 NSCLC tumors treated with a variety of SBRT schedules were available. The mean follow-up time was 18.4 months, and 26 local recurrences were observed. The optimal values for c, TCD50, and k were 10 Gy/cm, 0 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively. Thus, size-adjusted BED (sBED) may be defined as BED minus 10 times the tumor diameter (in centimeters). Our TCP model indicates that sBED values of 44 Gy, 69 Gy, and 93 Gy provide 80%, 90%, and 95% chances of tumor control at 2 years, respectively. When patients were grouped by sBED, the model accurately characterized the relationship between sBED and actuarial 2-year local control (r=0.847, P=.008). Conclusion: We have developed a TCP model that predicts 2-year local control rate after hypofractionated SBRT for early-stage NSCLC as a function of biologically effective dose and tumor diameter. Further testing of this model with additional datasets is warranted.

  6. Alternative approaches to research in physical therapy: positivism and phenomenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, K F; Jensen, G M; Schmoll, B J; Hack, L M; Gwyer, J

    1993-02-01

    This article presents philosophical approaches to research in physical therapy. A comparison is made to demonstrate how the research purpose, research design, research methods, and research data differ when one approaches research from the philosophical perspective of positivism (predominantly quantitative) as compared with the philosophical perspective of phenomenology (predominantly qualitative). Differences between the two approaches are highlighted by examples from research articles published in Physical Therapy. The authors urge physical therapy researchers to become familiar with the tenets, rigor, and knowledge gained from the use of both approaches in order to increase their options in conducting research relevant to the practice of physical therapy. PMID:8421722

  7. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  8. [Maintenance therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruwatari, Koichi; Yoh, Kiyotaka

    2014-08-01

    Maintenance therapy is a new treatment strategy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer(NSCLC), and it consists of switch maintenance and continuation maintenance.Switch maintenance is the introduction of a different drug, not included as part of the induction therapy, immediately after completion of 4 cycles of first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.Continuation maintenance is a continuation of at least one of the drugs used in the induction therapy in the absence of disease progression.Several phase III trials have reported survival benefits with continuation maintenance of pemetrexed and switch maintenance of pemetrexed or erlotinib.Therefore, maintenance therapy has become a part of the standard first-line treatment for advanced NSCLC.However, further research is needed to elucidate the selection criteria of patients who may benefit the most from maintenance therapy. PMID:25132023

  9. Fuel Cell Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Peter M. [Brown University

    2014-03-30

    Executive Summary In conjunction with the Brown Energy Initiative, research Projects selected for the fuel cell research grant were selected on the following criteria: They should be fundamental research that has the potential to significantly impact the nation’s energy infrastructure. They should be scientifically exciting and sound. They should synthesize new materials, lead to greater insights, explore new phenomena, or design new devices or processes that are of relevance to solving the energy problems. They involve top-caliper senior scientists with a record of accomplishment, or junior faculty with outstanding promise of achievement. They should promise to yield at least preliminary results within the given funding period, which would warrant further research development. They should fit into the overall mission of the Brown Energy Initiative, and the investigators should contribute as partners to an intellectually stimulating environment focused on energy science. Based on these criteria, fourteen faculty across three disciplines (Chemistry, Physics and Engineering) and the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory were selected to participate in this effort.1 In total, there were 30 people supported, at some level, on these projects. This report highlights the findings and research outcomes of the participating researchers.

  10. Stem cells in endodontic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Rama Kumar M, Madhu Varma K, Kalyan Satish R, Manikya kumar Nanduri.R, Murali Krishnam Raju S, Mohan rao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body. Serving as a sort of repair system for the body, they can theoretically divide without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. However, progress in stem cell biology and tissue engineering may present new options for replacing heavily damaged or lost teeth, or even individual tooth structures. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential impact of dental pulp stem cells on regenerative endodontics.

  11. How we make cell therapy in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montemurro T

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tiziana Montemurro, Mariele Viganò, Silvia Budelli, Elisa Montelatici, Cristiana Lavazza, Luigi Marino, Valentina Parazzi, Lorenza Lazzari, Rosaria GiordanoCell Factory, Unit of Cell Therapy and Cryobiology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, ItalyAbstract: In the 21st century scenario, new therapeutic tools are needed to take up the social and medical challenge posed by the more and more frequent degenerative disorders and by the aging of population. The recent category of advanced therapy medicinal products has been created to comprise cellular, gene therapy, and tissue engineered products, as a new class of drugs. Their manufacture requires the same pharmaceutical framework as for conventional drugs and this means that industrial, large-scale manufacturing process has to be adapted to the peculiar characteristics of cell-containing products. Our hospital took up the challenge of this new path in the early 2000s; and herein we describe the approach we followed to set up a pharmaceutical-grade facility in a public hospital context, with the aim to share the solutions we found to make cell therapy compliant with the requirements for the production and the quality control of a high-standard medicinal product.Keywords: advanced therapy medicinal product, good manufacturing practices, stem cells

  12. The Aurora kinase inhibitors in cancer research and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicenas, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    Compounds that affect enzymatic function of kinases are valuable for the understanding of the complex biochemical processes in cells. Aurora kinases (AURKs) play a key role in the control of the mitosis. These kinases are frequently deregulated in different human cancers: overexpression, amplifications, translocations and deletions were reported in many cancer cell lines as well as patient tissues. These findings steered a rigorous hunt for small-molecule AURK inhibitors not only for research purposes as well as for therapeutic uses. In this review, we describe a number of AURK inhibitors and their use in cancer research and/or therapy. We hope to assist researchers and clinicians in deciding which inhibitor is most appropriate for their specific purpose. The review will also provide a broad overview of the clinical studies performed with some of these inhibitors (if such studies have been performed). PMID:26932147

  13. Gene and cell therapy for muscle regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Stilhano, Roberta Sessa; Martins, Leonardo; Ingham, Sheila Jean McNeill; Pesquero, João Bosco; Huard, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury and healing are multifactorial processes, involving three steps of healing: (1) degeneration and inflammation, (2) regeneration, and (3) fibrosis. Fibrous tissue hinders the muscle’s complete recovery and current therapies fail in achieving total muscle recovery. Gene and cell therapy (or both) are potential future treatments for severe muscular injuries. Stem cells’ properties associated with growth factors or/and cytokines can improve muscle healing and permit long-te...

  14. Stem cell therapy independent of stemness

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Techung

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is entering a new era shifting the focus from initial feasibility study to optimization of therapeutic efficacy. However, how MSC therapy facilitates tissue regeneration remains incompletely characterized. Consistent with the emerging notion that secretion of multiple growth factors/cytokines (trophic factors) by MSC provides the underlying tissue regenerative mechanism, the recent study by Bai et al demonstrated a critical therapeutic role of MSC-derived h...

  15. An animal cell culture: Advance technology for modern research

    OpenAIRE

    Sarita Khare; Rajeev Nema

    2012-01-01

    At the present time animal cell culture is more significant and multifarious application tool for current research streams. A lot of field assorted from animal cell culture such: stem cell biology, IVF technology, cancer cell biology, monoclonal antibody production, recombinant protein production, gene therapy, vaccine manufacturing, novel drug selection and improvement. In this review conclude animal cell culture as well as its requirements

  16. Strategies for future histocompatible stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan; Barington, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell therapy based on the safe and unlimited self-renewal of human pluripotent stem cells is envisioned for future use in tissue or organ replacement after injury or disease. A gradual decline of regenerative capacity has been documented among the adult stem cell population in some body organs...... during the aging process. Recent progress in human somatic cell nuclear transfer and inducible pluripotent stem cell technologies has shown that patient-derived nuclei or somatic cells can be reprogrammed in vitro to become pluripotent stem cells, from which the three germ layer lineages can be generated......, genetically identical to the recipient. Once differentiation protocols and culture conditions can be defined and optimized, patient-histocompatible pluripotent stem cells could be directed towards virtually every cell type in the human body. Harnessing this capability to enrich for given cells within...

  17. CELL THERAPY OF HEART PATHOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Lukash, L.

    2008-01-01

    The review article is devoted to cellular cardiomyoplasty as a novel technology of treatment of cardiac insufficiency. The experiments on animals and the first clinical trials have shown the possibility to improve the contractile function of diseased heart after transplantation of different types of donor cells: cardiomyocytes, bone marrow enriched by hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells. The problems of cellular cardiomyoplasty are discussed.

  18. Stem cell strategies for Alzheimer's disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, K; Alvarez, A; Marutle, A; Kwak, Y D; Choumkina, E

    2006-06-01

    We have found much evidence that the brain is capable of regenerating neurons after maturation. In our previous study, human neural stem cells (HNSCs) transplanted into aged rat brains differentiated into neural cells and significantly improved the cognitive functions of the animals, indicating that HNSCs may be a promising candidate for cell-replacement therapies for neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, ethical and practical issues associated with HNSCs compel us to explore alternative strategies. Here, we report novel technologies to differentiate adult human mesenchymal stem cells, a subset of stromal cells in the bone marrow, into neural cells by modifying DNA methylation or over expression of nanog, a homeobox gene expressed in embryonic stem cells. We also report peripheral administrations of a pyrimidine derivative that increases endogenous stem cell proliferation improves cognitive function of the aged animal. Although these results may promise a bright future for clinical applications used towards stem cell strategies in AD therapy, we must acknowledge the complexity of AD. We found that glial differentiation takes place in stem cells transplanted into amyloid-( precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We also found that over expression of APP gene or recombinant APP treatment causes glial differentiation of stem cells. Although further detailed mechanistic studies may be required, RNA interference of APP or reduction of APP levels in the brain can significantly reduced glial differentiation of stem cells and may be useful in promoting neurogenesis after stem cell transplantation. PMID:16953146

  19. Research progress of adult cardiac stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Nan; Ning-kun ZHANG; Lian-ru GAO

    2013-01-01

    The traditional view is that the heart is a terminal organ. This dogma, however, has been widely questioned with the discovery of adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs). Since CSCs have a highly self-renewal capacity and specific myocardial differentiation potential, nowadays they have been regarded as the most promising type of stem cells used in ischemic heart disease and other replacement therapy of end-stage heart disease. The present paper will focus on current results of scientific research on...

  20. Beyond Practice: A Postmodern Feminist Perspective on Art Therapy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Helene

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the failure of art therapy, as a profession, to integrate feminism and gender issues into art therapy literature and research. Examines whether there are research methodologies that are less gender biased than others and which methods are best suited to art therapy. (SNR)

  1. Efficiency of Cell Therapy in Liver Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevela, E Ya; Starostina, N M; Pal'tsev, A I; Shipunov, M V; Zheltova, O I; Meledina, I V; Khvan, L A; Leplina, O Yu; Ostanin, A A; Chernykh, E R; Kozlov, V A

    2016-02-01

    We studied safety and clinical efficacy of transplantation of autologous bone marrow cell in complex therapy of 158 patients with chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis of the liver. The efficiency of cell therapy was assessed in 12 months after single injection of the cells. The positive response (alleviation of liver cirrhosis or stabilization of the pathological process) was observed in 70% cases. The efficacy of therapy correlated with the severity and etiology of the disease and was maximum in patients with Child-Pugh class A (in 82.5% cases) and class B liver cirrhosis (in 79% cases); in patients with class C liver cirrhosis, the positive response was achieved in 42.5% cases. In 39 patients, ultrasonic examination performed in 3 years after transplantation revealed no focal lesions or ectopic ossification foci. PMID:26902361

  2. Dynamic imaging for CAR-T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami-Shahri, Nia; Papa, Sophie

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy is entering the mainstream for the treatment of CD19(+)cancers. As is does we learn more about resistance to therapy and the role, risks and management of toxicity. In solid tumour CAR therapy research the route to the clinic is less smooth with a wealth of challenges facing translating this, potentially hugely valuable, therapeutic option for patients. As we strive to understand our successes, and navigate the challenges, having a clear understanding of how adoptively transferred CAR-T-cells behavein vivoand in human trials is invaluable. Harnessing reporter gene imaging to enable detection and tracking of small numbers of CAR-T-cells after adoptive transfer is one way by which we can accomplish this. The compatibility of certain reporter gene systems with tracers available routinely in the clinic makes this approach highly useful for future appraisal of CAR-T-cell success in humans. PMID:27068944

  3. Stem Cell Therapies for Treatment of Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy is an emerging form of treatment for several liver diseases, but is limited by the availability of donor livers. Stem cells hold promise as an alternative to the use of primary hepatocytes. We performed an exhaustive review of the literature, with a focus on the latest studies involving the use of stem cells for the treatment of liver disease. Stem cells can be harvested from a number of sources, or can be generated from somatic cells to create induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. Different cell lines have been used experimentally to support liver function and treat inherited metabolic disorders, acute liver failure, cirrhosis, liver cancer, and small-for-size liver transplantations. Cell-based therapeutics may involve gene therapy, cell transplantation, bioartificial liver devices, or bioengineered organs. Research in this field is still very active. Stem cell therapy may, in the future, be used as a bridge to either liver transplantation or endogenous liver regeneration, but efficient differentiation and production protocols must be developed and safety must be demonstrated before it can be applied to clinical practice.

  4. Advances in stem cell research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@In 1998, biologists Thomson and Gearhart successfully derived stem cells from human embryos. One year later, several researchers discovered that adult stem cells still retain the ability to be differentiated into unrelated types of cells. Advances in stem cell research open a promising direction for applied medical science. Moreover, it may also force scientists to reconsider the fundamental theory about how cells grow up. Stem cell research was considered by Science as the top of the ten breakthroughs of science of the year[1]. This paper gives a survey of recent advances in stem cell research. 1 Overview In the 1980s, embryonic stem cell and/or embryonic germ cell line (ES cell line, EG cell line) of multifarious mammalian animals, especially those of non-human pri-mates, had been established. In 1998, Thomson and Shamblott obtained ES, EG cell lines from human blasto-cysts and gonad ridges of early human embryos, respec-tively. Their research brought up an ethical debate about whether human embryos can be used as experimental materials. It was not appeased until 1999 when research-ers discovered that stem cells from adults still retain the ability to become different kinds of tissue cells. For in-stance, brain cells can become blood cells[2], and cells from bone marrow can become cells in liver. Scientists believe, for a long time, that cells can only be developed from early pluripotent embryo cells; the differentiation potential of stem cells from mature tissues is restricted to only one of the cell types of the tissue where stem cells are obtained. Recent stem cell researches, however, sub-verted the traditional view of stem cells. These discoveries made scientists speed ahead with the work on adult stem cells, hoping to discover whether their promise will rival that of ES cells.

  5. Establishing a Research Agenda for Art Therapy: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Donna; Deaver, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Art therapy in the United States is a young profession that would benefit from an identified research agenda to marshal resources more effectively to address gaps in the knowledge base. This article describes a Delphi study of U.S. art therapy researchers who were surveyed on research priorities for the profession. The research panelists were…

  6. [Cell therapy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: science and controversy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, L; Guerrero-Sola, A; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matias-Guiu, J

    2010-10-01

    Stem cell therapy is seen as a possible alternative for the treatment of different degenerative diseases, among which includes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Despite there being basic research works with this therapy in ALS, the mechanism of action of the implanted cells are still unclear. It is also unclear which type of cells to use (bone marrow, fat, dental pulp, etc.), or the most ideal administration route. Furthermore, clinical trials with mesenchymal stem cells are not very conclusive, therefore it has not been convincingly established as an alternative therapy in ALS or any other neurodegenerative disease. Despite the scientific evidence, several clinical trials have been conducted in the last few years that offer stem cell treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, giving rise to what is known as "cellular tourism". This phenomenon has set off alarms and reactions in the scientific community. The application of these therapies must be performed following the good clinical practice guidelines in research, evidence based methodology and international ethical and scientific recommendations. PMID:20964996

  7. Cell Therapy for Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include utilization of the safest and least invasive methods with goals of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced wound healing technology has triggered the use of cells to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of this review is to provide information on clinically available cell-based treatment options for healing of acute and chronic wounds. Compared with a variety of conventional methods, such as skin...

  8. Translational Research on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Mutations in Targeted Therapy for Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-yan; ZHOU Er-xi

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations in targeted therapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods:One hundred and seventeen patients with advanced NSCLC admitted in Maternal and Child Health Care Center of Zibo City from Jan., 2011 to Jan., 2014 were performed with EGFR gene detection and then divided into 3 groups according to the detecting results. Patients in group A and group B were given oral geiftinib, 250 mg/d while patients in Group C with docetaxel, 75 mg/m2. Chemotherapy for 3 groups was discontinued until severe adverse reactions or disease progression occurred, or continuous treatment was considered to be unfavorable by the doctors, or patients asked for withdrawal from the study. The relationship between clinicopathological features and EGFR mutations were analyzed. The short-term and long-term efifcacy and adverse reactions of 3 groups were observed. Results:Of the 31 cases with EGFR mutations, there were 16 cases (51.6%) of mutations in exon 19, 14 (45.2%) in exon 21 and 2 (6.45%) in exon 18. No EGFR mutation was found in exon 20. EGFR mutations were associated with histological types of tumors and whether patients were smoking. The median follow-up time was 26 months and 62 patients were dead. None of CR was in 3 groups. The disease control rate (DCR) in group A was obviously higher than that in group B (χ2=9.382,P=0.002), which was also higher in group C than that in group B (χ2=4.674,P=0.031). The 1-year survival rate in group A was obviously higher than that in group B and group C (P Conclusion:EGFR mutations are the main indicators for guiding the targeted therapy for patients with advanced NSCLC.

  9. Stem Cell Therapy: A New Treatment for Burns?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd G. Gauglitz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising new approach in almost every medicine specialty. This vast, heterogeneous family of cells are now both naturally (embryonic and adult stem cells or artificially obtained (induced pluripotent stem cells or iPSCs and their fates have become increasingly controllable, thanks to ongoing research in this passionate new field. We are at the beginning of a new era in medicine, with multiple applications for stem cell therapy, not only as a monotherapy, but also as an adjunct to other strategies, such as organ transplantation or standard drug treatment. Regrettably, serious preclinical concerns remain and differentiation, cell fusion, senescence and signalling crosstalk with growth factors and biomaterials are still challenges for this promising multidisciplinary therapeutic modality. Severe burns have several indications for stem cell therapy, including enhancement of wound healing, replacement of damaged skin and perfect skin regeneration – incorporating skin appendages and reduced fibrosis –, as well as systemic effects, such as inflammation, hypermetabolism and immunosuppression. The aim of this review is to describe well established characteristics of stem cells and to delineate new advances in the stem cell field, in the context of burn injury and wound healing.

  10. Cyclosporin in cell therapy for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen Of Lorkeers, S J; Hart, E; Tang, X L; Chamuleau, M E D; Doevendans, P A; Bolli, R; Chamuleau, S A J

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy in promoting cardiac repair in the setting of ischemic heart disease. Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that cell therapy improves cardiac function. Whether autologous or allogeneic cells should be used, and the need for immunosuppression in non-autologous settings, is a matter of debate. Cyclosporin A (CsA) is frequently used in preclinical trials to reduce cell rejection after non-autologous cell therapy. The direct effect of CsA on the function and survival of stem cells is unclear. Furthermore, the appropriate daily dosage of CsA in animal models has not been established. In this review, we discuss the pros and cons of the use of CsA on an array of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we present a small collection of data put forth by our group supporting the efficacy and safety of a specific daily CsA dosage in a pig model. PMID:24831573

  11. Embryonic and adult stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignier, Anne C; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2010-02-01

    There are many types of stem cells. All share the characteristics of being able to self-renew and to give rise to differentiated progeny. Over the last decades, great excitement has been generated by the prospect of being able to exploit these properties for the repair, improvement, and/or replacement of damaged organs. However, many hurdles, both scientific and ethical, remain in the path of using human embryonic stem cells for tissue-engineering purposes. In this report we review current strategies for isolating, enriching, and, most recently, inducing the development of human pluripotent stem cells. In so doing, we discuss the scientific and ethical issues associated with this endeavor. Finally, progress in the use of stem cells as therapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, and various neurologic and immunohematologic disorders, and as vehicles for the delivery of gene therapy, is briefly discussed. PMID:20061008

  12. How we make cell therapy in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemurro, Tiziana; Viganò, Mariele; Budelli, Silvia; Montelatici, Elisa; Lavazza, Cristiana; Marino, Luigi; Parazzi, Valentina; Lazzari, Lorenza; Giordano, Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    In the 21st century scenario, new therapeutic tools are needed to take up the social and medical challenge posed by the more and more frequent degenerative disorders and by the aging of population. The recent category of advanced therapy medicinal products has been created to comprise cellular, gene therapy, and tissue engineered products, as a new class of drugs. Their manufacture requires the same pharmaceutical framework as for conventional drugs and this means that industrial, large-scale manufacturing process has to be adapted to the peculiar characteristics of cell-containing products. Our hospital took up the challenge of this new path in the early 2000s; and herein we describe the approach we followed to set up a pharmaceutical-grade facility in a public hospital context, with the aim to share the solutions we found to make cell therapy compliant with the requirements for the production and the quality control of a high-standard medicinal product. PMID:26316716

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells: a new trend for cell therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin WEI; Xue YANG; Zhi-peng HAN; Fang-fang QU; Li SHAO; Yu-fang SHI

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs),the major stem cells for cell therapy,have been used in the clinic for approximately 10 years.From animal models to clinical trials,MSCs have afforded promise in the treatment of numerous diseases,mainly tissue injury and immune disorders.In this review,we summarize the recent opinions on methods,timing and cell sources for MSC administration in clinical applications,and provide an overview of mechanisms that are significant in MSC-mediated therapies.Although MSCs for cell therapy have been shown to be safe and effective,there are still challenges that need to be tackled before their wide application in the clinic.

  14. Large animal models for stem cell therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, John; Roberts, R. Michael; Mirochnitchenko, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    The field of regenerative medicine is approaching translation to clinical practice, and significant safety concerns and knowledge gaps have become clear as clinical practitioners are considering the potential risks and benefits of cell-based therapy. It is necessary to understand the full spectrum of stem cell actions and preclinical evidence for safety and therapeutic efficacy. The role of animal models for gaining this information has increased substantially. There is an urgent need for nov...

  15. 28. Embryonic and adult stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningson, Carl T; Stanislaus, Marisha A; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2003-02-01

    Stem cells are characterized by the ability to remain undifferentiated and to self-renew. Embryonic stem cells derived from blastocysts are pluripotent (able to differentiate into many cell types). Adult stem cells, which were traditionally thought to be monopotent multipotent, or tissue restricted, have recently also been shown to have pluripotent properties. Adult bone marrow stem cells have been shown to be capable of differentiating into skeletal muscle, brain microglia and astroglia, and hepatocytes. Stem cell lines derived from both embryonic stem and embryonic germ cells (from the embryonic gonadal ridge) are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal for long periods. Therefore embryonic stem and germ cells have been widely investigated for their potential to cure diseases by repairing or replacing damaged cells and tissues. Studies in animal models have shown that transplantation of fetal, embryonic stem, or embryonic germ cells may be able to treat some chronic diseases. In this review, we highlight recent developments in the use of stem cells as therapeutic agents for three such diseases: Diabetes, Parkinson disease, and congestive heart failure. We also discuss the potential use of stem cells as gene therapy delivery cells and the scientific and ethical issues that arise with the use of human stem cells. PMID:12592319

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells: cell biology and potential use in therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Kristiansen, Malthe; Abdallah, Basem M

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are clonogenic, non-haematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages e.g. osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages e.g. neuronal-like cells. Several methods...... are currently available for isolation of the mesenchymal stem cells based on their physical and immunological characteristics. Because of the ease of their isolation and their extensive differentiation potential, mesenchymal stem cells are among the first stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Recent...... studies have demonstrated that the life span of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro can be extended by increasing the levels of telomerase expression in the cells and thus allowing culture of large number of cells needed for therapy. In addition, it has been shown that it is possible to culture the cells...

  17. A Blueprint for Increasing the Relevance of Family Therapy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lee M.

    1991-01-01

    Notes that family therapy research and psychotherapy research in general have been criticized for their lack of relevance to clinical practice. Presents five-stage model, based on marketing and developmental perspective, that family therapy researchers can follow to increase relevance of their work for clinicians and other consumers of family…

  18. Art Therapy, Research and Evidence-Based Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Gilroy, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Art Therapy around the world is under increasing pressure to become more "evidence-based". As a result, practitioners now need to get to grips with what constitutes "evidence", how to apply research in appropriate ways and also how to contribute to the body of evidence through their own research and other related activities. Written specifically for art therapy practitioners and students, Art Therapy, Research & Evidence Based Practice traces the background to EBP, critically reviews the ...

  19. Translational Research on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Mutations in Targeted Therapy for Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yan WANG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To explore the significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene mutations in targeted therapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods: One hundred and seventeen patients with advanced NSCLC admitted in Maternal and Child Health Care Center of Zibo City from Jan., 2011 to Jan., 2014 were performed with EGFR gene detection and then divided into 3 groups according to the detecting results. Patients in group A and group B were given oral gefitinib, 250 mg/d while patients in Group C with docetaxel, 75 mg/m2. Chemotherapy for 3 groups was discontinued until severe adverse reactions or disease progression occurred, or continuous treatment was considered to be unfavorable by the doctors, or patients asked for withdrawal from the study. The relationship between clinicopathological features and EGFR mutations were analyzed. The short-term and long-term efficacy and adverse drug reactions of 3 groups were observed. Results: Of the 31 cases with EGFR mutations, there were 16 cases (51.6% of mutations in exon 19, 14 (45.2% in exon 21 and 2 (6.45% in exon 18. No EGFR mutation was found in exon 20. EGFR mutations were associated with histological types of tumors and whether patients were smoking. The median follow-up time was 26 months and 62 patients were dead. None of CR was in 3 groups. The disease control rate (DCR in Group A was obviously higher than that in Group B ( χ 2 =9.382, P=0.002, which was also higher in Group C than that in Group B ( χ 2 =4.674, P=0.031. The 1-year survival rate in Group A was obviously higher than that in group B and group C ( P <0.05, or P<0.01 , which was prominently higher in Group C than that in Group B ( P <0.01 . The median progression-free survival (PFS and median overall survival (OS were the longest in Group A was and the shortest in Group B. The adverse reactions of two kinds of

  20. Stem cell therapy for retinal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose Mauricio Garcia,; Luisa Mendon?a; Rodrigo Brant; Murilo Abud; Caio Regatieri; Bruno Diniz

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss about current knowledgeabout stem cell (SC) therapy in the treatment of retinaldegeneration. Both human embryonic stem cell andinduced pluripotent stem cell has been growth inculture for a long time, and started to be explored inthe treatment of blinding conditions. The Food andDrug Administration, recently, has granted clinical trialsusing SC retinal therapy to treat complex disorders, asStargardt's dystrophy, and patients with geographicatrophy, providing good outcomes. This study'sintent is to overview the critical regeneration of thesubretinal anatomy through retinal pigment epitheliumtransplantation, with the goal of reestablish importantpathways from the retina to the occipital cortex of thebrain, as well as the differentiation from pluripotentquiescent SC to adult retina, and its relationshipwith a primary retinal injury, different techniques oftransplantation, management of immune rejection andtumorigenicity, its potential application in improvingpatients' vision, and, finally, approaching future directionsand challenges for the treatment of several conditions.

  1. Ophthalmologic stem cell transplantation therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Blenkinsop, Timothy A.; Corneo, Barbara; Temple, Sally; Stern, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    Vision loss is a major social issue, with more than 20 million people over the age of 18 years affected in the USA alone. Loss of vision is feared more than premature death or cardiovascular disease, according to a recent Society for Consumer Research group survey. The annual direct cost of medical care for the most prevalent eye disease, age-related macular degeneration, was estimated at US$255 billion in 2010 with an additional economic impact of US$88 billion due to lost productivity and t...

  2. CAR-T Cell Therapy for Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Carlos A; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas arise from clonal expansions of B, T, or NK cells at different stages of differentiation. Because they occur in the immunocyte-rich lymphoid tissues, they are easily accessible to antibodies and cell-based immunotherapy. Expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) on T cells is a means of combining the antigen-binding site of a monoclonal antibody with the activating machinery of a T cell, enabling antigen recognition independent of major histocompatibility complex restriction, while retaining the desirable antitumor properties of a T cell. Here, we discuss the basic design of CARs and their potential advantages and disadvantages over other immune therapies for lymphomas. We review current clinical trials in the field and consider strategies to improve the in vivo function and safety of immune cells expressing CARs. The ultimate driver of CAR development and implementation for lymphoma will be the demonstration of their ability to safely and cost-effectively cure these malignancies. PMID:26332003

  3. Research needs for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key issues and questions addressed by the workshop related to optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), in general, and to the possibility of success of the present BNCT trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in particular. Both trials use nuclear fission reactors as neutron sources for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme (BNL) and of deep seated melanoma (MIT). Presentations and discussions focussed on optimal boron-labeled compounds, mainly for brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme, and the best mode of compound delivery to the tumor. Also, optimizing neutron irradiation with dose delivery to the tumor cells and the issues of dosimetry of BNCT especially in the brain were discussed. Planning of treatment and of follow-up of patients, coordination of BNCT at various treatment sites, and the potential of delivering BNCT to various types of cancer with an appropriately tailored protocol were additional issues. The need for multicentric interdisciplinary cooperation among the different medical specialties was highlighted

  4. Research needs for neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Key issues and questions addressed by the workshop related to optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), in general, and to the possibility of success of the present BNCT trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in particular. Both trials use nuclear fission reactors as neutron sources for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme (BNL) and of deep seated melanoma (MIT). Presentations and discussions focussed on optimal boron-labeled compounds, mainly for brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme, and the best mode of compound delivery to the tumor. Also, optimizing neutron irradiation with dose delivery to the tumor cells and the issues of dosimetry of BNCT especially in the brain were discussed. Planning of treatment and of follow-up of patients, coordination of BNCT at various treatment sites, and the potential of delivering BNCT to various types of cancer with an appropriately tailored protocol were additional issues. The need for multicentric interdisciplinary cooperation among the different medical specialties was highlighted.

  5. Human parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells:one potential resource for cell therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells derived from somatic cells through such processes as nuclear transfer or induced pluripotent stem(iPS) cells present an important model for biomedical research and provide potential resources for cell replacement therapies.However,the overall efficiency of the conversional nuclear transfer is very low and the safety issue remains a major concern for iPS cells.Embryonic stem cells(ESCs) generated from parthenogenetic embryos are one attractive alternative as a source of histocompatible cells and tissues for cell therapy.Recent studies on human parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells(hPG ESCs) have revealed that these ESCs are very similar to the hESCs derived from IVF or in vivo produced blastocysts in gene expression and other characteristics,but full differentiation and development potential of these hPG ESCs have to be further investigated before clinical research and therapeutic interventions.To generate various pluripotent stem cells,diverse reprogramming techniques and approaches will be developed and integrated.This may help elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying reprogramming and stem cell biology,and ultimately benefit cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

  6. Human parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells: one potential resource for cell therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Jie; HU WanWan; SHENG Chao; YU Yang; ZHOU Qi

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells derived from somatic cells through such processes as nuclear transfer or in duced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells present an important model for biomedical research and provide potential resources for cell replacement therapies. However, the overall efficiency of the conversional nuclear transfer is very low and the safety issue remains a major concern for iPS cells. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated from parthenogenetic embryos are one attractive alternative as a source of histocompatible cells and tissues for cell therapy. Recent studies on human parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells (hPG ESCs) have revealed that these ESCs are very similar to the hESCs derived from IVF or in vivo produced blastocysts in gene expression and other characteristics, but full differentiation and development potential of these hPG ESCs have to be further investigated before clinical research and therapeutic interventions. To generate various pluripotent stem cells, diverse reprogramming techniques and approaches will be developed and integrated. This may help elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying reprogramming and stem cell biology, and ultimately benefit cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

  7. Stem Cell Therapy Shows Promise Against Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158122.html Stem Cell Therapy Shows Promise Against Heart Failure A second ... 4, 2016 MONDAY, April 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stem cell therapy shows promise for people battling heart failure, ...

  8. Application of Novel Accelerator Research for Particle Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerke, Henrik Hemmestad

    2014-01-01

    This thesis seeks to review the latest trends in hadron therapy devices, and evaluate the potential of novel, researched accelerator concepts for future application. Although the clinical benefits of hadron therapy over photon therapy is unproven or disputed for many cancer types, there are several cases where hadron therapy presents a superior option. Many governments and medical institutions are planning or already executing development of new hadron treatment facilities. However, the highe...

  9. Radiation therapy for intracranial germ cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Shingo; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Tsuchiya, Miwako; Arai, Masahiko; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Niibe, Hideo; Tamura, Masaru

    1988-04-01

    The results of radiation therapy in 31 patients with intracranial germ cell tumors have been analyzed. The five-year survival rates were 70.1 % for germinomas and 38.1 % for teratomas. Three patients with germinoma have since died of spinal seeding. The prophylactic irradiation of the spinal canal has been found effective in protecting spinal seeding, since no relapse of germinoma has been observed in cases that received entire neuraxis iradiation, whereas teratomas and marker (AFP, HCG) positive tumors did not respond favorably to radiation therapy, and the cause of death in these patients has been local failure. Long-term survivors over 3 years after radiation therapy have been determined as having a good quality of life.

  10. Multisystemic Therapy: Clinical Foundations and Research Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W. Henggeler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Multisystemic therapy (MST is an intensive family and community-based treatment for adolescents presenting serious antisocial behavior and their families. Using a home-based model of service delivery to overcome barriers to service access and a strong quality assurance system to promote treatment fidelity, MST therapists address known risk factors (i.e., at individual, family, peer, school, and community levels strategically and comprehensively. The family is viewed as central to achieving favorable outcomes, and mediation research supports the emphasis of MST on promoting family functioning as the key mechanism of clinical change. Importantly, 22 MST outcome studies have been published, many of which are independent randomized clinical trials, and the vast majority, including those conducted in Europe, support the capacity of MST to reduce youth antisocial behavior and out-of-home placements. Such outcomes, combined with the advocacy of many juvenile justice stakeholders, have led to the transport of MST programs to more than 500 sites, including 10 nations in Europe.

  11. New advances in the mesenchymal stem cells therapy against skin flaps necrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Gui; Zhang; Xiu-Fa; Tang

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs), multipotential cells that reside within the bone marrow, can be induced to differentiate into various cells, such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, vascular endothelial progenitor cells, and other cell types. MSCs are being widely studied as potential cell therapy agents due to their angiogenic properties, which have been well established by in vitro and in vivo researches. Within this context, MSCs therapy appears to hold substantial promise, particularly in the treatment of conditions involving skin grafts, pedicle flaps, as well as free flaps described in literatures. The purpose of this review is to report the new advances and mechanisms underlying MSCs therapy against skin flaps necrosis.

  12. Stem cells - biological update and cell therapy progress

    OpenAIRE

    GIRLOVANU, MIHAI; Susman, Sergiu; Soritau, Olga; RUS-CIUCA, DAN; MELINCOVICI, CARMEN; CONSTANTIN, ANNE-MARIE; Carmen Mihaela MIHU

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the advances in stem cell research have suggested that the human body may have a higher plasticity than it was originally expected. Until now, four categories of stem cells were isolated and cultured in vivo: embryonic stem cells, fetal stem cells, adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Although multiple studies were published, several issues concerning the stem cells are still debated, such as: the molecular mechanisms of differentiation, the methods t...

  13. Mantle cell lymphoma: Frontline and salvage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaguera, Jorge E

    2008-10-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a therapeutic challenge because of its lower cure rate when compared with other lymphomas such as diffuse large cell lymphoma. The current emphasis in the treatment of newly diagnosed MCL has been on intensifying chemotherapy, but there is no consensus on the need to consolidate with autologous stem cell transplantation. These approaches, however, have not resulted in a cure. Newer strategies include the use of models to aid in tailoring therapy. Likewise, autologous stem cell consolidation does not cure relapsed disease. Because of its known graft-versus-lymphoma effect, allogeneic stem cell transplantation offers a potentially curative option for relapsed MCL. New insights into resistance pathways and new drugs created to inhibit them offer great promise in the treatment of newly diagnosed and previously treated MCL. PMID:20425467

  14. Steps in Researching the Music in Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2007-01-01

    The chapter introduces a generic flowchart + step-by-step guide for microanalysis of music (compositions and improvisations) in music therapy.......The chapter introduces a generic flowchart + step-by-step guide for microanalysis of music (compositions and improvisations) in music therapy....

  15. Renal Preservation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal preservation therapy has been a promising concept for the treatment of localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC for 20 years. Nowadays partial nephrectomy (PN is well accepted to treat the localized RCC and the oncological control is proved to be the same as the radical nephrectomy (RN. Under the result of well oncological control, minimal invasive method gains more popularity than the open PN, like laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN and robot assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (RPN. On the other hand, thermoablative therapy and cryoablation also play an important role in the renal preservation therapy to improve the patient procedural tolerance. Novel modalities, but limited to small number of patients, include high-intensity ultrasound (HIFU, radiosurgery, microwave therapy (MWT, laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT, and pulsed cavitational ultrasound (PCU. Although initial results are encouraging, their real clinical roles are still under evaluation. On the other hand, active surveillance (AS has also been advocated by some for patients who are unfit for surgery. It is reasonable to choose the best therapeutic method among varieties of treatment modalities according to patients' age, physical status, and financial aid to maximize the treatment effect among cancer control, patient morbidity, and preservation of renal function.

  16. In vivo tracking for cell therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of a particular cellular therapy regime requires the therapeutic agent to migrate expeditiously to the intended target in sufficient numbers and to provoke a desirable response. There are many variables associated with the production, administration and host that need to be investigated to maximize the resulting therapeutic benefit. The large number of factors which may contribute to, or detract from, treatment efficacy can make therapy optimization an arduous procedure. Direct visualization of in vivo migration patterns using nuclear medicine techniques greatly assists the appraisal of the multitude of variables. Conventional radionuclide cell labeling is a proven, simple and sensitive technique which can provide whole body biodistribution information. Labeling with a PET isotope offers greater sensitivity, much improved 3-dimensional resolution and quantification. In general, current efforts are increasingly concentrating on this technology. Imaging studies can supply definitive evidence of successful targeting and allow quantification of the degree of migration to a particular site. Incorporating tracking studies into clinical trials of cell-based therapy at the earliest stage can provide proof of mechanism of the therapy and permit evaluation of the many contributory variables, even on a patient-by-patient basis

  17. Stem Cell Therapy in Pediatric Neurological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Farnaz Torabian; Arvin Aghayi Nejad; Arash Akhavan Rezayat; Mehran Beiraghi Toosi; Ali Reza Attaei Nakhaie; Hamid Reza Rahimi

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric neurological disorders including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury are defined as a heterogenous group of diseases, of which some are known to be genetic. The two significant features represented for stem cells, leading to distinguish them from other cell types are addressed as below: they can renew themselves besides the ability to differentiate into cells with special function as their potency. Researches about the role of stem cells in repair of damaged t...

  18. Stem cell research in China

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Lianming; Li, Lingsong; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2007-01-01

    In the past 5 years, China has increased its efforts in the field of stem cell research and practice. Basic research mainly focuses on bone marrow and embryonic stem cells. Clinical applications of stem cells in the treatment of acute heart failure, acute liver failure and lower limb ischaemia have been reported by many hospitals. China enacted its ‘Ethical Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research’ in 2003. At present, China has the most liberal and favourable environments for human ...

  19. Cell therapies for pancreatic beta-cell replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okere, Bernard; Lucaccioni, Laura; Dominici, Massimo; Iughetti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment approach for type 1 diabetes is based on daily insulin injections, combined with blood glucose monitoring. However, administration of exogenous insulin fails to mimic the physiological activity of the islet, therefore diabetes often progresses with the development of serious complications such as kidney failure, retinopathy and vascular disease. Whole pancreas transplantation is associated with risks of major invasive surgery along with side effects of immunosuppressive therapy to avoid organ rejection. Replacement of pancreatic beta-cells would represent an ideal treatment that could overcome the above mentioned therapeutic hurdles. In this context, transplantation of islets of Langerhans is considered a less invasive procedure although long-term outcomes showed that only 10 % of the patients remained insulin independent five years after the transplant. Moreover, due to shortage of organs and the inability of islet to be expanded ex vivo, this therapy can be offered to a very limited number of patients. Over the past decade, cellular therapies have emerged as the new frontier of treatment of several diseases. Furthermore the advent of stem cells as renewable source of cell-substitutes to replenish the beta cell population, has blurred the hype on islet transplantation. Breakthrough cellular approaches aim to generate stem-cell-derived insulin producing cells, which could make diabetes cellular therapy available to millions. However, to date, stem cell therapy for diabetes is still in its early experimental stages. This review describes the most reliable sources of stem cells that have been developed to produce insulin and their most relevant experimental applications for the cure of diabetes. PMID:27400873

  20. Stem cell-based therapies for HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, Olivier; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-08-01

    One of the current focuses in HIV/AIDS research is to develop a novel therapeutic strategy that can provide a life-long remission of HIV/AIDS without daily drug treatment and, ultimately, a cure for HIV/AIDS. Hematopoietic stem cell-based anti-HIV gene therapy aims to reconstitute the patient immune system by transplantation of genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells with anti-HIV genes. Hematopoietic stem cells can self-renew, proliferate and differentiate into mature immune cells. In theory, anti-HIV gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells can continuously provide HIV-resistant immune cells throughout the life of a patient. Therefore, hematopoietic stem cell-based anti-HIV gene therapy has a great potential to provide a life-long remission of HIV/AIDS by a single treatment. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the recent progress of developing anti-HIV genes, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells, engraftment and reconstitution of anti-HIV gene-modified immune cells, HIV inhibition in in vitro and in vivo animal models, and in human clinical trials. PMID:27151309

  1. The Importance of Research in Educating About Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara L. Wheeler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this "Essay" article, the author explores some ways in which music therapy research is important in educating people—music therapists and those outside of music therapy—about music therapy. There are different levels and types of research, and different levels are appropriate at different points in the development of music therapy in a country. However, some type of music therapy research is important for the development of music therapy in all cases and in all situations and all countries. The author suggests that music therapy research may be used to: (a describe a situation, (b identify and examine processes and causal factors, (c provide evidence about outcomes, or (d change a situation. Information on music therapy research for each purpose is provide. The article examines how all of these may be used to educate people about music therapy. It is suggested that music therapists in different countries have different needs for research and that one thing that leads to these variations is how highly developed music therapy is in the country.

  2. Role of Vibrational Spectroscopy in Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    AKSOY, Ceren; Severcan, Feride

    2012-01-01

    Recent researches have mainly displayed the significant role of stem cells in tissue renewal and homeostasis with their unique capacity to develop different cell types. These findings have clarified the importance of stem cells to improve the effectiveness of any cell therapy for regenerative medicine. Identification of purity and differentiation stages of stem cells are the greatest challenges of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. The existing methods to carefully monitor and chara...

  3. Renal Preservation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yichun Chiu; Allen W. Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Renal preservation therapy has been a promising concept for the treatment of localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) for 20 years. Nowadays partial nephrectomy (PN) is well accepted to treat the localized RCC and the oncological control is proved to be the same as the radical nephrectomy (RN). Under the result of well oncological control, minimal invasive method gains more popularity than the open PN, like laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) and robot assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy...

  4. Targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, P H; Chaganti, R.S.K.; Motzer, R J

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has historically been refractory to cytotoxic and hormonal agents; only interleukin 2 and interferon alpha provide response in a minority of patients. We reviewed RCC biology and explored the ways in which this understanding led to development of novel, effective targeted therapies. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and novel agents are all being studied, and phase II studies show promising activity of sunitinib, sorafenib a...

  5. Stem Cell Therapy for Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Puliafico, Shannon B.; Penn, Marc S.; Silver, Kevin H.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in Americans. After myocardial infarction, significant ventricular damage persists despite timely reperfusion and pharmacological management. Treatment is limited, as current modalities do not cure this damage. In the past decade, stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising therapeutic solution to restore myocardial function. Clinical trials have demonstrated safety and beneficial effects in patients suffering from acute myocardial infarc...

  6. Stem cell therapy: A challenge to periodontist

    OpenAIRE

    Jayashree A Mudda; Monika Bajaj

    2011-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease which manifests clinically as loss of supporting periodontal tissues including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone, and periodontal therapy is aimed at achieving complete regeneration of these structures. To date, this goal has been tried to accomplish using various bone grafts, growth factors, and barrier membranes. Stem cells are the most fascinating area of biology today and have been used clinically in the field of medicine to treat m...

  7. Progress on gene therapy, cell therapy, and pharmacological strategies toward the treatment of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Pradeep; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George; Bachtarzi, Houria

    2015-05-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a muscle-specific, late-onset degenerative disorder whereby muscles of the eyes (causing ptosis), throat (leading to dysphagia), and limbs (causing proximal limb weakness) are mostly affected. The disease is characterized by a mutation in the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear-1 (PABPN1) gene, resulting in a short GCG expansion in the polyalanine tract of PABPN1 protein. Accumulation of filamentous intranuclear inclusions in affected skeletal muscle cells constitutes the pathological hallmark of OPMD. This review highlights the current translational research advances in the treatment of OPMD. In vitro and in vivo disease models are described. Conventional and experimental therapeutic approaches are discussed with emphasis on novel molecular therapies including the use of intrabodies, gene therapy, and myoblast transfer therapy. PMID:25860803

  8. Stem cell therapy independent of stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Techung

    2012-12-26

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is entering a new era shifting the focus from initial feasibility study to optimization of therapeutic efficacy. However, how MSC therapy facilitates tissue regeneration remains incompletely characterized. Consistent with the emerging notion that secretion of multiple growth factors/cytokines (trophic factors) by MSC provides the underlying tissue regenerative mechanism, the recent study by Bai et al demonstrated a critical therapeutic role of MSC-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in two animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS), which is a progressive autoimmune disorder caused by damage to the myelin sheath and loss of oligodendrocytes. Although current MS therapies are directed toward attenuation of the immune response, robust repair of myelin sheath likely requires a regenerative approach focusing on long-term replacement of the lost oligodendrocytes. This approach appears feasible because adult organs contain various populations of multipotent resident stem/progenitor cells that may be activated by MSC trophic factors as demonstrated by Bai et al This commentary highlights and discusses the major findings of their studies, emphasizing the anti-inflammatory function and trophic cross-talk mechanisms mediated by HGF and other MSC-derived trophic factors in sustaining the treatment benefits. Identification of multiple functionally synergistic trophic factors, such as HGF and vascular endothelial growth factor, can eventually lead to the development of efficacious cell-free therapeutic regimens targeting a broad spectrum of degenerative conditions. PMID:23516128

  9. Concentrator silicon cell research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Solar Photovoltaic Lab.

    1992-04-01

    This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

  10. Muscling up damaged hearts through cell therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi Van Dang

    2006-01-01

    @@ Molecular and cellular processes gleaned from the most fundamental of biomedical studies are now harnessed for their potential healing properties. In the US and throughout the world, millions of patients suffer from myocardial infarction and many succumb to the morbidity and mortality of the ensuing cardiac failure, a protracted condition in need of healing. While pharmacological agents have been the mainstay intervention that ameliorates cardiac failure through increased contractility or reduction of cardiac workload, these agents do not inherently heal the wounds inflicted by poor perfusion of the affected cardiac tissue.Cell therapy, however, holds the promise of repleting the damage heart with new contractile cells that can be engineered to secrete concoctions that promote healing by recruiting new blood vessel development or angiogenesis.Such cell therapeutic promise has already been fulfilled for many decades for hematological diseases through transplantation of bone marrow stem cells, which are now more broadly implicated for their healing potential of other tissues.

  11. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrefai MT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad T Alrefai,1–3 Divya Murali,4 Arghya Paul,4 Khalid M Ridwan,1,2 John M Connell,1,2 Dominique Shum-Tim1,2 1Division of Cardiac Surgery, 2Division of Surgical Research, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Abstract: Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. Keywords: stem cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac surgery, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, heart, scaffolds, organoids, cell sheet and tissue engineering

  12. Stem cell hype: media portrayal of therapy translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenova, Kalina; Caulfield, Timothy

    2015-03-11

    In this Perspective, we examine the portrayal of translational stem cell research in major daily newspapers in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom between 2010 and 2013, focusing on how timelines for stem cell therapies were represented before and after Geron terminated its pioneering stem cell program. Our content analysis reveals that press coverage has shifted from ethical, legal, and social issues to clinical translation issues, and highly optimistic timelines were provided with no substantial change in representation over time. Scientists were the dominant voice with respect to translation timelines. The findings raise questions about the degree to which the media's overly optimistic slant fosters unrealistic expectations regarding the speed of clinical translation and highlight the ethical responsibility of stem cell researchers as public communicators. PMID:25761887

  13. Commercialization and Stem Cell Research: A Review of Emerging Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Burningham, Sarah; Ollenberger, Adam; Caulfield, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell researchers face pressure to develop therapies that will reach the clinic within a short period of time. Yet, this pressure may be unrealistic, as bringing stem cell innovations to the clinic will likely require significant time and financial investment. In a variety of biomedical fields, some evidence suggests that commercialization pressures and strategies may negatively impact research. These negative impacts may also be felt in the field of stem cell research, unless the challen...

  14. [Current cell therapy strategies for repairing the central nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Féron, F

    2007-09-01

    One of the chief contemporary goals of neurologists and neuroscientists is to find a way to overcome the debilitating effects of brain diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases. Since very few molecules have been found to be efficient in curing the patients and even halting the progression of the symptoms, cell therapy is now seen as an attractive alternative. Two therapeutic strategies are currently under investigation: i) the "substitution" strategy, based on grafts of cells capable of differentiating in the appropriate cells and restoring lost functions and ii) the "neuroprotective" or "conservative" strategy aiming to increase the resistance of spared cells to the toxicity of their environment and to reinforce the body's own mechanisms of healing. Twenty years ago, foetal neuroblasts were the first cells to be transplanted in the brains of patients with Parkinson's or Huntington disease. A phase II clinical trial is presently conducted in France for the latter disorder. However, the numerous ethical and technical issues raised by the use of embryonic and foetal cells have directed the focus of clinicians and researchers towards substitute cell types. In this review, we summarise the main findings of the most recent basic studies and clinical trials based on: i) the grafting of surrogate adult cells such as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and olfactory ensheathing cells; ii) the potential therapeutic applications of neuropoiesis - the persistent neurogenesis in the brain - as a source for tissue engraftment and as self-repair by a person's own indigenous population of pluripotent cells and iii) immune-based therapy (autologous activated macrophages and T cell vaccination) as well as administration of immunomodulatory molecules. Unexpectedly, it has been found that undifferentiated adult stem cells can display immune-like functions when they home in on an inflamed brain area while immune cells and immunosuppressors can improve functional and

  15. Investigation progress of imaging techniques monitoring stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently stem cell therapy has showed potential clinical application in diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, malignant tumor and trauma. Efficient techniques of non-invasively monitoring stem cell transplants will accelerate the development of stem cell therapies. This paper briefly reviews the clinical practice of stem cell, in addition, makes a review of monitoring methods including magnetic resonance and radionuclide imaging which have been used in stem cell therapy. (authors)

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyles CC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cody C Wyles,1 Matthew T Houdek,2 Atta Behfar,3 Rafael J Sierra,21Mayo Medical School, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 3Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Osteoarthritis (OA is a painful chronic condition with a significant impact on quality of life. The societal burden imposed by OA is increasing in parallel with the aging population; however, no therapies have demonstrated efficacy in preventing the progression of this degenerative joint disease. Current mainstays of therapy include activity modification, conservative pain management strategies, weight loss, and if necessary, replacement of the affected joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a multipotent endogenous population of progenitors capable of differentiation to musculoskeletal tissues. MSCs have a well-documented immunomodulatory role, managing the inflammatory response primarily through paracrine signaling. Given these properties, MSCs have been proposed as a potential regenerative cell therapy source for patients with OA. Research efforts are focused on determining the ideal source for derivation, as MSCs are native to several tissues. Furthermore, optimizing the mode of delivery remains a challenge both for appropriate localization of MSCs and for directed guidance toward stemming the local inflammatory process and initiating a regenerative response. Scaffolds and matrices with growth factor adjuvants may prove critical in this effort. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of MSC-based therapeutics for OA and discuss potential barriers that must be overcome for successful implementation of cell-based therapy as a routine treatment strategy in orthopedics.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cell, osteoarthritis, treatment, regenerative medicine, cell therapy

  17. Summit on cell therapy for cancer: The importance of the interaction of multiple disciplines to advance clinical therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroncek David F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The field of cellular therapy of cancer is moving quickly and the issues involved with its advancement are complex and wide ranging. The growing clinical applications and success of adoptive cellular therapy of cancer has been due to the rapid evolution of immunology, cancer biology, gene therapy and stem cell biology and the translation of advances in these fields from the research laboratory to the clinic. The continued development of this field is dependent on the exchange of ideas across these diverse disciplines, the testing of new ideas in the research laboratory and in animal models, the development of new cellular therapies and GMP methods to produce these therapies, and the testing of new adoptive cell therapies in clinical trials. The Summit on Cell Therapy for Cancer to held on November 1 and 2, 2011 at the National Institutes of Health (NIH campus will include a mix of perspectives, concepts and ideas related to adoptive cellular therapy that are not normally presented together at any single meeting. This novel assembly will generate new ideas and new collaborations and possibly increase the rate of advancement of this field.

  18. Stem cell therapy in the management of shoulder rotatorcuff disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are frequent shoulder problems thatare usually dealt with surgical repair. Despite improvedsurgical techniques, the tendon-to-bone healing rateis unsatisfactory due to difficulties in restoring thedelicate transitional tissue between bone and tendon.It is essential to understand the molecular mechanismsthat determine this failure. The study of the molecularenvironment during embryogenesis and during normalhealing after injury is key in devising strategies to geta successful repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) candifferentiate into different mesodermal tissues and havea strong paracrine, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatoryand angiogenic potential. Stem cell therapy is thus apotentially effective therapy to enhance rotator cuffhealing. Promising results have been reported with theuse of autologous MSC of different origins in animalstudies they have shown to have better healing properties,increasing the amount of fibrocartilage formationand improving the orientation of fibrocartilage fibers withless immunologic response and reduced lymphocyteinfiltration. All these changes lead to an increase inbiomechanical strength. However, animal research is stillinconclusive and more experimental studies are neededbefore human application. Future directions includeexpanded stem cell therapy in combination with growthfactors or different scaffolds as well as new stem celltypes and gene therapy.

  19. New Insights into Diabetes Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysy, Philippe A; Corritore, Elisa; Sokal, Etienne M

    2016-05-01

    Since insulin discovery, islet transplantation was the first protocol to show the possibility to cure patients with type 1 diabetes using low-risk procedures. The scarcity of pancreas donors triggered a burst of studies focused on the production of new β cells in vitro. These were rapidly dominated by pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) demonstrating diabetes-reversal potential in diabetic mice. Subsequent enthusiasm fostered a clinical trial with immunoisolated embryonic-derived pancreatic progenitors. Yet safety is the Achilles' heel of PSCs, and a whole branch of β cell engineering medicine focuses on transdifferentiation of adult pancreatic cells. New data showed the possibility to chemically stimulate acinar or α cells to undergo β cell neogenesis and provide opportunities to intervene in situ without the need for a transplant, at least after weighing benefits against systemic adverse effects. The current studies suggested the pancreas as a reservoir of facultative progenitors (e.g., in the duct lining) could be exploited ex vivo for expansion and β cell differentiation in timely fashion and without the hurdles of PSC use. Diabetes cell therapy is thus a growing field not only with great potential but also with many pitfalls to overcome for becoming fully envisioned as a competitor to the current treatment standards. PMID:26983626

  20. Stem Cell Therapy for Congestive Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunduz E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHeart failure is a major cardiovascular health problem. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of congestive heart failure (CHF [1]. Cardiac transplantation remains the most effective long-term treatment option, however is limited primarily by donor availability, rejection and infections. Mechanical circulatory support has its own indications and limitations [2]. Therefore, there is a need to develop more effective therapeutic strategies.Recently, regenerative medicine has received considerable scientific attention in the cardiovascular arena. We report here our experience demonstrating the beneficial effects of cardiac stem cell therapy on left ventricular functions in a patient with Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL who developed CHF due to ischemic heart disease during the course of lymphoma treatment. Case reportA 58-year-old male with relapsed HL was referred to our bone marrow transplantation unit in October 2009. He was given 8 courses of combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, and dacarbazine (ABVD between June 2008 and February 2009 and achieved complete remission. However, his disease relapsed 3 months after completing the last cycle of ABVD and he was decided to be treated with DHAP (cisplatin, cytarabine, dexamethasone followed autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT. After the completion of first course of DHAP regimen, he developed acute myocardial infarction (AMI and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG was performed. After his cardiac function stabilized, 3 additional courses of DHAP were given and he was referred to our centre for consideration of autologous SCT. Computed tomography scans obtained after chemotherapy confirmed complete remission. Stem cells were collected from peripheral blood after mobilization with 10 µg/kg/day granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF subcutaneously. Collection was started on the fifth day of G-CSF and performed for 3 consecutive days. Flow cytometric

  1. Kallikrein-kinin in stem cell therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julie; Chao; Grant; Bledsoe; Lee; Chao

    2014-01-01

    The tissue kallikrein-kinin system exerts a wide spectrum of biological activities in the cardiovascular, renal and central nervous systems. Tissue kallikrein-kinin modulates the proliferation, viability, mobility and functional activity of certain stem cell populations, namely mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs), endothelial progenitor cells(EPCs), mononuclear cell subsets and neural stem cells. Stimulation of these stem cells by tissue kallikrein-kinin may lead to protection against renal, cardiovascular and neural damage by inhibiting apoptosis, inflammation, fibrosis and oxidative stress and promoting neovascularization. Moreover, MSCs and EPCs genetically modified with tissue kallikrein are resistant to hypoxia- and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, and offer enhanced protective actions in animal models of heart and kidney injury and hindlimb ischemia. In addition, activation of the plasma kallikrein-kinin system promotes EPC recruitment to the inflamed synovium of arthritic rats. Conversely, cleaved high molecular weight kininogen, a product of plasma kallikrein, reduces the viability and vasculogenic activity of EPCs. Therefore, kallikrein-kinin provides a new approach in enhancing the efficacy of stem cell therapy for human diseases.

  2. Yoga research and therapy in India

    OpenAIRE

    Shirley Telles

    2012-01-01

    Yoga was originally intended for spiritual growth. However, nowadays there is an increasing trend to use yoga as an add-on-therapy. In India it is believed that all diseases arise as a result of conflict between our instinct and our intellect1. This is also important in using yoga to promote positive health and prevent disease. A number of examples are cited here. Healthy children were given yoga and physical therapy and their physical fitness, cognitive functiones and emotional well being we...

  3. Chronic Liver Disease: Stem Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal MA Hassan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver diseases (CLD affect hundreds of millions of patientsworldwide. Stem Cells (SCs therapy to treat chronic liver diseasesis resorted and is considered as the dream of the future. AlthoughSCs are a promising means for treatment of liver diseases, studiesare still at the beginning of this era. SCs are undifferentiatedcells capable of renewing themselves throughout their life and ofgenerating one or more types of differentiated cells. Different typesof SCs with hepatic differentiation potential are theoretically eligiblefor liver cell replacement. These include Embryonic and fetal liverSCs, induced pluripotent SCs, hepatoblasts, annex SCs (pluripotentSCs obtained from umbilical cord and umbilical cord blood,placenta and amniotic fluid, and adult SCs, such hepatic progenitorcells, hematopoietic SCs, and mesenchymal stem cell. The optimalSCs delivery route should be easy to perform, less invasive andtraumatic, minimum side effects, and with high cells survival rate.Liver SCs can be transplanted through several routes: Intraperitonealand percutaneous intrahepatic artery catheterization in acute liverfailure, and umbilical vein catheterization, percutaneous intrahepaticroute, and portal vein or intrahepatic artery catheterization inmetabolic liver diseases. Whatever the source or delivery route ofSCs, how they can be manipulated for therapeutic interventionsin a variety of hepatic diseases is of course of great interest infuture studies. Although all clinical trials to date have shown someimprovement in liver function and CD34+ cells have been usedsafely for bone marrow transplantation for over 20 years, onlyrandomized controlled clinical trials will be able to fully assess thepotential clinical benefit of adult SCs therapy for patients with CLD.

  4. Using mixed methods in music therapy health care research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    »Mixed methods« (or »multiple methods») is a fairly new concept in music therapy research. It is inspired by recent methodological developments in social science, covering the interaction of quantitative and qualitative methods in one and the same research study. Mixed methods are not the same as...... the diversity or pluralism of methods advocated by many scholars who are critical towards the principles of evidence-based medicine. This article presents a concrete example of mixed methods in music therapy research: a psycho-social study of music therapy with female cancer survivors. Problems...

  5. Research progress of adult cardiac stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan ZHENG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view is that the heart is a terminal organ. This dogma, however, has been widely questioned with the discovery of adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs. Since CSCs have a highly self-renewal capacity and specific myocardial differentiation potential, nowadays they have been regarded as the most promising type of stem cells used in ischemic heart disease and other replacement therapy of end-stage heart disease. The present paper will focus on current results of scientific research on human adult CSCs and epicardium-derived cell (EPDC, as well as the treatment strategies in the field of cardiac regeneration, and the problems and prospect disclosed in the research.

  6. Bioprinting for stem cell research

    OpenAIRE

    Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest to apply bioprinting techniques to stem cell research. Several bioprinting methods have been developed utilizing acoustics, piezoelectricity, and lasers to deposit living cells onto receiving substrates. Using these technologies, spatially defined gradients of immobilized proteins can be engineered to direct stem cell differentiation into multiple subpopulations of different lineages. Stem cells can also be patterned in a high-throughput manner onto...

  7. Optimizing autologous cell grafts to improve stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psatha, Nikoletta; Karponi, Garyfalia; Yannaki, Evangelia

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, stem cell gene therapy has achieved unprecedented curative outcomes for several genetic disorders. Despite the unequivocal success, clinical gene therapy still faces challenges. Genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells are particularly vulnerable to attenuation of their repopulating capacity once exposed to culture conditions, ultimately leading to low engraftment levels posttransplant. This becomes of particular importance when transduction rates are low or/and competitive transplant conditions are generated by reduced-intensity conditioning in the absence of a selective advantage of the transduced over the unmodified cells. These limitations could partially be overcome by introducing megadoses of genetically modified CD34(+) cells into conditioned patients or by transplanting hematopoietic stem cells hematopoietic stem cells with high engrafting and repopulating potential. On the basis of the lessons gained from cord blood transplantation, we summarize the most promising approaches to date of increasing either the numbers of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation or/and their engraftability, as a platform toward the optimization of engineered stem cell grafts. PMID:27106799

  8. Stem Cell-Based Cell Therapy for Glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiling Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomerulonephritis (GN, characterized by immune-mediated inflammatory changes in the glomerular, is a common cause of end stage renal disease. Therapeutic options for glomerulonephritis applicable to all cases mainly include symptomatic treatment and strategies to delay progression. In the attempt to yield innovative interventions fostering the limited capability of regeneration of renal tissue after injury and the uncontrolled pathological process by current treatments, stem cell-based therapy has emerged as novel therapy for its ability to inhibit inflammation and promote regeneration. Many basic and clinical studies have been performed that support the ability of various stem cell populations to ameliorate glomerular injury and improve renal function. However, there is a long way before putting stem cell-based therapy into clinical practice. In the present article, we aim to review works performed with respect to the use of stem cell of different origins in GN, and to discuss the potential mechanism of therapeutic effect and the challenges for clinical application of stem cells.

  9. Future perspectives of cell-based therapy for intervertebral disc disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Daisuke

    2008-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is a primary cause of low back pain and has a high societal cost. Research on cell-based therapies for intervertebral disc disease is emerging, along with the interest in biological therapy to treat disc disease without reducing the mobility of the spinal motion segment. Results from animal models have shown promising results under limited conditions; however, future studies are needed to optimise efficacy, methodology, and safety. To advance research on cell-...

  10. Targed neural stem cell differentiation and related cell based therapy in spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalníková, Helena; Vodička, Petr; Halada, Petr; Maršala, M.; Motlík, Jan; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    Budapest : Hungarian proteomic society, 2009, s. 81-81. ISBN 978-963-9319-99-8. [3rd Central and Eastern Proteomics Conference, 2009. Budapešť (HU), 06.10.2009-09.10.2009] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : stem cells * cell therapy * spinal cord injury Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  11. Cell-Based Therapy for Silicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Bandeira, Elga; Morales, Marcelo M

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is the most common pneumoconiosis globally, with higher prevalence and incidence in developing countries. To date, there is no effective treatment to halt or reverse the disease progression caused by silica-induced lung injury. Significant advances have to be made in order to reduce morbidity and mortality related to silicosis. In this review, we have highlighted the main mechanisms of action that cause lung damage by silica particles and summarized the data concerning the therapeutic promise of cell-based therapy for silicosis. PMID:27066079

  12. Cell-Based Therapy for Silicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquéias Lopes-Pacheco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicosis is the most common pneumoconiosis globally, with higher prevalence and incidence in developing countries. To date, there is no effective treatment to halt or reverse the disease progression caused by silica-induced lung injury. Significant advances have to be made in order to reduce morbidity and mortality related to silicosis. In this review, we have highlighted the main mechanisms of action that cause lung damage by silica particles and summarized the data concerning the therapeutic promise of cell-based therapy for silicosis.

  13. Inflammatory mediators: Parallels between cancer biology and stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Patel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Shyam A Patel1,2,3, Andrew C Heinrich2,3, Bobby Y Reddy2, Pranela Rameshwar21Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA; 2Department of Medicine – Division of Hematology/Oncology, New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA; 3These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Inflammation encompasses diverse molecular pathways, and it is intertwined with a wide array of biological processes. Recently, there has been an upsurge of interest in the interactions between mediators of inflammation and other cells such as stem cells and cancer cells. Since tissue injuries are associated with the release of inflammatory mediators, it would be difficult to address this subject without considering the implications of their systemic effects. In this review, we discuss the effects of inflammatory reactions on stem cells and extrapolate on information pertaining to cancer biology. The discussion focuses on integrins and cytokines, and identifies the transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB as central to the inflammatory response. Since stem cell therapy has been proposed for type II diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, pulmonary edema, these disorders are used as examples to discuss the roles of inflammatory mediators. We propose prospects for future research on targeting the NFκB signaling pathway. Finally, we explore the bridge between inflammation and stem cells, including neural stem cells and adult stem cells from the bone marrow. The implications of mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine as pertaining to inflammation are vast based on their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Such features of stem cells offer great potential for therapy in graft-versus-host disease, conditions with a significant inflammatory component, and tissue regeneration.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, cancer, cytokines

  14. The challenges of stem cell research in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Oniovokoyubu Agbedia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Many patients and their families, have great expectations that Stem cell therapy could be the cure for a host of devastating diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's dementia, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, burns, etc. As stem cell research gains ground in Nigeria, it is appropriate to explore the issues surrounding the use of human embryos for stem cell research and its implication from a nursing perspective. In this paper the socio-political implications of the use of embryonic stem cell research was addressed. The nursing, medical and legal literature (both print and electronic related to Stem cell research and therapy were evaluated and the main ethical issues raised by the destruction of human embryos were examined.  There must be a public discussion/debate on the benefits including its cost implication. Nigerians must evaluate the appropriateness of stem cell technologies within their own national contexts and prioritize which applications are the most promising for improving their health.

  15. GREAT PROMISE OF TISSUE-RESIDENT ADULT STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS IN TRANSPLANTATION AND CANCER THERAPIES

    OpenAIRE

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cell research has inspired great interest because these immature cells from your own body can act as potential, easily accessible cell sources for cell transplantation in regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. The use of adult stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal ability and multilineage differentiation potential, which are able to regenerate all the mature cells in the tissues from their origin, offers great prom...

  16. Stem cell therapy in spinal trauma: Does it have scientific validity?

    OpenAIRE

    Harvinder Singh Chhabra; Kanchan Sarda

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based interventions aim to use special regenerative cells (stem cells) to facilitate neuronal function beyond the site of the injury. Many studies involving animal models of spinal cord injury (SCI) suggest that certain stem cell-based therapies may restore function after SCI. Currently, in case of spinal cord injuries, new discoveries with clinical implications have been continuously made in basic stem cell research, and stem cell-based approaches are advancing rapidly toward appli...

  17. Multisystemic Therapy: Clinical Foundations and Research Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Henggeler, Scott W.

    2012-01-01

    Multisystemic therapy (MST) is an intensive family and community-based treatment for adolescents presenting serious antisocial behavior and their families. Using a home-based model of service delivery to overcome barriers to service access and a strong quality assurance system to promote treatment fidelity, MST therapists address known risk factors (i.e., at individual, family, peer, school, and community levels) strategically and comprehensively. The family is viewed as central to achieving ...

  18. Bulimia Nervosa : A Review of Therapy Research

    OpenAIRE

    Garfinkel, Paul E.; Goldbloom, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Since the delineation of bulimia nervosa as a distinct syndrome in 1979, a variety of etiological models and related treatments have evolved. Methodological advances in evaluation have been reflected in recent outcome studies. There is now extensive evidence for the effectiveness of various short-term psychotherapies for bulimia nervosa. However, there is no convincing support for the specificity of any one form; all have a salubrious effect. Cognitive-behavioral therapy has...

  19. Oncolytic vaccinia therapy of squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yong A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel therapies are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC of the head and neck. Historically, vaccinia virus was administered widely to humans as a vaccine and led to the eradication of smallpox. We examined the therapeutic effects of an attenuated, replication-competent vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68 as an oncolytic agent against a panel of six human head and neck SCC cell lines. Results All six cell lines supported viral transgene expression (β-galactosidase, green fluorescent protein, and luciferase as early as 6 hours after viral exposure. Efficient transgene expression and viral replication (>150-fold titer increase over 72 hrs were observed in four of the cell lines. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1, GLV-1h68 was highly cytotoxic to the four cell lines, resulting in ≥ 90% cytotoxicity over 6 days, and the remaining two cell lines exhibited >45% cytotoxicity. Even at a very low MOI of 0.01, three cell lines still demonstrated >60% cell death over 6 days. A single injection of GLV-1h68 (5 × 106 pfu intratumorally into MSKQLL2 xenografts in mice exhibited localized intratumoral luciferase activity peaking at days 2–4, with gradual resolution over 10 days and no evidence of spread to normal organs. Treated animals exhibited near-complete tumor regression over a 24-day period without any observed toxicity, while control animals demonstrated rapid tumor progression. Conclusion These results demonstrate significant oncolytic efficacy by an attenuated vaccinia virus for infecting and lysing head and neck SCC both in vitro and in vivo, and support its continued investigation in future clinical trials.

  20. A joint research protocol for music therapy in dementia care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Stige, Brynjulf

    2011-01-01

    Agitation is a major challenge within institutions of care for the elderly. The effect of music therapy on agitation and quality of live is investigated in a practice-relevant research combined with a Randomized Controlled Trial and multicentre research. The research protocol is developed...

  1. The challenges of stem cell research in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Clara Oniovokoyubu Agbedia; Godwin Efe Oshegbo

    2013-01-01

    Many patients and their families, have great expectations that Stem cell therapy could be the cure for a host of devastating diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's dementia, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, burns, etc. As stem cell research gains ground in Nigeria, it is appropriate to explore the issues surrounding the use of human embryos for stem cell research and its implication from a nursing perspective. In this paper the socio-political implications of the use of embryonic stem...

  2. 干细胞治疗糖尿病及外周血管病变研究进展%Stem Cell Therapy for Diabetes and Peripheral Vascular Disease Research Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐克雷

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviewed the stem cell transplantation in the treatment of diabetes and peripheral vascular disease research progress, and countries in the fields of scholars experience and the present situation of new ways etc. About stem cell transplantation in the treatment of diabetes clinical efficacy and safety of the countries scholars remains controversial. Summarize the current clinical application research the existence of the related problems and experience. The scholars in all countries carry out the follow-up clinical research should avoid important scheme between the parameters of differences. More to the point, stem cells transplantation is yet to be long-term safety evaluation, and its potential tumorigenic risk has been concern. In the near future, Chinese association of diabetes learn to write the about stem cell therapy for diabetes position statement and stem cell therapy for diabetes peripheral vascular lesions position statement. It is to hope to be able to prevent the current clinical doctors and patients in recognition and medical behavior mess function. Make our country of stem cell clinical research and application in the sound track on development%本文综述干细胞移植治疗糖尿病及外周血管病变研究进展,各国学者在该领域的经验及现状新途径等.关于干细胞移植治疗糖尿病的临床有效性及安全性等方面,各国学者仍然存在争议.总结目前临床应用研究中所存在的相关问题及经验教训,各国学者在开展后续临床研究时,应该避免重要的方案参数之间存在明显差异.更值得一提的是,干细胞移植的长期安全性尚待评估,其潜在的致瘤风险已受到关注.近期,中华医学会糖尿病学分会撰写了《中华医学会糖尿病学分会关于干细胞治疗糖尿病的立场声明》和《中华医学会糖尿病学分会关于干细胞治疗糖尿病外周血管病变的立场声明》,就是希望能够为阻止当前临床医生和患

  3. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Bradford R.; Burke, John M.; Manish Agrawal; Hauke, Ralph J.; Hutson, Thomas E.; Gury Doshi; Mark T Fleming; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network's Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our though...

  4. Present and future cell therapies for pancreatic beta cell replenishment

    OpenAIRE

    Domínguez-Bendala, Juan; Ricordi, Camillo

    2012-01-01

    If only at a small scale, islet transplantation has successfully addressed what ought to be the primary endpoint of any cell therapy: the functional replenishment of damaged tissue in patients. After years of less-than-optimal approaches to immunosuppression, recent advances consistently yield long-term graft survival rates comparable to those of whole pancreas transplantation. Limited organ availability is the main hurdle that stands in the way of the widespread clinical utilization of this ...

  5. Changes in cell migration due to the combined effects of sonodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy on MDA-MB-231 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sono-photodynamic therapy is an emerging method with an increasing amount of research having demonstrated its anti-cancer efficacy. However, the impacts of cell migration ability after sono-photodynamic therapy have seldom been reported. In this study, we identified cell migration by wound healing and transwell assays. Significant inability of cell migration was observed in combined groups accompanied by the decline of cell adhesion. Cells in combined treatment groups showed serious microfilament network collapse as well as decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinases-9. These results suggested that sono-photodynamic therapy could inhibit MDA-MB-231 cell migration and that the microfilament and matrix metalloproteinases-9 disorder might be involved. (letter)

  6. Changes in cell migration due to the combined effects of sonodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy on MDA-MB-231 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Xiaobing; Liu, Quanhong

    2015-03-01

    Sono-photodynamic therapy is an emerging method with an increasing amount of research having demonstrated its anti-cancer efficacy. However, the impacts of cell migration ability after sono-photodynamic therapy have seldom been reported. In this study, we identified cell migration by wound healing and transwell assays. Significant inability of cell migration was observed in combined groups accompanied by the decline of cell adhesion. Cells in combined treatment groups showed serious microfilament network collapse as well as decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinases-9. These results suggested that sono-photodynamic therapy could inhibit MDA-MB-231 cell migration and that the microfilament and matrix metalloproteinases-9 disorder might be involved.

  7. Research Progress of Stem Cell Therapy for Heart Diseases%干细胞治疗心脏疾病的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗建红

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are origin cells of various mature cells, with the potential of self-renewal and differentiation. Stem cells have a strong regenerative capacity to replace,repair or strengthen damaged tissues or organs of biological functions. Two types of stem cell are used for cardiac repairing,i. e. allogene stem cell and somatic stem cell. In theory, it can cure dilated cardiomyopathy and acute myocardial infarction. The ways of stem cell transplantation are intravenous injection, epicardium injection, injection of coronary artery, and endocardium injection. The technology bring considerable benefit to the clinical practice, while there are still some problems to be solved,such as transplantation cell type and quantity, and post transplantation safety, which is still in further studies.%干细胞是各种成熟细胞的起源细胞,具有自我增殖和分化的潜能,能修复或替代受损组织和器官的生物学功能.用于心肌修复的干细胞包括同种异基因干细胞和自体同源性干细胞(成体干细胞)两大类.干细胞移植理论上可治疗扩张型心肌病、急性心肌梗死等心脏疾病.干细胞移植的途径有外周静脉注射、经心外膜直视下注射、经冠状动脉注射、心内膜注射等.该技术的应用使临床受益很大,与此同时也存在一些问题,如移植细胞种类及数量的选择,移植后的安全性问题等,目前该学科尚在进一步研究中.

  8. Stem Cells in Liver Diseases and Cancer: Recent Advances on the Path to New Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Rountree, C Bart; Mishra, Lopa; Willenbring, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells have potential for therapy of liver diseases, but may also be involved in the formation of liver cancer. Recently, the AASLD Henry M. and Lillian Stratton Basic Research Single Topic Conference “Stem Cells in Liver Diseases and Cancer: Discovery and Promise” brought together a diverse group of investigators to define the status of research on stem cells and cancer stem cells in the liver and identify problems and solutions on the path to clinical translation. This report summarizes...

  9. Managing particulates in cell therapy: Guidance for best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Dominic; Stanton, Jean; Powers, Donald; Karnieli, Ohad; Nahum, Sagi; Abraham, Eytan; Parisse, Jean-Sebastien; Oh, Steve

    2016-09-01

    The intent of this article is to provide guidance and recommendations to cell therapy product sponsors (including developers and manufacturers) and their suppliers in the cell therapy industry regarding particulate source, testing, monitoring and methods for control. This information is intended to help all parties characterize the processes that generate particulates, understand product impact and provide recommendations to control particulates generated during manufacturing of cell therapy products. PMID:27426934

  10. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Khondoker M; Samad, Sohel; Spiteri, Monica; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a distinct population of adult stem cells, have amassed significant interest from both medical and scientific communities. An inherent multipotent differentiation potential offers a cell therapy option for various diseases, including those of the musculoskeletal, neuronal, cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. MSCs also secrete an array of paracrine factors implicated in the mitigation of pathological conditions through anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory mechanisms. The safety and efficacy of MSCs in human application have been confirmed through small- and large-scale clinical trials. However, achieving the optimal clinical benefit from MSC-mediated regenerative therapy approaches is entirely dependent upon adequate understanding of their healing/regeneration mechanisms and selection of appropriate clinical conditions. MSC-mediated acute alveolar injury repair. A cartoon depiction of an injured alveolus with associated inflammation and AEC apoptosis. Proposed routes of MSC delivery into injured alveoli could be by either intratracheal or intravenous routes, for instance. Following delivery a proposed mechanism of MSC action is to inhibit/reduce alveolar inflammation by abrogation of IL-1_-depenedent Tlymphocyte proliferation and suppression of TNF-_ secretion via macrophage activation following on from stimulation by MSC-secreted IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RN). The inflammatory environment also stimulates MSC to secrete prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) which can stimulate activated macrophages to secrete the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Inhibition of AEC apoptosis following injury can also be promoted via MSC stimulated up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene. MSC-secreted KGF can stimulate AECII proliferation and migration propagating alveolar epithelial restitution. Alveolar structural engraftment of MSC is a rare event. PMID:22772131

  11. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells, early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium, using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration, timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury, single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications.

  12. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications. PMID:27338364

  13. Islet neogenesis potential of human adult stem cells and its applications in cell replacement therapy for diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Bhonde RR

    2008-01-01

    In recent years regenerative biology has reached to greater heights due to its therapeutic potential in treating degenerative diseases; as they are not curable by modern medicine. With the advent of research in stem cells and developmental biology the regenerative potential of adult resident stem cells is becoming clearer. The long term objective of regenerative medicine or cell therapy is to treat patients with their own stem cells. These stem cells could be derived from the diseased organs ...

  14. How to detour Treg cells in T cell-based antitumor immune therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Shu Zheng,1 Yanwei Shen,1,2 Yongmao Song,1,3 Ying Yuan1,21The Cancer Institute, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Intervention China National Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Medical Sciences, Zhejiang Province, 2Department of Medical Oncology, 3Department of Surgical Oncology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: T cell-based antitumor immune therapy which occupies the boosting area of translational medicine research is capable of eradicating some kinds of tumors that are in late stages. However, the effectiveness of adoptive cell transfer treatment varies among the different clinical trials, while the safety of cells is still uncertain for some patients. All these phenomena provoke us to ask whether the instability of T cell-based antitumor immune therapy is due to immune modulation function of Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment and the peripheral circulation. Some successful Treg-targeting treatments in clinical trials provide the inspiration for subtle modulation of Treg cells in future cancer immunotherapies. We hypothesized that Treg cells may somehow sense the abundance of peripheral immune effector cells, and maintain the shifted tumor-bearing homeostasis of the immune system. Killer cells infused in adoptive cell transfer therapy may be monitored and spontaneously downregulated by Treg cells. Further studies are required to develop more effective combinations of immunotherapy with conventional chemo/radiotherapy in the modulation of immune-suppressive cells.Keywords: regulatory T lymphocytes, Treg cells, adoptive cell transfer, tumor immune tolerance, immune modulation, cytokine induction

  15. Adoptive T cell therapy: Addressing challenges in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Cassian

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adoptive T cell therapy involves the ex vivo selection and expansion of effector cells for the treatment of patients with cancer. In this review, the advantages and limitations of using antigen-specific T cells are discussed in counterpoint to vaccine strategies. Although vaccination strategies represent more readily available reagents, adoptive T cell therapy provides highly selected T cells of defined phenotype, specificity and function that may influence their biological behavior in vivo. Adoptive T cell therapy offers not only translational opportunities but also a means to address fundamental issues in the evolving field of cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Music therapy in cardiac health care: current issues in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanser, Suzanne B

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy is a service that has become more prevalent as an adjunct to medical practice-as its evidence base expands and music therapists begin to join the cardiology team in every phase of care, from the most serious cases to those maintaining good heart health. Although applications of music medicine, primarily listening to short segments of music, are capable of stabilizing vital signs and managing symptoms in the short-term, music therapy interventions by a qualified practitioner are showing promise in establishing deeper and more lasting impact. On the basis of mind-body approaches, stress/coping models, the neuromatrix theory of pain, and entrainment, music therapy capitalizes on the ability of music to affect the autonomic nervous system. Although only a limited number of randomized controlled trials pinpoint the efficacy of specific music therapy interventions, qualitative research reveals some profound outcomes in certain individuals. A depth of understanding related to the experience of living with a cardiovascular disease can be gained through music therapy approaches such as nonverbal music psychotherapy and guided imagery and music. The multifaceted nature of musical responsiveness contributes to strong individual variability and must be taken into account in the development of research protocols for future music therapy and music medicine interventions. The extant research provides a foundation for exploring the many potential psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual outcomes of a music therapy service for cardiology patients. PMID:23535529

  17. Low Reactive Level Laser Therapy for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Toshihiro Kushibiki; Takeshi Hirasawa; Shinpei Okawa; Miya Ishihara

    2015-01-01

    Low reactive level laser therapy (LLLT) is mainly focused on the activation of intracellular or extracellular chromophore and the initiation of cellular signaling by using low power lasers. Over the past forty years, it was realized that the laser therapy had the potential to improve wound healing and reduce pain and inflammation. In recent years, the term LLLT has become widely recognized in the field of regenerative medicine. In this review, we will describe the mechanisms of action of LLLT...

  18. Yoga research and therapy in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Telles

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Yoga was originally intended for spiritual growth. However, nowadays there is an increasing trend to use yoga as an add-on-therapy. In India it is believed that all diseases arise as a result of conflict between our instinct and our intellect1. This is also important in using yoga to promote positive health and prevent disease. A number of examples are cited here. Healthy children were given yoga and physical therapy and their physical fitness, cognitive functiones and emotional well being were tested. Yoga improved their emotional well being. Yoga also helped children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy  (a degenerative disease by improving their quality of life and mental status2. Again the benefits were ascribed to the mental as well as the physical effects of yoga. Of course yoga has marked benefits in healthy obese adults to prevent diseases by increasing mental well being, reducing stress and improving sleep3. Yoga also reduced anthropometric indices and brought about changes in leptin and adiponectin levels in otherwise healthy adults4a,b. This change too, was believed to be related to mental changes, along with the physical. Finally yoga can help in various disorders in which a person feels pain and distress5a,b. Many of the effects are believed to be due to changes in the functions at the level of the cortex and thalamus6, as well as the autonomic nervous system7. However the mechanisms underlying the effects of yoga need to be explored more thoroughly.

  19. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa M. Doulames

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient’s own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI—even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury.

  20. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulames, Vanessa M; Plant, Giles W

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient's own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI-even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  1. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, Sebastiano; Bersanelli, Melissa; Donini, Maddalena; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC. PMID:25992216

  2. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Buti

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC.

  3. Cell therapy in congestive heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) has emerged as a major worldwide epidemic and its main causes seem to be the aging of the population and the survival of patients with post-myocardial infarction. Cardiomyocyte dropout (necrosis and apoptosis) plays a critical role in the progress of CHF; thus treatment of CHF by exogenous cell implantation will be a promising medical approach. In the acute phase of cardiac damage cardiac stem cells (CSCs) within the heart divide symmetrically and/or asymmetrically in response to the change of heart homeostasis, and at the same time homing of bone marrow stem cells (BMCs) to injured area is thought to occur, which not only reconstitutes CSC population to normal levels but also repairs the heart by differentiation into cardiac tissue. So far, basic studies by using potential sources such as BMCs and CSCs to treat animal CHF have shown improved ventricular remodelling and heart function. Recently, however, a few of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials demonstrated mixed results in heart failure with BMC therapy during acute myocardial infarction.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnecchi, Massimiliano; Danieli, Patrizia; Cervio, Elisabetta

    2012-08-19

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are adult stem cells with capacity for self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation. Initially described in the bone marrow, MSC are also present in other organs and tissues. From a therapeutic perspective, because of their easy preparation and immunologic privilege, MSC are emerging as an extremely promising therapeutic agent for tissue regeneration and repair. Studies in animal models of myocardial infarction have demonstrated the ability of transplanted MSC to engraft and differentiate into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells. Most importantly, engrafted MSC secrete a wide array of soluble factors that mediate beneficial paracrine effects and may greatly contribute to cardiac repair. Together, these properties can be harnessed to both prevent and reverse remodeling in the ischemically injured ventricle. In proof-of-concept and phase I clinical trials, MSC therapy improved left ventricular function, induced reverse remodeling, and decreased scar size. In this review we will focus on the current understanding of MSC biology and MSC mechanism of action in cardiac repair. PMID:22521741

  5. Pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells: From basic research to applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masahiro; Otsu; Takashi; Nakayama; Nobuo; Inoue

    2014-01-01

    Basic research on pluripotent stem cells is designed to enhance understanding of embryogenesis, whereas applied research is designed to develop novel therapies and prevent diseases. Attainment of these goals has been enhanced by the establishment of embryonic stem cell lines, the technological development of genomic reprogramming to generate induced-pluripotent stem cells, and improvements in in vitro techniques to manipulate stem cells. This review summarizes the techniques required to generate neural cells from pluripotent stem cells. In particular, this review describes current research applications of a simple neural differentiation method, the neural stem sphere method, which we developed.

  6. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  7. Application of Nanoscaffolds in Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ghoraishizadeh, Saman; Ghorishizadeh, Afsoon; Ghoraishizadeh, Peyman; Daneshvar, Nasibeh; Boroojerdi, Mohadese Hashem

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is an alternative solution for organ transplantation. Stem cells and nanoscaffolds are two essential components in regenerative medicine. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered as primary adult stem cells with high proliferation capacity, wide differentiation potential, and immunosuppression properties which make them unique for regenerative medicine and cell therapy. Scaffolds are engineered nanofibers that provide suitable microenvironment for cell signalling whi...

  8. MS Stem Cell Therapy Succeeds but Poses Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159285.html MS Stem Cell Therapy Succeeds But Poses Risks Toxic side effects ... HealthDay News) -- A treatment combining chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant could represent a major advance against aggressive ...

  9. MS Stem Cell Therapy Succeeds but Poses Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159285.html MS Stem Cell Therapy Succeeds But Poses Risks Toxic side effects ... HealthDay News) -- A treatment combining chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant could represent a major advance against aggressive ...

  10. Trends and Prospects of Stem Cell Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-wen Cao; Lu Zhang; Ye Li; Qing Yang; Wen-hua Fu; Xiao-chen Wang; Wen-long Huang

    2016-01-01

    Great progresses have been made in fundamental and clinical stem cell research in China in recent years. The official policy on stem cells, which was announced in 2015, seems as the spring of stem cell therapy in China. However, the regulation, governance, and management of clinical expectations are still challenging. This review summarized the current stem cell research and development in the field, as well as its rapidly evolving commercial, regulatory and ethical environment in China. As expected, the prospects of stem cells in China look prospective.

  11. Concise Review: Guidance in Developing Commercializable Autologous/Patient-Specific Cell Therapy Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Eaker, Shannon; Armant, Myriam; Brandwein, Harvey; Burger, Scott; Campbell, Andrew; Carpenito, Carmine; Clarke, Dominic; Fong, Timothy; Karnieli, Ohad; Niss, Knut; van"t Hof, Wouter; Wagey, Ravenska

    2013-01-01

    In this technical review, members of the International Society for Cell Therapy (ISCT) provide guidance in developing commercializable autologous and patient-specific manufacturing strategies from the perspective of process development. Guidance is provided to help small academic or biotech researchers determine what questions can be addressed at the bench level in order to make their cell therapy products more feasible for commercial-scale production.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Peter J Nelson; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associa...

  13. 77 FR 24717 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for the Treatment of Stage I Non-Small Cell...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... Therapies for the Treatment of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Endobronchial Obstruction Due to Advanced Lung Tumors AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Request for... therapy (IMRT), Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), Proton beam radiotherapy (PBR),...

  14. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells with Nanoparticle-Enabled Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Andrew R.; Singh, Ravi N.; Carroll, David L.; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that multiple tumor types are sustained by a small population of transformed stem-like cells that have the ability to both self-renew and give rise to non-tumorigenic daughter cells that constitute the bulk of a tumor. These cells, which generally constitute a minority of the overall cancer cell population, are highly resistant to conventional therapies and persist following treatment, leading to disease relapse and the formation of distant metastases. Therapies tha...

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells: Emerging mechanisms of immunomodulation and therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Justin; D; Glenn; Katharine; A; Whartenby

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) are a pleiotropic population of cells that are self-renewing and capable of differentiating into canonical cells of the mesenchyme, including adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. They employ multi-faceted approaches to maintain bone marrow niche homeostasis and promote wound healing during injury. Biomedical research has long sought to exploit their pleiotropic properties as a basis for cell therapy for a variety of diseases and to facilitate hematopoietic stem cell establishment and stromal reconstruction in bone marrow transplantation. Early results demonstrated their usage as safe, and there was little host response to these cells. The discovery of their immunosuppressive functions ushered in a new interest in MSCs as a promising therapeutic tool to suppress inflammation and down-regulate pathogenic immune responses in graft-versus-host and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, autoimmune diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. MSCs produce a large number of soluble and membrane-bound factors, some of which inhibit immune responses. However, the full range of MSC-mediated immune-modulation remains incompletely understood, as emerging reports also reveal that MSCs can adopt an immunogenic phenotype, stimulate immune cells, and yield seemingly contradictory results in experimental animal models of inflammatory disease. The present review describes the large body of literature that has been accumulated on the fascinating biology of MSCs and their complex effects on immune responses.

  16. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene th...

  17. Development of gene and stem cell therapy for ocular neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Xue; Zhang; Ning-Li; Wang; Qing-Jun; Lu

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases pose a serious threat to eye health, but there is currently no effective treatment available. Recent years have witnessed rapid development of several cutting-edge technologies, such as gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and tissue engineering. Due to the special features of ocular structure, some of these technologies have been translated into ophthalmological clinic practice with fruitful achievements, setting a good example for other fields. This paper reviews the development of the gene and stem cell therapies in ophthalmology.

  18. Stem Cell Therapy for Myocardial Infarction: Are We Missing Time?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.W. ter Horst

    2010-01-01

    The success of stem cell therapy in myocardial infarction (MI) is modest, and for stem cell therapy to be clinically effective fine-tuning in regard to timing, dosing, and the route of administration is required. Experimental studies suggest the existence of a temporal window of opportunity bound by

  19. Present and future of allogeneic natural killer cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okjae eLim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the anti-tumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions.

  20. Personalized Therapy of Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bryan J; Kalemkerian, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with distinct clinical, pathological and molecular characteristics. Despite robust responses to initial chemotherapy and radiation, the prognosis of patients with SCLC remains poor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 10 %. Despite the fact that numerous molecularly targeted approaches have thus far failed to demonstrate clinical utility in SCLC, further advances will rely on better definition of the biological pathways that drive survival, proliferation and metastasis. Recent next-generation, molecular profiling studies have identified many new therapeutic targets in SCLC, as well as extreme genomic instability which explains the high degree of resistance. A wide variety of anti-angiogenic agents, growth factor inhibitors, pro-apoptotic agents, and epigenetic modulators have been evaluated in SCLC and many studies of these strategies are on-going. Perhaps the most promising approaches involve agents targeting cancer stem cell pathways and immunomodulatory drugs that interfere with the PD1 and CTLA-4 pathways. SCLC offers many barriers to the development of successful therapy, including limited tumor samples, inadequate preclinical models, high mutational burden, and aggressive tumor growth which impairs functional status and hampers enrollment on clinical trials. PMID:26703804

  1. Mouse models for cancer stem cell research

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Le; Ramesh, Anirudh V.; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Choi, Jinhyang; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer stem cell concept assumes that cancers are mainly sustained by a small pool of neoplastic cells, known as cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells, which are able to reproduce themselves and produce phenotypically heterogeneous cells with lesser tumorigenic potential. Cancer stem cells represent an appealing target for development of more selective and efficient therapies. However, direct testing of the cancer stem cell concept and assessment of its therapeutic implications in human...

  2. Autologous bone marrow cell therapy for peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botti C

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available C Botti, C Maione, A Coppola, V Sica, G CobellisDepartment of General Pathology, Second University of Naples, Naples, ItalyAbstract: Inadequate blood supply to tissues caused by obstruction of arterioles and/or capillaries results in ischemic injuries – these injuries can range from mild (eg, leg ischemia to severe conditions (eg, myocardial infarction, stroke. Surgical and/or endovascular procedures provide cutting-edge treatment for patients with vascular disorders; however, a high percentage of patients are currently not treatable, owing to high operative risk or unfavorable vascular involvement. Therapeutic angiogenesis has recently emerged as a promising new therapy, promoting the formation of new blood vessels by the introduction of bone marrow–derived stem and progenitor cells. These cells participate in the development of new blood vessels, the enlargement of existing blood vessels, and sprouting new capillaries from existing blood vessels, providing evidence of the therapeutic utility of these cells in ischemic tissues. In this review, the authors describe peripheral arterial disease, an ischemic condition affecting the lower extremities, summarizing different aspects of vascular regeneration and discussing which and how stem cells restore the blood flow. The authors also present an overview of encouraging results from early-phase clinical trials using stem cells to treat peripheral arterial disease. The authors believe that additional research initiatives should be undertaken to better identify the nature of stem cells and that an intensive cooperation between laboratory and clinical investigators is needed to optimize the design of cell therapy trials and to maximize their scientific rigor. Only this will allow the results of these investigations to develop best clinical practices. Additionally, although a number of stem cell therapies exist, many treatments are performed outside international and national regulations and many

  3. Ethical dimension of circle Integrative Community Therapy on qualitative research

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Renata Miranda dos Santos; Elisangela Cerencovich; Laura Filomena Santos Araújo; Roseney Bellato; Sonia Ayako Tao Maruyama

    2014-01-01

    This study discusses ethical issues in research involving human beings and seeks to understand the relationship between qualitative research and the ethical care guidelines for Integrative Community Therapy (ICT) circles based on Resolution 466/12 of the National Health Council of the Ministry of Health of Brazil. This is documentary research, which analyzed Resolution 466/12 and ICT circles seeking to make a connection between the ethical guidelines contained in both. The analysis of the cor...

  4. Stem cells: basic research on health, from ethics to panacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naara Luna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though stem cell therapies are still under experimentation, the media has represented them as a panacea that would cure all diseases. This fact secured the authorization for using human embryos as research material. Therapies include manipulation of human material in tissue bioengineering, suggesting a representation of the body as a factory. This article describes stem cell research projects being carried out in the health sciences center of a higher education institution, focusing on field organization and on the system of values underlying scientific activity. Researchers at different levels were interviewed about perspectives on, and implications of, their research in order to analyze the discourse of the projects' participants. Experiments with adult stem cells enjoyed wide support, while the use of human embryos was disputed. The foundations of those arguments were sought in their relation both to the structure of the scientific field and to the researchers' religious background.

  5. Legislating Limits on Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sïna A. Muscati

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available  Research on embryonic stem cells has generated great intrigue in the scientific community. Many medical researchers consider stem cell-based therapies to have the potential of treating a host of human ailments and yielding a number of medical benefits. They are motivated by the possibility of treating incurable diseases or facilitating effective treatment methods. Their enthusiasm is shared by many of those who are afflicted with these debilitating diseases.

  6. Stem cell therapy in oral and maxillofacial region: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P M Sunil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cells with unique capacity for self-renewal and potency are called stem cells. With appropriate biochemical signals stem cells can be transformed into desirable cells. The idea behind this article is to shortly review the obtained literature on stem cell with respect to their properties, types and advantages of dental stem cells. Emphasis has been given to the possibilities of stem cell therapy in the oral and maxillofacial region including regeneration of tooth and craniofacial defects.

  7. Research Ethics: Institutional Review Board Oversight of Art Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaver, Sarah P.

    2011-01-01

    By having their research proposals reviewed and approved by Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), art therapists meet important ethical principles regarding responsibility to research participants. This article provides an overview of the history of human subjects protections in the United States; underlying ethical principles and their application…

  8. Regulations and ethical codes for clinical cell therapy trials in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hooshang Saberi; Nazi Derakhshanrad; Babak Arjmand; Jafar Ai; Masoud Soleymani; Amir Ali Hamidieh; Mohammad Taghi Joghataei; Zahid Hussain Khan; Seyed Hassan Emami Razavi

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The local regulations for conducting experimental and clinical cell therapy studies are dependent on the national and cultural approach to the issue, and may have many common aspects as well as differences with the regulations in other countries. The study reflects the latest national aspects of cell therapy in Iran and relevant regulations. Methods:The following topics are discussed in the article including sources of cell harvest, regulations for cell disposal, stem cell manufacturing, and economic aspects of stem cell, based on current practice in Iran. Results:All cell therapy trials in Iran are required to strictly abide with the ethical codes, national and local regulations, and safety requirements, as well as considering human rights and respect. Adherence to these standards has facilitated the conduct of human cell therapy trials for research, academic advancement, and therapy. Conclusions:The cell therapy trials based on the aforementioned regulations may be assumed to be ethical and they are candidates for clinical translations based on safety and efficacy issues.

  9. Research into the Development of Voice Assessment in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Sanne

    This study was a research into the development of a voice assessment profile (VOIAS). Already a preliminary literature search showed that no such profile within music therapy existed, and only very sparse research within music therapy focusing on and involving the human voice. The development of...... VOIAS is based on vocal parameters extracted from the literature review and my clinical approach “Psychodynamic Voice Therapy”. The parameters’ relevance is based on clinical practice and the focus of population in this study, clients suffering from depression....

  10. Stem cell-based therapy for erectile dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jian-hong; XIA Shu-jie

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the effect of stem cells in erectile dysfunction as well as their application to the therapy of erectile dysfunction.Data sources The data used in the present article were mainly from PubMed with relevant English articles published from 1974 to 2011.The search terms were "stem cells" and "erectile dysfunction".Study selection Articles regarding the role of stem cells in erectile dysfunction and their application to the therapy of erectile dysfunction were selected.Results Stem cells hold great promise for regenerative medicine because of their ability to self-renew and to differentiate into various cell types.Meanwhile,in preclinical experiments,therapeutic gene-modified stem cells have been approved to offer a novel strategy for cell therapy and gene therapy of erectile dysfunction.Conclusion The transplantation of stem cells has the potential to provide cell types capable of restoring normal function after injury or degradation inerectile dysfunction.However,a series of problems,such as the safety of stem cells transplantation,their application in cell therapy and gene therapy of erectile dysfunction need further investigation.

  11. "Cell therapy for stroke: use of local astrocytes"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek eChouchane

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Stroke refers to a variety of conditions caused by the occlusion or hemorrhage of blood vessels supplying the brain, which is one of the main causes of death and the leading cause of disability worldwide. In the last years, cell-based therapies have been proposed as a new approach to ameliorate post stroke deficits. However, the most appropriate type of cell to be used in such therapies, as well as their sources, remains a matter of intense research. A good candidate cell should, in principle, display high plasticity to generate diverse types of neurons and, at the same type, low risk to cause undesired outcomes, such as malignant transformation. Recently, a new approach grounded on the reprogramming of endogenous astrocytes towards neuronal fates emerged as an alternative to restore neurological functions in several central nervous system diseases. In this perspective, we review data about the potential of astrocytes to become functional neurons following expression of neurogenic genes and discuss the potential benefits and risks of reprogramming astrocytes in the glial scar to replace neurons lost after stroke.

  12. Beyond division: convergences between postmodern qualitative research and family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Haene, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    Starting from examples of postmodern research and therapeutic practice, we raise the question on the role of the research-therapy dichotomy within these approaches. The article aims to show the profound convergence between postmodern ethnographic research and constructionist, collaborative therapeutic approaches on a double, epistemological and practice level. First, we point out their converging development toward narrative and constructionist epistemologies. Second, an inquiry into the core features of these disciplinary activities' goal, process, and expert role reveals their profound convergence into a dialogical practice in which the boundaries between research and therapy are radically transgressed. We conclude by questioning the implications and acceptability of this convergence for researchers' and therapists' understanding of their practices. PMID:20074120

  13. Steady advance of stem cell therapies: report from the 2011 World Stem Cell Summit, Pasadena, California, October 3-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Melanie

    2011-12-01

    Stem cell research and related therapies (including regenerative medicine and cellular therapies) could have a significant near-term impact on worldwide public health and aging. One reason is the industry's strong linkage between policy, science, industry, and patient advocacy, as was clear in the attendance and programming at the 7(th) annual World Stem Cell Summit held in Pasadena, California, October 3-5, 2011. A special conference session sponsored by the SENS Foundation discussed how stem cell therapies are being used to extend healthy life span. Stem cells are useful not only in cell-replacement therapies, but also in disease modeling, drug discovery, and drug toxicity screening. Stem cell therapies are currently being applied to over 50 diseases, including heart, lung, neurodegenerative, and eye disease, cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Dozens of companies are developing therapeutic solutions that are in different stages of clinical use and clinical trials. Some high-profile therapies include Dendreon's Provenge for prostate cancer, Geron's first-ever embryonic stem cell trials for spinal cord injury, Fibrocell's laViv cellular therapy for wrinkles, and well-established commercial skin substitutes (Organogenesis' Apligraf and Advanced BioHealing's Dermagraft). Stem cell policy issues under consideration include medical tourism, standards for large-scale stem cell manufacturing, and lingering ethical debates over the use of embryonic stem cells. Contemporary stem cell science advances include a focus on techniques for the direct reprogramming of cells from one lineage to another without returning to pluripotency as an intermediary step, improved means of generating and characterizing induced pluripotent cells, and progress in approaches to neurodegenerative disease. PMID:22175514

  14. Stem cell therapy for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Leslie M; Fong, Helen; Huang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Underlying cognitive declines in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are the result of neuron and neuronal process losses due to a wide range of factors. To date, all efforts to develop therapies that target specific AD-related pathways have failed in late-stage human trials. As a result, an emerging consensus in the field is that treatment of AD patients with currently available drug candidates might come too late, likely as a result of significant neuronal loss in the brain. In this regard, cell-replacement therapies, such as human embryonic stem cell- or induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells, hold potential for treating AD patients. With the advent of stem cell technologies and the ability to transform these cells into different types of central nervous system neurons and glial cells, some success in stem cell therapy has been reported in animal models of AD. However, many more steps remain before stem cell therapies will be clinically feasible for AD and related disorders in humans. In this review, we will discuss current research advances in AD pathogenesis and stem cell technologies; additionally, the potential challenges and strategies for using cell-based therapies for AD and related disorders will be discussed. PMID:25766620

  15. Cell-based therapies and imaging in cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengel, Frank M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Munich (Germany); Schachinger, Volker; Dimmeler, Stefanie [University of Frankfurt, Department of Molecular Cardiology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2005-12-01

    Cell therapy for cardiac repair has emerged as one of the most exciting and promising developments in cardiovascular medicine. Evidence from experimental and clinical studies is increasing that this innovative treatment will influence clinical practice in the future. But open questions and controversies with regard to the basic mechanisms of this therapy continue to exist and emphasise the need for specific techniques to visualise the mechanisms and success of therapy in vivo. Several non-invasive imaging approaches which aim at tracking of transplanted cells in the heart have been introduced. Among these are direct labelling of cells with radionuclides or paramagnetic agents, and the use of reporter genes for imaging of cell transplantation and differentiation. Initial studies have suggested that these molecular imaging techniques have great potential. Integration of cell imaging into studies of cardiac cell therapy holds promise to facilitate further growth of the field towards a broadly clinically useful application. (orig.)

  16. THE POTENTIAL FOR CELL-BASED THERAPY IN PERINATAL BRAIN INJURIES

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Andre W.; Johnston, Michael V.; Fatemi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal brain injuries are a leading cause of cerebral palsy worldwide. The potential of stem cell therapy to prevent or reduce these impairments has been widely discussed within the medical and scientific communities and an increasing amount of research is being conducted in this field. Animal studies support the idea that a number of stem cells types, including cord blood and mesenchymal stem cells have a neuroprotective effect in neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. Both these cell types are readi...

  17. Some applications of nanotechnologies in stem cells research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stem cell based tissue engineering therapies involve the administration of ex vivo manipulated stem cell populations with the purpose of repairing and regenerating damaged or diseased tissue. Currently available methods of monitoring transplanted cells are quite limited. To monitor the outcomes of stem cell therapy longitudinally requires the development of non-destructive strategies that are capable of identifying the location, magnitude, and duration of cellular survival and fate. The recent development of imaging techniques offers great potential to address these critical issues by non-invasively tracking the fate of the transplanted cells. This review offers a focused presentation of some examples of the use of imaging techniques connected to the nanotechnological world in research areas related to stem cells. In particular investigations will be considered concerning tissue-engineered bone, treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration, treatment by human stem cells of muscular dystrophy of Duchenne in small animal models and the repair of spinal cord injuries.

  18. Some applications of nanotechnologies in stem cells research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belicchi, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico di Milano, Via Francesco Sforza, Milano 20122 (Italy); Cancedda, R. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro and Dipartimento di Oncologia Biologia e Genetica - Universita di Genova, Largo R. Benzi 10, Genova 16132 (Italy); Cedola, A. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Via Cinto Romano 42, Roma 00156 (Italy); Fiori, F. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); INBB - Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy); Gavina, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico di Milano, Via Francesco Sforza, Milano 20122 (Italy); Giuliani, A. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy); Komlev, V.S. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); Institute for Physical Chemistry of Ceramics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ozernaya 48, 119361 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lagomarsino, S. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Via Cinto Romano 42, Roma 00156 (Italy); Mastrogiacomo, M. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro and Dipartimento di Oncologia Biologia e Genetica - Universita di Genova, Largo R. Benzi 10, Genova 16132 (Italy); Renghini, C. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); INBB - Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy); Rustichelli, F., E-mail: f.rustichelli@univpm.i [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); INBB - Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Stem cell based tissue engineering therapies involve the administration of ex vivo manipulated stem cell populations with the purpose of repairing and regenerating damaged or diseased tissue. Currently available methods of monitoring transplanted cells are quite limited. To monitor the outcomes of stem cell therapy longitudinally requires the development of non-destructive strategies that are capable of identifying the location, magnitude, and duration of cellular survival and fate. The recent development of imaging techniques offers great potential to address these critical issues by non-invasively tracking the fate of the transplanted cells. This review offers a focused presentation of some examples of the use of imaging techniques connected to the nanotechnological world in research areas related to stem cells. In particular investigations will be considered concerning tissue-engineered bone, treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration, treatment by human stem cells of muscular dystrophy of Duchenne in small animal models and the repair of spinal cord injuries.

  19. Sorafenib and sunitinib: novel targeted therapies for renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandinetti, Cheryl A; Goldspiel, Barry R

    2007-08-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is a relatively uncommon malignancy, with 51,190 cases expected to be diagnosed in 2007. Localized disease is curable by surgery; however, locally advanced or metastatic disease is not curable in most cases and, until recently, had a limited response to drug treatment. Historically, biologic response modifiers or immunomodulating agents were tested in clinical trials based on observations that some cases of RCC can spontaneously regress. High-dose aldesleukin is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for advanced RCC; however, the drug is associated with a high frequency of severe adverse effects. Responses have been observed with low-dose aldesleukin and interferon alfa, but with little effect on overall survival. Sorafenib and sunitinib are novel therapies that target growth factor receptors known to be activated by the hypoxia-inducible factor and the Ras-Raf/MEK/ERK pathways. These pathways are important in the pathophysiology of RCC. Sorafenib and sunitinib have shown antitumor activity as first- and second-line therapy in patients with cytokine-refractory metastatic RCC who have clear-cell histology. Although complete responses are not common, both drugs promote disease stabilization and increase progression-free survival. This information suggests that disease stabilization may be an important determinant for response in RCC and possibly other cancers. Sorafenib and sunitinib are generally well tolerated and are considered first- and second-line treatment options for patients with advanced clear cell RCC. In addition, sorafenib and sunitinib have shown promising results in initial clinical trials evaluating antitumor activity in patients who are refractory to other antiangiogenic therapy. The most common toxicities with both sorafenib and sunitinib are hand-foot syndrome, rash, fatigue, hypertension, and diarrhea. Research is directed toward defining the optimal use of these new agents. PMID:17655513

  20. Chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy: 25years in the making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Saar; Maus, Marcela V; Porter, David L

    2016-05-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy of cancer is generating enormous enthusiasm. Twenty-five years after the concept was first proposed, major advances in molecular biology, virology, and good manufacturing practices (GMP)-grade cell production have transformed antibody-T cell chimeras from a scientific curiosity to a fact of life for academic cellular immunotherapy researchers and, increasingly, for patients. In this review, we explain the preclinical concept, outline how it has been translated to the clinic, and draw lessons from the first years of CAR T cell therapy for the practicing clinician. PMID:26574053

  1. Profile of the Brazilian Researcher in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Any Carolina Cardoso Guimarães Vasconcelos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to analyze the profile of Brazilian PhD researchers in occupational therapy based on data obtained from the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development - CNPq. Two hundred forty curricula of occupational therapists were individually analyzed, 102 of them from PhD researchers. The curricula were analyzed with respect to gender; completion time of undergraduate studies; institution; time spent for obtaining the doctorate; professional activities; geographical distribution, scientific, and editorial composition; and guidance of undergraduate research, specialization, and master, doctorate and post-doctorate courses. The data showed that 94% of the researchers were women. With regard to professional practice, 73% of the doctors were affiliated to public universities and 84% were located in the southeast region. A total of 1361 papers were produced, at an average of 13.3 articles per researcher, with 25% on the theme of functional health (cognitive, neuromotor, musculoskeletal occupational performance and assistive technology. The PhD researchers in occupational therapy also published 90 books and 488 book chapters. Additionally, 59% of the researchers collaborated as reviewers for scientific periodicals. The results of the analysis will allow the academic community to gain a perspective of the occupational therapy scenario in Brazil, assisting in the establishment of future priorities for improving knowledge and professional practice.

  2. Research in practice in the arts therapies:Chapter 2: Research in practice

    OpenAIRE

    Smeijsters, Henk

    2010-01-01

    The road to science for the arts therapies requires research on the full breadths of the spectrum, from systematic case studies to RCTs. It is important that arts therapists and arts therapeutic researchers reflect on the typical characteristics of each research paradigm, research type and research method and select what is appropriate with regard to the particular research question. Questions rather differ. Finding out whether a certain intervention has a particular effect with a large group...

  3. Fuel Cell Applied Research Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Richardson

    2006-09-15

    Since November 12, 2003, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology has been operating a 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cell to provide electrical and thermal energy to its campus. The project was made possible by funding from the U.S. Department of Energy as well as by a partnership with the provincial Alberta Energy Research Institute; a private-public partnership, Climate Change Central; the federal Ministry of Western Economic Development; and local natural gas supplier, ATCO Gas. Operation of the fuel cell has contributed to reducing NAIT's carbon dioxide emissions through its efficient use of natural gas.

  4. Islet transplantation versus stem cells for the cell therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, G; Montanucci, P; Calafiore, R

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic islet cell transplantation has represented the mainstay of cell therapy for the potential, final cure of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), along the past two decades. Unfortunately, the restricted availability of cadaveric human donor pancreases coupled with heavy side effects of the recipient's general immunosuppression, have severely crippled progress of this approach into clinical trials. Only a few excellence centers, worldwide, have thus far accrued still quite marginal clinical success. In an attempt to overcome the limits of islet transplantation new technologies for use of several stem cell lineages are being under investigation, with initial experimental evidence of success. Essentially, the actual lines of research involve attempts to either activate native endogenous stem cells that replace diseased/dead cells, by a cell regeneration process, or condition other stem cells to acquire the functional properties of the targeted cells to be substituted (i.e., beta-cell-like elements associated with insulin secretory competence). A wide array of stem cells may fulfill this task, from embryonic (whose use still faces strong ethical barriers), to adult, to induced pluripotent stem cells. Mesenchymal adult stem cells, retrievable from many different sites, including adipose tissue, bone marrow and post-partum umbilical cord Wharton Jelly, seem to couple plastic to immunoregulatory properties that might greatly help progress for the disease cure. PMID:26398188

  5. Stem Cell Therapy Remediates Reconstruction of the Craniofacial Skeleton After Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Deshpande, Sagar S.; Gallagher, Kathleen K.; Donneys, Alexis; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N.; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Sun, Hongli; Krebsbach, Paul H; Buchman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    This study utilized transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as a cellular replacement therapy to remedy radiation-induced injury and restore impaired new bone formation during distraction osteogenesis (DO). BMSC therapy brought about the successful generation of new bone and significantly improved both the rate and quality of a bony union of irradiated, distracted [X-ray radiation therapy (XRT)/DO] murine mandibles to the level of nonirradiated DO animals. The bone mineral density and ...

  6. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahuan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS. It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI.

  7. Advances in sickle cell therapies in the hydroxyurea era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Joshua J; Nathan, David G

    2014-01-01

    In the hydroxyurea era, insights into mechanisms downstream of erythrocyte sickling have led to new therapeutic approaches for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Therapies have been developed that target vascular adhesion, inflammation and hemolysis, including innovative biologics directed against P-selectin and invariant natural killer T cells. Advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplant and gene therapy may also provide more opportunities for cures in the near future. Several clinical studies are underway to determine the safety and efficacy of these new treatments. Novel approaches to treat SCD are desperately needed, since current therapies are limited and rates of morbidity and mortality remain high. PMID:25549232

  8. Clinical Translation of Cell Therapy, Tissue Engineering, and Regenerative Medicine Product in Malaysia and Its Regulatory Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bt Hj Idrus, Ruszymah; Abas, Arpah; Ab Rahim, Fazillahnor; Saim, Aminuddin Bin

    2015-12-01

    With the worldwide growth of cell and tissue therapy (CTT) in treating diseases, the need of a standardized regulatory policy is of paramount concern. Research in CTT in Malaysia has reached stages of clinical trials and commercialization. In Malaysia, the regulation of CTT is under the purview of the National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau (NPCB), Ministry of Health (MOH). NPCB is given the task of regulating CTT, under a new Cell and Gene Therapy Products framework, and the guidelines are currently being formulated. Apart from the laboratory accreditation, researchers are advised to follow Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Therapy from the Medical Development Division, MOH, published in 2009. PMID:26192075

  9. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Russell; Niemiro, Grace M.; De Lisio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs) is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers. PMID:27123008

  10. An integrative review of Reiki touch therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Reiki touch therapy is a complementary biofield energy therapy that involves the use of hands to help strengthen the body's ability to heal. There is growing interest among nurses to use Reiki in patient care and as a self-care treatment, however, with little supportive empirical research and evidence to substantiate these practices. The purpose of this integrative review is to begin the systematic process of evaluating the findings of published Reiki research. Selected investigations using Reiki for effects on stress, relaxation, depression, pain, and wound healing management, among others is reviewed and summarized. A summary of Reiki studies table illustrates the study descriptions and Reiki treatment protocols specified in the investigations. Synthesis of findings for clinical practice and implications for future research are explored. PMID:17627194

  11. Stem Cell Therapy in Treatment of Different Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Sahraian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are undifferentiated cells with the ability of proliferation, regeneration, conversion to differentiated cells and producing various tissues. Stem cells are divided into two categories of embryonic and adult. In another categorization stem cells are divided to Totipotent, Multipotent and Unipotent cells.So far usage of stem cells in treatment of various blood diseases has been studied (such as lymphoblastic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, thalassemia, multiple myeloma and cycle cell anemia. In this paper the goal is evaluation of cell therapy in treatment of Parkinsons disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer, Stroke, Spinal Cord Injury, Multiple Sclerosis, Radiation Induced Intestinal Injury, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Liver Disease, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Bone Disease, Renal Disease, Chronic Wounds, Graft-Versus-Host Disease, Sepsis and Respiratory diseases. It should be mentioned that some disease that are the target of cell therapy are discussed in this article.

  12. Administrative and research policies required to bring cellular therapies from the research laboratory to the patient's bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Robyn

    2005-10-01

    The research process is a balance between the inherent risks of new discoveries and the risks of research participant safety. Conflicts of interest, inherent to the research process, as well as those introduced by emerging cellular therapies, have the potential to compromise safety. The relationship of trust between the researcher and the clinical trial participant facilitates objective decision making, in the best interest of both parties. In the setup of each clinical trial, investigators incorporate ethical, political, legal, financial, and regulatory considerations as protocols are established. Responsibility to abide by these decisions ensures a systematic process and safeguards participants in this process. The integrity of the research process is strengthened by identifying potential conflicting issues with the guiding principles established in the protocols, which may threaten the objectivity of involved parties and jeopardize safety of the participants. The rapid pace and changing paradigms of new discoveries in cellular therapies exaggerate existing conflicts and introduce new ones. Ethical issues raised by emerging cellular therapies include the division of opinions regarding the use of embryonic and fetal tissue to develop stem cell lines for research, the individual versus professional conscience of a researcher, overselling of outcomes as a result of the researcher's desire to be the first to discover a cellular therapy, and therapeutic misconception resulting from a participant's desire for a miracle cure. The basic ethical issue of whether stem cells should be utilized as a cellular therapy raises heated debates because some believe that it is not acceptable to use fetal material as a source of research material for future cures and others feel equally as strong that inaction is unethical because it results in needless suffering and death owing to the absence of this research. Political issues include the divergent position statements of

  13. Apoptosis and cancer stem cells : Implications for apoptosis targeted therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating showing that cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells are key drivers of tumor formation and progression. Successful therapy must therefore eliminate these cells, which is hampered by their high resistance to commonly used treatment modalities. Thus far, only a limited nu

  14. Cell therapy strategies and improvements for muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Cassano, Marco; Crippa, Stefania; Perini, Ilaria; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2010-01-01

    Understanding stem cell commitment and differentiation is a critical step towards clinical translation of cell therapies. In past few years, several cell types have been characterized and transplanted in animal models for different diseased tissues, eligible for a cell-mediated regeneration. Skeletal muscle damage is a challenge for cell- and gene-based therapeutical approaches, given the unique architecture of the tissue and the clinical relevance of acute damages or dystrophies. In this rev...

  15. [Translational/regulatory science researches of NIHS for regenerative medicine and cellular therapy products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the Japanese Diet passed the Regenerative Medicine Promotion Act and the revisions to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act, which was also renamed as the Therapeutic Products Act (TPA). One of the aims of the new/revised Acts is to promote the development and translation of and access to regenerative/cellular therapies. In the TPA, a product derived from processing cells is categorized as a subgroup of "regenerative medicine, cellular therapy and gene therapy products" (RCGPs), products distinct from pharmaceuticals and medical devices, allowing RCGPs to obtain a conditional and time- limited marketing authorization much earlier than that under the conventional system. To foster not only RCGPs, but also innovative pharmaceuticals and medical devices, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare recently launched Translational Research Program for Innovative Pharmaceuticals, Medical Devices and RCGPs. This mini-review introduces contributions of the National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) to research projects on RCGPs in the Program. PMID:25707195

  16. Nano scaffolds and stem cell therapy in liver tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2015-08-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been constantly developing of late due to the major progress in cell and organ transplantation, as well as advances in materials science and engineering. Although stem cells hold great potential for the treatment of many injuries and degenerative diseases, several obstacles must be overcome before their therapeutic application can be realized. These include the development of advanced techniques to understand and control functions of micro environmental signals and novel methods to track and guide transplanted stem cells. A major complication encountered with stem cell therapies has been the failure of injected cells to engraft to target tissues. The application of nanotechnology to stem cell biology would be able to address those challenges. Combinations of stem cell therapy and nanotechnology in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have achieved significant advances. These combinations allow nanotechnology to engineer scaffolds with various features to control stem cell fate decisions. Fabrication of Nano fiber cell scaffolds onto which stem cells can adhere and spread, forming a niche-like microenvironment which can guide stem cells to proceed to heal damaged tissues. In this paper, current and emergent approach based on stem cells in the field of liver tissue engineering is presented for specific application. The combination of stem cells and tissue engineering opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration for stem cell therapy because of the potential to control stem cell behavior with the physical and chemical characteristics of the engineered scaffold environment.

  17. Dyadic research in marriage and family therapy: methodological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenborn, Andrea K; Dolbin-MacNab, Megan L; Keiley, Margaret K

    2013-01-01

    With training that emphasizes relationship systems, marriage and family therapists are uniquely attuned to interpersonal dynamics, interdependence, and the influence of relationships on individuals' perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes. While recent statistical advances have contributed to a proliferation of resources designed to introduce researchers to dyadic data analysis, guidelines related to the methodological aspects of dyadic research design have received less attention. Given the potential advantages of dyadic designs for examining couple and family relational and therapeutic processes, the purpose of this article is to introduce marriage and family therapy researchers to dyadic research methodology. Using examples from our own research, we discuss methodological considerations and lessons learned related to sampling, measurement, data collection, and ethics. Recommendations for future dyadic research are provided. PMID:25073839

  18. Slow-Cycling Therapy-Resistant Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Nathan; Houghton, JeanMarie; Lyle, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Tumor recurrence after chemotherapy is a major cause of patient morbidity and mortality. Recurrences are thought to be secondary to small subsets of cancer cells that are better able to survive traditional forms of chemotherapy and thus drive tumor regrowth. The ability to isolate and better characterize these therapy-resistant cells is critical for the future development of targeted therapies aimed at achieving more robust and long-lasting responses. Using a novel application for the prolife...

  19. Stem Cell Based Gene Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jae Heon Kim; Hong Jun Lee; Yun Seob Song

    2014-01-01

    Current prostate cancer treatment, especially hormone refractory cancer, may create profound iatrogenic outcomes because of the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Suicide gene therapy has been investigated for the substitute modality for current chemotherapy because it enables the treatment targeting the cancer cells. However the classic suicide gene therapy has several profound side effects, including immune-compromised due to viral vector. Recently, stem cells have been regarded as a new ...

  20. Large Animal Models of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Trobridge, Grant D.; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Large animal models have been instrumental in advancing hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy. Here we review the advantages of large animal models, their contributions to the field of HSC gene therapy, and recent progress in this field. Several properties of human HSCs including their purification, their cell-cycle characteristics, their response to cytokines, and the proliferative demands put on them after transplantation are more similar in large animal models than in mice. Progress i...

  1. Ambivalent journeys of hope: embryonic stem cell therapy in a clinic in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Amit

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell therapy in non-Western countries such as India has received a lot of attention. Apart from media reports, there are a number of social science analyses of stem cell policy, therapy, and research, their ethical implications, and impact of advertising on patients. Nevertheless, in the media reports as well as in academic studies, experiences of patients, who undertake overseas journeys for stem cell therapy, have largely been either ignored or presented reductively, often as a "false hope." In this article, I analyze the experiences of patients and their "journeys of hope" to NuTech Mediworld, an embryonic stem cell therapy clinic in New Delhi, India. My analysis, which draws on my observations in the clinic and patients' experiences, instead of seeking to adjudicate whether embryonic stem cell therapy in clinics such as NuTech is right or wrong, true or false, focuses on how patients navigate and contest these concerns. I utilize Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's "concepts," lines of flight and deterritorialization, to highlight how embryonic stem cell therapy's "political economy of hope" embodies deterritorialization of several "regimes of truth" and how these deterritorializations impact patients' experiences. PMID:25394653

  2. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yifan; Jaklitsch, Michael T; Bueno, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    Locally advanced (stage IIIA) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is confined to the chest, but requires more than surgery to maximize cure. Therapy given preoperatively is termed neoadjuvant, whereas postoperative therapy is termed adjuvant. Trimodality therapy (chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery) has become the standard treatment regimen for resectable, locally advanced NSCLC. During the past 2 decades, several prospective, randomized, and nonrandomized studies have explored various regimens for preoperative treatment of NSCLC. The evaluation of potential candidates with NSCLC for neoadjuvant therapy as well as the currently available therapeutic regimens are reviewed. PMID:27261916

  3. Cell transplantation therapies for spinal cord injury focusing on induced pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaya Nakamura; Hideyuki Okano

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated by the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine awarded for Shinya Yamanaka and Sir John Gurdon,there is an increasing interest in the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and reprograming technologies in medical science.While iPS cells are expected to open a new era providing enormous opportunities in biomedical sciences in terms of cell therapies and regenerative medicine,safety-related concerns for iPS cell-based cell therapy should be resolved prior to the clinical application of iPS cells.In this review,the pre-clinical investigations of cell therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) using neural stem/progenitor cells derived from iPS cells,and their safety issues in vivo,are outlined.We also wish to discuss the strategy for the first human trails of iPS cell-based cell therapy for SCI patients.

  4. Bases da terapia celular em cardiologia Cell therapy in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos C. Carvalho

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available O implante de células para o tratamento de doenças cardiovasculares encontra-se sob investigação em vários centros no mundo. Várias linhagens celulares, de células-tronco bem caracterizadas a frações contendo diferentes tipos de células, têm sido investigadas em modelos animais. Apesar dos avanços obtidos na última década, na área de ciência básica, com relação a esta nova modalidade terapêutica, diversas questões permanecem sem resposta. Pouco ainda se sabe sobre os mecanismos através dos quais a terapia celular possa gerar resultados efetivos. Adicionalmente, a melhor via para o transplante, o número total e a concentração de células, e o melhor tipo celular permanecem questões importantes, ainda sem definição. É fato de que diversas células da medula óssea exercem seus efeitos através de mecanismos parácrinos e de que existe um complexo mecanismo de interação, contato e liberação de sinais entre essas células e as outras populações celulares nos órgãos lesados. Atualmente, a maioria dos estudos em humanos se concentra em células de origem adulta e autóloga, em oposição ao uso de células de origem embrionária. Esta revisão analisa os principais ensaios clínicos que utilizaram células derivadas de medula óssea em quatro cardiopatias: doença arterial coronariana aguda e crônica, e nas cardiomiopatias chagásica e dilatada. Os resultados desses estudos demonstram que o procedimento é seguro e exequível, e potencialmente eficaz. Inquestionavelmente, mais estudos pré-clínicos e clínicos são necessários para acessar o real potencial benefício desse novo modelo terapêutico.Cell transplantation for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases is being investigated in many centers throughout the world. Various cell lines, from well characterized stem cells to cell fractions containing different types of cells, have been investigated in animal models. Despite progress in the basic research of

  5. Stem cell therapy - Hope and scope in pediatric surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta Devendra; Sharma Shilpa

    2005-01-01

    A stem cell is an undifferentiated cell in the body with undetermined function capable of forming various tissues under definite signals received from the body. Stem cell research in animals using embryonal stem cells has been an ongoing program in the west with fruitful results. However, only limited information is available with the use of stem cells in human beings. Of the various sources of stem cells, umbilical cord blood stem cell research has shown potential for future treatment in Alz...

  6. Ethical dimension of circle Integrative Community Therapy on qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Paula Renata Miranda Dos; Cerencovich, Elisangela; Araújo, Laura Filomena Santos de; Bellato, Roseney; Maruyama, Sonia Ayako Tao

    2014-12-01

    This study discusses ethical issues in research involving human beings and seeks to understand the relationship between qualitative research and the ethical care guidelines for Integrative Community Therapy (ICT) circles based on Resolution 466/12 of the National Health Council of the Ministry of Health of Brazil. This is documentary research, which analyzed Resolution 466/12 and ICT circles seeking to make a connection between the ethical guidelines contained in both. The analysis of the corpus was directed toward the construction of the following results: the person's perception, cultural diversity and community. It also brings in consideration of the influence of the ethical dimension of the ICT circles on qualitative research. We conclude that ICT circles are innovative in the sense of the diversity of participants and respect for cultural and social differences. Thus, ICT circles promote acquisition of quality information for social research as well as compliance with the ethical guidelines outlined in Resolution No. 466/12. PMID:25830749

  7. Stem cells for cell replacement therapy: a therapeutic strategy for HD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Anne; Svendsen, Clive N

    2014-09-15

    Much interest has been expressed over the last couple of decades in the potential application of stem cells to medicine, both for research and diagnostic tools and as a source of donor cells for therapeutic purposes. Potential therapeutic applications include replacement of cells in many body organs where the capacity for intrinsic repair is limited, including the pancreas, heart, and brain. A key challenge is to generate the relevant donor cell types, and this is particularly challenging in the brain where the number of different neuronal subtypes is so great. Although dopamine neuron replacement in Parkinson's disease has been the focus of most clinical studies, great interest has been shown in this approach for other disorders, including Huntington's disease. Replacing complete neural circuits in the adult brain is clearly challenging, and there are many other complexities with regard to both donor cells and host. This article presents the pros and cons of taking a cell therapy approach in Huntington's disease. It considers the implantation both of cells that are already of the same neural subtype as those lost in the disease process (ie, primary fetal cells derived from the developing striatum) and those derived from stem cells, which require "directing" toward that phenotype. PMID:25216372

  8. [Novelties in the diagnostics and therapy of hairy cell leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sári, Eszter; Rajnai, Hajnalka; Dénes, Kitti; Bödör, Csaba; Csomor, Judit; Körösmezey, Gábor; Tárkányi, Ilona; Eid, Hanna; Nagy, Zsolt; Demeter, Judit

    2016-06-01

    Differential diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) and related disorders (hairy cell leukemia variant and splenic marginal zone lymphoma) is of utmost importance since the treatment and prognosis of these lymphomas differ. Since 2011 diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia has been easier because of discovery of the disease defining somatic mutation BRAF V600E mutation, which has been also known as driver mutation in malignant melanoma. The presence of this mutation enabled targeted molecular therapy in HCL as well. As first line therapy purine nucleoside analogues are the gold standard, but refractory/relapsed patient are candidates for targeted BRAF-inhibitor therapy. This manuscript serves as guidance in making diagnosis and standard treatment of HCL, and summarizes newest data about molecular therapy, including our single center experience collected from 75 patients. PMID:27275640

  9. Extinction Models for Cancer Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sehl, Mary; Zhou, Hua; Sinsheimer, Janet ,; Lange, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Cells with stem cell-like properties are now viewed as initiating and sustaining many cancers. This suggests that cancer can be cured by driving these cancer stem cells to extinction. The problem with this strategy is that ordinary stem cells are apt to be killed in the process. This paper sets bounds on the killing differential (difference between death rates of cancer stem cells and normal stem cells) that must exist for the survival of an adequate number of normal stem cells. Our main tool...

  10. International Society for Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQ Stem Cell Glossary Stem Cell Facts Other Societies/Networks Donate For the Public Events Save Save ... 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 International Society for Stem Cell Research 5215 Old Orchard Road, ...

  11. Sickle Cell Research: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease? Are there any restrictions on diet or exercise? Read More "Sickle Cell Disease" Articles "Be Sickle Smart!" / Sickle Cell Research: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow / Sickle Cell Disease: Symptoms, ...

  12. Methods for Stem Cell Production and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo (Inventor); Valluri, Jagan V. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for rapidly expanding a stem cell population with or without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention relates to methods for rapidly increasing the life span of stem cell populations without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention also relates to methods for increasing the sensitivity of cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions and in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The methods of the present invention can also be used to proliferate cancer cells by culturing them in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The present invention also relates to methods for testing the sensitivity of cancer cells and cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer cells and cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce tissue for use in transplantation by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors to promote differentiation of cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions.

  13. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report 2015. Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Darcy E; Cardoso, Wellington V; Gilpin, Sarah E; Majka, Susan; Ott, Harald; Randell, Scott H; Thébaud, Bernard; Waddell, Thomas; Weiss, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine, in collaboration with the NHLBI, Alpha-1 Foundation, American Thoracic Society, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, European Respiratory Society, International Society for Cellular Therapy, and the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, convened a workshop, "Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases," held July 27 to 30, 2015, at the University of Vermont. The conference objectives were to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are all rapidly expanding areas of study that both provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, discuss and debate current controversies, and identify future research directions and opportunities for both basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. This 10th anniversary conference was a follow up to five previous biennial conferences held at the University of Vermont in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, and 2013. Each of those conferences, also sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, American Thoracic Society, and respiratory disease foundations, has been important in helping guide research and funding priorities. The major conference recommendations are summarized at the end of the report and highlight both the significant progress and major challenges in these rapidly progressing fields. PMID:27509163

  14. Stem cells therapy in cerebral palsy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułak-Bejda, Agnieszka; Kułak, Piotr; Bejda, Grzegorz; Krajewska-Kułak, Elżbieta; Kułak, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically present the best available stem cell therapies for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The databases Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register for RCTs were searched for studies published from 1967 to August 2015. Systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled trials, uncontrolled trials, cohort studies, open-label studies, and a meta-analysis were analysed. Of 360 articles, seven fulfilled the inclusion criteria: one RCT and six were open-label trials. In these studies, one application of stem cells for children with CP was typical, and the total number of cells administered to patients ranged from 10(6) to 10(8)/kg. Different routes of cell delivery were used, though in most studies motor development was applied as an indicator of primary outcomes. In three articles, neuroimaging studies were also implemented to confirm the efficacy of the therapies. Observation periods varied from 3months to 5years, and patients' tolerance of the therapy was generally good. Stem cell therapy may improve some symptoms in patients with CP, though larger studies are needed to examine the impact of stem cell therapy upon CP. PMID:27004672

  15. Regulatory landscape for cell therapy--EU view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBlane, James W

    2015-09-01

    This article addresses regulation of cell therapies in the European Union (EU), covering cell sourcing and applications for clinical trials and marketing authorisation applications. Regulatory oversight of cell sourcing and review of applications for clinical trials with cell therapies are handled at national level, that is, separately with each country making its own decisions. For clinical trials, this can lead to different decisions in different countries for the same trial. A regulation is soon to come into force that will address this and introduce a more efficient clinical trial application process. However, at the marketing authorisation stage, the process is pan-national: the Committee for Human Medicinal Products (CHMP) is responsible for giving the final scientific opinion on all EU marketing authorisation applications for cell therapies: favourable scientific opinions are passed to the European Commission (EC) for further consultation and, if successful, grant of a marketing authorisation valid in all 28 EU countries. In its review of applications for marketing authorisations (MAAs) for cell therapies, the CHMP is obliged to consult the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT), who conduct detailed scientific assessments of these applications, with assessment by staff from national regulatory authorities and specialist advisors to the regulators. PMID:25997566

  16. Dendritic Cell-Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell Differentiation for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, Julia; Berk, Erik; Czerniecki, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    The success of cellular immunotherapies against cancer requires the generation of activated CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T-cells. The type of T-cell response generated (e.g., Th1 or Th2) will determine the efficacy of the therapy, and it is generally assumed that a type-1 response is needed for optimal cancer treatment. IL-17 producing T-cells (Th17/Tc17) play an important role in autoimmune diseases, but their function in cancer is more controversial. While some studies have shown a pro-cancerous role for IL-17, other studies have shown an anti-tumor function. The induction of polarized T-cell responses can be regulated by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are key regulators of the immune system with the ability to affect both innate and adaptive immune responses. These properties have led many researchers to study the use of ex vivo manipulated DCs for the treatment of various diseases, such as cancer and autoimmune diseases. While Th1/Tc1 cells are traditionally used for their potent anti-tumor responses, mounting evidence suggests Th17/Tc17 cells should be utilized by themselves or for the induction of optimal Th1 responses. It is therefore important to understand the factors involved in the induction of both type-1 and type-17 T-cell responses by DCs. PMID:26344346

  17. Dendritic Cell-Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell Differentiation for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Terhune

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The success of cellular immunotherapies against cancer requires the generation of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. The type of T-cell response generated (e.g., Th1 or Th2 will determine the efficacy of the therapy, and it is generally assumed that a type-1 response is needed for optimal cancer treatment. IL-17 producing T-cells (Th17/Tc17 play an important role in autoimmune diseases, but their function in cancer is more controversial. While some studies have shown a pro-cancerous role for IL-17, other studies have shown an anti-tumor function. The induction of polarized T-cell responses can be regulated by dendritic cells (DCs. DCs are key regulators of the immune system with the ability to affect both innate and adaptive immune responses. These properties have led many researchers to study the use of ex vivo manipulated DCs for the treatment of various diseases, such as cancer and autoimmune diseases. While Th1/Tc1 cells are traditionally used for their potent anti-tumor responses, mounting evidence suggests Th17/Tc17 cells should be utilized by themselves or for the induction of optimal Th1 responses. It is therefore important to understand the factors involved in the induction of both type-1 and type-17 T-cell responses by DCs.

  18. License amendment for neutron capture therapy at the MIT research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the issuance by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of a license amendment to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for the use of the MIT Research Reactor's (MITR-II) medical therapy facility beam for the treatment of humans using neutron capture therapy (NCT). This amendment is one of 11 required approvals. The others are those of internal MIT committees, review panels of the Tufts-New England Medical Center (NEMC), which is directing the program jointly with MIT, that of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and an NRC amendment to the NEMC hospital license. This amendment is the first of its type to be issued by NRC, and as such it establishes a precedent for the conduct of human therapy using neutron beams. Neutron capture therapy is a bimodal method for treating cancer that entails the administration of a tumor-seeking boronated drug followed by the irradiation of the target organ with neutrons. The latter cause boron nuclei to fission and thereby release densely ionizing helium and lithium nuclei, which destroy cancerous cells while leaving adjacent healthy cells undamaged. Neutron capture therapy is applicable to glioblastoma multiforme (brain tumors) and metastasized melanoma (skin cancer). Both Brookhaven National Laboratory and MIT conducted trials of NCT more than 30 yr ago. These were unsuccessful because the available boron drugs did not concentrate sufficiently in tumor and because the thermal neutron beams that were used did not enable neutrons to travel deep enough into the brain

  19. Cancer stem cells and resistance to chemo and radio therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Babar; Nie, Daotai

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs, or tumor initiating cells) are responsible for tumor initiation. If cancer treatment kills most of cancer cells in the stage of transit amplifying and differentiation without killing the stem cells, the surviving CSCs will eventually lead to recurrence of tumors. Studies have suggested that CSCs may be the primary mediators of resistance to chemo- and radio-therapy, leading to failure in cancer therapy. Numerous targets are being investigated for their potential involvement in the self-renewal and chemo- and radio-resistance of cancer cells. However, despite the intensive efforts invested into characterizing the role of cancer stem cells, there is a sense of uncertainty regarding the identity and number of these cells as well as the implications in cancer treatment. In this review, we will discuss the identification of CSCs by cell surface markers, the biology of CSCs, and the role of CSCs in resistance to radio- and chemo-therapy. This review will discuss the advances in targeting CSCs to improve the efficacy of chemo- and radio-therapy. PMID:22202026

  20. Evidence for self-renewing lung cancer stem cells and their implications in tumor initiation, progression, and targeted therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, James P.; Minna, John D.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of rare tumor cells with stem cell features first in leukemia and later in solid tumors has emerged as an important area in cancer research. It has been determined that these stem-like tumor cells, termed cancer stem cells, are the primary cellular component within a tumor that drives disease progression and metastasis. In addition to their stem-like ability to self-renew and differentiate, cancer stem cells are also enriched in cells resistant to conventional radiation therapy ...

  1. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this requirement, design study of the facility and the R and D's of the key components in this design are promoted by NIRS. According successful results of these activities, the dedicated compact facility will be realized in Gunma University. In this facility, the established irradiation method is expected to use, which is passive irradiation method with wobbler magnets and ridge filter. In this presentation, above R and D's will be presented together with clinical results and basic research activities at HIMAC

  2. Advances in stem cell therapy for the lower urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Shwun Lin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract diseases are emotionally and financially burdensome to the individual and society. Current treatments are ineffective or symptomatic. Conversely, stem cells (SCs are regenerative and may offer long-term solutions. Among the different types of SCs, bone marrow SCs (BMSCs and skeletal muscle-derived SCs (SkMSCs have received the most attention in pre-clinical and clinical trial studies concerning the lower urinary tract. In particular, clinical trials with SkMSCs for stress urinary incontinence have demonstrated impressive efficacy. However, both SkMSCs and BMSCs are difficult to obtain in quantity and therefore neither is optimal for the eventual implementation of SC therapy. On the other hand, adipose tissue-derived SCs (ADSCs can be easily and abundantly obtained from “discarded” adipose tissue. Moreover, in several head-on comparison studies, ADSCs have demonstrated equal or superior therapeutic potential compared to BMSCs. Therefore, across several different medical disciplines, including urology, ADSC research is gaining wide attention. For the regeneration of bladder tissues, possible differentiation of ADSCs into bladder smooth muscle and epithelial cells has been demonstrated. For the treatment of bladder diseases, specifically hyperlipidemia and associated overactive bladder, ADSCs have also demonstrated efficacy. For the treatment of urethral sphincter dysfunction associated with birth trauma and hormonal deficiency, ADSC therapy was also beneficial. Finally, ADSCs were able to restore erectile function in various types of erectile dysfunction (ED, including those associated with diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and nerve injuries. Thus, ADSCs have demonstrated remarkable therapeutic potentials for the lower urinary tract.

  3. Cytokine-induced killer cell transplantation: an innovative adoptive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binh Thanh Vu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells areeffector immune cells with anti-tumor potency of T lymphocytes as well as non-major histocompatibility complex restricted elimination of natural killer cells. Preclinical models have shown that CIK cells have strong anti-tumor killing capacity against a variety of blood cancers and solid tumors. Clinical studies confirm the advantages of CIK cells, including the safety of CIK cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer. A preeminent property of CIK cells, which may help them to overcome some of the limitations of other adoptive immunotherapy strategies, is their ability to be expanded ex vivo to high numbers. Their robust in vitro proliferation provides adequate quantity for multiple adoptive infusions. The tumor-killing capacity of CIK cells is mainly based on the interaction between NKG2D molecules on CIK cells and MIC A/B or ULBP molecules on tumor cells. Moreover, CIK cells have a reduced allo-reactivity across HLA-barriers. This review summarizes the clinical applications of CIK cells and updates of combining CIK cells with other therapies. This review highlights the benefits of CIK cell use in clinical treatment of cancer. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(3.000: 533-541

  4. Progress toward cell-directed therapy for phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Co

    2008-08-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most common inborn errors of metabolism with an annual incidence of approximately 1:16,000 live births in North America. Contemporary therapy relies upon lifelong dietary protein restriction and supplementation with phenylalanine-free medical foods. This therapy is expensive and unpalatable; dietary compliance is difficult to maintain throughout life. Non-adherence to the diet is associated with learning disabilities, adult-onset neurodegenerative disease, and maternal PKU syndrome. The fervent dream of many individuals with PKU is a more permanent cure for this disease. This paper will review ongoing efforts to develop viable cell-directed therapies, in particular cell transplantation and gene therapy, for the treatment of PKU. PMID:18498375

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa El-Badri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with significant morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular, nervous, and renal complications. Attempts to cure diabetes mellitus using islet transplantation have been successful in providing a source for insulin secreting cells. However, limited donors, graft rejection, the need for continued immune suppression, and exhaustion of the donor cell pool prompted the search for a more sustained source of insulin secreting cells. Stem cell therapy is a promising alternative for islet transplantation in type 2 diabetic patients who fail to control hyperglycemia even with insulin injection. Autologous stem cell transplantation may provide the best outcome for those patients, since autologous cells are readily available and do not entail prolonged hospital stays or sustained immunotoxic therapy. Among autologous adult stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs therapy has been applied with varying degrees of success in both animal models and in clinical trials. This review will focus on the advantages of MSCs over other types of stem cells and the possible mechanisms by which MSCs transplant restores normoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients. Sources of MSCs including autologous cells from diabetic patients and the use of various differentiation protocols in relation to best transplant outcome will be discussed.

  6. Stem cell therapy: A novel treatment approach for oral mucosal lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G N Suma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have enormous potential to alleviate sufferings of many diseases that currently have no effective therapy. The research in this field is growing at an exponential rate. Stem cells are master cells that have specialized capability for self-renewal, potency and capability to differentiate to many cell types. At present, the adult mesenchymal stem cells are being used in the head and neck region for orofacial regeneration (including enamel, dentin, pulp and alveolar bone in lieu of their proliferative and regenerative properties, their use in the treatment of oral mucosal lesions is still in budding stages. Moreover, there is scanty literature available regarding role of stem cell therapy in the treatment of commonly seen oral mucosal lesions like oral submucous fibrosis, oral lichen planus, oral ulcers and oral mucositis. The present review will focus on the current knowledge about the role of stem cell therapies in oral mucosal lesions and could facilitate new advancements in this area (articles were obtained from electronic media like PubMed, EBSCO, Cochrane and Medline etc., from year 2000 to 2014 to review the role of stem cell therapy in oral mucosal lesions.

  7. Stem cell therapy: A novel treatment approach for oral mucosal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suma, G N; Arora, Madhu Pruthi; Lakhanpal, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells have enormous potential to alleviate sufferings of many diseases that currently have no effective therapy. The research in this field is growing at an exponential rate. Stem cells are master cells that have specialized capability for self-renewal, potency and capability to differentiate to many cell types. At present, the adult mesenchymal stem cells are being used in the head and neck region for orofacial regeneration (including enamel, dentin, pulp and alveolar bone) in lieu of their proliferative and regenerative properties, their use in the treatment of oral mucosal lesions is still in budding stages. Moreover, there is scanty literature available regarding role of stem cell therapy in the treatment of commonly seen oral mucosal lesions like oral submucous fibrosis, oral lichen planus, oral ulcers and oral mucositis. The present review will focus on the current knowledge about the role of stem cell therapies in oral mucosal lesions and could facilitate new advancements in this area (articles were obtained from electronic media like PubMed, EBSCO, Cochrane and Medline etc., from year 2000 to 2014 to review the role of stem cell therapy in oral mucosal lesions). PMID:25709329

  8. Recent advances in cell-based therapy for Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Cooper, Oliver; Vinuela, Angel;

    2008-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss recent advances in the field of cell therapy for Parkinson disease (PD). They compare and contrast recent clinical trials using fetal dopaminergic neurons. They attribute differences in cell preparation techniques, cell type specification, and immunosuppression...... progress in enrichment and purification strategies of stem cell-derived dopaminergic midbrain neurons. They conclude that recent advances in cell therapy for PD will create a viable long-term treatment option for synaptic repair for this debilitating disease....... as reasons for variable outcome and for some of the side effects observed in these clinical trials. To address ethical, practical, and technical issues related to the use of fetal cell sources, alternative sources of therapeutic dopaminergic neurons are being developed. The authors describe the...

  9. Anti-B cell antibody therapies for inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Jayne, David R W

    2014-01-01

    Several monoclonal antibodies targeting B cells have been tested as therapeutics for inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We review important observations from randomized clinical trials regarding the efficacy and safety of anti-B cell antibody-based therapies for rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus...... erythematosus, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, and primary Sjögren's syndrome. For some anti-B cell agents, clinical benefits have been convincingly demonstrated, while other B cell-targeted therapies failed to improve outcomes when added to standard......-of-care treatment or were associated with increased rates of adverse events. Although the risk-benefit balance seems to be acceptable for currently licensed anti-B cell agents, additional studies are required to fully assess the safety of treatment regimens involving prolonged interference with B cell counts and...

  10. Breast cancer stem-like cells and breast cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niansong Qian; Nobuko Kawaguchi-Sakita; Masakazu Toi

    2010-01-01

    @@ Until the early 1990s, human cancers were considered a morphologically heterogeneous population of cells. In 1997, Bonnet et al[1] demonstrated that a small population of leukemia cells was able to differentiate in vivo into leukemic blasts, indicating that the leukemic clone was organized as a hierarchy; this was subsequently denoted as cancer stem like cells (CSCs). CSCs are cancer cells that possess characteristics associated with normal stem cells and have the specific ability to give rise to all cell types found in a particular cancer. One reason for the failure of traditional anti tumor therapies might be their inability to eradicate CSCs. Therefore, therapies must identify and destroy CSCs in both primary and metastatic tumors.

  11. Messenger RNA electroporation: an efficient tool in immunotherapy and stem cell research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Ponsaerts

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades medicine has developed tremendously, but still many diseases are incurable. The last years, cellular (gene therapy has become a hot topic in biomedical research for the potential treatment of cancer, AIDS and diseases involving cell loss or degeneration. Here, we will focus on two major areas within cellular therapy, cellular immunotherapy and stem cell therapy, that could benefit from the introduction of neo-expressed genes through mRNA electroporation for basic research as well as for clinical applications. For cellular immunotherapy, we will provide a state-of-the-art on loading antigen-presenting cells with antigens in the mRNA format for manipulation of T cell immunity. In the area of stem cell research, we will highlight current gene transfer methods into adult and embryonic stem cells and discuss the use of mRNA electroporation for controlling guided differentiation of stem cells into specialized cell lineages.

  12. Overcoming challenges to initiating cell therapy clinical trials in rapidly developing countries: India as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Sowmya; Rao, Mahendra; Keating, Armand; Srivastava, Alok

    2013-08-01

    Increasingly, a number of rapidly developing countries, including India, China, Brazil, and others, are becoming global hot spots for the development of regenerative medicine applications, including stem cell-based therapies. Identifying and overcoming regulatory and translational research challenges and promoting scientific and ethical clinical trials with cells will help curb the growth of stem cell tourism for unproven therapies. It will also enable academic investigators, local regulators, and national and international biotechnology and biopharmaceutical companies to accelerate stem cell-based clinical research that could lead to effective innovative treatments in these regions. Using India as a model system and obtaining input from regulators, clinicians, academics, and industry representatives across the stem cell field in India, we reviewed the role of key agencies and processes involved in this field. We have identified areas that need attention and here provide solutions from other established and functioning models in the world to streamline and unify the regulatory and ethics approval processes for cell-based therapies. We also make recommendations to check the growth and functioning of clinics offering unproven treatments. Addressing these issues will remove considerable hurdles to both local and international investigators, accelerate the pace of research and development, and create a quality environment for reliable products to emerge. By doing so, these countries would have taken one important step to move to the forefront of stem cell-based therapeutics. PMID:23836804

  13. Development of gene and stem cell therapy for ocular neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jing-Xue; Wang, Ning-Li; Lu, Qing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases pose a serious threat to eye health, but there is currently no effective treatment available. Recent years have witnessed rapid development of several cutting-edge technologies, such as gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and tissue engineering. Due to the special features of ocular structure, some of these technologies have been translated into ophthalmological clinic practice with fruitful achievements, setting a good example for other fields. This paper reviews t...

  14. Stem cells have the potential to rejuvenate regenerative medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J; Fillmore, Randolph; Borlongan, Cesar V; Sanberg, Paul R

    2010-10-01

    The increasing number of publications featuring the use of stem cells in regenerative processes supports the idea that they are revolutionizing regenerative medicine research. In an analysis of the articles published in the journal Cell Transplantation - The Regenerative Medicine Journal between 2008 and 2009, which reveals the topics and categories that are on the cutting edge of regenerative medicine research, stem cells are becoming increasingly relevant as the "runner-up" category to "neuroscience" related articles. The high volume of stem cell research casts a bright light on the hope for stem cells and their role in regenerative medicine as a number of reports deal with research using stem cells entering, or seeking approval for, clinical trials. The "methods and new technologies" and "tissue engineering" sections were almost equally as popular, and in part, reflect attempts to maximize the potential of stem cells and other treatments for the repair of damaged tissue. Transplantation studies were again more popular than non-transplantation, and the contribution of stem cell-related transplants was greater than other types of transplants. The non-transplantation articles were predominantly related to new methods for the preparation, isolation and manipulation of materials for transplant by specific culture media, gene therapy, medicines, dietary supplements, and co-culturing with other cells and further elucidation of disease mechanisms. A sizeable proportion of the transplantation articles reported on how previously new methods may have aided the ability of the cells or tissue to exert beneficial effects following transplantation. PMID:20885363

  15. Stem Cell Therapy to Treat Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Liew, Chee Gee; Andrews, Peter W.

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets offers a direct treatment for type 1 diabetes and in some cases, insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes. However, its widespread use is hampered by a shortage of donor organs. Many extant studies have focused on deriving β-cell progenitors from pancreas and pluripotent stem cells. Efforts to generate β-cells in vitro will help elucidate the mechanisms of β-cell formation and thus provide a versatile in vivo system to evaluate the therapeutic potential of these ...

  16. MedAustron - Ion-Beam Therapy and Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MedAustron is a synchrotron-based light-ion beam therapy center for cancer treatment as well as for clinical and non-clinical research, currently in the commissioning phase in Wiener Neustadt, Austria. Recently, the first proton beam was transported successfully to one of the four irradiation rooms. Whilst the choice of basic machine parameters was driven by medical requirements, i.e. 60 MeV protons and 120 MeV/A to 400 MeV/A carbon ions, the accelerator complex design was also optimized to offer flexibility for research operation. The potential of the synchrotron is being exploited to increase the maximum proton energy far beyond the medical needs to up to 800 MeV, for experimental physics applications, mainly in the areas of proton scattering and detector research. The accelerator layout allows for the installation of up to four ion source-spectrometer units, to provide various ion types besides the clinical used protons and carbon ions. Besides experimental physics, the two main non-clinical research disciplines are medical radiation physics and radiation biology. To decouple research and medical operation, a dedicated irradiation room for non-clinical research was included providing the installation of different experiments. In addition, several labs have been equipped with appropriate devices for preparing and analyzing radio-biological samples. This presentation gives a status overview over the whole project and highlights the non-clinical research opportunities at MedAustron. (Author)

  17. Induced stem cells as a novel multiple sclerosis therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chong; Liu, Yan-qun; Guan, Yang-tai; Zhang, Guang-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell replacement is providing hope for many degenerative diseases that lack effective therapeutic methods including multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Transplantation of neural stem cells or mesenchymal stem cells is a potential therapy for MS thanks to their capacity for cell repopulation as well as for their immunomodulatory and neurotrophic properties. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC), an emerging cell source in regenerative medicine, is also being tested for the treatment of MS. Remarkable improvement in mobility and robust remyelination have been observed after transplantation of iPSC-derived neural cells into demyelinated models. Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into induced neural cells, such as induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) and induced oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (iOPCs), without passing through the pluripotency stage, is an alternative for transplantation that has been proved effective in the congenital hypomyelination model. iPSC technology is rapidly progressing as efforts are being made to increase the efficiency of iPSC therapy and reduce its potential side effects. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in application of stem cells, with particular focus on induced stem/progenitor cells (iPSCs, iNSC, iOPCs), which are promising in the treatment of MS. PMID:25732737

  18. Terapia celular no acidente vascular cerebral Cell therapy in strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia Mendez-Otero

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available O AVC é o recordista em número de óbitos e a maior causa de incapacidade no Brasil. Apesar das inúmeras pesquisas realizadas ao longo dos últimos anos não há terapias farmacológicas adequadas para este quadro e, neste cenário, as terapias celulares vêm sendo consideradas como alternativas terapêuticas para diminuir as perdas funcionais decorrentes do AVC. Nesta revisão comentaremos os resultados de diversos estudos pré-clinicos e de alguns clínicos que utilizaram diferentes tipos de células-tronco em AVC.Stroke is the leading cause of death and incapacity in Brazil. Over the last few years, numerous preclinical and clinical studies have been carried out, however to date, none of the drugs tested in these studies were effective in patients. The emerging field of stem cell research has raised hope of therapy to ameliorate the functional loss after strokes. In this review we will discuss the results of several preclinical studies and clinical trials using different types of stem cells in the treatment of strokes.

  19. Thyroid cell lines in research on goitrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, H; Peter, H J; Asmis, L; Studer, H

    1991-12-01

    Thyroid cell lines have contributed a lot to the understanding of goitrogenesis. The cell lines mostly used in thyroid research are briefly discussed, namely the rat thyroid cell lines FRTL and FRTL-5, the porcine thyroid cell lines PORTHOS and ARTHOS, The sheep thyroid cell lines OVNIS 5H and 6H, the cat thyroid cell lines PETCAT 1 to 4 and ROMCAT, and the human thyroid cell lines FTC-133 and HTh 74. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and COS-7 cells, stably transfected with TSH receptor cDNA and expressing a functional TSH receptor, are discussed as examples for non-thyroidal cells, transfected with thyroid genes. PMID:1726925

  20. Reassessing target antigens for adoptive T cell therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Christian S.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy can target and kill widespread malignant cells thereby inducing durable clinical responses in melanoma and selected other malignances. However, many commonly targeted tumor antigens are also expressed by healthy tissues, and T cells do not distinguish between benign and malignant tissues if both express the target antigen. As such, autoimmune toxicity from T-cell-mediated destruction of normal tissue has limited the development and adoption of this otherwise promising type of cancer therapy. A review of the unique biology of T-cell therapy and of recent clinical experience compels a reassessment of target antigens that traditionally have been viewed from the perspective of weaker immunotherapeutic modalities. In selecting target antigens for adoptive T-cell therapy, expression by tumors and not by essential healthy tissues is of paramount importance. The risk of autoimmune adverse events can be further mitigated by generating antigen receptors using strategies that reduce the chance of cross-reactivity against epitopes in unintended targets. In general, a circumspect approach to target selection and thoughtful preclinical and clinical studies are pivotal to the ongoing advancement of these promising treatments. PMID:24142051

  1. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Xuanbin Wang; Yibin Feng; Ning Wang; Fan Cheung; Hor Yue Tan; Sen Zhong; Charlie Li; Seiichi Kobayashi

    2014-01-01

    Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and...

  2. Potential sources of stem cells as a regenerative therapy for Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Abir Oueida El-Sadik

    2010-01-01

    Abir Oueida El-SadikDepartment of Anatomy and Embryology, Scientific Research Unit, Female Health Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Stem cells are believed to hold enormous promise as potential replacement therapy in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Stem cells were investigated to be the alternative therapeutic source capable of differentiating into dopamine (DA) neurons. Multiple important sign...

  3. Photodynamic therapy for multi-resistant cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen F. Nikkels

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare group of proliferative disorders. Beside cutaneous involvement, other internal organs can be affected. The treatment of cutaneous lesions is difficult and relies on topical corticosteroids, carmustine, nitrogen mustard, and photochemotherapy. Systemic steroids and vinblastine are used for recalcitrant skin lesions. However, some cases fail to respond. An 18-month old boy presented a CD1a+, S100a+ Langerhans cell histocytosis with cutaneous and severe scalp involvement. Topical corticosteroids and nitrogen mustard failed to improve the skin lesions. Systemic corticosteroids and vinblastine improved the truncal involvement but had no effect on the scalp lesions. Methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL based photodynamic therapy (PDT resulted in a significant regression of the scalp lesions. Control histology revealed an almost complete clearance of the tumor infiltrate. Clinical follow-up after six months showed no recurrence. Although spontaneous regression of cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis is observed, the rapid effect of photodynamic therapy after several failures of other treatment suggests that photodynamic therapy was successful. As far as we know this is the first report of photodynamic therapy for refractory skin lesions. Larger series are needed to determine whether photodynamic therapy deserves a place in the treatment of multiresistant cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

  4. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. ► Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. ► Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. ► Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1+/−K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5–7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 ± 5 (SEM) mm3 shrunk by 76 ± 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  5. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuccitelli, Richard, E-mail: rich@bioelectromed.com [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Tang, Jean Y. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  6. Gene Profiling Technique to Accelerate Stem Cell Therapies for Eye Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to accelerate stem cell therapies for eye diseases Gene profiling technique to accelerate stem cell therapies for ... The method simultaneously measures the expression of multiple genes, allowing scientists to quickly characterize cells according to ...

  7. Transplantation Tolerance Induction: Cell Therapies and Their Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalea, Joseph R.; Tomita, Yusuke; Lindholm, Christopher R.; Burlingham, William

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have been studied extensively in the context of transplantation tolerance induction. The most successful protocols have relied on transfusion of bone marrow prior to the transplantation of a renal allograft. However, it is not clear that stem cells found in bone marrow are required in order to render a transplant candidate immunologically tolerant. Accordingly, mesenchymal stem cells, regulatory myeloid cells, T regulatory cells, and other cell types are being tested as possible routes to tolerance induction, in the absence of donor-derived stem cells. Early data with each of these cell types have been encouraging. However, the induction regimen capable of achieving consistent tolerance, while avoiding unwanted sided effects, and which is scalable to the human patient, has yet to be identified. Here, we present the status of investigations of various tolerogenic cell types and the mechanistic rationale for their use in tolerance induction protocols. PMID:27014267

  8. Setting FIRES to Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Roxanne Grietz

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this lesson is to present the basic scientific knowledge about stem cells, the promise of stem cell research to medicine, and the ethical considerations and arguments involved. One of the challenges of discussing stem cell research is that the field is constantly evolving and the most current information changes almost daily. Few…

  9. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  10. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiachuan; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  11. Targeted therapy for squamous cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Rachel G.; Watanabe, Hideo; Meyerson, Matthew; Hammerman, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) is the second most common subtype of non-small-cell lung cancer and leads to 40,000–50,000 deaths per year in the USA. Management of non-small-cell lung cancer has dramatically changed over the past decade with the introduction of targeted therapeutic agents for genotypically selected individuals with lung adenocarcinoma. These agents lead to improved outcomes, and it has now become the standard of care to perform routine molecular genotyping of lung adenoc...

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Risaku

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome affects military personnel and civilians following the uncontrolled dispersal of radiation, such as that caused by detonation of nuclear devices and inappropriate medical treatments. Therefore, there is a growing need for medical interventions that facilitate the improved recovery of victims and patients. One promising approach may be cell therapy, which, when appropriately implemented, may facilitate recovery from whole body injuries. This editorial highlights the current knowledge regarding the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the benefits and limitations of which are under investigation. Establishing successful therapies for acute radiation syndrome may require using such a therapeutic approach in addition to conventional approaches. PMID:27182446

  13. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.;

    2009-01-01

    DNA into malignant cells causing them to die. Since SCLC is a highly disseminated malignancy, the gene therapeutic agent must be administered systemically, obligating a high level of targeting of tumor tissue and the use of delivery vehicles designed for systemic circulation of the therapeutic DNA......Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  14. Derivation of porcine pluripotent stem cells for biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Yow-Ling; Yang, Jenn-Rong; Liao, Yu-Jing; Kuo, Ting-Yung; Liao, Chia-Hsin; Kang, Ching-Hsun; Tai, Chein; Anderson, Gary B; Chen, Lih-Ren

    2016-07-01

    Pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), embryonic germ cells (EGCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are capable of self-renew and limitlessly proliferating in vitro with undifferentiated characteristics. They are able to differentiate in vitro, spontaneously or responding to suitable signals, into cells of all three primary germ layers. Consequently, these pluripotent stem cells will be valuable sources for cell replacement therapy in numerous disorders. However, the promise of human ESCs and EGCs is cramped by the ethical argument about destroying embryos and fetuses for cell line creation. Moreover, there are still carcinogenic risks existing toward the goal of clinical application for human ESCs, EGCs, and iPSCs. Therefore, a suitable animal model for stem cell research will benefit the further development of human stem cell technology. The pigs, on the basis of their similarity in anatomy, immunology, physiology, and biochemical properties, have been wide used as model animals in the study of various human diseases. The development of porcine pluripotent stem cell lines will hold the opportunity to provide an excellent material for human counterpart to the transplantation in biomedical research and further development of cell-based therapeutic strategy. PMID:27158128

  15. Love: an important dimension in marital research and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl-Emde, Astrid; Thomas, Volker; Willi, Jürg

    2003-01-01

    How do men and women describe and assess their relationship? What themes are decisive for its quality and stability? To answer such questions, we investigated a random sample of 204 married couples (reference sample), and 31 married couples undergoing psychotherapy (clinical sample) using a newly developed questionnaire. The participating couples were asked to evaluate a total of 19 themes with respect to their importance for the couple's connectedness. Although only rarely directly addressed in couple therapy and investigated in couple research, the theme "Love" proved to be the decisive factor for quality and stability. The results of the present study, therefore, indicate that "Love" should be investigated more thoroughly in couple research and included more actively in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. PMID:12879597

  16. Multisystemic Therapy(®) : Clinical Overview, Outcomes, and Implementation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henggeler, Scott W; Schaeffer, Cindy M

    2016-09-01

    Multisystemic therapy (MST) is an evidence-based treatment originally developed for youth with serious antisocial behavior who are at high risk for out-of-home placement and their families; and subsequently adapted to address other challenging clinical problems experience by youths and their families. The social-ecological theoretical framework of MST is presented as well as its home-based model of treatment delivery, defining clinical intervention strategies, and ongoing quality assurance/quality improvement system. With more than 100 peer-reviewed outcome and implementation journal articles published as of January 2016, the majority by independent investigators, MST is one of the most extensively evaluated family based treatments. Outcome research has yielded almost uniformly favorable results for youths and families, and implementation research has demonstrated the importance of treatment and program fidelity in achieving such outcomes. PMID:27370172

  17. Progress in gene and cell therapy for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesenbach, Uta; Alton, Eric W F W

    2012-01-01

    Although the development of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) was high priority for many groups in academia and industry in the first 10 to 15 years after cloning the gene, more recently active research into CF gene therapy is only being performed by a small number of committed, mainly academic, groups. However, despite the waning enthusiasm, which is largely due to the realisation that gene transfer into lungs is more difficult than originally thought and the fact that meaningful clinical trials are expensive and difficult to perform, gene therapy continues to hold promise for the treatment of CF lung disease. Problems related to repeat administration of adenovirus and adeno-associated virus-based vectors led to a focus on non-viral vectors in clinical trials. The UK CF Gene Therapy Consortium is currently running the only active gene therapy programme, aimed at assessing if repeated administration of a non-viral gene transfer agent can improve CF lung disease. However, the recent suggestion that lentiviral vectors may be able to evade the immune system and, thereby, allow for repeat administration and long lasting expression opens new doors for the use of viral vectors in the context of CF gene therapy. In addition, early pre-clinical studies have recently been initiated to address cell therapy-based approaches for CF. This involves systemic and topical administration of a variety of stem/progenitor cells, as well as first attempts as producing a tissue-engineered lung. Recent studies in viral and non-viral vector developments, as well as cell therapy will be discussed and an update on clinical gene therapy studies will be provided here. PMID:22229571

  18. On dendritic cell-based therapy for cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Morikazu Onji; Sk. Md. Fazle Akbar

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most prevalent antigen-presenting cell in vivo, had been widely characterized in the last three decades. DCs are present in almost all tissues of the body and play cardinal roles in recognition of microbial agents,autoantigens, allergens and alloantigen. DCs process the microbial agents or their antigens and migrate to lymphoid tissues to present the antigenic peptide to lymphocytes. This leads to activation of antigen-specific lymphocytes. Initially, it was assumed that DCs are principally involved in the induction and maintenance of adaptive immune responses, but now it is evident that DCs also have important roles in innate immunity. These features make DCs very good candidates for therapy against various pathological conditions including malignancies. Initially, DC-based therapy was used in animal models of cancers. Data from these studies inspired considerable optimism and DC-based therapies was started in human cancers 8 years ago. In general,DC-based therapy has been found to be safe in patients with cancers, although few controlled trials have been conducted in this regard. Because the fundamentals principles of human cancers and animal models of cancers are different, the therapeutic efficacy of the ongoing regime of DC-based therapy in cancer patients is not satisfactory. In this review, we covered the various aspects that should be considered for developing better regime of DC-based therapy for human cancers.

  19. Tissue engineering and cell based therapies, from the bench to the clinic: The potential to replace, repair and regenerate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fodor William L

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The field of Regenerative Biology as it applies to Regenerative Medicine is an increasingly expanding area of research with hopes of providing therapeutic treatments for diseases and/or injuries that conventional medicines and even new biologic drug therapies cannot effectively treat. Extensive research in the area of Regenerative Medicine is focused on the development of cells, tissues and organs for the purpose of restoring function through transplantation. The general belief is that replacement, repair and restoration of function is best accomplished by cells, tissues or organs that can perform the appropriate physiologic/metabolic duties better than any mechanical device, recombinant protein therapeutic or chemical compound. Several strategies are currently being investigated and include, cell therapies derived from autologous primary cell isolates, cell therapies derived from established cell lines, cell therapies derived from a variety of stem cells, including bone marrow/mesenchymal stem cells, cord blood stem cells, embryonic stem cells, as well as cells tissues and organs from genetically modified animals. This mini-review is not meant to be exhaustive, but aims to highlight clinical applications for the four areas of research listed above and will address a few key advances and a few of the hurdles yet to be overcome as the technology and science improve the likelihood that Regenerative Medicine will become clinically routine.

  20. Excellence in cell signaling research recognized with major new award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Stephan M

    2013-01-01

    The newly installed Life Sciences Breakthrough Prize (http://www.breakthroughprizeinlifesciences.org/), which comes with more than double the financial reward of the Nobel Prize, has been awarded to several world-leaders in the field of cancer-related cell signaling and therapy research: Lewis C. Cantley (PI3 kinase), Hans Clevers (Wnt signaling), Charles L. Sawyers (signaling-targeted cancer therapy), Bert Vogelstein (colorectal cancer signaling) and Robert Weinberg (Ras & other cancer-relevant genes). They have all made remarkable contributions to our understanding of cell communication and malignancies over the last decades. Needless to say that virtually all other awardees of the 11 scientists honored in 2013 have also, in one way or another, touched upon signaling molecules, highlighting the fundamental interdisciplinarity and significance of signal transduction for living cells in general. For example, Shinya Yamanaka's exciting work was built on the four transcriptional signaling proteins, Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. PMID:23497077

  1. Ethical dimension of circle Integrative Community Therapy on qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Renata Miranda dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses ethical issues in research involving human beings and seeks to understand the relationship between qualitative research and the ethical care guidelines for Integrative Community Therapy (ICT circles based on Resolution 466/12 of the National Health Council of the Ministry of Health of Brazil. This is documentary research, which analyzed Resolution 466/12 and ICT circles seeking to make a connection between the ethical guidelines contained in both. The analysis of the corpus was directed toward the construction of the following results: the person's perception, cultural diversity and community. It also brings in consideration of the influence of the ethical dimension of the ICT circles on qualitative research. We conclude that ICT circles are innovative in the sense of the diversity of participants and respect for cultural and social differences. Thus, ICT circles promote acquisition of quality information for social research as well as compliance with the ethical guidelines outlined in Resolution No. 466/12.

  2. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  3. Stem Cell Therapy for Treatment of Ocular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Priya Sivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustenance of visual function is the ultimate focus of ophthalmologists. Failure of complete recovery of visual function and complications that follow conventional treatments have shifted search to a new form of therapy using stem cells. Stem cell progenitors play a major role in replenishing degenerated cells despite being present in low quantity and quiescence in our body. Unlike other tissues and cells, regeneration of new optic cells responsible for visual function is rarely observed. Understanding the transcription factors and genes responsible for optic cells development will assist scientists in formulating a strategy to activate and direct stem cells renewal and differentiation. We review the processes of human eye development and address the strategies that have been exploited in an effort to regain visual function in the preclinical and clinical state. The update of clinical findings of patients receiving stem cell treatment is also presented.

  4. Stem Cell Therapy for Treatment of Ocular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Padma Priya; Syed, Sakinah; Mok, Pooi-Ling; Higuchi, Akon; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A.; Munusamy, Murugan A.; Awang Hamat, Rukman; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Sustenance of visual function is the ultimate focus of ophthalmologists. Failure of complete recovery of visual function and complications that follow conventional treatments have shifted search to a new form of therapy using stem cells. Stem cell progenitors play a major role in replenishing degenerated cells despite being present in low quantity and quiescence in our body. Unlike other tissues and cells, regeneration of new optic cells responsible for visual function is rarely observed. Understanding the transcription factors and genes responsible for optic cells development will assist scientists in formulating a strategy to activate and direct stem cells renewal and differentiation. We review the processes of human eye development and address the strategies that have been exploited in an effort to regain visual function in the preclinical and clinical state. The update of clinical findings of patients receiving stem cell treatment is also presented. PMID:27293447

  5. Effects of Photodynamic Therapy on the Ultrastructure of Glioma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the change in ultrastructure of C6 glioma cells after photodynamic therapy (PDT), to compare morphological differences in necrosis and apoptosis before and after PDT treatment, and to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy on the blood brain tumor barrier (BTB) of C6 glioma. Methods The model was produced by transplanting C6 glioma cells cultured in vitro using Peterson method into the caudate nuclei of Wister rats. The experiment group received PDT for two weeks after the operation. The sub-cellular structure, blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and BTB in both groups were observed under electron microscope. Results Apoptosis in different phases and necrosis could be observed in some C6 glioma cells.Swelling occurred on the ultrastructure of cellular organs such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum in most of the cells.Damage to the BTB, reduction of the number of cellular organs in endothelial cells of the capillary blood vessels, stretch of the tight junction, and enlargement of the gaps between endothelial cells were also seen in the experiment group. Meanwhile,limited impact on the normal sub-cellular structures and BBB was observed. Conclusion PDT could induce apoptosis and necrosis of C6 glioma cells due to the damage to the ultrastructure of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. The weakened function of C6 glioma BTB initiated by PDT makes it possible to perform a combined therapy of PDT and chemotherapy for glioma.

  6. Scientific Reports of Plasma Medicine and its Mechanism for Therapy in Plasma Bioscience Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-09-01

    Scientific reports of plasma medicine and its basic mechanism for therapy will be introduced, especially, performed in Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Korea. We have investigated enhanced anticancer effect of monocytes and macrophages activated by nonthermal plasma which act as immune-modulator on these immune cells. Further, we investigated the action of the nanosecond pulsed plasma activated media (NPPAM) on the lung cancer cells and its DNA oxidation pathway. We observed OD induced apoptosis on melanocytes G361 cancer cells through DNA damage signaling cascade. We also studied DNA oxidation by extracting DNA from treated cancer cell and analyzed the effects of OD/OH/D2O2/H2O2 on protein modification and oxidation. Additionally, we attempted molecular docking approaches to check the action of D2O2 on the apoptosis related genes.

  7. Monoclonal T-cell receptors: new reagents for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauss, Hans J; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Thomas, Sharyn; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Little, Ann-Margaret; Pospori, Constantina; King, Judy; Morris, Emma C

    2007-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an effective form of immunotherapy for persistent virus infections and cancer. A major limitation of adoptive therapy is the inability to isolate antigen-specific T lymphocytes reproducibly. The demonstration that cloned T-cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T-cell therapy. TCR gene-modified lymphocytes display antigen-specific function in vitro, and were shown to protect against virus infection and tumor growth in animal models. A recent trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted in all and reduced melanoma burden in 2/15 patients. In future trials, it may be possible to use TCR gene transfer to equip helper and cytotoxic T cells with new antigen-specificity, allowing both T-cell subsets to cooperate in achieving improved clinical responses. Sequence modifications of TCR genes are being explored to enhance TCR surface expression, while minimizing the risk of pairing between introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Current T-cell transduction protocols that trigger T-cell differentiation need to be modified to generate "undifferentiated" T cells, which, upon adoptive transfer, display improved in vivo expansion and survival. Both, expression of only the introduced TCR chains and the production of naïve T cells may be possible in the future by TCR gene transfer into stem cells. PMID:17637721

  8. Novel Therapies for Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Foon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive B-cell lymphoma (BCL comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, Burkitt lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL. DLBCL, with its 3 subtypes, is the most common type of lymphoma. Advances in chemoimmunotherapy have substantially improved disease control. However, depending on the subtype, patients with DLBCL still exhibit substantially different survival rates. In MCL, a mature B-cell lymphoma, the addition of rituximab to conventional chemotherapy regimens has increased response rates, but not survival. Burkitt lymphoma, the most aggressive BCL, is characterized by a high proliferative index and requires more intensive chemotherapy regimens than DLBCL. Hence, there is a need for more effective therapies for all three diseases. Increased understanding of the molecular features of aggressive BCL has led to the development of a range of novel therapies, many of which target the tumor in a tailored manner and are summarized in this paper.

  9. Gene, Stem Cell, and Alternative Therapies for SCA 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jacob L.; O'Connor, Deirdre M.; Donsante, Anthony; Boulis, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction. In disease pathogenesis, polyglutamine expansion within Ataxin-1, a gene involved in transcriptional repression, causes protein nuclear inclusions to form. Most notably, neuronal dysfunction presents in Purkinje cells. However, the effect of mutant Ataxin-1 is not entirely understood. Two mouse models are employed to represent spinocerebellar ataxia 1, a B05 transgenic model that specifically expresses mutant Ataxin-1 in Purkinje cells, and a Sca1 154Q/2Q model that inserts the polyglutamine expansion into the mouse Ataxin-1 locus so that the mutant Ataxin-1 is expressed in all cells that express Ataxin-1. This review aims to summarize and evaluate the wide variety of therapies proposed for spinocerebellar ataxia 1, specifically gene and stem cell therapies.

  10. Advanced research on separating prostate cancer stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is a common malignant tumor in male urinary system,and may easily develop into the hormone refractory prostate cancer which can hardly be cured. Recent studies had found that the prostate cancer stem cells may be the source of the prostate cancer's occurrence,development, metastasis and recurrence. The therapy targeting the prostate cancer stem cells may be the effective way to cure prostate cancer. But these cells is too low to be detected. The difficulty lies in the low separation efficiency of prostate cancer stem cell, so the effectively separating prostate cancer stem cells occupied the main position for the more in-depth research of prostate cancer stem cells. This paper reviews the research progress and existing problems on the several main separating methods of prostate cancer stem cells, includes the fluorescence activated cells sorting and magnetic activated cells sorting based on prostate cancer stem cell surface markers, the side-population sorting and serum-free medium sphere forming sorting based on prostate cancer stem cell's biology. (authors)

  11. Immunotoxin Therapy for Relapsed Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have relapsed multiple times or not responded to prior chemotherapy will be treated with an experimental immunotoxin called moxetumomab pasudotox given intravenously on days 1, 3, and 5 of 28-day cycles

  12. Stem cell and progenitor cell therapy in peripheral artery disease. A critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawall, Holger; Bramlage, Peter; Amann, Berthold

    2010-04-01

    Atherosclerotic peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis. The occlusion of large limb arteries leads to ischaemia with claudication which can progress to critical limb ischaemia (CLI) with pain at rest, and to tissue loss. At present, common therapy for CLI is either surgical or endovascular revascularisation aimed at improving blood flow to the affected extremity. However, major amputation and death are still frequent complications. Exploring new strategies for revascularisation of ischaemic limbs is thus of major importance. Bone marrow (BM)-derived stem and progenitor cells have been identified as a potential new therapeutic option to induce therapeutic angiogenesis. Encouraging results of preclinical studies have rapidly led to several small clinical trials, in which BM-derived mononuclear cells were administered to patients with limb ischaemia. Clinical benefits were reported from these trials including improvement of ankle-brachial index (ABI), transcutaneous partial pressure of oxygen (TcPO2), reduction of pain, and decreased need for amputation. Nonetheless, large randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind studies are necessary and currently ongoing (BONMOT-CLI, JUVENTUS and NCT00498069). Further research relates to the optimal cell type and dosage, the isolation method, the role of colony-stimulating factors, administration route, and the supportive stimulation of cells with reduced functioning due to advanced PAD. Autologous stem cell therapy for ischaemic peripheral disease seems to be a promising new tool for the treatment of severe limb ischaemia. Preliminary evidence has established its safety, feasibility and effectiveness on several important endpoints. Several large endpoints studies are underway to further consolidate this evidence. PMID:20174766

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells as vectors for lung cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kolluri, K. K.; Laurent, G. J.; Janes, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in treatment, lung cancer accounts for one third of all cancer-related deaths, underlining the need of development of new therapies. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess the ability to specifically home into tumours and their metastases. This property of MSCs could be exploited for the delivery of various anti-tumour agents directly into tumours. However, MSCs are not simple delivery vehicles but cells with active physiological process. This review outlines various ag...

  14. Understanding the application of stem cell therapy in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma RK

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rakesh K Sharma, Donald J Voelker, Roma Sharma, Hanumanth K ReddyUniversity of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Medical Center of South Arkansas, El Dorado, AR, USAAbstract: Throughout their lifetime, an individual may sustain many injuries and recover spontaneously over a period of time, without even realizing the injury in the first place. Wound healing occurs due to a proliferation of stem cells capable of restoring the injured tissue. The ability of adult stem cells to repair tissue is dependent upon the intrinsic ability of tissues to proliferate. The amazing capacity of embryonic stem cells to give rise to virtually any type of tissue has intensified the search for similar cell lineage in adults to treat various diseases including cardiovascular diseases. The ability to convert adult stem cells into pluripotent cells that resemble embryonic cells, and to transplant those in the desired organ for regenerative therapy is very attractive, and may offer the possibility of treating harmful disease-causing mutations. The race is on to find the best cells for treatment of cardiovascular disease. There is a need for the ideal stem cell, delivery strategies, myocardial retention, and time of administration in the ideal patient population. There are multiple modes of stem cell delivery to the heart with different cell retention rates that vary depending upon method and site of injection, such as intra coronary, intramyocardial or via coronary sinus. While there are crucial issues such as retention of stem cells, microvascular plugging, biodistribution, homing to myocardium, and various proapoptotic factors in the ischemic myocardium, the regenerative potential of stem cells offers an enormous impact on clinical applications in the management of cardiovascular diseases.Keywords: stem cell therapy, stem cell delivery, cardiovascular diseases, myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy

  15. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in inherited metabolic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Wagemaker (Gerard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAfter more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme

  16. CAR T Cell Therapy: A Game Changer in Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almåsbak, Hilde; Aarvak, Tanja; Vemuri, Mohan C

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel targeted therapies with acceptable safety profiles is critical to successful cancer outcomes with better survival rates. Immunotherapy offers promising opportunities with the potential to induce sustained remissions in patients with refractory disease. Recent dramatic clinical responses in trials with gene modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) in B-cell malignancies have generated great enthusiasm. This therapy might pave the way for a potential paradigm shift in the way we treat refractory or relapsed cancers. CARs are genetically engineered receptors that combine the specific binding domains from a tumor targeting antibody with T cell signaling domains to allow specifically targeted antibody redirected T cell activation. Despite current successes in hematological cancers, we are only in the beginning of exploring the powerful potential of CAR redirected T cells in the control and elimination of resistant, metastatic, or recurrent nonhematological cancers. This review discusses the application of the CAR T cell therapy, its challenges, and strategies for successful clinical and commercial translation. PMID:27298832

  17. Temporary corneal stem cell dysfunction after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy can cause corneal and conjuctival abnormalities that sometimes require surgical treatment. Corneal stem cell dysfunction is described, which recovered after the cessation of radiation. Methods - A 44-year-old man developed a corneal epithelial abnormality associated with conjuctival and corneal inflammation following radiation therapy for maxillary cancer. Examination of brush cytology samples showed goblet cells in the upper and lower parts of the cornea, which showed increased fluorescein permeability, and intraepithelial lymphocytes. Impression cytology showed goblet cells in the same part of the cornea. Specular microscopy revealed spindle type epithelial cells. Patient follow up included artificial tears and an antibiotic ophthalmic ointment. The corneal abnormalities resolved after 4 months with improved visual acuity without any surgical intervention, but the disappearance of the palisades of Vogt did not recover at 1 year after radiation. Radiation therapy in this patient caused temporary stem cell dysfunction which resulted in conjunctivalisation in a part of the cornea. Although limbal stem cell function did not fully recover, this rare case suggested that medical options should be considered before surgery. (Author)

  18. Stem cell-based therapy in neural repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Chen, Su-Liang; Wang, Dan-Yen; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based therapy could aid in alleviating symptoms or even reversing the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and nerve injuries. Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) has been shown to maintain the survival of neurons and induce neurite outgrowth. Accumulating evidence suggests that combination of FGF1 and cell-based therapy is promising for future therapeutic application. Neural stem cells (NSCs), with the characteristics of self-renewal and multipotency, can be isolated from embryonic stem cells, embryonic ectoderm, and developing or adult brain tissues. For NSC clinical application, several critical problems remain to be resolved: (1) the source of NSCs should be personalized; (2) the isolation methods and protocols of human NSCs should be standardized; (3) the clinical efficacy of NSC transplants must be evaluated in more adequate animal models; and (4) the mechanism of intrinsic brain repair needs to be better characterized. In addition, the ideal imaging technique for tracking NSCs would be safe and yield high temporal and spatial resolution, good sensitivity and specificity. Here, we discuss recent progress and future development of cell-based therapy, such as NSCs, induced pluripotent stem cells, and induced neurons, in neurodegenerative diseases and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:23806879

  19. CAR T Cell Therapy: A Game Changer in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almåsbak, Hilde; Aarvak, Tanja; Vemuri, Mohan C.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel targeted therapies with acceptable safety profiles is critical to successful cancer outcomes with better survival rates. Immunotherapy offers promising opportunities with the potential to induce sustained remissions in patients with refractory disease. Recent dramatic clinical responses in trials with gene modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) in B-cell malignancies have generated great enthusiasm. This therapy might pave the way for a potential paradigm shift in the way we treat refractory or relapsed cancers. CARs are genetically engineered receptors that combine the specific binding domains from a tumor targeting antibody with T cell signaling domains to allow specifically targeted antibody redirected T cell activation. Despite current successes in hematological cancers, we are only in the beginning of exploring the powerful potential of CAR redirected T cells in the control and elimination of resistant, metastatic, or recurrent nonhematological cancers. This review discusses the application of the CAR T cell therapy, its challenges, and strategies for successful clinical and commercial translation. PMID:27298832

  20. Application of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as an allogeneic transplantation cell source in bone regenerative therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have therapeutic applications in bone regenerative therapy due to their pluripotency. However, the ability of MSCs to proliferate and differentiate varies between donors. Furthermore, alternative sources of MSCs are required for patients with contraindications to autogenous cell therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mesenchymal cells from the human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a source of cells for allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. Cells that retained a proliferative capacity of more than 50 population doubling level were distinguished from other HAM cells as HAMα cells and induced to osteogenic status—their in vivo osteogenesis was subsequently investigated in rats. It was found that HAMα cells were spindle shaped and were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic stem cell markers. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition increased with osteogenic status of HAMα cells. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was increased in HAMα cells cultured on calcium phosphate scaffolds. Moreover, xenografted HAMα cells remained viable and produced extracellular matrix for several weeks. Thus, this study suggests that human amniotic mesenchymal cells possess osteogenic differentiation potential and could be applied to allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. - Highlights: ► Human amniotic mesenchymal cells include cells (HAMα cells) that have the properties of MSCs. ► HAMα cells have excellent osteogenic differentiation potential. ► Osteogenic differentiation ability of HAMα was amplified by calcium phosphate scaffolds. ► HAMα cells can be applicable to allogeneic cell transplantation in bone regenerative therapy.

  1. Application of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as an allogeneic transplantation cell source in bone regenerative therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, Hiroaki [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nogami, Makiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Koike, Chika; Okabe, Motonori [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Noto, Zenko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Arai, Naoya; Noguchi, Makoto [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nikaido, Toshio, E-mail: tnikaido@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have therapeutic applications in bone regenerative therapy due to their pluripotency. However, the ability of MSCs to proliferate and differentiate varies between donors. Furthermore, alternative sources of MSCs are required for patients with contraindications to autogenous cell therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mesenchymal cells from the human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a source of cells for allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. Cells that retained a proliferative capacity of more than 50 population doubling level were distinguished from other HAM cells as HAM{alpha} cells and induced to osteogenic status-their in vivo osteogenesis was subsequently investigated in rats. It was found that HAM{alpha} cells were spindle shaped and were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic stem cell markers. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition increased with osteogenic status of HAM{alpha} cells. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was increased in HAM{alpha} cells cultured on calcium phosphate scaffolds. Moreover, xenografted HAM{alpha} cells remained viable and produced extracellular matrix for several weeks. Thus, this study suggests that human amniotic mesenchymal cells possess osteogenic differentiation potential and could be applied to allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human amniotic mesenchymal cells include cells (HAM{alpha} cells) that have the properties of MSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells have excellent osteogenic differentiation potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteogenic differentiation ability of HAM{alpha} was amplified by calcium phosphate scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells can be applicable to allogeneic cell transplantation in bone regenerative therapy.

  2. Immune Cells in Cancer Therapy and Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyileten, Ceren; Majchrzak, Kinga; Pilch, Zofia; Tonecka, Katarzyna; Mucha, Joanna; Taciak, Bartlomiej; Ulewicz, Katarzyna; Witt, Katarzyna; Boffi, Alberto; Krol, Magdalena; Rygiel, Tomasz P.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate the critical role of tumour associated macrophages, tumour associated neutrophils, dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, and natural killer cells in tumourigenesis. These cells can have a significant impact on the tumour microenvironment via their production of cytokines and chemokines. Additionally, products secreted from all these cells have defined specific roles in regulating tumour cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. They act in a protumour capacity in vivo as evidenced by the recent studies indicating that macrophages, T cells, and neutrophils may be manipulated to exhibit cytotoxic activity against tumours. Therefore therapy targeting these cells may be promising, or they may constitute drug or anticancer particles delivery systems to the tumours. Herein, we discussed all these possibilities that may be used in cancer treatment. PMID:27212807

  3. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastiano Buti; Melissa Bersanelli; Maddalena Donini; Andrea Ardizzoni

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to d...

  4. Targeted therapies in small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    LU, HONG-YANG; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Mao, Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounted for 12.95% of all lung cancer histological types in 2002. Despite trends toward modest improvement in survival, the outcome remains extremely poor. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment in SCLC. More than two-thirds of patients who succumb to lung cancer in the United States are over 65 years old. Elderly patients tolerate chemotherapy poorly and need novel therapeutic agents. Targeted...

  5. Alzheimer's Disease and Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sung S.; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Seung U.; Lee, Hong J.

    2014-01-01

    The loss of neuronal cells in the central nervous system may occur in many neurodegenerative diseases. Alzheimer's disease is a common senile disease in people over 65 years, and it causes impairment characterized by the decline of mental function, including memory loss and cognitive impairment, and affects the quality of life of patients. However, the current therapeutic strategies against AD are only to relieve symptoms, but not to cure it. Because there are only a few therapeutic strategie...

  6. Myocardium repair with stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of assessing the efficacy of bone marrow-derived stem cells transplantation in patients with myocardial infarction and severe chronic heart failure through nuclear cardiology techniques, 15 revascularized patients were studied: nine (Group I) received autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells. The other six were controls (Group II). All underwent a clinical evaluation, radionuclide ventriculography, and gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MIBI-technetium99m, two-day protocol: dipyridamole - rest), before and three months after the procedure. At three months there was a clinical improvement in 89% of patients from Group I. The left ventricular ejection fraction increased: from 32±9% to 44±13% (p=0.03; Group I) and from 38±2% to 48±14% (p NS; Group II). The peak filling rate improved from 120±11 to 196±45 EDV/sec (p=0.03; Group I). The dipyridamole summed score diminished significantly only in Group I (from 35±5 to 23±14; p=0.02). The perfusion improvement was related to the implantation site in 60% of cases. We conclude that the bone marrow-derived stem cells transplantation is effective in patients with severe chronic heart failure of ischemic origin (au)

  7. Cell therapy medicinal product regulatory framework in Europe and its application for MSC based therapy development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janis eAncans

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs, including cell therapy products, form a new class of medicines in the European Union. Since ATMPs are at the forefront of scientific innovation in medicine, specific regulatory framework has been developed for these medicines and implemented from 2009. The Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT has been established at European Medicines Agency (EMA for centralized classification, certification and evaluation procedures, and other ATMP related tasks. Guidance documents, initiatives and interaction platforms are available to make the new framework more accessible for small and medium-sized enterprises, academia, hospitals and foundations. Good understanding of centralised and national components of the regulatory system is required to plan product development. It is in the best interests of cell therapy developers to utilise provided resources starting with the preclinical stage. Whilst there have not been mesenchymal stem cell (MSC based medicine authorisations in the EU, three MSC products have received marketing approval in other regions since 2011. Information provided on regulatory requirements, procedures and initiatives is aimed to facilitate MSC based medicinal product development and authorisation in the EU.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Hou, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for end-stage renal disease, but its implementation is limited by organ shortage and immune rejection. Side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs, such as nephrotoxicity, opportunistic infection, and tumorigenic potential, influence long-term graft outcomes. In recent years, continued research and subsequent discoveries concerning the properties and potential utilization of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have aroused considerable interest and expectations. Biological characteristics of MSCs, including multi-lineage differentiation, homing potential, paracrine effect and immunomodulation, have opened new horizons for applications in kidney transplantation. However, many studies have shown that the biological activity of MSCs depends on internal inflammatory conditions, and the safety and efficacy of the clinical application of MSCs remain controversial. This review summarizes the findings of a large number of studies and aims to provide an objective viewpoint based on a comprehensive analysis of the presently established benefits and obstacles of implementing MSC-based therapy in kidney transplantation, and to promote its clinical translation. PMID:26852923

  9. 中药干预骨髓干细胞治疗缺血性心脏病研究进展%Research Progress of the Interference of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Myeloid Stem Cells Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧影; 马亚珂; 杨岳; 王虹

    2015-01-01

    Abstracts:In recent years, the use of bone marrow stem cell mediated regeneration of vascular and cardiac in cell therapyhas brought a new prospect for the treatment of ischemic heart disease, and the role of traditional Chinese medicine on stem cells has become the hot spot of research.This paper reviewed the researches on the interference of some traditional Chinese medicine on bone marrow stem cell to cure ische-mic heart disease.%近年来细胞治疗技术利用骨髓干细胞介导血管及心肌的再生,为缺血性心脏病的治疗带来了新的前景,中医药对干细胞的作用成为研究的热点,现针对几味中药干预骨髓干细胞治疗缺血性心脏病的研究进展作一综述。

  10. Ethical Perspectives on Stem Cell-based Cellular Therapies for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Mette; Pedersen, Finn Skou; Andersen, Svend;

    2012-01-01

    have benefits for patients. The side effect described most commonly in the literature is the risk of tumor formation by stem cells not fully differentiated into neurons when transplanted or following viral transduction and subsequent differentiation to create induced pluripotent stem cells. This risk...... may be avoided by differentiating stem cells in culture before transplantation. Here we argue that the following ethical considerations are important for clinical trials: Informed consent of research subjects or patients, specification of possible therapeutic effects, risk analysis of possible side......The effect of stem cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease, and Parkinson disease are currently being investigated. Here we specify possible therapeutic effects and possible side effects for patients and conclude that cellular therapies may...

  11. Cell-based therapies of liver diseases: age-related challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarygin KN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Konstantin N Yarygin, Alexei Y Lupatov, Irina V Kholodenko Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biomedical Chemistry, Moscow, Russia Abstract: The scope of this review is to revise recent advances of the cell-based therapies of liver diseases with an emphasis on cell donor’s and patient’s age. Regenerative medicine with cell-based technologies as its integral part is focused on the structural and functional restoration of tissues impaired by sickness or aging. Unlike drug-based medicine directed primarily at alleviation of symptoms, regenerative medicine offers a more holistic approach to disease and senescence management aimed to achieve restoration of homeostasis. Hepatocyte transplantation and organ engineering are very probable forthcoming options of liver disease treatment in people of different ages and vigorous research and technological innovations in this area are in progress. Accordingly, availability of sufficient amounts of functional human hepatocytes is crucial. Direct isolation of autologous hepatocytes from liver biopsy is problematic due to related discomfort and difficulties with further expansion of cells, particularly those derived from aging people. Allogeneic primary human hepatocytes meeting quality standards are also in short supply. Alternatively, autologous hepatocytes can be produced by reprogramming of differentiated cells through the stage of induced pluripotent stem cells. In addition, fibroblasts and mesenchymal stromal cells can be directly induced to undergo advanced stage hepatogenic differentiation. Reprogramming of cells derived from elderly people is accompanied by the reversal of age-associated changes at the cellular level manifesting itself by telomere elongation and the U-turn of DNA methylation. Cell reprogramming can provide high quality rejuvenated hepatocytes for cell therapy and liver tissue engineering. Further technological advancements and establishment of national and global registries of

  12. Neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytoreductive nephrectomy as an independent option in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC cannot be considered as the only effective method, with rare exception, of a few patients with solitary metastases. Cytoreductive nephrectomy is now part of a multimodal approach encompassing surgical treatment and systemic drug therapy. Many retrospective and two prospective studies have demonstrated that it is expedient to perform cytoreductive nephrectomy. Immunotherapy should not be used as preoperatively in the era of cytokine therapy for mRCC due to that fact that it has no impact on primary tumor. In the current targeted therapy era, many investigators have concentrated attentionon the role of neoadjuvant targeted therapy for the treatment of patients with both localized and locally advanced mRCC. The potential benefits of neoadjuvant therapy for localized and locally advanced RCC include to make surgery easier and to increase the possibility of organsparing treatment, by decreasing the stage of primary tumor and the size of tumors. The possible potential advantages of neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with mRCC include prompt initiation of necessary systemic therapy; identification of patients with primary refractory tumors; and a preoperative reduction in the stage of primary tumor. Numerous retrospective and some prospective phase II studies have shown that neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with localized and locally advanced RCC is possible and tolerable and surgical treatment after neoadjuvant targeted therapy is safe and executable with a low incidence of complications. If neoadjuvant therapy is to be performed, it should be done within 2–4 months before surgery. Sorafenib and sunitinib are now most tested and suitable for neoadjuvant targeted therapy. Sorafenib is a more preferred drug due to its shorter half-life and accordingly to the possibility of discontinuing the drug immediately prior to

  13. Cell Based Therapies: At Crossroads to find the right Cell source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of newer Cell Based therapies for various diseases and disorders which have limited therapeutic options, is on the rise with clinical trials on cell based therapies being registered all over the world every now and then. However a dilemma arises when it comes to the choosing the ideal source of Stem cells for therapy. Clinical applications of Hematopoietic Stem cells Transplantation (HSCT in the form of Bone Marrow Transplantation has been in practice since the 1950s (1 for malignant and non malignant haematological disorders and even for auto-immune disorders (since 1977 (2, with several reports on successful outcomes after HSCT. The dilemma in HSCT is whether to use allogeneic or autologous sources. While allogeneic sources have the advantage of the graft being devoid of cancer cells, as they are from a healthy donor, they have the risk of life-long Immunosuppression. Autologous Source is advantageous as it needs no immunosuppression but the risk of relapse is high. In adult stem cells, there have been several studies which have demonstrated the various levels of safety and efficacy of both Allogeneic and autologous adult cell sources for application in diseases of the cornea, Spinal Cord, Heart, Liver etc. Each time, a study is published, the patients and the physicians are thrown into a state of perplexity on which source of cell could offer the best possible solution to the various diseases. Next hopping onto Human Embryonic Stem cells, though they were discovered in 1998, the first Human Embryonic Stem cell trial was approved by the FDA in January 2009 but it could hit the road only in October 2010 (3. The trial was for spinal cord injury and a year later, the trial came to a halt in November 2011 when the company, which was financing and pursuing the trial, announced the discontinuation of the trial due to financial reasons (4. However it is worthwhile to note that it was the financial compulsion which led to the

  14. Importance of the stem cell microenvironment forophthalmological cell-based therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Xia Wan; Bo-Wen Wang; Zhi-Chong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising treatment for diseasesthat are caused by cell degeneration or death. Thecells for clinical transplantation are usually obtainedby culturing healthy allogeneic or exogenous tissue invitro . However, for diseases of the eye, obtaining theadequate number of cells for clinical transplantationis difficult due to the small size of tissue donors andthe frequent needs of long-term amplification ofcells in vitro , which results in low cell viability aftertransplantation. In addition, the transplanted cells oftendevelop fibrosis or degrade and have very low survival.Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotentstem cells (iPS) are also promising candidates for celltherapy. Unfortunately, the differentiation of ESCs canbring immune rejection, tumorigenicity and undesireddifferentiated cells, limiting its clinical application.Although iPS cells can avoid the risk of immune rejectioncaused by ES cell differentiation post-transplantation,the low conversion rate, the risk of tumor formationand the potentially unpredictable biological changesthat could occur through genetic manipulation hinderits clinical application. Thus, the desired clinical effectof cell therapy is impaired by these factors. Recentresearch findings recognize that the reason for lowsurvival of the implanted cells not only depends on theseeded cells, but also on the cell microenvironment,which determines the cell survival, proliferation andeven reverse differentiation. When used for cell therapy,the transplanted cells need a specific three-dimensionalstructure to anchor and specific extra cellular matrixcomponents in addition to relevant cytokine signalingto transfer the required information to support theirgrowth. These structures present in the matrix inwhich the stem cells reside are known as the stem cellmicroenvironment. The microenvironment interactionwith the stem cells provides the necessary homeostasisfor cell maintenance and growth. A large number ofstudies

  15. Fraudsters operate and officialdom turns a blind eye: a proposal for controlling stem cell therapy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Dong, Bing He

    2016-09-01

    Stem cell tourism-the flow of patients from home countries to destination countries to obtain stem cell treatment-is a growing business in China. Many concerns have been raised regarding fraudsters that operate unsafe stem cell therapies and an officialdom that turns a blind eye to the questionable technology. The Chinese regulatory approach to stem cell research is based on Guidelines and Administrative Measures, rather than legislation, and may have no binding force on certain institutions, such as military hospitals. There is no liability and traceability system and no visible set of penalties for non-compliance in the stem cell legal framework. In addition to the lack of safety and efficacy systems in the regulations, no specific expert authority has been established to monitor stem cell therapy to date. Recognizing the global nature of stem cell tourism, this article argues that resolving stem cell tourism issues may require not only the Chinese government but also an international mechanism for transparency and ethical oversight. A stringent set of international regulations that govern stem cell therapies can encourage China to improve stem cell regulation and enforcement to fulfill its obligations. Through an international consensus, a minimum standard for clinical stem cell research and a central enforcement system will be provided. As a result, rogue clinics that conduct unauthorized stem cell therapies can be penalized, and countries that are reluctant to implement the reconciled regulations should be sanctioned. PMID:26906907

  16. Cognitive behavioral therapy: current status and future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMain, Shelley; Newman, Michelle G; Segal, Zindel V; DeRubeis, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), an umbrella term that includes a diverse group of treatments, is defined by a strong commitment to empiricism. While CBT has a robust empirical base, areas for improvement remain. This article reviews the status of the current empirical base and its limitations, and presents future directions for advancement of the field. Ultimately, studies are needed that will identify the predictors, mediators, and moderators of treatment response in order to increase knowledge on how to personalize interventions for each client and to strengthen the impact of CBT. Efforts to advance the dissemination and implementation of CBT, innovative approaches such as practice-oriented research, and the advantages of incorporating new and existing technologies, are discussed as well. PMID:25689506

  17. Research on neutron capture therapy in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on neutron capture therapy in the USSR began in 1964. Towards 1975 prime knowledge in physics, pharmacology and radiobiology had been accumulated. It was realized that inherent to NCT is a variety of modalities as to the type and location of the tumor, the energy and source of neutrons, the nature and transportation of the nuclide-carrying agent (NCA), etc. Thus, it became likely that some modalities would turn out to be clinically feasible. At the end of the 70s, studies of boron derivatives began at the All-Union Oncological Research Center, Moscow. These studies were stimulated by the clinical trials in Japan. Still, neutron capturing nuclides (NCN) other than 10b are regarded as promising. Research was aimed at clinical trials that could ensure sufficient safety, convenience and conclusiveness. Hence, new requirements emerged, such as the pre-clinical modeling of NCT in big animals and the monitoring of tumor response to each fraction of NCT. Usual requirements are also to be met, that is: tailoring neutron beams with an adequate intensity and energy, choosing NCNs and finding suitable NCAs, physical and radiobiological planning including adoption of tentative RBEs and time-fractionation regimen, selecting tumors as candidates for NCT, and developing techniques for monitoring NCNs in vivo

  18. Gold nanocages for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Laura; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Locarno, Silvia A.; Macchi, Chiara; D'Alfonso, Laura; Ruscica, Massimiliano; Magni, Paolo; Collini, Maddalena; Romeo, Sergio; Chirico, Giuseppe; Prosperi, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanocages (AuNCs) have been shown to be a useful tool both for imaging and hyperthermia therapy of cancer, thanks to their outstanding optical properties, low toxicity and facile functionalization with targeting molecules, including peptides and antibodies. In particular, hyperthermia is a minimally invasive therapy which takes advantage of the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles to efficiently convert the absorbed light into heat. Here, we use AuNCs for the selective targeting and imaging of prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we report the hyperthermic effect characterization of the AuNCs both in solution and internalized in cells. Prostate cancer cells were irradiated at different exposure times, with a pulsed near infrared laser, and the cellular viability was evaluated by confocal microscopy.

  19. Stem Cells in Liver Diseases and Cancer: Recent Advances on the Path to New Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, C. Bart; Mishra, Lopa; Willenbring, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have potential for therapy of liver diseases, but may also be involved in the formation of liver cancer. Recently, the AASLD Henry M. and Lillian Stratton Basic Research Single Topic Conference “Stem Cells in Liver Diseases and Cancer: Discovery and Promise” brought together a diverse group of investigators to define the status of research on stem cells and cancer stem cells in the liver and identify problems and solutions on the path to clinical translation. This report summarizes the outcomes of the conference and provides an update on recent research advances. Progress in liver stem cell research includes isolation of primary liver progenitor cells (LPC), directed hepatocyte differentiation of primary LPC and pluripotent stem cells, findings of transdifferentiation, disease-specific considerations for establishing a therapeutically effective cell mass, and disease modeling in cell culture. Tumor initiating stem-like cells (TISC) that emerge during chronic liver injury share expression of signaling pathways, including those organized around TGF-β and β-catenin, and surface markers with normal LPC. Recent investigations of the role of TISC in hepatocellular carcinoma have provided insight into the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of hepatocarcinogenesis. Targeted chemotherapies for TISC are in development as a means to overcome cellular resistance and mechanisms driving disease progression in liver cancer. PMID:22030746

  20. Trimodal therapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matuschek C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with ESCC (squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus are most commonly diagnosed with locally advanced tumor stages. Early metastatic disease and late diagnosis are common reasons responsible for this tumor's poor clinical outcome. The prognosis of esophageal cancer is very poor because patients usually do not have symptoms in early disease stages. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus frequently complicates patients with multiple co-morbidities and these patients often require interdisciplinary diagnosis and treatment procedures. At present time, neoadjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy followed by surgery are regarded as the international standard of care. Meta-analyses have confirmed that this approach provides the patient with better local tumor control and an increased overall survival rate. It is recommended that patients with positive tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy and who are poor surgical candidates should consider definitive radiochemotherapy without surgery as a treatment option. In future, EGFR antibodies may also be administered to patients during therapy to improve the current treatment effectiveness. Positron-emission tomography proves to be an early response-imaging tool used to evaluate the effect of the neoadjuvant therapy and could be used as a predictive factor for the survival rate in ESCC. The percentage proportions of residual tumor cells in the histopathological analyses represent a gold standard for evaluating the response rate to radiochemotherapy. In the future, early response evaluation and molecular biological tests could be important diagnostic tools in influencing the treatment decisions of ESCC patients.

  1. Trimodal therapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuschek, C; Bölke, E; Zahra, T; Knoefel, W T; Peiper, M; Budach, W; Erhardt, A; Scherer, A; Baldus, S E; Gerber, P A; Buhren, B A; Schauer, M; Hoff, N-Ph; Gattermann, N; Orth, K

    2011-10-10

    Patients with ESCC (squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus) are most commonly diagnosed with locally advanced tumor stages. Early metastatic disease and late diagnosis are common reasons responsible for this tumor's poor clinical outcome. The prognosis of esophageal cancer is very poor because patients usually do not have symptoms in early disease stages. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus frequently complicates patients with multiple co-morbidities and these patients often require interdisciplinary diagnosis and treatment procedures. At present time, neoadjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy followed by surgery are regarded as the international standard of care. Meta-analyses have confirmed that this approach provides the patient with better local tumor control and an increased overall survival rate. It is recommended that patients with positive tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy and who are poor surgical candidates should consider definitive radiochemotherapy without surgery as a treatment option. In future, EGFR antibodies may also be administered to patients during therapy to improve the current treatment effectiveness. Positron-emission tomography proves to be an early response-imaging tool used to evaluate the effect of the neoadjuvant therapy and could be used as a predictive factor for the survival rate in ESCC. The percentage proportions of residual tumor cells in the histopathological analyses represent a gold standard for evaluating the response rate to radiochemotherapy. In the future, early response evaluation and molecular biological tests could be important diagnostic tools in influencing the treatment decisions of ESCC patients. PMID:22024422

  2. Plant Cell Lines in Cell Morphogenesis Research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seifertová, Daniela; Klíma, Petr; Pařezová, Markéta; Petrášek, Jan; Zažímalová, Eva; Opatrný, Z.

    Vol. 1080. New York: Humana Press, 2014 - (Žárský, V.; Cvrčková, F.), s. 215-229. (Methods in Molecular Biology). ISBN 978-1-62703-643-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/0797; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2476 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : BY-2 * VBI-0 * Suspension-cultured cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. Stem cells: Potential therapy for age-related diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2006-01-01

    -engineered organs) to restore the functions of damaged or defective tissues and organs and thus to "rejuvenate" the failing aging body. One of the most important sources for cellular medicine is embryonic and adult (somatic) stem cells (SSCs). One example of SCCs with enormous clinical potential is the mesenchymal...... stem cells (MSCs) that are present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into cell types such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial cells, and probably also neuron-like cells. Because of the ease of their isolation and their extensive differentiation potential, MSCs are among the first...... stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Some recent studies have demonstrated the possible use of MSCs in systemic transplantation for systemic diseases, local implantation for local tissue defects, as a vehicle for genes in gene therapy protocols, or to generate transplantable tissues...

  4. Microbiota modulation of myeloid cells in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldszmid, Romina S.; Dzutsev, Amiran; Viaud, Sophie; Zitvogel, Laurence; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Trinchieri, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid cells represent a major component of the tumor microenvironment where they play divergent dual roles: they can induce antitumor immune responses but mostly they promote immune evasion, tumor progression and metastases formation. Thus, strategies aiming at reprogramming the tumor microenvironment represent a promising immunotherapy approach. Myeloid cells respond to environmental factors including signals derived from commensal microbes. In this Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads overview we discuss recent advances on the effects of the commensal microbiota on myeloid-cell function and how that impacts the response to cancer therapy. PMID:25660553

  5. Radiation therapy for intracranial germ cell tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Wakako; Takizawa, Yoshikazu; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Aruga, Moriyo; Arimizu, Noboru (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Itami, Jun

    1993-05-01

    From 1974 through 1988, 27 patients with intracranial germ cell tumor underwent radiotherapy in Chiba University Hospital. Radiation field encompassed the whole neuroaxis in 19 patients, the local area in 5, and the whole brain in 3. Overall 5-year survival rate of all 27 patients was 88.9%. There was no significant difference in 5-year overall survival rate between the patients who were treated by the neuroaxis radiation and by the more limited fields. The most significant prognostic factor was pathology of the tumors. Germinoma and histology-unknown tumors which showed good response to irradiation have more favorable prognosis than embryonal carcinoma and choriocarcinoma. From our data, three possibilities emerged: (1) some germinomas might be controlled by localized radiation; (2) optimal dose might be 45[approx]50 Gy; (3) if histology-unknown tumor has good response to radiation at 20 Gy, the tumor can be treated by the same way as germinoma. (author).

  6. Systemic Therapy for Metastatic Non-Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Recent Progress and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Simon; Matrana, Marc; Tsang, Christopher; Atkinson, Bradley; Choueiri, Toni K.; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2011-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) encompasses a heterogeneous group of histological subtypes of which clear-cell RCC (CCRCC) is the most common comprising more than 70–80% of all cases. Papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC) is the next most common comprising 10–15% of cases. PRCC is refractory to chemotherapy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy.

  7. Stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease : answering basic questions regarding cell behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogt, Koen Elzert Adriaan van der

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has raised enthusiasm as a potential treatment for cardiovascular diseases. However, questions remain about the in vivo behavior of the cells after transplantation and the mechanism of action with which the cells could potentially alleviate disease symptoms. The objective of the re

  8. Ethical Issues in Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell research offers great promise for understanding basic mechanisms of human development and differentiation, as well as the hope for new treatments for diseases such as diabetes, spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease, and myocardial infarction. However, human stem cell (hSC) research also raises sharp ethical and political controversies. The derivation of pluripotent stem cell lines from oocytes and embryos is fraught with disputes about the onset of human personhood. The reprogramm...

  9. Biological Tests for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Research at the TRIGA Mark II Reactor in Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal column of the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Pavia University is used as an irradiation facility to perform biological tests and irradiations of living systems for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research. The suitability of the facility has been ensured by studying the neutron flux and the photon background in the irradiation chamber inside the thermal column. This characterization has been realized both by flux and dose measurements as well as by Monte Carlo simulations. The routine irradiations concern in vitro cells cultures and different tumor animal models to test the efficacy of the BNCT treatment. Some results about these experiments will be described. (author)

  10. Biological Tests for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Research at the TRIGA Mark II Reactor in Pavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protti, N.; Ballarini, F.; Bortolussi, S.; De Bari, A.; Stella, S.; Altieri, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Nuclear Physics National Institute (INFN), Pavia (Italy); Bruschi, P. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Bakeine, J.G.; Cansolino, L.; Clerici, A.M. [Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    The thermal column of the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Pavia University is used as an irradiation facility to perform biological tests and irradiations of living systems for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research. The suitability of the facility has been ensured by studying the neutron flux and the photon background in the irradiation chamber inside the thermal column. This characterization has been realized both by flux and dose measurements as well as by Monte Carlo simulations. The routine irradiations concern in vitro cells cultures and different tumor animal models to test the efficacy of the BNCT treatment. Some results about these experiments will be described. (author)

  11. Engineering a clinically-useful matrix for cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Glenn D

    2008-01-01

    The design criteria for matrices for encapsulation of cells for cell therapy include chemical, biological, engineering, marketing, regulatory, and financial constraints. What is required is a biocompatible material for culture of cells in three-dimensions (3-D) that offers ease of use, experimental flexibility to alter composition and compliance, and a composition that would permit a seamless transition from in vitro to in vivo use. The challenge is to replicate the complexity of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) environment with the minimum number of components necessary to allow cells to rebuild a given tissue. Our approach is to deconstruct the ECM to a few modular components that can be reassembled into biomimetic materials that meet these criteria. These semi-synthetic ECMs (sECMs) employ thiol-modified derivatives of hyaluronic acid (HA) that can form covalently crosslinked, biodegradable hydrogels. These sECMs are "living" biopolymers, meaning that they can be crosslinked in the presence of cells or tissues to enable cell therapy and tissue engineering. Moreover, the sECMs allow inclusion of the appropriate biological cues needed to simulate the complexity of the ECM of a given tissue. Taken together, the sECM technology offers a manufacturable, highly reproducible, flexible, FDA-approvable, and affordable vehicle for cell expansion and differentiation in 3-D. PMID:19279714

  12. Advances in Research on Circulating Tumor Cells in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjian SONG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic and recurrent tumors have been identified as the leading attribute to the lung cancer deaths. Cancer research has demonstrated the critical role circulating tumor cells (CTCs play in the metastatic spread of carcinomas and the recurrence of lung cancer. The rapid advancement of technology in targeted therapy resolves the embarrassing situation for those late-stage patients whose tumor tissues cannot be obtained. CTCs, as a substitute for the tumor tissues, represent a decisive tool to the cancer treatment strategy. Thus, CTCs exert a fundamental role in the early detection of micro-metastasis, assisting in diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of the recurrent tumors, and subsequently choosing an individualized approach for the therapeutic treatment. This article will review the advances, which have been made in the research area of CTCs with the aid of its applications in cancer therapy.

  13. Transplantation and Stem Cell Therapy for Cerebellar Degenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendelin, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based and regenerative therapy may become a hopeful treatment for neurodegenerative diseases including hereditary cerebellar degenerations. Neurotransplantation therapy mainly aims to substitute lost cells, but potential effects might include various mechanisms including nonspecific trophic effects and stimulation of endogenous regenerative processes and neural plasticity. Nevertheless, currently, there remain serious limitations. There is a wide spectrum of human hereditary cerebellar degenerations as well as numerous cerebellar mutant mouse strains that serve as models for the development of effective therapy. By now, transplantation has been shown to ameliorate cerebellar function, e.g. in Purkinje cell degeneration mice, Lurcher mutant mice and mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and type 2 and Niemann-Pick disease type C. Despite the lack of direct comparative studies, it appears that there might be differences in graft development and functioning between various types of cerebellar degeneration. Investigation of the relation of graft development to specific morphological, microvascular or biochemical features of the diseased host tissue in various cerebellar degenerations may help to identify factors determining the fate of grafted cells and potential of their functional integration. PMID:26155762

  14. Treating hearing disorders with cell and gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Lisa N.; Richardson, Rachael T.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Wise, Andrew K.

    2014-12-01

    Hearing loss is an increasing problem for a substantial number of people and, with an aging population, the incidence and severity of hearing loss will become more significant over time. There are very few therapies currently available to treat hearing loss, and so the development of new therapeutic strategies for hearing impaired individuals is of paramount importance to address this unmet clinical need. Most forms of hearing loss are progressive in nature and therefore an opportunity exists to develop novel therapeutic approaches to slow or halt hearing loss progression, or even repair or replace lost hearing function. Numerous emerging technologies have potential as therapeutic options. This paper details the potential of cell- and gene-based therapies to provide therapeutic agents to protect sensory and neural cells from various insults known to cause hearing loss; explores the potential of replacing lost sensory and nerve cells using gene and stem cell therapy; and describes the considerations for clinical translation and the challenges that need to be overcome.

  15. Perinatal stem-cell and gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbek, Daniel; Schoeberlein, Andreina; Wagner, Anna

    2008-08-01

    Most genetic diseases of the lymphohematopoietic system, including hemoglobinopathies, can now be diagnosed early in gestation. However, as yet, prenatal treatment is not available. Postnatal therapy by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation from bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood is possible for several of these diseases, in particular for the hemoglobinopathies, but is often limited by a lack of histocompatible donors, severe treatment-associated morbidity, and preexisting organ damage that developed before birth. In-utero transplantation of allogeneic HSC has been performed successfully in various animal models and recently in humans. However, the clinical success of this novel treatment is limited to diseases in which the fetus is affected by severe immunodeficiency. The lack of donor cell engraftment in nonimmunocompromised hosts is thought to be due to immunologic barriers, as well as to competitive fetal marrow population by host HSCs. Among the possible strategies to circumvent allogeneic HLA barriers, the use of gene therapy by genetically corrected autologous HSCs in the fetus is one of the most promising approaches. The recent development of strategies to overcome failure of efficient transduction of quiescent hematopoietic cells using new vector constructs and transduction protocols opens new perspectives for gene therapy in general, as well as for prenatal gene transfer in particular. The fetus might be especially susceptible for successful gene therapy approaches because of the developing, expanding hematopoietic system during gestation and the immunologic naiveté early in gestation, precluding immune reaction towards the transgene by inducing tolerance. Ethical issues, in particular regarding treatment safety, must be addressed more closely before clinical trials with fetal gene therapy in human pregnancies can be initiated. PMID:18420474

  16. Colonic cancer cell polyamine synthesis after photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PhotoDynamic Therapy is a new concept for cancer treatment based on the interaction between light and a sensitizer, hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) selectively retained by tumor cells which becomes toxic after light exposure. This effect decreases cell growth, through complex pathways. The aim of this study was to determine whether cellular polyamines, Put (Putrescine), Spd (Spermidine) and Spm (Spermine) were modified after PDT or not. These cations of small molecular weight are essential for cell growth and differentiation of normal and neoplastic cells. In this study intracellular contents of Put, Spd and Spm were determined on 2 sublines of rat colonic cancer cells cloned from the same rat cancer and forming progressive (PROb) and regressive (REGb) tumors. (author). 12 refs., 2 figs

  17. REIMBURSEMENT OF CELL-BASED REGENERATIVE THERAPY IN THE UK AND FRANCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalatchimy, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    systems while addressing the main challenges for the reimbursement of these therapies. Nevertheless, despite their current differences, neither the English nor the French national healthcare system has yet approved the reimbursement of cell-based regenerative therapies. The paper highlights where both systems could be learning from each others' experiences to favour the adoption of cell-based regenerative therapies through the adaptation of their reimbursement methodologies. It also emphasises the gap between market access and patients' access, and it calls for research and discussions through reflexive agencies such as the Regenerative Medicine Expert Group in the UK. PMID:27083495

  18. Gene Therapy In Squamous Cell Carcinoma – A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Susan Varghese

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer remains one of the leading causes of death world wide. Various means to destroy tumor cells preferentially have been developed; gene therapy is one among them with less treatment morbidity. Gene therapy involves the transfer of therapeutic or working copy of genes into a specific cell of an individual in order to repair a faulty copy of gene. The alteration can be accomplished by repairing or replacing the damaged DNA by various strategies and vectors. To date genetically altered viruses are commonly used as gene delivery vehicle (vector which has an advantage of evolutionary selection of host-virus relation. Non viral vectors which include the physical transfection of genes can be accomplished by electrophoration, microinjection, or use of ballistic particles and chemical transfection by forming liposomes.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells - a promising therapy for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes M; Curley G; Laffey JG.

    2012-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) constitutes a spectrum of severe acute respiratory failure in response to a variety of inciting stimuli that is the leading cause of death and disability in the critically ill. Despite decades of research, there are no therapies for ARDS, and management remains supportive. A growing understanding of the complexity of the pathophysiology of ARDS, coupled with advances in stem cell biology, has lead to a renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of...

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for salivary gland dysfunction and xerostomia: a systematic review of preclinical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, David Hebbelstrup; Oliveri, Roberto Stefan; Trojahn-Kølle, Stig-Frederik;

    2014-01-01

    was to assess, through systematic review, the potential benefit of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy in radiation-induced and SS-related salivary gland dysfunction and xerostomia. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the World Health Organization...... gland dysfunction and xerostomia. Nonetheless, the preliminary studies identified in the present review were encouraging for further research....

  1. Prospets of stem cell research and regeneration medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QING Chun; LU Shu-liang

    2012-01-01

    Since the new century,stem cell research has become a hot field in medicine and life science.Scientists in Harvard Plans Stem Cell Center in 2004 have dreamed that one day they can lead stem cells to grow into tissues and even organs in the lab,which can be used to replace the damaged tissues or organs in severe injuries or applied in diseases at the end stage(incurable diseases)in order to prolong the life time and improve the life quality of patients.But this is a long way full of difficulties! Nevertheless,the stem cell research has helped our mankind to understand how single cells grow and develop into tissues as well as organs,and how healthy cells replace the damaged cells in adult body and so on,which induces us to explore the way of treating diseases on cell levels(repairing or regeneration medicine as we usually say)because gene therapies have many unsolved problems.

  2. Stem cell therapy in spinal cord injury: Hollow promise or promising science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Aimee

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) remains one of the most physically, psychologically and socially debilitating conditions worldwide. While rehabilitation measures may help limit disability to some extent, there is no effective primary treatment yet available. The efficacy of stem cells as a primary therapeutic option in spinal cord injury is currently an area under much scrutiny and debate. Several laboratory and some primary clinical studies into the use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells or embryonic stem cell-derived oligodentrocyte precursor cells have shown some promising results in terms of remyelination and regeneration of damaged spinal nerve tracts. More recently,laboratory and early clinical experiments into the use of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells, a type of glial cell derived from olfactory bulb and mucosa have provided some phenomenal preliminary evidence as to their neuroregenerative and neural bridging capacity. This report compares and evaluates some current research into selected forms of embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell therapy as well as olfactory ensheathing cell therapy in SCI, and also highlights some legal and ethical issues surrounding their use. While early results shows promise, more rigorous large scaleclinical trials are needed to shed light on the safety, efficacy and long term viability of stem cell and cellular transplant techniques in SCI.

  3. Stem cell therapy in spinal cord injury: Hollow promise or promising science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Goel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI remains one of the most physically, psychologically and socially debilitating conditions worldwide. While rehabilitation measures may help limit disability to some extent, there is no effective primary treatment yet available. The efficacy of stem cells as a primary therapeutic option in spinal cord injury is currently an area under much scrutiny and debate. Several laboratory and some primary clinical studies into the use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells or embryonic stem cell-derived oligodentrocyte precursor cells have shown some promising results in terms of remyelination and regeneration of damaged spinal nerve tracts. More recently,laboratory and early clinical experiments into the use of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells, a type of glial cell derived from olfactory bulb and mucosa have provided some phenomenal preliminary evidence as to their neuroregenerative and neural bridging capacity. This report compares and evaluates some current research into selected forms of embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell therapy as well as olfactory ensheathing cell therapy in SCI, and also highlights some legal and ethical issues surrounding their use. While early results shows promise, more rigorous large scaleclinical trials are needed to shed light on the safety, efficacy and long term viability of stem cell and cellular transplant techniques in SCI.

  4. Stem cell therapy in spinal cord injury: Hollow promise or promising science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Aimee

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) remains one of the most physically, psychologically and socially debilitating conditions worldwide. While rehabilitation measures may help limit disability to some extent, there is no effective primary treatment yet available. The efficacy of stem cells as a primary therapeutic option in spinal cord injury is currently an area under much scrutiny and debate. Several laboratory and some primary clinical studies into the use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells or embryonic stem cell-derived oligodentrocyte precursor cells have shown some promising results in terms of remyelination and regeneration of damaged spinal nerve tracts. More recently,laboratory and early clinical experiments into the use of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells, a type of glial cell derived from olfactory bulb and mucosa have provided some phenomenal preliminary evidence as to their neuroregenerative and neural bridging capacity. This report compares and evaluates some current research into selected forms of embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell therapy as well as olfactory ensheathing cell therapy in SCI, and also highlights some legal and ethical issues surrounding their use. While early results shows promise, more rigorous large scaleclinical trials are needed to shed light on the safety, efficacy and long term viability of stem cell and cellular transplant techniques in SCI. PMID:27217662

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells in drug/gene delivery: implications for cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Steven J; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2012-08-01

    Stem cells have been therapeutically utilized in replacement of hematopoetic cells for decades. This is in contrast to the recent emergence of adult stem cells as, perhaps, safe and beneficial therapeutics for multiple diseases and disorders. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently used in multiple human clinical trials. Although MSCs are ubiquitous, bone marrow, umbilical cord and adipose tissue are the sources where MSCs are isolated for research and clinical application. MSCs were thought to be mesodermal due to the initial reports showing their differentiation into specialized mesodermal cells such as chondrocytes. However, it now appears that MSCs might be neuroectodermal in origin. Thus far, there is no evidence of in vivo transformation of MSCs. However, it is too early to prove or disprove that MSCs can be transformed in vivo in clinical trials. MSCs display immunosuppressive properties when placed in a milieu of inflammatory mediators. This phenotype makes MSCs easily available for therapies as 'off-the-shelf cells. Additionally, MSCs express chemotactic receptors, thereby allowing them to migrate to sites of tissue injury. This latter property has proven useful in the embodiment of MSCs as cellular vehicles to deliver targeted therapeutics to precise regions. The MSCs would typically harbor a prodrug or ectopically express a therapeutic gene to be delivered at a targeted site. This approach has been utilized in a number of different indications requiring precise therapeutic delivery, specifically cancer, cardiovascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Combined with their immune-privileged status, safe clinical profile and low tumorigenicity, MSCs offer vast potential to benefit patients with serious diseases, for which limited treatment options exist. PMID:22946432

  6. Cell-cell and cell-stromal interactions in differentiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, D.; Huberman, E.

    1987-01-01

    Differentiation and proliferation of tumor cells can be modulated by direct cell contact and by diffusable macromolecules produced by stromal cells. The expression of specific functions of stromal, as well as epithelial cells can be influenced by specific inducers that can modulate synthesis and secretion of growth factors, extracellular matrix molecules and cell surface molecules. The end result of such alterations of stromal cell function is a decrease in proliferation and/or increase in differentiative properties of the tumor cell. The important factors in normal prostate gland differentiation are not well defined, whereas a variety of molecules have been defined in mammary gland and hematopoetic growth and differentiation. It is important to recognize that the induction of differentiation in epithelial systems does not automatically signify an alteration in tumorigenesis, much less prove the importance of cell-cell interactions in differentiation of epithelial tumors. Although there are reports of regression of tumors in strong embryonic fields or in regenerating fields and isolated reports of non-neural epithelial tumors converting to benign growth when placed in heterotypic cellular interactions, what is desperately needed is convincing evidence in well-documented model systems that specific induction of differentiated function in epithelial tumors occurs and that the phenomenon operates under the same fundamental laws that regulate cell differentiation in normal development. Until such results can be demonstrated and accepted widely, the concept of differentiation therapy will only be applicable to specialized cases like hematopoetic tumors and teratocarcinomas. To simply demonstrate that an inducer generates a differentiated response in a tumor cell population is not sufficient to argue that growth and tumorigenicity will be compromised. 96 refs.

  7. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - Cell Based Therapy and Novel Therapeutic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Changsung; Lee, Hee Chul; Sung, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease, characterized by the predominant loss of motor neurons (MNs) in primary motor cortex, the brainstem, and the spinal cord, causing premature death in most cases. Minimal delay of pathological development by available medicine has prompted the search for novel therapeutic treatments to cure ALS. Cell-based therapy has been proposed as an ultimate source for regeneration of MNs. Recent completion of non-autologous fetal spinal s...

  8. Progress and challenges with clinical cell therapy in neurorestoratology

    OpenAIRE

    Huang H; Mao G; Chen L; Liu A

    2015-01-01

    Hongyun Huang,1–3 Gengsheng Mao,1 Lin Chen,4,5 Aibing Liu11General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces,2Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, 3Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 4Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, 5Medical Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Cell therapies in the treatment of central nervous system disease and injury, such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, sequelae of st...

  9. Progress and challenges with clinical cell therapy in neurorestoratology

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hongyun

    2015-01-01

    Hongyun Huang,1–3 Gengsheng Mao,1 Lin Chen,4,5 Aibing Liu11General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces,2Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, 3Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 4Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, 5Medical Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Cell therapies in the treatment of central nervous system disease and injury, such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, se...

  10. Optimising gene therapy of hypoparathyroidism with hematopoietic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yi; L(U) Bing-jie; XU Ping; SONG Chun-fang

    2005-01-01

    Background The treatment of hypoparathyroidism (HPT) is still a difficult clinical problem, which necessitates a new therapy. Gene therapy of HPT has been valuable, but how to improve the gene transfer efficiency and expression stability is a problem. This study was designed to optimize the gene therapy of HPT with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) recombined with the parathyroid hormone (PTH) gene. Methods The human PTH gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from pcDNA3.1-PTH vectors and inserted into murine stem cell virus (MSCV) vectors with double enzyme digestion (EcoRI and XhoI). The recombinant vectors were transfected into PA317 packaging cell lines by the lipofectin method and screened by G418 selective medium. The condensed recombinant retroviruses were extracted and used to infect HSCs, which were injected into mice suffering from HPT. The change of symptoms and serum levels of PTH and calcium in each group of mice were investigated. Results The human PTH gene was inserted into MSCV vectors successfully and the titres were up to 2×107 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml in condensed retroviral solution. The secretion of PTH reached 15 ng·10-6·cell-1 per 48 hours. The wild type viruses were not detected via PCR amplification, so they were safe for use. The mice suffering from HPT recovered quickly and the serum levels of calcium and PTH remained normal for about three months after the HSCs recombined with PTH were injected into them. The therapeutic effect of this method was better than simple recombinant retroviruses injection.Conclusions The recombinant retroviral vectors MSCV-PTH and the high-titre condensed retroviral solution recombined with the PTH gene are obtained. The recombinant retroviral solution could infect HSCs at a high rate of efficiency. The infected HSCs could cure HPT in mice. This method has provided theoretical evidence for the clinical gene therapy of HPT.

  11. Research of commercial bifacial silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Tiantian; Li, Hongbo [Shanghai Solar Energy Research Center (China); Li, Wennan; Guo, Wenlin [Shanghai Perfect Energy (China); Chen, Mingbo [Shanghai Institute of Space Power-Sources (China)

    2008-07-01

    Because of the special finger shape and junction structure, bifacial silicon solar cells could receive sunlight from both sides. So the cells can absorb much sunlight, have less strict require for installation, and have higher conversion efficiency. We have done research in commercial bifacial silicon solar cells. We designed the bifacial silicon solar cells with realizable structure and high conversion efficiency. We designed and realized proper technics path, which are used to fabricate these bifacial solar cells. The boron backfield is used. The anti-reflection coating and finger contact are fabricated on both surfaces of the solar cells, so the cells have different contact structure. Meanwhile, we realized ohmic contact between finger contacts and surface of solar cells on both sides. We successfully produced the bifacial silicon solar cells with the front and rear efficiencies exceed 15% and 9%(AM1.5, 25 C), respectively, and which can be produced in large-scale. (orig.)

  12. Survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma in the pretargeted versus targeted therapy eras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengxiang; Wong, Yu-Ning; Armstrong, Katrina; Haas, Naomi; Subedi, Prasun; Davis-Cerone, Margaret; Doshi, Jalpa A

    2016-02-01

    Between December 2005 and October 2009, FDA approved six targeted therapies shown to significantly extend survival for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients in clinical trials. This study aimed to examine changes in survival between the pretargeted and targeted therapy periods in advanced RCC patients in a real-world setting. Utilizing the 2000-2010 SEER Research files, a pre-post study design with a contemporaneous comparison group was employed to examine differences in survival outcomes for patients diagnosed with advanced RCC (study group) or advanced prostate cancer (comparison group, for whom no significant treatment innovations happened during this period) across the pretargeted therapy era (2000-2005) and the targeted therapy era (2006-2010). RCC patients diagnosed in the targeted therapy era (N = 6439) showed improved survival compared to those diagnosed in the pretargeted therapy era (N = 7231, hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause death: 0.86, P < 0.01), while the change between the pre-post periods was not significant for advanced prostate cancer patients (HR: 0.97, P = 0.08). Advanced RCC patients had significantly larger improvements in overall survival compared to advanced prostate cancer patients (z = 4.31; P < 0.01). More detailed year-to-year analysis revealed greater survival improvements for RCC in the later years of the posttargeted period. Similar results were seen for cause-specific survival. Subgroup analyses by nephrectomy status, age, and gender showed consistent findings. Patients diagnosed with advanced RCC during the targeted therapy era had better survival outcomes than those diagnosed during the pretargeted therapy era. Future studies should examine the real-world survival improvements directly associated with targeted therapies. PMID:26645975

  13. Convergence of normal stem cell and cancer stem cell developmental stage: Implication for differential therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Shengwen Calvin Li; Lee, Katherine L.; Jane Luo; Jiang F. Zhong; William G Loudon

    2011-01-01

    Increased evidence shows that normal stem cells may contribute to cancer development and progression by acting as cancer-initiating cells through their interactions with abnormal environmental elements. We postulate that normal stem cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) possess similar mechanisms of self-renewal and differentiation. CSC can be the key to the elaboration of anti-cancer-based therapy. In this article, we focus on a controversial new theme relating to CSC. Tumorigenesis may have a c...

  14. ''Total'' therapy for oat cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Undifferentiated small cell (oat cell) carcinoma of the lung is almost predictably disseminated at the time of diagnosis, even in seemingly early clinical presentations. The need for combined modality therapy is mandatory when this aspect of the natural history of disease is appreciated. Between November 1974, and April 1976, 31 consecutive patients without prior treatment received simultaneous radiotherapy of bulk disease, prophylactic whole brain irradiation, and intensive systematic chemotherapy. Primary treatment was completed in 3 months, following which all patients were observed without maintenance therapy. Complete remissions were achieved in 29/31 cases (94%) and the median disease-free interval after termination of therapy was 9 months. The median survival (actuarial) exceeds 14 months, despite consideration of 4 deaths from treatment complications (no residual tumor identified at autopsy) as deaths caused by cancer. Most encouraging have been the sustained remissions for more than 1 year accompanied by resumption of normal activity in one-half of patients with regional clinical presentations (intrathoracic disease). The latter suggests that curative treatment may be potentially available using current therapeutic tools in a fraction of cases with oat cell carcinoma of the lung. Tolerance to the treatment program utilized could be correlated with the radiotherapy technique and the experience using three different fractionation schemes is described. Also reported are the substantial iatrogenic complications encountered with this combined modality regimen

  15. Therapies targeting cancer stem cells: Current trends and future challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denisa; L; Dragu; Laura; G; Necula; Coralia; Bleotu; Carmen; C; Diaconu; Mihaela; Chivu-Economescu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional therapies against cancer, chemo- and radiotherapy, have multiple limitations that lead to treatment failure and cancer recurrence. These limitations are related to systemic and local toxicity, while treatment failure and cancer relapse are due to drug resistance and self-renewal, properties of a small population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These cells are involved in cancer initiation, maintenance, metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, in order to develop efficient treatments that can induce a longlasting clinical response preventing tumor relapse it is important to develop drugs that can specifically target and eliminate CSCs. Recent identification of surface markers and understanding of molecular feature associated with CSC phenotype helped with the design of effective treatments. In this review we discuss targeting surface biomarkers, signaling pathways that regulate CSCs self-renewal and differentiation, drug-efflux pumps involved in apoptosis resistance, microenvironmental signals that sustain CSCs growth, manipulation of mi RNA expression, and induction of CSCs apoptosis and differentiation, with specific aim to hamper CSCs regeneration and cancer relapse. Some of these agents are under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies, most of them for using in combination with traditional therapies. The combined therapy using conventional anticancer drugs with CSCs-targeting agents, may offer a promising strategy for management and eradication of different types of cancers.

  16. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell skin cancer ENT-organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Volgin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of photodynamic therapy in 96 patients with primary and recurrent basal cell skin cancer of ENT-organs are represented. For photodynamic therapy the Russian-made photosensitizer Photoditazine at dose of 0.6–1.4 mg/kg was used. Parameters were selected taking into account type and extent of tumor and were as follows: output power – 0.1–3.0 W, power density – 0.1–1.3 W/cm2, light dose – 100–400 J/cm2. The studies showed high efficacy of treatment for primary and recurrent basal cell skin cancer of nose, ear and external auditory canal – from 87.5 to 94.7% of complete regression. Examples of efficacy of the method are represented in the article. High efficacy and good cosmetic effects allowed to make a conclusion about perspectivity of photodynamic therapy for recurrent basal cell skin cancer of ENT-organs. 

  17. 浅议干细胞治疗与1型糖尿病的研究应用%Discussion of Stem Cell Therapy with Type 1 Diabetes Research Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄莹; 黄妙玲

    2014-01-01

    This article mainly introduces the disease mechanism,characteristics,clinical diagnosis of type 1 diabetes,then introduces the clinical treatments of type 1 diabetes.More emphasis is put on using stem cell to treat type 1 diabetes which includes the concept of stem cell and its clinical research values, in order to make readers have a more comprehensive understanding to the applications of stem cell in treatment of type 1 diabetes.%本文主要介绍1型糖尿病的发病机制、发病特点和临床诊断方法,进一步介绍1型糖尿病的临床治疗方法,着重阐述干细胞的概念和使用干细胞治疗1型糖尿病的临床研究进展,以期让读者对干细胞在1型糖尿病的临床治疗中的应用有更加全面、清晰的认识。

  18. Targeting insulin-producing beta cells for regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Adriana; Roscioni, Sara S; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic beta cells differ in terms of glucose responsiveness, insulin secretion and proliferative capacity; however, the molecular pathways that regulate this cellular heterogeneity are unknown. We have identified the Wnt-planar cell polarity (PCP) effector Flattop (FLTP) as a biomarker that identifies mature beta cells in the islets of Langerhans. Interestingly, three-dimensional architecture and Wnt-PCP ligands are sufficient to trigger mouse and human beta cell maturation. These results highlight the fact that novel biomarkers shed light on the long-standing mystery of beta cell heterogeneity and identify the Wnt-PCP pathway as triggering beta cell maturation. Understanding heterogeneity in the islets of Langerhans might allow targeting of beta cell subpopulations for regenerative therapy and provide building principles for stem cell-derived islets. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Can we make a better beta cell?' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Amin Ardestani and Kathrin Maedler, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3892-9 , and by Harry Heimberg and colleagues, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3879-6 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Shanta Persaud (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3870-2 ). PMID:27412250

  19. Brain tumor stem cells as research and treatment targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most malignant forms of human cancer. Despite intensive treatment, the mean survival of GBM patients remains about 1 year. Recent cancer studies revealed that cancer tissues are pathologically heterogeneous and only a small population of cells has the specific ability to reinitiate cancer. This small cell population is called cancer stem cells (CSCs); in brain tumors these are known as brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs). The identification of BTSCs yielded new insights into chemo- and radioresistance, by which BTSCs can survive selectively and initiate recurrence. Research focused on BTSCs as treatment targets may contribute to the discovery of new therapeutic strategies. Clinical and basic research studies gradually led to improved outcomes in patients with brain tumors. Stupp et al. reported a mean survival of 14.6 months in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with radiotherapy plus temozolomide and 12.1 months in those subjected to radiotherapy alone. Earlier cancer therapies primarily targeted rapidly dividing cells but not minor populations of slowly dividing cells that contain BTSCs. Accumulating evidence suggests that BTSCs may represent an excellent tool for discovering new strategies to treat GBM patients. In this review, we present evidence supporting the CSC model of tumor progression, and discuss difficulties encountered in CSC research and experimental and therapeutic implications. (author)

  20. Medulloblastoma stem cells: Promising targets in medulloblastoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guo-Hao; Xu, Qing-Fu; Cui, You-Hong; Li, Ningning; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Lv, Sheng-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Despite great improvements in the therapeutic regimen, relapse and leptomeningeal dissemination still pose great challenges to the long-term survival of MB patients. Developing more effective strategies has become extremely urgent. In recent years, a number of malignancies, including MB, have been found to contain a subpopulation of cancer cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs), or tumor initiating/propagating cells. The CSCs are thought to be largely responsible for tumor initiation, maintenance, dissemination, and relapse; therefore, their pivotal roles have revealed them to be promising targets in MB therapy. Our growing understanding of the major medulloblastoma molecular subgroups and the derivation of some of these groups from specific stem or progenitor cells adds additional layers to the CSC knowledge base. Herein we review the current knowledge of MB stem cells, highlight the molecular mechanisms relating to MB relapse and leptomeningeal dissemination, and incorporate these with the need to develop more effective and accurate therapies for MB patients. PMID:27171351

  1. The role of myeloid cells in cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engblom, Camilla; Pfirschke, Christina; Pittet, Mikael J

    2016-07-01

    Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the ability to durably control cancer in some patients by manipulating T lymphocytes. These immunotherapies are revolutionizing cancer treatment but benefit only a minority of patients. It is thus a crucial time for clinicians, cancer scientists and immunologists to determine the next steps in shifting cancer treatment towards better cancer control. This Review describes recent advances in our understanding of tumour-associated myeloid cells. These cells remain less studied than T lymphocytes but have attracted particular attention because their presence in tumours is often linked to altered patient survival. Also, experimental studies indicate that myeloid cells modulate key cancer-associated activities, including immune evasion, and affect virtually all types of cancer therapy. Consequently, targeting myeloid cells could overcome limitations of current treatment options. PMID:27339708

  2. New perspectives in human stem cell therapeutic research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trounson Alan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human stem cells are in evaluation in clinical stem cell trials, primarily as autologous bone marrow studies, autologous and allogenic mesenchymal stem cell trials, and some allogenic neural stem cell transplantation projects. Safety and efficacy are being addressed for a number of disease state applications. There is considerable data supporting safety of bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cell transplants but the efficacy data are variable and of mixed benefit. Mechanisms of action of many of these cells are unknown and this raises the concern of unpredictable results in the future. Nevertheless there is considerable optimism that immune suppression and anti-inflammatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells will be of benefit for many conditions such as graft versus host disease, solid organ transplants and pulmonary fibrosis. Where bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells are being studied for heart disease, stroke and other neurodegenerative disorders, again progress is mixed and mostly without significant benefit. However, correction of multiple sclerosis, at least in the short term is encouraging. Clinical trials on the use of embryonic stem cell derivatives for spinal injury and macular degeneration are beginning and a raft of other clinical trials can be expected soon, for example, the use of neural stem cells for killing inoperable glioma and embryonic stem cells for regenerating β islet cells for diabetes. The change in attitude to embryonic stem cell research with the incoming Obama administration heralds a new co-operative environment for study and evaluation of stem cell therapies. The Californian stem cell initiative (California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has engendered global collaboration for this new medicine that will now also be supported by the US Federal Government. The active participation of governments, academia, biotechnology, pharmaceutical companies, and private investment is a powerful consortium for

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that leads to permanent neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens are insufficient to treat the irreversible neurological disabilities. Tremendous progress in the experimental and clinical applications of cell-based therapies has recognized stem cells as potential candidates for regenerative therapy for many neurodegenerative disorders including MS. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs derived precursor cells can modulate the autoimmune response in the central nervous system (CNS and promote endogenous remyelination and repair process in animal models. This review highlights studies involving the immunomodulatory and regenerative effects of mesenchymal stem cells and iPSCs derived cells in animal models, and their translation into immunomodulatory and neuroregenerative treatment strategies for MS.

  4. Head and neck cancer: from research to therapy and cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varelas, Xaralabos; Kukuruzinska, Maria A

    2014-12-01

    Cumulative findings from many research groups have identified new signaling mechanisms associated with head and neck cancers. We summarize these findings, including discussion of aberrant NOTCH, PI3K, STAT3, immune recognition, oxidative pathway, and regulation of cell cycle and cell death. The genomic landscape of head and neck cancers has been shown to differ depending on human papillomavirus (HPV) status. We discuss studies examining the integration of HPV into genomic regions, as well as the epigenetic alterations that occur in response to HPV infection, and how these may help reveal new biomarker and treatment predictors. The characterization of premalignant lesions is also highlighted, as is evidence indicating that the surgical removal of these lesions is associated with better clinical outcomes. Current surgical methods are also discussed, including several less aggressive approaches such as minimal invasive robotic surgery. While much remains to be done in the fight against head and neck cancer, continued integration of basic research with new treatment options will likely lead to more effective therapeutic strategies directed against this disease. PMID:25532687

  5. Targeted agents in non-small cell lung cancer therapy: What is there on the horizon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria M Villaflor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases. There has been much research in lung cancer over the past decade which has advanced our ability to treat these patients with a more personalized approach. The scope of this paper is to review the literature and give a broad understanding of the current molecular targets for which we currently have therapies as well as other targets for which we may soon have therapies. Additionally, we will cover some of the issues of resistance with these targeted therapies. The molecular targets we intend to discuss are epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, anaplastic large-cell lymphoma kinase (ALK, KRAS, C-MET/RON, PIK3CA. ROS-1, RET Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR. Ephrins and their receptors, BRAF, and immunotherapies/vaccines. This manuscript only summarizes the work which has been done to date and in no way is meant to be comprehensive.

  6. Engineered T Cells for the Adoptive Therapy of B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Koehler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL remains an incurable disease due to the high risk of relapse, even after complete remission, raising the need to control and eliminate residual tumor cells in long term. Adoptive T cell therapy with genetically engineered specificity is thought to fulfil expectations, and clinical trials for the treatment of CLL are initiated. Cytolytic T cells from patients are redirected towards CLL cells by ex vivo engineering with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which binds to CD19 on CLL cells through an antibody-derived domain and triggers T cell activation through CD3ζ upon tumor cell engagement. Redirected T cells thereby target CLL cells in an MHC-unrestricted fashion, secret proinflammatory cytokines, and eliminate CD19+ leukaemia cells with high efficiency. Cytolysis of autologous CLL cells by patient's engineered T cells is effective, however, accompanied by lasting elimination of healthy CD19+ B-cells. In this paper we discuss the potential of the strategy in the treatment of CLL, the currently ongoing trials, and the future challenges in the adoptive therapy with CAR-engineered T cells.

  7. Stem Cell Research and Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J.; Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.; Klasko, Stephen K.; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are being touted as the greatest discovery for the potential treatment of a myriad of diseases in the new millennium, but there is still much research to be done before it will be known whether they can live up to this description. There is also an ethical debate over the production of one of the most valuable types of stem cell: the…

  8. Immunological aspects of allogeneic and autologous mesenchymal stem cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogduijn, M J; Roemeling-van Rhijn, M; Korevaar, S S; Engela, A U; Weimar, W; Baan, C C

    2011-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have potential for therapeutic application as an immunomodulatory and regenerative agent. The immunogenicity and survival of MSCs after infusion are, however, not clear and evidence suggests that allogeneic but also autologous MSCs disappear rapidly after infusion. This may be associated with the susceptibility of MSCs to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells, possibly a result of culture-induced stress. In the present study we examined whether NK cell-mediated lysis of MSCs could be inhibited by immunosuppressive drugs. Human MSCs were isolated from adipose tissue and expanded in culture. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were activated with interleukin (IL)-2 (200 U/ml) and IL-15 (10 ng/ml) for 7 days. CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+) NK cells were then isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and added to europium-labeled MSCs for 4 hr in the presence or absence of immunosuppressive drugs. Lysis of MSCs was determined by spectrophotometric measurement of europium release. Nonactivated NK cells were not capable of lysing MSCs. Cytokine-activated NK cells showed upregulated levels of granzyme B and perforin and efficiently lysed allogeneic and autologous MSCs. Addition of tacrolimus, rapamycin or sotrastaurin to the lysis assay did not inhibit MSC killing. Furthermore, preincubation of activated NK cells with the immunosuppressive drugs for 24 hr before exposure to MSCs had no effect on MSC lysis. Last, addition of the immunosuppressants before and during the activation of NK cells, reduced NK cell numbers but did not affect their capacity to lyse MSCs. We conclude that the immunosuppressive drugs tacrolimus, rapamycin, and sotrastaurin are not capable of inhibiting the lysis of allogeneic and autologous MSCs by activated NK cells. Other approaches to controlling lysis of MSCs should be investigated, as controlling lysis may determine the efficacy of MSC therapy. PMID:21732766

  9. Shared data for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization research: the CORT dataset

    OpenAIRE

    Craft, David; Bangert, Mark; Long, Troy; Papp, Dávid; Unkelbach, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background: We provide common datasets (which we call the CORT dataset: common optimization for radiation therapy) that researchers can use when developing and contrasting radiation treatment planning optimization algorithms. The datasets allow researchers to make one-to-one comparisons of algorithms in order to solve various instances of the radiation therapy treatment planning problem in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), including beam angle optimization, volumetric modulated ar...

  10. Autologous bone marrow stromal cells are promising candidates for cell therapy approaches to treat bone degeneration in sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique Lebouvier

    2015-11-01

    SCD-ON patients have a higher frequency of BMSCs that retain their bone regeneration potential. Our findings suggest that BMSCs isolated from SCD-ON patients can be used clinically in cell therapy approaches. This work provides important preclinical data that is necessary for the clinical application of expanded BMSCs in advanced therapies and medical products.

  11. Constraint-induced movement therapy as a paradigm of translational research in neurorehabilitation: Reviews and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Chao; Chen, Yun-Ju; Chien, Chung-Liang; Kashima, Haruo; Lin, Keh-Chung

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness about the importance of translation from basic scientific findings into practical application for efficiently improving human health, especially in the pharmaceutical industry. In the field of neurorehabilitation, however, the bench-to-bedside process continues to be developing, and thus most of the therapeutic interventions have encountered barriers during exploration of evidence-based effectiveness. Despite this immaturity, constraint-induced movement therapy (CIT), a well-evidenced treatment evolved from research in nonhuman primates, is suggested to be an ideal paradigm of translational research in the field of neurorehabilitation. This article reviews the evolvement of CIT with regards to its behavioral efficacy and neuroimaging evidence through the translation roadmap developed by the National Institutes of Health. We also discuss prospects for the application of combined interventions, such as stem cell therapy or pharmaceutical prescription, with appropriate screening of patients beforehand, as well as an efficient delivery mode after the treatment. To achieve such goals and consolidate evidenced-based neurorehabilitation, we provide a framework for applications into the translational research of other therapeutic interventions aside from CIT. PMID:21139805

  12. Progress and challenges with clinical cell therapy in neurorestoratology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang H

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hongyun Huang,1–3 Gengsheng Mao,1 Lin Chen,4,5 Aibing Liu11General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces,2Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, 3Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 4Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, 5Medical Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Cell therapies in the treatment of central nervous system disease and injury, such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, sequelae of stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and cerebral palsy, have been studied in the clinic for the last 10–20 years. Excitingly, many studies have demonstrated that most patients appear to have some functional improvement following administration of different types of cells by different routes with relatively low risk and good tolerability. However, there are some misconceptions that hinder the development of cell-based neurorestorative strategies. It is a considerable challenge but also an opportunity for physicians in neurorestoratology to face these issues. This review briefly outlines the progress made in neurorestoratology, discusses the relevant issues, and attempts to correct the misconceptions.Keywords: neurorestorative strategies, cell therapy, progress, challenges, neurorestoratology

  13. Biomaterial Applications in Cell-Based Therapy in Experimental Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisserand, Ligia S. B.; Kodama, Tomonobu; Papassin, Jérémie; Auzely, Rachel; Moisan, Anaïck; Rome, Claire; Detante, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is an important health issue corresponding to the second cause of mortality and first cause of severe disability with no effective treatments after the first hours of onset. Regenerative approaches such as cell therapy provide an increase in endogenous brain structural plasticity but they are not enough to promote a complete recovery. Tissue engineering has recently aroused a major interesting development of biomaterials for use into the central nervous system. Many biomaterials have been engineered based on natural compounds, synthetic compounds, or a mix of both with the aim of providing polymers with specific properties. The mechanical properties of biomaterials can be exquisitely regulated forming polymers with different stiffness, modifiable physical state that polymerizes in situ, or small particles encapsulating cells or growth factors. The choice of biomaterial compounds should be adapted for the different applications, structure target, and delay of administration. Biocompatibilities with embedded cells and with the host tissue and biodegradation rate must be considerate. In this paper, we review the different applications of biomaterials combined with cell therapy in ischemic stroke and we explore specific features such as choice of biomaterial compounds and physical and mechanical properties concerning the recent studies in experimental stroke.

  14. Performing Art-Based Research: Innovation in Graduate Art Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bruce L.; Hoffman, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an innovation in art therapy research and education in which art-based performance is used to generate, embody, and creatively synthesize knowledge. An art therapy graduate student's art-based process of inquiry serves to demonstrate how art and performance may be used to identify the research question, to conduct a…

  15. Breast cancer stem cells: implications for therapy of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Brian J.; Schmidt, Chris W.; Lakhani, Sunil R; Reynolds, Brent A.; Lopez, J. Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The concept of cancer stem cells responsible for tumour origin, maintenance, and resistance to treatment has gained prominence in the field of breast cancer research. The therapeutic targeting of these cells has the potential to eliminate residual disease and may become an important component of a multimodality treatment. Recent improvements in immunotherapy targeting of tumour-associated antigens have advanced the prospect of targeting breast cancer stem cells, an approach that might lead to...

  16. Effect of stem cell-based therapy for ischemic stroke treatment: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Duan, Feng; Wang, Ming-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Peng; Ma, Li-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and long-term disability worldwide. Cell-based therapies improve neural functional recovery in pre-clinical studies, but clinical results require evaluation. We aimed to assess the effects of mesenchymal stem cells on ischemic stroke treatment. We searched the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases until July 2015 and selected the controlled trials using mesenchymal stem cells for ischemic stroke treatment compared with cell-free treatment. We assessed the results by meta-analysis using the error matrix approach, and we assessed the association of mesenchymal stem cell counts with treatment effect by dose-response meta-analysis. Seven trials were included. Manhattan plots revealed no obvious advantage of the application of stem cells to treat ischemic stroke. For the comprehensive evaluation index, stem cell treatment did not significantly reduce the mortality of ischemic stroke patients (relative risk (RR) 0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29-1.19; ln(RR) 0.54, 95% CI -0.18 to 1.25, p=0.141). The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was also not significantly improved by stem cell treatment (standardized mean difference (SMD) 0.94, 95% CI -0.13 to 2.01, p=0.072). The European Stroke Scale was significantly improved using the stem cell treatment (SMD 1.15, 95% CI 0.37-1.92). The dose-response meta-analysis did not reveal a significant linear regression relationship between the number of stem cells and therapeutic effect, except regarding the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale index. In conclusion, our assessments indicated no significant difference between stem cell and cell-free treatments. Further research is needed to discover more effective stem cell-based therapies for ischemic stroke treatment. PMID:27131124

  17. Sickle Cell Research: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Recent Developments | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell disease should have regular checkups to detect eye damage. And a simple ultrasound test of the head can identify children at high risk for strokes. Recent Developments Research on bone marrow transplants, gene therapy, and new medicines for sickle cell ...

  18. Potential sources of stem cells as a regenerative therapy for Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Oueida El-Sadik

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abir Oueida El-SadikDepartment of Anatomy and Embryology, Scientific Research Unit, Female Health Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Stem cells are believed to hold enormous promise as potential replacement therapy in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD. Stem cells were investigated to be the alternative therapeutic source capable of differentiating into dopamine (DA neurons. Multiple important signaling factors were recorded for the induction of DA neuronal traits from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs such as fibroblast growth factor 8, sonic hedgehog, and Wnt 1. Recent protocols were described for the differentiation of human ESCs into DA neurons, achieving high efficiency of DA neuronal derivation. Despite that, the use of human ESCs is still ethically controversial. The transcription factors necessary for DA neuron development from adult neural stem cells (NSCs, such as Pitx3, Nurr1, En-1, En-2, Lmx1a, Lmx1b, Msx1, and Ngn2, were investigated. In addition to replacement of lost DA neurons, adult NSCs were recorded to provide neuroprotective and neurogenic factors for the mesencephalon. In addition, induced pluripotent stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells represent reliable stem cell sources of DA neurons. Future studies are recommended to provide further insight into the regenerative capacity of stem cells needed for the treatment of PD.Keywords: dopamine, embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, Parkinson's disease, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells

  19. Contributions to the Study of Violence and Trauma: Multisystemic Therapy, Exposure Therapy, Attachment Styles, and Therapy Process Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The prevention of future violence through engaging violent adolescents in multisystemic therapy and the treatment of trauma with exposure therapy are two of the most important scientific advances in the field of interpersonal violence in the past 20 years. A particularly significant methodological innovation is the development of reliable and…

  20. Combined immunotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy of cancer with microencapsulated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirone, Pasquale; Bourgeois, Jacqueline M; Shen, Feng; Chang, Patricia L

    2004-10-01

    An alternative form of gene therapy involves immunoisolation of a nonautologous cell line engineered to secrete a therapeutic product. Encapsulation of these cells in a biocompatible polymer serves to protect these allogeneic cells from host-versus-graft rejection while recombinant products and nutrients are able to pass by diffusion. This strategy was applied to the treatment of cancer with some success by delivering either interleukin 2 or angiostatin. However, as cancer is a complex, multifactorial disease, a multipronged approach is now being developed to attack tumorigenesis via multiple pathways in order to improve treatment efficacy. A combination of immunotherapy with angiostatic therapy was investigated by treating B16-F0/neu melanoma-bearing mice with intraperitoneally implanted, microencapsulated mouse myoblasts (C2C12) genetically modified to deliver angiostatin and an interleukin 2 fusion protein (sFvIL-2). The combination treatment resulted in improved survival, delayed tumor growth, and increased histological indices of antitumor activity (apoptosis and necrosis). In addition to improved efficacy, the combination treatment also ameliorated some of the undesirable side effects from the individual treatments that have led to the previous failure of the single treatments, for example, inflammatory response to IL-2 or vascular mimicry due to angiostatin. In conclusion, the combination of immuno- and antiangiogenic therapies delivered by immunoisolated cells was superior to individual treatments for antitumorigenesis activity, not only because of their known mechanisms of action but also because of unexpected protection against the adverse side effects of the single treatments. Thus, the concept of a "cocktail" strategy, with microencapsulation delivering multiple antitumor recombinant molecules to improve efficacy, is validated. PMID:15585110

  1. Controversial issue: is it safe to employ mesenchymal stem cells in cell-based therapies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepperdinger, Günter; Brunauer, Regina; Jamnig, Angelika;

    2008-01-01

    The prospective clinical use of multipotent mesenchymal stromal stem cells (MSC) holds enormous promise for the treatment of a large number of degenerative and age-related diseases. However, the challenges and risks for cell-based therapies are multifaceted. The risks for patients receiving stem...... restricts their proliferation and differentiation efficiency. It however also limits the yield of sufficient numbers of cells needed for therapy. Another issue is to eliminate contamination of expanding cells with serum-bound pathogenic agents in order to reduce the risks for infection. A recent technical...... cells, which have been expanded in vitro in the presence of xenogenic compounds, can hardly be anticipated and methods for the culture and manipulation of "safe" MSC ex vivo are being investigated. During in vitro expansion, stem cells experience a long replicative history and are thus subject to damage...

  2. Stem cell research and economic promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    In the context of stem cell research, the promise of economic growth has become a common policy argument for adoption of permissive policies and increased government funding. However, declarations of economic and commercial benefit, which can be found in policy reports, the scientific literature, public funding policies, and the popular press, have arguably created a great deal of expectation. Can stem cell research deliver on the economic promise? And what are the implications of this economic ethos for the researchers who must work under its shadow? PMID:20579253

  3. Targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Ching Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recent progress in molecular biology has enabled us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying pathogenesis of human malignancy including lung cancer. Sequencing of human genome has identified many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,giving us a better understanding of the molecular events leading to the formation, progression, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance in human lung cancer. In addition, many signal transduction pathways have been discovered that play important roles in lung cancer. Novel strategy of anti-cancer drug development now involves the identification and development of targeted therapy that interrupts one or more than one pathways or cross-talk among different signal transduction pathways. In addition, efforts are underway that combine the traditional cytotoxic (non-targeted) agents with the biological (targeted) therapy to increase the response rate and survival in patients with lung cancer, especially advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  4. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  5. Methods to Improve Adoptive T-Cell Therapy for Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Hansen, Morten; Sendrup, Sarah L;

    2013-01-01

    Further development of adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) with autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) has the potential to markedly change the long-term prognosis of patients with metastatic melanoma, and modifications of the original protocol that can improve its clinical efficacy are highly...... desirable. In this study, we demonstrated that a high in vitro tumor reactivity of infusion products was associated with clinical responses upon adoptive transfer. In addition, we systematically characterized the responses of a series of TIL products to relevant autologous short term-cultured melanoma cell...... lines from 12 patients. We provide evidence that antitumor reactivity of both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells could be enhanced in most TIL products by autologous melanoma sensitization by pretreatment with low-dose IFN-γ. IFN-γ selectively enhanced responses to tumor-associated antigens other than melanoma...

  6. Stem cell therapy in spinal trauma: Does it have scientific validity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvinder Singh Chhabra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based interventions aim to use special regenerative cells (stem cells to facilitate neuronal function beyond the site of the injury. Many studies involving animal models of spinal cord injury (SCI suggest that certain stem cell-based therapies may restore function after SCI. Currently, in case of spinal cord injuries, new discoveries with clinical implications have been continuously made in basic stem cell research, and stem cell-based approaches are advancing rapidly toward application in patients. There is a huge base of preclinical evidence in vitro and in animal models which suggests the safety and clinical efficacy of cellular therapies after SCI. Despite this, data from clinical studies is not very encouraging and at times confounding. Here, we have attempted to cover preclinical and clinical evidence base dealing with safety, feasibility and efficacy of cell based interventions after SCI. The limitations of preclinical data and the reasons underlying its failure to translate in a clinical setting are also discussed. Based on the evidence base, it is suggested that a multifactorial approach is required to address this situation. Need for standardized, stringently designed multi-centric clinical trials for obtaining validated proof of evidence is also highlighted.

  7. Helicobacter Pylori eradication therapy: getting research into practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, R

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter Pylori (H. Pylori) is the primary cause of duodenal ulcer (DU). Guidelines recommend that all patients with DU be considered for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Therapy (HPET). However, the proportion of patients with DU on long term anti-ulcer medication receiving HPET is small. This study examined the effectiveness of the continuing medical education (CME) network of the Irish College of General Practitioners (ICGP) in promoting best practice in DU treatment among GPs in an eastern region of Ireland. Ninty eight GPs recruited from the CME network of the ICGP were randomised in two cohorts. Cohort 1 received an (early) intervention; GPs were asked to identify their patients with DU receiving long term anti-ulcer medication and prescribe HPET according to defined criteria. Cohort 2 received the intervention later. Prescribing of HPET was monitored using routine prescribing data. Twenty per cent (286\\/1,422) of patients in cohort 1 and 19.2% (127\\/661) in cohort 2 had a DU. After exclusions, 53% (152\\/286) in cohort 1 and 30.7% (39\\/127) in cohort 2, were eligible for HPET. A significantly higher proportion of patients in cohort 1 received HPET compared with cohort 2 during the early intervention period (13.8% vs 0.0%, p<0.05). Reasons for not prescribing HPET included concurrent illness in patients, failure to comply with treatment. Best practice guidelines on HPET treatment of DU can be successfully applied using CME networks. This model could be repeated in another therapeutic area where established research is not yet current practice.

  8. Positive Art Therapy: Linking Positive Psychology to Art Therapy Theory, Practice, and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Rebecca A.; Chilton, Gioia

    2013-01-01

    As a growing movement in the larger field of mental health, positive psychology has much to offer the art therapy profession, which in turn is uniquely poised to contribute to the study of optimal functioning. This article discusses the relationship of positive psychology to art therapy and its capacity to mobilize client strengths, to induce…

  9. Photothermal therapy of cancer cells using novel hollow gold nanoflowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han J

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jing Han,1 Jinru Li,1 Wenfeng Jia,1 Liangming Yao,2 Xiaoqin Li,1 Long Jiang,1 Yong Tian21Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, 2Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: This article presents a new strategy for fabricating large gold nanoflowers (AuNFs that exhibit high biological safety under visible light and very strong photothermal cytotoxicity to HeLa cells under irradiation with near-infrared (NIR light. This particular type of AuNF was constructed using vesicles produced from a multiamine head surfactant as a template followed by depositing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and growing their crystallites on the surface of vesicles. The localized surface plasmon-resonance spectrum of this type of AuNF can be easily modulated to the NIR region by controlling the size of the AuNFs. When the size of the AuNFs increased, biosafety under visible light improved and cytotoxicity increased under NIR irradiation. Experiments in vitro with HeLa cells and in vivo with small mice have been carried out, with promising results. The mechanism for this phenomenon is based on the hypothesis that it is difficult for larger AuNFs to enter the cell without NIR irradiation, but they enter the cell easily at the higher temperatures caused by NIR irradiation. We believe that these effects will exist in other types of noble metallic NPs and cancer cells. In addition, the affinity between AuNPs and functional biomolecules, such as aptamers and biomarkers, will make this type of AuNF a good recognition device in cancer diagnosis and therapy.Keywords: HeLa cells, endocytosis, cytotoxicity, AuNFs, NIR, cancer therapy

  10. Enhancing exposure-based therapy from a translational research perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2007-01-01

    Combining an effective psychological treatment with conventional anxiolytic medication is typically not more effective than unimodal therapy for treating anxiety disorders. However, recent advances in the neuroscience of fear reduction have led to novel approaches for combining psychological therapy and pharmacological agents. Exposure-based treatments in humans partly rely on extinction to reduce the fear response in anxiety disorders. Animal studies have shown that d-cycloserine (DCS), a pa...

  11. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, S.

    Departments of Biochemistry &Molecular Biology, Genetics &Human Genetics, Pediatrics &Child Long-duration space missions require countermeasures against severe/invasive disorders in astronauts that are caused by space environments, such as hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone/muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Some, if not all, of these disorders may be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy and gene therapy. Growing evidence indicates that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess extraordinary plasticity to differentiate not only to all types of blood cells but also to various tissues, including bone, muscle, skin, liver and neuronal cells. Therefore, our working hypothesis is that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called as the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), might provide countermeasure/prevention for hematological abnormalities, bone and muscle losses in space, thereby maintaining astronauts' homeostasis. Our expertise lies in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene therapy for the hemoglobinopathies, -thalassemia and sickle cell disease (Ohi S, Kim BC, J Pharm Sci 85: 274-281, 1996; Ohi S, et al. Grav Space Biol Bull 14: 43, 2000). As the requisite steps in this protocol, we established procedures for purification of HSCs from both mouse and human bone marrow in 1 G. Furthermore, we developed an easily harvestable, long-term liquid suspension culture system, which lasts more than one year, for growing/expanding HSCs without stromal cells. Human globin cDNAs/gene were efficiently expressed from the rAAVs in the mouse HSCs in culture. Additionally, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system is being optimized for the HSC growth/expansion. Thus, using these technologies, the above hypothesis is being investigated by the ground-based experiments as follows: 1) -thalassemic mice (C57BL/6-Hbbth/Hbbth, Hbd-minor) are transplanted with normal isologous HSCs to correct the

  12. Electrogene therapy with interleukin-12 in canine mast cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast cell tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant cutaneous tumors in dogs with extremely variable biological behaviour. Different treatment approaches can be used in canine cutaneous MCT, with surgical excision being the treatment of choice. In this study, electrogene therapy (EGT) as a new therapeutic approach to canine MCTs, was established. Eight dogs with a total of eleven cutaneous MCTs were treated with intratumoral EGT using DNA plasmid encoding human interleukin-12 (IL-12). The local response to the therapy was evaluated by repeated measurements of tumor size and histological examination of treated tumors. A possible systemic response was assessed by determination of IL-12 and interferon- γ (IFN-γ) in patients’ sera. The occurence of side effects was monitored with weekly clinical examinations of treated animals and by performing basic bloodwork, consisting of the complete bloodcount and determination of selected biochemistry parameters. Intratumoral EGT with IL-12 elicits significant reduction of treated tumors’ size, ranging from 13% to 83% (median 50%) of the initial tumor volume. Additionally, a change in the histological structure of treated nodules was seen. There was a reduction in number of malignant mast cells and inflammatory cell infiltration of treated tumors. Systemic release of IL-12 in four patients was detected, without any noticeable local or systemic side effects. These data suggest that intratumoral EGT with plasmid encoding IL-12 may be useful in the treatment of canine MCTs, exerting a local antitumor effect

  13. Current and future regenerative medicine - principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    be recorded and reported.Stem cell and tissue engineering research in the horse has exciting comparative and equine specific perspectives that most likely will benefit the health of horses and humans. Controlled, well-designed studies are needed to move this new equine research field forward.......This paper provides a bird's-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine.The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds......, and their potential therapeutic use in horses are rudimentary at present. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation has been proclaimed from several equine tissues in the past few years. Based on the criteria of the International Society for Cellular Therapy, most of these cells are more correctly referred to as multipotent...

  14. Stem cell therapy for joint problems using the horse as a clinically relevant animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Betts, Dean H.

    2007-01-01

    of the developmental biology of synovial joints and their pathologies. Before human clinical trials are undertaken, stem cell-based therapies for non-life-threatening disorders should be evaluated for their safety and efficacy using animal models of spontaneous disease and not solely by the existing laboratory models...... of experimentally induced lesions. The horse lends itself as a good animal model of spontaneous joint disorders that are clinically relevant to similar human disorders. Equine stem cell and tissue engineering studies may be financially feasible to principal investigators and small biotechnology companies......Research into articular cartilage is a surprisingly recent endeavour and much remains to be learned about the normal development of the synovial joint and its components that interplay in osteoarthritis and focal cartilage defects. Stem cell research is likely to contribute to the understanding...

  15. The latest advances of experimental research on targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongliang Pan; Lianchao Jin; Xianghua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The absence of ef ective therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) establishes the need to de-velop novel therapeutic modality, such as targeted gene therapy, which is ideal for the treatment of CRPC. But its application has been limited due to lack of favorable gene vector and the reduction of“bystander ef ect”. Consequently, scientists al over the world focus their main experimental research on the fol owing four aspects:targeted gene, vector, transfer means and comprehensive therapy. In this paper, we reviewed the latest advances of experimental research on targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer .

  16. Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues From the Director: Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease Past Issues / Summer ... Zerhouni, NIH Director, described the need for expanding stem cell research. Recently, he spoke about stem cell research with ...

  17. Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues From the Director: Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease Past Issues / ... Zerhouni, NIH Director, described the need for expanding stem cell research. Recently, he spoke about stem cell research ...

  18. The Endocrine Regulation of Stem Cells: Physiological Importance and Pharmacological Potentials for Cell-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Ahmad; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat

    2016-01-01

    Throughout life, different types of stem cells participate in tissue generation, maintenance, plasticity, and repair. Their abilities to secrete growth factors, to proliferate and differentiate into several cell lineages, and to migrate and home into the damaged tissues have made them attractive candidates for cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. Normal stem cell function is tied to the cell-intrinsic mechanisms and extrinsic signals derived from the surrounding microenvironment or circulation. Understanding the regulatory signals that govern stem cell functions is essential in order to have full knowledge about organogenesis, tissue maintenance and tissue plasticity in the physiological condition. It is also important for optimizing tissue engineering and improving the therapeutic efficiency of stem cells in regenerative medicine. A growing body of evidence indicates that hormonal signals can critically influence stem cell functions in fetal, postnatal, and adult tissues. This review focuses on recent studies revealing how growth hormone, insulin, thyroid hormone, parathormone, adrenocorticotropin, glucocorticoids, erythropoietin, and gastrointestinal hormones control stem cell behavior through influencing survival, proliferation, migration, homing, and differentiation of these cells. Moreover, how environmental factors such as exercise, hypoxia, and nutrition might affect stem cell functions through influencing the endocrine system is discussed. Some of the current limitations of cell therapy and how hormones can help overcoming these limitations are briefly outlined. PMID:26337380

  19. Latest Sickle Cell Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Special Section: Sickle Cell Disease Latest Sickle Cell Research Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents ... Complications of sickle cell trait 100 Years of Sickle Cell Research Dr. James B. Herrick Photo: National Library ...

  20. Stem Cell Therapies for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Side Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benderitter, Marc; Caviggioli, Fabio; Chapel, Alain; Coppes, Robert P.; Guha, Chandan; Klinger, Marco; Malard, Olivier; Stewart, Fiona; Tamarat, Radia; Van Luijk, Peter; Limoli, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Targeted irradiation is an effective cancer therapy but damage inflicted to normal tissues surrounding the tumor may cause severe complications. While certain pharmacologic strategies can temper the adverse effects of irradiation, stem cell therapies provide unique opportunities for re

  1. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) might countermeasure various space-caused disorders so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using animal models of disorders (hindlimb suspension unloading system and beta-thalassemia), the HSCT was tested for muscle loss, immunodeficiency and space anemia. The results indicate feasibility of HSCT for these disorders. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  2. Cell and gene therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J E

    1994-02-01

    Experiments in mice have supported the idea of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by implanting normal muscle precursor cells into dystrophin-deficient muscles. However, similar experiments on DMD patients have had little success. Gene therapy for DMD, by introducing dystrophin constructs via retroviral or adenoviral vectors, has been shown to be possible in the mouse, but the efficiency and safety aspects of this technique will have to be carefully examined before similar experiments can be attempted in man. Direct injection of dystrophin cDNA constructs into mdx muscles has given rise to very low levels of dystrophin and this may be a possibility for the treatment of heart muscle. PMID:7514447

  3. Defensive mechanism in cholangiocarcinoma cells against oxidative stress induced by chlorin e6-based photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hye Myeong Lee,1,* Chung-Wook Chung,2,* Cy Hyun Kim,1,3 Do Hyung Kim,1,3 Tae Won Kwak,1 Young-Il Jeong,1 Dae Hwan Kang1,3 1National Research and Development Center for Hepatobiliary Cancer, Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Yangsan, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Biological Sciences, Andong National University, Andong, Republic of Korea; 3School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Republic of Korea *Both authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In this study, the effect of chlorin e6-based photodynamic therapy (Ce6-PDT was investigated in human intrahepatic (HuCC-T1 and extrahepatic (SNU1196 cholangiocarcinoma (CCA cells. The amount of intracellular Ce6 increased with increasing Ce6 concentration administered, or with incubation time, in both cell lines. The ability to take up Ce6 and generate reactive oxygen species after irradiation at 1.0 J/cm2 did not significantly differ between the two CCA cell types. However, after irradiation, marked differences were observed for photodamage and apoptotic/necrotic signals. HuCC-T1 cells are more sensitive to Ce6-PDT than SNU1196 cells. Total glutathione (GSH levels, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities in SNU1196 cells were significantly higher than in HuCC-T1 cells. With inhibition of enzyme activity or addition of GSH, the phototoxic effect could be controlled in CCA cells. The intracellular level of GSH is the most important determining factor in the curative action of Ce6-PDT against tumor cells. Keywords: cholangiocarcinoma, chlorin e6, photodynamic therapy, reactive oxygen species, glutathione, heme oxygenase-1

  4. Induction of cell death in a glioblastoma line by hyperthermic therapy based on gold nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Cabada T

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tamara Fernandez Cabada1,2,*, Cristina Sanchez Lopez de Pablo1,3,*, Alberto Martinez Serrano2, Francisco del Pozo Guerrero1,3, Jose Javier Serrano Olmedo1,3,*, Milagros Ramos Gomez1–3,* 1Centre for Biomedical Technology, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; 2Centre for Molecular Biology, "Severo Ochoa" Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; 3Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-bbn, Zaragoza, Spain.*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Metallic nanorods are promising agents for a wide range of biomedical applications. In this study, we developed an optical hyperthermia method capable of inducing in vitro death of glioblastoma cells.Methods: The procedure used was based on irradiation of gold nanorods with a continuous wave laser. This kind of nanoparticle converts absorbed light into localized heat within a short period of time due to the surface plasmon resonance effect. The effectiveness of the method was determined by measuring changes in cell viability after laser irradiation of glioblastoma cells in the presence of gold nanorods.Results: Laser irradiation in the presence of gold nanorods induced a significant decrease in cell viability, while no decrease in cell viability was observed with laser irradiation or incubation with gold nanorods alone. The mechanism of cell death mediated by gold nanorods during photothermal ablation was analyzed, indicating that treatment compromised the integrity of the cell membrane instead of initiating the process of programmed cell death.Conclusion: The use of gold nanorods in hyperthermal therapies is very effective in eliminating glioblastoma cells, and therefore represents an important area of research for therapeutic development.Keywords: laser irradiation, photothermal therapy, surface plasmon resonance, cancer

  5. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Allana Nicole; Brezo, Jelena

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. While the cause of these symptoms are not yet fully delineated, one possible explanation could be the inhibition of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) growth and hematopoiesis in space. HSCs differentiate into all types of blood cells, and growing evidence indicates that the HSCs also have the ability to transdifferentiate to various tissues, including muscle, skin, liver, neuronal cells and possibly bone. Therefore, a hypothesis was advanced in this laboratory that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), could mitigate some of the disorders described above. Due to the magnitude of this project our laboratory has subdivided it into 3 sections: a) HSCT for space anemia; b) HSCT for muscle and bone losses; and c) HSCT for immunodeficiency. Toward developing the HSCT protocol for space anemia, the HSC transplantation procedure was established using a mouse model of beta thalassemia. In addition, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system was used to grow HSCs in space condition. To investigate the HSCT for muscle loss and bone loss, donor HSCs were genetically marked either by transfecting the beta-galactosidase-containing plasmid, pCMV.SPORT-beta-gal or by preparing from b-galactosidase transgenic mice. The transdifferentiation of HSCs to muscle is traced by the reporter gene expression in the hindlimb suspended mice with some positive outcome, as studied by the X-gal staining procedure. The possible structural contribution of HSCs against muscle loss is being investigated histochemically.

  6. Contributions to the study of violence and trauma: Multisystemic therapy, exposure therapy, attachment styles and therapy process research

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan.

    2005-01-01

    The prevention of future violence through engaging violent adolescents in multisystemic therapy and the treatment of trauma with exposure therapy are two of the most important scientific advances in the field of interpersonal violence in the past 20 years. A particularly significant methodological innovation is the development of reliable and valid measures of childhood and adult attachment because attachment deficits and their remediation are central to understanding and treating perpetrator...

  7. Apoptotic cell-based therapies against transplant rejection: role of recipient’s dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larregina, Adriana T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals in transplantation is to develop novel therapeutic methods for induction of donor-specific tolerance to reduce the side effects caused by the generalized immunosuppression associated to the currently used pharmacologic regimens. Interaction or phagocytosis of cells in early apoptosis exerts potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects on antigen (Ag)-presenting cells (APC) like dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages. This observation led to the idea that apoptotic cell-based therapies could be employed to deliver donor-Ag in combination with regulatory signals to recipient’s APC as therapeutic approach to restrain the anti-donor response. This review describes the multiple mechanisms by which apoptotic cells down-modulate the immuno-stimulatory and pro-inflammatory functions of DC and macrophages, and the role of the interaction between apoptotic cells and APC in self-tolerance and in apoptotic cell-based therapies to prevent/treat allograft rejection and graft-versus-host disease in murine experimental systems and in humans. It also explores the role that in vivo-generated apoptotic cells could have in the beneficial effects of extracorporeal photopheresis, donor-specific transfusion, and tolerogenic DC-based therapies in transplantation. PMID:20140521

  8. Combination of nitric oxide therapy, anti-oxidative therapy, low level laser therapy, plasma rich platelet therapy and stem cell therapy as a novel therapeutic application to manage the pain and treat many clinical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasa, Salaheldin; Dickinson, Eva

    2014-02-01

    From hypertension to diabetes, cancer to HIV, stroke to memory loss and learning disorders to septic shock, male impotence to tuberculosis, there is probably no pathological condition where nitric oxide does not play an important role. Nitric oxide is an analgesic, immune-modulator, vasodilator, anti-apoptotic, growth modulator, angiogenetic, anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory and neuro-modulator. Because of the above actions of nitric oxide, many clinical conditions associated with abnormal Nitric oxide (NO) production and bioavailability. Our novel therapeutic approach is to restore the homeostasis of nitric oxide and replace the lost cells by combining nitric oxide therapy, anti-oxidative therapy, low level laser therapy, plasma rich platelet therapy and stem cell therapy.

  9. Cell and gene therapy for arrhythmias: Repair of cardiac conduction damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Fu Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials generated in the sinoatrial node(SAN)dominate the rhythm and rate of a healthy human heart.Subsequently,these action potentials propagate to the whole heart via its conduction system .Abnormalities of impulse generation and/or propagation in a heart can cause arrhythmias.For example,SAN dysfunction or conduction block of the atrioventricular node can lead to serious bradycardia which is currently treated with an implanted electronic pacemaker.On the other hand conduction damage may cause reentrant tachyarrhythmias which are primarily treated pharmacologically or by medical device-based therapies,including defibrillation and tissue ablation.However,drug therapies sometimes may not be effective or are associated with serious side effects.Device-based therapies for cardiac arrhythmias,even with well developed technology,still face inadequacies,limitations,hardware complications,and other challenges.Therefore,scientists are actively seeking other alternatives for antiarrhythmic therapy.In particular,cells and genes used for repairing cardiac conduction damage/defect have been investigated in various studies both in vitro and in vivo.Despite the complexities of the excitation and conduction systems of the heart,cell and gene-based strategies provide novel alternatives for treatment or cure of cardiac anhythmias.This review summarizes some highlights of recent research progress in this field.

  10. Maintaining clarity: Review of maintenance therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dearing, Kristen R; Sangal, Ashish; Weiss, Glen J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the role of maintenance therapy in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A brief overview about induction chemotherapy and its primary function in NSCLC is provided to address the basis of maintenance therapies foundation. The development of how maintenance therapy is utilized in this population is discussed and current guidelines for maintenance therapy are reviewed. Benefits and potential pitfalls of maintenance therapy are ad...

  11. Research Advancements in Porcine Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Dinesh; Shivakumar, Sharath Belame; Subbarao, Raghavendra Baregundi; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    In the present era of stem cell biology, various animals such as Mouse, Bovine, Rabbit and Porcine have been tested for the efficiency of their mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs before their actual use for stem cell based application in humans. Among them pigs have many similarities to humans in the form of organ size, physiology and their functioning, therefore they have been considered as a valuable model system for in vitro studies and preclinical assessments. Easy assessability, few ethical issues, successful MSC isolation from different origins like bone marrow, skin, umbilical cord blood, Wharton's jelly, endometrium, amniotic fluid and peripheral blood make porcine a good model for stem cell therapy. Porcine derived MSCs (pMSCs have shown greater in vitro differentiation and transdifferention potential towards mesenchymal lineages and specialized lineages such as cardiomyocytes, neurons, hepatocytes and pancreatic beta cells. Immunomodulatory and low immunogenic profiles as shown by autologous and heterologous MSCs proves them safe and appropriate models for xenotransplantation purposes. Furthermore, tissue engineered stem cell constructs can be of immense importance in relation to various osteochondral defects which are difficult to treat otherwise. Using pMSCs successful treatment of various disorders like Parkinson's disease, cardiac ischemia, hepatic failure, has been reported by many studies. Here, in this review we highlight current research findings in the area of porcine mesenchymal stem cells dealing with their isolation methods, differentiation ability, transplantation applications and their therapeutic potential towards various diseases. PMID:26201864

  12. Adoptive Cell Therapy for Lymphoma with CD4 T Cells Depleted of CD137 Expressing Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, Matthew J; Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Houot, Roch; Varghese, Bindu; Lin, Jack T.; Swanson, Erica; Levy, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with anti-tumor T cells is a promising novel approach to the treatment of cancer. However, T cell therapy may be limited by the co-transfer of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here we explored this hypothesis by using two cell surface markers, CD44 and CD137, to isolate anti-tumor CD4 T cells while excluding Tregs. In a murine model of B cell lymphoma, only CD137negCD44hi CD4 T cells infiltrated tumor sites and provided protection. Conversely, the population of CD137posCD44h...

  13. Personalized Therapy of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgeel, Shirish M

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer related deaths in both men and women in the United States and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for over 85 % of all lung cancers. Survival of these patients has not significantly altered in over 30 years. This chapter initially discusses the clinical presentation of lung cancer patients. Most patients diagnosed with lung cancer due to symptoms have advanced stage cancer. Once diagnosed, lung cancer patients need imaging studies to assess the stage of the disease before decisions regarding therapy are finalized. The most important prognostic factors are stage of the disease and performance status and these factors also determine therapy. The chapter subsequently discusses management of each stage of the disease and the impact of several pathologic, clinical factors in personalizing therapy for each individual patient. Transition from chemotherapy for every patient to a more personalized approach based on histology and molecular markers has occurred in the management of advanced stage NSCLC. It is expected that such a personalized approach will extend to all stages of NSCLC and will likely improve the outcomes of all NSCLC patients. PMID:26703806

  14. Therapeutic and diagnostic set for irradiation the cell lines in low level laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryko, Lukasz; Zajac, Andrzej; Gilewski, Marian; Szymanska, Justyna; Goralczyk, Krzysztof

    2014-05-01

    In the paper is presented optoelectronic diagnostic set for standardization the biostimulation procedures performed on cell lines. The basic functional components of the therapeutic set are two digitally controlled illuminators. They are composed of the sets of semiconductor emitters - medium power laser diodes and high power LEDs emitting radiation in wide spectral range from 600 nm to 1000 nm. Emitters are coupled with applicator by fibre optic and optical systems that provides uniform irradiation of vessel with cell culture samples. Integrated spectrometer and optical power meter allow to control the energy and spectral parameters of electromagnetic radiation during the Low Level Light Therapy procedure. Dedicated power supplies and digital controlling system allow independent power of each emitter . It was developed active temperature stabilization system to thermal adjust spectral line of emitted radiation to more efficient association with absorption spectra of biological acceptors. Using the set to controlled irradiation and allowing to measure absorption spectrum of biological medium it is possible to carry out objective assessment the impact of the exposure parameters on the state cells subjected to Low Level Light Therapy. That procedure allows comparing the biological response of cell lines after irradiation with radiation of variable spectral and energetic parameters. Researches were carried out on vascular endothelial cell lines. Cells proliferations after irradiation of LEDs: 645 nm, 680 nm, 740 nm, 780 nm, 830 nm, 870 nm, 890 nm, 970 nm and lasers 650 nm and 830 nm were examined.

  15. Translating stem cell therapies: the role of companion animals in regenerative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Volk, Susan W.; Theoret, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Veterinarians and veterinary medicine have been integral to the development of stem cell therapies. The contributions of large animal experimental models to the development and refinement of modern hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were noted nearly five decades ago. More recent advances in adult stem cell/regenerative cell therapies continue to expand knowledge of the basic biology and clinical applications of stem cells. A relatively liberal legal and ethical regulation of stem cell r...

  16. A Bibliometric Analysis of Research on the Behavior Therapy in China and Its Trend

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵山明; 能昌华; 吴汉荣

    2003-01-01

    To get formed of the status of research and application of the domestic behavior therapy and its development trend, the time distribution and the subject distribution were bibliometricallly analyzed of the literature on behavior therapy from 1981 to 2000 in the CBMdisc. Our results showed that the number of literature of behavior therapy has been increasing in exponential manner over the past 20 years; the behavior modification, the biofeedback and the cognitive therapy are extensively used in China. In clinical practice, the behavior modification and the biofeedback have been applied in all departments of medical institutions, especially for treating the cardiovascular and the neurological conditions. The cognitive therapy has been employed mainly for the treatment of mental disorders (or dysphrenia), the aversive therapy mainly for material withdrawal, and the systematic desensitization for phobia. There was no report found on the clinical use of meditation. It is concluded that the study and application in behavior therapy in China is currently developing very fast.

  17. Are reviewers obstructing stem cell research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Binetruy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bernard BinetruyINSERM U626, Faculté de Médecine La Timone, Marseille, FranceA current controversy in stem cell research was published on the BBC website recently. Some stem cell researchers have said that "they believe a small group of scientists is effectively vetoing high quality science from publication in journals". They strongly suspected some reviewers to be deliberately sending back negative comments or asking for unnecessary experiments. Nature editor, Dr Philip Campbell, has said that "this idea is utterly false".

  18. Extended rhodamine photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Kellie S; Linder, Michelle K; Kryman, Mark W; Detty, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Extended thio- and selenorhodamines with a linear or angular fused benzo group were prepared. The absorption maxima for these compounds fell between 640 and 700nm. The extended rhodamines were evaluated for their potential as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy in Colo-26 cells. These compounds were examined for their photophysical properties (absorption, fluorescence, and ability to generate singlet oxygen), for their dark and phototoxicity toward Colo-26 cells, and for their co-localization with mitochondrial-specific agents in Colo-26 and HUT-78 cells. The angular extended rhodamines were effective photosensitizers toward Colo-26 cells with 1.0Jcm(-2) laser light delivered at λmax±2nm with values of EC50 of (2.8±0.4)×10(-7)M for sulfur-containing analogue 6-S and (6.4±0.4)×10(-8)M for selenium-containing analogue 6-Se. The linear extended rhodamines were effective photosensitizers toward Colo-26 cells with 5 and 10Jcm(-2) of broad-band light (EC50's⩽2.4×10(-7)M). PMID:27246858

  19. Target cell specific antibody-based photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Lauren T.; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Kakareka, John W.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-03-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), localized monochromatic light is used to activate targeted photosensitizers (PS) to induce cellular damage through the generation of cytotoxic species such as singlet oxygen. While first-generation PS passively targeted malignancies, a variety of targeting mechanisms have since been studied, including specifically activatable agents. Antibody internalization has previously been employed as a fluorescence activation system and could potentially enable similar activation of PS. TAMRA, Rhodamine-B and Rhodamine-6G were conjugated to trastuzumab (brand name Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody with specificity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), to create quenched PS (Tra-TAM, Tra-RhoB, and Tra-Rho6G). Specific PDT with Tra-TAM and Tra-Rho6G, which formed covalently bound H-dimers, was demonstrated in HER2+ cells: Minimal cell death (SDS-PAGE).

  20. Role of radiation therapy in large cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper compares the results of treatment for large cell lymphoma with use of radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy (CT), or both. The authors retrospectively studied 142 patients with large cell lymphoma. Seventy-two has stage I or II disease and 70, stage III or IV; 37% had B symptoms. CT was used in 66 patients, RT in 22, both in 46, and surgery with or without RT or CT in eight. CT regimens were CHOP, 38 patients; C-MOPP/COPP, 25; CHOP-bleo/BACOP, 15; COP-BLAN-MEL, 8; M-BACOD, 8; COP/CVP, 5; COP-BLAM, 5; and other regimens, 12. Statistical analysis showed that age, stage B symptoms, and treatment were significant variables determining survival. In stages I and II, the 5-year survival rate with RT plus CT was 65%; with CT, 35%; and with RT, 9% (P = < .01)

  1. Cell Therapy in Patients with Critical Limb Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Compagna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical limb ischemia (CLI represents the most advanced stage of peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD with a severe obstruction of the arteries which markedly reduces blood flow to the extremities and has progressed to the point of severe rest pain and/or even tissue loss. Recent therapeutic strategies have focused on restoring this balance in favor of tissue survival using exogenous molecular and cellular agents to promote regeneration of the vasculature. These are based on stimulation of angiogenesis by extracellular and cellular components. This review article carries out a systematic analysis of the most recent scientific literature on the application of stem cells in patients with CLI. The results obtained from the detailed analysis of the recent literature data have confirmed the beneficial role of cell therapy in reducing the rate of major amputations in patients with CLI and improving their quality of life.

  2. Identifying Paths to Successful Marriage and Family Therapy Research: External Factors Within the Publications of Three Eminent Marriage and Family Therapy Researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Droubay, Sarah Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    In an attempt to identify a possible pathway to successful research in marriage and family therapy (MFT), publications of three eminent MFT researchers-James Alexander, John Gottman, and Howard Liddle- were content analyzed. These 208 journal articles, books, book chapters, and dissertations were examined for ex tern al factors and patterns across time. Results supported the importance of doing clinical work, having a sustained research interest area, obtaining funding, and maximizing the ...

  3. Dendritic Cells and Multiple Sclerosis: Disease, Tolerance and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Mohammad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a devastating neurological disease that predominantly affects young adults resulting in severe personal and economic impact. The majority of therapies for this disease were developed in, or are beneficial in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the animal model of MS. While known to target adaptive anti-CNS immune responses, they also target, the innate immune arm. This mini-review focuses on the role of dendritic cells (DCs, the professional antigen presenting cells of the innate immune system. The evidence for a role for DCs in the appropriate regulation of anti-CNS autoimmune responses and their role in MS disease susceptibility and possible therapeutic utility are discussed. Additionally, the current controversy regarding the evidence for the presence of functional DCs in the normal CNS is reviewed. Furthermore, the role of CNS DCs and potential routes of their intercourse between the CNS and cervical lymph nodes are considered. Finally, the future role that this nexus between the CNS and the cervical lymph nodes might play in site directed molecular and cellular therapy for MS is outlined.

  4. Quality and exploitation of umbilical cord blood for cell therapy: Are we beyond our capabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roura, Santiago; Pujal, Josep Maria; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing interest in identifying novel stem cell sources for application in emerging cell therapies. In this context, umbilical cord blood (UCB) shows great promise in multiple clinical settings. The number of UCB banks has therefore increased worldwide, with the objective of preserving potentially life-saving cells that are usually discarded after birth. After a rather long and costly processing procedure, the resultant UCB-derived cell products are cryopreserved until transplantation to patients. However, in many cases, only a small proportion of administered cells engraft successfully. Thus, can we do any better regarding current UCB-based therapeutic approaches? Here we discuss concerns about the use of UCB that are not critically pondered by researchers, clinicians, and banking services, including wasting samples with small volumes and the need for more reliable quality and functional controls to ensure the biological activity of stem cells and subsequent engraftment and treatment efficacy. Finally, we appeal for collaborative agreements between research institutions and UCB banks in order to redirect currently discarded small-volume UCB units for basic and clinical research purposes. Developmental Dynamics 245:710-717, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27043849

  5. Live attenuated measles virus vaccine therapy for locally established malignant glioblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shammari AM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M Al-Shammari,1 Farah E Ismaeel,2 Shahlaa M Salih,2 Nahi Y Yaseen11Experimental Therapy Department, Iraqi Center for Cancer and Medical Genetic Researches, Mustansiriya University, 2Departments of Biotechnology, College of Science, Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad, IraqAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans, with poor prognosis. A new glioblastoma cell line (ANGM5 was established from a cerebral glioblastoma multiforme in a 72-year-old Iraqi man who underwent surgery for an intracranial tumor. This study was carried out to evaluate the antitumor effect of live attenuated measles virus (MV Schwarz vaccine strain on glioblastoma multiforme tumor cell lines in vitro. Live attenuated MV Schwarz strain was propagated on Vero, human rhabdomyosarcoma, and human glioblastoma-multiform (ANGM5 cell lines. The infected confluent monolayer appeared to be covered with syncytia with granulation and vacuolation, as well as cell rounding, shrinkage, and large empty space with cell debris as a result of cell lysis and death. Cell lines infected with virus have the ability for hemadsorption to human red blood cells after 72 hours of infection, whereas no hemadsorption of uninfected cells is seen. Detection of MV hemagglutinin protein by monoclonal antibodies in infected cells of all cell lines by immunocytochemistry assay gave positive results (brown color in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Cell viability was measured after 72 hours of infection by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Results showed a significant cytotoxic effect for MV (P≤0.05 on growth of ANGM5 and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines after 72 hours of infection. Induction of apoptosis by MV was assessed by measuring mitochondrial membrane potentials in tumor cells after 48, 72, and 120 hours of infection. Apoptotic cells were counted, and the mean percentage of dead cells was significantly higher after 48, 72

  6. Quality compliance in the shift from cell transplantation to cell therapy in non-pharma environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives, Joaquim; Oliver-Vila, Irene; Pla, Arnau

    2015-08-01

    Along with academic and charitable organizations, transfusion centers have ventured into the stem cell field, with the aim of testing of novel cell-based therapeutics in a clinical setting for future marketing approval. The fact that quality management structures, which are required for compliance with good scientific practice regulations, were originally designed for product development in corporate environments represents a major challenge for many developers. In this Commentary, challenges that non-pharmaceutical institutions must overcome to translate cell-based products into clinical therapies will be discussed from a quality standpoint. Furthermore, our development experience for a mesenchymal stromal cell-based therapy will be shared as a case study. PMID:25769789

  7. Comparison of different culture conditions for human mesenchymal stromal cells for clinical stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sorensen, M.; Friis, T.; Bindslev, L.;

    2008-01-01

    used for MSC cultivation in animal studies simulating clinical stem cell therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Human mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from BM aspirates by density gradient centrifugation and cultivated in a GMP-accepted medium (EMEA medium) or in one of four other media. RESULTS: FACS...... compliant medium for MSC cultivation, expansion and differentiation. The expanded and differentiated MSCs can be used in autologous mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in patients with ischaemic heart disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008......OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow (BM) are considered potential candidates for therapeutic neovascularization in cardiovascular disease. When implementing results from animal trials in clinical treatment, it is essential to isolate and expand the MSCs under...

  8. The intricacies of neurotrophic factor therapy for retinal ganglion cell rescue in glaucoma: a case for gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldvari, Marianna; Chen, Ding Wen

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of damaged retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and their axons is an important aspect of reversing vision loss in glaucoma patients. While current therapies can effectively lower intraocular pressure, they do not provide extrinsic support to RGCs to actively aid in their protection and regeneration. The unmet need could be addressed by neurotrophic factor gene therapy, where plasmid DNA, encoding neurotrophic factors, is delivered to retinal cells to maintain sufficient levels of neurotrophins in the retina. In this review, we aim to describe the intricacies in the design of the therapy including: the choice of neurotrophic factor, the site and route of administration and target cell populations for gene delivery. Furthermore, we also discuss the challenges currently being faced in RGC-related therapy development with special considerations to the existence of multiple RGC subtypes and the lack of efficient and representative in vitro models for rapid and reliable screening in the drug development process.

  9. The Combination of Light and Stem Cell Therapies: A Novel Approach in Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Juanita; Moges, Helina; Wu, Xingjia; Ilev, Ilko; Waynant, Ronald; Longo, Leonardo

    2010-05-01

    Light therapy commonly referred to as low level laser therapy can alter cellular functions and clinical conditions. Some of the commonly reported in vitro and in vivo effects of light therapy include cellular proliferation, alterations in the inflammatory response to injury, and increases in mitochondrial respiration and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. Based on the known effects of light on cells and tissues in general and on reports in the last 5 years on the interaction of light with stem cells, evidence is mounting indicating that light therapy could greatly benefit stem cell regenerative medicine. Experiments on a variety of harvested adult stem cells demonstrate that light therapy enhances differentiation and proliferation of the cells and alters the expression of growth factors in a number of different types of adult stem cells and progenitors in vitro. It also has the potential to attenuate cytotoxic effects of drugs used to purge harvested autologous stem cells and to increase survival of transplanted cells.

  10. The Combination of Light and Stem Cell Therapies: A Novel Approach in Regenerative Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light therapy commonly referred to as low level laser therapy can alter cellular functions and clinical conditions. Some of the commonly reported in vitro and in vivo effects of light therapy include cellular proliferation, alterations in the inflammatory response to injury, and increases in mitochondrial respiration and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. Based on the known effects of light on cells and tissues in general and on reports in the last 5 years on the interaction of light with stem cells, evidence is mounting indicating that light therapy could greatly benefit stem cell regenerative medicine. Experiments on a variety of harvested adult stem cells demonstrate that light therapy enhances differentiation and proliferation of the cells and alters the expression of growth factors in a number of different types of adult stem cells and progenitors in vitro. It also has the potential to attenuate cytotoxic effects of drugs used to purge harvested autologous stem cells and to increase survival of transplanted cells.

  11. Stem cell therapy in inflammatory bowel disease: Apromising therapeutic strategy?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana I Flores; Gonzalo J Gómez-Gómez; ángeles Masedo-González; M Pilar Martínez-Montiel

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are inflammatory, chronicand progressive diseases of the intestinal tract forwhich no curative treatment is available. Research inother fields with stem cells of different sources and withimmunoregulatory cells (regulatory T-lymphocytes anddendritic T-cells) opens up new expectations for theiruse in these diseases. The goal for stem cell-basedtherapy is to provide a permanent cure. To achieve this,it will be necessary to obtain a cellular product, originalor genetically modified, that has a high migrationcapacity and homes into the intestine, has high survivalafter transplantation, regulates the immune reactionwhile not being visible to the patient's immune system,and repairs the injured tissue.

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy induces cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis of glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioma stem cells in the quiescent state are resistant to clinical radiation therapy. An almost inevitable glioma recurrence is due to the persistence of these cells. The high linear energy transfer associated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) could kill quiescent and proliferative cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of BNCT on glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro. The damage induced by BNCT was assessed using cell cycle progression, apoptotic cell ratio and apoptosis-associated proteins expression. The surviving fraction and cell viability of glioma stem/progenitor cells were decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells using the same boronophenylalanine pretreatment and the same dose of neutron flux. BNCT induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, with changes in the expression of associated proteins. Glioma stem/progenitor cells, which are resistant to current clinical radiotherapy, could be effectively killed by BNCT in vitro via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis using a prolonged neutron irradiation, although radiosensitivity of glioma stem/progenitor cells was decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells when using the same dose of thermal neutron exposure and boronophenylalanine pretreatment. Thus, BNCT could offer an appreciable therapeutic advantage to prevent tumor recurrence, and may become a promising treatment in recurrent glioma

  13. Human Nature and Research Paradigms: Theory Meets Physical Therapy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plack, Margaret M.

    2005-01-01

    Human nature is a very complex phenomenon. In physical therapy this complexity is enhanced by the need to understand the intersection between the art and science of human behavior and patient care. A paradigm is a set of basic beliefs that represent a worldview, defines the nature of the world and the individual's place in it, and helps to…

  14. Dialectical Behaviour Therapy: Description, Research and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swales, Michaela A.

    2009-01-01

    Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) is a cognitive behavioural treatment initially developed for adult women with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and a history of chronic suicidal behaviour (Linehan, 1993a; 1993b). DBT was the first treatment for BPD to demonstrate its efficacy in a randomised controlled trial (Linehan ,…

  15. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies. PMID:17855129

  16. Proteome-wide analysis of neural stem cell differentiation to facilitate transition to cell replacement therapies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižková, Martina; Suchá, Rita; Tylečková, Jiřina; Jarkovská, Karla; Mairychová, Kateřina; Kotrčová, Eva; Marsala, M.; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2015), s. 83-95. ISSN 1478-9450 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : cell therapy * immunomodulation * neural stem cell differentiation * neural subpopulation * neurodegenerative disease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.896, year: 2014

  17. Changes of the cell cycle regulators and cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cells after cisplatin therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of the cell cycle regulators ATM,Chk2 and p53 and cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells after cisplatin therapy. Methods The proliferation-inhibiting rates of HeLa cells induced by cisplatin of different concentrations were measured by MTT assays. The mRNA and protein expressions of ATM,Chk2 and p53 of HeLa cells with and without cisplatin were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot,respectively. The cell cycle analysis was conducted by flow cytometric analysis. Results Cisplatin...

  18. Searching for Music's Potential: A Critical Examination of Research on Music Therapy with Individuals with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordino, Robert; Comer, Ronald; Heller, Wendy B.

    2007-01-01

    The authors conducted a literature review on music therapy for individuals with autism because of the frequent use of music therapy for those with autism and recent research on the musical abilities of this population. To accomplish this narrative review, articles were searched from relevant databases, reference lists from articles, and book…

  19. Facilitation of research-based evidence within occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Borg, T.; Hounsgaard, L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose:This study investigated the facilitation of evidence-based practice with the use of everyday life occupations and client-centred practice within occupational therapy in three settings of stroke rehabilitation. Method:The study was based on a phenomenological hermeneutical research approach...... implementation of evidence-based occupational therapy....

  20. Facilitation of research-based evidence within occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, H.; Borg, T.; Hounsgaard, Lise

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the facilitation of evidence-based practice with the use of everyday life occupations and client-centred practice within occupational therapy in three settings of stroke rehabilitation. Method: The study was based on a phenomenological hermeneutical research...... implementation of evidence-based occupational therapy....