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Sample records for cell temperature coefficients

  1. Modelling of tandem cell temperature coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, D.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the temperature dependence of the basic solar-cell operating parameters for a GaInP/GaAs series-connected two-terminal tandem cell. The effects of series resistance and of different incident solar spectra are also discussed.

  2. A Simple Method for Determining the Temperature Coefficient of Voltaic Cell Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saieed, Alfred E.; Davies, Keith M.

    1996-10-01

    Although use of the Nernst equation to illustrate the dependence of cell potential on half-cell concentrations is routinely covered in first-year college chemistry and high school AP chemistry classes, the temperature dependence of cell voltages is rarely encountered outside of the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory. Even there, its coverage is somewhat limited because of the cost and sophistication of the instrumentation required. This article describes a relatively simple method for preparing voltaic cells, and through their temperature coefficient, _Eo/_T, it explores relationships between DeltaGo, DeltaHo and DeltaSo for the cell reactions involved.

  3. Temperature coefficients for GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the temperature coefficients for MBE-grown GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb multijunction solar cells and the corresponding single junction sub-cells. Temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements were carried out using a solar simulator equipped with a 1000 W Xenon lamp and a three-band AM1.5D simulator. The triple-junction cell exhibited an efficiency of 31% at AM1.5G illumination and an efficiency of 37–39% at 70x real sun concentration. The external quantum efficiency was also measured at different temperatures. The temperature coefficients up to 80°C, for the open circuit voltage, the short circuit current density, and the conversion efficiency were determined to be −7.5 mV/°C, 0.040 mA/cm2/°C, and −0.09%/°C, respectively

  4. Temperature coefficients for GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, Arto; Isoaho, Riku; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Aho, Timo; Raappana, Marianna; Guina, Mircea [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2015-09-28

    We report the temperature coefficients for MBE-grown GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb multijunction solar cells and the corresponding single junction sub-cells. Temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements were carried out using a solar simulator equipped with a 1000 W Xenon lamp and a three-band AM1.5D simulator. The triple-junction cell exhibited an efficiency of 31% at AM1.5G illumination and an efficiency of 37–39% at 70x real sun concentration. The external quantum efficiency was also measured at different temperatures. The temperature coefficients up to 80°C, for the open circuit voltage, the short circuit current density, and the conversion efficiency were determined to be −7.5 mV/°C, 0.040 mA/cm{sup 2}/°C, and −0.09%/°C, respectively.

  5. Quantum efficiency and temperature coefficients of GaInP/GaAs dual-junction solar cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lei; CHEN NuoFu; BAI YiMing; CUI Ming; ZHANG Han; GAO FuBao; YIN ZhiGang; ZHANG XingWang

    2009-01-01

    GalnP/GaAs dual-junction solar cell with a conversion efficiency of 25.2% has been fabricated using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. Quantum efficiencies of the solar cell were measured within a temperature range from 25 to 160℃. The results indicate that the quantum ef-ficiencies of the subcells increase slightly with the increasing temperature. And red-shift phenomena of absorption limit for all subcells are observed by increasing the cell's work temperature, which are consistent with the viewpoint of energy gap narrowing effect. The short-circuit current density tem-perature coefficients dJoc/dT of GalnP subcell and GaAs subcell are determined to be 8.9 and 7.4 μA/cm2/℃ from the quantum efficiency data, respectively. And the open-circuit cell voltage temperature coefficients d Voc/d T calculated based on a theoretical equation are -2.4 mV/℃ and -2.1 mV/℃ for GalnP subcell and GaAs subcell.

  6. Quantum efficiency and temperature coefficients of GaInP/GaAs dual-junction solar cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    GaInP/GaAs dual-junction solar cell with a conversion efficiency of 25.2% has been fabricated using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition(MOCVD) technique.Quantum efficiencies of the solar cell were measured within a temperature range from 25 to 160 ℃.The results indicate that the quantum ef-ficiencies of the subcells increase slightly with the increasing temperature.And red-shift phenomena of absorption limit for all subcells are observed by increasing the cell’s work temperature,which are consistent with the viewpoint of energy gap narrowing effect.The short-circuit current density tem-perature coefficients dJsc/dT of GaInP subcell and GaAs subcell are determined to be 8.9 and 7.4 μA/cm2/℃ from the quantum efficiency data,respectively.And the open-circuit cell voltage temperature coefficients dVoc/dT calculated based on a theoretical equation are-2.4 mV/℃ and-2.1 mV/℃ for GaInP subcell and GaAs subcell.

  7. Measuring optical temperature coefficients of Intralipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlone, V Andrew; Martinsen, Paul; Künnemeyer, Rainer; Jordan, Bob; Cletus, Biju

    2007-05-01

    The temperature sensitivities of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in the range 700-1000 nm are determined for the liquid phantom Intralipid using spatially resolved continuous wave measurements. The measurements were conducted on a 10 L heated volume of 1% Intralipid subjected to a 40-30 degrees C cooling regime. The temperature sensitivities of the absorbance coefficients are similar to that expected for pure water. However, the reduced scattering coefficients are more sensitive than can be explained by temperature related density changes, and show an unexpected relationship with wavelength. We have also found that temperature perturbations provide a useful means to evaluate instrument model performance. PMID:17440240

  8. Measuring optical temperature coefficients of Intralipid (registered)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature sensitivities of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in the range 700-1000 nm are determined for the liquid phantom Intralipid (registered) using spatially resolved continuous wave measurements. The measurements were conducted on a 10 L heated volume of 1% Intralipid (registered) subjected to a 40-30 deg. C cooling regime. The temperature sensitivities of the absorbance coefficients are similar to that expected for pure water. However, the reduced scattering coefficients are more sensitive than can be explained by temperature related density changes, and show an unexpected relationship with wavelength. We have also found that temperature perturbations provide a useful means to evaluate instrument model performance

  9. Temperature dependence of the optical absorption coefficient of microcrystalline silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Poruba, A.; Špringer, J.; Mullerova, L.; Beitlerova, A.; Vaněček, M.; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Shah, Arvind

    2008-01-01

    The optical absorption coefficient of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon was determined in a spectral range 400–3100 nm and a temperature range 77–350 K. Transmittance measurement and Fourier transform photocurrent spectroscopy were used. The measured data served as an input for our optical model of amorphous/microcrystalline tandem solar cell. Differences in the current generated in the amorphous and microcrystalline parts were computed, for an operating temperature between −20 °C and +8...

  10. Compilation report of VHTRC temperature coefficient benchmark calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Hideshi; Yamane, Tsuyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-11-01

    A calculational benchmark problem has been proposed by JAERI to an IAEA Coordinated Research Program, `Verification of Safety Related Neutronic Calculation for Low-enriched Gas-cooled Reactors` to investigate the accuracy of calculation results obtained by using codes of the participating countries. This benchmark is made on the basis of assembly heating experiments at a pin-in block type critical assembly, VHTRC. Requested calculation items are the cell parameters, effective multiplication factor, temperature coefficient of reactivity, reaction rates, fission rate distribution, etc. Seven institutions from five countries have joined the benchmark works. Calculation results are summarized in this report with some remarks by the authors. Each institute analyzed the problem by applying the calculation code system which was prepared for the HTGR development of individual country. The values of the most important parameter, k{sub eff}, by all institutes showed good agreement with each other and with the experimental ones within 1%. The temperature coefficient agreed within 13%. The values of several cell parameters calculated by several institutes did not agree with the other`s ones. It will be necessary to check the calculation conditions again for getting better agreement. (J.P.N.).

  11. Temperature and Coefficient of Restitution of a Table Tennis Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonyoung Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The coefficient of restitution (COR of a bouncing table tennis ball was measured at varying ball temperatures with a Motion Detector. It was found that there is a negative linear relationship between the COR and the temperature of the table tennis ball for temperatures ranging from 5 to 56 ̊C.

  12. Temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient of ionic colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehnem, A. L.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.; Aquino, R.; Campos, A. F. C.; Tourinho, F. A.; Depeyrot, J.

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient ST(T ) in electrostatically charged magnetic colloids is investigated. Two different ferrofluids, with different particles' mean dimensions, are studied. In both cases we obtain a thermophilic behavior of the Soret effect. The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient is described assuming that the nanoparticles migrate along the ionic thermoelectric field created by the thermal gradient. A model based on the contributions from the thermoelectrophoresis and variation of the double-layer energy, without fitting parameters, is used to describe the experimental results of the colloid with the bigger particles. To do so, independent measurements of the ζ potential, mass diffusion coefficient, and Seebeck coefficient are performed. The agreement of the theory and the experimental results is rather good. In the case of the ferrofluid with smaller particles, it is not possible to get experimentally reliable values of the ζ potential and the model described is used to evaluate this parameter and its temperature dependence.

  13. Estimation of high temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John H.; Capobianco, Christopher J.; Drake, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been known for some time that abundances of siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth are far in excess of those expected from equilibrium between metal and silicate at low pressures and temperatures. Murthy (1991) has re-examined this excess of siderophile element problem by estimating liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients reduces from their measured values at a lower temperature, implying that siderophile elements become much less siderophilic at high temperatures. Murthy then draws the important conclusion that metal/silicate equilibrium at high temperatures can account for the abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle. Of course, his conclusion is critically dependent on the small values of the partition coefficients he calculates. Because the numerical values of most experimentally-determined partition coefficients increase with increasing temperature at both constant oxygen fugacity and at constant redox buffer, we think it is important to try an alternative extrapolation for comparison. We have computed high temperature metal/silicate partition coefficients under a different set of assumptions and show that such long temperature extrapolations yield values which are critically dependent upon the presumed chemical behavior of the siderophile elements in the system.

  14. The HD+ dissociative recombination rate coefficient at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the rotational temperature of the ions is considered for low-energy dissociative recombination (DR of HD+. Merged beams measurements with HD+ ions of a rotational temperature near 300 K are compared to multichannel quantum defect theory calculations. The thermal DR rate coefficient for a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution is derived from the merged-beams data and compared to theoretical results for a range of rotational temperatures. Good agreement is found for the theory with 300 K rotational temperature. For a low-temperature plasma environment where also the rotational temperature assumes 10 K, theory predicts a considerably higher thermal DR rate coefficient. The origin of this is traced to predicted resonant structures of the collision-energy dependent DR cross section at few-meV collision energies for the particular case of HD+ ions in the rotational ground state.

  15. The temperature variation of hydrogen diffusion coefficients in metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients were measured as a function of temperature for a few metal alloys using an electrochemical evolution technique. Results from these measurements are compared to those obtained by the time-lag method. In all cases, diffusion coefficients obtained by the electrochemical method are larger than those by the time-lag method by an order of magnitude or more. These differences are attributed mainly to hydrogen trapping.

  16. Research of fuel temperature control in fuel pipeline of diesel engine using positive temperature coefficient material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As fuel temperature increases, both its viscosity and surface tension decrease, and this is helpful to improve fuel atomization and then better combustion and emission performances of engine. Based on the self-regulated temperature property of positive temperature coefficient material, this article used a positive temperature coefficient material as electric heating element to heat diesel fuel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine. A kind of BaTiO3-based positive temperature coefficient material, with the Curie temperature of 230°C and rated voltage of 24 V, was developed, and its micrograph and element compositions were also analyzed. By the fuel pipeline wrapped in six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, its resistivity–temperature and heating characteristics were tested on a fuel pump bench. The experiments showed that in this installation, the surface temperature of six positive temperature coefficient ceramics rose to the equilibrium temperature only for 100 s at rated voltage. In rated power supply for six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, the temperature of injection fuel improved for 21°C–27°C within 100 s, and then could keep constant. Using positive temperature coefficient material to heat diesel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine, the injection mass per cycle had little change, approximately 0.3%/°C. This study provides a beneficial reference for improving atomization of high-viscosity liquids by employing positive temperature coefficient material without any control methods.

  17. Changes of the temperature coefficients of the characteristics which accompany degradation and recovery of a-Si solar cells; A-Si taiyo denchi no hikari (denryu) rekka oyobi kaifuku ni tomonau tokusei ondo keisu no henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Koyanagi, T.; Nakamura, K.; Takahisa, K.; Kojima, T. [electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Pursuant to the measuring of temperature dependency of the characteristics such as conversion efficiency, during the process of degradation in a-Si solar cells due to light and electric current and the process of recovery by annealing, this paper describes changes in temperature coefficients, correlation between the characteristic parameters and the degradation, and the results of the examination of their characteristics. The conversion efficiency {mu} degraded approximately by 45% of the initial value each by the irradiation under a light intensity with 3 SUN accelerated and by the infusion of current at 20mA/cm{sup 2}; and then, the efficiency recovered to 70-75% of the degradation by subsequent annealing. In addition, in the temperature dependency at 80{degree}C against at 20{degree}C, Isc slightly increased while Vcc greatly decreased. This slight increase in Isc was mainly due to the decrease in the width of the forbidden band, while the decrease in Vcc was due to the increase in the reverse saturation current. The temperature dependency of {mu}N was negative, becoming small in accordance with the degradation. The temperature dependency of FF/FFO was negative initially both in light and current, but it decreased with the degradation and turned to positive. The temperature coefficients of I-V parameters reversibly changed corresponding to the degradation and recovery of these parameters and stayed in a good correlation. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Negative Temperature Coefficient of Resistivity in Bulk Nanostructured Ag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The change of the temperature coefficient of resistivity (α) with the particle size, dp, and the grain size, dc, in the nanostructured Ag bulk samples was investigated, dp and de were controlled by heating the nano-Ag powders over the temperature range from 393 to 453 K. The electrical resistance measurements of the nanostructured Ag bulk samples obtained by compacting the Ag powders after heat treatments showed a change in the sign of α with dp and dc. When dp and dc are smaller or equal to 18 and 11 nm below room temperature or 20 and 12 nm above room temperature, respectively, the sign of the temperature coefficient of resistivity changes from positive to negative. The negative α arises mainly from the high resistivity induced by the particle interfaces with very lowly ordered or even disordered structure, a large volume fraction of interfaces and impurities existing in the interfaces, and the quantum size effect appearing in the nano-Ag grains.

  19. Measurement of thermal expansion coefficient of nonuniform temperature specimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingmin Dai; Chunsuo Kin; Xiaowa He

    2008-01-01

    A new technique is developed to measure the longitudinal thermal expansion coefficient of C/C composite material at high temperature. The measuring principle and components of the apparatus are described in detail. The calculation method is derived from the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient. The apparatus mainly consists of a high temperature environmental chamber, a power circuit of heating, two high-speed pyrometers, and a laser scanning system. A long solid specimen is resistively heated to a steady high-temperature state by a steady electrical current. The temperature profile of the specimen surface is not uniform because of the thermal conduction and radiation. The temperature profile and the total expansion are measured with a high-speed scanning pyrometer and a laser slit scanning measuring system, respectively. The thermal expansion coefficient in a wide temperature range (1000 - 3800 K) of the specimen can therefore be obtained. The perfect consistency between the present and previous results justifies the validity of this technique.

  20. Fully automated setup for high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of fully automated experimental setup for high temperature Seebeck coefficient ($\\alpha$) measurement. The K-type thermocouples are used to measure the average temperature of the sample and Seebeck voltage (SV) across it. The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficients of the thermocouple and its negative leg is taken care by using the integration method. Steady state based differential technique is used for $\\alpha$ measurement. Use of limited component and thin heater simplify the sample holder design and minimize the heat loss. The power supplied to the heater decides temperature difference across the sample and measurement is carried out by achieving the steady state. The LabVIEW based program is built to automize the whole measurement process. The complete setup is fabricated by using commonly available materials in the market. This instrument is standardized for materials with a wide range of $\\alpha$ and for the wide range of $\\Delta T$ across the specimen...

  1. Temperature dependence of Soret and diffusion coefficients for toluene-cyclohexane mixture measured in convection-free environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mialdun, A; Shevtsova, V

    2015-12-14

    We report on the measurement of diffusion (D), Soret (S(T)), and thermodiffusion (D(T)) coefficients in toluene-cyclohexane mixture with mass fraction of toluene 0.40 onboard of the International Space Station. The coefficients were measured in the range of the mean temperatures between 20 °C and 34 °C. The Soret coefficient is negative within the investigated temperature range and its absolute value |S(T)| decreases with increasing temperature. The diffusion coefficient for this system increases with temperature rising. For comparison, the temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient was measured in ground laboratory using counter-flow cell technique and revealed a good agreement with microgravity results. A non-direct comparison of the measured onboard Soret coefficients with different systems indicated a similar trend for the temperature dependent behavior. Unexpected experimental finding is that for this system the thermodiffusion coefficient D(T) does not depend on temperature. PMID:26671399

  2. Temperature dependence of impact ionization coefficients in InP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Kenko; Torikai, Toshitaka; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Makita, Kikuo; Ishihara, Hisahiro

    1986-01-01

    Impact ionization coefficients for electrons and holes in InP were measured experimentally at 25-175 °C in the 400-600 kV/cm electric field range with planar avalanche photodiodes, in which the n-InP avalanche region was separated from the light absorbing InGaAs and/or InGaAsP layers. α and β monotonically decreased with elevated temperatures; β/α slightly decreased with increasing temperature. Comparison of the experimental results with Okuto-Crowell formula on the impact ionization coefficient gave the phonon energy ERO=46 meV and the phonon scattering mean free path λ0=41.7 Å for electron impact ionization and ERO=36 meV and λ0=41.3 Å for hole impact ionization, respectively. Curves calculated by using these parameters agree with the experimental results quite satisfactorily at each temperature.

  3. High temperature coefficient of resistance for a ferroelectric tunnel junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xiaolin; Tian, Bobo; Liu, Bolu; Wang, Xudong; Huang, Hai [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yu Tian Road 500, Shanghai 200083 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 19 A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Jianlu, E-mail: jlwang@mail.sitp.ac.cn, E-mail: xjmeng@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Zou, Yuhong; Sun, Shuo; Lin, Tie; Han, Li; Sun, Jinglan; Meng, Xiangjian, E-mail: jlwang@mail.sitp.ac.cn, E-mail: xjmeng@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Chu, Junhao [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yu Tian Road 500, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2015-08-10

    An infrared detector is proposed that is based on a ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ) working under bolometer-like principles. Electron tunneling, either direct or indirect, through the ferroelectric barrier depends on the temperature of the devices. During tunneling, infrared radiation alters the polarization of the ferroelectric film via pyroelectricity, resulting in a change in the barrier height of the tunnel junction. A high temperature coefficient of resistance of up to −3.86% was observed at room temperature. These results show that the FTJ structure has potential to be adapted for use in uncooled infrared detectors.

  4. Temperature Dependence of the Particle Diffusion Coefficient in Dust Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechal, Radim; Richterova, Ivana; Pavlu, Jiri; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek

    2014-05-01

    During the interaction of ions/neutrals with dust grains, some of the particles are implanted into the grain and, as a consequence, the density gradient induces their diffusion toward the grain surface. Their release can cause a transport of these particles over large distances in space. In our laboratory experiment, measurements of the diffusion coefficient of the particles implanted into the dust grain are carried out in an electrodynamic quadrupole trap. Although experimental setup does not allow an assessment of the dust grain temperature, it can be modified (e.g., by changing thermal radiation from the surrounding walls, laser irradiation, etc.). We present an upgraded laboratory set-up and the resulting temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient estimations and discuss implications for the space dust.

  5. Unipolar memristive switching in bulk positive temperature coefficient ceramic thermistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongya; Wang, Caihui; Fu, Hua; Zhou, Ji; Zheng, Shuzhi

    2016-01-01

    A memristive switching phenomena was investigated in macroscale bulk positive temperature coefficient (PTC) thermosensitive ceramics. (BaxSr1-x)TiO3, which is a well-known PTC thermistor, was taken as an example to analyze the memristive behavior of those macroscale bulk ceramics. Hysteretic current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, which are the features of memristor were obtained. The origin of the effect is attributed to the PTC thermosensitive characteristic of the bulk ceramics, and a switching mechanism driven by competing field-driven heat generation and heat dissipation was proposed.

  6. Temperature dependence of Kerr coefficient and quadratic polarized optical coefficient of a paraelectric Mn:Fe:KTN crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qieni; Han, Jinxin; Dai, Haitao; Ge, Baozhen; Zhao, Shuang

    2015-08-01

    We measure temperature dependence on Kerr coefficient and quadratic polarized optical coefficient of a paraelectric Mn:Fe:KTN crystal simultaneously in this work, based on digital holographic interferometry (DHI). And the spatial distribution of the field-induced refractive index change can also be visualized and estimated by numerically retrieving sequential phase maps of Mn:Fe:KTN crystal from recording digital holograms in different states. The refractive indices decrease with increasing temperature and quadratic polarized optical coefficient is insensitive to temperature. The experimental results suggest that the DHI method presented here is highly applicable in both visualizing the temporal and spatial behavior of the internal electric field and accurately measuring electro-optic coefficient for electrooptical media.

  7. Temperature dependence of Kerr coefficient and quadratic polarized optical coefficient of a paraelectric Mn:Fe:KTN crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qieni Lu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We measure temperature dependence on Kerr coefficient and quadratic polarized optical coefficient of a paraelectric Mn:Fe:KTN crystal simultaneously in this work, based on digital holographic interferometry (DHI. And the spatial distribution of the field-induced refractive index change can also be visualized and estimated by numerically retrieving sequential phase maps of Mn:Fe:KTN crystal from recording digital holograms in different states. The refractive indices decrease with increasing temperature and quadratic polarized optical coefficient is insensitive to temperature. The experimental results suggest that the DHI method presented here is highly applicable in both visualizing the temporal and spatial behavior of the internal electric field and accurately measuring electro-optic coefficient for electrooptical media.

  8. Monte Carlo analysis of doppler reactivity coefficient for UO2 pin cell geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo analysis has been performed to investigate the impact of the exact resonance elastic scattering model on the Doppler reactivity coefficient for the UO2 pin cell geometry with the parabolic temperature profile. As a result, the exact scattering model affects the coefficient similarly for both the flat and parabolic temperature profiles; it increases the contribution of uranium-238 resonance capture in the energy region from ∼16 eV to ∼150 eV and does uniformly in the radial direction. Then the following conclusions hold for both the exact and asymptotic resonance scattering models. The Doppler reactivity coefficient is well reproduced with the definition of the effective fuel temperature (equivalent flat temperature) proposed by Grandi et al. In addition, the effective fuel temperature volume-averaged over the entire fuel region negatively overestimates the reference Doppler reactivity coefficient but the calculated one can be significantly improved by dividing the fuel region into a few equi-volumes. (author)

  9. Measurement and Research of Equivalent Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity for CARR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Jian-long; LV; Zheng; HUA; Xiao; XIAO; Shi-gang; LIU; Tian-cai; RAN; Huai-chang

    2012-01-01

    <正>The reactor with a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity has inner stability, which is a important symbol of inherent reactor safety. During the reactor start-up Commissioning Stage C for CARR, the measurement of equivalent temperature coefficient of reactivity is a important experiment by the way of measuring the reactivity change resulting of the equivalent temperature variation in the reactor core.

  10. Evaluation of reactivity coefficients for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the evaluation methods and evaluated results of doppler-, moderator temperature- and power coefficients for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). From this study, it was made clear that the HTTR possesses inherent power-suppressing feed back characteristic due to the negative power coefficient though the moderator temperature coefficient is slightly positive due to the accumulated isotopes 135Xe and 239Pu. (author)

  11. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of working standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Torras Rosell, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of measurement microphones is affected by changes in the environmental conditions, mainly temperature and static pressure. This rate of change has been the object of previous studies focused on Laboratory Standard microphones. The literature describes frequency dependent values...

  12. The investigation of the zero temperature coefficient point of power MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Zhang; Xiaoling, Zhang; Wenwen, Xiong; Shuojie, She; Xuesong, Xie

    2016-06-01

    The paper investigates the zero temperature coefficient (ZTC) point of power MOSFET, based on the output characteristic of power MOSFET, the temperature coefficient of threshold voltage and the carrier mobility. It is found that the gate voltage has a big effect on the ZTC point. The result indicates that there are three types of temperature coefficient under different gate voltage. When the gate voltage is near the threshold voltage, both the linear region and saturation region shows a large positive temperature coefficient. With the increase of gate voltage, the temperature coefficient of the linear region changes from positive to negative, when the saturation region still remains positive, giving rise to the ZTC point. When the gate voltage is high enough, the negative temperature coefficient is present on both the linear and saturation region, resulting in no ZTC point. According to the experimental result, the change of ZTC point as a function of temperature is larger when the gate voltage is higher. The carrier mobility is also discussed, displaying a positive temperature coefficient at low gate voltage due to the free charge screen effect.

  13. Calculation of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity for miniature neutron source reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents results of the evaluated group constants for fuel and other important materials of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (Mnr) and the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity through global reactor calculation. In this study the group constants were calculated with the WIMSD code and the global reactor calculation is accomplished by the CITATION code. This work also presents a method for evaluation of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity at different temperatures and it's average value in a range of temperature directly through the values of moderator temperature for MNSRs. This method provides simple analytical representation convenient for reactor kinetics calculation and reactor safety assessment. (author)

  14. Temperature-Dependent Diffusion Coefficients from ab initio Computations: Hydrogen in Nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Wimmer; W Wolf; J Sticht; P Saxe; C Geller; R Najafabadi; G Young

    2006-03-16

    The temperature-dependent mass diffusion coefficient is computed using transition state theory. Ab initio supercell phonon calculations of the entire system provide the attempt frequency, the activation enthalpy, and the activation entropy as a function of temperature. Effects due to thermal lattice expansion are included and found to be significant. Numerical results for the case of hydrogen in nickel demonstrate a strong temperature dependence of the migration enthalpy and entropy. Trapping in local minima along the diffusion path has a pronounced effect especially at low temperatures. The computed diffusion coefficients with and without trapping bracket the available experimental values over the entire temperature range between 0 and 1400 K.

  15. Measurement of the power and temperature reactivity coefficients of the RTP TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie, E-mail: m_hairie@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my

    2013-12-15

    This paper presents the experimental results of the power and temperature coefficients of reactivity of the RTP TRIGA reactor at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency. The power coefficient of reactivity obtained was approximately −0.26 ¢ kW{sup −1} (−1.81 × 10{sup −5} kW{sup –1}), and the measured temperature reactivity coefficient of the reactor was −0.82 ¢ °C{sup −1} (−5.77 × 10{sup −5} °C{sup −1}) and −1.15 ¢ °C{sup −1} (−8.08 × 10{sup −5} °C{sup −1}) in IFE C12 and IFE F16, respectively. The power defect, which is the change in reactivity taking place between zero power and the power of 850 kW was ∼2.19 $. Because of the negative temperature coefficient, a significant amount of reactivity is needed to compensate for the temperature change and allows the reactor to operate at the higher power levels in steady state. Throughout this experiment, it is the temperature of the fuel that was measured, not the isothermal temperature coefficient (ITC), which comprises both moderator and fuel.

  16. A study of the irradiation temperature coefficient for L-alanine and DL-alanine dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine dosimetry is now well established both as a reference and routine dosemeter for industrial irradiation processing. Accurate dosimetry under the relatively harsh conditions of industrial processing requires a characterisation of the parameters that influence the dosemeter response. The temperature of the dosemeter during irradiation is a difficult quantity to measure so that the accuracy of the temperature coefficient that governs the dosemeter response becomes a critical factor. Numerous publications have reported temperature coefficients for several types of alanine dosemeters. The observed differences in the measured values were commonly attributed to the differences in the polymer binder or the experimental design of the measurement. However, the data demonstrated a consistent difference in the temperature coefficients between L-alanine and DL-alanine. Since there were no commonalities in the dosemeter composition or the measurement methods applied, a clear conclusion is not possible. To resolve this issue, the two isomeric forms of alanine dosemeters were prepared and irradiated in an identical manner. The results indicated that the DL-alanine temperature coefficient is more than 50% higher than the L-alanine temperature coefficient. (authors)

  17. The Joint Toxicity of Different Temperature Coefficient Insecticides on Apolygus lucorum (Hemiptera: Miridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Lincoln, Tamra; An, Jingjie; Gao, Zhanlin; Dang, Zhihong; Pan, Wenliang; Li, Yaofa

    2016-08-01

    The effect of temperature on the cotoxicity coefficient (CTC) value was used to evaluate mixture efficacy of different temperature coefficient chemicals from 15 to 35°C by exposing third-instar Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) to dip-treated asparagus bean pods. The results indicated the joint toxicity of same temperature coefficient insecticide (TCI) types were unaffected by temperature. This means that even when temperatures change, the mixture ratios of the highest CTC values remained the same, and the effect of temperature on the joint toxicity of same TCI types was only on the CTC values. However, the effect of temperature was variable when considering the joint toxicity of different TCI types. The effect of temperature on the joint toxicity of both strong positive and strong negative TCI types was clear, and the highest CTC values of mixture ratios changed with temperature regularly. When comparing the influence of temperature between strong/slight positive/negative insecticides, the results indicated a greater influence of the strong TCI. Paradoxically, the highest CTC value of the imidacloprid and methomyl mixture did not change with temperature changes consistently, even with the variance of imidacloprid ratios, a strong TCI. These results will guide pest managers in choosing the most effective insecticide mixtures for A. lucorum control under given environmental conditions. PMID:27190041

  18. Temperature effects on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol in subcritical water extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    6-gingerol and 6-shogaol are the main constituents as anti-inflammatory or bioactive compounds from zingiber officinale Roscoe. These bioactive compounds have been proven for inflammatory disease, antioxidatives and anticancer. The effect of temperature on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol were studied in subcritical water extraction. The diffusion coefficient was determined by Fick's second law. By neglecting external mass transfer and solid particle in spherical form, a linear portion of Ln (1-(Ct/Co)) versus time was plotted in determining the diffusion coefficient. 6-gingerol obtained the higher yield at 130°C with diffusion coefficient of 8.582x10−11 m2/s whilst for 6-shogaol, the higher yield and diffusion coefficient at 170°C and 19.417 × 10−11 m2/s.

  19. Temperature effects on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol in subcritical water extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilia Anisa, Nor; Azian, Noor; Sharizan, Mohd; Iwai, Yoshio

    2014-04-01

    6-gingerol and 6-shogaol are the main constituents as anti-inflammatory or bioactive compounds from zingiber officinale Roscoe. These bioactive compounds have been proven for inflammatory disease, antioxidatives and anticancer. The effect of temperature on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol were studied in subcritical water extraction. The diffusion coefficient was determined by Fick's second law. By neglecting external mass transfer and solid particle in spherical form, a linear portion of Ln (1-(Ct/Co)) versus time was plotted in determining the diffusion coefficient. 6-gingerol obtained the higher yield at 130°C with diffusion coefficient of 8.582x10-11 m2/s whilst for 6-shogaol, the higher yield and diffusion coefficient at 170°C and 19.417 × 10-11 m2/s.

  20. Temperature coefficients for in vivo RL and OSL dosimetry using Al2O3 : C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.E.; Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler; Damkjaer, S.M.S.;

    2008-01-01

    A radiotherapy dosimetry system based on radiolurninescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from small carbon-doped aluminum oxide (Al2O3:C) crystals attached to optical-fiber cables has been developed. To quantify the influence of temperature variations on clinical RL and OSL...... measurement results, we conducted an automated laboratory experiment involving threefold randomization of (1) irradiation temperature (10-45 degrees C), (2) stimulation temperature (10-45 degrees C), and (3) irradiation dose (0-4 Gy; 50 kV X-rays). We derived linear RL and OSL temperature coefficients using...... a simple statistical model fitted to all data (N = 909). The study shows that the temperature coefficients are independent of dose and other variables studied. In agreement with an earlier investigation, we found that the RL signal changes only with irradiation temperature whereas the OSL response changes...

  1. An apparatus for high temperature measurement of the resistivity and Hall coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Kasper Andersen; Toberer, Eric; Snyder, G Jeffrey;

    resistivity and Hall coefficient measurements are outlined. The VDP method is convenient for use in thermoelectrics research since it accepts sample geometries compatible with measurements of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity. This allows for the thermoelectric figure of merit to be measured......Two instruments implementing the van der Pauw (VDP) method for measuring the specific resistivity and Hall coefficient at high temperatures are described. Several features to minimize the measurement errors are proposed and some of the advantages compared with traditional six-probe combined...

  2. The accommodation coefficient of the liquid at temperatures below the boiling

    OpenAIRE

    Bulba Elena E.

    2015-01-01

    Are carried out experimental investigation of the laws of vaporization at temperatures below the boiling point. Is determined the mass rate of evaporation of distilled water in large intervals of time at different temperatures in order to sound conclusions about the stationarity of the process of evaporation of the liquid in the conditions of the experiments performed, and also studied the effect of temperature on the rate of evaporation. Accommodation coefficient is defined in the mathematic...

  3. Pressure and temperature dependence of viscosity and diffusion coefficients of a glassy binary mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Bhattacharyya, Sarika; Bagchi, Biman

    2002-01-01

    Extensive isothermal-isobaric (NPT) molecular dynamics simulations at many different temperatures and pressures have been carried out in the well-known Kob-Andersen binary mixture model to monitor the effect of pressure (P) and temperature (T) on the dynamic properties such as the viscosity (\\eta) and the self-diffusion (Di) coefficients of the binary system. The following results have been obtained: (i) Compared to temperature, pressure is found to have a weaker effect on the dynamical prope...

  4. Estimation of water diffusion coefficient into polycarbonate at different temperatures using numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasirabadi, P. Shojaee; Jabbari, M.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, many electronic systems are exposed to harsh conditions of relative humidity and temperature. Mass transport properties of electronic packaging materials are needed in order to investigate the influence of moisture and temperature on reliability of electronic devices. Polycarbonate (PC) is widely used in the electronics industry. Thus, in this work the water diffusion coefficient into PC is investigated. Furthermore, numerical methods used for estimation of the diffusion coefficient and their assumptions are discussed. 1D and 3D numerical solutions are compared and based on this, it is shown how the estimated value can be different depending on the choice of dimensionality in the model.

  5. Study of cross correlation coefficients of temperature fluctuations in a longitudinal magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genin, L.G.; Manchkha, S.P.; Sviridov, V.G.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was made of the effect that a longitudinal magnetic field has on correlation coefficients of temperature fluctuations in a transverse direction. This effect on those fluctuations was shown to be small in comparison to its effect on the coefficients of longitudinal correlation. This indicates that the structure of the temperature field becomes more anisotropic so that there is an increase in the scale of turbulent disturbances in the direction of the magnetic field's force lines. 1 figure, 2 references.

  6. The effective lifetime and temperature coefficient in a coupled fast-thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of coupled systems was extensively developed by Avery and co-workers at the Argonne National Laboratory. One of the main points of interest in a coupled system is the larger effective lifetime of neutrons. The effect of the thermal component acts as a sort of neutron-delayer. As in the theory of delayed neutrons the delaying effect disappears if the reactivity worth is high enough to make the fast component critical by itself. In the study a coupled reactor is considered where the fast component suffers a sudden reactivity step α0. Because of the increasing power-level the temperature rises and two temperature coefficients start to work: the temperature coefficient of the fast component and the temperature coefficient of the thermal component. The problem is considered with one group of delayed neutrons (in the ordinary meaning). A formalism is given to express the effective lifetime and temperature coefficient during the different stages of the excursion. Excursions for different α0 are given so that the limit of fast-reactor kinetics is reached. (author)

  7. Temperature dependence of the radiative recombination coefficient in crystalline silicon from spectral photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Hieu T., E-mail: hieu.nguyen@anu.edu.au; Macdonald, Daniel [Research School of Engineering, College of Engineering and Computer Science, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Baker-Finch, Simeon C. [Research School of Engineering, College of Engineering and Computer Science, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); PV Lighthouse, Coledale, NSW 2515 (Australia)

    2014-03-17

    The radiative recombination coefficient B(T) in crystalline silicon is determined for the temperature range 90–363 K, and in particular from 270 to 350 K with an interval of 10 K, where only sparse data are available at present. The band-band absorption coefficient established recently by Nguyen et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 043710 (2014)] via photoluminescence spectrum measurements is employed to compute the values of B(T) at various temperatures. The results agree very well with literature data from Trupke et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 94, 4930 (2003).] We present a polynomial parameterization describing the temperature dependence of the product of B(T) and the square of the intrinsic carrier density. We also find that B(T) saturates at a near constant value at room temperature and above for silicon samples with relatively low free carrier densities.

  8. Temperature and current coefficients of lasing wavelength in tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, M; Mishima, T.; Nakayama, N.; Masuda, T

    2010-01-01

    The factors determining temperature and current coefficients of lasing wavelength are investigated and discussed under monitoring CO2-gas absorption spectra. The diffusion rate of Joule heating at the active layer to the surrounding region is observed by monitoring the change in the junction voltage, which is a function of temperature and the wavelength (frequency) deviation under sinusoidal current modulation. Based on the experimental results, the time interval of monitoring the wavelength ...

  9. Wilson Coefficients in the Operator Product Expansion of Scalar Currents at Finite Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Veliev, Elsen Veli; Aliev, Takhmassib M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate operator product expansion for thermal correlation function of the two scalar currents. Due to breakdown of Lorentz invariance at finite temperature, more operators of the same dimension appear in the operator product expansion than at zero temperature. We calculated Wilson coefficients in the short distance expansion and obtain operator product expansion for thermal correlation function in terms of quark condensate, gluon condensate, quark energy density and glu...

  10. Thermo-optic coefficient dependent temperature sensitivity of FBG-in-SMS based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Quan; Zhang, JianZhong; Yang, Jun; Canning, John; Peng, GangDing; Chen, YuJin; Yuan, LiBo

    2015-09-01

    Fiber Bragg grating in single-multi-single mode fiber structure (FBG-in-SMS) is proposed to be used as a sensor. It could realize temperature and strain measurement simultaneously because of the different responses of the different parts of the FBG-in-SMS transmission spectrum. The temperature response is decided by the thermo-optic coefficient of the multimode fiber mainly, which is focused on especially in order to optimize its performance.

  11. The Henry's law coefficient of 2-nitrophenol over the temperature range 278–303 K

    OpenAIRE

    Heal, Mathew R.

    2001-01-01

    Although 2-nitrophenol has been identified as an important environmental chemical there is scarcity in the literature regarding the temperature dependence of its Henry's law coefficient, H. Here a bubble purge method was used to measure H for 2- nitrophenol over the temperature range 278–303 K. A novel approach in the data treatment allowed correction of the data for non-equilibrium partitioning in the apparatus to obtain the true equilibrium H value. The experimentally derived...

  12. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~ 275 to ~ 400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures. To this end we introduce a new parameterisation for the temperature dependence. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multi-component system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~ 190 to ~ 440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 28% in

  13. The Variation of Electrochemical Cell Potentials with Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Gavin D.; McNaught, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical cell potentials have no simple relationship with temperature but depend on the interplay between the sign and magnitude of the isothermal temperature coefficient, dE[degrees]/dT, and on the magnitude of the reaction quotient, Q. The variations in possible responses of standard and non-standard cell potentials to changes in the…

  14. Estimation of Pressure Index and Temperature Sensitivity Coefficient of Solid Rocket Propellants by Static Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Shekhar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Burning rate of a solid rocket propellant depends on pressure and temperature. Conventional strand burner and Crawford bomb test on propellant strands was conducted to assess these dependent parameters. However, behaviour of propellant in rocket motor is different from its behaviour in strand form. To overcome this anomaly, data from static evaluation of rocket motor was directly used for assessment of these burningrate controlling parameters. The conventional empirical power law (r=aoexp[p{T-To}]Pn was considered and a method was evolved for determination of pressure index (n and temperature sensitivity coefficient (p of burning rate for solid rocket propellants from static evaluation data. Effect of pressure index and temperature sensitivity coefficient on firing curve is also depicted. Propellant grain was fired in progressive mode to cover a very wide pressure range of 50 kg/cm2 to 250 kg/cm2 and propellant burning rate index was calculated to be 0.32 in the given pressure range. Propellant grain was fired at +35 °C and –20 °C temperatures and temperature sensitivity coefficient of burning rate was calculated to be 0.27 % per °C. Since both the values were evaluated from realised static evaluation curves, these are more realistic and accurate compared to data generated by conventional methods.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(6, pp.666-669, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1573

  15. Calculation of an axial temperature distribution using the reflection coefficient of an acoustic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červenka, Milan; Bednařík, Michal

    2015-10-01

    This work verifies the idea that in principle it is possible to reconstruct axial temperature distribution of fluid employing reflection or transmission of acoustic waves. It is assumed that the fluid is dissipationless and its density and speed of sound vary along the wave propagation direction because of the fluid temperature distribution. A numerical algorithm is proposed allowing for calculation of the temperature distribution on the basis of known frequency characteristics of reflection coefficient modulus. Functionality of the algorithm is illustrated on a few examples, its properties are discussed. PMID:26520344

  16. Method for passively compensating for temperature coefficient of gain in silicon photomultipliers and similar devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKisson, John E.; Barbosa, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    A method for designing a completely passive bias compensation circuit to stabilize the gain of multiple pixel avalanche photo detector devices. The method includes determining circuitry design and component values to achieve a desired precision of gain stability. The method can be used with any temperature sensitive device with a nominally linear coefficient of voltage dependent parameter that must be stabilized. The circuitry design includes a negative temperature coefficient resistor in thermal contact with the photomultiplier device to provide a varying resistance and a second fixed resistor to form a voltage divider that can be chosen to set the desired slope and intercept for the characteristic with a specific voltage source value. The addition of a third resistor to the divider network provides a solution set for a set of SiPM devices that requires only a single stabilized voltage source value.

  17. Effect of Heat Transfer Coefficient on the Temperature Gradient for Hollow Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华平; 余晓蔚; 杨崇倡; 胡学超; 庄毅

    2001-01-01

    The heat transfer coefficient h caused by blowing affects the heat transfer of fiber greatly. Especially,unsymmetrical blowing forms the unsymmetrical temperature gradient on the fiber cross.section. Based on the results of spinning simulation by computer, the changes of heat transfer coefficient on the cross-section along the spinning line and the effects on distributions of temperature gradients were discussedl It is showed that for the spinning simulation of hollow fiber under strong blowing condition, the heat transfer coetticient should bemodified as: h=0.437×10-4[ G/Vρ ( R2/ R2-n2 ) ] -o.333(V2+ 64( VYsin (θ))2)0.167

  18. Temperature dependence of the coefficient of linear thermal expansion of single-crystal SmS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coefficient of linear thermal expansion of single-crystal SmS has been measured in the temperature range 300-850 K by dilatometry and X-ray diffraction. It is shown that the difference in the results obtained by these two methods is due to the heating-induced formation of SmS phases with small lattice parameters (5.62-5.8 A) close to that for the metallic SmS phase

  19. Fabrication of Continuous Fire Wire Detection Sensor usingNegative Temperature Coefficient Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Singla

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Manganese-based spinel semiconducting ceramic was mixed with lanthanum oxide powderand the mixture was characterised for the reproducible negative temperature coefficient (NTCof resistance behaviour. The same mixture was used for the fabrication of 15 m long continuousthermal detector.  The addition of La2O3 leads to decrease in thermistor constant and activationenergy values, thus giving freedom to fabricate thermal sensors for various temperatureapplications. A 3 m long continuous thermal detector for application in the temperature range275 - 350 oC was fabricated and later coupled to form a continuous unit of 15 m length.

  20. The effect of core configuration on temperature coefficient of reactivity in IRR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettan, M.; Silverman, I.; Shapira, M.; Nagler, A. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel)

    1997-08-01

    Experiments designed to measure the effect of coolant moderator temperature on core reactivity in an HEU swimming pool type reactor were performed. The moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity ({alpha}{sub {omega}}) was obtained and found to be different in two core loadings. The measured {alpha}{sub {omega}} of one core loading was {minus}13 pcm/{degrees}C at the temperature range of 23-30{degrees}C. This value of {alpha}{sub {omega}} is comparable to the data published by the IAEA. The {alpha}{sub {omega}} measured in the second core loading was found to be {minus}8 pcm/{degrees}C at the same temperature range. Another phenomenon considered in this study is core behavior during reactivity insertion transient. The results were compared to a core simulation using the Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants. It was found that in the second core loading factors other than the moderator temperature influence the core reactivity more than expected. These effects proved to be extremely dependent on core configuration and may in certain core loadings render the reactor`s reactivity coefficient undesirable.

  1. On the temperature dependence of the rate coefficient of formation of C2+ from C + CH+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, S.; Pastore, M.; Garcia, E.; Pacifici, L.; Laganà, A.

    2016-08-01

    We carry out quasi-classical trajectory calculations for the C + CH+→ C_2^+ + H reaction on an ad hoc computed high-level ab initio potential energy surface. Thermal rate coefficients at the temperatures of relevance in cold interstellar clouds are derived and compared with the assumed, temperature-independent estimates publicly available in kinetic data bases KIDA and UDfA. For a temperature of 10 K the data base value overestimates by a factor of 2 the one obtained by us (thus improperly enhancing the destruction route of CH+ in astrochemical kinetic models) which is seen to double in the temperature range 5-300 K with a sharp increase in the first 50 K. The computed values are fitted via the popular Arrhenius-Kooij formula and best-fitting parameters α = 1.32 × 10-9 cm3 s-1, β = 0.1 and γ = 2.19 K to be included in the online mentioned data bases are provided. Further investigation shows that the temperature dependence of the thermal rate coefficient better conforms to the recently proposed so-called `deformed Arrhenius' law by Aquilanti and Mundim.

  2. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  3. Quasiparticle Theory of Transport Coefficients for Hadronic Matter at Finite Temperature and Baryon Density

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, M

    2016-01-01

    We develop a flexible quasiparticle theory of transport coefficients of hot hadronic matter at finite baryon density. We begin with a hadronic quasiparticle model which includes a scalar and a vector mean field. Quasiparticle energies and the mean fields depend on temperature and baryon chemical potential. Starting with the quasiparticle dispersion relation, we derive the Boltzmann equation and use the Chapman-Enskog expansion to derive formulas for the shear and bulk viscosities and thermal conductivity. We obtain both relaxation time approximation formulas and more general integral equations. Throughout the work, we explicitly enforce the Landau-Lifshitz conditions of fit and ensure the theory is thermodynamically self-consistent. The derived formulas should be useful for predicting the transport coefficients of the hadronic phase of matter produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and at other accelerators.

  4. Method of measuring instant negative temperature coefficient of pulsed reactor by noise techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the relationship of neutron noise and temperature noise in reactors, a physical model which will be used to calculate the instant negative temperature coefficient (αF) of pulsed reactor is established in frequency domain by noise techniques. The neutron dynamic equation and thermal-dynamic equation were used while constructing the physical model. According to the disturbance in formation of neutron signal and temperature signal in the stable operation situation of reactors, the power spectrum densities are get by auto-regress moving average model. The αF of the pulsed reactor is obtained by best fitting method in the frequency domain. And the results are relative to the theory values

  5. Graphene-based, mid-infrared, room-temperature pyroelectric bolometers with ultrahigh temperature coefficient of resistance

    CERN Document Server

    Sassi, U; Nanot, S; Bruna, M; Borini, S; Milana, S; De Fazio, D; Zhuang, Z; Lidorikis, E; Koppens, F H L; Ferrari, A C; Colli, A

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is ideally suited for photonic and optoelectronic applications, with a variety of photodetectors (PDs) in the visible, near-infrared (NIR), and THz reported to date, as well as thermal detectors in the mid-infrared (MIR). Here, we present a room temperature-MIR-PD where the pyroelectric response of a LiNbO3 crystal is transduced with high gain (up to 200) into resistivity modulation for graphene, leading to a temperature coefficient of resistance up to 900%/K, two orders of magnitude higher than the state of the art, for a device area of 300x300um2. This is achieved by fabricating a floating metallic structure that concentrates the charge generated by the pyroelectric substrate on the top-gate capacitor of the graphene channel. This allows us to resolve temperature variations down to 15umK at 1 Hz, paving the way for a new generation of detectors for MIR imaging and spectroscopy

  6. Frequency analysis of temperature-dependent interferometric signal for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianqin; Shen, Jun; Neill, W. Stuart

    2016-07-01

    A method of frequency analysis for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index (dn/dT) using a Fabry-Perot interferometer was developed and tested against ethanol and water. The temperature-dependent interferometric signal described by Airy's formula was analyzed in both the temperature and frequency domains. By fast Fourier transform, a low-pass filter was designed and employed to eliminate the noise superimposed on the signal. dn/dT was determined accurately from the noise-removed signal by peak analysis. Furthermore, the signal frequency parameters may be utilized for the material thermophysical property characterization. This method lays the foundation for an online dn/dT instrument for monitoring chemical processes.

  7. Size- and Temperature-Dependent Thermal Expansion Coefficient of a Nanofilm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Jun; GUO Jian-Gang; ZHAO Ya-Pu

    2009-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of an ideal crystal is derived by using a method of Boltzmann statistics.The Morse potential energy function is adopted to show the dependence of the TEC on the temperature.By taking the effects of the surface relaxation and the surface energy into consideration,the dimensionless TEC of a nanofilm is derived.It is shown that with decreasing thickness,the TEC can increase or decrease,depending on the surface relaxation of the nanofilm.

  8. Thermocouple error correction for measuring the flame temperature with determination of emissivity and heat transfer coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindasageri, V; Vedula, R P; Prabhu, S V

    2013-02-01

    Temperature measurement by thermocouples is prone to errors due to conduction and radiation losses and therefore has to be corrected for precise measurement. The temperature dependent emissivity of the thermocouple wires is measured by the use of thermal infrared camera. The measured emissivities are found to be 20%-40% lower than the theoretical values predicted from theory of electromagnetism. A transient technique is employed for finding the heat transfer coefficients for the lead wire and the bead of the thermocouple. This method does not require the data of thermal properties and velocity of the burnt gases. The heat transfer coefficients obtained from the present method have an average deviation of 20% from the available heat transfer correlations in literature for non-reacting convective flow over cylinders and spheres. The parametric study of thermocouple error using the numerical code confirmed the existence of a minimum wire length beyond which the conduction loss is a constant minimal. Temperature of premixed methane-air flames stabilised on 16 mm diameter tube burner is measured by three B-type thermocouples of wire diameters: 0.15 mm, 0.30 mm, and 0.60 mm. The measurements are made at three distances from the burner tip (thermocouple tip to burner tip/burner diameter = 2, 4, and 6) at an equivalence ratio of 1 for the tube Reynolds number varying from 1000 to 2200. These measured flame temperatures are corrected by the present numerical procedure, the multi-element method, and the extrapolation method. The flame temperatures estimated by the two-element method and extrapolation method deviate from numerical results within 2.5% and 4%, respectively.

  9. Thermocouple error correction for measuring the flame temperature with determination of emissivity and heat transfer coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindasageri, V; Vedula, R P; Prabhu, S V

    2013-02-01

    Temperature measurement by thermocouples is prone to errors due to conduction and radiation losses and therefore has to be corrected for precise measurement. The temperature dependent emissivity of the thermocouple wires is measured by the use of thermal infrared camera. The measured emissivities are found to be 20%-40% lower than the theoretical values predicted from theory of electromagnetism. A transient technique is employed for finding the heat transfer coefficients for the lead wire and the bead of the thermocouple. This method does not require the data of thermal properties and velocity of the burnt gases. The heat transfer coefficients obtained from the present method have an average deviation of 20% from the available heat transfer correlations in literature for non-reacting convective flow over cylinders and spheres. The parametric study of thermocouple error using the numerical code confirmed the existence of a minimum wire length beyond which the conduction loss is a constant minimal. Temperature of premixed methane-air flames stabilised on 16 mm diameter tube burner is measured by three B-type thermocouples of wire diameters: 0.15 mm, 0.30 mm, and 0.60 mm. The measurements are made at three distances from the burner tip (thermocouple tip to burner tip/burner diameter = 2, 4, and 6) at an equivalence ratio of 1 for the tube Reynolds number varying from 1000 to 2200. These measured flame temperatures are corrected by the present numerical procedure, the multi-element method, and the extrapolation method. The flame temperatures estimated by the two-element method and extrapolation method deviate from numerical results within 2.5% and 4%, respectively. PMID:23464237

  10. Determination of Thermal Expansion Coefficients and Locating the Temperature-Induced Phase Transition in Methylammonium Lead Perovskites Using X-ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, T Jesper; Schwan, L Josef; Ottosson, Mikael; Hagfeldt, Anders; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2015-11-16

    Lead halogen perovskites, and particularly methylammonium lead iodine, CH3NH3PbI3, have recently attracted considerable interest as alternative solar cell materials, and record solar cell efficiencies have now surpassed 20%. Concerns have, however, been raised about the thermal stability of methylammonium lead iodine, and a phase transformation from a tetragonal to a cubic phase has been reported at elevated temperature. Here, this phase transition has been investigated in detail using temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction measurements. The phase transformation is pinpointed to 54 °C, which is well within the normal operating range of a typical solar cell. The cell parameters were extracted as a function of the temperature, from which the thermal expansion coefficient was calculated. The latter was found to be rather high (αv = 1.57 × 10(-4) K(-1)) for both the tetragonal and cubic phases. This is 6 times higher than the thermal expansion coefficient for soda lime glass and CIGS and 11 times larger than that of CdTe. This could potentially be of importance for the mechanical stability of perovskite solar cells in the temperature cycling experienced under normal day-night operation. The experimental knowledge of the thermal expansion coefficients and precise determination of the cell parameters can potentially also be valuable while conducting density functional theory simulations on these systems in order to deliver more accurate band structure calculations. PMID:26457861

  11. Temperature dependences of N2-broadening and shift coefficients in the ν6 perpendicular band of 12CH3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature-dependences of line broadening and shift parameters for many 12CH3D transitions have been determined using six high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio, room-temperature CH3D (98% purity) and CH3D-N2 spectra recorded with 25 cm path length ( at 0.01 cm−1 unapodized resolution) using the McMath−Pierce FTS located on Kitt Peak, Arizona, and 17 additional high quality, pure CH3D (99% purity) and CH3D-N2 spectra recorded between 79 and 296 K with the 20.38 cm path coolable cell (at 0.0056 cm−1 unapodized resolution) with the Bruker 125HR FTS at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California. The spectra have been fitted simultaneously applying a multispectrum nonlinear least-squares technique. In the analysis, the Lorentzian N2-broadened half-width coefficients and the corresponding pressure-shift coefficients as well as their temperature dependences are extracted for about 400 transitions (0≤J″≤19, K″≤16) in the perpendicular (ΔK=±1) ν6 band. At 296 K, the measured N2-broadened half-width coefficients range from 0.0209 to 0.0782 cm−1 atm−1 whereas the majority of the associated N2-induced shift coefficients are negative, and the values are between -0.016 and 0.005 cm−1 atm−1. The temperature dependence exponents for N2-broadened half-widths range between 0.264 and 0.924, whereas the temperature dependence coefficients for N2-induced shifts are between 0 and 0.00011 cm−1 atm−1 K−1. The N2-broadened half-width coefficients have been also calculated using a semi-classical approach based on a rigorous treatment of the active molecule as a symmetric top, a model intermolecular potential comprising both short- and long-range interactions, and exact classical trajectories. The role of the various high-order multipoles in the line-broadening at low, middle and high values of the rotational quantum number J″ has been investigated and the main features of the K-dependences analyzed. The calculations performed for

  12. A method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient (KdPAR)from paired temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Emily Kara

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient for photosynthetically active radiation (KdPAR) from paired temperature sensors was derived. We show that during cases where the attenuation of penetrating shortwave solar radiation is the dominant source of temperature changes, time series measurements of water temperatures at multiple depths (z1 and z2) are related to one another by a linear scaling factor (a). KdPAR can then be estimated by the simple equation KdPAR ln(a)/(z2/z1). A suggested workflow is presented that outlines procedures for calculating KdPAR according to this paired temperature sensor (PTS) method. This method is best suited for conditions when radiative temperature gains are large relative to physical noise. These conditions occur frequently on water bodies with low wind and/or high KdPARs but can be used for other types of lakes during time periods of low wind and/or where spatially redundant measurements of temperatures are available. The optimal vertical placement of temperature sensors according to a priori knowledge of KdPAR is also described. This information can be used to inform the design of future sensor deployments using the PTS method or for campaigns where characterizing sub-daily changes in temperatures is important. The PTS method provides a novel method to characterize light attenuation in aquatic ecosystems without expensive radiometric equipment or the user subjectivity inherent in Secchi depth measurements. This method also can enable the estimation of KdPAR at higher frequencies than many manual monitoring programs allow.

  13. Low temperature FIR and submm mass absorption coefficient of interstellar silicate dust analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Coupeaud, A; Meny, C; Nayral, C; Delpech, F; Leroux, H; Depecker, C; Creff, G; Brubach, J B; Roy, P

    2011-01-01

    Cold dust grains emission in the FIR/submm is usually expressed as a modified black body law in which the dust mass absorption coefficient (MAC), is described with a temperature- and wavelength-independent emissivity spectral index, beta. However, numerous data from space and balloon-born missions and recently from Herschel and Planck show that dust emission is not well understood, as revealed by the observed anti-correlation of beta with the grain temperature. In order to give astronomers the necessary data to interpret FIR/submm observations, we synthesised analogues of interstellar amorphous and crystalline silicate grains, rich in Mg and Ca, and having stiochiometry of olivine and pyroxene and measured their MAC, in the 100-1000/1500 \\mum range for grain temperatures varying from 300 to 10 K. We find that the grain MAC decreases when the grain temperature decreases and that the local spectral index, beta, defined as the slope of the MAC curve, is anti-correlated with the grain temperature. These variation...

  14. Design of a bilayer ceramic capacitor with low temperature coefficient of capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foeller, P. Y.; Dean, J. S.; Reaney, I. M.; Sinclair, D. C.

    2016-08-01

    We show how a simple bilayer system that combines a layer of undoped BaTiO3 (BT) with a second layer of Ba0.975Na0.025Ti0.975Nb0.025O3 (2.5NNBT) can be used to improve the temperature coefficient of capacitance (TCC) of BaTiO3-based materials for capacitor applications. The bilayer system emulates the volume ratio between a conventional core and shell phase microstructure allowing a simple resource efficient approach to optimise the system for low TCC. Optimisation was achieved with a volume ratio of 0.67 2.5NNBT with 0.33 BT and results in a TCC of ±6% over the temperature range ˜25 to 125 °C whilst maintaining a permittivity of ɛr ˜ 3000 and low dielectric loss.

  15. Temperature- and pressure-dependent absorption coefficients for CO2 and O2 at 193 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartinger, K. T.; Nord, S.; Monkhouse, P. B.

    Absorption of laser radiation at 193 nm by CO2 and O2 was studied at a series of different temperatures up to 1273 K and pressures up to 1 bar. The spectrum for CO2 was found to be broadband, so that absorption could be fitted to a Beer-Lambert law. On the other hand, the corresponding O2 spectrum is strongly structured and parameterisation requires a more complex relation, depending on both temperature and the product (pressure × absorption path length). In this context, the influence of spectral structure on the resulting spectrally integrated absorption coefficients is discussed. Using the fitting parameters obtained, effective transmissions at 193 nm can be calculated for a wide range of experimental conditions. As an illustration of the practical application of these data, the calculation of effective transmission for a typical industrial flue gas is described.

  16. Design and fabrication of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets with a low temperature coefficient of intrinsic coercivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui X.G.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To decrease the temperature coefficients of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets, the influencing factors on temperature coefficients, especially the reversible temperature coefficient β of intrinsic coercivity Hcj, were analyzed. The results showed that the absolute value of β decreased with increasing Hcj and also the ratio of microstructure parameter c to Neff, indicating that the increase of magnetocrystalline anisotropy field HA and c/Neff can effectively decrease the absolute value of β. On the basis of this analysis, a sintered Nd-Fe-B magnet with a low temperature coefficient of Hcj was fabricated through composition design, and the value of β was only -0.385%/ºC in the temperature interval of 20-150ºC.

  17. Two-temperature transport coefficients of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Zhexin; Wu, Yi, E-mail: wuyic51@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Chunlin [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Guo, Anxiang; Liu, Zirui [Electric Power Research Institute of State Grid Shaanxi Electric Power Company, Xian (China)

    2015-10-15

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is widely adopted in electric power industry, especially in high-voltage circuit breakers and gas-insulated switchgear. However, the use of SF{sub 6} is limited by its high liquidation temperature and high global warming potential. Recently, research shows SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} mixture, which shows environmental friendliness and good electrical properties, may be a feasible substitute for pure SF{sub 6}. This paper is devoted to the calculation of and transport coefficients of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} mixture under both LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) and non-LTE condition. The two–temperature mass action law was used to determine the composition. The transport coefficients were calculated by classical Chapman–Enskog method simplified by Devoto. The thermophysical properties are presented for electron temperatures of 300–40 000 K, ratios of electron to heavy species temperature of 1–10 and N{sub 2} mole fraction of 0%–100% at atmospheric pressure. The ionization processes under both LTE and non-LTE have been discussed. The results show that deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium significantly affect the properties of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma, especially before the plasma is fully ionized. The different influence of N{sub 2} on properties for SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma in and out of LTE has been found. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of the behavior of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasmas.

  18. Self-diffusion coefficients for water and organic solvents at high temperatures along the coexistence curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ken; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Nakahara, Masaru

    2008-12-01

    The self-diffusion coefficients D for water, benzene, and cyclohexane are determined by using the pulsed-field-gradient spin echo method in high-temperature conditions along the liquid branch of the coexistence curve: 30-350 °C (1.0-0.58 g cm-3), 30-250 °C (0.87-0.56 g cm-3), and 30-250 °C (0.77-0.48 g cm-3) for water, benzene, and cyclohexane, respectively. The temperature and density effects are separated and their origins are discussed by examining the diffusion data over a wide range of thermodynamic states. The temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient for water is larger than that for organic solvents due to the large contribution of the attractive hydrogen-bonding interaction in water. The density dependence is larger for organic solvents than for water. The difference is explained in terms of the van der Waals picture that the structure of nonpolar organic solvents is determined by the packing effect due to the repulsion or exclusion volumes. The dynamic solvation shell scheme [K. Yoshida et al., J. Chem. Phys. 127, 174509 (2007)] is applied for the molecular interpretation of the translational dynamics with the aid of molecular dynamics simulation. In water at high temperatures, the velocity relaxation is not completed before the relaxation of the solvation shell (mobile-shell type) as a result of the breakdown of the hydrogen-bonding network. In contrast, the velocity relaxation of benzene is rather confined within the solvation shell (in-shell type).

  19. Intelligent Detector of Internal Combustion Engine Cylinder Pressure and Sensitivity Temperature Coefficient Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beirong Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The detecting device based on mechanical mechanism is far from the measurement of internal combustion engine cylinder explosion and compression pressure. This pressure detection is under the environment of pulsed gas (over 500 times per one minute and mechanical impactive vibration. Piezoresistive detection with silicon on insulator (SOI strain gauges to pressure seems to be a good solution to meet such special applications. In this work, separation by implanted oxygen (SIMOX wafer was used to fabricate the high temperature pressure sensor chip. For high accuracy and wide temperature range application, this paper also presents a novel pressure sensitivity temperature coefficient (TCS compensation method, using integrated constant current network. A quantitative compensation formula is introduced in mathematics. During experiments, the absolute value of the compensated TCS is easy to be 10 × 10−6/°C~100 × 10−6/°C by individual adjustment and calibration of each device’s temperature compensation. Therefore, the feasibility and practicability of this technology are tested. Again, the disadvantages are discussed after the research of the experiment data and the improvement methods are also given in the designing period. This technology exhibits the great potential practical value of internal combustion engine cylinder pressure with volume manufacturing.

  20. Determination of the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Concrete at Early Ages by Using Temperature-stress Testing Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Kaicheng; SHUI Zhonghe; LI Yue

    2006-01-01

    By using the uptodate temperatuer-stress testing machine, the thermal expansion coefficient of concrete at early ages was studied and indicative conclusions were achieved: temperature rising due to hydration heat is not directly correlated with cracking, but the temperature and stress evolution process should be taken into consideration in the same time. Proper chemical admixtures and mineral compositions can improve the mechanical properties of concrete such as thermal expansion coefficient, which is very indicative in practice.

  1. Experimentally determined Henry's law coefficient of phenol, 2-methylphenol and 2-nitrophenol in the temperature range 281-302 K

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Mark A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The Henry's Law coefficient is a key physical parameter in the partitioning, and hence environmental fate, of a chemical species between air and water. Despite the acknowledged polluting potential of phenol, 2-methylphenol (o-cresol) and 2- nitrophenol, there is extremely poor agreement in the literature of their Henry's law coefficients and, in particular, no apparent systematic measurement of the variation with temperature. Here, a temperature-controlled column-stripping meth...

  2. Experimentally determined Henry's Law coefficients of phenol, 2-methylphenol and 2-nitrophenol in the temperature range 281-302 K

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Mark A. J.; Cape, J. Neil; Heal, Mathew R.

    2002-01-01

    The Henry’s Law coefficient is a key physical parameter in the partitioning, and hence environmental fate, of a chemical species between air and water. Despite the acknowledged polluting potential of phenol, 2-methylphenol (o-cresol) and 2-nitrophenol, there is extremely poor agreement in the literature of their Henry’s law coefficients and, in particular, no apparent systematic measurement of the variation with temperature. Here a temperature controlled column-stripping method was employed t...

  3. An instrument for the high temperature measurement of the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system for the simultaneous measurement of thermoelectric power and resistivity of one and/or two samples over a temperature range of 300–1000 K in a vacuum chamber is designed and implemented. A sample probe is developed to provide its easy mounting and usage. In addition, two samples can be measured at the same time. Measurement accuracy has been enhanced by beadless thermocouples and micro-heaters that are specifically designed in order to minimize the ‘cold-finger effect’ and to eliminate some possible source of contact, design and measurement errors. A broad range of physical types and shapes of samples, such as bulk, bar or disc, can be measured by a software controlled system. A differential steady-state method has been applied for Seebeck coefficient measurement. Resistivity measurement is conducted with the axial technique of the four-point probe method. Platinum wire and a niobium rod are chosen as the standard samples. The total data error for the Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements is estimated to be less than 2.6% and 1%, respectively. (paper)

  4. Transverse Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Measurements of Carbon Fibers Using ESEM at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, O.; Jiang, J.; Putnam, D.; Lo, Z.; Ellis, A.; Effinger, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The transverse coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of single IM7, T1000, and P55 carbon fibers are measured at elevated temperatures. The specimens are prepared by press-fitting fiber tows into 0.7mm-diameter cavity in a graphite disk of 5mm in diameter and 3mm high. The specimens are placed on a crucible in an ESEM, and images of the fiber cross section are taken as the fibers are heated up to 800 C. Holding time, heating and cool down cycles are also introduced. The geometrical changes are measured using a graphics tablet. The change in area/perimeter is calculated to determine the strain and transverse CTE for each fiber. In a complimentary computational effort, displacements and stresses are calculated with finite element models.

  5. HIGH TEMPERATURE POLYMER FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Qingfeng, Li; He, Ronghuan;

    2003-01-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200°C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working...... temperature allows for utilization of the excess heat for fuel processing. Moreover, it provides an excellent CO tolerance of several percent, and the system needs no purification of hydrogen from a reformer. Continuous service for over 6 months at 150°C has been demonstrated....

  6. Preparation and study on performance of submicron nickel powder for multilayer chip positive temperature coefficient resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yong; Gong Shu-Ping; Fu Qiu-Yun; Zheng Zhi-Ping; Huang Ri-Ming; Su Peng

    2010-01-01

    Base metal nickel is often used as the inner electrode in multilayer chip positive temperature coefficient resistance (PTCR). The fine grain of ceramic powders and base metal nickel are necessary. This paper uses reducing hydrazine to gain submicron nickel powder whose diameter was 200-300 nm through adjusting the consumption of nucleating agent PVP properly. The submicron nickel powder could disperse well and was fit for co-fired of multilayer chip PTCR. It analyes the submicron nickel powder through x-ray Diffraction (XRD) and calculates the diameter of nickel by PDF cards. Using XRD analyses it obtains several conclusions:If the molar ratio of hydrazine hydrate and nickel sulfate is kept to be a constant, when enlarging the molar ratio of NaOH/Ni2+>, the diameter of nickel powder would become smaller. When the temperature in the experiment raises to 70-80 ℃, nickel powder becomes smaller too. And if the molar ratio of NaOH/Ni2+> is 4, when molar ratio of (C2>H5>O)2>/Ni2+> increases, the diameter of nickel would reduce.Results from viewing the powders by optical microscope should be the fact that the electrode made by submicron nickel powder has a better formation and compactness. Furthermore, the sheet resistance testing shows that the electrode made by submicron nickel is smaller than that made by micron nickel.

  7. Fermi pockets and quantum oscillations of the Hall coefficient in high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sudip; Kee, Hae-Young

    2008-01-01

    Recent quantum oscillation measurements in high-temperature superconductors in high magnetic fields and low temperatures have ushered in a new era. These experiments explore the normal state from which superconductivity arises and provide evidence of a reconstructed Fermi surface consisting of electron and hole pockets in a regime in which such a possibility was previously considered to be remote. More specifically, the Hall coefficient has been found to oscillate according to the Onsager quantization condition, involving only fundamental constants and the areas of the pockets, but with a sign that is negative. Here, we explain the observations with the theory that the alleged normal state exhibits a hidden order, the d-density wave, which breaks symmetries signifying time reversal, translation by a lattice spacing, and a rotation by an angle π/2, while the product of any two symmetry operations is preserved. The success of our analysis underscores the importance of spontaneous breaking of symmetries, Fermi surface reconstruction, and conventional quasiparticles. We primarily focus on the version of the order that is commensurate with the underlying crystalline lattice, but we also touch on the consequences if the order were to incommensurate. It is shown that whereas commensurate order results in two independent oscillation frequencies as a function of the inverse of the applied magnetic field, incommensurate order leads to three independent frequencies. The oscillation amplitudes, however, are determined by the mobilities of the charge carriers comprising the Fermi pockets. PMID:18577585

  8. The Temperature Dependence Coefficients of Amorphous Silicon and Crystalline Photovoltaic Modules Using Malaysian Field Test Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Shaari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence coefficients of amorphous silicon and crystalline photovoltaic (PV modules using Malaysian field data have been obtained using linear regression technique. This is achieved by studying three test stand-alone PV-battery systems using 62 Wp a-Si, 225 Wp multi-crystalline and 225 Wp mono-crystalline PV modules. These systems were designed to provide electricity for rural domestic loads at 200 W, 500 W and 530 W respectively. The systems were installed in the field with data monitored using data loggers. Upon analysis, the study found that the normalized power output per operating array temperature for the amorphous silicon modules, multi-crystalline modules and mono-crystalline modules were: +0.037 per°C, +0.0225 per °C and +0.0263 per °C respectively. In addition, at a solar irradiance value of 500 Wm-2, the current, voltage, power and efficiency dependence coefficients on operating array temperatures obtained from linear regression were: +37.0 mA per °C, -31.8 mV per °C, -0.1036 W per °C and -0.0214% per °C, for the a-Si modules, +22.5 mA per °C, -39.4 mV per °C, -0.2525 W per °C, -0.072 % per °C for the multi-crystalline modules and +26.3 mA per °C, -32.6 mV per °C, -0.1742 W per °C, -0.0523 % per °C for the mono-crystalline modules. These findings have a direct impact on all systems design and sizing in similar climate regions. It is thus recommended that the design and sizing of PV systems in the hot and humid climate regions of the globe give due address to these findings.

  9. Temperature coefficient of reactivity of a typical swimming pool type research reactor using low enriched uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature coefficients of reactivity of a swimming pool type material test research reactor have been calculated using standard computer codes. It is observed that the core reactivity loss due to increase in water temperature and void formation is sensitive to control rod position at criticality. The reactivity decreases more rapidly when the core volume is small. (author)

  10. Experimental and numerical study on effects of airflow and aqueous ammonium solution temperature on ammonia mass transfer coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Li; Nielsen, Peter V; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2010-04-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation, based on fundamental fluid dynamics and mass transfer theory, carried out to obtain a general understanding of ammonia mass transfer from an emission surface. The effects of airflow and aqueous ammonium solution temperature on ammonia mass transfer are investigated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and by a mechanism modeling using dissociation constant and Henry's constant models based on the parameters measured in the experiments performed in a wind tunnel. The validated CFD model by experimental data is used to investigate the surface concentration distribution and mass transfer coefficient at different temperatures and velocities for which the Reynolds number is from 1.36 x 10(4) to 5.43 x 10(4) (based on wind tunnel length). The surface concentration increases as velocity decreases and varies greatly along the airflow direction on the emission surface. The average mass transfer coefficient increases with higher velocity and turbulence intensity. However, the mass transfer coefficient estimated by CFD simulation is consistently larger than the calculated one by the method using dissociation constant and Henry's constant models. In addition, the results show that the liquid-air temperature difference has little impact on the simulated mass transfer coefficient by CFD modeling, whereas the mass transfer coefficient increases with higher liquid temperature using the other method under the conditions that the liquid temperature is lower than the air temperature. Although there are differences of mass transfer coefficients between these two methods, the mass transfer coefficients determined by these two methods are significantly related.

  11. A promising method to derive the temperature coefficients of material constants of SAW and BAW materials. first application to LGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolay, Pascal; Aubert, Thierry

    2014-08-01

    Langasite (LGS) is a promising material for SAW applications at high temperature. However, the temperature coefficients of LGS material constants are not accurate enough to perform reliable simulations, and therefore to make good use of available design tools, above 300°C. In the first part of the paper, we describe a new possible way to derive these coefficients in a wider temperature range. The method is based on Simulated Annealing, a well-known optimization algorithm. The algorithm converges toward a set of optimized temperature coefficients of the stiffness constants which are used to perform accurate simulations up to at least 800°C. In the second part, a deeper analysis of the algorithm outputs demonstrates some of its strengths but also some of its main limitations. Possible solutions are described to predict and then improve the accuracy of the optimized coefficient values. In particular, one solution making use of additional BAW target curves is tested. A promising solution to extend the optimization to the temperature coefficients of piezoelectric constants is also discussed.

  12. Derivation of Regression Coefficients for Sea Surface Temperature Retrieval over East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Myoung-Hwan AHN; Eun-Ha SOHN; Byong-Jun HWANG; Chu-Yong CHUNG; Xiangqian WU

    2006-01-01

    Among the regression-based algorithms for deriving SST from satellite measurements, regionally optimized algorithms normally perform better than the corresponding global algorithm. In this paper,three algorithms are considered for SST retrieval over the East Asia region (15°-55°N, 105°-170°E),including the multi-channel algorithm (MCSST), the quadratic algorithm (QSST), and the Pathfinder algorithm (PFSST). All algorithms are derived and validated using collocated buoy and Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS-5) observations from 1997 to 2001. An important part of the derivation and validation of the algorithms is the quality control procedure for the buoy SST data and an improved cloud screening method for the satellite brightness temperature measurements. The regionally optimized MCSST algorithm shows an overall improvement over the global algorithm, removing the bias of about -0.13℃ and reducing the root-mean-square difference (rmsd) from 1.36℃ to 1.26℃. The QSST is only slightly better than the MCSST. For both algorithms, a seasonal dependence of the remaining error statistics is still evident. The Pathfinder approach for deriving a season-specific set of coefficients, one for August to October and one for the rest of the year, provides the smallest rmsd overall that is also stable over time.

  13. Experimental high temperature coefficients of compressibility and expansivity of liquid sodium and other related properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subcooled compressibility of liquid sodium was directly measured up to 200 atm between 900 K and 1867 K, utilizing a new multi-property apparatus which was previously tested with water. The experimental data were correlated by a 6-term equation with a standard deviation of 9.2 percent. The equation can be used to estimate the subcooled compressibilities and densities of liquid sodium up to 2300 K and 500 ata. The thermal expansion of liquid sodium was also measured along the isobars 1 ata, 28.9 ata and 69 ata. Densities within 1 percent of those obtained from the compressibilities were obtained. The above compressibility data were used to calculate the thermal pressure coefficient of saturated liquid sodium. Also, Bhise and Bonilla's correlations for the vapor pressure and the saturated liquid density of sodium were improved by including more data in the analysis. The critical temperature and density were thus reestimated as 2508.7 K and 0.2141 g/cc. Furthermore, a new correlation was developed to determine the heat of vaporization of sodium up to the critical point, which was then used to estimate the internal energy and the entropy of vaporization and the saturated vapor density of sodium up to the critical point

  14. Rational design and synthesis of an orally bioavailable peptide guided by NMR amide temperature coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Conan K.; Northfield, Susan E.; Colless, Barbara; Chaousis, Stephanie; Hamernig, Ingrid; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Nielsen, Daniel S.; Schroeder, Christina I.; Liras, Spiros; Price, David A.; Fairlie, David P.; Craik, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing the oral bioavailability of peptide drug leads is a major challenge in drug design. As such, methods to address this challenge are highly sought after by the pharmaceutical industry. Here, we propose a strategy to identify appropriate amides for N-methylation using temperature coefficients measured by NMR to identify exposed amides in cyclic peptides. N-methylation effectively caps these amides, modifying the overall solvation properties of the peptides and making them more membrane permeable. The approach for identifying sites for N-methylation is a rapid alternative to the elucidation of 3D structures of peptide drug leads, which has been a commonly used structure-guided approach in the past. Five leucine-rich peptide scaffolds are reported with selectively designed N-methylated derivatives. In vitro membrane permeability was assessed by parallel artificial membrane permeability assay and Caco-2 assay. The most promising N-methylated peptide was then tested in vivo. Here we report a novel peptide (15), which displayed an oral bioavailability of 33% in a rat model, thus validating the design approach. We show that this approach can also be used to explain the notable increase in oral bioavailability of a somatostatin analog. PMID:25416591

  15. Temperature dependence of invariant diffusion coefficient and activation energy for Fe-Cr-Ni-Co system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental determination of diffusion invariant coefficients in a four-component Fe-Cr-Ni-Co system is conducted for alloys with 16 mas.% of Cr, 13 mas.% of Ni, 2-14 mas.% of Co. Activation energies, corresponding to diffusion invariant coefficients are calculated by the least squares technique. The analysis of concentrational dependences of these coefficients has shown that under a low cobalt content the system can be characterized by the unique activation energy value

  16. Experimental and Numerical Study on Effects of Airflow and Aqueous Ammonium Temperature on Ammonia Mass Transfer Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Nielsen, Peter V.; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2010-01-01

    transfer are investigated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and by a mechanism modeling using dissociation constant and Henry's constant models based on the parameters measured in the experiments performed in a wind tunnel. The validated CFD model by experimental data is used to...... constant and Henry's constant models. In addition, the results show that the liquid-air temperature difference has little impact on the simulated mass transfer coefficient by CFD modeling, whereas the mass transfer coefficient increases with higher liquid temperature using the other method under the...

  17. Effects of magnetic field intensity on carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in γ-Fe temperature region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Duan, Guosheng; Zhao, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Effects of magnetic field intensity on carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in the γ-Fe temperature region were investigated using carburizing technology. The carbon penetration profiles from the iron surface to interior were measured by field emission electron probe microanalyzer. The carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron carburized with different magnetic field intensities was calculated according to the Fick's second law. It was found that the magnetic field intensity could obviously affect the carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in the γ-Fe temperature region, and the carbon diffusion coefficient decreased obviously with the enhancement of magnetic field intensity, when the magnetic field intensity was higher than 1 T, the carbon diffusion coefficient in field annealed specimen was less than half of that of the nonfield annealed specimen, further enhancing the magnetic field intensity, the carbon diffusion coefficient basically remains unchanged. The stiffening of lattice due to field-induced magnetic ordering was responsible for an increase in activation barrier for jumping carbon atoms. The greater the magnetic field intensity, the stronger the inhibiting effect of magnetic field on carbon diffusion.

  18. Uptake, efflux, and mass transfer coefficient of fluorescent PAMAM dendrimers into pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Armin W; Czymmek, Kirk J; Wickstrom, Eric; Wagner, Norman J

    2013-02-01

    Targeted delivery of imaging agents to cells can be optimized with the understanding of uptake and efflux rates. Cellular uptake of macromolecules is studied frequently with fluorescent probes. We hypothesized that the internalization and efflux of fluorescently labeled macromolecules into and out of mammalian cells could be quantified by confocal microscopy to determine the rate of uptake and efflux, from which the mass transfer coefficient is calculated. The cellular influx and efflux of a third generation poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer labeled with an Alexa Fluor 555 dye was measured in Capan-1 pancreatic cancer cells using confocal fluorescence microscopy. The Capan-1 cells were also labeled with 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) green cell tracker dye to delineate cellular boundaries. A dilution curve of the fluorescently labeled PAMAM dendrimer enabled quantification of the concentration of dendrimer in the cell. A simple mass transfer model described the uptake and efflux behavior of the PAMAM dendrimer. The effective mass transfer coefficient was found to be 0.054±0.043μm/min, which corresponds to a rate constant of 0.035±0.023min(-1) for uptake of the PAMAM dendrimer into the Capan-1 cells. The effective mass transfer coefficient was shown to predict the efflux behavior of the PAMAM dendrimer from the cell if the fraction of labeled dendrimer undergoing non-specific binding is accounted for. This work introduces a novel method to quantify the mass transfer behavior of fluorescently labeled macromolecules into mammalian cells.

  19. Diffusion coefficients for LMFBR cells calculated with MOC and Monte Carlo methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooijen, W.F.G. van, E-mail: rooijen@u-fukui.ac.j [Research Institute of Nuclear Energy, University of Fukui, Bunkyo 3-9-1, Fukui-shi, Fukui-ken 910-8507 (Japan); Chiba, G., E-mail: chiba.go@jaea.go.j [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata Shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    The present work discusses the calculation of the diffusion coefficient of a lattice of hexagonal cells, with both 'sodium present' and 'sodium absent' conditions. Calculations are performed in the framework of lattice theory (also known as fundamental mode approximation). Unlike the classical approaches, our heterogeneous leakage model allows the calculation of diffusion coefficients under all conditions, even if planar voids are present in the lattice. Equations resulting from this model are solved using the method of characteristics (MOC). Independent confirmation of the MOC result comes from Monte Carlo calculations, in which the diffusion coefficient is obtained without any of the assumptions of lattice theory. It is shown by comparison to the Monte Carlo results that the MOC solution yields correct values of the diffusion coefficient under all conditions, even in cases where the classic calculation of the diffusion coefficient fails. This work is a first step in the development of a robust method to calculate the diffusion coefficient of lattice cells. Adoption into production codes will require more development and validation of the method.

  20. Thin film thermistor with positive temperature coefficient of resistance based on phase separated blends of ferroelectric and semiconducting polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Thomas; Sharifi Dehsari, Hamed; Asadi, Kamal; Blom, Paul W. M.; Groen, Wilhelm A.; de Leeuw, Dago M.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that ferroelectric memory diodes can be utilized as switching type positive temperature coefficient (PTC) thermistors. The diode consists of a phase separated blend of a ferroelectric and a semiconducting polymer stacked between two electrodes. The current through the semiconducting polymer depends on the ferroelectric polarization. At the Curie temperature the ferroelectric polymer depolarizes and consequently the current density through the semiconductor decreases by orders of magnitude. The diode therefore acts as switching type PTC thermistor. Unlike their inorganic counterparts, the PTC thermistors presented here are thin film devices. The switching temperature can be tuned by varying the Curie temperature of the ferroelectric polymer.

  1. Fabrication and temperature dependence of a GaInP/GaAs/Ge tandem solar cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔敏; 陈诺夫; 杨晓丽; 张汉

    2012-01-01

    GaInP/GaAs/Ge tandem solar cells were fabricated by a MOCVD technique.The photoelectric properties of the solar cells were characterized by a current-voltage test method.The dependence of the solar cell's characteristics on temperature were investigated from 30 to 170 ℃ at intervals of 20 ℃.Test results indicated that with increasing temperature,Jsc of the cell increased slightly with a temperature coefficient of 9.8 (μA/cm2)/℃.Voc reduced sharply with a coefficient of-5.6 mV/℃.FF was reduced with a temperature coefficient of-0.00063/℃.Furthermore,the conversion efficiency decreased linearly with increasing temperature which decreased from 28% at 30 ℃ to 22.1% at 130 ℃.Also,detailed theoretical analyses for temperature characteristics of the solar cell were given.

  2. Experimental investigation of benzoic acid diffusion coefficient in γ-Al2O3 nanofluids at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manouchehrian Fard, Manouchehr; Beiki, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    An experimental study was performed to measure benzoic acid diffusion coefficient in water-based γ-Al2O3 nanofluids at different temperatures. Measurements were carried out at 15, 20 and 25 °C. γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles with an average diameter of 10-20 nm were added into de-ionized water as the based fluid. Nanoparticles volume fractions used in the based fluid were 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 %. Measurements showed that the diffusion coefficients was not changed with nanoparticles concentration and no enhancement was found. Dependence of diffusion coefficients on nanoparticles concentration followed the same trend in all temperatures investigated in this work. Nano stirring and nano-obstacles could be regarded as two reasons for mass diffusivity changes in nanofluids.

  3. First integrals and analytical solutions of the nonlinear fin problem with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    EMRULLAH YA¸SAR; YAKUP YILDIRIM; ILKER BURAK GIRESUNLU

    2016-08-01

    Fin materials can be observed in a variety of engineering applications. They are used to ease the dissipation of heat from a heated wall to the surrounding environment. In this work, we consider a nonlinear fin problem with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient. The equation(s) under study are highly nonlinear. Both the thermal conductivity and the heat transfer coefficient are given as arbitrary functions of temperature. Firstly, we consider the Lie group analysis for different cases of thermal conductivity and the heat transfer coefficients. These classifications are obtained from the Lie group analysis. Then, the first integrals of the nonlinear straight fin problem are constructed by three methods, namely, Noether’s classical method, partial Noether approach and Ibragimov’s nonlocal conservation method. Some exact analytical solutions are also constructed. The obtained result is also compared with the result obtained by other methods.

  4. Determining Outdoor CPV Cell Temperature (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, M.

    2011-04-01

    An accurate method is needed for determining cell temperature when measuring CPV modules outdoors. It has been suggested that cell temperature can be calculated though a procedure that shutters sunlight to the cells while measuring the transients in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and heat sink temperature. This presentation documents application of this shutter procedure to multiple CPV modules at NREL. The challenges and limitations are presented along with an alternate approach to measuring CPV cell operating temperature.

  5. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  6. Materials for low-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley; Yan, Yushan; Lu, Max

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in Low-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in low-temperature fuel cells. A related book will cover key materials in high-temperature fuel cells. The two books form part

  7. Determination and correlation of mass transfer coefficients in a stirred cell. [Molten Salt Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, J.; Bloxom, S.R.; Keeler, J.B.; Roth, S.R.

    1975-12-17

    In the proposed Molten Salt Breeder Reactor flowsheet, a fraction of the rare earth fission products is removed from the fuel salt in mass transfer cells. To obtain design parameters for this extraction, the effect of cell size, blade diameter, phase volume, and agitation rate on the mass transfer for a high density ratio system (mercury/water) in nondispersing square cross section contactors was determined. Aqueous side mass transfer coefficients were measured by polarography over a wide range of operating conditions. Correlations for the experimental mass transfer coefficients as functions of the operating parameters are presented. Several techniques for measuring mercury-side mass transfer coefficients were evaluated and a new one is recommended. (auth)

  8. Determination of diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water between 268 and 473 K in a high-pressure capillary optical cell with in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wanjun; Guo, Huirong; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Li, Lanlan

    2013-01-01

    Accurate values of diffusion coefficients for carbon dioxide in water and brine at reservoir conditions are essential to our understanding of transport behavior of carbon dioxide in subsurface pore space. However, the experimental data are limited to conditions at low temperatures and pressures. In this study, diffusive transfer of carbon dioxide in water at pressures up to 45 MPa and temperatures from 268 to 473 K was observed within an optical capillary cell via time-dependent Raman spectroscopy. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least-squares method for the measured variations in carbon dioxide concentration in the cell at various sample positions and time. At the constant pressure of 20 MPa, the measured diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water increase with increasing temperature from 268 to 473 K. The relationship between diffusion coefficient of carbon dioxide in water [D(CO2) in m2/s] and temperature (T in K) was derived with Speedy–Angell power-law approach as: D(CO2)=D0[T/Ts-1]m where D0 = 13.942 × 10−9 m2/s, Ts = 227.0 K, and m = 1.7094. At constant temperature, diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water decrease with pressure increase. However, this pressure effect is rather small (within a few percent).

  9. Temperature anomaly of the coefficient of ultrasonic absorption by electrons of hybridized states of cobalt impurities in mercury selenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhevstovskikh, I. V.; Okulov, V. I.; Gudkov, V. V.; Mayakin, V. Yu.; Sarychev, M. N.; Andriichuk, M. D.; Paranchich, L. D.

    2015-05-01

    The effects of the interaction of ultrasound with donor d electrons of cobalt impurity atoms at low concentrations in mercury selenide crystals have been investigated. The temperature dependences of the electronic contribution to the absorption coefficient at a frequency of 53 MHz in crystals with cobalt concentrations from 1018 to 1020 cm-3 and in the undoped crystal have been observed experimentally. It has been found that crystals with impurities are characterized by an anomalous nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient of the slow transverse wave in a narrow temperature range near 10 K. A smooth monotonic temperature dependence has been observed for longitudinal and fast transverse waves. Based on the developed theoretical interpretation, it has been established that the anomaly in the temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient of a slow transverse wave is associated with the hybridization of impurity d states in the conduction band of the crystal. A comparison of the theoretical and experimental dependences has made it possible to determine the parameters characterizing the hybridized electronic states.

  10. Temperature Coefficient of Sound Velocity of Perovskite-Enstatite and Lateral Thermal Heterogeneity in Earth's Lower Mantle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Zi-Zheng; XIE Hong-Sen; JING Fu-Qian; LIU Yong-Gang; GUO Jie; XU Jian

    2000-01-01

    Using the differences of sound velocity and temperature on the Hugoniot and isoentropic state, the temperature coefficients of sound velocity of perovskite-enstatite under high pressure were obtained. For compressional, shear and bulk wave velocities, their temperature coefficients decrease from 0.386, 0.251, 0.255m/(s.K) at 40GPa to 0.197, 0.131, 0. 162m/(s.K) at 140GPa, respectively. Extrapolating these to zero pressure results in ( K/ T)0 =-0.0279 GPa. K-1, which is consistent very well with the value got by hydrostatic pressure experiment. On the basis of our data, we conclude that the compressional wave velocity anomaly of 0.1-0.2% in the deep lower mantle and 2% in the D" region would imply lateral thermal heterogeneity with amplitude of 53-106 K and 1066 K in these regions, respectively.

  11. Influence of Chemical Composition on Phase Transformation Temperature and Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Hot Work Die Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hao-jie; WU Xiao-chun; MIN Yong-an

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the uniform design method,six kinds of martensitie hot work die steels were designed.The phase transformation temperatures including Ac1,Ac3,and M,were measured by DIL805A quenching dilatometer.The influences of the main elements on phase transformation temperatures were analyzed by quadratic stepwise regression analysis,and three corresponding equations were obtained.These equations,in which the interactions of the elements were considered,showed more effectiveness than the traditional ones.In addition,the thermal expansion coefficients of these steels in annealed state and quenched state were also obtained during the tests.The influences of chemical composition and temperature on the thermal expansion coefficient were analyzed;the equations obtained Were verified by using several kinds of steels.The predicted values were in accordance with the results of the experiments.

  12. Measurement of the Ar diffusion coefficient in graphite at high temperature by the ISOL method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eleon, C. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France); Jardin, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France)], E-mail: Jardin@ganil.fr; Thomas, J.C.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Huet-Equilbec, C.; Alves Conde, R. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France); Angelique, J.C. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, 38026 Grenoble (France); Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, ISMRA, 14050 Caen (France); Boilley, D.; Cornell, J.; Dubois, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France); Franberg, H. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); ISOLDE, CERN, 1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Gaubert, G.; Jacquot, B. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France); Koester, U. [ISOLDE, CERN, 1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Institut Laue Langevin, 38042 Grenoble (France); Leroy, R. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France); Maunoury, L. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherche Ion Laser, 14070 Caen (France); Orr, N. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, ISMRA, 14050 Caen (France); Pacquet, J.Y.; Pellemoine, F.; Stodel, C. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France)] (and others)

    2008-10-15

    This work has been carried out at GANIL within the ambit of the TARGISOL European collaboration which aims to study the relevant variables governing the release of radioactive elements from targets in an ISOL system. This work shows how it has been possible to extract diffusion coefficients for {sup 35}Ar atoms diffusing out of graphite targets from release time measurements by using an analytic description of the release times. The diffusion coefficients and efficiencies are presented and compared with results obtained using a 'continuous' method.

  13. Investigation on low room-temperature resistivity Cr/(Ba0.85Pb0.15)TiO3 positive temperature coefficient composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Zeming; Ma, J.; Qu, Yuanfang;

    2009-01-01

    Low room-temperature resistivity positive temperature coefficient (PTC) Cr/(Ba0.85Pb0.15)TiO3 composites were produced via a reducing sintering and a subsequent oxidation treatment. The effects of metallic content and processing conditions on materials resistivity–temperature properties were...... discussed. Using these special processes, the prepared composite with 20 wt% Cr possessed low room-temperature resistivity (2.96 Ω cm at 25 °C) and exhibited PTC effect (resistivity jump of 10), which is considered as a promising candidate for over-current protector when working at low voltage. The grain...

  14. Shear piezoelectric coefficients of PZT, LiNbO3 and PMN-PT at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Syed; Islam, Md; Haziot, Ariel; Beamish, John

    2014-12-01

    Piezoelectric transducers are used to detect stress and to generate nanometer scale displacements but their piezoelectric coefficients decrease with temperature, limiting their performance in cryogenic applications. We have developed a capacitive technique and directly measured the temperature dependence of the shear coefficient d15 for ceramic lead zirconium titanate (PZT), 41° X-cut lithium niobate (LiNbO3) and single crystal lead magnesium niobium-lead titanate (PMN-PT). In PZT, d15 decreases nearly linearly with temperature, dropping by factor of about 4 by 1.3 K. LiNbO3 has the smallest room temperature d15, but its value decreased by only 6% at the lowest temperatures. PMN-PT had the largest value of d15 at room temperature (2.9 × 10-9 m/V, about 45 times larger than for LiNbO3) but it decreased rapidly below 75 K; at 1.3 K, d15 was only about 8% of its room temperature value.

  15. Convergence of Cell Based Finite Volume Discretizations for Problems of Control in the Conduction Coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evgrafov, Anton; Gregersen, Misha Marie; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2011-01-01

    design, in particular shape and topology optimization, and are most often solved numerically utilizing a finite element approach. Within the FV framework for control in the coefficients problems the main difficulty we face is the need to analyze the convergence of fluxes defined on the faces of cells......We present a convergence analysis of a cell-based finite volume (FV) discretization scheme applied to a problem of control in the coefficients of a generalized Laplace equation modelling, for example, a steady state heat conduction. Such problems arise in applications dealing with geometric optimal...... provide characterizations of limit points, with respect to FV mesh size, of globally optimal solutions and two types of stationary points to the discretized problems. We illustrate the practical behaviour of our cell-based FV discretization algorithm on a numerical example....

  16. On the Effect of Counterface Materials on Interface Temperature and Friction Coefficient of GFRE Composite Under Dry Sliding Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S.M. El-Tayeb

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is an increase interest in polymeric composite materials for high-performance in many industrial applications. In other words, the tribo-studies on polymeric materials are growing fast to enhance the polymeric products such as bearings, seals, ring and bushes. The current work presents an attempt to study the correlation between the type of counterface material and frictional heating at the interface surfaces for different, normal loads (23N, 49N and 72N, sliding velocities (0.18, 1.3 and 5.2 m sˉ1 and interval time (0-720 sec. Sliding friction experiments are performed on a pin-on-ring (POR tribometer under dry contact condition. Interface temperature and friction force were measured simultaneously during sliding of glass fiber reinforced epoxy (GFRE composite against three different counter face materials, hardened steel (HS, cast iron (CI and Aluminum alloy (Al. Experimental results showed that the type of counterface material greatly influences both interface temperature and friction coefficient. Higher temperature and friction coefficient were evident when sliding took place against HS surface, compared to sliding against CI and Al under same condition. When sliding took place against HS, the friction coefficient of GFRE composite was about an order of magnitude higher than sliding the GFRE composite against the other counter face materials. Based on the optical microscope graphs, the friction and induced temperature results of GFRE composite are analyzed and discussed.

  17. Materials for high-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, San Ping; Lu, Max

    2013-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in High-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in high-temperature fuel cells with emphasis on the most important solid oxide fuel cells. A related book will cover key mater

  18. Dynamic Model of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2007-01-01

    the stack at a high stoichiometric air flow. This is possible because of the PBI fuel cell membranes used, and the very low pressure drop in the stack. The model consists of a discrete thermal model dividing the stack into three parts: inlet, middle and end and predicting the temperatures in these three...... parts, where also the temperatures are measured. The heat balance of the system involves a fuel cell model to describe the heat added by the fuel cells when a current is drawn. Furthermore the model also predicts the temperatures, when heating the stack with external heating elements for start-up, heat......The present work involves the development of a model for predicting the dynamic temperature of a high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. The model is developed to test different thermal control strategies before implementing them in the actual system. The test system consists of a prototype...

  19. Temperature dependence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesen, Y.; Stuckelberger, M.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.; Wyrsch, N.

    2016-01-01

    Thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar (a-Si:H) cells are known to have better temperature coefficients than crystalline silicon cells. To investigate whether a-Si:H cells that are optimized for standard conditions (STC) also have the highest energy yield, we measured the temperature and irradiance dependence of the maximum power output (Pmpp), the fill factor (FF), the short-circuit current density (Jsc), and the open-circuit voltage (Voc) for four series of cells fabricated with different deposition conditions. The parameters varied during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) were the power and frequency of the PE-CVD generator, the hydrogen-to-silane dilution during deposition of the intrinsic absorber layer (i-layer), and the thicknesses of the a-Si:H i-layer and p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide layer. The results show that the temperature coefficient of the Voc generally varies linearly with the Voc value. The Jsc increases linearly with temperature mainly due to temperature-induced bandgap reduction and reduced recombination. The FF temperature dependence is not linear and reaches a maximum at temperatures between 15 °C and 80 °C. Numerical simulations show that this behavior is due to a more positive space-charge induced by the photogenerated holes in the p-layer and to a recombination decrease with temperature. Due to the FF(T) behavior, the Pmpp (T) curves also have a maximum, but at a lower temperature. Moreover, for most series, the cells with the highest power output at STC also have the best energy yield. However, the Pmpp (T) curves of two cells with different i-layer thicknesses cross each other in the operating cell temperature range, indicating that the cell with the highest power output could, for instance, have a lower energy yield than the other cell. A simple energy-yield simulation for the light-soaked and annealed states shows that for Neuchâtel (Switzerland) the best cell at STC also has the best energy

  20. Iron Disilicide as High-Temperature Reference Material for Traceable Measurements of Seebeck Coefficient Between 300 K and 800 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowski, Pawel; Stiewe, Christian; de Boor, Johannes; Druschke, Ines; Zabrocki, Knud; Edler, Frank; Haupt, Sebastian; König, Jan; Mueller, Eckhard

    2016-09-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) convert heat to electrical energy by means of the Seebeck effect. The Seebeck coefficient is a central thermoelectric material property, measuring the magnitude of the thermovoltage generated in response to a temperature difference across a thermoelectric material. Precise determination of the Seebeck coefficient provides the basis for reliable performance assessment in materials development in the field of thermoelectrics. For several reasons, measurement uncertainties of up to 14% can often be observed in interlaboratory comparisons of temperature-dependent Seebeck coefficient or in error analyses on currently employed instruments. This is still too high for an industrial benchmark and insufficient for many scientific investigations and technological developments. The TESt (thermoelectric standardization) project was launched in 2011, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), to reduce measurement uncertainties, engineer traceable and precise thermoelectric measurement techniques for materials and TEGs, and develop reference materials (RMs) for temperature-dependent determination of the Seebeck coefficient. We report herein the successful development and qualification of cobalt-doped β-iron disilicide (β-Fe0.95Co0.05Si2) as a RM for high-temperature thermoelectric metrology. A brief survey on technological processes for manufacturing and machining of samples is presented. Focus is placed on metrological qualification of the iron disilicide, results of an international round-robin test, and final certification as a reference material in accordance with ISO-Guide 35 and the "Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement" by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, the national metrology institute of Germany.

  1. Turbulent Transfer Coefficients and Calculation of Air Temperature inside Tall Grass Canopies in Land Atmosphere Schemes for Environmental Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, D. T.; Alapaty, K.; Lalic, B.; Arsenic, I.; Rajkovic, B.; Malinovic, S.

    2004-10-01

    A method for estimating profiles of turbulent transfer coefficients inside a vegetation canopy and their use in calculating the air temperature inside tall grass canopies in land surface schemes for environmental modeling is presented. The proposed method, based on K theory, is assessed using data measured in a maize canopy. The air temperature inside the canopy is determined diagnostically by a method based on detailed consideration of 1) calculations of turbulent fluxes, 2) the shape of the wind and turbulent transfer coefficient profiles, and 3) calculation of the aerodynamic resistances inside tall grass canopies. An expression for calculating the turbulent transfer coefficient inside sparse tall grass canopies is also suggested, including modification of the corresponding equation for the wind profile inside the canopy. The proposed calculations of K-theory parameters are tested using the Land Air Parameterization Scheme (LAPS). Model outputs of air temperature inside the canopy for 8 17 July 2002 are compared with micrometeorological measurements inside a sunflower field at the Rimski Sancevi experimental site (Serbia). To demonstrate how changes in the specification of canopy density affect the simulation of air temperature inside tall grass canopies and, thus, alter the growth of PBL height, numerical experiments are performed with LAPS coupled with a one-dimensional PBL model over a sunflower field. To examine how the turbulent transfer coefficient inside tall grass canopies over a large domain represents the influence of the underlying surface on the air layer above, sensitivity tests are performed using a coupled system consisting of the NCEP Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model and LAPS.

  2. A method of computing the transient temperature of thick walls from arbitrary variation of adiabatic-wall temperature and heat-transfer coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P R

    1958-01-01

    A method of calculating the temperature of thick walls has been developed in which the time series and the response to a unit triangle variation of surface temperature concepts are used, together with essentially standard formulas for transient temperature and heat flow into thick walls. The method can be used without knowledge of the mathematical tools of its development. The method is particularly suitable for determining the wall temperature in one-dimensional thermal problems in aeronautics where there is a continuous variation of the heat-transfer coefficient and adiabatic-wall temperature. The method also offers a convenient means for solving the inverse problem of determining the heat-flow history when temperature history is known.

  3. Feasibility of a simple laboratory approach for determining temperature influence on SPMD-air partition coefficients of selected compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicenaite, A.; Huckins, J.N.; Alvarez, D.A.; Cranor, W.L.; Gale, R.W.; Kauneliene, V.; Bergqvist, P.-A.

    2007-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are a widely used passive sampling methodology for both waterborne and airborne hydrophobic organic contaminants. The exchange kinetics and partition coefficients of an analyte in a SPMD are mediated by its physicochemical properties and certain environmental conditions. Controlled laboratory experiments are used for determining the SPMD-air (Ksa's) partition coefficients and the exchange kinetics of organic vapors. This study focused on determining a simple approach for measuring equilibrium Ksa's for naphthalene (Naph), o-chlorophenol (o-CPh) and p-dichlorobenzene (p-DCB) over a wide range of temperatures. SPMDs were exposed to test chemical vapors in small, gas-tight chambers at four different temperatures (-16, -4, 22 and 40 ??C). The exposure times ranged from 6 h to 28 d depending on test temperature. Ksa's or non-equilibrium concentrations in SPMDs were determined for all compounds, temperatures and exposure periods with the exception of Naph, which could not be quantified in SPMDs until 4 weeks at the -16 ??C temperature. To perform this study the assumption of constant and saturated atmospheric concentrations in test chambers was made. It could influence the results, which suggest that flow through experimental system and performance reference compounds should be used for SPMD calibration. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Feasibility of a simple laboratory approach for determining temperature influence on SPMD–air partition coefficients of selected compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicenaite, Aurelija; Huckins, James N.; Alvarez, David A.; Cranor, Walter L.; Gale, Robert W.; Kauneliene, Violeta; Bergqvist, Per-Anders

    2007-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are a widely used passive sampling methodology for both waterborne and airborne hydrophobic organic contaminants. The exchange kinetics and partition coefficients of an analyte in a SPMD are mediated by its physicochemical properties and certain environmental conditions. Controlled laboratory experiments are used for determining the SPMD–air (Ksa's) partition coefficients and the exchange kinetics of organic vapors. This study focused on determining a simple approach for measuring equilibrium Ksa's for naphthalene (Naph), o-chlorophenol (o-CPh) and p-dichlorobenzene (p-DCB) over a wide range of temperatures. SPMDs were exposed to test chemical vapors in small, gas-tight chambers at four different temperatures (−16, −4, 22 and 40 °C). The exposure times ranged from 6 h to 28 d depending on test temperature. Ksa's or non-equilibrium concentrations in SPMDs were determined for all compounds, temperatures and exposure periods with the exception of Naph, which could not be quantified in SPMDs until 4 weeks at the −16 °C temperature. To perform this study the assumption of constant and saturated atmospheric concentrations in test chambers was made. It could influence the results, which suggest that flow through experimental system and performance reference compounds should be used for SPMD calibration.

  5. Grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient in MQL grinding of high-temperature nickel-base alloy by using different vegetable oils as base oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Benkai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oil can be used as a base oil in minimal quantity of lubrication (MQL. This study compared the performances of MQL grinding by using castor oil, soybean oil, rapeseed oil, corn oil, sunflower oil, peanut oil, and palm oil as base oils. A K-P36 numerical-control precision surface grinder was used to perform plain grinding on a workpiece material with a high-temperature nickel base alloy. A YDM–III 99 three-dimensional dynamometer was used to measure grinding force, and a clip-type thermocouple was used to determine grinding temperature. The grinding force, grinding temperature, and energy ratio coefficient of MQL grinding were compared among the seven vegetable oil types. Results revealed that (1 castor oil-based MQL grinding yields the lowest grinding force but exhibits the highest grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient; (2 palm oil-based MQL grinding generates the second lowest grinding force but shows the lowest grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient; (3 MQL grinding based on the five other vegetable oils produces similar grinding forces, grinding temperatures, and energy ratio coefficients, with values ranging between those of castor oil and palm oil; (4 viscosity significantly influences grinding force and grinding temperature to a greater extent than fatty acid varieties and contents in vegetable oils; (5 although more viscous vegetable oil exhibits greater lubrication and significantly lower grinding force than less viscous vegetable oil, high viscosity reduces the heat exchange capability of vegetable oil and thus yields a high grinding temperature; (6 saturated fatty acid is a more efficient lubricant than unsaturated fatty acid; and (7 a short carbon chain transfers heat more effectively than a long carbon chain. Palm oil is the optimum base oil of MQL grinding, and this base oil yields 26.98 N tangential grinding force, 87.10 N normal grinding force, 119.6 °C grinding temperature, and 42.7% energy

  6. Fabrication of a simple apparatus for the Seebeck coefficient measurement in the temperature range of 300-620 K

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    A simple apparatus for the measurement of Seebeck coefficient ({\\alpha}) in the temperature range 300-620 K has been fabricated. Our design is appropriate for the characterization of samples with different geometries like disk and rod shaped. The sample holder assembly of the apparatus has been designed in such a way that, single heater used for sample heating purpose is enough to provide a self maintain temperature gradient (1-10 K) across the sample. The value of $\\alpha$ is obtained without explicit measurement of temperature gradient. The whole apparatus is fabricated from the materials, which are commonly available, so that any part can be replaced in case of any damage. Commercially available standard Nickel (Ni) metal sample has been used as a reference material for calibration of the instrument. The experimentally observed value of {\\alpha} by our apparatus gives the similar temperature dependent behavior as reported in the literature.

  7. From boiling point to glass transition temperature: Transport coefficients in molecular liquids follow three-parameter scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, B.; Petzold, N.; Kahlau, R.; Hofmann, M.; Rössler, E. A.

    2012-10-01

    The phenomenon of the glass transition is an unresolved problem in condensed matter physics. Its prominent feature, the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the transport coefficients, remains a challenge to be described over the full temperature range. For a series of molecular glass formers, we combined τ(T) collected from dielectric spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering covering a range 10-12 s < τ(T) < 102 s. Describing the dynamics in terms of an activation energy E(T), we distinguish a high-temperature regime characterized by an Arrhenius law with a constant activation energy E∞ and a low-temperature regime for which Ecoop(T) ≡ E(T)-E∞ increases exponentially while cooling. A scaling is introduced, specifically Ecoop(T)/E∞ ∝ exp[-λ(T/TA-1)], where λ is a fragility parameter and TA a reference temperature proportional to E∞. In order to describe τ(T) still the attempt time τ∞ has to be specified. Thus, a single interaction parameter E∞ describing the high-temperature regime together with λ controls the temperature dependence of low-temperature cooperative dynamics.

  8. A novel (ex situ) method to quantify oxygen diffusion coefficient of polymer fuel cells backing and catalyst layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baricci, Andrea; Casalegno, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Limiting current density of oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells is determined by several mass transport resistances that lower the concentration of oxygen on the catalyst active site. Among them, diffusion across porous media plays a significant role. Despite the extensive experimental activity documented in PEMFC literature, only few efforts have been dedicated to the measurement of the effective transport properties in porous layers. In the present work, a methodology for ex situ measurement of the effective diffusion coefficient and Knudsen radius of porous layers for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (gas diffusion layer, micro porous layer and catalyst layer) is described and applied to high temperature polymer fuel cells State of Art materials. Regression of the measured quantities by means of a quasi 2D physical model is performed to quantify the Knudsen effect, which is reported to account, respectively, for 30% and 50% of the mass transport resistance in micro porous layer and catalyst layer. On the other side, the model reveals that pressure gradient consequent to permeation in porous layers of high temperature polymer fuel cells has a negligible effect on oxygen concentration in relevant operating conditions.

  9. Estimation of Water Diffusion Coefficient into Polycarbonate at Different Temperatures Using Numerical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, many electronic systems are exposed to harsh conditions of relative humidity and temperature. Masstransport properties of electronic packaging materials are needed in order to investigate the influence of moisture andtemperature on reliability of electronic devices. Polycarbonate (PC...

  10. Effect of Two Temperatures on Reflection Coefficient in Micropolar Thermoelastic with and without Energy Dissipation Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The reflection of plane waves at the free surface of thermally conducting micropolar elastic medium with two temperatures is studied. The theory of thermoelasticity with and without energy dissipation is used to investigate the problem. The expressions for amplitudes ratios of reflected waves at different angles of incident wave are obtained. Dissipation of energy and two-temperature effects on these amplitude ratios with angle of incidence are depicted graphically. Some special and particular cases are also deduced.

  11. Water Diffusion Coefficients of Selected Legumes Grown in Turkey As Affected by Temperature and Variety

    OpenAIRE

    SEYHAN-GÜRTAŞ, Ferda; AK, M. Mehmet; Evranuz, E. Özgül

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of water absorption by chickpeas (Koçbaşı, Kuşbaşı), lentils (green Pul) and beans (Battal, Dermason, Horoz, Şeker) grown in Turkey were studied by a gravimetric method during soaking at 15, 25 and 40ºC to determine moisture diffusivity of these selected legumes. The water diffusion coefficients of the legumes were in the range 9.71x10-11 - 5.98x10-10 m2/s for the chickpeas, 3.53x10-10 - 1.33x10-9 m2/s for the lentils and 4.35x10-11 - 3.79x10-9 m2/s for the beans. An Arrhenius-t...

  12. Remarks on the contribution of electron-phonon scattering to low-temperature transport coefficients in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For very low temperature, the technical difficulty of calculating the electron-phonon contribution to transport coefficients in metals can be substantially reduced. The collision operator reduces to the product of an integral operator on the energy dependence, with a differential (or multiplicative) operator on the angular dependence of the distribution function for electrical (or thermal) conduction. This simple asymptotic limit of the collision operator as T → O is proven, and from it a number of results are derived. These results include statements about the distribution function and the transport coefficients, but the most useful ones are the simplified formulae that occur for collision matrix elements and for α2F(ω) distributions appropriate to transport

  13. Mid-infrared response of reduced graphene oxide and its high-temperature coefficient of resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Haifeng, E-mail: hfliang2004@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Optical Measurement and Thin Film of Shaanxi Province, Xi’an Technological University, Xi’an 710032 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Much effort has been made to study the formation mechanisms of photocurrents in graphene and reduced graphene oxide films under visible and near-infrared light irradiation. A built-in field and photo-thermal electrons have been applied to explain the experiments. However, much less attention has been paid to clarifying the mid-infrared response of reduced graphene oxide films at room temperature. Thus, mid-infrared photoresponse and annealing temperature-dependent resistance experiments were carried out on reduced graphene oxide films. A maximum photocurrent of 75 μA was observed at room temperature, which was dominated by the bolometer effect, where the resistance of the films decreased as the temperature increased after they had absorbed light. The electrons localized in the defect states and the residual oxygen groups were thermally excited into the conduction band, forming a photocurrent. In addition, a temperature increase of 2 °C for the films after light irradiation for 2 minutes was observed using absorption power calculations. This work details a way to use reduced graphene oxide films that contain appropriate defects and residual oxygen groups as bolometer-sensitive materials in the mid-infrared range.

  14. Mid-infrared response of reduced graphene oxide and its high-temperature coefficient of resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Liang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Much effort has been made to study the formation mechanisms of photocurrents in graphene and reduced graphene oxide films under visible and near-infrared light irradiation. A built-in field and photo-thermal electrons have been applied to explain the experiments. However, much less attention has been paid to clarifying the mid-infrared response of reduced graphene oxide films at room temperature. Thus, mid-infrared photoresponse and annealing temperature-dependent resistance experiments were carried out on reduced graphene oxide films. A maximum photocurrent of 75 μA was observed at room temperature, which was dominated by the bolometer effect, where the resistance of the films decreased as the temperature increased after they had absorbed light. The electrons localized in the defect states and the residual oxygen groups were thermally excited into the conduction band, forming a photocurrent. In addition, a temperature increase of 2 °C for the films after light irradiation for 2 minutes was observed using absorption power calculations. This work details a way to use reduced graphene oxide films that contain appropriate defects and residual oxygen groups as bolometer-sensitive materials in the mid-infrared range.

  15. The effect of concentration- and temperature-dependent dielectric constant on the activity coefficient of NaCl electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezső

    2014-06-21

    Our implicit-solvent model for the estimation of the excess chemical potential (or, equivalently, the activity coefficient) of electrolytes is based on using a dielectric constant that depends on the thermodynamic state, namely, the temperature and concentration of the electrolyte, ε(c, T). As a consequence, the excess chemical potential is split into two terms corresponding to ion-ion (II) and ion-water (IW) interactions. The II term is obtained from computer simulation using the Primitive Model of electrolytes, while the IW term is estimated from the Born treatment. In our previous work [J. Vincze, M. Valiskó, and D. Boda, "The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations," J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154507 (2010)], we showed that the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the activity coefficient can be reproduced qualitatively with this II+IW model without using any adjustable parameter. The Pauling radii were used in the calculation of the II term, while experimental solvation free energies were used in the calculation of the IW term. In this work, we analyze the effect of the parameters (dielectric constant, ionic radii, solvation free energy) on the concentration and temperature dependence of the mean activity coefficient of NaCl. We conclude that the II+IW model can explain the experimental behavior using a concentration-dependent dielectric constant and that we do not need the artificial concept of "solvated ionic radius" assumed by earlier studies.

  16. Temperature dependence of friction coefficient and wear rate of hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper resumes results of our study of the temperature dependent parameters of TiN, CoCr, CoCrN and MoS2 coatings. All investigated coatings were sputtered by means of a system of unbalanced magnetrons with pulsed d.c. supply. The most important deposition parameters ( e.g. total and partial pressures of Ar+N2 mixture, sample bias) were registered. The coatings thickness, determined by means of Calotest method, was 2 - 3 μm. The adhesion was measured with a scratch tester, for coating structure and internal stress evaluation the XRD and for coatings hardness the Hanemann microhardness were used. The temperature dependence of tribological parameters was determined by means of a high temperature tribometer (Authors)

  17. Variation of the temperature coefficient of collapse field in bismuth-based bubble garnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratello, V. J.; Pierce, R. D.; Brandle, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    An approximation to the collapse-field formula is used to show its dependence on magnetization and wall energy and the effect of additions of Gd, Sm, and Eu on 1-micron Bi:YIG bubble materials. The collapse field, magnetization, and wall energy are fitted to quadratic functions of temperature from -50 to 150 C. It is shown that the addition of the various classes of rare earths reduces the temperature derivative of the collapse field in Bi:YIG. Gd influences the collapse field through the magnetization, Sm affects it through the domain wall energy, and Eu does both. The singular magnetic properties of Eu result in the most nearly constant temperature dependence of the collapse field and the best match to a barium-ferrite bias magnite.

  18. Influence of temperature changes on torsional rigidity and damping coefficient of rubber torsional vibration damper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech HOMIK

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The short explanation of usefulness of rubber torsional dampers in crankshaft in multi-cylinder engines is presented. The description of the construction and operation of rubber torsional damper is also included. In the rubber torsional damper, the damping is achieved as the effect of internal friction resulting from the deformation of the rubber material. This deformation appears while the internal rubber elasticity is overloaded. Both the physical and mechanical rubber properties depend on temperature change. In cooperation with rubber dampers manufacturer the experimental investigations are made in order to establish the influence of temperature change on torsional stiffness and damping.

  19. Determination of absorption coefficients of glasses at high tempera-tures, by measuring the thermal emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loenen, E.; Van der Tempel, L.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental setup built in 1995 measures the spectral absorptioncoefficient of glass as a function of temperature and wavelength bythe emissive method. The setup was improved, as well as the softwarefor processing the measurement data. The measurement results of quartzwere validated by compariso

  20. Temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of new poly(ester-syloxane)urethane elastomers in thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusu, M.; Rusu, G.G.; Bucescu, M.; Rusu, G.I. [A.I. Cuza Univ., Iassy (Romania). Fac. of Phys.; Stanciu, A.; Bulacovschi, V. [`P. Poni` Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda, 41 A, Iassy, R-6600 (Romania)

    1998-08-04

    The temperature dependences of the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient for some new poly(ester-syloxane)urethane elastomers are studied. The measurements have been performed using thin films deposited from solution. It is found that the investigated polymers have semiconducting properties. Values of some semiconducting parameters of these films (activation energy of electrical conduction, charge carrier concentration, ratio of carrier mobilities) have been calculated. The correlations between some of these parameters and the molecular structure of the respective polymers are discussed. (orig.) 41 refs.

  1. Heat transfer analysis of a fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Mirgolbabaee

    2015-02-01

    Results are presented for the dimensionless temperature distribution and fin efficiency for different values of the problem parameters which for the purpose of comparison, obtained equation were calculated with mentioned methods. It was found the proposed solution is very accurate, efficient, and convenient for the discussed problem, furthermore convergence problems for solving nonlinear equations by using AGM appear small so the results demonstrate that the AGM could be applied through other methods in nonlinear problems with high nonlinearity.

  2. Temperature-dependent solubilities and mean ionic activity coefficients of alkali halides in water from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2015-07-01

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous KCl, NaF, NaI, and NaCl solutions of varying concentrations have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations following a recently developed methodology based on gradual insertions of salt molecules [Z. Mester and A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 044507 (2015)]. The non-polarizable ion models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)], Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)], Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)], and Joung and Cheatham [J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 9020 (2008)] were used along with the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model [Berendsen et al., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987)] in the simulations. In addition to the chemical potentials in solution used to obtain the activity coefficients, we also calculated the chemical potentials of salt crystals and used them to obtain the solubility of these alkali halide models in SPC/E water. The models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)] and Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)] provide excellent predictions of the mean ionic activity coefficients at 298.15 K and 1 bar, but significantly underpredict or overpredict the solubilities. The other two models generally predicted the mean ionic activity coefficients only qualitatively. With the exception of NaF for which the solubility is significantly overpredicted, the model of Joung and Cheatham predicts salt solubilities that are approximately 40%-60% of the experimental values. The models of Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)] make good predictions for the NaCl and NaI solubilities, but significantly underpredict the solubilities for KCl and NaF. We also tested the transferability of the models to temperatures much higher than were used to parametrize them by performing simulations for NaCl at 373.15 K and 1 bar, and at 473.15 K and 15.5 bar. All models overpredict the drop in the values of mean ionic

  3. Temperature-related changes in respiration and Q10 coefficient of Guava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bron Ilana Urbano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Guava (Psidium guajava L. is a tropical fruit that presents fast post-harvest ripening; therefore it is a very perishable product. Inappropriate storage temperature and retail practices can accelerate fruit quality loss. The objective of this study was to evaluate the respiratory activity (RA, the ethylene production (EP and Q10 of guava fruit at different storage temperatures. 'Paluma' guava fruits were harvested at maturity stage 1 (dark-green skin and stored at either 1, 11, 21, 31 or 41ºC; RA and EP were determined after 12, 36, 84 and 156 h of storage. RA and EP rates at 1 and 11ºC were the lowest - 0.16 and 0.43 mmol CO2 kg-1 h-1 and 0.003 and 0.019 µmol C2H4 kg-1 h-1, respectively. When guavas were stored at 21ºC, a gradual increase occurred in RA and EP, reaching 2.24 mmol CO2 kg-1 h-1 and 0.20 µmol C2H4 kg-1 h-1, after 156 h of storage. The highest RA and EP were recorded for guavas stored at 31ºC. In spite of high RA, guavas stored at 41ºC presented EP similar to guavas stored at 11ºC, an indicator of heat-stress injury. Considering the 1-11ºC range, the mean Q10 value was around 3.0; the Q10 value almost duplicated at 11-21ºC range (5.9. At 21-31ºC and 31-41ºC, Q10 was 1.5 and 0.8, respectively. Knowing Q10, respiratory variation and ripening behavior in response to different temperatures, fruit storage and retail conditions can be optimized to reduce quality losses.

  4. Near zero temperature coefficient of resistance in Ti:Si:O thin films deposited by magnetron co-sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, Marcela; Quevedo Lopez, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    Thin films of titanium/silicon/oxygen (Ti:Si:O) deposited by sputtering were evaluated as thin film resistors and the resulting resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) was studied. The films were deposited in an Argon atmosphere at room temperature with 1% oxygen and their electrical properties evaluated before and after forming gas (5% H2: 95% N2) annealing at 325 and 450 °C for 1 h. The physical structure was characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), elemental composition and depth profile by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), and film composition by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Carrier mobility, type and concentration were evaluated by Hall effect measurements. Thin films with a Ti:Si ratio of 1.6 exhibited a near zero TCR (-405 ppm °C-1) and sheet resistance (Rsh) at 25 °C of 1 kOhm sq-1.

  5. Effect of variable heat transfer coefficient on tissue temperature next to a large vessel during radiofrequency tumor ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro Cleber

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the current shortcomings of radiofrequency (RF tumor ablation is its limited performance in regions close to large blood vessels, resulting in high recurrence rates at these locations. Computer models have been used to determine tissue temperatures during tumor ablation procedures. To simulate large vessels, either constant wall temperature or constant convective heat transfer coefficient (h have been assumed at the vessel surface to simulate convection. However, the actual distribution of the temperature on the vessel wall is non-uniform and time-varying, and this feature makes the convective coefficient variable. Methods This paper presents a realistic time-varying model in which h is a function of the temperature distribution at the vessel wall. The finite-element method (FEM was employed in order to model RF hepatic ablation. Two geometrical configurations were investigated. The RF electrode was placed at distances of 1 and 5 mm from a large vessel (10 mm diameter. Results When the ablation procedure takes longer than 1–2 min, the attained coagulation zone obtained with both time-varying h and constant h does not differ significantly. However, for short duration ablation (5–10 s and when the electrode is 1 mm away from the vessel, the use of constant h can lead to errors as high as 20% in the estimation of the coagulation zone. Conclusion For tumor ablation procedures typically lasting at least 5 min, this study shows that modeling the heat sink effect of large vessels by applying constant h as a boundary condition will yield precise results while reducing computational complexity. However, for other thermal therapies with shorter treatment using a time-varying h may be necessary.

  6. Modeling of thermal expansion coefficient of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, F.; Maghsoudipour, A.; Alizadeh, M.; Khakpour, Z.; Javaheri, M.

    2015-09-01

    Artificial intelligence models have the capacity to eliminate the need for expensive experimental investigation in various areas of manufacturing processes, including the material science. This study investigates the applicability of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) approach for modeling the performance parameters of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode. Oxides (Ln = La, Nd, Sm and M = Fe, Ni, Mn) have been prepared and characterized to study the influence of the different cations on TEC. Experimental results have shown TEC decreases favorably with substitution of Nd3+ and Mn3+ ions in the lattice. Structural parameters of compounds have been determined by X-ray diffraction, and field emission scanning electron microscopy has been used for the morphological study. Comparison results indicated that the ANFIS technique could be employed successfully in modeling thermal expansion coefficient of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode, and considerable savings in terms of cost and time could be obtained by using ANFIS technique.

  7. Effect of temperature-dependent surface heat transfer coefficient on the maximum surface stress in ceramics during quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Y. F.; Song, F.; Jiang, C. P.; Xu, X. H.; Wei, J. C.; Zhou, Z. L.

    2016-02-01

    We study the difference in the maximum stress on a cylinder surface σmax using the measured surface heat transfer coefficient hm instead of its average value ha during quenching. In the quenching temperatures of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 and 800°C, the maximum surface stress σmmax calculated by hm is always smaller than σamax calculated by ha, except in the case of 800°C; while the time to reach σmax calculated by hm (fmmax) is always earlier than that by ha (famax). It is inconsistent with the traditional view that σmax increases with increasing Biot number and the time to reach σmax decreases with increasing Biot number. Other temperature-dependent properties also have a small effect on the trend of their mutual ratios with quenching temperatures. Such a difference between the two maximum surface stresses is caused by the dramatic variation of hm with temperature, which needs to be considered in engineering analysis.

  8. High temperature coefficient of resistance of low-temperature-grown VO2 films on TiO2-buffered SiO2/Si (100) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of a TiO2 buffer layer significantly improved the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR), a measure of the sharpness of the metal–insulator transition, for films of VO2 grown on SiO2/Si (100) substrates at growth temperatures below 670 K. X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements revealed that polycrystalline VO2 films were formed on the TiO2-buffered substrates at low temperatures below 600 K, whereas amorphous films were formed at these temperatures on SiO2/Si (100) substrates without a TiO2 buffer layer. Electron microscopy studies confirmed that the TiO2 buffer layer enhanced the grain growth of VO2 films at low growth temperatures. The VO2 films grown at 600 K on TiO2-buffered substrates showed a large TCR of more than 80%/K as a result of the improved crystallinity and grain size of the VO2 films. Our results provide an effective approach toward the integration of VO2-based devices onto Si platforms at process temperatures below 670 K

  9. High temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is a comprehensive review of high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). PEMFCs are the preferred fuel cells for a variety of applications such as automobiles, cogeneration of heat and power units, emergency power and portable electronics. The first 5 chapters...

  10. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. It is shown that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  11. Test on temperature coefficient of standard capacitors%标准电容器的温度系数试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴冬雪; 王维; 金攀; 何小兵

    2015-01-01

    Standard capacitor is a kind of material metrology instrument, the change of environmental temperature is the main factor of capacitance variation. According to JJG183-1992 Verification Regulation of Standard Capacitors, we per-formed the test on temperature coefficient of standard capacitors. The test verifies the temperature characteristic of the capacitors which are made of different dielectric materials.%作为实物计量器具的标准电容器,环境温度的变化是引起其容量变化的主要因素。依据JJG183-1992《标准电容器检定规程》,对标准电容器进行了温度系数试验,验证了不同介质材料制造的标准电容器的温度特性,为标准电容器的检定校准工作提供了试验依据。

  12. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections

  13. Unified explanation for suppressed electron ionization coefficient and its weak temperature dependence in InGaP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Wah-Peng; Wang, Hong

    2004-10-01

    Experimental evidence of electron multiplication, extracted from InGaP -GaAs-InGaP double heterojunction bipolar transistors, reveals a suppressed electron impact ionization coefficient, αn, with weak temperature dependence in InGaP compared to those measured from binary InP and GaP, which could not be predicted by the widely used Okuto-Crowell relation assuming that the optical phonon scattering is the only dominant scattering process during impact ionization. We show that discrepancies between the experimental data and the Okuto-Crowell relation can be consistently ascribed to the involvement of alloy scattering. This provides an improved insight into understanding the presence of alloy scattering on carrier impact ionization behavior in InGaP.

  14. Characterization of solar cells for space applications. Volume 5: Electrical characteristics of OCLI 225-micron MLAR wraparound cells as a function of intensity, temperature, and irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.; Weiss, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Computed statistical averages and standard deviations with respect to the measured cells for each intensity temperature measurement condition are presented. Display averages and standard deviations of the cell characteristics in a two dimensional array format are shown: one dimension representing incoming light intensity, and another, the cell temperature. Programs for calculating the temperature coefficients of the pertinent cell electrical parameters are presented, and postirradiation data are summarized.

  15. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600

  16. Development of a non-intrusive method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaziere, C

    2000-07-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) plays an important role in the feedback mechanism and thus in the inherent stability of Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs). Due to the inaccuracy of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques, many power utilities nowadays only measure the zero-power MTC since its determination is relatively straightforward and accurate. For the at-power MTC determination during the remaining fuel cycle, core calculations are assumed to be reliable enough. Nevertheless, these calculations were never benchmarked and most importantly, the use of high burnup fuel might induce a slightly positive MTC at Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) due to the high initial boron concentration. Even if in such a case the Doppler effect would still insure a negative reactivity feedback, monitoring the MTC throughout the cycle could become crucial. In this respect, not only the sign of the MTC is of importance, but also its magnitude. Consequently, developing a method that would permit monitoring the MTC during the fuel cycle is of great interest. One of the main disadvantages of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques is that the reactor has to be perturbed in order to induce a change of the moderator temperature. The modification of other parameters that can only be estimated by core calculation represents also a severe drawback of these methods, both for their precision and their reliability. A measurement performed at Ringhals-4 by using the so-called boron dilution method revealed that the uncertainty associated to the MTC estimation could even be much larger than previously expected due to the calculated reactivity corrections. These corrections are very sensitive to the input parameters chosen for the core simulation, and slight mis-estimations of these have large reactivity effects. It is known that if the reactivity noise and the moderator temperature noise could be measured, the MTC could be determined without disturbing

  17. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k- ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  18. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  19. Measuring the osmotic water permeability coefficient (Pf) of spherical cells: isolated plant protoplasts as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatil-Cohen, Arava; Sibony, Hadas; Draye, Xavier; Chaumont, François; Moran, Nava; Moshelion, Menachem

    2014-10-08

    Studying AQP regulation mechanisms is crucial for the understanding of water relations at both the cellular and the whole plant levels. Presented here is a simple and very efficient method for the determination of the osmotic water permeability coefficient (P(f)) in plant protoplasts, applicable in principle also to other spherical cells such as frog oocytes. The first step of the assay is the isolation of protoplasts from the plant tissue of interest by enzymatic digestion into a chamber with an appropriate isotonic solution. The second step consists of an osmotic challenge assay: protoplasts immobilized on the bottom of the chamber are submitted to a constant perfusion starting with an isotonic solution and followed by a hypotonic solution. The cell swelling is video recorded. In the third step, the images are processed offline to yield volume changes, and the time course of the volume changes is correlated with the time course of the change in osmolarity of the chamber perfusion medium, using a curve fitting procedure written in Matlab (the 'PfFit'), to yield P(f).

  20. Temperature dependence of the particle/gas partition coefficient: An application to predict indoor gas-phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenjuan; Mandin, Corinne; Blanchard, Olivier; Mercier, Fabien; Pelletier, Maud; Le Bot, Barbara; Glorennec, Philippe; Ramalho, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    The indoor gas-phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can be predicted from their respective concentrations in airborne particles by applying the particle/gas partitioning equilibrium. The temperature used for partitioning is often set to 25°C. However, indoor temperatures frequently differ from this reference value. This assumption may result in errors in the predicted equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentrations. To improve the prediction model, the temperature dependence of the particle/gas partition coefficient must be addressed. In this paper, a theoretical relationship between the particle/gas partition coefficient and temperature was developed based on the SVOC absorptive mechanism. The SVOC particle/gas partition coefficients predicted by employing the derived theoretical relationship agree well with the experimental data retrieved from the literature (R>0.93). The influence of temperature on the equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentration was quantified by a dimensionless analysis of the derived relationship between the SVOC particle/gas partition coefficient and temperature. The predicted equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentration decreased by between 31% and 53% when the temperature was lowered by 6°C, while it increased by up to 750% when the indoor temperature increased from 15°C to 30°C. PMID:27152992

  1. Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells: Temperature Impact on Passivation and Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seif, J.; Krishnamani, G.; Demaurex, B.; Martin de Nicholas, S.; Holm, N.; Ballif, C.; De Wolf, S.

    2015-03-23

    Photovoltaic devices deployed in the field can reach operation temperatures (T) as high as 90 °C [1]. Hence, their temperature coefficients (TC1) are of great practical importance as they determine their energy yield. In this study we concentrate on T-related lifetime variations of amorphous/crystalline interfaces and study their influence on the TCs of the individual solar cell parameters. We find that both the open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are influenced by these lifetime variations. However, this is only a minor effect compared to the dominant increase of the intrinsic carrier density and the related increase in dark saturation current density. Additionally, in this paper we will show that the TCVoc does not depend solely on the initial value of the Voc [2, 3], but that the structure of the device has to be considered as well.

  2. High temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Scott; M. Mamlouk

    2006-01-01

    One of the major issues limiting the introduction of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is the low temperature of operation which makes platinum-based anode catalysts susceptible to poisoning by the trace amount of CO, inevitably present in reformed fuel. In order to alleviate the problem of CO poisoning and improve the power density of the cell, operating at temperature above 100 ℃ is preferred. Nafion(R) -type perfluorosulfonated polymers have been typically used for PEMFC. However, the conductivity of Nafion(R) -type polymers is not high enough to be used for fuel cell operations at higher temperature ( > 90 ℃) and atmospheric pressure because they dehydrate under these condition.An additional problem which faces the introduction of PEMFC technology is that of supplying or storing hydrogen for cell operation,especially for vehicular applications. Consequently the use of alternative fuels such as methanol and ethanol is of interest, especially if this can be used directly in the fuel cell, without reformation to hydrogen. A limitation of the direct use of alcohol is the lower activity of oxidation in comparison to hydrogen, which means that power densities are considerably lower. Hence to improve activity and power output higher temperatures of operation are preferable. To achieve this goal, requires a new polymer electrolyte membrane which exhibits stability and high conductivity in the absence of liquid water.Experimental data on a polybenzimidazole based PEMFC were presented. A simple steady-state isothermal model of the fuel cell is also used to aid in fuel cell performance optimisation. The governing equations involve the coupling of kinetic, ohmic and mass transport. This paper also considers the advances made in the performance of direct methanol and solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells and considers their limitations in relation to the source and type of fuels to be used.

  3. FINITE ELEMENT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TEMPERATURE FIELD IN METAL PATTERN CASTING SYSTEM AND "REVERSE METHOD" OF DEFINING THE THERMAL PHYSICAL COEFFICIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. Chen; P.L. Wang; P.N. Song; J.Y. Zhang

    2007-01-01

    With the technology support of virtual reality and ANSYS software, an example on the simulation of temperature distribution of casting system during the solidification process was provided, which took the latent heat of phase change, the conditions for convection, and the interface heat transfer coefficient into consideration. The result of ANSYS was found to agree well with the test data. This research offers an unorthodox way or "reverse method" of defining the relevant thermal physical coefficient.

  4. Thermal analysis of pad-on-disc contact under tribological solicitations: a coupled numerical-experimental approach to identify surface temperatures and flow partition coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellami, Amira; Kchaou, Mohamed; Elleuch, Riadh; Desplanques, Yannick

    2016-09-01

    Aiming to provide a better understanding of thermal phenomena occurring in a sliding contact under tribological solicitation, a numerical model of pad-on-disc tribometer has been proposed. This study deals with an inverse problem concerning the identification of the heat exchange coefficient "h". The method used allows the sequential estimation of the thermal boundary conditions by minimizing an error function between numerical and experimental temperature values. Coupled with the identification of the heat flux partition coefficient, the proposed model is validated.

  5. Predicting MDCK cell permeation coefficients of organic molecules using membrane-interaction QSAR analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-li CHEN; Jia YAO; Jian-bo YANG; Jie YANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To use membrane-interaction quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis (MI-QSAR) to develop predictive models of partitioning of organic compounds in gastrointestinal cells. Methods: A training set of 22 structurally diverse compounds, whose apparent permeability accross cellular membranes of MadinDarby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were measured, were used to construct MIQSAR models. Molecular dynamic simulations were used to determine the explicit interaction of each test compound (solute) with a dimyristoyl-phosphatidyl-choline monolayer membrane model. An additional set of intramolecular solute descriptors were computed and considered in the trial pool of descriptors for building MI-QSAR models. The QSAR models were optimized using multidimensional linear regression fitting and the stepwise method. A test set of 8 compounds were evaluated using the MI-QSAR models as part of a validation process. Results:MI-QSAR models of the gastrointestinal absorption process were constructed.The descriptors found in the best MI-QSAR models are as follows: 1) ClogP (the logarithm of the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient); 2) EHOMO (the highest occupied molecular orbital energy); 3) Es (stretch energy); 4) PMY (the principal moment of inertia Y, the inertia along the y axis in the rectangular coordinates; 5) Ct(total connectivity); and 6) Enb (the energy of interactions between all of the nonbonded atoms). The most important descriptor in the models is ClogP. Conclusion:Permeability is not only determined by the properties of drug molecules, but is also very much influenced by the molecule-membrane interaction process.

  6. Effects of base doping and carrier lifetime on differential current gain and temperature coefficient of 4H-SiC power bipolar junction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, X.; Fardi, H.

    2012-04-01

    4H-SiC NPN bipolar junction transistor (BJT) is studied systematically by performing two-dimensional numerical simulations. Several design issues are discussed. Depending on the doping concentration of the base and the carrier lifetimes, both positive and negative temperature coefficients in the common emitter current gain could exist in 4H-SiC NPN BJTs with aluminium-doped base. The temperature coefficients of the current gain at different base doping concentrations and different carrier lifetimes have been determined. A high base doping concentration can reduce the requirement for the carrier lifetime in order to obtain negative temperature coefficient in current gain. Device simulations are performed to evaluate the carrier lifetimes by fitting the measured output IC -VCE curves. An excellent fitting is obtained and the base electron lifetime and the emitter hole lifetime are extracted to be about 22 and 5.7 ns, respectively.

  7. The nature of single-ion activity coefficients calculated from potentiometric measurements on cells with liquid junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarubin, Dmitri P., E-mail: dmitri.zarubin@mtu-net.ru [Department of Physical and Collod Chemistry, Moscow State University of Technology and Management, 73 Zemlyanoi Val, Moscow 109803 (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Problem of ionic activity coefficients, determined by potentiometry, is reconsidered. > They are found to be functions of mean activity coefficients and transport numbers of ions. > The finding is verified by calculations and comparing the results with reported data. > Calculations are performed for systems with single electrolytes and binary mixtures. - Abstract: Potentiometric measurements on cells with liquid junctions are sometimes used for calculations of single-ion activity coefficients in electrolyte solutions, the incidence of this being increased recently. As surmised by Guggenheim in the 1930s, such coefficients (of ions i), {gamma}{sub i}, are actually complicated functions of mean ionic activity coefficients, {gamma}{sub {+-}}, and transport numbers of ions, t{sub i}. In the present paper specific functions {gamma}{sub i}({gamma}{sub {+-}}, t{sub i}) are derived for a number of cell types with an arbitrary mixture of strong electrolytes in a one-component solvent in the liquid-junction system. The cell types include cells with (i) identical electrodes, (ii) dissimilar electrodes reversible to the same ions, (iii) dissimilar electrodes reversible to ions of opposite charge signs, (iv) dissimilar electrodes reversible to different ions of the same charge sign, and (v) identical reference electrodes and an ion-selective membrane permeable to ions of only one type. Pairs of functions for oppositely charged ions are found to be consistent with the mean ionic activity coefficients as would be expected for pairs of the proper {gamma}{sub i} quantities by definition of {gamma}{sub {+-}}. The functions are tested numerically on some of the reported {gamma}{sub i} datasets that are the more tractable. A generally good agreement is found with data reported for cells with single electrolytes HCl and KCl in solutions, and with binary mixtures in the liquid-junction systems of KCl from the reference solutions and NaCl and HCl from the test solutions. It

  8. An investigation of the effect of the upper beryllium reflector on the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity of miniature neutron source reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binh, Do Quang [Univ. of Technical Education, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Hai, Nguyen Hoang [Centre for Research and Development of Radiation Technology, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, an investigation on the dependence of the effective multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, on moderator temperature for various thicknesses of the upper beryllium reflector in reactor conditions with different fuel burnups for the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor is carried out. Based on the linear dependence of k{sub eff} on moderator temperature, an approach to calculate the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity, α{sub T}, at different temperatures and its average value, anti α{sub T}, in a range of temperatures directly through the moderator temperature is developed. Calculations are performed to evaluate the effect of change in the upper reflector thickness on the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity for the fresh core and reactor conditions with different fuel burnups. Calculated results indicate that anti α{sub T} increases with the increased beryllium thickness, but decreases with the increasing fuel burnup. Analysis of calculated results provides an additional insight into the relation of the upper reflector thickness, the neutron energy spectrum in the reactor core, and the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity.

  9. Simulation of temperature rise in Li-ion cells at very high currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jing; Tiedemann, William; Newman, John

    2014-12-01

    The Dualfoil model is used to simulate the electrochemical behavior and temperature rise for MCMB/LiCoO2 Li-ion cells under a small constant-resistance load, approaching a short-circuit condition. Radial mass transport of lithium from the center of the pore to the pore wall has been added to the model to describe better current limitations at very high discharge currents. Electrolyte and solid-surface-concentration profiles of lithium ions across the cell at various times are developed and analyzed to explain the lithium-ion transport limitations. Sensitivity tests are conducted by changing solution and solid-state diffusion coefficients, and the heat-transfer coefficient. Because diffusion coefficients increase at high temperature, calculated discharge curves can show currents dropping initially but then rising to a second peak, with most of the available capacity being consumed in the second peak. Conditions which lead to such a second peak are explored.

  10. Novel Low Temperature Solid State Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chonglin [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Nash, Patrick [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Liu, Jian [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Collins, Gregory [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2010-03-23

    We have successfully fabricated (PrBa)Co2O5+δ and (LaBa)Co2O5+δ epitaxial thin film on various single crystal substrates. Physical and electrochemical properties characterizations were carried out. Highly conductive oxygen-deficient double perovskite LnBaCo2O5+ thin films were grown on single crystal (001) SrTiO3 (STO), (001) MgO, (001) LaAlO3 and (110) NdGaO3} substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Microstructure studies from synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. High temperature transport properties was carried in different atmosphere (O2,Air, N2) up to ~900K. Resistance response of (LaBa)Co2O5+δ epitaxial thin film was characterized in oxygen, nitrogen and 4% hydrogen over a wide range of temperature from 400 C up to 800 C. To determine the electrode performance and oxygen exchange kinetics of PrBaCo2O5+δ, multi-layered thin film based half cell was deposited on LaAlO3(001) substrate. The temperature dependence of the resistance of this half cell structure was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) within different temperature and gas environments. Anode supported fuel cells, with GCO:YSZ multilayer thin film as electrolyte and PBCO thin film as electrode, are fabricated on tape casted NiO/YSZ substrate. Full cell performance is characterized up to 800 C.

  11. Densities, Excess Molar Volumes, and Thermal Expansion Coefficients of Aqueous Aminoethylethanolamine Solutions at Temperatures from 283.15 to 343.15 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Marcin; Tatarczuk, Adam; Spiewak, Dariusz; Wilk, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The densities of aqueous mixtures of aminoethylethanolamine (CAS #000111-41-1) were measured over the entire compositional range at temperatures of 283.15-343.15 K. The results of these measurements were used to calculate excess molar volumes and isobaric thermal expansion coefficients, and partial molar and apparent molar volumes and excess isobaric thermal expansion coefficients were subsequently derived. The excess molar volumes were correlated as a function of the mole fraction using the Redlich-Kister equation. Temperature dependences of the Redlich-Kister coefficients are also presented. The partial molar volumes at infinite dilution of AEEA in water were determined using two different methods. In addition, the solution density was correlated using a Joubian-Acree model. Aqueous solutions of AEEA exhibit similar properties to the aqueous solutions of other alkanolamines (like monoethanolamine) used in acid gas sweetening. PMID:24899753

  12. Diffusion coefficients of fission products in the UO sub 2 kernel and pyrocarbon layer of BISO-coated fuel particles at extremely high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Fukuda, Kousaku (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1990-11-01

    Release of metal fission products from pyrocarbon (PyC) coated UO{sub 2} particles was studied by post-irradiation annealing at temperatures from 1600 to 2300deg C. Release of {sup 106}Ru and {sup 155}Eu was controlled by diffusion in the kernel at temperatures above 1800deg C, and their reduced diffusion coefficients in the kernel were very close to each other. The diffusion coefficient of Cs, D{sub Cs} (m{sup 2}/s), in the PyC layer was determined from the fractional release, as follows: D{sub Cs}=1.2x10{sup -3} exp(-4.12x10{sup 5} (J/mol)/RT), which was larger than that of Ce by an order of magnitude. The diffusion coefficients of fission products in the PyC layer was discussed in terms of their ionic radii and stability of their carbides. (orig.).

  13. Diffusion coefficients of fission products in the UO2 kernel and pyrocarbon layer of BISO-coated fuel particles at extremely high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Release of metal fission products from pyrocarbon (PyC) coated UO2 particles was studied by post-irradiation annealing at temperatures from 1600 to 2300deg C. Release of 106Ru and 155Eu was controlled by diffusion in the kernel at temperatures above 1800deg C, and their reduced diffusion coefficients in the kernel were very close to each other. The diffusion coefficient of Cs, DCs (m2/s), in the PyC layer was determined from the fractional release, as follows: DCs=1.2x10-3 exp[-4.12x105 (J/mol)/RT], which was larger than that of Ce by an order of magnitude. The diffusion coefficients of fission products in the PyC layer was discussed in terms of their ionic radii and stability of their carbides. (orig.)

  14. Optimization and experimental validation of a thermal cycle that maximizes entropy coefficient fisher identifiability for lithium iron phosphate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Sergio; Rothenberger, Michael; Hake, Alison; Fathy, Hosam

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a framework for optimizing the thermal cycle to estimate a battery cell's entropy coefficient at 20% state of charge (SOC). Our goal is to maximize Fisher identifiability: a measure of the accuracy with which a parameter can be estimated. Existing protocols in the literature for estimating entropy coefficients demand excessive laboratory time. Identifiability optimization makes it possible to achieve comparable accuracy levels in a fraction of the time. This article demonstrates this result for a set of lithium iron phosphate (LFP) cells. We conduct a 24-h experiment to obtain benchmark measurements of their entropy coefficients. We optimize a thermal cycle to maximize parameter identifiability for these cells. This optimization proceeds with respect to the coefficients of a Fourier discretization of this thermal cycle. Finally, we compare the estimated parameters using (i) the benchmark test, (ii) the optimized protocol, and (iii) a 15-h test from the literature (by Forgez et al.). The results are encouraging for two reasons. First, they confirm the simulation-based prediction that the optimized experiment can produce accurate parameter estimates in 2 h, compared to 15-24. Second, the optimized experiment also estimates a thermal time constant representing the effects of thermal capacitance and convection heat transfer.

  15. Temperature Effects on the Photovoltaic Performance of Planar Structure Perovskite Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cojocaru, Ludmila; Uchida, Satoshi; Sanehira, Yoshitaka; González Pedro, Victoria; Bisquert, Juan; Nakazaki, Jotaro; Kubo, Takaya; Segawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Temperature effects of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells having simple planar architecture were investigated on the crystal structure and photovoltaic performance. The obvious changes in the CH3NH3PbI3 crystal structure were found by varying the temperature as a consequence to the augmentation in lattice parameters and expansion of the unit cell. The expansion of the crystal gave a serious influence on the performance of the solar cells, where the differences in the coefficients of the therma...

  16. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  17. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  18. Large exponential gain coefficient in polymer assisted asymmetric liquid crystal cells originating from surface effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiayin; Zhang, Jingwen; Xue, Tingyu; Zhao, Hua

    2016-09-01

    As large as 4607 cm-1 gain coefficient in two beam coupling experiment was obtained by introducing PVK:C60 film to ZnSe assisted liquid crystal system. As short as 5.0 ms holographic recording time was reached when probing the grating formation process, showing great potential in real time applications. Systematical two beam coupling and grating probing experiments were performed in studying the mechanism behind the high photorefractive (PR) performance. Unusual energy transfer direction change and gain coefficient fluctuation were observed when the voltage polarity and incidence side were altered in the related two wave coupling experiments.

  19. Analysis of benchmarks on the reactivity temperature coefficient using new libraries based on ENDF/B-VI (release 5) and JEF2-2 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erradi, L.; Htet, A.; Chakir, E

    2001-06-01

    This paper presents, the analysis of discrepancies between calculation and experiments in the prediction of isothermal moderator temperature coefficient of a set of lattice experiments, using WIMSD4, WIMSD5B and APOLLO1 lattice codes. In this analysis we have used the original cross sections libraries (CEA-86 library for APOLLO1 and both of 1981 and 1986 libraries for WIMS) and the updated ones based on JEF2.2 data for APOLLO code and both of ENDF/B6 and JEF2.2 data for WIMS code. We have also analysed the numerical benchmark proposed by Mosteller to evaluate the accuracy in predicting Doppler coefficient in light water type lattices. This study on Doppler coefficient was performed using, in addition to APOLLO and WIMS codes, the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B for which a new library based on ENDF/B6 nuclear data file, have been processed using the NJOY system.

  20. Analysis of benchmarks on the reactivity temperature coefficient using new libraries based on ENDF/B-VI (release 5) and JEF2-2 data

    CERN Document Server

    Erradi, L; Chakir, E

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents, the analysis of discrepancies between calculation and experiments in the prediction of isothermal moderator temperature coefficient of a set of lattice experiments, using WIMSD4, WIMSD5B and APOLLO1 lattice codes. In this analysis we have used the original cross sections libraries (CEA-86 library for APOLLO1 and both of 1981 and 1986 libraries for WIMS) and the updated ones based on JEF2.2 data for APOLLO code and both of ENDF/B6 and JEF2.2 data for WIMS code. We have also analysed the numerical benchmark proposed by Mosteller to evaluate the accuracy in predicting Doppler coefficient in light water type lattices. This study on Doppler coefficient was performed using, in addition to APOLLO and WIMS codes, the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B for which a new library based on ENDF/B6 nuclear data file, have been processed using the NJOY system.

  1. Silicon (BSFR) solar cell AC parameters at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R Anil; Suresh, M.S. [ISRO Satellite Center, Bangalore- 560 017 (India); Nagaraju, J. [Solar Energy and Thermodynamic Laboratory, Department of Instrumentation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore- 560 012 (India)

    2005-01-31

    The AC parameters of back surface field reflected (BSFR) silicon solar cell are measured at different cell temperatures (198-348K) both in forward and reverse bias under dark condition using impedance spectroscopy technique. It is found that cell capacitance increases with temperature whereas cell resistance decreases, in forward bias voltage. Beyond maximum power point voltage, the cell inductance (0.28{mu}H) is measured, as the inductive reactance is comparable with cell series resistance. The measured cell parameters (cell capacitance, dynamic resistance, etc) are used to calculate the mean carrier lifetime and diode factor at different cell temperatures.

  2. Influence of wall emissivity and convective heat transfer coefficient on the adiabatic surface temperature as thermal/structural parameter in fire modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fire engineering analysis, one of the open problem is the transfer of thermal parameters obtained by fire CFD model to FEM models for structural analysis. In this study the new useful concept of “Adiabatic Surface Temperature” or more commonly known as AST, introduced by Wickström, is investigated. The adiabatic surface temperature offers the opportunity to transfer both thermal information of the gas and the net heat flux to the solid phase model, obtained by CFD analysis. In this study two CFD analyses are carried out in order to evaluate the effect of emissivity and of convective heat transfer coefficient to determine the AST. First one CFD analysis simulating a fire scenario, “conjugate heat transfer”, with a square steel beam exposed to hot surface is carried out to calculate AST, heat convective coefficient and temperature field in the beam. Second one, a conductive analysis is carried out on “standalone beam” imposing a third type boundary condition on its boundaries assuming the AST, evaluated in the conjugate analysis, as external temperature. Different heat convective coefficients are imposed on the beam walls. The comparison between results obtained by means of the two proposed analyses shows the use of AST as transfer thermal parameter between CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamic) and FEM (Finite Element Method) models is appropriate when the convective heat transfer coefficient is properly evaluated. -- Highlights: ► An open problem is to transfer parameters obtained by thermal to structural models. ► The useful concept of “Adiabatic Surface Temperature” (AST) is investigated. ► The AST use is right for properly evaluated convective heat transfer coefficient

  3. 低温感高能硝胺发射药的实验研究%Experiments on the Low Temperature Sensitivity Coefficient High-Energy Nitroamine Propellant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史先扬; 王泽山

    2001-01-01

    通过中止试验、高压密闭爆发器试验与火炮内弹道试验研究了低温感高能硝胺发射药的低温感效果。结果表明,低温感装药技术用于高能硝胺发射药能够大幅度降低火炮温度系数,提高火炮能量利用率。%Studied the low temperature sensitivity coefficient (LTSC) effect on high-energy nitroamine propellant throgh the termination experiment,closed bomb experiment and interior ballistic experiment.The results show that the LTSC charge technology can decrease temperature sensitivity coefficient and improve energy utilization ratio of gun.

  4. Calculation of 2-temperature plasma thermo-physical properties considering condensed phases: application to CO2-CH4 plasma: part 2. Transport coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chunping; Chen, Zhexin; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Yang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohua; Pang, Qingping

    2016-10-01

    The transport coefficients, namely thermal conductivity, viscosity and electrical conductivity, of CO2-CH4 mixture in and out of LTE are calculated in this paper. The calculation was based on local chemical equilibrium (LCE) and local phase equilibrium assumption. The 2-temperature composition results obtained with consideration of condensed phase in the previous paper (Part I) of this series were used in this calculation. The transport coefficients were calculated by classical Chapman-Enskog method simplified by Devoto. The results are presented for different temperatures (300-30 000 K), pressures (0.1-10 atm), non-equilibrium degrees (1-5), and CH4 molar proportions (0-100%). The influence of condensed graphite, non-LTE effect, mixture ratio and pressure on the composition and thermodynamic properties has been discussed. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of CO2-CH4 plasmas.

  5. Calculation of the radial and axial diffusion coefficient for a hexagonal lattice of a high-temperature reactor with block elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical method for the calculation of the radial and axial diffusion coefficient for the hexagonal lattice of a high-temperature reactor with block elements is developed. Results for a typical lattice are given and a comparison with the formulas of Behrens and Benoist is made. A modification of Benoist's formulas for a tightly packed lattice that gives a better agreement with the numerical results is proposed. 9 refs

  6. Dependence of the coefficient of ultrasonic velocity on the coefficient of free length in organic liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yigang; PENG Jianxin; TONG Jie; DONG Yanwu

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of Jacobson's free length theory and the theory of pressure coefficient and temperature coefficient of free length in liquids, the relationship between the pressure coefficient of ultrasonic velocity and the pressure coefficient of free length, and the relationship between the temperature coefficient of ultrasonic velocity and the temperature coefficient of free length were studied. Relevant equations were given, and the pressure coefficient and temperature coefficient of ultrasonic velocity were calculated, which are in agreement with the measured values.

  7. Dose conversion coefficients for monoenergetic electrons incident on a realistic human eye model with different lens cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, P.; Zankl, M.; Schlattl, H.; Vaz, P.

    2011-11-01

    The radiation-induced posterior subcapsular cataract has long been generally accepted to be a deterministic effect that does not occur at doses below a threshold of at least 2 Gy. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that the threshold for cataract induction may be much lower or that there may be no threshold at all. A thorough study of this subject requires more accurate dose estimates for the eye lens than those available in ICRP Publication 74. Eye lens absorbed dose per unit fluence conversion coefficients for electron irradiation were calculated using a geometrical model of the eye that takes into account different cell populations of the lens epithelium, together with the MCNPX Monte Carlo radiation transport code package. For the cell population most sensitive to ionizing radiation—the germinative cells—absorbed dose per unit fluence conversion coefficients were determined that are up to a factor of 4.8 higher than the mean eye lens absorbed dose conversion coefficients for electron energies below 2 MeV. Comparison of the results with previously published values for a slightly different eye model showed generally good agreement for all electron energies. Finally, the influence of individual anatomical variability was quantified by positioning the lens at various depths below the cornea. A depth difference of 2 mm between the shallowest and the deepest location of the germinative zone can lead to a difference between the resulting absorbed doses of up to nearly a factor of 5000 for electron energy of 0.7 MeV.

  8. Experimental boiling heat transfer coefficients in the high temperature generator of a double effect absorption machine for the lithium bromide/water mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos, J.D. [Escuela Tecnica Superior Ingenieria Industrial, UNED, c/Juan del Rosal 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Izquierdo, M. [Instituto de Ciencias de la Construccion Eduardo Torroja (CSIC), c/Serrano Galvache 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Lizarte, R. [Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Palacios, E. [Escuela Universitaria Ingenieria Tecnica Industrial, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/ Ronda de Valencia 3, 28012 Madrid (Spain); Infante Ferreira, C.A. [Delft University of Technology, Engineering Thermodynamics, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    The aim of this work is to determine the boiling heat transfer coefficients in the high temperature desorber (HTD) of an air-cooled double effect lithium bromide/water absorption prototype. The HTD is a plate heat exchanger (PHE) with thermal oil on one side, and a lithium bromide solution on the other side. Several experiments were performed with this PHE while the prototype was working with an outdoor dry bulb temperature around 42 C and condensation temperature around 55 C. The registered data allowed to calculate the global heat transfer coefficient and the heat transfer coefficient for the LiBr/water mixture in forced convective boiling. The pressure drop produced by the boiling of the refrigerant has been calculated as well. It has been verified that the largest part of the heat supplied in the generator is required for desorbing the refrigerant (except for the maximum solution mass flow), while the sensible heat varies from 10% to 50% of the total heat supplied. (author)

  9. The Effect of Temperature on Kinetics and Diffusion Coefficients of Metallocene Derivatives in Polyol-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Laleh Bahadori; Mohammed Harun Chakrabarti; Ninie Suhana Abdul Manan; Mohd Ali Hashim; Farouq Sabri Mjalli; Inas Muen AlNashef; Nigel Brandon

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the density, dynamic viscosity and ionic conductivity of several deep eutectic solvents (DESs) containing ammonium-based salts and hydrogen bond donvnors (polyol type) are investigated. The temperature-dependent electrolyte viscosity as a function of molar conductivity is correlated by means of Walden's rule. The oxidation of ferrocene (Fc/Fc+) and reduction of cobaltocenium (Cc+/Cc) at different temperatures are studied by cyclic voltammetry and potential-step c...

  10. Temperature coefficient of piezoelectric constants in Pb(Mg1/3 Nb2/3O3 - PbTiO3 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Henrique Lente

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the thermal stability of piezoelectric constants of PMN-PT ceramics in the tetragonal and rhombohedral phases were investigated in a wide range of temperatures. The results showed that the tetragonal PMN-PT presented higher thermal stability and, consequently, the temperature coefficients for the piezoelectric constants were approximately zero. This result revealed to be much better than that commonly found for PZT ceramics. Although the rhombohedral PMN-PT presented a slight lower thermal stability, the values found for the coupling factor were significantly higher than the tetragonal composition.

  11. Magneto Transport of high TCR (temperature coefficient of resistance) La2/3Ca1/3MnO3: Ag Polycrystalline Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Awana, V. P. S.; Tripathi, Rahul; Balamurugan, S.; Kishan, H.; Takayama-Muromachi, E.

    2006-01-01

    We report the synthesis, (micro)structural, magneto-transport and magnetization of polycrystalline La2/3Ca1/3MnO3:Agx composites with x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4. The temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) near ferromagnetic (FM) transition is increased significantly with addition of Ag. The FM transition temperature (TFM) is also increased slightly with Ag addition. Magneto-transport measurements revealed that magneto-resistance MR is found to be maximum near TFM. Further the increas...

  12. In Vitro Assessment of Factors Affecting the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient of Ramos Cells Using Bio-phantoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki,Takanori

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The roles of cell density, extracellular space, intracellular factors, and apoptosis induced by the molecularly targeted drug rituximab on the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values were investigated using bio-phantoms. In these bio-phantoms, Ramos cells (a human Burkittセs lymphoma cell line were encapsulated in gellan gum. The ADC values decreased linearly with the increase in cell density, and declined steeply when the extracellular space became less than 4 μm. The analysis of ADC values after destruction of the cellular membrane by sonication indicated that approximately 65% of the ADC values of normal cells originate from the cell structures made of membranes and that the remaining 35% originate from intracellular components. Microparticles, defined as particles smaller than the normal cells, increased in number after rituximab treatments, migrated to the extracellular space and significantly decreased the ADC values of bio-phantoms during apoptosis. An in vitro study using bio-phantoms was conducted to quantitatively clarify the roles of cellular factors and of extracellular space in determining the ADC values yielded by tumor cells and the mechanism by which apoptosis changes those values.

  13. MM98.34 Experimental Measurements of Die temperatures and determination of heat transfer coefficient in backward can extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Wanheim, Tarras

    1998-01-01

    The large deformations in backward can extrusion result in a rise of temperature of more than 200 degrees Centigrade. In the experiments cans in low carbon steel are formed, with a lubrication layer of phosphate soap. The temperature is measured by thermocouples in the die insert and the punch...

  14. MM98.04 Measurement of temperature and determination of heat transfer coefficient in backward can extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Wanheim, Tarras

    1998-01-01

    Temperature is measured during backward can extrusion of steel. The process is characterised by large deformations and very high surface pressure. In the experiments, a can in low carbon steel with a lubrication layer of phosphate soap is formed. The temperature is measured by thermocouples...

  15. The Effect of Temperature on Kinetics and Diffusion Coefficients of Metallocene Derivatives in Polyol-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Bahadori

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the density, dynamic viscosity and ionic conductivity of several deep eutectic solvents (DESs containing ammonium-based salts and hydrogen bond donvnors (polyol type are investigated. The temperature-dependent electrolyte viscosity as a function of molar conductivity is correlated by means of Walden's rule. The oxidation of ferrocene (Fc/Fc+ and reduction of cobaltocenium (Cc+/Cc at different temperatures are studied by cyclic voltammetry and potential-step chronoamperometry in DESs. For most DESs, chronoamperometric transients are demonstrated to fit an Arrhenius-type relation to give activation energies for the diffusion of redox couples at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the measured conductivities of DES1 and DES2 are better correlated with the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The kinetics of the Fc/Fc+ and Cc+/Cc electrochemical systems have been investigated over a temperature range from 298 to 338 K. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant is then calculated at different temperatures by means of a logarithmic analysis. The glycerol-based DES (DES5 appears suitable for further testing in electrochemical energy storage devices.

  16. The Effect of Temperature on Kinetics and Diffusion Coefficients of Metallocene Derivatives in Polyol-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Laleh; Chakrabarti, Mohammed Harun; Manan, Ninie Suhana Abdul; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Mjalli, Farouq Sabri; AlNashef, Inas Muen; Brandon, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the density, dynamic viscosity and ionic conductivity of several deep eutectic solvents (DESs) containing ammonium-based salts and hydrogen bond donvnors (polyol type) are investigated. The temperature-dependent electrolyte viscosity as a function of molar conductivity is correlated by means of Walden's rule. The oxidation of ferrocene (Fc/Fc+) and reduction of cobaltocenium (Cc+/Cc) at different temperatures are studied by cyclic voltammetry and potential-step chronoamperometry in DESs. For most DESs, chronoamperometric transients are demonstrated to fit an Arrhenius-type relation to give activation energies for the diffusion of redox couples at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the measured conductivities of DES1 and DES2 are better correlated with the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The kinetics of the Fc/Fc+ and Cc+/Cc electrochemical systems have been investigated over a temperature range from 298 to 338 K. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant is then calculated at different temperatures by means of a logarithmic analysis. The glycerol-based DES (DES5) appears suitable for further testing in electrochemical energy storage devices. PMID:26642045

  17. Quantification of in situ temperature measurements on a PBI-based high temperature PEMFC unit cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebæk, Jesper; Ali, Syed Talat; Møller, Per;

    2010-01-01

    The temperature is a very important operating parameter for all types of fuel cells. In the present work distributed in situ temperature measurements are presented on a polybenzimidazole based high temperature PEM fuel cell (HT-PEM). A total of 16 T-type thermocouples were embedded on both the an...

  18. Coumarin-bearing triarylamine sensitizers with high molar extinction coefficient for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Changjian; Gao, Jianrong; Cui, Yanhong; Li, Ting; Han, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Coumarin unit is introduced into triarylamine and three organic sensitizers are designed and synthesized with triarylamine bearing coumarin moiety as the electron donor, conjugated system containing thiophene unit as the π-bridge, and cyanoacetic acid moiety as the electron acceptor. The light-harvesting capabilities and photovoltaic performance of these dyes are investigated systematically with the comparison of different π-bridges. High molar extinction coefficients are observed in these triarylamine dyes and the photocurrent and photovoltage are increased with the introduction of another thiophene or benzene. Optimal photovoltaic performance (η = 6.24%, Voc = 690 mV, Jsc = 14.33 mA cm-2, and ff = 0.63) is observed in the DSSC based on dye with thiophene-phenyl unit as the π-conjugated bridge under 100 mW cm-2 simulated AM 1.5 G solar irradiation.

  19. The protein amide {sup 1}H{sup N} chemical shift temperature coefficient reflects thermal expansion of the N-H{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}O=C hydrogen bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Jingbo; Jing Qingqing; Yao Lishan, E-mail: yaols@qibebt.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (China)

    2013-01-15

    The protein amide {sup 1}H{sup N} chemical shift temperature coefficient can be determined with high accuracy by recording spectra at different temperatures, but the physical mechanism responsible for this temperature dependence is not well understood. In this work, we find that this coefficient strongly correlates with the temperature coefficient of the through-hydrogen-bond coupling, {sup 3h}J{sub NC Prime }, based on NMR measurements of protein GB3. Parallel tempering molecular dynamics simulation suggests that the hydrogen bond distance variation at different temperatures/replicas is largely responsible for the {sup 1}H{sup N} chemical shift temperature dependence, from which an empirical equation is proposed to predict the hydrogen bond thermal expansion coefficient, revealing responses of individual hydrogen bonds to temperature changes. Different expansion patterns have been observed for various networks formed by {beta} strands.

  20. Fluorinated and Non-Fluorinated Electro-Optic Copolymers: Determination of the Time and Temperature Stability of the Induced Electro-Optic Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Belardini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Organic fluorinated materials demonstrate their excellent electro-optic properties and versatility for technological applications. The partial substitution of hydrogen with fluorine in carbon-halides bounds allows the reduction of absorption losses at the telecommunication wavelengths. In these interesting compounds, the electro-optic coefficient was typically induced by a poling procedure. The magnitude and the time stability of the coefficient is an important issue to be investigated in order to compare copolymer species. Here, a review of different measurement techniques (such as nonlinear ellipsometry, second harmonic generation, temperature scanning and isothermal relaxation was shown and applied to a variety of fluorinated and non-fluorinated electro-optic compounds.

  1. Investigation of temperature effect on cell mechanics by optofluidic microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tie; Nava, Giovanni; Minzioni, Paolo; Veglione, Manuela; Bragheri, Francesca; Lelii, Francesca Demetra; Vazquez, Rebeca Martinez; Osellame, Roberto; Cristiani, Ilaria

    2015-08-01

    Here we present the results of a study concerning the effect of temperature on cell mechanical properties. Two different optofluidic microchips with external temperature control are used to investigate the temperature-induced changes of highly metastatic human melanoma cells (A375MC2) in the range of ~0 - 35 °C. By means of an integrated optical stretcher, we observe that cells' optical deformability is strongly enhanced by increasing cell and buffer-fluid temperature. This finding is supported by the results obtained from a second device, which probes the cells' ability to be squeezed through a constriction. Measured data demonstrate a marked dependence of cell mechanical properties on temperature, thus highlighting the importance of including a proper temperature-control system in the experimental apparatus.

  2. Effective ionisation coefficients and critical breakdown electric field of CO2 at elevated temperature: effect of excited states and ion kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizong; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-10-01

    Electrical breakdown by the application of an electric field occurs more easily in hot gases than in cold gases because of the extra electron-species interactions that occur as a result of dissociation, ionization and excitation at higher temperature. This paper discusses some overlooked physics and clarifies inaccuracies in the evaluation of the effective ionization coefficients and the critical reduced breakdown electric field of CO2 at elevated temperature, considering the influence of excited states and ion kinetics. The critical reduced breakdown electric field is obtained by balancing electron generation and loss mechanisms using the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) derived from the Boltzmann transport equation under the two-term approximation. The equilibrium compositions of the hot gas mixtures are determined based on Gibbs free energy minimization considering the ground states as well as vibrationally and electronically excited states as independent species, which follow a Boltzmann distribution with a fixed excitation temperature. The interaction cross sections between electrons and the excited species, not reported previously, are properly taken into account. Furthermore, the ion kinetics, including electron-ion recombination, associative electron detachment, charge transfer and ion conversion into stable negative ion clusters, are also considered. Our results indicate that the excited species lead to a greater population of high-energy electrons at higher gas temperature and this affects the Townsend rate coefficients (i.e. of electron impact ionization and attachment), but the critical reduced breakdown electric field strength of CO2 is only affected when also properly accounting for the ion kinetics. Indeed, the latter greatly influences the effective ionization coefficients and hence the critical reduced breakdown electric field at temperatures above 1500 K. The rapid increase of the dissociative electron attachment cross-section of

  3. Improving Accuracy in Arrhenius Models of Cell Death: Adding a Temperature-Dependent Time Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, John A

    2015-12-01

    The Arrhenius formulation for single-step irreversible unimolecular reactions has been used for many decades to describe the thermal damage and cell death processes. Arrhenius predictions are acceptably accurate for structural proteins, for some cell death assays, and for cell death at higher temperatures in most cell lines, above about 55 °C. However, in many cases--and particularly at hyperthermic temperatures, between about 43 and 55 °C--the particular intrinsic cell death or damage process under study exhibits a significant "shoulder" region that constant-rate Arrhenius models are unable to represent with acceptable accuracy. The primary limitation is that Arrhenius calculations always overestimate the cell death fraction, which leads to severely overoptimistic predictions of heating effectiveness in tumor treatment. Several more sophisticated mathematical model approaches have been suggested and show much-improved performance. But simpler models that have adequate accuracy would provide useful and practical alternatives to intricate biochemical analyses. Typical transient intrinsic cell death processes at hyperthermic temperatures consist of a slowly developing shoulder region followed by an essentially constant-rate region. The shoulder regions have been demonstrated to arise chiefly from complex functional protein signaling cascades that generate delays in the onset of the constant-rate region, but may involve heat shock protein activity as well. This paper shows that acceptably accurate and much-improved predictions in the simpler Arrhenius models can be obtained by adding a temperature-dependent time delay. Kinetic coefficients and the appropriate time delay are obtained from the constant-rate regions of the measured survival curves. The resulting predictions are seen to provide acceptably accurate results while not overestimating cell death. The method can be relatively easily incorporated into numerical models. Additionally, evidence is presented

  4. Estimation of the effective intercellular diffusion coefficient in cell monolayers coupled by gap junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Hofgaard, Johannes P; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik;

    2012-01-01

    A recently developed dye-based assay to study gap junction permeability is analysed. The assay is based on electroporation of dye into a large number of connexin 43 expressing cells, grown to confluency on electrically conductive slides. The subsequent intercellular spread of dye to non-electroporated...

  5. Using Variable Temperature Powder X-Ray Diffraction to Determine the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Solid MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsepius, Nicholas C.; DeVore, Thomas C.; Reisner, Barbara A.; Warnaar, Deborah L.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory exercise was developed by using variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) to determine [alpha] for MgO (periclase)and was tested in the Applied Physical Chemistry and Materials Characterization Laboratories at James Madison University. The experiment which was originally designed to provide undergraduate students with a…

  6. Effect of particle size on dc conductivity, activation energy and diffusion coefficient of lithium iron phosphate in Li-ion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V.S.L. Satyavani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cathode materials in nano size improve the performance of batteries due to the increased reaction rate and short diffusion lengths. Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4 is a promising cathode material for Li-ion batteries. However, it has its own limitations such as low conductivity and low diffusion coefficient which lead to high impedance due to which its application is restricted in batteries. In the present work, increase of conductivity with decreasing particle size of LiFePO4/C is studied. Also, the dependence of conductivity and activation energy for hopping of small polaron in LiFePO4/C on variation of particle size is investigated. The micro sized cathode material is ball milled for different durations to reduce the particle size to nano level. The material is characterized for its structure and particle size. The resistivities/dc conductivities of the pellets are measured using four probe technique at different temperatures, up to 150 °C. The activation energies corresponding to different particle sizes are calculated using Arrhenius equation. CR2032 cells are fabricated and electrochemical characteristics, namely, ac impedance and diffusion coefficients, are studied.

  7. Electrolytes for Wide Operating Temperature Lithium-Ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Provided herein are electrolytes for lithium-ion electrochemical cells, electrochemical cells employing the electrolytes, methods of making the electrochemical cells and methods of using the electrochemical cells over a wide temperature range. Included are electrolyte compositions comprising a lithium salt, a cyclic carbonate, a non-cyclic carbonate, and a linear ester and optionally comprising one or more additives.

  8. Characterization of the BaBiO3-doped BaTiO3 positive temperature coefficient of a resistivity ceramic using impedance spectroscopy with Tc=155℃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Chang-Lai; Liu Xin-Yu; Zhou Chang-Bong; Xu Ji-Wen; Yang Yun

    2011-01-01

    BaBi03-doped BaTi03 (BB-BT)ceramic, as a candidate for lead-free positive temperature coefficient of resistivity (PTCR)materials with a higher Curie temperature, has been synthesized in air by a conventional sintering technique.The temperature dependence of resistivity shows that the phase transition of the PTC thermistor ceramic occurs at the Curie temperature, Tc=155℃, which is higher than that of BaTiO3 (≤130℃). Analysis of ac impedance data using complex impedance spectroscopy gives the alternate current (AC)resistance of the PTCR ceramic. By additional use of the complex electric modulus formalism to analyse the same data, the inhomogeneous nature of the ceramic may be unveiled. The impedance spectra reveal that the grain resistance of the BB-BT sample is slightly influenced by the increase of temperature, indicating that the increase in overall resistivity is entirely due to a grain-boundary effect.Based on the dependence of the extent to which the peaks of the imaginary part of electric modulus and impedance are matched on frequency, the conduction mechanism is also discussed for a BB-BT ceramic system.

  9. Low resistivity W{sub x}V{sub 1−x}O{sub 2}-based multilayer structure with high temperature coefficient of resistance for microbolometer applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Émond, Nicolas; Hendaoui, Ali; Chaker, Mohamed, E-mail: chaker@emt.inrs.ca [INRS-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Boulevard Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2015-10-05

    Materials that exhibit semiconductor-to-metal phase transition (SMT) are commonly used as sensing layers for the fabrication of uncooled microbolometers. The development of highly responsive microbolometers would benefit from using a sensing material that possesses a large thermal coefficient of resistance (TCR) close to room temperature and a resistivity low enough to compromise between noise reduction and high TCR, while it should also satisfies the requirements of current CMOS technology. Moreover, a TCR that remains constant when the IR camera surrounding temperature varies would contribute to achieve reliable temperature measurements without additional corrections steps for TCR temperature dependence. In this paper, the characteristics of the SMT occurring in undoped and tungsten-doped vanadium dioxide thin films deposited on LaAlO{sub 3} (100) substrates are investigated. They are further exploited to fabricate a W{sub x}V{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} (0 ≤ x ≤ 2.5) multilayer structure exhibiting a bottom-up gradient of tungsten content. This MLS displays a combination of properties that is promising for application to uncooled microbolometer, such as a large TCR of −10.4%/ °C and low resistivity values ranging from 0.012 to 0.10 Ω-cm over the temperature range 22 °C–42 °C.

  10. Near-zero temperature coefficient of resistivity associated with magnetic ordering in antiperovskite Mn{sub 3+x}Ni{sub 1−x}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Sihao; Sun, Ying; Wang, Lei; Shi, Kewen; Hu, Pengwei; Wang, Cong, E-mail: congwang@buaa.edu.cn [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wu, Hui; Huang, Qingzhen [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-6102 (United States)

    2016-01-25

    The near-zero temperature coefficient of resistivity (NZ-TCR) behavior is reported in the antiperovskite compounds Mn{sub 3+x}Ni{sub 1−x}N (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.333). Our results indicate that the broad temperature range (above 275 K extending to above 220 K) of NZ-TCR is obtained by Mn doping at the Ni site. The short-range magnetic ordering is revealed by both neutron powder diffraction and inverse magnetic susceptibility. Further, we find a strong correlation between the anomalous resistivity change of Mn{sub 3+x}Ni{sub 1−x}N from the metal-like to the NZ-TCR behavior and the lack of the long-range magnetic ordering. The possible mechanism of NZ-TCR behavior is discussed using the spin-disorder scattering model.

  11. Burst annealing of high temperature GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, P. R.; Horne, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    One of the major limitations of solar cells in space power systems is their vulnerability to radiation damage. One solution to this problem is to periodically heat the cells to anneal the radiation damage. Annealing was demonstrated with silicon cells. The obstacle to annealing of GaAs cells was their susceptibility to thermal damage at the temperatures required to completely anneal the radiation damage. GaAs cells with high temperature contacts and encapsulation were developed. The cells tested are designed for concentrator use at 30 suns AMO. The circular active area is 2.5 mm in diameter for an area of 0.05 sq cm. Typical one sun AMO efficiency of these cells is over 18 percent. The cells were demonstrated to be resistant to damage after thermal excursions in excess of 600 C. This high temperature tolerance should allow these cells to survive the annealing of radiation damage. A limited set of experiments were devised to investigate the feasibility of annealing these high temperature cells. The effect of repeated cycles of electron and proton irradiation was tested. The damage mechanisms were analyzed. Limitations in annealing recovery suggested improvements in cell design for more complete recovery. These preliminary experiments also indicate the need for further study to isolate damage mechanisms. The primary objective of the experiments was to demonstrate and quantify the annealing behavior of high temperature GaAs cells. Secondary objectives were to measure the radiation degradation and to determine the effect of repeated irradiation and anneal cycles.

  12. Controlled Delivery of Human Cells by Temperature Responsive Microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.C. Mak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy is one of the most promising areas within regenerative medicine. However, its full potential is limited by the rapid loss of introduced therapeutic cells before their full effects can be exploited, due in part to anoikis, and in part to the adverse environments often found within the pathologic tissues that the cells have been grafted into. Encapsulation of individual cells has been proposed as a means of increasing cell viability. In this study, we developed a facile, high throughput method for creating temperature responsive microcapsules comprising agarose, gelatin and fibrinogen for delivery and subsequent controlled release of cells. We verified the hypothesis that composite capsules combining agarose and gelatin, which possess different phase transition temperatures from solid to liquid, facilitated the destabilization of the capsules for cell release. Cell encapsulation and controlled release was demonstrated using human fibroblasts as model cells, as well as a therapeutically relevant cell line—human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. While such temperature responsive cell microcapsules promise effective, controlled release of potential therapeutic cells at physiological temperatures, further work will be needed to augment the composition of the microcapsules and optimize the numbers of cells per capsule prior to clinical evaluation.

  13. Effective absorption coefficient for graded band-gap semiconductors and the expected photocurrent density in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Acevedo, Arturo [CINVESTAV del IPN, Electrical Engineering Department, Avenida IPN No. 2508, 07360 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    A simple model for the generation of carriers by photons incident on a (linearly) decreasing band-gap material, such as has been described in recent CIGS solar cells, is developed. The model can be generalized for different cases such as increasing band-gap grading or for having a more complex band-gap profile. The model developed for direct band semiconductors such as CIGS or AlGaAs allows us to define an effective absorption coefficient, so that the ideal photocurrent density can be calculated in a similar manner as for solar cells with non-graded band-gap materials. We show that this model gives completely different results as those expected from intuitive approaches for calculating this ideal photocurrent density. We also show that grading of the band-gap of the absorbing material in solar cells makes the photocurrent less sensitive to the total band-gap change, in such a way that the design of the band-gap variation can be more flexible in order to have other advantages such as higher built-in voltage or higher back surface field in the device structure. (author)

  14. A new evaluation of the Creole experiment. Qualification of the PWR reactivity temperature coefficient using JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CREOLE experimental program was conceived to supply accurate differential information on the Reactivity Temperature Coefficient (RTC) of standard UOX (clean and Boron poisoned) and MOX fuel type lattices in the whole temperature range of interest in a large PWR (from room temperature up to 300 deg C). This experiment has been recently reassessed using the most recent kinetic parameters of the library JEFF3.1.1. We have analyzed this newly assessed experimental data using the deterministic transport APOLLO2 code and the Monte Carlo transport code TRIPOLI4 with JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data library. The results show a remarkable agreement between the deterministic and Monte Carlo methods. The discrepancies between calculations and experiment on the RTC for clean and Boron poisoned UO2 PWR lattices is slightly negative, less than 1 pcm/ deg C which corresponds to the current target accuracy in LWR design calculations. Concerning the MOX lattices, the discrepancy between calculation and experiment on the average RTC for the temperature range from 20 deg C to 300 deg C is clearly positive, about +2 pcm/ deg C. (authors)

  15. Transport Coefficients of Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2006-01-01

    Until recently the formal statistical mechanical approach offered no practicable method for computing the transport coefficients of liquids, and so most practitioners had to resort to empirical fitting formulas. This has now changed, as demonstrated in this innovative monograph. The author presents and applies new methods based on statistical mechanics for calculating the transport coefficients of simple and complex liquids over wide ranges of density and temperature. These molecular theories enable the transport coefficients to be calculated in terms of equilibrium thermodynamic properties, and the results are shown to account satisfactorily for experimental observations, including even the non-Newtonian behavior of fluids far from equilibrium.

  16. Analysis of Fuel Temperature Reactivity Coefficients According to Burn-up and Pu-239 Production in CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonances for some kinds of nuclides such as U-238 and Pu-239 are not easy to be accurately processed. In addition, the Pu-239 productions from burnup are also significant in CANDU, where the natural uranium is used as a fuel. In this study, the FTCs were analyzed from the viewpoints of the resonance self-shielding methodology and Pu-239 build-up. The lattice burnup calculations were performed using the TRITON module in the SCALE6 code system, and the BONAMI module was executed to obtain self-shielded cross sections using the Bondarenko approach. Two libraries, ENDF/B-VI.8 and ENDF/B-VII.0, were used to compare the Pu-239 effect on FTC, since the ENDF/B-VII has updated the Pu-239 cross section data. The FTCs of the CANDU reactor were newly analyzed using the TRITON module in the SCALE6 code system, and the BONAMI module was executed to apply the Bondarenko approach for self-shielded cross sections. When compared with some reactor physics codes resulting in slightly positive FTC in the specific region, the FTCs evaluated in this study showed a clear negativity over the entire fuel temperature range on fresh/equilibrium fuel. In addition, the FTCs at 960.15 K were slightly negative during the entire burnup. The effects on FTCs from the library difference between ENDF/B-VI.8 and ENDF/B-VII.0 are recognized to not be large; however, they appear more positive when more Pu-239 productions with burnup are considered. This feasibility study needs an additional benchmark evaluation for FTC calculations, but it can be used as a reference for a new FTC analysis in CANDU reactors

  17. Innovative High Temperature Fuel Cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Au, Siu Fai

    2003-01-01

    The world's energy consumption is growing extremely rapidly. Fuel cell systems are of interest by researchers and industry as the more efficient alternative to conventional thermal systems for power generation. The principle of fuel cell conversion does not involve thermal combustion and hence in th

  18. 不同温度下氯化钙-葡萄糖-水体系的活度研究%Study of Activity Coefficients for CaCl2-glucose System in Water at Different Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小庆; 李晶

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical cells with a calcium ion selective electrode ( Ca-ISE ) versus a chlorine ion selective electrode ( Cl-ISE) as a reference electrode were used to determine the activity coefficients for CaCl2-glucose system in water at 308. 15 K and 318. 15 K, the molality rage of glucose was from 0. 1 to 2. 0 mol · kg-1 . A comparison of the results thus obtained was made with those determined by another electromotive force ( emf) method. It was showed that agreement was excellent. At the same time, the activity coefficients for CaCl2 -glucose-water systems at these temperatures were compared with other reference data. The results suggested that the activity coefficients for CaCl2 in the systems not only related to molality but also to temperature.%用一个钙离子选择性电极( Ca-ISE )和一个氯离子选择性电极( Cl-ISE )作参比电极组成的电池测定308.15 K和318.15 K下水中CaCl2-葡萄糖体系的平均活度系数,糖的浓度从0.1~2.0 mol·kg-1,此法和用其他电动势法测得的结果一致性相当好。同时,结合参考文献的其他数据综合比较了不同温度下活度系数随浓度及温度的变化情况。结果表明,活度系数不但与浓度有关,而且也与温度有关。

  19. Effects of Iso-Octane/Ethanol Blend Ratios on the Observance of Negative Temperature Coefficient Behavior within the Ignition Quality Tester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogin, Gregory E., Jr.; Luecke, Jon; Ratcliff, Matthew A.; Osecky, Eric; Zigler, Bradley T.

    2016-12-15

    An ignition delay study investigating the reduction in low temperature heat release (LTHR) and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) region with increasing ethanol concentration in binary blends of ethanol/isooctane was conducted in the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT). The IQT is advantageous for studying multi-component fuels such as iso-octane/ethanol which are difficult to study at lower temperatures covering the NTC region in traditional systems (e.g., shock tubes, rapid compression machines, etc.). The high octane numbers and concomitant long ignition delay times of ethanol and iso-octane are ideal for study in the IQT allowing the system to reach a quasi-homogeneous mixture; allowing the effect of fuel chemistry on ignition delay to be investigated with minimal impact from the fuel spray due to the relatively long ignition times. NTC behavior from iso-octane/ethanol blends was observed for the first time using an IQT. Temperature sweeps of iso-octane/ethanol volumetric blends (100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 50/50, and 0/100) were conducted from 623 to 993 K at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 MPa and global equivalence ratios ranging from 0.7 to 1.0. Ignition of the iso-octane/ethanol blends in the IQT was also modeled using a 0-D homogeneous batch reactor model. Significant observations include: (1) NTC behavior was observed for ethanol/iso-octane fuel blends up to 20% ethanol. (2) Ethanol produced shorter ignition delay times than iso-octane in the high temperature region. (3) The initial increase in ethanol from 0% to 10% had a lesser impact on ignition delay than increasing ethanol from 10% to 20%. (4) The 0-D model predicts that at 0.5 and 1.0 MPa ethanol produces the shortest ignition time in the high-temperature regime, as seen experimentally.

  20. A Student-Constructed Galvanic Cell for the Measurement of Cell Potentials at Different Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A student-made galvanic cell is proposed for temperature measurements of cell potential. This cell can be easily constructed by students, the materials needed are readily available and nontoxic, and the solution applied is in an attractive color. For this cell, the potential values are excellently reproducible at each temperature, and the…

  1. Experimental measurements of low temperature rate coefficients for neutral-neutral reactions of interest for atmospheric chemistry of Titan, Pluto and Triton: reactions of the CN radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Sébastien B; Le Picard, Sébastien D; Canosa, André; Sims, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of cyano radical, CN (X2sigma+) with three hydrocarbons, propane (CH3CH2CH3), propene (CH3CH=CH2) and 1-butyne (CH[triple band]CCH2CH3) have been studied over the temperature range of 23-298 K using a CRESU (Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme or Reaction Kinetics in Uniform Supersonic Flow) apparatus combined with the pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique. These reactions are of interest for the cold atmospheres of Titan, Pluto and Triton, as they might participate in the formation of nitrogen and carbon bearing molecules, including nitriles, that are thought to play an important role in the formation of hazes and biological molecules. All three reactions are rapid with rate coefficients in excess of 10(-10) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) at the lowest temperatures of this study and show behaviour characteristic of barrierless reactions. Temperature dependences, different for each reaction, are compared to those used in the most recent photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere. PMID:21302546

  2. Effects of heat treatment temperature on crystallization and thermal expansion coefficient of Li2 O-Al2 O3-SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢安贤; 贾明; 刘树江

    2004-01-01

    The basic glass of Li2 O-Al2 O3-SiO2 system using P2O5 as nucleator was prepared by means of conventional melt quenching technology, and the heat-treatment process was determined by using differential thermal analysis. The crystalline phases and the microstructure of the glass-ceramics were investigated by using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the glass based on Li2 O-Al2 O3-SiO2 oxides using P2 O5 as nucleator can be prepared at lower melt temperature of 1 450 ℃ and the glass-ceramics with lower thermal expansion coefficient of 21.6 × 10-7 ℃ 1 can also be obtained at 750 ℃. The glass-ceramics contain a few crystal phases in which the main crystal phase is β-quartz solid solution and the second crystal phase is β-spodumene solid solution. When the heat treatment temperature is not higher than 650 ℃, the transparent glass-ceramics containing β-quartzsolid solution can be prepared. β-quartz solid solution changes into β-spodumene solid solution at about 750 ℃. And the appearance of the glass-ceramics changes from translucent, part opaque to complete opaque with increasing temperature.

  3. Temperature dependence of thermal expansion coefficient of (CuInTe{sub 2}){sub 1-x}(2ZnTe){sub x} solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnar, I.V.; Chibusova, L.V. [Belarus State Univ. of Information Science and Radio Electronics, Minsk (Belarus); Korzun, B.V. [Inst. of Physics of Solids and Semiconductors, Minsk (Belarus)

    2000-06-16

    Investigations have been made for the first time of the thermal expansion of the (CuInTe{sub 2}){sub 1-x}(2ZnTe){sub x} solid solutions. It has been demonstrated that the thermal expansion coefficient {alpha}{sub L} grows considerably in the temperature range from 77 to 300 K whereas the temperature dependence above 300 K is rather weak. For the solid solutions with 0=} 0.4). The Debye temperatures {theta}{sub D} and the average quadratic dynamic displacements u{sup 2} were calculated. (orig.)

  4. A comparative study of 1/f noise and temperature coefficient of resistance in multiwall and single-wall carbon nanotube bolometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rongtao; Kamal, Rayyan; Wu, Judy Z

    2011-07-01

    The 1/f noise and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) are investigated in multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film bolometers since both affect the bolometer detectivity directly. A comparison is made between the MWCNT film bolometers and their single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) counterparts. The intrinsic noise level in the former has been found at least two orders of magnitude lower than that in the latter, which outweighs the moderately lower TCR absolute values in the former and results in higher bolometer detectivity in MWCNT bolometers. Interestingly, reduced noise and enhanced TCR can be obtained by improving the inter-tube coupling using thermal annealing in both SWCNT and MWCNT films, suggesting much higher detectivity may be achieved via engineering the inter-tube coupling. PMID:21576772

  5. Real-time Monitoring of Internal Temperature and Voltage of High-temperature Fuel Cell Stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonuniform local temperature and voltage in the chemical reaction process of high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) stack can affect the reaction of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and the performance and life of fuel cell stack. The effectiveness and internal information of fuel cell stack can be discussed by using external measurement, invasive, theoretical modeling, and single temperature, or voltage measurement. But there are some problems, such as mm scale sensor, inaccurate measurement, influencing the fuel cell stack performance, and failing to know internal actual reactive state instantly. This study uses micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology to develop a new generation flexible micro temperature and voltage sensors applicable to high-temperature electrochemical environment. Micro sensors have embedded in the cathode channel plate of HT-PEMFC stack. At the operating temperature of 170 °C and constant current (2, 10, 20 A), the curvilinear trends of local temperature and voltage inside the fuel cell stack measured by flexible micro sensors are consistent, proving the reliability of micro sensors. The test result also shows that the heat distribution in the fuel cell stack is nonuniform

  6. Development of a noise-based method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) is an important safety parameter of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). In most countries, the so-called at-power MTC has to be measured a few months before the reactor outage, in order to determine if the MTC will not become too negative. Usually, the at-power MTC is determined by inducing a change in the moderator temperature, which has to be compensated for by other means, such as a change in the boron concentration. An MTC measurement using the boron dilution method is analysed in this thesis. It is demonstrated that the uncertainty of such a measurement technique is so large, that the measured MTC could become more negative than what the Technical Specifications allow. Furthermore, this technique incurs a disturbance of the plant operation. For this reason, another technique relying on noise analysis was proposed a few years ago. In this technique, the MTC is inferred from the neutron noise measured inside the core and the moderator temperature noise measured at the core-exit, in the same or in a neighbouring fuel assembly. This technique does not require any perturbation of the reactor operation, but was nevertheless proven to underestimate the MTC by a factor of 2 to 5. In this thesis, it is shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that the reason of the MTC underestimation by noise analysis is the radially loosely coupled character of the moderator temperature noise throughout the core. A new MTC noise estimator, accounting for this radially non-homogeneous moderator temperature noise is proposed and demonstrated to give the correct MTC value. This new MTC noise estimator relies on the neutron noise measured in a single point of the reactor and the radially averaged moderator temperature noise measured inside the core. In the case of the Ringhals-2 PWR in Sweden, Gamma-Thermometers (GTs) offer such a possibility since in dynamic mode they measure the moderator temperature noise, whereas in static

  7. InGaN High Temperature Photovoltaic Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this Phase II project are to develop InGaN photovoltaic cells for high temperature and/or high radiation environments to TRL 4 and to define the...

  8. InGaN High Temperature Photovoltaic Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I project is to demonstrate InGaN materials are appropriate for high operating temperature single junction solar cells. Single junction...

  9. Materials for Intermediate-Temperature Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, John A.; Burriel, Mónica

    2014-07-01

    Solid-oxide fuel cells are devices for the efficient conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy and heat. Research efforts are currently addressed toward the optimization of cells operating at temperatures in the region of 600°C, known as intermediate-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells, for which materials requirements are very stringent. In addition to the requirements of mechanical and chemical compatibility, the materials must show a high degree of oxide ion mobility and electrochemical activity at this low temperature. Here we mainly examine the criteria for the development of two key components of intermediate-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells: the electrolyte and the cathode. We limit the discussion to novel approaches to materials optimization and focus on the fluorite oxide for electrolytes, principally those based on ceria and zirconia, and on perovskites and perovskite-related families in the case of cathodes.

  10. Novel High Temperature Membrane for PEM Fuel Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed in this STTR program is a high temperature membrane to increase the efficiency and power density of PEM fuel cells. The NASA application is...

  11. Design of high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells. (Spent fuel inspection cells) in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ino, Hiroichi; Ueta, Shouhei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sawa, Kazuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tobita, Tsutomu [Nuclear Engineering Company, Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes design requirements and design results for shields, ventilation system and fuel handling devices for the high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells (spent fuel inspection cells). These cells are small cells to carry out few post-irradiation examinations of spent fuels, specimen, etc., which are irradiated in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, since the cells should be built in limited space in the HTTR reactor building, the cells are designed considering relationship between the cells and the reactor building to utilize the limited space effectively. The cells consist of three partitioned hot cells with wall for neutron and gamma-ray shields, ventilation system including filtering units and fuel handling devices. The post-irradiation examinations of the fuels and materials are planed by using the cells and the Hot Laboratory of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor to establish the technology basis on high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). In future, irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations will be carried out with the cells to upgrade present HTGR technologies and to make the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  12. Design of high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells. (Spent fuel inspection cells) in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes design requirements and design results for shields, ventilation system and fuel handling devices for the high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells (spent fuel inspection cells). These cells are small cells to carry out few post-irradiation examinations of spent fuels, specimen, etc., which are irradiated in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, since the cells should be built in limited space in the HTTR reactor building, the cells are designed considering relationship between the cells and the reactor building to utilize the limited space effectively. The cells consist of three partitioned hot cells with wall for neutron and gamma-ray shields, ventilation system including filtering units and fuel handling devices. The post-irradiation examinations of the fuels and materials are planed by using the cells and the Hot Laboratory of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor to establish the technology basis on high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). In future, irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations will be carried out with the cells to upgrade present HTGR technologies and to make the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  13. Quantum fluctuations of mesoscopic biological cell at finite temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-qi; XU Xing-lei

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of the quantization of mesoscopic biological cell equivalent circuit,we studied the quantum fluctuations of voltage and current of mesoscopic biological cell equivalent circuit as finite temperature by Bogoliuov transformation.The result shows that the quantum fluctuations of voltage and current not only relate with the parameters of equivalent circuit,temperature,but also decay with time.This result may have significant value on the design and application of the bio-electronic apparatus.

  14. Microstructure and temperature coefficient of resistance of thin cermet resistor films deposited from CrSi2-Cr-SiC targets by S-gun magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technological solutions for producing nanoscale cermet resistor films with sheet resistances above 1000 Ω/□ and low temperature coefficients of resistance (TCR) have been investigated. 2-40 nm thick cermet films were sputter deposited from CrSi2-Cr-SiC targets by a dual cathode dc S-gun magnetron. In addition to studying film resistance versus temperature, the nanofilm structural features and composition were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. This study has revealed that all cermet resistor films deposited at ambient and elevated temperatures were amorphous. The atomic ratio of Si to Cr in these films was about 2 to 1. The film TCR displayed a significant increase when the deposited film thickness was reduced below 2.5 nm. An optimized sputter process consisting of wafer degassing, cermet film deposition at elevated temperature with rf substrate bias, and a double annealing in vacuum, consisting of in situ annealing following the film sputtering and an additional annealing following the exposure of the wafers to air, has been found to be very effective for the film thermal stabilization and for fine tuning the film TCR. Cermet films with thicknesses in the range of 2.5-4 nm deposited using this technique had sheet resistances ranging from 1800 to 1200 Ω/□ and TCR values from -50 ppm/ deg. C to near zero, respectively. A possible mechanism responsible for the high efficiency of annealing the cermet films in vacuum (after preliminary exposure to air), resulting in resistance stabilization and TCR reduction, is also discussed.

  15. Temperature-dependent imaging of living cells by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of lateral organization of plasma membranes is a prerequisite to the understanding of membrane structure-function relationships in living cells. Lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions are responsible for the existence of various membrane microdomains involved in cell signalization and in numerous pathologies. Developing approaches for characterizing microdomains associate identification tools like recognition imaging with high-resolution topographical imaging. Membrane properties are markedly dependent on temperature. However, mesoscopic scale topographical information of cell surface in a temperature range covering most of cell biology experimentation is still lacking. In this work we have examined the possibility of imaging the temperature-dependent behavior of eukaryotic cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results establish that the surface of living CV1 kidney cells can be imaged by AFM, between 5 and 37 deg. C, both in contact and tapping modes. These first temperature-dependent data show that large cell structures appeared essentially stable at a microscopic scale. On the other hand, as shown by contact mode AFM, the surface was highly dynamic at a mesoscopic scale, with marked changes in apparent topography, friction, and deflection signals. When keeping the scanning conditions constant, a progressive loss in the image contrast was however observed, using tapping mode, on decreasing the temperature

  16. Solar cell junction temperature measurement of PV module

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, B.J.

    2011-02-01

    The present study develops a simple non-destructive method to measure the solar cell junction temperature of PV module. The PV module was put in the environmental chamber with precise temperature control to keep the solar PV module as well as the cell junction in thermal equilibrium with the chamber. The open-circuit voltage of PV module Voc is then measured using a short pulse of solar irradiation provided by a solar simulator. Repeating the measurements at different environment temperature (40-80°C) and solar irradiation S (200-1000W/m2), the correlation between the open-circuit voltage Voc, the junction temperature Tj, and solar irradiation S is derived.The fundamental correlation of the PV module is utilized for on-site monitoring of solar cell junction temperature using the measured Voc and S at a short time instant with open circuit. The junction temperature Tj is then determined using the measured S and Voc through the fundamental correlation. The outdoor test results show that the junction temperature measured using the present method, Tjo, is more accurate. The maximum error using the average surface temperature Tave as the junction temperature is 4.8 °C underestimation; while the maximum error using the present method is 1.3 °C underestimation. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Liquid Viscosity Coefficient Measured by Rising-Ball Method at Different Temperatures%升球法测量变温液体粘滞系数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐磊; 母自豪; 勾文哲; 解玉鹏

    2016-01-01

    将传统落球法测定液体粘滞系数改为升球法进行试验,很好地控制小球上升匀速段,提高精度;同时配以激光光电计时器计时,使测量结果更加精准。另外,本套装置中配设水循环系统,室温和变温下的液体粘滞系数均可测量。%We had been used rising-ball method instead of the traditional falling-ball method, which can control the ball rising at a constant speed to increase the measuring accuracy.Moreover,Laser photoelectric tim-er was used to record time to make the measurement more accurate.In addition,this device had water circula-tion system,which can be used to measure liquid viscosity coefficient at room temperature and variable temper-ature.

  18. Intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a graded quantum well under intense laser field: Effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature and electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungan, F., E-mail: fungan@cumhuriyet.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Restrepo, R.L. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Escuela de Ingeniería de Antioquia AA 7516, Medellín (Colombia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Ave. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Morales, A.L.; Duque, C.A. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2014-02-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and electric field on the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes associated with intersubband transition in a typical GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As graded quantum well under intense laser field have been investigated theoretically. The electron energy eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions of the graded quantum well are calculated within the effective mass approximation and envelope wave function approach. The analytical expressions of the optical properties are obtained using the compact density-matrix approach and the iterative method. The numerical results show that the linear and nonlinear optical properties depend strongly on the intense laser field and electric field but weakly on the hydrostatic pressure and temperature. Additionally, it has been found that the electronic and optical properties in a GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As graded quantum well under the intense laser field can be tuned by changing these external inputs. Thus, these results give a new degree of freedom in the devices applications.

  19. Experimental determination of the Rashba coefficient in InSb/InAlSb quantum wells at zero magnetic field and elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leontiadou, M A; Litvinenko, K L; Murdin, B N; Clowes, S K [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gilbertson, A M; Branford, W R; Cohen, L F [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Pidgeon, C R [Department of Physics, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Fearn, M; Ashley, T; Emeny, M T, E-mail: s.clowes@surrey.ac.uk [QinetiQ Ltd, St Andrews Road, Malvern WR14 3PS (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-26

    We report the optical measurement of the spin dynamics at elevated temperatures and in zero magnetic field for two types of degenerately doped n-InSb quantum wells (QWs), one asymmetric (sample A) and one symmetric (sample B) with regards to the electrostatic potential across the QW. Making use of three directly determined experimental parameters: the spin lifetime, {tau}{sub s}, the sheet carrier concentration, n, and the electron mobility, {mu}, we directly extract the zero-field spin splitting. For the asymmetric sample where the Rashba interaction is the dominant source of spin splitting, we deduce a room temperature Rashba parameter of {alpha} = 0.09 {+-} 0.1 eV A which is in good agreement with calculations and we estimate the Rashba coefficient {alpha}{sub 0} (a figure of merit for the ease with which electron spins can be modulated via an electric field). We review the merits/limitations of this approach and the implications of our findings for spintronic devices.

  20. Effects of electron irradiation and temperature on 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletta, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    One OHM-cm and 10 OHM-cm silicon solar cells were exposed to 1.0 MeV electrons at a fixed flux of 10 to the 11th power e/sq cm/sec and fluences of 10 to the 13th power, 10 to the 14th power and 10 to the 15th power e/sq.cm. 1-V curves of the cells were made at room temperature, - 63 C and + or - 143 C after each irradiation. A value of 139.5 mw/sq cm was used as AMO incident energy rate per unit area. The 10 OHM-cm cells appear more efficient than 1 OHM-cm cells after exposure to a fluence greater than 10 to the 14th power e/sq cm. The 1.0 MeV electron damage coefficients for both 1 OHM-cm and 10 OHM-cm cells are somewhat less than those for previously irradiated cells at room temperature. The values of the damage coefficients increase as the cell temperatures decrease. Efficiencies pertaining to maximum power output are about the same as those of n on p silicon cells evaluated previously.

  1. Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

  2. Diffusion length variation and proton damage coefficients for InP/In(x)Ga(1-x)As/GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of lighter, mechanically strong and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5 and 3 MeV proton irradiations are explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence is calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient K(L) is plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  3. Correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient value and pathological grading in pT1b clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation of ADC values on 3.0 T MR with the pathological grades in pT1b clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC). Methods: Conventional MR images, ADC values and Fuhrman pathological grading of pT1b CCRCC were performed in 30 patients. Grade Ⅰ and Ⅱ were defined as low-grade group; grade Ⅲ and Ⅳ were defined as high-grade group. The differences of ADC values among four different pathologic grades were compared with a one-way analysis of variance. The comparison of ADC values of two different grade groups was performed with t test, and the ROC curve was performed to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of ADC value. Correlation between pathological grading and ADC values was assessed with Spearman rank correlation analysis. Results: (1) The mean ADC value of grading Ⅰ (10 patients), Ⅱ (8 patients), Ⅲ (7 patients), Ⅳ (5 patients) was (0.94 ± 0.11) ×10-3 mm2/s, (0.82 ±0.13) × 10-3 mm2/s,(0.68 ±0.09) × 10-3 mm2/s, (0.59 ±0.03) × 10-3 mm2/s, respectively. Significant differences of ADC values among the four grades were present (F=16.422, P=0.000). (2) The mean ADC value of the low-grade group was significantly higher than that of the high-grade group (t=5.738, P=0.000). Sensitivity and specificity of diagnosing the low-grade group was 88.9% and 83.3% respectively. There was a negative correlation between pathological grading and ADC value (r=-0.807, P<0.05). Conclusions: The ADC values of pT1b CCRCC have close correlation with pathological grading. They can be used to predict the degree of tumor malignancy preoperatively and guide surgical planning. (authors)

  4. Comparison of Fuel Temperature Coefficients of PWR UO{sub 2} Fuel from Monte Carlo Codes (MCNP6.1 and KENO6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-O; Roh, Gyuhong; Lee, Byungchul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As a result, there was a difference within about 300-400 pcm between keff values at each enrichment due to the difference of codes and nuclear data used in the evaluations. The FTC was changed to be less negative with the increase of uranium enrichment, and it followed the form of asymptotic curve. However, it is necessary to perform additional study for investigating what factor causes the differences more than two standard deviation (2σ) among the FTCs at partial enrichment region. The interaction probability of incident neutron with nuclear fuel is depended on the relative velocity between the neutron and the target nuclei. The Fuel Temperature Coefficient (FTC) is defined as the change of Doppler effect with respect to the change in fuel temperature without any other change such as moderator temperature, moderator density, etc. In this study, the FTCs for UO{sub 2} fuel were evaluated by using MCNP6.1 and KENO6 codes based on a Monte Carlo method. In addition, the latest neutron cross-sections (ENDF/B-VI and VII) were applied to analyze the effect of these data on the evaluation of FTC, and nuclear data used in MCNP calculations were generated from the makxsf code. An evaluation of the Doppler effect and FTC for UO{sub 2} fuel widely used in PWR was conducted using MCNP6.1 and KENO6 codes. The ENDF/B-VI and VII were also applied to analyze what effect these data has on those evaluations. All cross-sections needed for MCNP calculation were produced using makxsf code. The calculation models used in the evaluations were based on the typical PWR UO{sub 2} lattice.

  5. Influence of Zirconium Addition on Magnetic Properties and Temperature Coefficient for Nanocomposite Nd10Fe78.5-xCo5ZrxB6.5 Magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shiyan; Xu Hui; Tan Xiaohua; Ni Jiansen; Dong Yuanda

    2007-01-01

    The influence of Zr addition on magnetic properties and temperature coefficient for nanocomposite Nd10Fe78.5-xCO5ZrxB6.5 (x=0~4) bonded magnets was investigated. It was found that the room-temperature magnetic properties were remarkably improved with Zr addition due to the grain refinement and increasing volume fraction of the hard magnetic phase. The optimal magnetic properties of Jr=0.689T, iHc=769.4kA·m-1 and (BH)max=84kJ·m-3 were obtained for 2.5% Zr addition. The temperature coefficient of remanence (α) increases slightly and the temperature coefficient of coercivity (β) decreases obviously with increasing Zr content for nanocomposite Nd10Fe78.5-xCo5ZrxB6.5 (x=0~4) bonded magnets.

  6. The dew point temperature as a criterion for optimizing the operating conditions of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    be predicted a priori with the aid of these diagrams. Finally, guidelines for the desired cell operating temperature based on the expected dew point temperatures are developed. In the current work these guidelines are limited to the interdigitated flow field design, and they are likely to be different...... of the operating pressure, the stoichiometric flow ratios and the net drag coefficient of water through the membrane. Then, computational modeling results obtained with a previously published model are analyzed and compared with the dew point charts, and it is demonstrated how cell flooding or membrane dry-out can...

  7. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  8. Operating Cell Temperature Determination in Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two procedures (simplified and complete) to determine me operating cell temperature in photovoltaic modules operating in real conditions assuming isothermal stationary modules are presented in this work. Some examples are included that show me dependence of this temperature on several environmental (sky, ground and ambient temperatures, solar irradiance, wind speed, etc.) and structural (module geometry and size, encapsulating materials, anti reflexive optical coatings, etc.) factors and also on electrical module performance. In a further step temperature profiles for non-isothermal modules are analysed besides transitory effects due to variable irradiance and wind gusts. (Author) 27 refs

  9. 一种低温度系数带隙基准源设计%Design of Low Temperature Coefficient Bandgap Reference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马哲; 王沦

    2015-01-01

    The effect,caused by the input offset of the operational amplifier,can be reduced by the utilization of two bipolar in series in bandgap references.But in CMOS process,the forward beta is so small that the current of base has a significant effect on the collector current,which leads to a large drift for the reference voltage.To solve this problem,a base current compensating technique is proposed in a low temperature coefficient bandgap reference.The circuit adopts TSMC 0.25μm process,the simulation results show that the temperature coefficient is 8.44ppm/℃,the reference drift 1.85mV within -55℃ to 125℃.The current of the power only increases 0.5 μA after adopting base current compensation circuit.%采用两个三级管基极-发射极串联的带隙基准可以降低运放失调电压的影响,但是在CMOS 工艺中,三级管的正向电流放大倍数β很小,导致三极管基极电流的分流会对发射极电流产生很大影响,带隙基准输出存在较大温漂。为了解决这个问题,提出了一种带基极电流补偿的低温度系数带隙基准源电路。电路设计采用 TSMC 0.25μm 工艺,经过 spectre 仿真验证,进行-55℃-125℃的温区扫描,基准随温度变化范围为1.85mV,相应的温漂系数为8.44ppm /℃,加入基极电流补偿电路后电源电流只增加了0.5μA。

  10. Electrical transport and temperature coefficient of resistance in polycrystalline La0.7−xAgxCa0.3MnO3 pellets: Analysis in terms of a phase coexistence transport model and phase separation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependent resistivity and temperature coefficient of resistance of Ag doped La0.7−xAgxCa0.3MnO3 polycrystalline pellets (x=0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20) are investigated. Ag substitution enhances the conductivity of this system. The Curie temperature also increases from 260 to 283 K with increasing Ag content. Using phase-coexistence transport model and phase separation model, we calculated the resistivity as a function of temperature and the temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) behavior. Comparing the calculated maximum TCR, we found that it is related to activation energy, transition temperature, and disorder in doped manganites. The relationship between the proposed TCR behavior and the transport parameters can suggest conditions improving TCRmax of doped manganites for the use of the bolometric infrared detectors

  11. A cell-permeable fluorescent polymeric thermometer for intracellular temperature mapping in mammalian cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruyuki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Changes in intracellular temperatures reflect the activity of the cell. Thus, the tool to measure intracellular temperatures could provide valuable information about cellular status. We previously reported a method to analyze the intracellular temperature distribution using a fluorescent polymeric thermometer (FPT in combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM. Intracellular delivery of the FPT used in the previous study required microinjection. We now report a novel FPT that is cell permeable and highly photostable, and we describe the application of this FPT to the imaging of intracellular temperature distributions in various types of mammalian cell lines. This cell-permeable FPT displayed a temperature resolution of 0.05°C to 0.54°C within the range from 28°C to 38°C in HeLa cell extracts. Using our optimized protocol, this cell-permeable FPT spontaneously diffused into HeLa cells within 10 min of incubation and exhibited minimal toxicity over several hours of observation. FLIM analysis confirmed a temperature difference between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and heat production near the mitochondria, which were also detected previously using the microinjected FPT. We also showed that this cell-permeable FPT protocol can be applied to other mammalian cell lines, COS7 and NIH/3T3 cells. Thus, this cell-permeable FPT represents a promising tool to study cellular states and functions with respect to temperature.

  12. A cell-permeable fluorescent polymeric thermometer for intracellular temperature mapping in mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Teruyuki; Fukuda, Nanaho; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Inada, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    Changes in intracellular temperatures reflect the activity of the cell. Thus, the tool to measure intracellular temperatures could provide valuable information about cellular status. We previously reported a method to analyze the intracellular temperature distribution using a fluorescent polymeric thermometer (FPT) in combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Intracellular delivery of the FPT used in the previous study required microinjection. We now report a novel FPT that is cell permeable and highly photostable, and we describe the application of this FPT to the imaging of intracellular temperature distributions in various types of mammalian cell lines. This cell-permeable FPT displayed a temperature resolution of 0.05°C to 0.54°C within the range from 28°C to 38°C in HeLa cell extracts. Using our optimized protocol, this cell-permeable FPT spontaneously diffused into HeLa cells within 10 min of incubation and exhibited minimal toxicity over several hours of observation. FLIM analysis confirmed a temperature difference between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and heat production near the mitochondria, which were also detected previously using the microinjected FPT. We also showed that this cell-permeable FPT protocol can be applied to other mammalian cell lines, COS7 and NIH/3T3 cells. Thus, this cell-permeable FPT represents a promising tool to study cellular states and functions with respect to temperature.

  13. Initial Experience of 3-Tesla Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values in Characterizing Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: With the increased clinical use of 3-Tesla (3T) magnets, it becomes important to identify the potential applications of advanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging in head and neck pathologies. Purpose: To establish the 3T apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for normal neck structures, and to examine the utility of ADC values in distinguishing head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) from normal neck anatomy. Material and Methods: 3T diffusion-weighted imaging was performed on 10 normal volunteers and 10 patients with known HNSCC. In the volunteers, mean ADC was calculated in the parotid gland, submandibular gland, base of the tongue, pterygoid muscle, masseter muscle, paraspinal muscles, true vocal cord, thyroid gland, thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage, and lymph nodes. The mean tumor ADC value was calculated from the 10 patients with HNSCC and compared with the normal ADC values from various neck structures. Results: The mean ADC value measured in the HNSCC was 1.101 (±0.214)x10-3mm2/s. This was significantly lower than ADC values of paraspinal muscles, pterygoid muscle, masseter muscle, thyroid gland, and base of the tongue (P=0.0006, 0.0002, 0.0001, 0.001, and 0.002, respectively). The tumor ADC values were not significantly different from ADC values of parotid and submandibular glands (P=0.057 and 0.14, respectively). Conclusion: 3T ADC values show potential for distinguishing HNSCC from normal extracranial head and neck structures

  14. Temperature dependent electroreflectance study of CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raadik, T., E-mail: taavi.raadik@ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Krustok, J.; Josepson, R.; Hiie, J. [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Potlog, T.; Spalatu, N. [Moldova State University, A. Mateevici str. 60, MD-2009 Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium telluride is a promising material for large scale photovoltaic applications. In this paper we study CdS/CdTe heterojunction solar cells with electroreflectance spectroscopy. Both CdS and CdTe layers in solar cells were grown sequentially without intermediate processing by the close-space sublimation method. Electroreflectance measurements were performed in the temperature range of T = 100–300 K. Two solar cells were investigated with conversion efficiencies of 4.1% and 9.6%. The main focus in this work was to study the temperature dependent behavior of the broadening parameter and the bandgap energy of CdTe thin film in solar cells. Room temperature bandgap values of CdTe were E{sub g} = 1.499 eV and E{sub g} = 1.481 eV for higher and lower efficiency solar cells, respectively. Measured bandgap energies are lower than for single crystal CdTe. The formation of CdTe{sub 1−x}S{sub x} solid solution layer on the surface of CdTe is proposed as a possible cause of lower bandgap energies. - Highlights: ► Temperature dependent electroreflectance measurements of CdS/CdTe solar cells ► Investigation of junction properties between CdS and CdTe ► Formation of CdTe{sub 1−} {sub x}S{sub x} solid solution layer in the junction area.

  15. Temperature dependent electroreflectance study of CdTe solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium telluride is a promising material for large scale photovoltaic applications. In this paper we study CdS/CdTe heterojunction solar cells with electroreflectance spectroscopy. Both CdS and CdTe layers in solar cells were grown sequentially without intermediate processing by the close-space sublimation method. Electroreflectance measurements were performed in the temperature range of T = 100–300 K. Two solar cells were investigated with conversion efficiencies of 4.1% and 9.6%. The main focus in this work was to study the temperature dependent behavior of the broadening parameter and the bandgap energy of CdTe thin film in solar cells. Room temperature bandgap values of CdTe were Eg = 1.499 eV and Eg = 1.481 eV for higher and lower efficiency solar cells, respectively. Measured bandgap energies are lower than for single crystal CdTe. The formation of CdTe1−xSx solid solution layer on the surface of CdTe is proposed as a possible cause of lower bandgap energies. - Highlights: ► Temperature dependent electroreflectance measurements of CdS/CdTe solar cells ► Investigation of junction properties between CdS and CdTe ► Formation of CdTe1− xSx solid solution layer in the junction area

  16. Changes in the chemical properties and swelling coefficient of alfalfa root cell walls in the presence of toluene as a toxic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, M; Khoshgoftarmanesh, A H; Hadadzadeh, H

    2016-04-01

    The influence of toluene pollution on the chemical properties and swelling coefficient of root cell walls in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was investigated. Two sets of alfalfa seedlings were selected and one set was treated with 450 mg L(-1) toluene in the nutrient solution under hydroponic culture. Thirty days after treatment with toluene, alfalfa plants were harvested and the root cell walls were isolated. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was carried out for the characterization of the root cell walls composition. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the swelling coefficient of the root cell walls (Kcw) were estimated at various pH values. The toluene contamination significantly reduced the mass of the cell wall material in the alfalfa roots. According to the FTIR spectra, the toluene pollution can change the alfalfa root cell wall properties by reducing the cell wall functional groups. These functional groups are probably related to the proteins and polysaccharides in the cell wall. Also, toluene pollution strongly reduced CEC and Kcw of the root cell walls. The results show that the decrease in the active sites of adsorption on the root cell walls as a response to toluene pollution can affect the water flow rate and the mineral nutrients uptake by roots. PMID:26728292

  17. Chromium–niobium co-doped vanadium dioxide films: Large temperature coefficient of resistance and practically no thermal hysteresis of the metal–insulator transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Miyazaki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of chromium (Cr and niobium (Nb co-doping on the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR and the thermal hysteresis of the metal–insulator transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2 films. We determined the TCR and thermal-hysteresis-width diagram of the V1−x−yCrxNbyO2 films by electrical-transport measurements and we found that the doping conditions x ≳ y and x + y ≥ 0.1 are appropriate for simultaneously realizing a large TCR value and an absence of thermal hysteresis in the films. By using these findings, we developed a V0.90Cr0.06Nb0.04O2 film grown on a TiO2-buffered SiO2/Si substrate that showed practically no thermal hysteresis while retaining a large TCR of 11.9%/K. This study has potential applications in the development of VO2-based uncooled bolometers.

  18. A full-dimensional model of ozone forming reaction: the absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplukhin, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-07-28

    Rigorous calculations of scattering resonances in ozone are carried out for a broad range of rotational excitations. The accurate potential energy surface of Dawes is adopted, and a new efficient method for calculations of ro-vibrational energies, wave functions and resonance lifetimes is employed (which uses hyper-spherical coordinates, the sequential diagonalization/truncation approach, grid optimization and complex absorbing potential). A detailed analysis is carried out to characterize distributions of resonance energies and lifetimes, their rotational/vibrational content and their positions with respect to the centrifugal barrier. Emphasis is on the contribution of these resonances to the recombination process that forms ozone. It is found that major contributions come from localized resonances at energies near the top of the barrier. Delocalized resonances at higher energies should also be taken into account, while very narrow resonances at low energies (trapped far behind the centrifugal barrier) should be treated as bound states. The absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies are obtained using the energy-transfer model developed in the earlier work. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained if one follows the suggestion of Troe, who argued that the energy transfer mechanism of recombination is responsible only for 55% of the recombination rate (with the remaining 45% coming from the competing chaperon mechanism). PMID:27364351

  19. InGaN High-Temperature Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikov, David

    2015-01-01

    This Phase II project developed Indium-Gallium-Nitride (InGaN) photovoltaic cells for high-temperature and high-radiation environments. The project included theoretical and experimental refinement of device structures produced in Phase I as well as modeling and optimization of solar cell device processing. The devices have been tested under concentrated air mass zero (AM0) sunlight, at temperatures from 100 degC to 250 degC, and after exposure to ionizing radiation. The results are expected to further verify that InGaN can be used for high-temperature and high-radiation solar cells. The large commercial solar cell market could benefit from the hybridization of InGaN materials to existing solar cell technology, which would significantly increase cell efficiency without relying on highly toxic compounds. In addition, further development of this technology to even lower bandgap materials for space applications would extend lifetimes of satellite solar cell arrays due to increased radiation hardness. This could be of importance to the Departmentof Defense (DoD) and commercial satellite manufacturers.

  20. In-cell measurements of smoke backscattering coefficients using a CO2 laser system for application to lidar-dial forest fire detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellecci, Carlo; Gaudio, Pasquale; Gelfusa, Michela; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Murari, Andrea; Richetta, Maria; de Leo, Leonerdo

    2010-12-01

    In the lidar-dial method, the amount of the water vapor present in the smoke of the vegetable fuel is detected to reduce the number of false alarms. We report the measurements of the smoke backscattering coefficients for the CO2 laser lines 10R20 and 10R18 as determined in an absorption cell for two different vegetable fuels (eucalyptus and conifer). These experimental backscattering coefficients enable us to determine the error to be associated to the water vapor measurements when the traditional first-order approximation is assumed. We find that this first-order approximation is valid for combustion rates as low as 100 g/s.

  1. Dynamic Model of the High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    The present work involves the development of a model for predicting the dynamic temperature of a high temperature proton exchange membrane (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. The model is developed to test different thermal control strategies before implementing them in the actual system. The test system...... is managed by running the stack at a high stoichiometric air flow. This is possible because of the polybenzimidazole (PBI) fuel cell membranes used and the very low pressure drop in the stack. The model consists of a discrete thermal model dividing the stack into three parts: inlet, middle, and end...

  2. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Systems, Control and Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Justesen, Kristian Kjær;

    2015-01-01

    Various system topologies are available when it comes to designing high temperature PEM fuel cell systems. Very simple system designs are possible using pure hydrogen, and more complex system designs present themselves when alternative fuels are desired, using reformer systems. The use of reformed...... fuels utilizes one of the main advantages of the high temperature PEM fuel cell: robustness to fuel quality and impurities. In order for such systems to provide efficient, robust, and reliable energy, proper control strategies are needed. The complexity and nonlinearity of many of the components...

  3. Status and prospects of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bangwu Liu; Yue Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Compared with conventional electric power generation systems, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has many advantages because of its unique features. High temperature SOFC has been successfully developed to its commercial applications, but it still faces many problems which hamper large-scale commercial applications of SOFC. To reduce the cost of SOFC, intermediate tem-perature solid oxide fuel cell (IT-SOFC) is presently under rapid development. The status of IT-SOFC was reviewed with emphasis on discussion of their component materials.

  4. Strategies for Lowering Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tarancón

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Lowering the operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs to the intermediate range (500–700 ºC has become one of the main SOFC research goals. High operating temperatures put numerous requirements on materials selection and on secondary units, limiting the commercial development of SOFCs. The present review first focuses on the main effects of reducing the operating temperature in terms of materials stability, thermo-mechanical mismatch, thermal management and efficiency. After a brief survey of the state-of-the-art materials for SOFCs, attention is focused on emerging oxide-ionic conductors with high conductivity in the intermediate range of temperatures with an introductory section on materials technology for reducing the electrolyte thickness. Finally, recent advances in cathode materials based on layered mixed ionic-electronic conductors are highlighted because the decreasing temperature converts the cathode into the major source of electrical losses for the whole SOFC system. It is concluded that the introduction of alternative materials that would enable solid oxide fuel cells to operate in the intermediate range of temperatures would have a major impact on the commercialization of fuel cell technology.

  5. Direct dimethyl ether high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng;

    A high temperature polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer fuel cell was fed with dimethyl ether (DME) and water vapour mixture on the anode at ambient pressure with air as oxidant. A peak power density of 79 mW/cm2 was achieved at 200°C. A conventional polymer based direct DME fuel cell is liquid fed......V higher than that of methanol, indicating less fuel crossover....

  6. New polymer electrolytes for low temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundholm, F.; Elomaa, M.; Ennari, J.; Hietala, S.; Paronen, M. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland). Lab. of Polymer Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    Proton conducting polymer membranes for demanding applications, such as low temperature fuel cells, have been synthesised and characterised. Pre-irradiation methods are used to introduce sulfonic acid groups, directly or using polystyrene grafting, in stable, preformed polymer films. The membranes produced in this work show promise for the development of cost-effective, highly conducting membranes. (orig.)

  7. Advanced energy analysis of high temperature fuel cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the performance of high temperature fuel cell systems is studied using a new method of exergy analysis. The thesis consists of three parts: ⢠In the first part a new analysis method is developed, which not only considers the total exergy losses in a unit operation, but which distingu

  8. Lowering the temperature of solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsman, Eric D; Lee, Kang Taek

    2011-11-18

    Fuel cells are uniquely capable of overcoming combustion efficiency limitations (e.g., the Carnot cycle). However, the linking of fuel cells (an energy conversion device) and hydrogen (an energy carrier) has emphasized investment in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells as part of a larger hydrogen economy and thus relegated fuel cells to a future technology. In contrast, solid oxide fuel cells are capable of operating on conventional fuels (as well as hydrogen) today. The main issue for solid oxide fuel cells is high operating temperature (about 800°C) and the resulting materials and cost limitations and operating complexities (e.g., thermal cycling). Recent solid oxide fuel cells results have demonstrated extremely high power densities of about 2 watts per square centimeter at 650°C along with flexible fueling, thus enabling higher efficiency within the current fuel infrastructure. Newly developed, high-conductivity electrolytes and nanostructured electrode designs provide a path for further performance improvement at much lower temperatures, down to ~350°C, thus providing opportunity to transform the way we convert and store energy.

  9. Note: A variable temperature cell for spectroscopy of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock-Nannestad, T.; Nielsen, C. B.; Bak, H. Ø.; Pittelkow, M.

    2013-04-01

    We report the design and construction of a cell that enables precisely controlled measurement of UV/Vis spectra of thin films on transparent substrates at temperatures up to 800 K. The dimensions of the setup are accommodated by a standard Varian Cary 5E spectrophotometer allowing for widespread use in standard laboratory settings. The cell also fits in a Bio-Rad IR-spectrometer. The cell is constructed with an outer water cooled heat shield of aluminum and an inner sample holder with heating element, thermo-resistor and windows, made from nickel coated copper. The cell can operate both in air, and with an inert gas filling. We illustrate the utility of the cell by characterization of three commercially available near infrared absorbers that are commonly used for laser welding of plastics and are known to possess high thermal stability.

  10. High-Temperature Oxidation-Resistant and Low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion NiAl-Base Bond Coat Developed for a Turbine Blade Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Many critical gas turbine engine components are currently made from Ni-base superalloys that are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC). The TBC consists of a ZrO2-based top coat and a bond coat that is used to enhance the bonding between the superalloy substrate and the top coat. MCrAlY alloys (CoCrAlY and NiCrAlY) are currently used as bond coats and are chosen for their very good oxidation resistance. TBC life is frequently limited by the oxidation resistance of the bond coat, along with a thermal expansion mismatch between the metallic bond coat and the ceramic top coat. The aim of this investigation at the NASA Glenn Research Center was to develop a new longer life, higher temperature bond coat by improving both the oxidation resistance and the thermal expansion characteristics of the bond coat. Nickel aluminide (NiAl) has excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance and can sustain a protective Al2O3 scale to longer times and higher temperatures in comparison to MCrAlY alloys. Cryomilling of NiAl results in aluminum nitride (AlN) formation that reduces the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the alloy and enhances creep strength. Thus, additions of cryomilled NiAl-AlN to CoCrAlY were examined as a potential bond coat. In this work, the composite alloy was investigated as a stand-alone substrate to demonstrate its feasibility prior to actual use as a coating. About 85 percent of prealloyed NiAl and 15 percent of standard commercial CoCrAlY alloys were mixed and cryomilled in an attritor with stainless steel balls used as grinding media. The milling was carried out in the presence of liquid nitrogen. The milled powder was consolidated by hot extrusion or by hot isostatic pressing. From the consolidated material, oxidation coupons, four-point bend, CTE, and tensile specimens were machined. The CTE measurements were made between room temperature and 1000 C in an argon atmosphere. It is shown that the CTE of the NiAl-AlN-CoCrAlY composite bond coat

  11. Advanced anodes for high-temperature fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, A.; Barnett, S.; Gorte, R.J.;

    2004-01-01

    Fuel cells will undoubtedly find widespread use in this new millennium in the conversion of chemical to electrical energy, as they offer very high efficiencies and have unique scalability in electricity-generation applications. The solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is one of the most exciting...... of these energy technologies; it is an all-ceramic device that operates at temperatures in the range 500-1,000degreesC. The SOFC offers certain advantages over lower temperature fuel cells, notably its ability to use carbon monoxide as a fuel rather than being poisoned by it, and the availability of high......-grade exhaust heat for combined heat and power, or combined cycle gas-turbine applications. Although cost is clearly the most important barrier to widespread SOFC implementation, perhaps the most important technical barriers currently being addressed relate to the electrodes, particularly the fuel electrode...

  12. Localized subcritical convective cells in temperature-dependent viscosity fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatov, V. S.

    2012-06-01

    Numerical simulations of infinite Prandtl number convection in the stagnant lid regime of temperature-dependent viscosity convection demonstrate the existence of spatially localized, stable convective cells below the critical Rayleigh number (subcritical convection). These solutions are in stark contrast to the usual, supercritical, convective planforms, where convective cells form in the entire layer. The isolated cell has a shape of an axisymmetric dome with an upwelling at the center and thus appears as a very weak plume. Formation of these structures requires subcritical conditions and a localized initial temperature perturbation but does not require any spatial heterogeneity in the material properties or the heat flux. When several localized plumes form, they tend to attract to each other and form stable clusters. This type of subcritical convection may play a role in the formation and longevity of localized features on planetary bodies, including the crustal dichotomy and Tharsis region on Mars and the asymmetric pattern of volcanism on Mercury.

  13. Optimization of Storage Temperature for Cultured ARPE-19 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Pasovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The establishment of future retinal pigment epithelium (RPE replacement therapy is partly dependent on the availability of tissue-engineered RPE cells, which may be enhanced by the development of suitable storage methods for RPE. This study investigates the effect of different storage temperatures on the viability, morphology, and phenotype of cultured RPE. Methods. ARPE-19 cells were cultured under standard conditions and stored in HEPES-buffered MEM at nine temperatures (4°C, 8°C, 12°C, 16°C, 20°C, 24°C, 28°C, 32°C, and 37°C for seven days. Viability and phenotype were assessed by a microplate fluorometer and epifluorescence microscopy, while morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Results. The percentage of viable cells preserved after storage was highest in the 16°C group (48.7%±9.8%; P<0.01 compared to 4°C, 8°C, and 24°C–37°C; P<0.05 compared to 12°C. Ultrastructure was best preserved at 12°C, 16°C, and 20°C. Expression of actin, ZO-1, PCNA, caspase-3, and RPE65 was maintained after storage at 16°C compared to control cells that were not stored. Conclusion. Out of nine temperatures tested between 4°C and 37°C, storage at 12°C, 16°C, and 20°C was optimal for maintenance of RPE cell viability, morphology, and phenotype. The preservation of RPE cells is critically dependent on storage temperature.

  14. Low Temperature Plasma Kills SCaBER Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barekzi, Nazir; van Way, Lucas; Laroussi, Mounir

    2013-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare type of bladder cancer that forms as a result of chronic irritation of the epithelial lining of the bladder. The cell line used in this study is SCaBER (ATCC® HTB-3™) derived from squamous cell carcinoma of the human urinary bladder. Current treatments of bladder cancer include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, the cost of these treatments, the potential toxicity of the chemotherapeutic agents and the systemic side-effects warrant an alternative to current cancer treatment. This paper represents preliminary studies to determine the effects of biologically tolerant plasma (BTP) on a cell line of human bladder cancer cells. Previous work by our group using the plasma pencil revealed the efficacy of BTP on leukemia cells suspended in solution. Based on these earlier findings we hypothesized that the plasma exposure would elicit a similar programmed cell death in the SCaBER cells. Trypan blue exclusion and MTT assays revealed the cell killing after exposure to BTP. Our study indicates that low temperature plasma generated by ionizing helium gas and the reactive species may be a suitable and safe alternative for cancer therapy.

  15. File list: His.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Histone Adult Temperature sensitiv...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Histone Adult Temperature sensitiv...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Histone Adult Temperature sensitiv...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Histone Adult Temperature sensitiv...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  19. Effect of elevated temperatures on cell cycle kinetics of rat gliosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross-Riveros, P.

    1978-07-01

    9L rat gliosarcoma cells were examined in vitro for survival response to hyperthermic temperatures ranging from 39.0/sup 0/ to 45.0/sup 0/C for graded exposure times. At 43.0/sup 0/C, the split exposure response was also studied. Changes in cell cycle kinetics resulting from hyperthermia were compared for isosurvival levels achieved by appropriate exposure time to either 42.5/sup 0/C or 43.0/sup 0/C. After heat treatment, cells were held at 37.0/sup 0/C for varying recovery periods. Cells were then either prepared for flow microfluorometry (FMF), or exposed to tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/HTdR) for autoradiography. The survival studies indicated that the rate of change in cell killing for each increasing degree centigrade was greater for temperatures below 43.0/sup 0/C than for temperatures above 43.0/sup 0/C. The shoulder width of the survival curves was maximal at 42.5/sup 0/C. The shoulder width represents an important parameter since it describes a threshold time after which significant cell killing occurs. Thus both 43.0/sup 0/C, the temperature at which mortality kinetics changed, and 42.5/sup 0/C, the temperature at which the shoulder width was maximum, represent critical temperatures for the 9L cells. When 9L cells were given an initial conditioning exposure to 43.0/sup 0/C, then returned to 37/sup 0/C for 3 hrs, followed by graded exposure intervals at 43.0/sup 0/, the resulting survival curve indicated that cells required longer times for equal cell killing than for the single exposure condition, suggesting that the cells possess a capability to adapt to the higher temperature.

  20. High Temperature Polymers for use in Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, Katherine M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is currently working on polymers for fuel cell and lithium battery applications. The desire for more efficient, higher power density, and a lower environmental impact power sources has led to interest in proton exchanges membrane fuels cells (PEMFC) and lithium batteries. A PEMFC has many advantages as a power source. The fuel cell uses oxygen and hydrogen as reactants. The resulting products are electricity, heat, and water. The PEMFC consists of electrodes with a catalyst, and an electrolyte. The electrolyte is an ion-conducting polymer that transports protons from the anode to the cathode. Typically, a PEMFC is operated at a temperature of about 80 C. There is intense interest in developing a fuel cell membrane that can operate at higher temperatures in the range of 80 C- 120 C. Operating the he1 cell at higher temperatures increases the kinetics of the fuel cell reaction as well as decreasing the susceptibility of the catalyst to be poisoned by impurities. Currently, Nafion made by Dupont is the most widely used polymer membrane in PEMFC. Nafion does not function well above 80 C due to a significant decrease in the conductivity of the membrane from a loss of hydration. In addition to the loss of conductivity at high temperatures, the long term stability and relatively high cost of Nafion have stimulated many researches to find a substitute for Nafion. Lithium ion batteries are popular for use in portable electronic devices, such as laptop computers and mobile phones. The high power density of lithium batteries makes them ideal for the high power demand of today s advanced electronics. NASA is developing a solid polymer electrolyte that can be used for lithium batteries. Solid polymer electrolytes have many advantages over the current gel or liquid based systems that are used currently. Among these advantages are the potential for increased power density and design flexibility. Automobiles, computers, and cell phones require

  1. Investigation the cause of plasma treatment for low temperature annealed dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Shungo; Komatsu, Yuta; Ono, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) require annealing of TiO2photoelectrodes at 450 C to 550 C. However, such high-temperature annealing is unfavorable because it limits the use of materials that cannot withstand high temperatures, such as plastic substrates. In our previous paper, a low temperature annealing technique of TiO2 photoelectrodes using ultraviolet light and dielectric barrier discharge treatments was proposed to reduce the annealing temperature from 450 C to 150 C for a TiO2 paste containing an organic binder. Here, we investigated the cause of plasma treatment via the Nyquist diagram (Cole-Cole plot) of DSSCs. The Nyquist diagram was masured with a frequency response analyzer (NF Corporation, FRA5022) under 100 mW/cm2 illumination of a calibrated xenon lamp (Hamamatsu L2274, 150W). The lifetime of the electrons, the effective electron diffusion coefficient, and the electron diffusion length of TiO2 photoelectrodes were determined by analyzing the Nyquist diagrams. As a result of analyzing the Nyquist diagrams, it was shown that plasma treatment can reduce the electron transport resistance and promote the necking of Hot UV annealed TiO2 nanoparticles. This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows.

  2. Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Jabbar, Mohammed Hussain

    . On the other hand, low-temperature operation poses serious challenges to the electrode performance. Effective catalysts, redox stable electrodes with improved microstructures are the prime requisite for the development of efficient SOFC anodes. The performance of Nb-doped SrT iO3 (STN) ceramic anodes......An important issue that has limited the potential of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) for portable applications is its high operating temperatures (800-1000 ºC). Lowering the operating temperature of SOFCs to 400-600 ºC enable a wider material selection, reduced degradation and increased lifetime......, an investigation on the effect of application of cathodic polarization on Ni-YSZ anodes is described....

  3. Photo-Activated Low Temperature, Micro Fuel Cell Power Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry L. Tuller

    2007-03-30

    A Key objective of this program is to identify electrodes that will make it possible to significantly reduce the operating temperature of micro-SOFC and thin film-based SOFCs. Towards this end, efforts are directed towards: (a) identifying the key rate limiting steps which limit presently utilized electrodes from performing at reduced temperatures, as well as, (b) investigating the use of optical, as opposed to thermal energy, as a means for photocatalyzing electrode reactions and enabling reduced operating temperatures. During Phase I, the following objectives were achieved: (a) assembly and testing of our unique Microprobe Thin Film Characterization System; (b) fabrication of the model cathode materials system in thin film form by both PLD and ink jet printing; and (c) the successful configuration and testing of the model materials as cathodes in electrochemical cells. A further key objective (d) to test the potential of illumination in enhancing electrode performance was also achieved.

  4. Investigation on the temperature-dependence of absorption properties of solar cells with micro-structured surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The temperature of a solar cell will increase when it is exposed to the sunlight,which results in variations of optical parameters and thermal expansion coefficient of the cell,thus affecting its spectral absorption feature.This paper is aimed to investigate the effects of temperature on the absorption property of solar cells with micro-structured surfaces.By taking hemispherical, cylindrical and spherical surfaces as models,numerical computation is conducted to obtain spectral distribution of absorptance of such surfaces with different structural parameters by means of the finite difference time domain(FDTD)method.Furthermore,the effects of material properties and structural period on the absorption property are also investigated.

  5. Development of thin film amorphous silicon oxide/microcrystalline silicon double-junction solar cells and their temperature dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sriprapha, K.; Piromjit, C.; Limmanee, A.; Sritharathikhun, J. [Institute of Solar Energy Technology Development (SOLARTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), 111 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand)

    2011-01-15

    We have developed thin film silicon double-junction solar cells by using micromorph structure. Wide bandgap hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO:H) film was used as an absorber layer of top cell in order to obtain solar cells with high open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}), which are attractive for the use in high temperature environment. All p, i and n layers were deposited on transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coated glass substrate by a 60 MHz-very-high-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF-PECVD) technique. The p-i-n-p-i-n double-junction solar cells were fabricated by varying the CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} flow rate of i top layer in order to obtain the wide bandgap with good quality material, which deposited near the phase boundary between a-SiO:H and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon oxide ({mu}c-SiO:H), where the high V{sub oc} can be expected. The typical a-SiO:H/{mu}c-Si:H solar cell showed the highest initial cell efficiency of 10.5%. The temperature coefficient (TC) of solar cells indicated that the values of TC for conversion efficiency ({eta}) of the double-junction solar cells were inversely proportional to the initial V{sub oc}, which corresponds to the bandgap of the top cells. The TC for {eta} of typical a-SiO:H/{mu}c-Si:H was -0.32%/ C, lower than the value of conventional a-Si:H/{mu}c-Si:H solar cell. Both the a-SiO:H/{mu}c-Si:H solar cell and the conventional solar cell showed the same light induced degradation ratio of about 20%. We concluded that the solar cells using wide bandgap a-SiO:H film in the top cells are promising for the use in high temperature regions. (author)

  6. Thermal coupling of a high temperature PEM fuel cell with a complex hydride tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeifer, P.; Wall, C.; Jensen, Jens Oluf;

    2009-01-01

    the possibilities of a thermal coupling of a high temperature PEM fuel cell operating at 160-200 degrees C. The starting temperatures and temperature hold-times before starting fuel cell operation, the heat transfer characteristics of the hydride storage tanks, system temperature, fuel cell electrical power...

  7. High pressure Moissanite-anvil cells for the low temperature Hall effect measurements of oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomo, Shusuke; Tozer, Stanley

    2013-03-01

    The Hall effect was successfully measured for a single crystal of high temperature superconductor in a Moissanite-anvil clamp cell up to 5 GPa, with proper arrangement of lead wires and a sample. Zylon gasket, good in electrical insulation, worked well up to 5 GPa. The 30-40 % increase of the clamped pressure was observed during cooling to below 60 K. The appreciable pressure effect of the a-b plane Hall coefficient was observed and negative for La2 - x Srx CuO4 with x = 0.090. The result is discussed with those for sintered samples and those studied with a different pressurizing method. Thanks are due to Visiting Scientist Program, NHMFL, and NNSA grant DE-FG52-03NA00066.

  8. Quantitative measurement on optical attenuation coefficient of cell lines 5-8F and 6-10B using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianghua; Shen, Zhiyuan; He, Yonghong; Tu, Ziwei; Xia, Yunfei; Chen, Changshui; Liu, Songhao

    2012-10-01

    Oncogenesis and metastasis of tumor are difficult to detect during the clinic therapy. To explore the optical properties of tumorigenesis and metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), we assessed the NPC cell lines 5-8F and 6-10B by optical coherence tomography (OCT): first, the OCT images of the two different types of cell pellets were captured. Second, by fitting Beer's law to the averaged A-scans in these OCT datasets, the attenuation coefficients (μt) of the cells were extracted. The median attenuation coefficients (interquartile range (IQR)) of 5-8F and 6-10B were 6.79 mm-1 (IQR 6.52 to 7.23 mm-1) versus 8.06 mm-1 (IQR 7.65 to 8.40 mm-1), respectively (p < 0.01, df = 39). Subsequently, the results were compared with those obtained by polarization sensitive OCT, which further confirmed that the quantitative OCT analysis (by μt) could differentiate the oncogenesis and metastasis NPC cell lines in real time non-invasively.

  9. Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Alfred Junio

    This dissertation focuses on the development of nanostructured cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and their performance at low operating temperatures. Cathodes were mainly fabricated by the infiltration method, whereby electrocatalysts are introduced onto porous, ionic conducting backbones......degreeC. The most promising cathode was integrated onto an anode supported cell and it was found that the cell exhibits electrochemical stability with no measureable degradation during 1500 h operation at 700degreeC. LaCoO3 and Co3O4 infiltrated - CGO cathodes were also investigated and revealed...... that these nanoparticulate infiltrates have good oxygen reduction capabilities. The significance of the choice of ionic conducting backbone was also addressed by replacing the CGO with Bi2V0.9Cu0.1O5.35 (BICUVOX). Cathodes with a BICUVOX backbone exhibit performance degradation not observed in LSC infiltrated - CGO cathodes...

  10. Theoretical examination of effective oxygen diffusion coefficient and electrical conductivity of polymer electrolyte fuel cell porous components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Gen; Yokoyama, Kouji; Ooyama, Junpei; Terao, Takeshi; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Kubo, Norio; Kawase, Motoaki

    2016-09-01

    The reduction of oxygen transfer resistance through porous components consisting of a gas diffusion layer (GDL), microporous layer (MPL), and catalyst layer (CL) is very important to reduce the cost and improve the performance of a PEFC system. This study involves a systematic examination of the relationship between the oxygen transfer resistance of the actual porous components and their three-dimensional structure by direct measurement with FIB-SEM and X-ray CT. Numerical simulations were carried out to model the properties of oxygen transport. Moreover, based on the model structure and theoretical equations, an approach to the design of new structures is proposed. In the case of the GDL, the binder was found to obstruct gas diffusion with a negative effect on performance. The relative diffusion coefficient of the MPL is almost equal to that of the model structure of particle packing. However, that of CL is an order of magnitude less than those of the other two components. Furthermore, an equation expressing the relative diffusion coefficient of each component can be obtained with the function of porosity. The electrical conductivity of MPL, which is lower than that of the carbon black packing, is considered to depend on the contact resistance.

  11. High temperature PEM fuel cells - Degradation and durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, S.S.

    2012-12-15

    This work analyses the degradation issues of a High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (HT-PEMFC). It is based on the assumption that given the current challenges for storage and distribution of hydrogen, it is more practical to use liquid alcohols as energy carriers for fuel cells. Among these, methanol is very attractive, as it can be obtained from a variety of renewable sources and has a relatively low reforming temperature for the production of hydrogen rich gaseous mixture. The effects on HT-PEMFC of the different constituents of this gaseous mixture, known as a reformate gas, are investigated in the current work. For this, an experimental set up, in which all these constituents can be fed to the anode side of a fuel cell for testing, is put in place. It includes mass flow controllers for the gaseous species, and a vapor delivery system for the vapor mixture of the unconverted reforming reactants. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is used to characterize the effects of these impurities. The effects of CO were tested up to 2% by volume along with other impurities. All the reformate impurities, including ethanol-water vapor mixture, cause loss in the performance of the fuel cell. In general, CO{sub 2} dilutes the reactants, if tested alone at high operating temperatures (180 C), but tends to exacerbate the effects of CO if they are tested together. On the other hand, CO and methanol-water vapor mixture degrade the fuel cell proportionally to the amounts in which they are tested. In this dissertation some of the mechanisms with which the impurities affect the fuel cell are discussed and interdependence among the effects is also studied. This showed that the combined effect of reformate impurities is more than the arithmetic sum of the individual effects of reformate constituents. The results of the thesis help to understand better the issues of degradation and durability in fuel cells, which can help to make them more durable and

  12. Determination of the bulk diffusion coefficient of oxygen in [alpha] zirconium, in the temperature range 500-640 deg C, by nuclear microanalysis. Determination par microanalyse nucleaire du coefficient de diffusion en volume de l'oxygene dans le zirconium [alpha] entre 500 et 640 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viennot, M.; David, D.; Lambertin, M.; Beranger, G. (Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, 60 (France))

    1994-03-17

    The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in [alpha]-zirconium was measured in the temperature range 500-640 deg C, by means of nuclear microanalysis. Measurements were performed without grinding the samples, and then using a computer process applied to the nuclear spectra of emitted protons from the [sup 16]O (d,p)[sup 17] O[sup *] reaction. The results are in good agreement with higher temperature ones, previously measured by some of the authors. They are also in agreement with stress-strain aging results, at lower temperatures. These results are bulk diffusion ones. Nevertheless, they are rather different from a series of others, also at lower temperatures. This is perhaps the effect of a grain boundary diffusion phenomenon. (authors). 9 refs., 3 figs.

  13. [Prediction of Encapsulation Temperatures of Copolymer Films in Photovoltaic Cells Using Hyperspectral Imaging Techniques and Chemometrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ping; Chen, Yong-ming; Yao, Zhi-lei

    2015-11-01

    A novel method of combination of the chemometrics and the hyperspectral imaging techniques was presented to detect the temperatures of Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate copolymer (EVA) films in photovoltaic cells during the thermal encapsulation process. Four varieties of the EVA films which had been heated at the temperatures of 128, 132, 142 and 148 °C during the photovoltaic cells production process were used for investigation in this paper. These copolymer encapsulation films were firstly scanned by the hyperspectral imaging equipment (Spectral Imaging Ltd. Oulu, Finland). The scanning band range of hyperspectral equipemnt was set between 904.58 and 1700.01 nm. The hyperspectral dataset of copolymer films was randomly divided into two parts for the training and test purpose. Each type of the training set and test set contained 90 and 10 instances, respectively. The obtained hyperspectral images of EVA films were dealt with by using the ENVI (Exelis Visual Information Solutions, USA) software. The size of region of interest (ROI) of each obtained hyperspectral image of EVA film was set as 150 x 150 pixels. The average of reflectance hyper spectra of all the pixels in the ROI was used as the characteristic curve to represent the instance. There kinds of chemometrics methods including partial least squares regression (PLSR), multi-class support vector machine (SVM) and large margin nearest neighbor (LMNN) were used to correlate the characteristic hyper spectra with the encapsulation temperatures of of copolymer films. The plot of weighted regression coefficients illustrated that both bands of short- and long-wave near infrared hyperspectral data contributed to enhancing the prediction accuracy of the forecast model. Because the attained reflectance hyperspectral data of EVA materials displayed the strong nonlinearity, the prediction performance of linear modeling method of PLSR declined and the prediction precision only reached to 95%. The kernel-based forecast models were

  14. [Prediction of Encapsulation Temperatures of Copolymer Films in Photovoltaic Cells Using Hyperspectral Imaging Techniques and Chemometrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ping; Chen, Yong-ming; Yao, Zhi-lei

    2015-11-01

    A novel method of combination of the chemometrics and the hyperspectral imaging techniques was presented to detect the temperatures of Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate copolymer (EVA) films in photovoltaic cells during the thermal encapsulation process. Four varieties of the EVA films which had been heated at the temperatures of 128, 132, 142 and 148 °C during the photovoltaic cells production process were used for investigation in this paper. These copolymer encapsulation films were firstly scanned by the hyperspectral imaging equipment (Spectral Imaging Ltd. Oulu, Finland). The scanning band range of hyperspectral equipemnt was set between 904.58 and 1700.01 nm. The hyperspectral dataset of copolymer films was randomly divided into two parts for the training and test purpose. Each type of the training set and test set contained 90 and 10 instances, respectively. The obtained hyperspectral images of EVA films were dealt with by using the ENVI (Exelis Visual Information Solutions, USA) software. The size of region of interest (ROI) of each obtained hyperspectral image of EVA film was set as 150 x 150 pixels. The average of reflectance hyper spectra of all the pixels in the ROI was used as the characteristic curve to represent the instance. There kinds of chemometrics methods including partial least squares regression (PLSR), multi-class support vector machine (SVM) and large margin nearest neighbor (LMNN) were used to correlate the characteristic hyper spectra with the encapsulation temperatures of of copolymer films. The plot of weighted regression coefficients illustrated that both bands of short- and long-wave near infrared hyperspectral data contributed to enhancing the prediction accuracy of the forecast model. Because the attained reflectance hyperspectral data of EVA materials displayed the strong nonlinearity, the prediction performance of linear modeling method of PLSR declined and the prediction precision only reached to 95%. The kernel-based forecast models were

  15. Differential effects of growth temperature on ice nuclei active at different temperatures that are produced by cells of Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurian-Sherman, D; Lindow, S E

    1995-04-01

    The temperature at which ice-nucleating bacteria are grown causes differences of 100- to 10,000-fold in the fraction of cells that nucleate ice at a given temperature (ice nucleation frequency). Ice nucleation frequencies of cells of Pseudomonas syringae grown at temperatures that ranged from 9 to 33 degrees C were examined in order to more accurately characterize physiological effects on ice nuclei active at temperatures of from about -2 to -10 degrees C, the temperature range for this phenotype. Large differences in ice nucleation frequency occurred at all but the lowest assay temperatures in cells of P. syringae grown in the temperature range of 15 to 33 degrees C. These differences in ice nucleation frequency may be attributed, at least in part, to post-translational factors. Because other studies have indicated that ice nuclei active at the lowest assay temperatures may reflect the amount of ice nucleation protein produced, while higher nucleation temperatures reflect aggregates of this ice nucleation protein, data was normalized to the frequency of ice nuclei active at the lowest ice nucleation temperatures (which also correspond to the most abundant nuclei). This was done in order to develop a baseline of comparison for cells grown at different temperatures that more clearly shows possible post-translational effects such as aggregation of the nucleation protein. After this normalization was performed, and in contrast to the results noted above, the number of ice nuclei in cells grown at 9, 15, and 20 degrees C that were active at different assay temperatures was very similar. Differences in ice nucleation frequency that occurred over all assay temperatures in cells grown between 9 and 20 degrees C may be attributed to differences in the total number of nuclei present in the population of cells. The large effects of growth temperature on nucleation frequency have important implications for estimating numbers of ice nucleating bacteria in environmental samples

  16. Low Temperature Affects Stem Cell Maintenance in Brassica oleracea Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Jennifer; Kodde, Jan; Severing, Edouard I; Bonnema, Guusje; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H; Groot, Steven P C

    2016-01-01

    Most of the above ground tissues in higher plants originate from stem cells located in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several plant species can suffer from spontaneous stem cell arrest resulting in lack of further shoot development. In Brassica oleracea this SAM arrest is known as blindness and occurs in an unpredictable manner leading to considerable economic losses for plant raisers and farmers. Detailed analyses of seedlings showed that stem cell arrest is triggered by low temperatures during germination. To induce this arrest reproducibly and to study the effect of the environment, an assay was developed. The role of genetic variation on the susceptibility to develop blind seedlings was analyzed by a quantitative genetic mapping approach, using seeds from a double haploid population from a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale, produced at three locations. The analysis revealed, besides an effect of the seed production location, a region on linkage group C3 associated with blindness sensitivity. A subsequent dynamic genome-wide transcriptome analysis resulted in the identification of around 3000 differentially expressed genes early after blindness induction. A large number of cell cycle genes were en masse induced early during the development of blindness, whereas shortly after, all were down-regulated. This miss-regulation of core cell cycle genes is accompanied with a strong reduction of cells reaching the DNA replication phase. From the differentially expressed genes, 90 were located in the QTL region C3. Among them are two genes belonging to the MINICHROMOSOMAL MAINTENANCE gene family, known to be involved in DNA replication, a RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED gene, a key regulator for cell cycle initiation, and several MutS homologs genes, involved in DNA repair. These genes are potential candidates for being involved in the development of blindness in Brassica oleracea sensitive genotypes. PMID:27375654

  17. Electrolytes For Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rękas M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid electrolytes for construction of the intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells, IT-SOFC, have been reviewed. Yttrium stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals, YTZP, as a potential electrolyte of IT-SOFC have been highlighted. The experimental results involving structural, microstructural, electrical properties based on our own studies were presented. In order to study aluminum diffusion in YTZP, aluminum oxide was deposited on the surface of 3 mol.% yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP. The samples were annealed at temperatures from 1523 to 1773 K. Diffusion profiles of Al in the form of mean concentration vs. depth in B-type kinetic region were investigated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS. Both the lattice (DB and grain boundary (DGB diffusion were determined.

  18. GaAs/Ge solar cell AC parameters at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R. Anil; Suresh, M.S. [ISRO Satellite centre, ISRO, Bangalore 560 017 (India); Nagaraju, J. [Department of Instrumentation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2003-05-15

    The AC parameters of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs/Ge) solar cell were measured at different cell temperatures (198-348K) by varying the cell bias voltage (forward and reverse) under dark condition using impedance spectroscopy technique. It was found that the cell capacitance increases with the cell temperature where as the cell resistance decreases, at any bias voltage. The measured cell parameters were used to calculate the intrinsic concentration of electron-hole pair, cell material relative permittivity and its band gap energy. The diode factor and the cell dynamic resistance at the corresponding maximum power point decrease with the cell temperature.

  19. Live cell plasma membranes do not exhibit a miscibility phase transition over a wide range of temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Il-Hyung; Saha, Suvrajit; Polley, Anirban; Huang, Hector; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan; Groves, Jay T

    2015-03-26

    Lipid/cholesterol mixtures derived from cell membranes as well as their synthetic reconstitutions exhibit well-defined miscibility phase transitions and critical phenomena near physiological temperatures. This suggests that lipid/cholesterol-mediated phase separation plays a role in the organization of live cell membranes. However, macroscopic lipid-phase separation is not generally observed in cell membranes, and the degree to which properties of isolated lipid mixtures are preserved in the cell membrane remain unknown. A fundamental property of phase transitions is that the variation of tagged particle diffusion with temperature exhibits an abrupt change as the system passes through the transition, even when the two phases are distributed in a nanometer-scale emulsion. We support this using a variety of Monte Carlo and atomistic simulations on model lipid membrane systems. However, temperature-dependent fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of labeled lipids and membrane-anchored proteins in live cell membranes shows a consistently smooth increase in the diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature. We find no evidence of a discrete miscibility phase transition throughout a wide range of temperatures: 14-37 °C. This contrasts the behavior of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) blebbed from the same cells, which do exhibit phase transitions and macroscopic phase separation. Fluorescence lifetime analysis of a DiI probe in both cases reveals a significant environmental difference between the live cell and the GPMV. Taken together, these data suggest the live cell membrane may avoid the miscibility phase transition inherent to its lipid constituents by actively regulating physical parameters, such as tension, in the membrane.

  20. Identification of a novel temperature sensitive promoter in cho cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesse Friedemann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO expression system is the leading production platform for manufacturing biopharmaceuticals for the treatment of numerous human diseases. Efforts to optimize the production process also include the genetic construct encoding the therapeutic gene. Here we report about the successful identification of an endogenous highly active gene promoter obtained from CHO cells which shows conditionally inducible gene expression at reduced temperature. Results Based on CHO microarray expression data abundantly transcribed genes were selected as potential promoter candidates. The S100a6 (calcyclin and its flanking regions were identified from a genomic CHO-K1 lambda-phage library. Computational analyses showed a predicted TSS, a TATA-box and several TFBSs within the 1.5 kb region upstream the ATG start signal. Various constructs were investigated for promoter activity at 37°C and 33°C in transient luciferase reporter gene assays. Most constructs showed expression levels even higher than the SV40 control and on average a more than two-fold increase at lower temperature. We identified the core promoter sequence (222 bp comprising two SP1 sites and could show a further increase in activity by duplication of this minimal sequence. Conclusions This novel CHO promoter permits conditionally high-level gene expression. Upon a shift to 33°C, a two to three-fold increase of basal productivity (already higher than SV40 promoter is achieved. This property is of particular advantage for a process with reduced expression during initial cell growth followed by the production phase at low temperature with a boost in expression. Additionally, production of toxic proteins becomes feasible, since cell metabolism and gene expression do not directly interfere. The CHO S100a6 promoter can be characterized as cold-shock responsive with the potential for improving process performance of mammalian expression systems.

  1. On the influence of temperature on PEM fuel cell operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppo, M.; Siegel, N. P.; Spakovsky, M. R. von

    The 3D implementation of a previously developed 2D PEMFC model [N.P. Siegel, M.W. Ellis, D.J. Nelson, M.R. von Spakovsky, A two-dimensional computational model of a PEMFC with liquid water transport, J. Power Sources 128 (2) (2004) 173-184; N.P. Siegel, M.W. Ellis, D.J. Nelson, M.R. von Spakovsky, Single domain PEMFC model based on agglomerate catalyst geometry, J. Power Sources 115 (2003) 81-89] has been used to analyze the various pathways by which temperature affects the operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell [M. Coppo, CFD analysis and experimental investigation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells, Ph.D. Dissertation, Politecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy, 2005]. The original model, implemented in a specially modified version of CFDesign ® [CFDesign ® V5.1, Blue Ridge Numerics, 2003] , accounts for all of the major transport processes including: (i) a three-phase model for water transport in the liquid, vapor and dissolved phases, (ii) proton transport, (iii) gaseous species transport and reaction, (iv) an agglomerate model for the catalyst layers and (v) gas phase momentum transport. Since the details of it have been published earlier [N.P. Siegel, M.W. Ellis, D.J. Nelson, M.R. von Spakovsky, A two-dimensional computational model of a PEMFC with liquid water transport, J. Power Sources 128 (2) (2004) 173-184; N.P. Siegel, M.W. Ellis, D.J. Nelson, M.R. von Spakovsky, Single domain PEMFC model based on agglomerate catalyst geometry, J. Power Sources 115 (2003) 81-89; N.P. Siegel, Development and validation of a computational model for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, Ph.D. Dissertation, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 2003], only new features are briefly discussed in the present work. In particular, the model has been extended in order to account for the temperature dependence of all of the physical properties involved in the model formulation. Moreover, a novel model has been developed to describe liquid

  2. Durable Catalysts for High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durability of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is recognized as one of the most important issues to be addressed before the commercialization. The failure mechanisms are not well understood, however, degradation of carbon supported noble metal catalysts is identified as a major failure...... significant attention in recent years because of its potential advantages such as high CO tolerance, easy cooling, better heat utilization and possible integration with fuel processing units. However, the high temperature obviously aggravates the carbon corrosion and catalyst degradation. Based on thermally...

  3. Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Temperature Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celik, Ismail B. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This EPSCoR project had two primary goals: (i) to build infrastructure and work force at WVU to support long-term research in the area of fuel cells and related sciences; (ii) study effects of various impurities found in coal-syngas on performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). As detailed in this report the WVU research team has made significant accomplishments in both of these areas. What follows is a brief summary of these accomplishments: State-of-the-art test facilities and diagnostic tools have been built and put into use. These include cell manufacturing, half-cell and full-cell test benches, XPS, XRD, TEM, Raman, EDAX, SEM, EIS, and ESEM equipment, unique in-situ measurement techniques and test benches (Environmental EM, Transient Mass-Spectrometer-MS, and IR Optical Temperature measurements). In addition, computational capabilities have been developed culminating in a multi-scale multi-physics fuel cell simulation code, DREAM-SOFC, as well as a Beowulf cluster with 64 CPU units. We have trained 16 graduate students, 10 postdoctoral fellows, and recruited 4 new young faculty members who have actively participated in the EPSCoR project. All four of these faculty members have already been promoted to the tenured associate professor level. With the help of these faculty and students, we were able to secure 14 research awards/contracts amounting to a total of circa $5.0 Million external funding in closely related areas of research. Using the facilities mentioned above, the effects of PH3, HCl, Cl2, and H2S on cell performance have been studied in detail, mechanisms have been identified, and also remedies have been proposed and demonstrated in the laboratory. For example, it has been determined that PH3 reacts rapidly with Ni to from secondary compounds which may become softer or even melt at high temperature and then induce Ni migration to the surface of the cell changing the material and micro-structural properties of the cell drastically. It is found that

  4. Effect of porous structure of catalyst layer on effective oxygen diffusion coefficient in polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Gen; Kawase, Motoaki

    2016-09-01

    It is important to reduce the oxygen diffusion resistance through PEFC porous electrode, because it is the key to reduce the PEFC cost. However, the gas diffusion coefficient of CL is lower than MPL in spite of framework consisted of same carbon blacks. In this study, in order to understand the reasons of the lower gas diffusion performance of CL, the relationship between a carbon black agglomerate structure and ionomer adhesion condition is evaluated by a numerical analysis with an actual reconstructed structure and a simulated structure. As a result, the gas diffusion property of CL strongly depends on the ionomer adhesion shape. In the case of adhesion shape with the same curvature of ionomer interface, each pore can not be connected enough. So the pore tortuosity increases. Moreover, in the case of existence of inefficient large pores formed by carbon black agglomerate and ununiformly coated ionomer, the gas diffusion performance decrease rapidly. As the measurement values in actual CL are almost equal to that with model structure with inefficient large pores. These characteristics can be confirmed by actual cross-section image obtained by FIB-SEM.

  5. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH{sup +} → C{sup +} + H{sub 2} reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werfelli, Ghofran [Université de Bordeaux, Institut des Sciences Moléculaires, CNRS UMR 5255, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El-Manar, Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Halvick, Philippe; Stoecklin, Thierry [Université de Bordeaux, Institut des Sciences Moléculaires, CNRS UMR 5255, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Honvault, Pascal [Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, CNRS UMR 6303, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Université de Franche-Comté, UFR ST, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Kerkeni, Boutheïna [Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El-Manar, Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Institut Supérieur des Arts Multimédia de la Manouba, Université de la Manouba, 2010 la Manouba (Tunisia)

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH{sup +}, in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH{sup +} in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H{sub 2}, and e{sup −}. In this work, we address the destruction process of CH{sup +} by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH{sup +}. The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K–800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation.

  6. Low temperature characteristic of ITO/SiO x /c-Si heterojunction solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, H. W.; Yang, J.; Li, Y.; Gao, M.; Chen, S. M.; Yu, Z. S.; Xu, F.; Ma, Z. Q.

    2015-09-01

    Based on the temperature-dependent measurements and the numerical calculation, the temperature response of the photovoltaic parameters for a ITO/SiO x /c-Si heterojunction solar cell have been investigated in the ascending sorting of 10-300 K. Under unique energy concentrated photon irradiation with the wavelength of 405 nm and power density of 667 mW cm-2, it was found that the short-circuit current (I SC) was nonlinearly increased and the open-circuit voltage (V OC) decreased with temperature. The good passivation of the ITO/c-Si interface by a concomitant SiO x buffer layer leads to the rare recombination of carriers in the intermediate region. The inversion layer model indicated that the band gap of c-silicon was narrowed and the Fermi level of n-type silicon (E\\text{F}n ) tended to that of the intrinsic Fermi level (E\\text{F}i ) (in the middle of band gap) with the increase of the temperature, which lessened the built-in voltage (V D) and thus the V OC. However, the reduction by 90% of V OC is attributed to the shift of E\\text{F}n in c-silicon rather than the energy band narrowing. Through the analysis of the current-voltage relationship and the data fitting, we infer that the series resistance (R s) is not responsible for the increase of I SC, but the absorption coefficient and the depletion-width of c-silicon are the causes of the enhancing I SC. Mostly, the interaction of the photon-generated excess ‘cold hole’ and the acoustic phonon in n-Si would influence the variation of I ph or I SC with temperature.

  7. File list: DNS.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 DNase-seq Adult Temperature sensit...ive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/DNS.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Unc.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Oth.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 TFs and others Adult Temperature s...ensitive cells SRX699115 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Unc.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: DNS.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 RNA polymerase Adult Temperature s...ensitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in children with sickle cell disease - detecting alterations in the apparent diffusion coefficient in hips with avascular necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, John D. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hernandez, Andrea; Pena, Andres; Khrichenko, Dmitry; Gonzalez, Leonardo; Jaramillo, Diego [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ruppert, Kai [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Virginia, Department of Radiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jawad, Abbas F. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pediatrics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wells, Lawrence [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Orthopedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Smith-Whitley, Kim [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Hematology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is a common morbidity in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) that leads to pain and joint immobility. However, the diagnosis is often uncertain or delayed. To examine the ability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements on diffusion-weighted imaging to detect AVN in children with SCD. ADC values were calculated at the hips of normal children (n = 19) and children with SCD who were either asymptomatic with no known previous hip disease (n = 13) or presented for the first time with clinical symptoms of hip pathology (n = 12). ADC values were compared for differences among groups with and without AVN using non-parametric statistical methods. The ADC values were elevated in the hips of children with AVN (median ADC = 1.57 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s [95% confidence interval = 0.86-2.10]) and differed significantly in pairwise comparisons (all P < 0.05) from normal children (0.74 [0.46-0.98]), asymptomatic children with SCD (0.55 [0.25-0.85]), and SCD children who had symptoms referable to their hips but did not show findings of hip AVN on conventional MRI or radiographs (0.46 [0.18-0.72]). Children with sickle cell disease have elevated apparent diffusion coefficient values in their affected hips on initial diagnosis of avascular necrosis. (orig.)

  3. Low temperature tolerance of human embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Chin Heng, Kumar Jayaseelan Vinoth, Hua Liu, Manoor Prakash Hande, Tong Cao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of exposing human embryonic stem cells (hESC to 4oC and 25oC for extended durations of 24h and 48h respectively. Cell survivability after low temperature exposure was assessed through the MTT assay. The results showed that hESC survivability after exposure to 25oC and 4oC for 24h was 77.3 ± 4.8 % and 64.4 ± 4.4 % respectively (significantly different, P < 0.05. The corresponding survival rates after 48h exposure to 25oC and 4oC was 71.0 ± 0.5 % and 69.0 ± 2.3 % respectively (not significantly different, P > 0.05. Spontaneous differentiation of hESC after low temperature exposure was assessed by morphological observations under bright-field and phase-contrast microscopy, and by immunocytochemical staining for the pluripotency markers SSEA-3 and TRA-1-81. hESC colonies were assigned into 3 grades according to their degree of spontaneous differentiation: (1 Grade A which was completely or mostly undifferentiated, (2 Grade B which was partially differentiated, and (3 Grade C which was mostly differentiated. In all low temperature exposed groups, about 95% of colonies remain undifferentiated (Grade A, which was not significantly different (P > 0.05 from the unexposed control group maintained at 37oC. Additionally, normal karyotype was maintained in all low temperature-exposed groups, as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of metaphase spreads with telomere and centromere-specific PNA probes. Further analysis with m-FISH showed that chromosomal translocations were absent in all experimental groups. Hence, hESC possess relatively high-tolerance to extended durations of low temperature exposure, which could have useful implications for the salvage of hESC culture during infrequent occurrences of incubator break-down and power failure.

  4. Doubling the annual coefficient of performance of air-conditioning units by taking advantage of small temperature lifts; Verdoppelung der Jahresarbeitszahl von Klimakaelteanlagen durch Ausnuetzung eines kleinen Temperaturhubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellig, B.; Kegel, B.; Meier, M.

    2006-07-01

    The seasonal performance factor (SPF) of chilled water systems (CWS) is closely related to the temperature lift, i.e. the difference between the temperature of the heat source and the heat sink. In many applications in building services engineering, a temperature lift of 10-20 K is in principle sufficient. However, the potential for highly efficient refrigerating systems is not fully exploited as standard chillers are designed for lifts of 30-60 K. The exergy analysis of typical CWS shows that the external exergy losses are greater than the exergy losses of the chiller. The second-law (or exergetic) efficiency is usually far below 10%. It is therefore important to avoid unnecessarily high temperature lifts. Measurements on refrigeration systems in two office buildings have shown that even in state-of-the-art CWS, considerable energy savings (up to 50%) can be achieved by persistent use of small temperature lifts. However, SPF-values around 5-6 can hardly be exceeded in systems with electric driven chillers. SPFs higher than 10 or even above 20 can only be reached with optimized free cooling processes. Basic decisions, which ultimately lead to CWS with unnecessarily high temperature lifts, are taken in the early project stages. Therefore, this study presents guidelines for the design and operation of CWS with small temperature lifts. The implementation of these simple measures will lead to a considerable reduction of energy consumption and operating costs. (author)

  5. Modelling the impact of blood flow on the temperature distribution in the human eye and the orbit: fixed heat transfer coefficients versus the Pennes bioheat model versus discrete blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prediction of the temperature distribution in the eye depends on how the impact of the blood flow is taken into account. Three methods will be compared: a simplified eye anatomy that applies a single heat transfer coefficient to describe all heat transport mechanisms between the sclera and the body core, a detailed eye anatomy in which the blood flow is accounted for either by the bioheat approach, or by including the discrete vasculature in the eye and the orbit. The comparison is done both for rabbit and human anatomies, normo-thermally and when exposed to homogeneous power densities. The first simplified model predicts much higher temperatures than the latter two. It was shown that the eye is very hard to heat when taking physiological perfusion correctly into account. It was concluded that the heat transfer coefficient describing the heat transport from the sclera to the body core reported in the literature for the first simplified model is too low. The bioheat approach is appropriate for a first-order approximation of the temperature distribution in the eye when exposed to a homogeneous power density, but the discrete vasculature down to 0.2 mm in diameter needs to be taken into account when the heterogeneity of the temperature distribution at a mm scale is of interest

  6. Comparison of photovoltaic cell temperatures in modules operating with exposed and enclosed back surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, D.; Simon, F. F.

    1981-01-01

    Four different photovoltaic module designs were tested to determine the cell temperature of each design. The cell temperatures were compared to those obtained on identical design, using the same nominal operating cell temperature (NOCT) concept. The results showed that the NOCT procedure does not apply to the enclosed configurations due to continuous transient conditions. The enclosed modules had higher cell temperatures than the open modules, and insulated modules higher than the uninsulated. The severest performance loss - when translated from cell temperatures - 17.5 % for one enclosed, insulated module as a compared to that module mounted openly.

  7. Graphite friction coefficient for various conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The friction coefficient the graphite used in the Tsinghua University 10MW High Tem-perature Gas-Cooled Reactor was analyzed for various conditions. The variation of the graphitefriction coefficient was measured for various sliding velocities, sliding distances, normal loads, en-vironments and temperatures. A scanning elector microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the fric-tion surfaces.

  8. Experimental investigations for determination of heat-transfer coefficients and temperature fields in simulated fuel assemblies of BREST reactor with fuel elements spaced by transverse grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consideration is given to heat transfer and temperature fields in fuel pin bundles with transverse spacer grids (s/d =1.33) equally spaced along energy deposition length. Experimental data are obtained on two simulated 37-rod core assemblies: one assembly is with uniform geometry along the cross-section and in the other there is nonheated rod simulating supporting pipe in fuel assembly of reactor with heavy coolant. Eutectic Na-K alloy is used as coolant. Nusselt numbers and temperature nonuniformity along the perimeter of measurement fuel element simulator obtained in these assemblies are compared as well as available data for finned (wire to wire) fuel rods

  9. Attractions in sterically stabilized silica dispersions : III. Second virial coefficient as a function of temperature, as measured by means of turbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.W.; Kruif, C.G. de; Vrij, A.

    1986-01-01

    Silica particles coated with octadecyl chains and dispersed in toluene exhibit attractions on lowering the temperature. The attraction is supposed to be the result of interactions between the chain segments and solvent. Since light is strongly scattered in the dispersions turbidity measurements are

  10. Moisture and temperature triggered release of a volatile active agent from soy protein coated paper: effect of glass transition phenomena on carvacrol diffusion coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalier, Pascale; Ben Arfa, Afef; Guillard, Valerie; Gontard, Nathalie

    2009-01-28

    Carvacrol release from SPI-coated papers was evaluated at different relative humidities (RH; 60, 80, and 100%) and storage temperatures (5, 20, and 30 degrees C). Effective carvacrol diffusivities were determined from experimental release kinetics and by using a mathematical model based on Fick's second law. Increasing storage temperature and RH lead to an increase of carvacrol diffusivity. Depending on the relative humidity, the carvacrol effective diffusivity varied from 1.71 x 10(-16) to 138 x 10(-16) m(2)/s at 30 degrees C, from 0.85 x 10(-16) to 8.78 x 10(-16) m(2)/s at 20 degrees C, and from 0.11 x 10(-16) to 7.50 x 10(-16) m(2)/s at 5 degrees C. The combined effect of relative humidity and temperature on diffusivity was particularly marked at 30 degrees C and 100% RH. The temperature and relative humidity dependence of carvacrol release was related to the glass transition phenomenon and its effect on chain protein mobility and carvacrol diffusivity. PMID:19154166

  11. Stochastic reconstruction and a scaling method to determine effective transport coefficients of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, UNAM, Privada Xochicalco S/N, 62580 Temixco (Mexico); Andaverde, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas, UAEM, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62210 Cuernavaca (Mexico); Escobar, B. [Instituto Tecnologico de Cancun, Av. Kabah 3, 77515 Cancun (Mexico); Cano, U. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Av. Reforma 113, col. Palmira, 62490 Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2011-02-01

    This work uses a method for the stochastic reconstruction of catalyst layers (CLs) proposing a scaling method to determine effective transport properties in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The algorithm that generates the numerical grid makes use of available information before and after manufacturing the CL. The structures so generated are characterized statistically by two-point correlation functions and by the resultant pore size distribution. As an example of this method, the continuity equation for charge transport is solved directly on the three-dimensional grid of finite control volumes (FCVs), to determine effective electrical and proton conductivities of different structures. The stochastic reconstruction and the electrical and proton conductivity of a 45 {mu}m side size cubic sample of a CL, represented by more than 3.3 x 10{sup 12} FVCs were realized in a much shorter time compared with non-scaling methods. Variables studied in an example of CL structure were: (i) volume fraction of dispersed electrolyte, (ii) total CL porosity and (iii) pore size distribution. Results for the conduction efficiency for this example are also presented. (author)

  12. Magnetocaloric effect and temperature coefficient of resistance of La0.85Ag0.15MnO3 epitaxial thin films obtained by polymer-assisted deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobas Acosta R.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the magnetocaloric effects and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR of La0.85Ag0.15MnO3 epitaxial thin films grown on single-crystal substrates of LaAlO3 (001 and SrTiO3 (001 using the chemical solution approach of polymer-assisted deposition (PAD. The film thicknesses are in the range 30-35 nm. Magnetocaloric effects, with entropy changes of -2.14 J/kg.K, in the case of the LaAlO3 substrate and -2.72 J/kg.K for the SrTiO3 substrate, (corresponding to a magnetic field variation of 2T were obtained at room temperature. The refrigeration capacity at this field variation reached large values of 125 J/kg and 216 J/kg, indicating that these films prepared by PAD have the potential for microcooling applications. The temperature coefficient of resistance has been calculated from the resistivity measurements. A maximum TCR value of 3.01 % K-1 was obtained at 309 K, which shows that these films also have potential as uncooled thermometers for bolometric applications.

  13. Interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenhua

    Presently, one of the principal goals of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) research is to reduce the stack operating temperature to between 600 and 800°C. However, one of the principal technological barriers is the non-availability of a suitable material satisfying all of the stability requirements for the interconnect. In this work two approaches for intermediate temperature SOFC interconnects have been explored. The first approach comprises an interconnect consisting of a bi-layer structure, a p-type oxide (La0.96Sr0.08MnO 2.001/LSM) layer exposed to a cathodic environment, and an n-type oxide (Y0.08Sr0.88Ti0.95Al0.05O 3-delta/YSTA) layer exposed to anodic conditions. Theoretical analysis based on the bi-layer structure has established design criteria to implement this approach. The analysis shows that the interfacial oxygen partial pressure, which determines the interconnect stability, is independent of the electronic conductivities of both layers but dependent on the oxygen ion layer interconnects, the oxygen ion conductivities of LSM and YSTA were measured as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Based on the measured data, it has been determined that if the thickness of YSTA layer is around 0.1cm, the thickness of LSM layer should be around 0.6 mum in order to maintain the stability of LSM. In a second approach, a less expensive stainless steel interconnect has been studied. However, one of the major concerns associated with the use of metallic interconnects is the development of a semi-conducting or insulating oxide scale and chromium volatility during extended exposure to the SOFC operating environment. Dense and well adhered Mn-Cu spinet oxide coatings were successfully deposited on stainless steel by an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. It was found that the Mn-Cu-O coating significantly reduced the oxidation rate of the stainless steel and the volatility of chromium. The area specific resistance (ASR) of coated Crofer 22 APU is

  14. High temperature coefficient of resistance achieved by ion beam assisted sputtering with no heat treatment in VyM1−yOx (M = Nb, Hf)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal imaging based on room temperature bolometer sensors is a growing market, constantly searching for improved sensitivity. One important factor is the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR), i.e., the sensitivity of the active material. Herein, the authors report the improved TCR properties attainable by the “ion beam assisted deposition” method for room temperature deposition. VyM1−yOx (M = Nb, Hf) thin-film alloys were fabricated on 1 μm thermal SiO2 atop Si (100) substrates by reactive magnetron cosputtering at room temperature using a low energy ion source, aimed at the film, to insert dissociated oxygen species and increase film density. The authors studied the influence of deposition parameters such as oxygen partial pressure, V to M ratio, and power of the plasma source, on resistance and TCR. The authors show high TCR (up to −3.7% K−1) at 300 K, and excellent uniformity, but also an increase in resistance. The authors emphasize that samples were prepared at room temperature with no heat treatment, much simpler than common processes that require annealing at high temperatures. So, this is a promising fabrication route for uncooled microbolometers

  15. High temperature coefficient of resistance achieved by ion beam assisted sputtering with no heat treatment in V{sub y}M{sub 1−y}O{sub x} (M = Nb, Hf)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vardi, Naor; Sharoni, Amos, E-mail: amos.sharoni@biu.ac.il [Department of Physics and Institute of Nanoscience and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 5290002 (Israel)

    2015-11-15

    Thermal imaging based on room temperature bolometer sensors is a growing market, constantly searching for improved sensitivity. One important factor is the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR), i.e., the sensitivity of the active material. Herein, the authors report the improved TCR properties attainable by the “ion beam assisted deposition” method for room temperature deposition. V{sub y}M{sub 1−y}O{sub x} (M = Nb, Hf) thin-film alloys were fabricated on 1 μm thermal SiO{sub 2} atop Si (100) substrates by reactive magnetron cosputtering at room temperature using a low energy ion source, aimed at the film, to insert dissociated oxygen species and increase film density. The authors studied the influence of deposition parameters such as oxygen partial pressure, V to M ratio, and power of the plasma source, on resistance and TCR. The authors show high TCR (up to −3.7% K{sup −1}) at 300 K, and excellent uniformity, but also an increase in resistance. The authors emphasize that samples were prepared at room temperature with no heat treatment, much simpler than common processes that require annealing at high temperatures. So, this is a promising fabrication route for uncooled microbolometers.

  16. Temperature Characteristics Analysis of Triple-Junction Solar Cell under Concentrated Conditions using Spice Diode Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurada, Yuya; Ota, Yasuyuki; Nishioka, Kensuke

    2011-12-01

    Using spice diode model, the temperature characteristics of an InGaP/InGaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cell under concentrated light conditions were analyzed in detail. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the single-junction solar cells (InGaP, InGaAs, and Ge solar cells) were measured at various temperatures. From dark I-V characteristics of each single-junction solar cell, the diode parameters and temperature exponents were extracted. The extracted diode parameters and temperature exponents were applied to the equivalent circuit model for the triple-junction solar cell, and the solar cell performance was calculated with considering the temperature characteristics of series resistance. There was good agreement between the measured and calculated I-V characteristics of the triple-junction solar cell at various temperatures under concentrated light conditions.

  17. File list: ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...811237 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...811238 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...699108 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...699108 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  1. Temperature gradient stimulation for cell division in C. Elegans Embryos on chip

    OpenAIRE

    Baranek, Sophie; Bezler, Alexandra; Adamczyk, Christian; Gönczy, Pierre; Renaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a new microfluidic device for temperature stimulation of cell in in-vitro culture. Micro-electrodes in a meander shape are embedded into the microfluidic channels to generate either a temperature gradient through the culture chamber or a local heat spot under specific cells. One promising application is the control of cell di- vision rate. Here we present first results of the synchronization of cell division in a two-cell stage embryos of C. Elegans.

  2. Modelling and Evaluation of Heating Strategies for High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on two different cathode air cooled high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stacks; a 30 cell 400W prototype stack using two bipolar plates per cell, and a 65 cell 1 kW commercial stack using one bipolar plate per cell. The work seeks to examine the use of different...

  3. An Aurivillius Oxide Based Cathode with Excellent CO2 Tolerance for Intermediate-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yinlong; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Yubo; Shao, Zongping

    2016-07-25

    The Aurivillius oxide Bi2 Sr2 Nb2 MnO12-δ (BSNM) was used as a cobalt-free cathode for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). To the best of our knowledge, the BSNM oxide is the only alkaline-earth-containing cathode material with complete CO2 tolerance that has been reported thus far. BSNM not only shows favorable activity in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at intermediate temperatures but also exhibits a low thermal expansion coefficient, excellent structural stability, and good chemical compatibility with the electrolyte. These features highlight the potential of the new BSNM material as a highly promising cathode material for IT-SOFCs.

  4. An Aurivillius Oxide Based Cathode with Excellent CO2 Tolerance for Intermediate-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yinlong; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Yubo; Shao, Zongping

    2016-07-25

    The Aurivillius oxide Bi2 Sr2 Nb2 MnO12-δ (BSNM) was used as a cobalt-free cathode for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). To the best of our knowledge, the BSNM oxide is the only alkaline-earth-containing cathode material with complete CO2 tolerance that has been reported thus far. BSNM not only shows favorable activity in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at intermediate temperatures but also exhibits a low thermal expansion coefficient, excellent structural stability, and good chemical compatibility with the electrolyte. These features highlight the potential of the new BSNM material as a highly promising cathode material for IT-SOFCs. PMID:27294808

  5. Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the development of an equivalent circuit model of a 65 cell high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The HTPEM fuel cell membranes used are PBI-based and uses phosphoric acid as proton conductor. The operating temperature...

  6. Nuclear Quadrupole Double Resonance Investigation of the Anomalous Temperature Coefficients of the Strong Hydrogen Bonds in Sodium and Potassium Deuterium Diacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Eric Max

    This thesis was directed at learning more about the unusual electronic environment near hydrogen within strong hydrogen bonds. "Strong" hydrogen bonds are unique in that the hydrogen atom is symmetrically located, or nearly so, between two electronegative atoms; the bond energies are relatively large. In a "normal" hydrogen bond the hydrogen atom is bonded to, and thus physically closer to, a parent atom, and only weakly attracted to another electronegative atom; bond energies are typically small. To examine these bonds, deuterium was substituted for hydrogen and the electric quadrupole coupling constant (QCC) of deuterium was measured using field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance. The electric quadrupole moment of deuterium is sensitive to changes in the surrounding electric field gradient, and is thus a good probe of the immediate electronic structure. The results show that the temperature dependence of the QCC is opposite to, and much larger than, what one would normally expect to observe for deuterium. The QCC is found to decrease strongly with decreasing temperature. This project was the first to study in detail the temperature dependence of deuterium QCCs in strong hydrogen bonds. The magnitude of the deuterium QCCs for the diacetates was found to be strongly depressed relative to typical values for deuterium. These results parallel large shifts in the infrared vibrational frequencies observed in many molecules which contain strong hydrogen bonds. The asymmetry parameter, which is a measure of the departure from axial symmetry of the electric field gradient (EFG) at deuterium, was found to be unusually large for what are known to be linear, or nearly linear, three-center bonds. Based on ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations aimed at determining the EFG at H in the archetypal bifluoride ion, F-H-F^-, the electronic charge density is drastically depleted at H. It is believed that the large reduction in the charge density allows the deuterium EFG to be highly

  7. Development of a 400 W High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Power Pack:Fuel Cell Stack Test

    OpenAIRE

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Bang, Mads; Korsgaard, Anders; Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2006-01-01

    When using pressurized hydrogen to fuel a fuel cell, much space is needed for fuel storage. This is undesirable especially with mobile or portable fuel cell systems, where refuelling also often is inconvenient. Using a reformed liquid carbonhydrate can reduce this fuel volume considerably. Nafion based low temperature PEM (LTPEM) fuel cells are very intolerant to reformate gas because of the presence of CO. PBI based high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cells can operate stable at much higher CO...

  8. 基于红外测温的对流换热系数反识别算法研究%A numerical method on Inverse determination of heat transfer coefficient based on thermographic temperature measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范春利; 孙丰瑞; 杨立

    2008-01-01

    The heat transfer coefficient in a multidimensional heat conduction problem is obtained from the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem based on the thermographic temperature measurement. The modified one-dimensional correction method (MODCM), along with the finite volume method, is employed for both two-and three-dimensional inverse problems. A series of numerical experiments are conducted in order to verify the effectiveness of the method. In addition, the effect of the temperature measurement error, the ending criterion of the iteration, etc. on the result of the inverse problem is investigated. It is proved that the method is a simple, stable and accurate one that can solve successfully the inverse heat conduction problem.

  9. Investigation of light intensity and temperature dependency of solar cells electric parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Tobnaghi, Davoud Mostafa; Madatov, Rahim; Farhadi, Payam

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the performance and overview use of solar cells is expressed. The role of temperature, sunlight intensity on the solar cells electric parameters has been studied. Experimental results the amount of solar cell output parameters variations such as maximum output power, open circuit voltage, short circuit current, and fill factor in terms of temperature and light intensity shows. the most significant is the temperature dependence of the voltage which decreases with increasing t...

  10. Wave Reflection Coefficient Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞聿修; 邵利民; 柳淑学

    2003-01-01

    The wave reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and directional spectrum for concrete face slope breakwaters and rubble mound breakwaters are investigated through physical model tests in the present study. The reflection coefficients of oblique irregular waves are analyzed by the Modified Two-Point Method (MTPM) proposed by the authors. The results show that the wave reflection coefficient decreases with increasing wave frequency and incident angle or decreasing structure slope. The reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and its variation with Iribarren number are given in this paper. The paper also suggests an empirical 3-dimensional reflection coefficient spectrum, i.e. reflection coefficient directional spectrum, which can be used to illustrate quantitatively the variation of reflection coefficient with the incident angle and the Iribarren number for oblique irregular waves.

  11. Low temperature rate coefficients for the reactions of 1CH2 with reactive and non-reactive species, and the implications for Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Kevin; Slater, Eloise; Blitz, Mark; Plane, John; Heard, Dwayne; Seakins, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan revealed unexpectedly large amounts of benzene in the troposphere, and confirmed the absence of a global ethane ocean as predicted by photochemical models of methane conversion over the lifetime of the solar system. An important chemical intermediate in both the production and loss of benzene and ethane is the first electronically excited state of methylene, 1CH2. For example, at room temperature an important reaction of 1CH2 is with acetylene (R1a), leading to the formation of propargyl (C3H3)[1]. The subsequent recombination of propargyl radicals is the major suggested route to benzene in Titan's atmosphere (R2)[2]. In addition to reaction of 1CH2 leading to products, there is also competition between inelastic electronic relaxation to form the ground triplet state 3CH2 (R1b). This ground state 3CH2 has a markedly different reactivity to the singlet, reacting primarily with methyl radicals (CH3) to form ethene (R3). As methyl radical recombination is the primary route to ethane (R4)[3], reactions of 1CH2 will also heavily influence the ethane budget on Titan. 1CH2 + C2H2 → C3H3 + H (R1a) 1CH2 + C2H2 → 3CH2 + C2H2 (R1b) C3H3 + C3H3 → C6H6 (R2) 3CH2 + CH3 → C2H4 + H (R3) CH3 + CH3 (+ M) → C2H6 (R4) Thus this competition between chemical reaction and electronic relaxation in the reactions of 1CH2 with H2, CH4, C2H4, and C2H6 will play an important role in determining the benzene and ethane budgets on Titan. Despite this there are no measurements of any rate constants for 1CH2 at temperatures relevant to Titan's atmosphere (60 - 170 K). Using a pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus coupled with pulsed laser photolysis laser-induced fluorescence, the low temperature reaction kinetics for the removal of 1CH2 with nitrogen, hydrogen, methane, ethane, ethene, acetylene, and oxygen, have been studied. The results revealed an increase in the removal rate of 1CH2 at temperatures below 200 K, with a sharp increase of around a factor of

  12. Cell integrated multi-junction thermocouple array for solid oxide fuel cell temperature sensing: N+1 architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaweera, Manoj; Kim, Jung-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the cell temperature distribution of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks during normal operation has multifaceted advantages in performance and degradation studies. Present efforts on measuring temperature from operating SOFCs measure only the gas channel temperature and do not reveal the cell level temperature distribution, which is more important for understanding a cell's performance and its temperature-related degradation. The authors propose a cell-integrated, multi-junction thermocouple array for in-situ cell surface temperature monitoring of an operational SOFC. The proposed thermocouple array requires far fewer numbers of thermoelements than that required by sets of thermocouples for the same number of temperature sensing points. Hence, the proposed array causes lower disturbance to cell performance than thermocouples. The thermoelement array was sputter deposited on the cathode of a commercial SOFC using alumel (Ni:Al:Mn:Si - 95:2:2:1 by wt.) and chromel (Ni:Cr - 90:10 by wt.). The thermocouple array was tested in a furnace over the entire operating temperature range of a typical SOFC. The individual sensing points of the array were shown to measure temperature independently from each other with equivalent accuracy to a thermocouple. Thus, the concept of multi-junction thermocouples is experimentally validated and its stability on a porous SOFC cathode is confirmed.

  13. 蓝宝石光纤温度传感器K值标定系统%Calibration System of Sapphire-fiber Temperature Sensor's Coefficient K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓明; 郝晓剑; 周汉昌

    2012-01-01

    标定了一种镀制氧化锆陶瓷薄膜的蓝宝石光纤黑体腔温度传感器.标定系统用氢氧焰枪作为热源,以Modline3红外测温仪作为标准传感器,采用数据采集卡(PCI20612)对被校准传感器和Modline3的输出信号同步采集,通过比较法得到K值.实验验证了该方案的可行性,测得K值为98.578×106(V·m2/W),并得到该传感器温度-电压曲线,系统简单,方便,具有一定实用价值.%A kind of sapphire fiber blackbody cavity temperature sensor which was sprayed by ZrO2 film was calibrated. In this measruement system, hydrogen-oxygen gas flame welding machine was used as heat, Modline 3 infrared themometer was the standard sensor,data acquisition card(PCI20612) collected both of output of the calibrated sensor and Modline3. K was obstained by comparison. Experiments demonstrate the feasibility of this program,the results show K is 98. 578 x 10 ( V · m /W) ,and the T-V curve is presented. The calibration system is convenience and practical.

  14. Transport coefficients of heavy baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolos, Laura; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Das, Santosh K.

    2016-08-01

    We compute the transport coefficients (drag and momentum diffusion) of the low-lying heavy baryons Λc and Λb in a medium of light mesons formed at the later stages of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We employ the Fokker-Planck approach to obtain the transport coefficients from unitarized baryon-meson interactions based on effective field theories that respect chiral and heavy-quark symmetries. We provide the transport coefficients as a function of temperature and heavy-baryon momentum, and analyze the applicability of certain nonrelativistic estimates. Moreover we compare our outcome for the spatial diffusion coefficient to the one coming from the solution of the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport equation, and we find a very good agreement between both calculations. The transport coefficients for Λc and Λb in a thermal bath will be used in a subsequent publication as input in a Langevin evolution code for the generation and propagation of heavy particles in heavy-ion collisions at LHC and RHIC energies.

  15. Design and Control of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    E-cient fuel cell systems have started to appear in many dierent commercial applications and large scale production facilities are already operating to supply fuel cells to support an ever growing market. Fuel cells are typically considered to replace leadacid batteries in applications where...... or life time losses. In order to evaluate the performance of using HTPEM fuel cells for electricity production in electrical applications, a 400 W fuel cell system is initially designed using a cathode air cooled 30 cell HTPEM stack. The stack runs on pure hydrogen in a deadend anode configuration...... that often during a normal driving cycle. The combination of batteries and super capacitors together with fuel cells can improve the system performance, lifetime and cost. Simple systems can be designed where the fuel cells and batteries are directly connected, but the introduction of power electronics can...

  16. The apparent diffusion coefficient of a primary lesion correlates with local failure of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy. President award proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We prospectively investigated whether the value of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of a primary lesion prior to treatment correlated with local failure of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) following radiotherapy. In 17 patients who underwent radiotherapy for primary HNSCC, we compared variables considered to affect local failure, including parameters related to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, such as ADC and its alteration ratio, between cases of local failure and controls and analyzed survival among those patients in whom the variables differed or demonstrated association with local failure. We also retrospectively analyzed variables in a validation study of 40 patients. In the prospective study, pretreatment values of ADChigh (calculated with b-values of 300, 500, 750, and 1000 s/mm2) alone showed significant association with local failure (P=0.0186). In the validation study, pretreatment values of tumor volume (P=0.0217) and ADChigh (P=0.0001) were significantly associated with local failure. Pretreatment ADChigh was superior to pretreatment tumor volume regarding association with local failure. These results suggest that pretreatment values of both ADC obtained using high b-values and tumor volume correlate with local failure of HNSCC treated with radiotherapy. (author)

  17. Weibull strength variations between room temperature and high temperature Ni-3YSZ half-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curran, Declan; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2013-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell stacks are vulnerable to mechanical failures. One of the most relevant failure mechanisms is brittle fracture of the individual ceramic cells, which are an integral part of the stack structure. Even the mechanical failure of one cell can lead to temporary interruption, reduc...

  18. H2, He, and CO2 line-broadening coefficients, pressure shifts and temperature-dependence exponents for the HITRAN database. Part 1: SO2, NH3, HF, HCl, OCS and C2H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilzewski, Jonas S.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Kochanov, Roman V.; Hill, Christian; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-01-01

    To increase the potential for use of the HITRAN database in astronomy, experimental and theoretical line-broadening coefficients, line shifts and temperature-dependence exponents of molecules of planetary interest broadened by H2, He, and CO2 have been assembled from available peer-reviewed sources. The collected data were used to create semi-empirical models so that every HITRAN line of the studied molecules has corresponding parameters. Since H2 and He are major constituents in the atmospheres of gas giants, and CO2 predominates in atmospheres of some rocky planets with volcanic activity, these spectroscopic data are important for remote sensing studies of planetary atmospheres. In this paper we make the first step in assembling complete sets of these parameters, thereby creating datasets for SO2, NH3, HF, HCl, OCS and C2H2.

  19. Determining intracellular temperature at single-cell levelby a novel thermocouple method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changling Wang; Ruizhi Xu; Wenj uan Tian; Xiaoli Jiang; Zhengyu Cui; Meng Wang; Huaming Sun; Kun Fang; Ning Gu

    2011-01-01

    Dear Editor,Living cells can change their intramembranous temperature during cell activities such as division,gene expression,enzyme reaction,and metabolism [1,2].Moreover,under external stimuli,such as drugs or other signals,cells may quickly change their metabolic activities,leading to acute variation of intracellular temperatures from the normal state [3,4].However,such temperature change inside cells is usually at a small scale and is of transient nature due to the thermo-influence by the extracellular environment,rendering it rather difficult to measure using the conventional temperature detection methods.Thus,a more precise and faster-response thermometer is needed to measure single-cell temperature changes in real time,which may constitute a new layer of cellular information for studies of cellular signaling,and even clinical diagnosis and therapy.

  20. Influence of high-pressure-low-temperature treatment on the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Shen; G. Urrutia Benet; S. Brul; D. Knorr

    2005-01-01

    High pressure inactivation processes, especially at subzero temperatures, were performed on Bacillus subtilis vegetative cells at various pressure, temperature and time combinations. Whilst atmospheric pressure, lowering the temperature for various periods to as low as 45 -C was found to have minor

  1. Moissanite-anvil cells for the electrical transport measurements at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yomo, Shusuke [School of Biological Science and Engineering, Tokai University, Minami-ku, Sapporo 005-8601 (Japan); Tozer, Stanley W, E-mail: yomo@tokai-u.j [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL 32310-3706 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    We have successfully measured the Hall effect of a single crystal of a high temperature superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} in moissanite-anvil high pressure cells. A pressure cell with new Zylon-gasket and wiring arrangement survived under pressure up to at least 5 GPa. Pressure which was clamped at room temperature increased with lowering the temperature down to below 60 K by a factor of 1.3-1.4.

  2. Moissanite-anvil cells for the electrical transport measurements at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomo, Shusuke; Tozer, Stanley W.

    2010-03-01

    We have successfully measured the Hall effect of a single crystal of a high temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 in moissanite-anvil high pressure cells. A pressure cell with new Zylon-gasket and wiring arrangement survived under pressure up to at least 5 GPa. Pressure which was clamped at room temperature increased with lowering the temperature down to below 60 K by a factor of 1.3-1.4.

  3. Moissanite-anvil cells for the electrical transport measurements at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have successfully measured the Hall effect of a single crystal of a high temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 in moissanite-anvil high pressure cells. A pressure cell with new Zylon-gasket and wiring arrangement survived under pressure up to at least 5 GPa. Pressure which was clamped at room temperature increased with lowering the temperature down to below 60 K by a factor of 1.3-1.4.

  4. WE-G-18C-02: Estimation of Optimal B-Value Set for Obtaining Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Free From Perfusion in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karki, K; Hugo, G; Ford, J; Saraiya, S; Weiss, E [Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Olsen, K; Groves, R [Radiology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) is increasingly being investigated for radiotherapy planning and response assessment. Selection of a limited number of b-values in DW-MRI is important to keep geometrical variations low and imaging time short. We investigated various b-value sets to determine an optimal set for obtaining monoexponential apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) close to perfusion-insensitive intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model ADC (ADCIVIM) in nonsmall cell lung cancer. Methods: Seven patients had 27 DW-MRI scans before and during radiotherapy in a 1.5T scanner. Respiratory triggering was applied to the echo-planar DW-MRI with TR=4500ms approximately, TE=74ms, pixel size=1.98X1.98mm{sub 2}, slice thickness=4–6mm and 7 axial slices. Diffusion gradients were applied to all three axes producing traceweighted images with eight b-values of 0–1000μs/μm{sup 2}. Monoexponential model ADC values using various b-value sets were compared to ADCIVIM using all b-values. To compare the relative noise in ADC maps, intra-scan coefficient of variation (CV) of active tumor volumes was computed. Results: ADCIVIM, perfusion coefficient and perfusion fraction for tumor volumes were in the range of 880-1622 μm{sup 2}/s, 8119-33834 μm{sup 2}/s and 0.104–0.349, respectively. ADC values using sets of 250, 800 and 1000; 250, 650 and 1000; and 250–1000μs/μm{sup 2} only were not significantly different from ADCIVIM(p>0.05, paired t-test). Error in ADC values for 0–1000, 50–1000, 100–1000, 250–1000, 500–1000, and three b-value sets- 250, 500 and 1000; 250, 650 and 1000; and 250, 800 and 1000μs/μm{sup 2} were 15.0, 9.4, 5.6, 1.4, 11.7, 3.7, 2.0 and 0.2% relative to the reference-standard ADCIVIM, respectively. Mean intrascan CV was 20.2, 20.9, 21.9, 24.9, 32.6, 25.8, 25.4 and 24.8%, respectively, whereas that for ADCIVIM was 23.3%. Conclusion: ADC values of two 3 b-value sets

  5. Convective cells of internal gravity waves in the earth's atmosphere with finite temperature gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Onishchenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated vortex structures (e.g. convective cells of internal gravity waves (IGWs in the earth's atmosphere with a finite vertical temperature gradient. A closed system of nonlinear equations for these waves and the condition for existence of solitary convective cells are obtained. In the atmosphere layers where the temperature decreases with height, the presence of IGW convective cells is shown. The typical parameters of such structures in the earth's atmosphere are discussed.

  6. Dynamic modeling and analysis of a 20-cell PEM fuel cell stack considering temperature and two-phase effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Kyun; Choe, Song-Yul

    2008-05-01

    Dynamic characteristics and performance of a PEM fuel cell stack are crucial factors to ensure safe, effective and efficient operation. In particular, water and heat at varying loads are important factors that directly influence the stack performance and reliability. Herein, we present a new dynamic model that considers temperature and two-phase effects and analyze these effects on the characteristics of a stack. First, a model for a two-cell stack was developed and the simulated results were compared with experimental results. Next, a model for a 20-cell stack was constructed to investigate start-up and transient behavior. Start-up behavior under different conditions where the amplitudes and slopes of a load current, the temperature and flow rate of the coolant, and extra heating of end plates were varied were also analyzed. The transient analyses considered the dynamics of temperature, oxygen and vapor concentration in the gas diffusion media, liquid water saturation, and the variations of water content in the membranes at a multi-step load. Comparative studies revealed that the two-phase effect of water predominantly reduces oxygen concentration in the catalysts and subsequently increases the activation over-potential, while temperature gradients in the cells directly affect the ohmic over-potential. The results showed that the heat-up time at start-up to achieve a given reference working temperature was inversely proportional to the amplitude of the current density applied and the flow rate and temperature of the coolants. In addition, the asymmetric profile of the stack temperature in the stack was balanced when the temperature of the coolant supplied was reheated and elevated. Analyses of transient behaviors for a 20-cell stack showed that strong temperature gradients formed in the last four end cells, while temperature, oxygen concentration, vapor concentration, liquid water saturation, and membrane water content in the rest of the cells were uniform.

  7. Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Sohal

    2009-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on “Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation,” held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: • Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) • Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

  8. Silicon solar cell characterization at low temperatures and low illumination as a function of particulate irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Little, S. A.; Peacock, C. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Various configurations of back surface reflector silicon solar cells including small (2 x 2) cm and large (approx. 6 x 6) cm cells with conventional and wraparound contacts were subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation and characterized under both Earth orbital and deep space conditions of temperatures and illuminations. Current-Voltage (I-V) data were generated from +65 C to -150 C and at incident illuminations from 135.3 mW/sq cm to 5.4 mW/sq cm for these cells. Degradation in cell performance which is manifested only under deep space conditions is emphasized. In addition, the effect of particle irradiation on the high temperature and high intensity and low temperature and low intensity performance of the cells is described. The cells with wraparound contacts were found to have lower efficiencies at Earth orbital conditions than the cells with conventional contacts.

  9. Real Time Monitoring of Temperature of a Micro Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Chuang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon micro-hole arrays (Si-MHA were fabricated as a gas diffusion layer (GDL in a micro fuel cell using the micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS fabrication technique. The resistance temperature detector (RTD sensor was integrated with the GDL on a bipolar plate to measure the temperature inside the fuel cell. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature was generally linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity were within 0.5 °C and 1.68×10-3/°C, respectively. The best experimental performance was 9.37 mW/cm2 at an H2/O2 dry gas flow rate of 30/30 SCCM. Fuel cell temperature during operation was 27 °C, as measured using thermocouples in contact with the backside of the electrode. Fuel cell operating temperature measured in situ was 30.5 °C.

  10. Real time monitoring of temperature of a micro proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Hu, Yuh-Chung; Shih, Wen-Pin; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Chuang, Chih-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Silicon micro-hole arrays (Si-MHA) were fabricated as a gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a micro fuel cell using the micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) fabrication technique. The resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensor was integrated with the GDL on a bipolar plate to measure the temperature inside the fuel cell. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature was generally linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity were within 0.5 °C and 1.68×10(-3)/°C, respectively. The best experimental performance was 9.37 mW/cm(2) at an H(2)/O(2) dry gas flow rate of 30/30 SCCM. Fuel cell temperature during operation was 27 °C, as measured using thermocouples in contact with the backside of the electrode. Fuel cell operating temperature measured in situ was 30.5 °C. PMID:22573963

  11. FEM simulations and experimental studies of the temperature field in a large diamond crystal growth cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhan-Chang; Jia Xiao-Peng; Huang Guo-Feng; Hu Mei-Hua; Li Yong; Yan Bing-Min; Ma Hong-An

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the temperature field variation in the growth region of a diamond crystal in a sealed cell during the whole process of crystal growth by using the temperature gradient method (TGM) at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT).We employ both the finite element method (FEM) and in situ experiments.Simulation results show that the temperature in the center area of the growth cell continues to decrease during the process of large diamond crystal growth.These results are in good agreement with our experimental data,which demonstrates that the finite element model can successfully predict the temperature field variations in the growth cell.The FEM simulation will be useful to grow larger high-quality diamond crystal by using the TGM.Furthermore,this method will be helpful in designing better cells and improving the growth process of gem-quality diamond crystal.

  12. FEM simulations and experimental studies of the temperature field in a large diamond crystal growth cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the temperature field variation in the growth region of a diamond crystal in a sealed cell during the whole process of crystal growth by using the temperature gradient method (TGM) at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT). We employ both the finite element method (FEM) and in situ experiments. Simulation results show that the temperature in the center area of the growth cell continues to decrease during the process of large diamond crystal growth. These results are in good agreement with our experimental data, which demonstrates that the finite element model can successfully predict the temperature field variations in the growth cell. The FEM simulation will be useful to grow larger high-quality diamond crystal by using the TGM. Furthermore, this method will be helpful in designing better cells and improving the growth process of gem-quality diamond crystal. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  13. Temperature propagation in prismatic lithium-ion-cells after short term thermal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Pamina; Liebig, Gerd; Komsiyska, Lidiya; Wittstock, Gunther

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a 3D model based on the thermal material characteristics of an automotive prismatic Li-NiMnCoO2 (NMC) cell was created in COMSOL Multiphysics® in order to simulate the temperature propagation in the cell during short term thermal stress. The thermal characteristics of the battery components were experimentally determined via laser flash analysis (LFA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and used as an input parameter for the models. In order to validate the modelling approach, an experimental setup was built to measure the temperature propagation during thermal stresses within a dummy cell, equipped with temperature sensors. After validating, the model is used to describe the temperature propagation after a short-term temperature stress on automotive prismatic lithium-ion cells, simulating welding of the contact leads.

  14. In-plane and through-plane local and average Nusselt numbers in fibrous porous materials with different fiber layer temperatures: Gas diffusion layers for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza

    2016-09-01

    Convective heat transfer inside fibrous gas diffusion layers (GDLs) noticeably impacts the heat and water management of air-cooled polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Cutting-edge experiments have recently proved that convective heat transfer inside fibrous GDLs increases their thermal resistances considerably. However, heat transfer coefficients are difficult to measure experimentally or compute numerically for the millions of the tiny pores inside microstructural GDLs. The present study provides robust analytic models for predicting the heat transfer coefficient for both through-plane and in-plane flows inside fibrous media such as GDLs. The model is based on the unit cell approach and the integral method. Closed-form formulas are developed for local and average heat transfer coefficients. The model considers the temperature variations of the fiber layers along the medium thickness while assuming the same temperature for all the fibers in each layer. The model is well verified by COMSOL numerical data for a few pores inside a GDL. The simple, closed-form easy-to-use formulas developed in this study can be readily employed for predicting Nusselt number inside multilayer fibrous porous materials.

  15. Effect of Structure on Transport Properties (Viscosity, Ionic Conductivity, and Self-Diffusion Coefficient) of Aprotic Heterocyclic Anion (AHA) Room Temperature Ionic Liquids. 2. Variation of Alkyl Chain Length in the Phosphonium Cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liyuan; Morales-Collazo, Oscar; Xia, Han; Brennecke, Joan F

    2016-06-30

    A series of room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) composed of triethyl(alkyl)phosphonium cations paired with three different aprotic heterocyclic anions (AHAs) (alkyl = butyl ([P2224](+)) and octyl ([P2228](+))) were prepared to investigate the effect of cationic alkyl chain length on transport properties. The transport properties and density of these ILs were measured from 283.15 to 343.15 K at ambient pressure. The dependence of the transport properties (viscosity, ionic conductivity, diffusivity, and molar conductivity) on temperature can be described by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman (VFT) equation. The ratio of the molar conductivity obtained from the molar concentration and ionic conductivity measurements to that calculated from self-diffusion coefficients (measured by pulsed gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) using the Nernst-Einstein equation was used to quantify the ionicity of these ILs. The molar conductivity ratio decreases with increasing number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain, indicating that the reduced Coulombic interactions resulting from lower density are more than balanced by the increased van der Waals interactions between the alkyl chains. The results of this study may provide insight into the design of ILs with enhanced dynamics that may be suitable as electrolytes in lithium ion batteries and other electrochemical applications.

  16. Temperature effect on proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells from turkeys with different growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D L; Coy, C S; Strasburg, G M; Reed, K M; Velleman, S G

    2016-04-01

    Poultry selected for growth have an inefficient thermoregulatory system and are more sensitive to temperature extremes. Satellite cells are precursors to skeletal muscle and mediate all posthatch muscle growth. Their physiological functions are affected by temperature. The objective of the current study was to determine how temperature affects satellite cells isolated from the pectoralis major (p. major) muscle (breast muscle) of turkeys selected for increased 16 wk body weight (F line) in comparison to a randombred control line (RBC2) from which the F line originated. Pectoralis major muscle satellite cells were thermally challenged by culturing between 33°C and 43°C to analyze the effects of cold and heat on proliferation and differentiation as compared to control temperature of 38°C. Expression levels of myogenic regulatory factors: myogenic differentiation factor 1 (MYOD1) and myogenin (MYOG) were quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). At all sampling times, proliferation increased at a linear rate across temperature in both the RBC2 and F lines. Differentiation also increased at a linear rate across temperature from 33 to 41°C at all sampling times in both the F and RBC2 lines. Satellite cells isolated from F line turkeys were more sensitive to both hot and cold temperatures as proliferation and differentiation increased to a greater extent across temperature (33 to 43°C) when compared with the RBC2 line. Expression of MYOD1 and MYOG increased as temperatures increased from 33 to 41°C at all sampling times in both the F and RBC2 lines. These results demonstrate that satellite cell function is sensitive to both cold and hot temperatures and p. major muscle satellite cells from F line turkeys are more sensitive to temperature extremes than RBC2 satellite cells.

  17. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells - Degradation and Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon

    A harmonious mix of renewable and alternative energy sources, including fuel cells is necessary to mitigate problems associated with the current fossil fuel based energy system, like air pollution, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, and economic dependence on oil, and therefore on unstable areas...... of the globe. Fuel cells can harness the excess energy from other renewable sources, such as the big players in the renewable energy market, Photovoltaic (PV) panels and wind turbines, which inherently suffer from intermittency problems. The excess energy can be used to produce hydrogen from water or can...... be stored in liquid alcohols such as methanol, which can be sources of hydrogen for fuel cell applications. In addition, fuel cells unlike other technologies can use a variety of other fuels that can provide a source of hydrogen, such as biogas, methane, butane, etc. More fuel flexibility combined...

  18. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells - Degradation and Durability

    OpenAIRE

    Araya, Samuel Simon

    2012-01-01

    A harmonious mix of renewable and alternative energy sources, including fuel cells is necessary to mitigate problems associated with the current fossil fuel based energy system, like air pollution, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, and economic dependence on oil, and therefore on unstable areas of the globe. Fuel cells can harness the excess energy from other renewable sources, such as the big players in the renewable energy market, Photovoltaic (PV) panels and wind turbines, which inherently s...

  19. High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generator Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Pierre

    2007-09-30

    This report describes the results of the tubular SOFC development program from August 22, 1997 to September 30, 2007 under the Siemens/U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement. The technical areas discussed include cell manufacturing development, cell power enhancement, SOFC module and system cost reduction and technology advancement, and our field unit test program. Whereas significant progress has been made toward commercialization, significant effort remains to achieve our cost, performance and reliability targets for successful commercialization.

  20. Temperature Gradients on the Cell Wall in the Critical Viscosity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the diverging susceptibility delta rho/delta Tau near the liquid-vapor critical point, temperature gradients must be kept small to maintain adequate sample homogeneity. In our Science Requirements Document we paid particular attention to radial density gradients caused by equilibration of the xenon sample. Axial density gradients were addressed through the requirement that the cell's copper wall have a gradient less than 22 microK/m. This report re-examines the cell wall's temperature distribution in more detail by estimating all known significant contributions to temperature differences on the cell's wall.

  1. Investigation of Temperature and Aging Effects in Nanostructured Dye Solar Cells Studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Toivola

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of aging and cyclically varying temperature on the electrical parameters of dye solar cells were analyzed with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Photoelectrode total resistance increased as a function of time due to increasing electron transport resistance in the TiO2 film. On the other hand, photoelectrode recombination resistance was generally larger, electron lifetimes in the TiO2 were film longer, and charge transfer resistance on the counter electrode was smaller after the temperature treatments than before them. These effects correlated with the slower deterioration rate of the temperature-treated cells, in comparison to the reference cells.

  2. Temperature dependent estimator for load cells using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K-C [Department of Automation Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei, Yunlin 63208, Taiwan (China)

    2005-01-01

    Accurate weighting of pieces in various temperature environments for load cells is a key feature in many industrial applications. This paper proposes a method to achieve high-precision {+-}0.56/3000 grams for a load-cell-based weighting system by using ANFIS. ANFIS is used to model the relationship between the reading of load cells and the actual weight of samples considering temperature-varying effect and nonlinearity of the load cells. The model of the load-cell-based weighting system can accurately estimate the weight of test samples from the load cell reading. The proposed ANFIS-based method is convenient for use and can improve the precision of digital load cell measurement systems. Experiments demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of fuzzy neural networks for modeling of load cells and the results show that the proposed ANFIS-based method outperforms some existing methods in terms of modeling and prediction accuracy.

  3. Experimental Investigation of the Integral 2π Emissivity. Electrical Conductivity and Thermal Conductivity Coefficient for a Number of High-Melting Metals in the Temperature Range 1300-3000°K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-melting metals molybdenum, tantalum, niobium and others serve as a basis for modern vapour-tight structural materials in new technical fields, and in particular for MHD generators. They are becoming increasingly widely used both in the pure form and in the form of alloys and chemical compounds. The investigation of their thermophysical properties, in particular the thermal conductivity coefficient, the specific electric resistance and the integral emissivity, is a very pressing problem, important both from the strictly applied and from the theoretical point of view. In the present paper, the experimental methods of studying these characteristics are based on electron heating. This has made it possible to experiment with samples of simple geometry (short cylinders, 10-12 mm diam.), and in practice to remove restrictions on the temperature levels attainable. All the properties concerned are studied together on two experimental rigs of original design, and measurements may be made on one and the same sample. The error of the measurements does not exceed ± 1 to 1.5 % for electrical conductivity, ± 6 to 8% for the integral 2π emissivity, and ± 10 to 12% for the thermal conductivity coefficent. The paper investigates molybdenum (poly- and monocrystalline), tantalum, niobium and hafnium iodide. The data obtained have made it possible to gain a more precise idea of the accuracy of the Wiedemann-Franz- Lorentz relationship for this group of metals in the high temperature region. Data have been obtained for the first time for a number of temperature ranges for niobium, tantalum and hafnium. (author)

  4. Large low field magneto-resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance in La{sub 0.8}Ca{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} epitaxial thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debnath, J.C., E-mail: jcd341@uowmail.edu.au; Strydom, A.M.

    2015-02-05

    Highlights: • A giant value of MR 73% and 57% for both the directions are obtained at 1.5 T applied field. • The values of TCR about 14.2% K{sup −1} and 11.5% K{sup −1} for both directions are obtained in a wide temperature range. • This film is potential in non-cooling and highly sensitive bolometric applications. • This epitaxial thin film is efficient for the application of novel electronic devices. - Abstract: An epitaxial La{sub 0.8}Ca{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3}/LaAlO{sub 3} (LCMO/LAO) thin film was fabricated using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique to evaluate the magnetoresistance (MR) and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). The LCMO film was about 200 nm in thickness and appeared to have a strong out-of-plane texture. A giant value of MR 73% and 57% for both the ab-plane and in the c-directions respectively are obtained at 1.5 T applied field. The values of TCR are about 14.2% K{sup −1} and 11.5% K{sup −1} for both the ab-plane and in the c-directions respectively in a wide temperature range. These results proved that La{sub 0.8}Ca{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3}/LaAlO{sub 3} (LCMO/LAO) thin film is a promising candidate of perovskites for novel electronic applications.

  5. Estimation of optimal b-value sets for obtaining apparent diffusion coefficient free from perfusion in non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Kishor; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Ford, John C.; Olsen, Kathryn M.; Saraiya, Siddharth; Groves, Robert; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine optimal sets of b-values in diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) for obtaining monoexponential apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) close to perfusion-insensitive intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model ADC (ADCIVIM) in non-small cell lung cancer. Ten subjects had 40 DW-MRI scans before and during radiotherapy in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Respiratory triggering was applied to the echo-planar DW-MRI with \\text{TR}≈ 4500 ms, TE  =  74 ms, eight b-values of 0-1000 μs μm-2, pixel size  =  1.98× 1.98 mm2, slice thickness  =  6 mm, interslice gap  =  1.2 mm, 7 axial slices and total acquisition time ≈6 min. One or more DW-MRI scans together covered the whole tumour volume. Monoexponential model ADC values using various b-value sets were compared to reference-standard ADCIVIM values using all eight b-values. Intra-scan coefficient of variation (CV) of active tumour volumes was computed to compare the relative noise in ADC maps. ADC values for one pre-treatment DW-MRI scan of each of the 10 subjects were computed using b-value pairs from DW-MRI images synthesized for b-values of 0-2000 μs μm-2 from the estimated IVIM parametric maps and corrupted by various Rician noise levels. The square root of mean of squared error percentage (RMSE) of the ADC value relative to the corresponding ADCIVIM for the tumour volume of the scan was computed. Monoexponential ADC values for the b-value sets of 250 and 1000; 250, 500 and 1000; 250, 650 and 1000; 250, 800 and 1000; and 250-1000 μs μm-2 were not significantly different from ADCIVIM values (p>0.05 , paired t-test). Mean error in ADC values for these sets relative to ADCIVIM were within 3.5%. Intra-scan CVs for these sets were comparable to that for ADCIVIM. The monoexponential ADC values for other sets—0-1000 50-1000 100-1000 500-1000 and 250 and 800 μs μm-2 were significantly different from the ADCIVIM values. From Rician noise simulation

  6. Temperature-responsive intelligent interfaces for biomolecular separation and cell sheet engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Jun; Okano, Teruo

    2009-06-01

    Temperature-responsive intelligent surfaces, prepared by the modification of an interface with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its derivatives, have been used for biomedical applications. Such surfaces exhibit temperature-responsive hydrophilic/hydrophobic alterations with external temperature changes, which, in turn, result in thermally modulated interactions with biomolecules and cells. In this review, we focus on the application of these intelligent surfaces to chromatographic separation and cell cultures. Chromatographic separations using several types of intelligent surfaces are mentioned briefly, and various effects related to the separation of bioactive compounds are discussed, including wettability, copolymer composition and graft polymer architecture. Similarly, we also summarize temperature-responsive cell culture substrates that allow the recovery of confluent cell monolayers as contiguous living cell sheets for tissue-engineering applications. The key factors in temperature-dependent cell adhesion/detachment control are discussed from the viewpoint of grafting temperature-responsive polymers, and new methodologies for effective cell sheet culturing and the construction of thick tissues are summarized. PMID:19324682

  7. 400 W High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2006-01-01

    -1000 series MEAs by Pemeas, with an active area of 45cm2. The low pressure gas channels enable the use of low power blowers instead of a compressor which increases the overall system efficiency. This initial system was made to test the bipolar plate design, and there is no need for humidification...... of the species as in a LTPEM fuel cell system. The use of the HTPEM fuel cell makes it possible to use reformed gas at high CO concentrations, still with a stable efficient performance....

  8. The experimental investigation of linear expansion coefficient measurement of car fuel supplying cell parts%轿车供油单元零件线膨胀系数测定试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麻文焱; 杨延俊; 潘发明

    2009-01-01

    详细研究了电阻应变计法测量材料线膨胀系数的原理,结合轿车供油单元零件线膨胀系数测定试验,具体阐述了试验步骤及方法.结果表明应用电阻应变计法测试材料线膨胀系数是一种既简单实用又经济的测试技术.%This article studies the principle of measuring coefficient of linear expansion by using resistance strain gauge and discusses the experimental steps and methods combining with the determination test of linear expansion coefficient of car fuel supply cell parts. The result shows it is a practical and economical testing technique to measure linear expansion coefficients of materials by resistance strain gauge.

  9. Characterization of high-temperature performance of cesium vapor cells with anti-relaxation coating

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wenhao; Peng, Xiang; Pustelny, Szymon; Wickenbrock, Arne; Guo, Hong; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Vapor cells with antirelaxation coating are widely used in modern atomic physics experiments due to the coating's ability to maintain the atoms' spin polarization during wall collisions. We characterize the performance of vapor cells with different coating materials by measuring longitudinal spin relaxation and vapor density at temperatures up to 95{\\deg}C. We found that the spin-projection-noise-limited sensitivity for atomic magnetometers with such cells improves with temperature, which demonstrates the potential of antirelaxation coated cells in applications of future high-sensitivity magnetometers.

  10. A Direct DME High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng;

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl ether (DME) has been identified as an alternative to methanol for use in direct fuel cells. It combines the advantages of hydrogen in terms of pumpless fuel delivery and high energy density like methanol, but without the toxicity of the latter. The performance of a direct dimethyl ether ...

  11. Correlation of Choline/Creatine and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient values with the prognostic parameters of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek Abdel; Nada, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to measure choline/creatine (Ch/Cr) levels through (1)H-MRS and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values through diffusion-weighted MRI, and to correlate these values with the prognostic parameters of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The institutional review board approved this study and informed written consent was obtained from all study participants. A prospective study of 43 patients (31 men and 12 women; mean age, 65 years) with HNSCC was conducted. Single-voxel (1)H-MRS was performed at the tumor or metastatic cervical lymph node with point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) at TE = 135 ms. Diffusion-weighted MR images with b values of 0, 500 and 1000 s/mm(2) and contrast MRI of the head and neck were performed. The Ch/Cr levels and ADC values of HNSCC were calculated. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was also calculated. The degree of tumor differentiation was determined through pathological examination. The HNSCC Ch/Cr level was negatively correlated with the ADC value (r = -0.662, p = 0.001). There was a significant difference in the Ch/Cr and ADC values at different degrees of tumor differentiation (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001) and with different GTVs (p = 0.122 and p = 0.001). The following prognostic parameter categories were used: (i) poorly differentiated and undifferentiated versus well differentiated to moderately differentiated; and (ii) HNSCC with GTV 30 cm(3). The cut-off values for Cho/Cr and ADC for each category were 1.83, 0.95 and 1.94, 0.99, respectively, and the areas under the curve were 0.771, 0.967 and 0.726, 0.795, respectively, for each category. We conclude that the Ch/Cr levels determined using (1)H-MRS and the ADC values are well correlated with several prognostic parameters of HNSCC.

  12. The use of Electrolyte Additives to Improve the High Temperature Resilience of Li-Ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Lucht, B. L.; Ratnakumar, Bugga V.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of electrolyte additves to improve the resillience of Lithium ion cells. The objective of this work is to identify lithium-ion electrolytes, which will lead to Li-ion cells with a wide operational temperature range (+60 to -60 C), and to develop Li-ion electrolytes which result in cells that display improved high temperature resilience. Significant improvement in the high temperature resilience of Li-ion cells containing these additives was observed, with the most dramatic benefit being displayed by addition of DMAc. When the electrochemical properties of the individual electrodes were analyzed, the degradation of the anode kinetics was slowed most dramatically by the incorporation of DMAc into the electrolytes. Whereas, the greatest retention in the cathode kinetics was observed in the cell containing the electrolyte with VC added.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Measurements of Temperature and Cell Viability in Response to Nanoparticle Mediated Photothermal Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, Jon R [ORNL; Rodgers, Amanda [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Harvie, Erica [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Carswell, William [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Torti, Suzy [Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Rylander, Christopher [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Rylander, Nichole M [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Nanoparticle enhanced photothermal therapy is a promising alternative to tumor resection. However, quantitative measurements of cellular response to these treatments are limited. This paper introduces a Bimodal Enhanced Analysis of Spatiotemporal Temperature (BEAST) algorithm to rapidly determine the viability of cancer cells in vitro following photothermal therapy alone or in combination with nanoparticles. Materials & Methods: To illustrate the capability of the BEAST viability algorithm, single wall carbon nanohorns were added to renal cancer (RENCA) cells in vitro and time-dependent spatial temperature maps measured with an infrared camera during laser therapy were correlated with post-treatment cell viability distribution maps obtained by cell-staining fluorescent microscopy. Conclusion: The BEAST viability algorithm accurately and rapidly determined the cell viability as function of time, space, and temperature.

  14. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo;

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the aptitude of several metal oxide supports (TiO2, SnO2, NbO2, ZrO2, SiO2, Ta2O5 and Nb2O5) to redisperse platinum under electrochemical conditions pertinent to the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathode. The redispersion on oxide supports in air has been studied in ...

  15. Performance and endurance of a high temperature PEM fuel cell operated on methanol reformate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela; Zhou, Fan;

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of methanol and water vapor on the performance of a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) at varying temperatures, ranging from 140 °C to 180 °C. For the study, a H3PO4 – doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) – based membrane electrode assembly (ME...

  16. Climatology Applied To Architecture: An Experimental Investigation about Internal Temperatures Distribution at Two Test Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Tibério Cardoso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Data were analyzed en relative spatial distribution of the internal surface temperature (IST and internal air temperature or dry bulb (TBS, in two different test cells, for a typical experimental day under the influence of tropical mass. The main goal of this research is to provide guidelines to collect temperature data experimentally since there is not an appropriate standard to guide this methodological procedure in buildings. The data series of dry bulb temperature and internal surface temperatures were measured in a test cell with a green roof and the other with conventional ceramic roof by thermocouples installed at predetermined locations. The data of solar radiation and the main climatic variables were recorded by the automatic weather station at the Center of Science Engineering Applied to the Environment (CCEAMA, School of Engineering of São Carlos (EESC-USP. The results led to the conclusion that the distribution of the internal surface temperature is almost uniform in the two test cells, but in relation to the dry bulb temperature there is a small vertical temperature gradient in the conventional cell. This work will contribute significantly to future studies in the area of human comfort and environmental suitability of buildings

  17. BEHAVIOR OF CHO CELLS ON MODIFIED POLYPROPYLENE BY LOW TEMPERATURE AMMONIA PLASMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong; YU Yaoting; PAN Jilun; XU Yuanping; ZHU Hesun

    2001-01-01

    The surface of polypropylene (PP) membrane was modified by low temperature plasma with ammonia. The effect of exposure time was investigated by means of contact angle measurement. The results show that low temperature ammonia plcsma treatment can enhance its hydrophilicity. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells attachment on the modified membrane was enhanced and the growth rate on the membrane was faster than unmodified one.

  18. Further Improvement and System Integration of High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology based on Nafion membranes can operate at temperatures around 80°C. The new development in the field is high temperature PEMFC for operation above 100°C, which has been successfully demonstrated through the previous EC Joule III and the 5th...

  19. Sudden collapse of vacuoles in Saintpaulia sp. palisade cells induced by a rapid temperature decrease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriaki Kadohama

    Full Text Available It is well known that saintpaulia leaf is damaged by the rapid temperature decrease when cold water is irrigated onto the leaf surface. We investigated this temperature sensitivity and the mechanisms of leaf damage in saintpaulia (Saintpaulia sp. cv. 'Iceberg' and other Gesneriaceae plants. Saintpaulia leaves were damaged and discolored when subjected to a rapid decrease in temperature, but not when the temperature was decreased gradually. Sensitivity to rapid temperature decrease increased within 10 to 20 min during pre-incubation at higher temperature. Injury was restricted to the palisade mesophyll cells, where there was an obvious change in the color of the chloroplasts. During a rapid temperature decrease, chlorophyll fluorescence monitored by a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer diminished and did not recover even after rewarming to the initial temperature. Isolated chloroplasts were not directly affected by the rapid temperature decrease. Intracellular pH was monitored with a pH-dependent fluorescent dye. In palisade mesophyll cells damaged by rapid temperature decrease, the cytosolic pH decreased and the vacuolar membrane collapsed soon after a temperature decrease. In isolated chloroplasts, chlorophyll fluorescence declined when the pH of the medium was lowered. These results suggest that a rapid temperature decrease directly or indirectly affects the vacuolar membrane, resulting in a pH change in the cytosol that subsequently affects the chloroplasts in palisade mesophyll cells. We further confirmed that the same physiological damage occurs in other Gesneriaceae plants. These results strongly suggested that the vacuoles of palisade mesophyll cells collapsed during the initial phase of leaf injury.

  20. Sudden collapse of vacuoles in Saintpaulia sp. palisade cells induced by a rapid temperature decrease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadohama, Noriaki; Goh, Tatsuaki; Ohnishi, Miwa; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Mimura, Tetsuro; Suzuki, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that saintpaulia leaf is damaged by the rapid temperature decrease when cold water is irrigated onto the leaf surface. We investigated this temperature sensitivity and the mechanisms of leaf damage in saintpaulia (Saintpaulia sp. cv. 'Iceberg') and other Gesneriaceae plants. Saintpaulia leaves were damaged and discolored when subjected to a rapid decrease in temperature, but not when the temperature was decreased gradually. Sensitivity to rapid temperature decrease increased within 10 to 20 min during pre-incubation at higher temperature. Injury was restricted to the palisade mesophyll cells, where there was an obvious change in the color of the chloroplasts. During a rapid temperature decrease, chlorophyll fluorescence monitored by a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer diminished and did not recover even after rewarming to the initial temperature. Isolated chloroplasts were not directly affected by the rapid temperature decrease. Intracellular pH was monitored with a pH-dependent fluorescent dye. In palisade mesophyll cells damaged by rapid temperature decrease, the cytosolic pH decreased and the vacuolar membrane collapsed soon after a temperature decrease. In isolated chloroplasts, chlorophyll fluorescence declined when the pH of the medium was lowered. These results suggest that a rapid temperature decrease directly or indirectly affects the vacuolar membrane, resulting in a pH change in the cytosol that subsequently affects the chloroplasts in palisade mesophyll cells. We further confirmed that the same physiological damage occurs in other Gesneriaceae plants. These results strongly suggested that the vacuoles of palisade mesophyll cells collapsed during the initial phase of leaf injury.

  1. Sudden collapse of vacuoles in Saintpaulia sp. palisade cells induced by a rapid temperature decrease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadohama, Noriaki; Goh, Tatsuaki; Ohnishi, Miwa; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Mimura, Tetsuro; Suzuki, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that saintpaulia leaf is damaged by the rapid temperature decrease when cold water is irrigated onto the leaf surface. We investigated this temperature sensitivity and the mechanisms of leaf damage in saintpaulia (Saintpaulia sp. cv. 'Iceberg') and other Gesneriaceae plants. Saintpaulia leaves were damaged and discolored when subjected to a rapid decrease in temperature, but not when the temperature was decreased gradually. Sensitivity to rapid temperature decrease increased within 10 to 20 min during pre-incubation at higher temperature. Injury was restricted to the palisade mesophyll cells, where there was an obvious change in the color of the chloroplasts. During a rapid temperature decrease, chlorophyll fluorescence monitored by a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer diminished and did not recover even after rewarming to the initial temperature. Isolated chloroplasts were not directly affected by the rapid temperature decrease. Intracellular pH was monitored with a pH-dependent fluorescent dye. In palisade mesophyll cells damaged by rapid temperature decrease, the cytosolic pH decreased and the vacuolar membrane collapsed soon after a temperature decrease. In isolated chloroplasts, chlorophyll fluorescence declined when the pH of the medium was lowered. These results suggest that a rapid temperature decrease directly or indirectly affects the vacuolar membrane, resulting in a pH change in the cytosol that subsequently affects the chloroplasts in palisade mesophyll cells. We further confirmed that the same physiological damage occurs in other Gesneriaceae plants. These results strongly suggested that the vacuoles of palisade mesophyll cells collapsed during the initial phase of leaf injury. PMID:23451194

  2. File list: NoD.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 No description Adult Temperature s...ensitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: NoD.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 No description Adult Temperature s...ensitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: InP.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Input control Adult Temperature se...nsitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Input control Adult Temperature se...nsitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 No description Adult Temperature s...ensitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Input control Adult Temperature se...nsitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: InP.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Input control Adult Temperature se...nsitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  9. Simulations on Asymmetric Three-barrier Transmission Coefficients under Different Bias and Temperatures%不同偏压温度下非对称三势垒透射系数的模拟计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵瑞娟; 安盼龙; 许丽萍; 杨艳

    2012-01-01

    非对称多势垒可获得比双势垒更大的共振隧穿电流及更良好的峰谷比。通过分析单电子对任意势垒透射的理论模型,建立了任意非对称三势垒模型,研究了不同偏压和温度对透射系数的影响,并得出结论,为进一步设计非对称量子器件提供理论指导。%Asymmetric multi-barrier can obtain larger resonant tunneling current and better peak-valley ratio than double barrier. By analyzing the theoretical models of single-electron transmission on any harrier, an arbitrary asymmetric three-barrier model was established. Effects of different bias and temperatures on the transmission coefficient were studied. It provides a theoretical guidance for the further design of asymmetric quantum devices.

  10. Thermal cycling properties of a lead-free positive temperature coefficient thermistor in the Ba0.97(Bi0.5Na0.5)0.03TiO3 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyoung-Seuk; Choi, Soon-Mok; Choi, Duck-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    A Pb-free PTC (positive temperature coefficient thermistor) heater was developed in the Ba0.97(Bi0.5Na0.5)0.03TiO3 system especially for automotive part applications. The reliability was verified by using a thermal cycling test designed on the basis of the result from a quality function deployment (QFD) analysis. We compared the thermal cycling test results from the newly-developed Pb-free PTC heaters with the results from PTC heaters currently on the market, namely, PTC heaters containing Pb. Life prediction and stress-strength relationships were analyzed together with a thermal diffusivity evaluation. We discuss the potential failure mechanisms during the thermal cycling test, focusing on the fact that electrical degradation in PTC materials is closely related to mechanical degradation due to the internal stress in the materials that comes from repeated phase changes. Different grain size distributions on the sintered bulks were considered to a key factor for explaining the different results of the reliability tests between the new Pb-free PTC heaters developed in this study and the commercial PTC heaters containing Pb.

  11. Cell-intrinsic mechanisms of temperature compensation in a grasshopper sensory receptor neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemschied, Frederic A; Eberhard, Monika Jb; Schleimer, Jan-Hendrik; Ronacher, Bernhard; Schreiber, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Changes in temperature affect biochemical reaction rates and, consequently, neural processing. The nervous systems of poikilothermic animals must have evolved mechanisms enabling them to retain their functionality under varying temperatures. Auditory receptor neurons of grasshoppers respond to sound in a surprisingly temperature-compensated manner: firing rates depend moderately on temperature, with average Q10 values around 1.5. Analysis of conductance-based neuron models reveals that temperature compensation of spike generation can be achieved solely relying on cell-intrinsic processes and despite a strong dependence of ion conductances on temperature. Remarkably, this type of temperature compensation need not come at an additional metabolic cost of spike generation. Firing rate-based information transfer is likely to increase with temperature and we derive predictions for an optimal temperature dependence of the tympanal transduction process fostering temperature compensation. The example of auditory receptor neurons demonstrates how neurons may exploit single-cell mechanisms to cope with multiple constraints in parallel.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02078.001. PMID:24843016

  12. Characterisation and Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Schaltz, Erik;

    2009-01-01

    In designing and controlling fuel cell systems it is advantageous having models predicting fuel cell behavior in steady-state as well as in dynamic operation. This work examines the use of Electro-chemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) for characterizing and developing an impedance model for a high...... temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. A Labview virtual instrument has been developed to perform the signal generation and data acquisition which is needed to perform EIS. The typical output of an EIS measurement on a fuel cell, is a Nyquist plot, which shows the imaginary and real part of the impedance...... of the measured system. The full stack impedance depends on the impedance of each of the single cells of the stack. Equivalent circuit models for each single cell can be used to predict the stack impedance at different temperature profiles of the stack. The information available in such models can be used...

  13. Larger Daphnia at lower temperature: a role for cell size and genome configuration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Marwa; Wojewodzic, Marcin W; Laane, Carl Morten M; Hessen, Dag O

    2013-09-01

    Experiments with Daphnia magna and Daphnia pulex raised at 10 and 20 °C yielded larger adult size at the lower temperature. This must reflect increased cell size, increased cell numbers, or a combination of both. As it is difficult to achieve good estimates on cell size in crustaceans, we, therefore, measured nucleus and genome size using flow cytometry at 10 and 20 °C. DNA was stained with propidium iodide, ethidium bromide, and DAPI. Both nucleus and genome size estimates were elevated at 10 °C compared with 20 °C, suggesting that larger body size at low temperature could partly be accredited to an enlarged nucleus and thus cell size. Confocal microscopy observations confirmed the staining properties of fluorochromes. As differences in nucleotide numbers in response of growth temperature within a life span is unlikely, these results seem accredited to changed DNA-fluorochrome binding properties, presumably reflecting increased DNA condensation at low temperature. This implies that genome size comparisons may be impacted by ambient temperature in ectotherms. It also suggests that temperature-induced structural changes in the genome could affect cell size and for some species even body size.

  14. Enhancing Protein Expression in HEK-293 Cells by Lowering Culture Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chi-Yen; Huang, Zhen; Wen, Wei; Wu, Andrew; Wang, Congzhou; Niu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Animal cells and cell lines, such as HEK-293 cells, are commonly cultured at 37°C. These cells are often used to express recombinant proteins. Having a higher expression level or a higher protein yield is generally desirable. As we demonstrate in this study, dropping culture temperature to 33°C, but not lower, 24 hours after transient transfection in HEK-293S cells will give rise to ~1.5-fold higher expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropio...

  15. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P., E-mail: richard.smedley-stevenson@awe.co.uk [AWE PLC, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); McClarren, Ryan G., E-mail: rmcclarren@ne.tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  16. Fabrication and Characterizations of Materials and Components for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells and Water Electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Prag, Carsten Brorson; Li, Qingfeng;

    The worldwide development of fuel cells and electrolysers has so far almost exclusively addressed either the low temperature window (20-200 °C) or the high temperature window (600-1000 °C). This work concerns the development of key materials and components of a new generation of fuel cells...... might be used. One of the key materials in the fuel cell and electrolyser systems is the electrolyte. Proton conducting materials such as cesium hydrogen phosphates, zirconium hydrogen phosphates and tin pyrophosphates have been investigated by others and have shown interesting potential....

  17. Binary co-generative plants with height temperature SOFC fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a field of binary co-generative plants with height temperature SOFC fuel cells is presented. Special attention of application of height temperature SOFC fuel cells and binary co-generative units has been given. These units made triple electricity and heat. Principle of combination of fuel cells with binary cycles has been presented. A model and computer programme for calculation of BKPFC, has been created. By using the program, all the important characteristic-results are calculated: power, efficiency, emission, dimension and economic analysis. On base of results, conclusions and recommendations has been given. (Author)

  18. Development of low temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, W.T.; Goldstein, R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The historical focus of the electric utility industry has been central station power plants. These plants are usually sited outside urban areas and electricity was delivered via high voltage transmission lines. Several things are beginning to change this historical precedent One is the popular concern with EMF as a health hazard. This has rendered the construction of new lines as well as upgrading old ones very difficult. Installation of power generating equipment near the customer enables the utility to better utilize existing transmission and distribution networks and defer investments. Power quality and lark of disturbances and interruptions is also becoming increasingly more important to many customers. Grid connected, but dedicated small power plants can greatly improve power quality. Finally the development of high efficiency, low emission, modular fuel cells promises near pollution free localized power generation with an efficiency equal to or exceeding that of even the most efficient central power stations.

  19. Electrode design for low temperature direct-hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanglin; Zhao, Fei; Liu, Qiang

    2015-10-06

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  20. Electrode Design for Low Temperature Direct-Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanglin (Inventor); Zhao, Fei (Inventor); Liu, Qiang (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  1. INVESTIGATION ON SILICON SOLAR CELL CAPACITANCE AND ITS DEPENDENCE ON BOTH TEMPERATURE AND INCIDENCE ANGLE

    OpenAIRE

    Moustapha Sané

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate a theoretical study of a vertical junction silicon solar cell capacitance under monochromatic illumination. By solving the continuity equation and using a one dimensional model in frequency modulation, we derive the analytical expressions of both excess minority carrier density and photovoltage. Based on these expressions, the solar cell capacitance was calculated; we then exhibited the effects of both temperature and incidence angle on the solar cell ca...

  2. Temperature dependency of state of charge inhomogeneities and their equalization in cylindrical lithium-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osswald, P. J.; Erhard, S. V.; Rheinfeld, A.; Rieger, B.; Hoster, H. E.; Jossen, A.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of cell temperature on the current density distribution and accompanying inhomogeneities in state of charge (SOC) during cycling is analyzed in this work. To allow for a detailed insight in the electrochemical behavior of the cell, commercially available 26650 cells were modified to allow for measuring local potentials at four different, nearly equidistant positions along the electrodes. As a follow-up to our previous work investigating local potentials within a cell, we apply this method for studying SOC deviations and their sensitivity to cell temperature. The local potential distribution was studied during constant current discharge operations for various current rates and discharge pulses in order to evoke local inhomogeneities for temperatures ranging from 10 °C to 40 °C. Differences in local potentials were considered for estimating local SOC variations within the electrodes. It could be observed that even low currents such as 0.1C can lead to significant inhomogeneities, whereas a higher cell temperature generally results in more pronounced inhomogeneities. A rapid SOC equilibration can be observed if the variation in the SOC distribution corresponds to a considerable potential difference defined by the open circuit voltage of either the positive or negative electrode. With increasing temperature, accelerated equalization effects can be observed.

  3. An induction heating diamond anvil cell for high pressure and temperature micro-Raman spectroscopic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Keiji; Noguchi, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    A new external heating configuration is presented for high-temperature diamond anvil cell instruments. The supporting rockers are thermally excited by induction from an externally mounted copper coil passing a 30 kHz alternating current. The inductive heating configuration therefore avoids the use of breakable wires, yet is capable of cell temperatures of 1100 K or higher. The diamond anvil cell has no resistive heaters, but uses a single-turn induction coil for elevating the temperature. The induction coil is placed near the diamonds and directly heats the tungsten carbide rockers that support the diamond. The temperature in the cell is determined from a temperature-power curve calibrated by the ratio between the intensities of the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman lines of silicon. The high-pressure transformation of quartz to coesite is successfully observed by micro-Raman spectroscopy using this apparatus. The induction heating diamond anvil cell is thus a useful alternative to resistively heated diamond anvil cells. PMID:18248060

  4. Temperature distributions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell from 3-D numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present TempDAC, a 3-D numerical model for calculating the steady-state temperature distribution for continuous wave laser-heated experiments in the diamond anvil cell. TempDAC solves the steady heat conduction equation in three dimensions over the sample chamber, gasket, and diamond anvils and includes material-, temperature-, and direction-dependent thermal conductivity, while allowing for flexible sample geometries, laser beam intensity profile, and laser absorption properties. The model has been validated against an axisymmetric analytic solution for the temperature distribution within a laser-heated sample. Example calculations illustrate the importance of considering heat flow in three dimensions for the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. In particular, we show that a “flat top” input laser beam profile does not lead to a more uniform temperature distribution or flatter temperature gradients than a wide Gaussian laser beam

  5. Temperature dependence of SET switching characteristics in phase-change memory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiang; Li, Zhen; Liu, Chang; Meng, Xiang-ru; Peng, Ju-hong; Lai, Zhi-bo; Miao, Xiang-shui

    2016-09-01

    The temperature dependence of crystallization kinetics of phase-change materials raises a series of reliability issues, while phase-change memory cells work at high temperature or thermal-disturbance condition. These issues hinder the development of ultrahigh-density storage devices. We investigate the evolution of SET switching characteristics of phase-change memory cells at high operating temperature. We show that the high temperature strongly impacts the SET state resistance. As a result, SET failure has been observed with elevated ambient temperature. Our SPICE simulations indicate that transient amorphization behavior during a complete SET pulse period is considered as the potential mechanism of SET failure. By modifying the SET pulse intensity and width linearly, we successfully reduce the SET failure in the experiments. The results illustrate that the demonstrated linear properties may optimize SET pulse performance.

  6. Electrochemical characterization of a polybenzimidazole-based high temperature proton exchange membrane unit cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Schaltz, Erik; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    This work constitutes detailed EIS (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy) measurements on a PBIbased HT-PEM unit cell. By means of EIS the fuel cell is characterized in several modes of operation by varying the current density, temperature and the stoichiometry of the reactant gases. Using...... Equivalent Circuit (EC) modeling key parameters, such as the membrane resistance, charge transfer resistance and gas transfer resistance are identified, however the physical interpretation of the parameters derived from EC's are doubtful as discussed in this paper. The EC model proposed, which is a modified...... Randles circuit, provides a reasonably good fit at all the conditions tested. The measurements reveal that the cell temperature is an important parameter, which influences the cell performance significantly, especially the charge transfer resistance proved to be very temperature dependent. The transport...

  7. Cobalt based layered perovskites as cathode material for intermediate temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: A brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosato, Renato; Cordaro, Giulio; Stucchi, Davide; Cristiani, Cinzia; Dotelli, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, the cathode is the most studied component in Intermediate Temperature-Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (IT-SOFCs). Decreasing SOFCs operating temperature implies slow oxygen reduction kinetics and large polarization losses. Double perovskites with general formula REBaCo2O5+δ are promising mixed ionic-electronic conductors, offering a remarkable enhancement of the oxygen diffusivity and surface exchange respect to disordered perovskites. In this review, more than 250 compositions investigated in the literature were analyzed. The evaluation was performed in terms of electrical conductivity, Area Specific Resistance (ASR), chemical compatibility with electrolytes and Thermal Expansion Coefficient (TEC). The most promising materials have been identified as those bearing the mid-sized rare earths (Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd). Doping strategies have been analyzed: Sr doping on A site promotes higher electrical conductivity, but worsen ASR and TECs; B-site doping (Fe, Ni, Mn) helps lowering TECs, but is detrimental for the electrochemical properties. A promising boost of the electrochemical activity is obtained by simply introducing a slight Ba under-stoichiometry. Still, the high sensitivity of the electrochemical properties against slight changes in the stoichiometry hamper a conclusive comparison of all the investigated compounds. Opportunities for an improvement of double perovskite cathodes performance is tentatively foreseen in combining together the diverse effective doping strategies.

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of biofuels as fuels for high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Jarosław; Bujalski, Wojciech; Lewandowski, Janusz

    2013-02-01

    Based on mathematical modeling and numerical simulations, applicativity of various biofuels on high temperature fuel cell performance are presented. Governing equations of high temperature fuel cell modeling are given. Adequate simulators of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) have been done and described. Performance of these fuel cells with different biofuels is shown. Some characteristics are given and described. Advantages and disadvantages of various biofuels from the system performance point of view are pointed out. An analysis of various biofuels as potential fuels for SOFC and MCFC is presented. The results are compared with both methane and hydrogen as the reference fuels. The biofuels are characterized by both lower efficiency and lower fuel utilization factors compared with methane. The presented results are based on a 0D mathematical model in the design point calculation. The governing equations of the model are also presented. Technical and financial analysis of high temperature fuel cells (SOFC and MCFC) are shown. High temperature fuel cells can be fed by biofuels like: biogas, bioethanol, and biomethanol. Operational costs and possible incomes of those installation types were estimated and analyzed. A comparison against classic power generation units is shown. A basic indicator net present value (NPV) for projects was estimated and commented.

  9. Prestarlike functions with negative coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Silverman

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available The extreme points for prestarlike functions having negative coefficients are determined. Coefficient, distortion and radii of univalence, starlikeness, and convexity theorems are also obtained.

  10. High-Energy-Density, Low-Temperature Li/CFx Primary Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Jay; Bugga, Ratnakumar; Smart, Marshall; Prakash, G.; Yazami, Rachid

    2007-01-01

    High-energy-density primary (nonrechargeable) electrochemical cells capable of relatively high discharge currents at temperatures as low as -40 C have been developed through modification of the chemistry of commercial Li/CFx cells and batteries. The commercial Li/CFx units are not suitable for high-current and low-temperature applications because they are current limited and their maximum discharge rates decrease with decreasing temperature. The term "Li/CFx" refers to an anode made of lithium and a cathode made of a fluorinated carbonaceous material (typically graphite). In commercial cells, x typically ranges from 1.05 to 1.1. This cell composition makes it possible to attain specific energies up to 800 Wh/kg, but in order to prevent cell polarization and the consequent large loss of cell capacity, it is typically necessary to keep discharge currents below C/50 (where C is numerically equal to the current that, flowing during a charge or discharge time of one hour, would integrate to the nominal charge or discharge capacity of a cell). This limitation has been attributed to the low electronic conductivity of CFx for x approx. 1. To some extent, the limitation might be overcome by making cathodes thinner, and some battery manufacturers have obtained promising results using thin cathode structures in spiral configurations. The present approach includes not only making cathodes relatively thin [.2 mils (.0.051 mm)] but also using sub-fluorinated CFx cathode materials (x 1. It was known from recent prior research that cells containing sub-fluorinated CFx cathodes (x between 0.33 and 0.66) are capable of retaining substantial portions of their nominal low-current specific energies when discharged at rates as high as 5C at room temperature. However, until experimental cells were fabricated following the present approach and tested, it was not known whether or to what extent low-temperature performance would be improved.

  11. In Situ Irradiation and Measurement of Triple Junction Solar Cells at Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.D.; Imaizumi, M.; Walters, R.J.; Lorentzen, J.R.; Messenger, S.R.; Tischler, J.G.; Ohshima, T.; Sato, S.; Sharps, P.R.; Fatemi, N.S.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of triple junction InGaP/(In)GaAs/Ge space solar cells was studied following high energy electron irradiation at low temperature. Cell characterization was carried out in situ at the irradiation temperature while using low intensity illumination, and, as such, these conditions reflect those found for deep space, solar powered missions that are far from the sun. Cell characterization consisted of I-V measurements and quantum efficiency measurements. The low temperature irradiations caused substantial degradation that differs in some ways from that seen after room temperature irradiations. The short circuit current degrades more at low temperature while the open circuit voltage degrades more at room temperature. A room temperature anneal after the low temperature irradiation produced a substantial recovery in the degradation. Following irradiation at both temperatures and an extended room temperature anneal, quantum efficiency measurement suggests that the bulk of the remaining damage is in the (In)GaAs sub-cell

  12. Determination of effective thermal expansion coefficients of unidirectional fibrous nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ming; Schiavone, Peter; Gao, Cun-Fa

    2016-10-01

    We present an efficient numerical scheme (based on complex variable techniques) to calculate the effective thermal expansion coefficients of a composite containing unidirectional periodic fibers. Moreover, the mechanical behavior of the fibers incorporates interface effects allowing the ensuing analytical model of the composite to accommodate deformations at the nanoscale. The resulting `nanocomposite' is subjected to a uniform temperature variation which leads to periodic deformations within the plane perpendicular to the fibers and uniform deformations along the direction of the fibers. These deformation fields are determined by analyzing a representative unit cell of the composite subsequently leading to the corresponding effective thermal expansion coefficients. Numerical results are illustrated via several physical examples. We find that the influence of interface effects on the effective thermal expansion coefficients (in particular that corresponding to the transverse direction in the plane perpendicular to the fibers) decays rapidly as the fibers become harder. In addition, by comparing the results obtained here with those from effective medium theories, we show that the latter may induce significant errors in the determination of the effective transverse thermal expansion coefficient when the fibers are much softer than the matrix and the fiber volume fraction is relatively high.

  13. Gorenstein Hilbert Coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Sabine El

    2012-01-01

    We prove upper and lower bounds for all the coefficients in the Hilbert Polynomial of a graded Gorenstein algebra $S=R/I$ with a quasi-pure resolution over $R$. The bounds are in terms of the minimal and the maximal shifts in the resolution of $R$ . These bounds are analogous to the bounds for the multiplicity found in \\cite{S} and are stronger than the bounds for the Cohen Macaulay algebras found in \\cite{HZ}.

  14. Novel Method for Measuring Temperature Distribution within Fuel Cell using Microsensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Hsieh, Chi-Lieh; Wu, Guan-Wei

    2007-05-01

    A fuel cell has the potential to become an important source of electric power. However, measuring the temperature inside the fuel cell is difficult. Hence, in this investigation, an array of microsensors is set up inside the fuel cell to measure the temperature distribution. The substrate of a bipolar plate in the fuel cell is stainless steel (SS-316) and an electroforming technique is implemented to fabricate channels in the stainless steel substrate. Then micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technologies are employed to fabricate a platinum temperature sensor on the rib of a channel in the stainless steel substrate. In this experiment, the temperature of microsensor is measured to range from 31 to 80 °C and its resistance ranges from 0.593 to 0.649 Ω. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature is almost linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity are 0.5 °C and 1.93× 10-3/°C, respectively. The performance curves of a single fuel cell operating at 34 °C and H2/O2 gas flow rates of 50/50 ml/min are determined. The maximum power density is 170 mW/cm2 and the current density is 513 mA/cm2.

  15. High-Temperature Experiments using a Resistively-Heated High-Pressure Membrane Diamond Anvil Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenei, Z; Visbeck, K; Cynn, H; Yoo, C; Evans, W

    2009-04-22

    A reliable high-performance heating method using resistive heaters and a membrane driven diamond anvil cell (mDAC) is presented. Two micro-heaters are mounted in a mDAC and use electrical power of less than 150 W to achieve sample temperatures up to 1200 K. For temperature measurement we use two K-type thermocouples mounted near the sample. The approach can be used for in-situ Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction at high pressures and temperatures. A W-Re alloy gasket material permits stable operation of mDAC at high temperature. Using this method, we made an isothermal compression at 900 K to pressures in excess of 100 GPa and isobaric heating at 95 GPa to temperatures in excess of 1000 K. As an example, we present high temperature Raman spectroscopy measurements of nitrogen at high pressures.

  16. The "Micromorph" cell: a New Way to High-Efficiency-Low-Temperature Crystalline Silicon Thin-Film Cell Manufacturing ?

    OpenAIRE

    Keppner, H.; Kroll, U.; Torres, P.; J. Meier; Platz, R.; Fischer, D.; Beck, N; Dubail, S.; Anna Selvan, J. A.; Pellaton Vaucher, N.; Goerlitzer, M.; Ziegler, Y.; Tscharner, R.; Hof, Ch.; Goetz, M

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline Silicon (µc-Si:H) produced by the VHF-GD (Very High Frequency Glow Discharge) process can be considered to be a new base material for thin-film crystalline silicon solar cells. The most striking feature of such cells, in contrast to conventional amorphous silicon technology, is their stability under light-soaking. With respect to crystalline silicon technology, their most striking advantage is their low process temperature (220 °C). The so called “micromorph” cel...

  17. Enhancement of Power Efficiency and Stability of P3HT-Based Organic Solar Cells under Elevated Operating-Temperatures by Using a Nanocomposite Photoactive Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thi Thao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim to find out an enhanced operating-temperature range for photovoltaic device parameters, two types of the photoactive layer were prepared: poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT and P3HT+nc-TiO2 (PTC thin films. The enhancement obtained for the photoelectrical conversion efficiency of the composite based OSCs is attributed to the presence of nanoheterojunctions of TiO2/P3HT. For the temperature range of 30–70°C, the decrease of the open-circuit potential was compensated by an increase of the fill factor; and the increase in the short-circuit current resulted in an overall increase of the energy conversion efficiency. At elevated temperatures of 60–80°C the efficiency of the P3HT- and PTC-based cells reached a maximum value of 1.6% and 2.1%, respectively. Over this temperature range the efficiency of P3HT-based OSC decreased strongly to zero, whereas for the PTC cells it maintained a value as large as 1.2% at the temperature range of 110–140°C. The improved thermal stability of the composite-based device was attributed to the lowered thermal expansion coefficient of the nanocomposite photoactive layer.

  18. Survival of Suspension-cultured Sycamore Cells Cooled to the Temperature of Liquid Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Y; Sakai, A

    1974-11-01

    Suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) which were immersed in liquid nitrogen after prefreezing to the temperatures from -30 to -50 C in the presence of dimethylsulfoxide and glucose as cryoprotective additive could proliferate vigorously when rewarmed rapidly in water at 40 C. For maintaining high viability of the cells after immersion in liquid nitrogen, it seems to be essential to use the cells at the later lag phase or the early cell division phase. This study provides a possibility for long term preservation in liquid nitrogen of plant-cultured lines.

  19. Thermal modeling and temperature control of a PEM fuel cell system for forklift applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen;

    2014-01-01

    fuel cell system for studying temperature variations over fast load changes. A temperature dependent cell polarization and hydration model integrated with the compressor, humidifier and cooling system are simulated in dynamic condition. A feedback PID control was implemented for stack cooling....... A combination of high temperature and reduced humidity increases the degradation rate. Stack thermal management and control are, thus, crucial issues in PEM fuel cell systems especially in automotive applications such as forklifts. In this paper we present a control–oriented dynamic model of a liquid–cooled PEM....... The stack energy balance was reduced to a first order differential equation using a lumped approach. The first-order Linear Time-Invariant system was used to obtain the transfer function which was determined based on experimental data at different stack loads. The developed model approach can assist...

  20. The Truth About Ballistic Coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The ballistic coefficient of a bullet describes how it slows in flight due to air resistance. This article presents experimental determinations of ballistic coefficients showing that the majority of bullets tested have their previously published ballistic coefficients exaggerated from 5-25% by the bullet manufacturers. These exaggerated ballistic coefficients lead to inaccurate predictions of long range bullet drop, retained energy and wind drift.

  1. Low temperature measurements of state-of-the-art concentrator solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, Valery D.; Chekalin, Alexander V.; Malevskiy, Dmitry A.; Shvarts, Maxim Z.; Andreev, Valery M.

    2015-09-01

    Knowing the temperature behavior of the photovoltaic parameters in multi-junction (MJ) solar cells (SCs) can give information suitable for comparing different cell structures and for estimating a potential of their operation in various environmental conditions. As a rule, the cell structures are designed specifically for terrestrial (with high sunlight concentration), or space (sometimes with relatively low concentration) applications, differing in certain, but not principal, details. Structural improvements introduced in one of the cell types may highlight the effective ways for improvements applicable for another cell type. In this work, a set of the state-of-the-art concentrator triple-junction SCs were investigated to analyze the influence of temperature in a very wide range of -170 ≤ T ≤ +85°C, together with the sunlight concentration ratio variation, on the cell performance. In particular, the PV conversion efficiencies as high as 50 - 52% (AM1.5d) have been measured in the temperature range of -120 - -150°C for the sunlight concentration ratios of C = 50 - 300 suns. Such investigations may be regarded as a tool for revealing the presence of the "parasitic" built-in energy barriers at cell structure optimization.

  2. Measurement of R Line Fluorescence in Ruby Using the Diamond Anvil Cell at Low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Li-Wen; CHE Rong-Zheng; JIN Chang-Qing

    2000-01-01

    Using our custom-built high-pressure cryostat we have performed the measurements of the R line fluorescence of ruby in the diamond anvil cell from room temperature down to 90K. The maximum pressure was 11.1 GPa. By computer curve fitting, different equations have been found for functions of wavenumber versus temperature between ambient pressure and 2.7 GPa. The changes of the shape and linewidth of R lines were observed.

  3. Strategy and Enhanced Temperature Determination in a Laser Heated Diamond Anvil Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Deemyad, Shanti; Papathanassiou, Anthony N.; Silvera, Isaac F.

    2009-01-01

    We show that a strategy for increased accuracy in temperature determination by optical pyrometry when the wavelength dependence of the emissivity is unknown is to measure the spectral irradiance at short wavelengths. We then introduce an improved method of determining the temperature in laser heated diamond anvil cells. In general a blackbody source is used to determine the optical transfer function required for determining the blackbody curve. By using the thermal radiation of a heated absor...

  4. Fast and low temperature growth of electron transport layers for efficient perovskite solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jie; Juárez Pérez, Emilio José; Mora Seró, Iván; Viana, Bruno; Pauporté, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    We describe a fast, simple and low temperature electrochemical technique for the preparation of zinc oxide layers on rigid and flexible substrates. The layers, prepared from a zinc nitrate precursor, are of high structural and optical quality. They have been optimized to be applied as efficient electron transport layers in CH3NH3PbI3-sensitized perovskite solar cells (PSCs). We show that an electrodeposition time of only two minutes and a low processing temperature are sufficient ...

  5. BEHAVIOR OF CHO CELLS ON MODIFIED POLYPROPYLENE BY LOW TEMPERATURE AMMONIA PLASMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGHong; ZHUHesun; 等

    2001-01-01

    The surface of polypropylene(PP) membrane was modified by low temperature plasma with ammonia.The effect of exposure time was investigated by means of contact angle measurement.The results show that low temperature ammonia plasma treatment can enhance its hydrophilicity.Chinese hamster ovary(CHO)cells attachment on the modified membrane was enhanced and the growth rate on the membrane was faster than unmodified one.

  6. Temperature dependent competition between different recombination channels in organic heterojunction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modification of the Shockley–Queisser theory for organic heterojunctions is presented with a special focus on constellations, where a linear extrapolation of the temperature dependence of the open circuit voltage results in the optical gap of the absorber rather than in the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) gap. We demonstrate that, depending on the electronic coupling strength between donor and acceptor molecules, either singlet or CT recombination is dominant in different temperature regimes. The different regimes are separated by a transition temperature that is usually well above room temperature (RT). However, in the case of small energy level offset and weak electronic coupling, it can be around 300 K or even below. We point out that a linear extrapolation of the open circuit voltage V oc towards 0 K for measured temperatures larger than the transition temperature results in a photovoltaic gap that is close to the optical gap, whereas for values below the transition temperature the CT gap will be extracted. We show that for α-sexithiophene (6T)/diindenoperylene (DIP) solar cells heating the substrate during 6T deposition leads to a molecular configuration at the interface where the coupling between donor and acceptor molecules is strongly reduced. This leads to a transition temperature well below RT which is confirmed by temperature dependent electroluminescence measurements. By comparing the temperature dependent spectra of high temperature and RT grown 6T/DIP solar cells to the spectra of the individual materials, the different contributions from the CT gap and the optical gap are separated. (paper)

  7. Liquid phase PVTx properties of (water + tert-butanol) binary mixtures at temperatures from 278.15 to 323.15 K and pressures from 0.1 to 100 MPa. II. Molar isothermal compressions, molar isobaric expansions, molar thermal pressure coefficients, and internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Molar isothermal compressions and molar isobaric expansions were evaluated. ► Coefficients of thermal pressure and internal pressure were obtained. ► Concentration dependences of coefficients under study display extremes. ► Temperature and pressure dependences of internal pressure of the mixture were linear. -- Abstract: Molar isothermal compressions, molar isobaric expansions, molar coefficients of thermal pressure, and internal pressure were calculated over the whole concentration range of {water (1) + tert-butanol (2)} mixture at pressures from 0.1 to 100 MPa and temperatures from 278.15 to 323.15 K. It was revealed that the extremes, observed on concentration dependences of molar isothermal compression KT,m and molar isobaric expansion EP,m of the mixture, became more pronounced with pressure growth and temperature lowering. Values of molar thermal pressure coefficients of the mixture sharply rose at compositions with small TBA mole fraction and then decreased practically linearly with the alcohol content increasing. Temperature and pressure dependences of the mixture internal pressure were almost linear, and at low TBA concentrations changed significantly from the dependences of water, tert-butanol and their mixtures at large alcohol content

  8. Some comments on `Equation for the second virial coefficient`

    OpenAIRE

    Umirzakov, I. H.

    2013-01-01

    The second viral coefficient calculated using the equation suggested in the paper of Kaplun A.B., Meshalkin A.B. Equation for the second virial coefficient published in High temperature high pressure, 1999, Volume 31, pages 253-258 is compared with experimental data for helium, hydrogen, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, carbon dioxide, water, ammonia, methane, ethylene. It is shown the formula cannot describe the temperature dependence of the experimental data on the second virial coefficient for...

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Components for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells And Electrolyzers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede

    it might become possible to use non-noble metal catalysts. On the other hand, the temperature is low enough for a wide range of materials to be used as construction materials. In this work a set-up was built and fuel cell hardware was made for demonstration of fuel cells for the intermediate temperature...... and other materials must be sought for. It was attempted to use stainless steel (316L), this however corroded and therefore a protective tantalum coating was applied. The tantalum coatings were found to be corrosion resistant and furthermore provided extremely low interfacial contact resistances of only 1...

  10. A Circuit Model for CMOS Hall Cells Performance Evaluation including Temperature Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Alexandra Paun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide the information on their Hall voltage, sensitivity, and drift with temperature, a new simpler lumped circuit model for the evaluation of various Hall cells has been developed. In this sense, the finite element model proposed by the authors in this paper contains both geometrical parameters (dimensions of the cells and physical parameters such as the mobility, conductivity, Hall factor, carrier concentration, and the temperature influence on them. Therefore, a scalable finite element model in Cadence, for behavior simulation in circuit environment of CMOS Hall effect devices, with different shapes and technologies assessing their performance, has been elaborated.

  11. Ultra-high temperature isothermal furnace liners (IFLS) for copper freeze point cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussinger, P. M.; Tavener, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    Primary Laboratories use large fixed-point cells in deep calibration furnaces utilizing heat pipes to achieve temperature uniformity. This combination of furnace, heat pipe, and cell gives the smallest of uncertainties. The heat pipe, also known as an isothermal furnace liner (IFL), has typically been manufactured with Alloy 600/601 as the envelope material since the introduction of high temperature IFLs over 40 years ago. Alloy 600/601 is a widely available high temperature material, which is compatible with Cesium, Potassium, and Sodium and has adequate oxidation resistance and reasonable high temperature strength. Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) Alloy 600/Sodium IFLs are rated to 1100°C for approximately 1000 hours of operation (based on creep strength). Laboratories interested in performing calibrations and studies around the copper freezing point (1084.62°C) were frustrated by the 1000 hours at 1100°C limitation and the fact that expensive freeze-point cells were getting stuck and/or crushed inside the IFL. Because of this growing frustration/need, ACT developed an Ultra High Temperature IFL to take advantage of the exceptional high temperature strength properties of Haynes 230.

  12. Scaling the Raman gain coefficient: Applications to Germanosilicate fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Bromage, J.; Stentz, A.J.;

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the temperature dependence of a Raman amplifier and the scaling of the Raman gain coefficient with wavelength, modal overlap, and material composition. The temperature dependence is derived by applying a quantum theoretical description, whereas the...... scaling of the Raman gain coefficient is derived using a classical electromagnetic model. We also present experimental verification of our theoretical findings....

  13. Invariant coefficients of diffusion in iron-chromium-nickel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokrov, A.P.; Akimov, V.K.; Golubev, V.G.

    1984-02-01

    The temperature and concentration dependences of the Dsub(c) coefficients in the ..gamma..-phase of iron-chromium-nickel system are determined. It is proposed to described mutual diffusion in multicomponent systems using invariant, i.e. independent of the choice of solvent, coefficients of diffusion. The assumption that their temperature dependence follows the Arrhenius law is confirmed by the experiment.

  14. Invariant coefficients of diffusion in iron-chromium-nickel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature and concentration dependences of the Dsub(c) coefficients in the γ-phase of iron-chromium-nickel system are determined. It is proposed to described mutual diffusion in mul-- ticomponent systems using invariant, i. e. independent of the choice of solvent, coefficients of diffusion. The assumption that their temperature dependence follows the Arrhenius law is confirmed by the experiment

  15. Dependence of interparticle force on temperature and cell thickness in nematic colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Noboru; Iwashita, Yasutaka; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2010-08-01

    We have experimentally studied the interparticle force between two particles accompanied by hyperbolic hedgehog defects in a nematic liquid crystal. The force F was measured with dual-beam optical tweezers at various temperatures and in cells with various thicknesses. In a thick cell, the dependence of F on the interparticle distance R obtained at different temperatures can be scaled to a universal curve of F∝R^(-4) for R>3a , where a is the radius of a particle. The effective elastic constant evaluated from F is found to be in good agreement with splay constant of the nematic liquid crystal. In a thin cell, the magnitude of F decreases and the dependence of F on R becomes short-ranged as the thickness of a cell, L , decreases. The reduced force curves, FL(4) against R/L , at different L are found to be scaled to a single theoretical curve which has been proposed recently. PMID:20866767

  16. Experimental Mg IX photo recombination rate coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate coefficient for radiative and dielectronic recombination of beryllium-like magnesium ions was measured with high resolution at the Heidelberg heavy-ion storage ring TSR. In the electron-ion collision energy range 0-207 eV resonances due to 2s → 2p (ΔN = 0) and 2s → 3l (ΔN = 1) core excitations were detected. At low energies below 0.15 eV the recombination rate coefficient is dominated by strong 1s2(2s2p 3P)7l resonances with the strongest one occurring at an energy of only 21 meV. These resonances decisively influence the Mg IX recombination rate coefficient in a low temperature plasma. The experimentally derived Mg IX dielectronic recombination rate coefficient (±15% systematical uncertainty) is compared with the recommendation by Mazzotta et al. (1998, AandAS, 133, 403) and the recent calculations by Gu (2003, ApJ, 590, 1131) and by Colgan et al. (2003, AandA, 412, 597). These results deviate from the experimental rate coefficient by 130%, 82% and 25%, respectively, at the temperature where the fractional abundance of Mg IX is expected to peak in a photoionized plasma. At this temperature a theoretical uncertainty in the 1s2(2s2p 3P)7l resonance positions of only 100 meV would translate into an uncertainty of the plasma rate coefficient of almost a factor 3. This finding emphasizes that an accurate theoretical calculation of the Mg IX recombination rate coefficient from first principles is challenging. (authors)

  17. Experimental Mg IX photorecombination rate coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippers, S.; Schnell, M.; Brandau, C.; Kieslich, S.; Müller, A.; Wolf, A.

    2004-07-01

    The rate coefficient for radiative and dielectronic recombination of beryllium-like magnesium ions was measured with high resolution at the Heidelberg heavy-ion storage ring TSR. In the electron-ion collision energy range 0-207 eV resonances due to 2s -> 2p (Δ N = 0) and 2s -> 3l (Δ N=1) core excitations were detected. At low energies below 0.15 eV the recombination rate coefficient is dominated by strong 1s2 (2s 2p 3P) 7l resonances with the strongest one occuring at an energy of only 21 meV. These resonances decisively influence the Mg IX recombination rate coefficient in a low temperature plasma. The experimentally derived Mg IX dielectronic recombination rate coefficient (±15% systematical uncertainty) is compared with the recommendation by Mazzotta et al. (1998, A&AS, 133, 403) and the recent calculations by Gu (2003, ApJ, 590, 1131) and by Colgan et al. (2003, A&A, 412, 597). These results deviate from the experimental rate coefficient by 130%, 82% and 25%, respectively, at the temperature where the fractional abundance of Mg IX is expected to peak in a photoionized plasma. At this temperature a theoretical uncertainty in the 1s2 (2s 2p 3P) 7l resonance positions of only 100 meV would translate into an uncertainty of the plasma rate coefficient of almost a factor 3. This finding emphasizes that an accurate theoretical calculation of the Mg IX recombination rate coefficient from first principles is challenging.

  18. High temperature polymer fuel cells and their Interplay with fuel processing systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Qingfeng, Li; He, R.;

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports recent results from our group on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200°C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all....... The high working temperature allows for utilization of the excess heat for fuel processing. Moreover, it provides an excellent CO tolerance of several percent, and the system needs no purification of hydrogen from a reformer. Continuous service for over 6 months at 150°C has been demonstrated....

  19. Prevention of core cell damage in isolated islets of Langerhans by low temperature preconditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Fu Cui; Ming Ma; Gui-Yu Wang; De-En Han; Brigitte Vollmar; Michael D. Menger

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the core cell damage in isolated islets of Langerhans and its prevention by low temperature preconditioning (26 ℃).METHODS: Islets were cultured at 37 ℃ for 7-14 d after isolation, and then at 26 ℃ for 2, 4 and 7 d before additional culture at 37 ℃ for another 7 d. Core cell damage in the isolated islets was monitored by video-microscopy and analyzed quantitatively by use of a computer-assisted image analysis system. The analysis included daily measurement of the diameter and the area of the isolated islets and the area of the core cell damage that developed in those islets over time during culture. Histology and TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were used to characterize the cell damage and to monitor islet function.RESULTS: Microscopic analysis showed that during the 7 to 14 d of culture at 37 ℃, core cell damage occurred in the larger islets with diameters >200 μm, which included both necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Low temperature (26 ℃) culture could prevent core cell damage of isolated islets. The 7-d culture procedure at 26 ℃ could inhibit most of the core cell (excluding diameters>300 μm) damages when the islets were re-warmed at 37 ℃.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that core cell damage within isolated islets of Langerhans correlates with the size of islets. Low temperature (26 ℃) culture can prevent core cell damage in isolated islets, and successfully precondition these islets for incubation at 37 ℃. These novel findings may help to understand the pathophysiology of early loss of islet tissue after transplantation, and may provide a new strategy to improve graft function in the clinical setting of islet transplantation.

  20. Oxidative degradation of polybenzimidazole membranes as electrolytes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, J.H.; Li, Qingfeng; Rudbeck, H.C.;

    2011-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole membranes imbibed with acid are emerging as a suitable electrolyte material for high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The oxidative stability of polybenzimidazole has been identified as an important issue for the long-term durability of such cells. In this paper...... the oxidative degradation of the polymer membrane was studied under the Fenton test conditions by the weight loss, intrinsic viscosity, size exclusion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. During the Fenton test, significant weight losses depending...

  1. An Innovative Configuration for CO 2 Capture by High Temperature Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Rossi; Andrea Nicolini; Massimo Palombo; Beatrice Castellani; Elena Morini; Mirko Filipponi

    2014-01-01

    Many technological solutions have been proposed for CO 2 capture in the last few years. Most of them are characterized by high costs in terms of energy consumption and, consequently, higher fossil fuel use and higher economic costs. High temperature fuel cells are technological solutions currently developed for energy production with low environmental impact. In CIRIAF—University of Perugia labs, cylindrical geometry, small-sized molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) prototypes were built and t...

  2. Room temperature electrocompetent bacterial cells improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Tu; Jia Yin; Jun Fu; Jennifer Herrmann; Yuezhong Li; Yulong Yin; Francis Stewart, A.; Rolf Müller; Youming Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial competent cells are essential for cloning, construction of DNA libraries, and mutagenesis in every molecular biology laboratory. Among various transformation methods, electroporation is found to own the best transformation efficiency. Previous electroporation methods are based on washing and electroporating the bacterial cells in ice-cold condition that make them fragile and prone to death. Here we present simple temperature shift based methods that improve DNA transformation and re...

  3. Effect of temperature on the activation of myocardial KATP channel in guinea pig ventricular myocytes: a pilot study by whole cell patch clamp recording

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN San-qing; NIU Li-jun; DENG Chun-yu; YAO Zhi-bin; ZHOU Ying-jie

    2006-01-01

    Background The myocardial ATP sensitive potassium channel (KATP channel) has been known for more than two decades, the properties of this channel have been intensively investigated, especially the myocardial protection effect by opening this channel. Numerous studies, including hypothermic, using KATP agonists to achieve a hyperpolarizing cardioplegic arrest, have shown a better myocardial protection than potassium arrest.However, there is no evidence showing that KATP channel could be opened by its agonists under profound hypothermia. We investigated the effect of temperature on activation of myocardial KATP channel by nicorandil.Methods Isolated ventricular myocytes were obtained by collagenase digestion of the hearts of guinea pigs and stored in KB solution at 4℃. With a steady ground current, the myocytes were perfused with 1 mmol/L nicorandil until a steady IKATP occurred. Then the cells were perfused with 1 mmol/L nicorandil plus 1 μmol/L glybenclamide. Currents signals were recorded on whole cells using patch clamp technique at several temperatures. The temperature of the bath solution around myocytes was monitored and was controlled at 4℃,10℃, 20℃, 25℃ and 35℃ respectively. About 10 cells were tested at each temperature, the cells were considered useful only when the outward current could be induced by nicorandil and blocked by glybenclamide.All data were analyzed using Graphpad PRISM 3.0 (Graphpad, San Diego, CA, USA). Nonlinear curve fitting was done in Clampfit (Axon) or Sigmaplot (SPSS).Results At 4℃, 10℃, 20℃, 25℃ and 35℃, the time needed to open the myocardial KATP channel was (81.0±0)minutes, (50.5±11.7) minutes, (28.8±2.3) minutes, (9.4±10.2) minutes and (2.3± 1.0) minutes respectively (P=0.003). The linear relationship between temperature and time needed to open the channel was y (min) =(4348.790-124.277x)/60, where y (min) is time needed to open KATP channel, x is temperature, correlation coefficient r =-0.942 (P=0

  4. Treatment of prostate cancer cell lines and primary cells using low temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, Adam; Frame, Fiona F.; Maitland, Norman J.

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms of cell death after plasma treatment of both benign and cancerous prostate epithelial cells are investigated. Prostate cancer tissue was obtained with patient consent from targeted needle core biopsies following radical prostatectomy. Primary cells were cultured from cancer tissue and plated onto a chamber slide at a density of 10,000 cells per well in 200 microliter of stem cell media (SCM). The treated sample was previously identified as Gleason grade 7 cancer through tissue histo-pathology. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet configuration, with helium as a carrier gas, and 0.3% O2 admixture was used for treating the cells. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) produced by the plasma are believed to be the main mediators of the plasma-cell interaction and response. We found the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced inside the cells increased with plasma exposure. Exposure to the plasma for >3 minutes showed high levels of DNA damage compared to untreated and hydrogen peroxide controls. Cell viability and cellular recovery are also investigated and will be presented. All findings were common to both cell lines, suggesting the potential of LTP therapy for both benign and malignant disease.

  5. Influence of the starting materials on performance of high temperature oxide fuel cells devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Emilia Satoshi Miyamaru; Yoshito, Walter Kenji; Ussui, Valter; Lazar, Dolores Ribeiro Ricci; Castanho, Sonia Regina Homem de Mello; Paschoal, Jose Octavio Armani [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: esmiyseo@net.ipen.br

    2004-03-01

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer an environmentally friendly technology to convert gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas or gasified coal into electricity at high efficiencies. Besides the efficiency, higher than those obtained from the traditional energy conversion systems, a fuel cell provides many other advantages like reliability, modularity, fuel flexibility and very low levels of N Ox and S Ox emissions. The high operating temperature (950-1000 deg C) used by the current generation of the solid oxide fuel cells imposes severe constraints on materials selection in order to improve the lifetime of the cell. Besides the good electrical, electrochemical, mechanical and thermal properties, the individual cell components must be stable under the fuel cell operating atmospheres. Each material has to perform not only in its own right but also in conjunction with other system components. For this reason, each cell component must fulfill several different criteria. This paper reviews the materials and the methods used to fabricate the different cell components, such as the cathode, the electrolyte, the anode and the interconnect. Some remarkable results, obtained at IPEN (Nuclear Energy Research Institute) in Sao Paulo, have been presented. (author)

  6. Influence of the starting materials on performance of high temperature oxide fuel cells devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emília Satoshi Miyamaru Seo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs offer an environmentally friendly technology to convert gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas or gasified coal into electricity at high efficiencies. Besides the efficiency, higher than those obtained from the traditional energy conversion systems, a fuel cell provides many other advantages like reliability, modularity, fuel flexibility and very low levels of NOx and SOx emissions. The high operating temperature (950-1000 °C used by the current generation of the solid oxide fuel cells imposes severe constraints on materials selection in order to improve the lifetime of the cell. Besides the good electrical, electrochemical, mechanical and thermal properties, the individual cell components must be stable under the fuel cell operating atmospheres. Each material has to perform not only in its own right but also in conjunction with other system components. For this reason, each cell component must fulfill several different criteria. This paper reviews the materials and the methods used to fabricate the different cell components, such as the cathode, the electrolyte, the anode and the interconnect. Some remarkable results, obtained at IPEN (Nuclear Energy Research Institute in São Paulo, have been presented.

  7. Improved low temperature performance of lithium ion cells with quaternary carbonate-based electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Chin, K. B.; Surampudi, S.; Croft, H.; Tice, D.; Staniewicz, R.

    2002-01-01

    In order to enable future missions involving the exploration of the surface of Mars with Landers and Rovers, NASA desires long life, high energy density rechargeable batteries which can operate well at very low temperature (down to 40(deg)C). Lithium-ion technology has been identified as being the most promising chemistry, due to high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities, as well as, long life characteristics. However, the state-of-art (SOA) technology is not sufficient to meet the needs of many applications that require excellent low temperature capabilities. To further improve this technology, work at JF'L has been focused upon developing electrolytes that result in lithium-ion cells with wider temperature ranges of operation. These efforts have led to the identification of a number of ternary and quaternary, all carbonate-based electrolytes that have been demonstrated to result in improved low temperature performance in experimental three-electrode MCMB carbon/LiNio.sCoo.zOz cells. A number of electrochemical characterization techniques were performed on these cells (i.e., Tafel polarization measurements, linear polarization measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) to further enhance our understanding of the performance limitations at low temperature. The most promising electrolyte formulations, namely 1 .O M LiPF6EC+DEC+DMC+EMC (1 : 1: 1 :2 v/v) and 1 .O M LiPF6 EC+DEC+DMC+EMC (1 : 1 : 1 :3 v/v), were incorporated into SAFT prototype DD-size (9 Ahr) lithium- cells for evaluation. A number of electrical tests were performed on these cells, including rate characterization as a function of temperature, cycle life characterization at different temperatures, as well as, many mission specific characterization test to determine their viability to enable future missions to Mars. Excellent performance was observed with the prototype DD-size cells over a wide temperature range (-50 to 4OoC), with high specific energy being delivered at very

  8. A drug-compatible and temperature-controlled microfluidic device for live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Gomez-Escoda, Blanca; Munoz-Garcia, Javier; Babic, Julien; Griscom, Laurent; Wu, Pei-Yun Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring cellular responses to changes in growth conditions and perturbation of targeted pathways is integral to the investigation of biological processes. However, manipulating cells and their environment during live-cell-imaging experiments still represents a major challenge. While the coupling of microfluidics with microscopy has emerged as a powerful solution to this problem, this approach remains severely underexploited. Indeed, most microdevices rely on the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which strongly absorbs a variety of molecules commonly used in cell biology. This effect of the microsystems on the cellular environment hampers our capacity to accurately modulate the composition of the medium and the concentration of specific compounds within the microchips, with implications for the reliability of these experiments. To overcome this critical issue, we developed new PDMS-free microdevices dedicated to live-cell imaging that show no interference with small molecules. They also integrate a module for maintaining precise sample temperature both above and below ambient as well as for rapid temperature shifts. Importantly, changes in medium composition and temperature can be efficiently achieved within the chips while recording cell behaviour by microscopy. Compatible with different model systems, our platforms provide a versatile solution for the dynamic regulation of the cellular environment during live-cell imaging. PMID:27512142

  9. A drug-compatible and temperature-controlled microfluidic device for live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Gomez-Escoda, Blanca; Munoz-Garcia, Javier; Babic, Julien; Griscom, Laurent; Wu, Pei-Yun Jenny; Coudreuse, Damien

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring cellular responses to changes in growth conditions and perturbation of targeted pathways is integral to the investigation of biological processes. However, manipulating cells and their environment during live-cell-imaging experiments still represents a major challenge. While the coupling of microfluidics with microscopy has emerged as a powerful solution to this problem, this approach remains severely underexploited. Indeed, most microdevices rely on the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which strongly absorbs a variety of molecules commonly used in cell biology. This effect of the microsystems on the cellular environment hampers our capacity to accurately modulate the composition of the medium and the concentration of specific compounds within the microchips, with implications for the reliability of these experiments. To overcome this critical issue, we developed new PDMS-free microdevices dedicated to live-cell imaging that show no interference with small molecules. They also integrate a module for maintaining precise sample temperature both above and below ambient as well as for rapid temperature shifts. Importantly, changes in medium composition and temperature can be efficiently achieved within the chips while recording cell behaviour by microscopy. Compatible with different model systems, our platforms provide a versatile solution for the dynamic regulation of the cellular environment during live-cell imaging. PMID:27512142

  10. Heterodiffusion coefficients in alpha-iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsika-Tsigourakou, Vassiliki, E-mail: vkatsik@phys.uoa.g [Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, 15784 Athens (Greece); Skordas, Efthimios S. [Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, 15784 Athens (Greece)

    2010-04-01

    The diffusion of tungsten in alpha-iron is important for the application of ferritic-iron alloys to thermal power plants. These data, over a wide temperature range across the Curie temperature, have been recently reported. We show that these diffusion coefficients can be satisfactory reproduced in terms of the bulk elastic and expansivity data by means of a thermodynamical model that interconnects point defects parameters with bulk qualities.

  11. Sensitivity of the Heat Transfer Coefficient Calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Singer, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the Liscic/Petrofer probe is to determine the cooling intensity during liquid quenching in laboratory and workshop environments. The surface heat transfer coefficient is calculated by the one-dimensional finite volume method from the smoothed temperature curve, measured at a near-surface point in the probe. Smoothed reference temperature curves for oil and water, based on measurements made by the probe, are used in a series of numerical experiments to investigate the sensitivit...

  12. AFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON SILICON SOLAR CELL PARAMETERS%温度对晶体硅太阳电池模型参数的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘锋; 黄建华; 陈军; 李翔; 陈宁; 吴春健

    2012-01-01

    通过非线性全局拟合的方法从晶体硅太阳电池的I-V数据中提取不同温度下电池的等效电路模型参数,分析这些参数随温度的变化规律,计算其温度系数.研究表明反向饱和电流对温度依赖性会因电池本身复合中心密度的不同而出现分化,这种分化现象具有可利用的价值.研究太阳电池模型参数的温度特性,有利于更深入了解硅光伏电池的性能,为工艺改进提供帮助.%A nonlinear global fitting method was applied to determine solar cell parameters from the illuminated I-V data under different temperatures. The variations of the model parameters with temperature increasing were obtained. And all the temperature coefficient of the five model parameters including a single crystalline silicon solar cell and a multi-crystalline silicon solar cell were got. And then it is found the density of recombination centre will result in a big change of the variations of the saturate current with temperature, which is useful for us to improve the fabrication of silicon solar cells and promote the accuracy of testing solar cells.

  13. Ice formation in PEM fuel cells operated isothermally at sub-freezing temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhan, Roger W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hussey, Daniel S [NIST; Jacobson, David L [NIST; Arif, Muhammad [NIST

    2009-01-01

    The effect of MEA and GDL structure and composition on the performance of single-PEM fuel cells operated isothermally at subfreezing temperatures is presented. The cell performance and durability are not only dependent on the MEA/GDL materials used but also on their interfaces. When a cell is operated isothermally at sub-freezing temperatures in constant current mode, the water formation due to the current density initially hydrates the membrane/ionomer and then forms ice in the catalyst layer/GDL. An increase in high frequency resistance was also observed in certain MEAs where there is a possibility of ice formation between the catalyst layer and GDL leading to a loss in contact area. The total water/ice holding capacity for any MEA was lower at lower temperatures and higher current densities. The durability of MEAs subjected to multiple isothermal starts was better for LANL prepared MEAs as compared to commercial MEAs, and cloth GDLs when compared to paper GDLs. The ice formation was monitored using high-resolution neutron radiography and was found to be concentrated near the cathode catalyst layer. However, there was significant ice formation in the GDLs especially at the higher temperature ({approx} -10 C) and lower current density (0.02 A/cm{sup 2}) operations. These results are consistent with the longer-term durability observations that show more severe degradation at the lower temperatures.

  14. Unravelling the low-temperature metastable state in perovskite solar cells by noise spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, C.; Lang, F.; Mauro, C.; Landi, G.; Rappich, J.; Nickel, N. H.; Rech, B.; Pagano, S.; Neitzert, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid perovskite methylammonium lead iodide CH3NH3PbI3 recently revealed its potential for the manufacturing of low-cost and efficient photovoltaic cells. However, many questions remain unanswered regarding the physics of the charge carrier conduction. In this respect, it is known that two structural phase transitions, occurring at temperatures near 160 and 310 K, could profoundly change the electronic properties of the photovoltaic material, but, up to now, a clear experimental evidence has not been reported. In order to shed light on this topic, the low-temperature phase transition of perovskite solar cells has been thoroughly investigated by using electric noise spectroscopy. Here it is shown that the dynamics of fluctuations detect the existence of a metastable state in a crossover region between the room-temperature tetragonal and the low-temperature orthorhombic phases of the perovskite compound. Besides the presence of a noise peak at this transition, a saturation of the fluctuation amplitudes is observed induced by the external DC current or, equivalently, by light exposure. This noise saturation effect is independent on temperature, and may represent an important aspect to consider for a detailed explanation of the mechanisms of operation in perovskite solar cells. PMID:27703203

  15. Active control of the nucleation temperature enhances freezing survival of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterboeck, L; Hofmann, N; Mueller, T; Glasmacher, B

    2015-12-01

    Cryopreservation is a technique that has been extensively used for storage of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in regenerative medicine. Therefore, improving current cryopreservation procedures in terms of increasing cell viability and functionality is important. In this study, we optimized the cryopreservation protocol of MSCs derived from the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus (cj), which can be used as a non-human primate model in various pathological and transplantation studies and have a great potential for regenerative medicine. We have investigated the effect of the active control of the nucleation temperature using induced nucleation at a broad range of temperatures and two different dimethylsulfoxide concentrations (Me2SO, 5% (v/v) and 10%, (v/v)) to evaluate the overall effect on the viability, metabolic activity and recovery of cells after thawing. Survival rate and metabolic activity displayed an optimum when ice formation was induced at -10 °C. Cryomicroscopy studies indicated differences in ice crystal morphologies as well as differences in intracellular ice formation with different nucleation temperatures. High subzero nucleation temperatures resulted in larger extracellular ice crystals and cellular dehydration, whereas low subzero nucleation temperatures resulted in smaller ice crystals and intracellular ice formation. PMID:26499840

  16. Optimal design and operational tests of a high-temperature PEM fuel cell for a combined heat and power unit

    OpenAIRE

    Barreras Toledo, Felix Manuel; Lozano Fantoba, Antonio; Roda Serrat, Vicente; Barroso Estébanez, Jorge Angel; Martin Yagüe, Jesus Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    Development of new materials for polymer electrolyte membranes has allowed increasing the operational temperature of PEM fuel cell stacks above 120 degrees C. The present paper summarizes the main results obtained in a research devoted to the design, fabrication and operational tests performed on a high-temperature PEMFC prototype. A 5-cell stack has been assembled with commercial Celtec P-1000 high-temperature MEAs from BASF Fuel Cells, but the rest of elements and processes have been develo...

  17. Effect of season on milk temperature, milk growth hormone, prolactin, and somatic cell counts of lactating cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igono, M. O.; Johnson, H. D.; Steevens, B. J.; Hainen, W. A.; Shanklin, M. D.

    1988-09-01

    Monthly fluctuations in milk temperature, somatic cell counts, milk growth hormone and prolactin of lactating cows were measured in milk samples over a 1 year period. The seasonal patterns in milk temperature, somatic cell count and milk prolactin concentration showed a positive trend with increasing environmental temperatures. Milk growth hormone concentration increased with lactation level and declined significantly during summer heat. Milk temperature and the measured hormonal levels may serve as indicators of the impact of the climatic environment on lactating cattle.

  18. Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    In designing and controlling fuel cell sys-tems it is advantageous having models predicting the behavior of the fuel cells in steady-state as well as in dynamic ope-ration. This work examines the use of electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for characterizing and developing a model for a high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. A Labview virtual interface has been developed to perform the signal generation and acquisition which is needed to perform EIS. In designing and contro...

  19. Lithium Ion Electrolytes and Lithium Ion Cells With Good Low Temperature Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    There is provided in one embodiment of the invention an electrolyte for use in a lithium ion electrochemical cell. The electrolyte comprises a mixture of an ethylene carbonate (EC), an ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), an ester cosolvent, and a lithium salt. The ester cosolvent comprises methyl propionate (MP), ethyl propionate (EP), methyl butyrate (MB), ethyl butyrate (EB), propyl butyrate (PB), or butyl butyrate (BB). The electrochemical cell operates in a temperature range of from about -60 C to about 60 C. In another embodiment there is provided a lithium ion electrochemical cell using the electrolyte of the invention.

  20. High temperature and high pressure gas cell for quantitative spectroscopic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Fateev, Alexander;

    2016-01-01

    CO2-N2 mixture at 100 bar and 1000 K are revealed for the first time, exceeding the high temperature and pressure combinations previously reported. This paper discusses the design considerations involved in the construction of the cell and presents validation measurements compared against simulated...... spectra, as well as published experimental data. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. Dynamic modeling and experimental investigation of a high temperature PEM fuel cell stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlin, Simon Lennart

    2016-01-01

    High temperature polymer fuel cells operating at 100 to 200◦C require simple fuel processing and produce high quality heat that can integrate well with domestic heating systems. Because the transportation of hydrogen is challenging, an alternative option is to reform natural gas on site. This art...

  2. Potential Usage of Thermoelectric Devices in a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Gao; Chen, Min; Andreasen, Søren Juhl;

    2012-01-01

    Methanol fuelled high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HTPEMFC) power systems are promising as the next generation of vehicle engines, efficient and environmentally friendly. Currently, their performance still needs to be improved and they still rely on a large Li-ion battery f...

  3. Thermal curing of PBI membranes for high temperature PEM fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Cleemann, Lars N.; Li, Qingfeng;

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) has emerged as one of the most promising electrolyte materials for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells operating under anhydrous conditions at temperatures of up to 200 °C. The limited long-term durability of the membrane electrode assemblies...

  4. Electrolytes for Low-Temperature Operation of Li-CFx Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Bhalla, Pooja; Smith, Kiah

    2009-01-01

    A report describes a study of electrolyte compositions selected as candidates for improving the low-temperature performances of primary electrochemical cells that contain lithium anodes and fluorinated carbonaceous (CFx) cathodes. This study complements the developments reported in Additive for Low-Temperature Operation of Li-(CF)n Cells (NPO- 43579) and Li/CFx Cells Optimized for Low-Temperature Operation (NPO- 43585), which appear elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. Similar to lithium-based electrolytes described in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles, each of these electrolytes consisted of a lithium salt dissolved in a nonaqueous solvent mixture. Each such mixture consisted of two or more of the following ingredients: propylene carbonate (PC); 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME); trifluoropropylene carbonate; bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) ether; diethyl carbonate; dimethyl carbonate; and ethyl methyl carbonate. The report describes the physical and chemical principles underlying the selection of the compositions (which were not optimized) and presents results of preliminary tests made to determine effects of the compositions upon the low-temperature capabilities of Li-CFx cells, relative to a baseline composition of LiBF4 at a concentration of 1.0 M in a solvent comprising equal volume parts of PC and DME.

  5. Polybenzimidazole and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane composite membranes for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Allward, Todd; Alfaro, Silvia Martinez;

    2014-01-01

    Composite membranes based on poly(2,2′(m-phenylene)-5,5́bibenzimidazole) (PBI) and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (S-POSS) with S-POSS contents of 5 and 10wt.% were prepared by solution casting as base materials for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. With membran...

  6. Catalyst Degradation in High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Buazar, F.; Li, Qingfeng;

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of carbon supported platinum catalysts is a major failure mode for the long term durability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes. With Vulcan carbon black as a reference, thermally treated carbon black...

  7. Dynamic Thermal Model and Temperature Control of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵庆龙; 卫东; 曹广益; 朱新坚

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic thermal transfer model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack is developed based on energy conservation in order to reach better temperature control of PEMFC stack. Considering its uncertain parameters and disturbance, we propose a robust adaptive controller based on backstepping algorithm of Lyaponov function. Numerical simulations indicate the validity of the proposed controller.

  8. On temperature variations during 3He Polarization experiments in Pomeranchuk cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Q.; Rasmussen, Finn Berg

    1984-01-01

    Simple model calculations have been performed in relation to temperature changes in decompression experiments with Pomeranchuk cells, aiming at the production of spin polarized liquid **3He. Comparison with reported experiments indicates that thermal contact with the surroundings is too strong...

  9. Further Improvement and System Integration of High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    The new development in the field of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is high temperature PEMFC for operation above 100°C, which has been successfully demonstrated through the previous EC Joule III and the 5th framework programme. New challenges are encountered, bottlenecks for the new...

  10. Rigid bonded glass ceramic seals for high temperature membrane reactors and solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, Ove

    2009-05-15

    Solid Oxide Fuel cells (SOFC) and dense gas separation membranes based on mixed ionic and electronic conductors have gained increased interest the resent years due the search for new technologies for clean energy generation. These technologies can be utilized to produce electricity from fossil fuel with low CO{sub 2} emission compared to conventional gas or coal based energy plants. One crucial challenge with high temperature membrane reactors and SOFCs is the sealing of the active membranes/electrolytes to prevent leakage of air to fuel side or vice versa. Due to the high operating temperatures of typical 800-1000 degrees Celsius the selection of reliable sealing materials is limited. The seals have to remain gas tight during the life time of the reactor/SOFC, they need to be chemical compatible with the sealed materials and stable in reducing and oxidizing atmospheres containing water vapour and CO{sub 2}, and finally they should be cheap, readily available and easy to process. The main purpose of the present work was to evaluate rigid bonded glass ceramic seals for dense oxygen ion and proton conducting membranes and electrolytes for SOFCs and high temperature (HT) membrane reactors. First, a review of sealing technologies has been carried out with emphasis on SOFC and ceramic membranes technologies applicable for zero emission power plants. Regarding sealing, the best and cheapest materials at the present time are based on silicate glass and glass ceramics. In the present work aluminate glass without silica is introduced as a new class of seals expanding the material selection for HT membrane sealing technologies. The main reason for studying silica free systems is that silica is known to be unstable in humid atmospheres and/or reducing conditions at elevated temperatures. Two glass systems have been evaluated. The first was based on aluminate glasses in the system RO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (R=Mg, Ba, Sr) with special focus on the CaO-MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3

  11. Temperature-Phase Converter Based on a LC Cell as a Variable Capacitance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Torres

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main characteristic of liquid crystals is that their properties, both electrical and optical, can be modified through a convenient applied signal, for instance a certain voltage. This tunable behavior of liquid crystals is directly related to the orientation of their nanometric components with respect to a director direction. However, the initial alignment is a fabrication-dependent parameter and may be either planar or homeotropic. In addition, the strong dependence of the properties of liquid crystals with the temperature is well known and widely used for several temperature sensors. This dependence is produced by the influence of the temperature on the ordering of the molecules. In this work, we have studied the temperature dependence of the electric properties of a liquid crystal cell, in particular the dielectric permittivity, with the temperature as a function of the initial alignment set during the fabrication process. Starting from experimental measurements, an equivalent circuit model including the temperature dependence has been proposed. We have observed that a good linearity in a wide temperature range is provided at a suitable exciting frequency. Finally, a proper conditioner circuit is proposed as a powerful tool for linear and high sensibility temperature measurement.

  12. Enhancing Protein Expression in HEK-293 Cells by Lowering Culture Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yen Lin

    Full Text Available Animal cells and cell lines, such as HEK-293 cells, are commonly cultured at 37°C. These cells are often used to express recombinant proteins. Having a higher expression level or a higher protein yield is generally desirable. As we demonstrate in this study, dropping culture temperature to 33°C, but not lower, 24 hours after transient transfection in HEK-293S cells will give rise to ~1.5-fold higher expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA receptors. By following the time course of the GFP-expressing cells growing at 37°C and 33°C from 24 hours after transfection (including 19 hours recovery at 37°C in the normal growth medium, we found that a mild hypothermia (i.e., 33°C reduces the growth rate of HEK-293S cells, while increasing cellular productivity of recombinant proteins. As a result, green cells remain undivided in a longer period of time. Not surprisingly, the property of a recombinant protein expressed in the cells grown at 33°C is unaffected, as shown by the use of AMPA receptors. We further demonstrate with the use of PC12 cells that this method may be especially useful when a recombinant protein is difficult to express using a chemical-based, transient transfection method.

  13. Enhancing Protein Expression in HEK-293 Cells by Lowering Culture Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Yen; Huang, Zhen; Wen, Wei; Wu, Andrew; Wang, Congzhou; Niu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Animal cells and cell lines, such as HEK-293 cells, are commonly cultured at 37°C. These cells are often used to express recombinant proteins. Having a higher expression level or a higher protein yield is generally desirable. As we demonstrate in this study, dropping culture temperature to 33°C, but not lower, 24 hours after transient transfection in HEK-293S cells will give rise to ~1.5-fold higher expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. By following the time course of the GFP-expressing cells growing at 37°C and 33°C from 24 hours after transfection (including 19 hours recovery at 37°C in the normal growth medium), we found that a mild hypothermia (i.e., 33°C) reduces the growth rate of HEK-293S cells, while increasing cellular productivity of recombinant proteins. As a result, green cells remain undivided in a longer period of time. Not surprisingly, the property of a recombinant protein expressed in the cells grown at 33°C is unaffected, as shown by the use of AMPA receptors. We further demonstrate with the use of PC12 cells that this method may be especially useful when a recombinant protein is difficult to express using a chemical-based, transient transfection method. PMID:25893827

  14. Calculation of power coefficient in CANFLEX-NU fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Byung Joo; Jun, Ji Su; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    Changes in power level affect reactivity due to its dependence on fuel and coolant temperatures. The power coefficient of reactivity is related to the fuel temperature coefficient through the change in fuel temperature per percent change in power. In addition, power level changes are followed by changes in coolant temperature and density which contribute to the reactivity effect. In this report, the power coefficient of CANFLEX-NU was calculated and the result would be compared with that of CANDU-6 reactor which is operating. 8 refs., 43 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  15. The ``Micromorph'' cell: a new way to high-efficiency-low-temperature crystalline silicon thin-film cell manufacturing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppner, H.; Kroll, U.; Torres, P.; Meier, J.; Platz, R.; Fischer, D.; Beck, N.; Dubail, S.; Anna Selvan, J. A.; Pellaton Vaucher, N.; Goerlitzer, M.; Ziegler, Y.; Tscharner, R.; Hof, Ch.; Goetz, M.; Pernet, P.; Wyrsch, N.; Vuille, J.; Cuperus, J.; Shah, A.; Pohl, J.

    1997-02-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline Silicon (μc-Si:H) produced by the VHF-GD (Very High Frequency Glow Discharge) process can be considered to be a new base material for thin-film crystalline silicon solar cells. The most striking feature of such cells, in contrast to conventional amorphous silicon technology, is their stability under light-soaking. With respect to crystalline silicon technology, their most striking advantage is their low process temperature (220 °C). The so called "micromorph" cell contains such a μc-Si:H based cell as bottom cell, whereas the top-cell consists of amorphous silicon. A stable efficiency of 10.7% (confirmed by ISE Freiburg) is reported in this paper. At present, all solar cell concepts based on thin-film crystalline silicon have a common problem to overcome: namely, too long manufacturing times. In order to help in solving this problem for the particular case of plasma-deposited μc-Si:H, results on combined argon/hydrogen dilution of the feedgas (silane) are presented. It is shown that rates as high as 9.4 Å/s can be obtained: furthermore, a first solar cell deposited with 8.7 Å/s resulted in an efficiency of 3.1%.

  16. Temperature dependent electrical characterization of thin film Cu2ZnSnSe4 solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kask, E.; Krustok, J.; Giraldo, S.; Neuschitzer, M.; López-Marino, S.; Saucedo, E.

    2016-03-01

    Impedance spectroscopy (IS) and current-voltage characteristics measurements were applied to study properties of a Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) thin film solar cell. IS measurements were done in the frequency range 20 Hz to 10 MHz. The measurement temperature was varied from 10 K to 325 K with a step ▵T  =  5 K. Temperature dependence of V oc revealed an activation energy of 962 meV, which is in the vicinity of the band gap energy of CZTSe and hence the dominating recombination mechanism in this solar cell is bulk recombination. Different temperature ranges, where electrical properties change, were found. Interface states at grain boundaries with different properties were revealed to play an important role in impedance measurements. These states can be described by introducing a constant phase element in the equivalent circuit.

  17. Characterisation and modelling of a high temperature PEM fuel cell stack using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jespersen, J.L. [Danish Technological Institute, Kongsvang Alle 29, DK-8000 Arhus C (Denmark); Schaltz, E.; Kaer, S.K. [Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, Pontoppidanstraede 101, DK-9220 Aalborg East (Denmark); Andreasen, S.J.

    2009-08-15

    In designing and controlling fuel cell systems, it is advantageous to have models which predict fuel cell behaviour in steady-state as well as in dynamic operation. This work examines the use of electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for characterising and developing an impedance model for a high temperature PEM (HT-PEM) fuel cell stack. A Labview virtual instrument has been developed to perform the signal generation and data acquisition which is needed to perform EIS. The typical output of an EIS measurement on a fuel cell is a Nyquist plot, which shows the imaginary and real parts of the impedance of the measured system. The full stack impedance depends on the impedance of each of the single cells of the stack. Equivalent circuit models for each single cell can be used to predict the stack impedance at different temperature profiles of the stack. The information available in such models can be used to predict the fuel cell stack performance, e.g. in systems where different electronic components introduce current harmonics. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Electricity generation of single-chamber microbial fuel cells at low temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Shaoan

    2011-01-01

    Practical applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for wastewater treatment will require operation of these systems over a wide range of wastewater temperatures. MFCs at room or higher temperatures (20-35°C) are relatively well studied compared those at lower temperatures. MFC performance was examined here over a temperature range of 4-30°C in terms of startup time needed for reproducible power cycles, and performance. MFCs initially operated at 15°C or higher all attained a reproducible cycles of power generation, but the startup time to reach stable operation increased from 50h at 30°C to 210h at 15°C. At temperatures below 15°C, MFCs did not produce appreciable power even after one month of operation. If an MFC was first started up at temperature of 30°C, however, reproducible cycles of power generation could then be achieved at even the two lowest temperatures of 4°C and 10°C. Power production increased linearly with temperature at a rate of 33±4mW°C-1, from 425±2mWm-2 at 4°C to 1260±10mWm-2 at 30°C. Coulombic efficiency decreased by 45% over this same temperature range, or from CE=31% at 4°C to CE=17% at 30°C. These results demonstrate that MFCs can effectively be operated over a wide range of temperatures, but our findings have important implications for the startup of larger scale reactors where low wastewater temperatures could delay or prevent adequate startup of the system. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Possible temperature effects computed for acoustic microscopy used for living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawska, T; Wójcik, J; Filipczyński, L

    2004-01-01

    Imaging of living cells or tissues at a microscopic resolution, where GHz frequencies are used, provides a foundation for many new biological applications. The possible temperature increase causing a destructive influence on the living cells should be then avoided. However, there is no information on possible local temperature increases at these very high frequencies where, due to strongly focused ultrasonic beams, nonlinear propagation effects occur. Acoustic parameters of living cells were assumed to be close to those of water; therefore, the power density of heat sources in a water medium was determined as a basic quantity. Hence, the numerical solution of temperature distributions at the frequency of 1 GHz was computed for high and low powers generated by the transducer equal to 0.32 W and 0.002 W. In the first case, typical nonlinear propagation effects were demonstrated and, in the second one, propagation was almost linear. The focal temperature increase obtained in water equaled 14 degrees C for the highest possible theoretical repetition frequency of fr = 10 MHz and for the thermal insulation at the sapphire lens-water boundary. Simultaneously, the scanning velocity of the tested object was assumed to be incomparably low in respect to the acoustic beam velocity. The maximum temperature increase in water occurred exactly at this boundary, being equal there to 20 degrees C. It was shown that, first of all, the very high absorption of water was significant for the temperature distribution in the investigated region, suppressing the focal temperature peaks. Because the temperature increases are proportional to the repetition frequency, so for example, at its practical value of fr = 0.1 MHz, all temperature increases will be 100 times lower than listed above. For the low transducer power of 0.002 W, the corresponding temperature increases were about 140 times lower than those for the high power of 0.32 W. The presented solutions are devoted mainly to the

  20. Transparent polymeric cell culture chip with integrated temperature control and uniform media perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petronis, Sarunas; Stangegaard, Michael; Christensen, C.;

    2006-01-01

    Modern microfabrication and microfluidic technologies offer new opportunities in the design and fabrication of miniaturized cell culture systems for online monitoring of living cells. We used laser micromachining and thermal bonding to fabricate an optically transparent, low-cost polymeric chip for...... long-term online cell culture observation under controlled conditions. The chip incorporated a microfluidic flow equalization system, assuring uniform perfusion of the cell culture media throughout the cell culture chamber. The integrated indium-tin-oxide heater and miniature temperature probe linked...... to an electronic feedback system created steady and spatially uniform thermal conditions with minimal interference to the optical transparency of the chip. The fluidic and thermal performance of the chip was verified by finite element modeling and by operation tests under fluctuating ambient...