WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell technology standards

  1. The developments of international hydrogen and fuel cell technology standards and the response strategies in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tso, C.

    2009-01-01

    The application of hydrogen and fuel cells has expanded as the technology in international markets has improved. Leading countries have focused on establishing hydrogen and fuel cell technology standards. Both the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) continuously release new hydrogen and fuel cell related standards. Although the government of Taiwan is promoting the development of a hydrogen and fuel cell industry, it may delay the commercialized schedule if there are no hydrogen and fuel cell related standards and regulations in place. Standards and regulations must be established as quickly as possible in order to accelerate the progress of the hydrogen and fuel cell industry. This presentation reviewed the international progress in hydrogen and fuel cell development and explained Taiwan's response strategies regarding the adoption of hydrogen and fuel cell products in niche Taiwanese markets

  2. Automotive Technology Skill Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Tom; Asay, Don; Evans, Richard; Barbie, Bill; Herdener, John; Teague, Todd; Allen, Scott; Benshoof, James

    2009-01-01

    The standards in this document are for Automotive Technology programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school automotive program. Minimally, the student will complete a three-year program to achieve all standards. Although these exit-level standards are designed…

  3. Importance of international standards on hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Gingras, S.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation provided some basic information regarding standards and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). It also explained the importance of standardization activities, particularly ISO/TC 197 which applies to hydrogen technologies. Standards are established by consensus. They define the minimum requirements that will ensure that products and services are reliable and effective. Standards contribute to the elimination of technical barriers to trade (TBT). The harmonization of standards around the world is desirable in a free trade environment. The influence of the TBT on international standardization was discussed with particular reference to the objectives of ISO/TC 197 hydrogen technologies. One of the priorities for ISO/TC 197 is a hydrogen fuel infrastructure which includes refuelling stations, fuelling connectors, and storage technologies for gaseous and liquid hydrogen. Other priorities include an agreement between the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the ISO, in particular the IEC/TC 105 and ISO/TC 197 for the development of fuel cell standards. The international standards that have been published thus far include ISO 13984:1999 for liquid hydrogen, land vehicle fuelling system interface, and ISO 14687:1999 for hydrogen fuel product specification. Standards are currently under development for: liquid hydrogen; airport hydrogen fuelling facilities; gaseous hydrogen blends; basic considerations for the safety of hydrogen systems; gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and gaseous hydrogen for land vehicle filling connectors. It was concluded that the widespread use of hydrogen is dependent on international standardization

  4. Biofuels: policies, standards and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    Skyrocketing prices of crude oil in the middle of the first decade of the 21st century accompanied by rising prices for food focused political and public attention on the role of biofuels. On the one hand, biofuels were considered as a potential automotive fuel with a bright future, on the other hand, biofuels were accused of competing with food production for land. The truth must lie somewhere in-between and is strongly dependent on the individual circumstance in different countries and regions. As food and energy are closely interconnected and often compete with each other for other resources, such as water, the World Energy Council - following numerous requests of its Member Committees - decided to undertake an independent assessment of biofuels policies, technologies and standards.

  5. Industrial diffusion models and technological standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo-Hermosilla, J.

    2007-01-01

    Conventional models of technology diffusion have typically focused on the question of the rate of diffusion at which one new technology is fully adopted. The model described here provides a broader approach, from the perspective the extension of the diffusion of multiple technologies, and the related phenomenon of standardization. Moreover, most conventional research has characterized the diffusion process in terms of technology attributes or adopting firms attributes. Alternatively, we propose here a wide-ranging and consistent taxonomy of the relationships between the circumstances of an industry and the attributes of the technology standardization processes taking place within it. (Author) 100 refs

  6. Automated saturated standard cell intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, B.E.; Deitesfeld, C.A. (ed.)

    1987-10-05

    A cost effective, highly efficient, and automatic method of intercomparing standard cells has been sought after and implemented, utilizing computer control and a commercially available scanner. This system reduces intercomparison time from 4 hours to 30 minutes using the standard National Bureau of Standard (NBS) 4 x 4 design. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. LTE-Advanced Relay Technology and Standardization

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Yifei

    2013-01-01

    LTE-Advanced Relay Technology and Standardization provides a timely reference work for relay technology with the finalizing of LTE Release 10 specifications. LTE-Advanced is quickly becoming the global standard for 4G cellular communications. The relay technology, as one of the key features in LTE-Advanced, helps not only to improve the system coverage and capacity, but also to save the costs of laying wireline backhaul. As a leading researcher in the field of LTE-Advanced standards, the author provides an in-depth description of LTE-A relay technology, and explains in detail the standard specification and design principles.     Readers from both academic and industrial fields can find sections of interest to them: Sections 2 & 4 could benefit researchers in academia and those who are engaged in exploratory work, while Sections 3 & 4 are more useful to engineers. Dr. Yifei Yuan is the Technical Director at the Standards Department of ZTE Inc.

  8. Relations between the technological standards and technological appropriation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto PRADO GUERRERO

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyze the educational practices of using Blackboard in blended learning environments with students of higher education to understand the relationship between technological appropriation and standards of educational technology. To achieve that goal, the following research question was raised: ¿To what extent are the standards of education technology with the appropriation of technology in blended learning environments in higher educa­tion related? The contextual framework of this work includes the following topics: the institution, teaching, teachers and students. The design methodology that was used is of a correlation type. Correlations were carried out to determine the frequency and level in the technological standards as well as the appropriation of technology. In the comparison of the results obtained by the students, the teachers and the platform; we found that students in the school study showed a high degree of technology ownership and this was the same for the performance shown on the technological standards. It was established that teachers play a key role in developing the techno­logical appropriation of students and performance in technology standards.

  9. Fuel-cell technology for vehicular applications; L`introduzione delle pile a combustibile nel settore dei trasporti: proposte, standard e normative per sistemi di bordo ed impianti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.; Marmigi, R. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Energia

    1998-12-31

    The fuel-cell technology applied to engines for vehicular applications grants broad margins of convenience over any known alternative engine for what concerns the compliance with any present and foreseeable environmental and energy saving regulations. On the other hand, the use of hydrogen produced on board from fuels or stored as a liquid or a gas, raises new problems from the point of view of safety regulations and standards both in the design and use of vehicles and in the fuel production and distribution. The present work is aimed at pointing out the above main safety problems, describes the technical-choices together with their technical grounds, in the framework of the italian and U E standards and regulations. The report is then made up of three parts. The initial section where the on board storage of the fuel from technical-economical point of view is discussed. with particular reference to the compressed hydrogen, the second describing the regulations and standards holding in the field of on board pressure equipment and reporting the ongoing ENEA`s activities in the field. The final part is devoted to the distribution and supply of the fuels to the fuel cell powered electric vehicles. [Italiano] La tecnologia delle celle a combustibile, impiegata nella realizzazione dei propulsori dei veicoli elettrici, conferisce ad essi ampi margini di vantaggio su ogni altro tipo di motorizzazione per quanto riguarda le attuali e prevedibili future normative ambientali e di risparmio energetico. Il presente rapporto si propone di evidenziare alcuni tra questi problemi ed esporre e motivare le soluzioni tecniche previste nell`ambito degli specifici programmi dell`ENEA, in un contesto normativo di riferimento nazionale e comunitario. Il rapporto si compone pertanto di tre parti: una parte iniziale dove e` affrontato dal punto di vista tecnico-economico il problema del trasporto del combustibile a bordo con particolare riferimento all`idrogeno compresso, una seconda in cui

  10. Banning standard cell engineering notebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    A family of standardized thick-oxide P-MOS building blocks (standard cells) is described. The information is presented in a form useful for systems designs, logic design, and the preparation of inputs to both sets of Design Automation programs for array design and analysis. A data sheet is provided for each cell and gives the cell name, the cell number, its logic symbol, Boolean equation, truth table, circuit schematic circuit composite, input-output capacitances, and revision date. The circuit type file, also given for each cell, together with the logic drawing contained on the data sheet provides all the information required to prepare input data files for the Design Automation Systems. A detailed description of the electrical design procedure is included.

  11. Inspection technology of Korean standard Reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doh, Euisoon

    2002-01-01

    This paper is for the inspection technology of Korean standard Reactor vessel. KPS performed Korean standard Reactor vessel inspection for a part of Yonggwang unit 5 and full inspection of Yonggwang unit 6 on November in 2001. Korean standard Reactor vessel is different from Westinghouse and Framatome plants in design and material. Understanding design, structure and material is very important to prepare and to perform Reactor vessel inspection. Korean standard Reactor vessel has 6 Stabilizer lugs, 6 Core stop lugs and one Flow Baffle around Lower head to Bottom head weld(G4). They make very difficult to perform scanning of G4 by transducers and to install Lower Platform of robot system. Korean standard Reactor vessel has 2 Outlet Nozzles, 4 Inlet Nozzles and small curvature of Inner Radius regions. That small curvature's Inner Radius region needs a special technology to perform the area more than 90% of whole examination volume. The most significant difference of Korean standard Reactor vessel is that it does not have Safe End region because both of Reactor vessel and main reactor coolant system piping are carbon steel. Therefore, the technology for this nozzle to piping weld is very unique to be compared with other Westinghouse or Framatome plants. Described above, the inspection technology of Korean standard Reactor Vessel is very different from other Reactor Vessel due to different internal structure and material. The company which performs this 10 years ISI in future will need much investigation of structure and material to succeed in Reactor vessel inspection of Korean standard plant

  12. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record #833

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Burch, William; McDonnell, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. This Scoring Record was coordinated by Dennis Teefy and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  13. Standards And Their Impact On Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endelman, Lincoln L.

    1990-01-01

    The needs for standards and the processes to provide them are very complex. Standardization is dependent upon voluntary and nonvoluntary agreement among individuals, companies, various organizations, and countries around the world. The agreements on standards, which sometimes take five to ten years, are hindered by monetary considerations, relinquishment of patent rights, disagreement among nations on dimensions in metric or the English system, and professional jealousy among some individuals. Standards, Standards, Standards - what a boring and uninteresting topic. Why did I ever agree to speak to you about something that most people take for granted and don't even bother to pay much attention to until they encounter a situation where a nonstandard item creates a problem. Have any of you ever bought a roll of 35mm film for your foreign made camera and found out that it needs 32mm film? That could have happened to you in the late nineteenth or early twentieth century. Yes, we know that, you say, but that's not a problem anymore. Well, how about when you try to put a Beta cassette into your VCR that uses VHS cassettes? Have you tried to fit a Minolta lens onto a Nikon camera? But enough, you all have the idea. Standards were developed to make interchangeable components compatible with other equipment, no matter who made it or where it was made. Some companies and countries deliberately made things different to protect their inventions and profit by their uniqueness. More and more attempts are being made to reduce the international differences in technology and establish a common ground for trade and commerce. The European Common Market is in the process of eliminating many of the barriers to free exchange of goods, services, and even moving to a universal currency. This all sounds good for Europe, but what about the USA and the rest of the world. The United States has fought the change to the metric system for almost two hundred years. Our electrical system and the

  14. Microscale technologies for cell engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh

    2016-01-01

    This book offers readers cutting-edge research at the interface of polymer science and engineering, biomedical engineering, materials science, and biology. State-of-the-art developments in microscale technologies for cell engineering applications are covered, including technologies relevant to both pluripotent and adult stem cells, the immune system, and somatic cells of the animal and human origin. This book bridges the gap in the understanding of engineering biology at multiple length scale, including microenvironmental control, bioprocessing, and tissue engineering in the areas of cardiac, cartilage, skeletal, and vascular tissues, among others. This book also discusses unique, emerging areas of micropatterning and three-dimensional printing models of cellular engineering, and contributes to the better understanding of the role of biophysical factors in determining the cell fate. Microscale Technologies for Cell Engineering is valuable for bioengineers, biomaterial scientists, tissue engineers, clinicians,...

  15. 78 FR 23574 - Public Workshop on Marine Technology and Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... Material Bilgewater Monitoring Using Advanced Light Scattering Technology Vortex Induced Vibration Design... Verification of Energy Efficiency Design Index Testing and Approval of Ballast Water Treatment Systems... Technology and Standards AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The American Society of...

  16. Standards for Technological Literacy: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, William E., Jr; Moye, Johnny J.

    2018-01-01

    "Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology (STL)" provides the content for what every technologically literate student should know and be able to do. It "defines what the study of technology in Grades K-12 should be, but it does not lay out a curriculum" (ITEA/ITEEA, 2000/2002/2007, p. 200).…

  17. DICOM standard in computer-aided medical technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, A.V.; Prilutskij, D.A.; Selishchev, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    The paper outlines one of the promising standards to transmit images in medicine, in radiology in particular. the essence of the standard DICOM is disclosed and promises of its introduction into computer-aided medical technologies

  18. Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None available

    2001-05-31

    For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

  19. Informatics and standards for nanomedicine technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dennis G; Klaessig, Fred; Harper, Stacey L; Fritts, Martin; Hoover, Mark D; Gaheen, Sharon; Stokes, Todd H; Reznik-Zellen, Rebecca; Freund, Elaine T; Klemm, Juli D; Paik, David S; Baker, Nathan A

    2011-01-01

    There are several issues to be addressed concerning the management and effective use of information (or data), generated from nanotechnology studies in biomedical research and medicine. These data are large in volume, diverse in content, and are beset with gaps and ambiguities in the description and characterization of nanomaterials. In this work, we have reviewed three areas of nanomedicine informatics: information resources; taxonomies, controlled vocabularies, and ontologies; and information standards. Informatics methods and standards in each of these areas are critical for enabling collaboration; data sharing; unambiguous representation and interpretation of data; semantic (meaningful) search and integration of data; and for ensuring data quality, reliability, and reproducibility. In particular, we have considered four types of information standards in this article, which are standard characterization protocols, common terminology standards, minimum information standards, and standard data communication (exchange) formats. Currently, because of gaps and ambiguities in the data, it is also difficult to apply computational methods and machine learning techniques to analyze, interpret, and recognize patterns in data that are high dimensional in nature, and also to relate variations in nanomaterial properties to variations in their chemical composition, synthesis, characterization protocols, and so on. Progress toward resolving the issues of information management in nanomedicine using informatics methods and standards discussed in this article will be essential to the rapidly growing field of nanomedicine informatics. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Informatics and Standards for Nanomedicine Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Klaessig, Fred; Harper, Stacey L.; Fritts, Martin; Hoover, Mark D.; Gaheen, Sharon; Stokes, Todd H.; Reznik-Zellen, Rebecca; Freund, Elaine T.; Klemm, Juli D.; Paik, David S.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    There are several issues to be addressed concerning the management and effective use of information (or data), generated from nanotechnology studies in biomedical research and medicine. These data are large in volume, diverse in content, and are beset with gaps and ambiguities in the description and characterization of nanomaterials. In this work, we have reviewed three areas of nanomedicine informatics: information resources; taxonomies, controlled vocabularies, and ontologies; and information standards. Informatics methods and standards in each of these areas are critical for enabling collaboration, data sharing, unambiguous representation and interpretation of data, semantic (meaningful) search and integration of data; and for ensuring data quality, reliability, and reproducibility. In particular, we have considered four types of information standards in this review, which are standard characterization protocols, common terminology standards, minimum information standards, and standard data communication (exchange) formats. Currently, due to gaps and ambiguities in the data, it is also difficult to apply computational methods and machine learning techniques to analyze, interpret and recognize patterns in data that are high dimensional in nature, and also to relate variations in nanomaterial properties to variations in their chemical composition, synthesis, characterization protocols, etc. Progress towards resolving the issues of information management in nanomedicine using informatics methods and standards discussed in this review will be essential to the rapidly growing field of nanomedicine informatics. PMID:21721140

  1. Smart grid standards specifications, requirements, and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Takuro; Duan, Bin; Macuha, Martin; Zhou, Zhenyu; Wu, Jun; Tariq, Muhammad; Asfaw, Solomon A

    2015-01-01

    With numerous existing Smart Grid standards, it is clear that governments and industrial organizations world-wide have understood and acknowledged the critical role they play. This timely book is a useful guide for Smart Grid professionals in easily classifying fundamental Smart Grid standards, and to quickly find the building blocks they need to analyse and implement a Smart Grid system. The standards are organized in a systematic manner that aids identification, according to grid requirements. It also covers broader Smart Grid areas including, but not limited to, the following: A fully c

  2. 77 FR 55482 - Public Workshop on Marine Technology and Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... Technology and Standards AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The American Society of...-day public workshop on marine technology and standards in Arlington, VA. This public workshop will...: The workshop will be held at The Double Tree by Hilton Hotel, in the Crystal City neighborhood of...

  3. Outdoor Lighting Networks: Market, Technologies and Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalcanti, D.; Wang, J.; Chen, R.; Jiang , D.; Yang, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Providing the right amount of light where and when it is needed is an opportunity to transform today’s cities into smart and livable urban spaces. New technologies are being introduced, such are adaptivecontrols and outdoor lighting networks, which can deliver energy andcost savings through adaptive

  4. Status of nickel-hydrogen cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Nickel hydrogen cell technology has been developed which solves the problems of thermal management, oxygen management, electrolyte management, and electrical and mechanical design peculiar to this new type of battery. This technology was weight optimized for low orbit operation using computer modeling programs but is near optimum for other orbits. Cells ranging in capacity up to about 70 ampere-hours can be made from components of a single standard size and are available from two manufacturers. The knowledge gained is now being applied to the development of two extensions to the basic design: a second set of larger standard components that will cover the capacity range up to 150 ampere-hours; and the development of multicell common pressure vessel modules to reduce volume, cost and weight. A manufacturing technology program is planned to optimize the producibility of the cell design and reduce cost. The most important areas for further improvement are life and reliability which are governed by electrode and separator technology.

  5. Simulation and Modeling Capability for Standard Modular Hydropower Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Kevin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Brennan T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Witt, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeNeale, Scott T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevelhimer, Mark S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pries, Jason L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burress, Timothy A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kao, Shih-Chieh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mobley, Miles H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Kyutae [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Curd, Shelaine L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tsakiris, Achilleas [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Mooneyham, Christian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Papanicolaou, Thanos [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ekici, Kivanc [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Whisenant, Matthew J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Welch, Tim [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Rabon, Daniel [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Grounded in the stakeholder-validated framework established in Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s SMH Exemplary Design Envelope Specification, this report on Simulation and Modeling Capability for Standard Modular Hydropower (SMH) Technology provides insight into the concepts, use cases, needs, gaps, and challenges associated with modeling and simulating SMH technologies. The SMH concept envisions a network of generation, passage, and foundation modules that achieve environmentally compatible, cost-optimized hydropower using standardization and modularity. The development of standardized modeling approaches and simulation techniques for SMH (as described in this report) will pave the way for reliable, cost-effective methods for technology evaluation, optimization, and verification.

  6. [THE TECHNOLOGY "CELL BLOCK" IN CYTOLOGICAL PRACTICE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchenko, N N; Borisova, O V; Baranova, I B

    2015-08-01

    The article presents summary information concerning application of "cell block" technology in cytological practice. The possibilities of implementation of various modern techniques (immune cytochemnical analysis. FISH, CISH, polymerase chain reaction) with application of "cell block" method are demonstrated. The original results of study of "cell block" technology made with gelatin, AgarCyto and Shadon Cyoblock set are presented. The diagnostic effectiveness of "cell block" technology and common cytological smear and also immune cytochemical analysis on samples of "cell block" technology and fluid cytology were compared. Actually application of "cell block" technology is necessary for ensuring preservation of cell elements for subsequent immune cytochemical and molecular genetic analysis.

  7. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Information Technology Design/Build Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document contains Illinois Occupational Skill Standards for occupations in the Information Technology Design and Build Cluster (technical writer, programmer, system analyst, network architect, application product architect, network engineer, and database administrator). The skill standards define what an individual should know and the…

  8. Spectral properties of iodine cells for laser standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabina, Jan; Šarbort, Martin; Acef, Ouali; Du Burck, Frédéric; Chiodo, Nicola; Chea, Erick; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej; Lazar, Josef

    2014-12-01

    The main aim of this work is oriented towards preparation and spectral properties evaluation of optical frequency references for laser standards - molecular iodine cells. These references represent the crucial part of setups for practical realization of the meter unit - highly stable laser standards. Furthermore, not only in the most precise laboratory instruments, but also in less demanding interferometric measuring setups the frequency stabilization of the lasers throught the absorption in suitable media ensure the direct traceability to the fundamental standard of length. A set of absorption cells filled with different amounts of molecular iodine (different saturation pressure point of absorption media) was prepared and an agreement between expected and resulting spectral properties of these cells was observed and evaluated. The usage of borosilicate glass instead of common fused silica as a material for cells bodies represents an approach to simplify the manufacturing technology process and also reduces the overall cell costs. A great care must be taken to control/avoid the risk of absorption media contamination by impurities releasing from the cell walls. We introduce an iodine purity and spectral properties evaluation method based on measurement of linewidth of the hyperfine transitions. The proposed method was used for verification of great iodine purity of manufactured cells by comparison of spectral properties with cells traditionally made of fused silica glass with well known iodine purity. The results confirmed a great potential of proposed approaches.

  9. Standard Modular Hydropower Technology Acceleration Workshop: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Brennan T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeNeale, Scott T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Witt, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mobley, Miles H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fernandez, Alisha R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    In support of the Department of Energy (DOE) funded Standard Modular Hydropower (SMH) Technology Acceleration project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) staff convened with five small hydropower technology entrepreneurs on June 14 and 15, 2017 to discuss gaps, challenges, and opportunities for small modular hydropower development. The workshop was designed to walk through SMH concepts, discuss the SMH research vision, assess how each participant’s technology aligns with SMH concepts and research, and identify future pathways for mutually beneficial collaboration that leverages ORNL expertise and entrepreneurial industry experience. The goal coming out of the workshop is to advance standardized, scalable, modular hydropower technologies and development approaches with sustained and open dialogue among diverse stakeholder groups.

  10. Patterns in Standards and Technologies for Economic Information Systems Interoperability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Irimia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presets results from a review of the current standards used for collaboration between economic information systems, including web services and service oriented architecture, EDI, ebXML framework, RosettaNet framework, cXML, xCBL UBL, BPMN, BPEL, WS-CDL, ASN.1, and others. Standards have a key role in promoting economic information system interoperability, and thus enable collaboration. Analyzing the current standards, technologies and applications used for economic information systems interoperability has revealed a common pattern that runs through all of them. From this pattern we construct a basic model of interoperability around which we relate and judge all standards, technologies and applications for economic information systems interoperability.

  11. Hydrogen fuel cell engines and related technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    The manual documents the first training course developed on the use of hydrogen fuel cells in transportation. The manual contains eleven modules covering hydrogen properties, use and safety; fuel cell technology and its systems, fuel cell engine desi...

  12. A key technology for standardizing outdoor optical wireless communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Su

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a key technology, polarization modulation (PM, which should be taken into account when standardizing outdoor optical wireless communications (OWC, also known as free-space optical communications (FSO. We analyze the distortion of the polarization state when a laser beam propagates through the atmospheric channel. The floating range of the optical polarization was estimated and the necessity of researching the proposed technology was discussed. Moreover, we conducted a comparison between the PM-based FSO system and intensity modulation-based FSO system. The conclusions will be helpful in establishing the FSO standard architectures.

  13. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Standards and Guidelines. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-18

    We, the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board or Board), are revising and updating, in a single rulemaking, our standards for electronic and information technology developed, procured, maintained, or used by Federal agencies covered by section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as well as our guidelines for telecommunications equipment and customer premises equipment covered by Section 255 of the Communications Act of 1934. The revisions and updates to the section 508-based standards and section 255-based guidelines are intended to ensure that information and communication technology covered by the respective statutes is accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

  14. Temperature measurements at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangum, B. W.

    The high-precision and high-accuracy measurements involved in the calibrations of various types of thermometers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are described. The responsibilities of the NIST Thermometry Group include not only calibration of the standard instruments of the scales but also the calibration of base-metal and noble-metal thermocouples, industrial platinum resistance thermometers, liquid in-glass thermometers, thermistor thermometers, and digital thermometers. General laboratory thermometer calibrations are described. Also, a Measurement Assurance Program is described which provides a direct assessment of a customer's technological competence in thermometry.

  15. Linear thermal expansion coefficient measurement technology in hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dae Gyu; Choo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Lee, K. S.

    1998-06-01

    To establish linear thermal expansion coefficient measurement technology in hot cell, we reviewed and evaluated various measuring technology by paper and these were compared with the data produced with pre-installed dilatometer in hot cell. Detailed contents are as follows; - The theory of test. - Review of characteristics for various measurement technology and compatibility with hot cell. - Review of standard testing regulations(ASTM). - System calibration of pre-installed dilatometer. - Performance test of pre-installed dilatometer. (author). 12 refs., 15 tabs., 8 figs

  16. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Michael A. [Southwest Research Institute; Page, Richard A. [Southwest Research Institute

    2012-07-30

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to

  17. Standards, building codes, and certification programs for solar technology applicatons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, J. D.; Odland, R.; Barker, H.

    1979-07-01

    This report is a primer on solar standards development. It explains the development of standards, building code provisions, and certification programs and their relationship to the emerging solar technologies. These areas are important in the commercialization of solar technology because they lead to the attainment of two goals: the development of an industry infrastructure and consumer confidence. Standards activities in the four phases of the commercialization process (applied research, development, introduction, and diffusion) are discussed in relation to institutional issues. Federal policies have been in operation for a number of years to accelerate the development process for solar technology. These policies are discussed in light of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular on federal interaction with the voluntary consensus system, and in light of current activities of DOE, HUD, and other interested federal agencies. The appendices cover areas of specific interest to different audiences: activities on the state and local level; and standards, building codes, and certification programs for specific technologies. In addition, a contract for the development of a model solar document let by DOE to a model consortium is excerpted in the Appendix.

  18. Can standards and regulations keep up with health technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Christopher James; Niezen, Gerrit; O'Kane, Aisling Ann; Stawarz, Katarzyna

    2015-06-03

    Technology is changing at a rapid rate, opening up new possibilities within the health care domain. Advances such as open source hardware, personal medical devices, and mobile phone apps are creating opportunities for custom-made medical devices and personalized care. However, they also introduce new challenges in balancing the need for regulation (ensuring safety and performance) with the need to innovate flexibly and efficiently. Compared with the emergence of new technologies, health technology design standards and regulations evolve slowly, and therefore, it can be difficult to apply these standards to the latest developments. For example, current regulations may not be suitable for approaches involving open source hardware, an increasingly popular way to create medical devices in the maker community. Medical device standards may not be flexible enough when evaluating the usability of mobile medical devices that can be used in a multitude of different ways, outside of clinical settings. Similarly, while regulatory guidance has been updated to address the proliferation of health-related mobile phone apps, it can be hard to know if and when these regulations apply. In this viewpoint, we present three examples of novel medical technologies to illustrate the types of regulatory issues that arise in the current environment. We also suggest opportunities for support, such as advances in the way we review and monitor medical technologies.

  19. Developing global health technology standards: what can other industries teach us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masum, Hassan; Lackman, Rebecca; Bartleson, Karen

    2013-10-17

    There is a lack of effective and affordable technologies to address health needs in the developing world. One way to address problems of innovation and affordability is to design global health technologies to follow agreed-upon standards. This Debate article argues that we can better develop standards for global health technologies if we learn lessons from other industries. The article's Background section begins by explaining why standards are needed in global health. For example, if global health technologies can be modularized into independent interfacing parts, these parts can then interact via well-defined standards in a "plug and play" fashion. This can avoid development of mutually incompatible solutions by different organizations, speed the pace of innovation, unlock health systems from single providers and approaches, and lower barriers to entry. The Background then gives a brief primer on standards and discusses incentives for health standards. The article's Discussion section begins with brief relevant cases of standards development from other industries, including electricity, container shipping, CD standards, Universal Serial Bus (USB), and the Internet. It then explores lessons from these and other industries that suggest how to develop standards for global health technologies. The remainder of the Discussion considers intellectual property and regulatory issues and standards-based global health business models, and ends with a checklist of considerations for health standards development leaders. (The associated Additional file discusses observations from standards development for cell phones and semiconductors, as well as challenges in the standards development process itself.) Throughout the article, point-of-care diagnostics are used as an illustrative example. An initiative is already underway to explore standardized diagnostics platforms. This Debate article aims to convince the reader that standards can benefit global health technologies if we

  20. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Blind Grid Scoring Record Number 842

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karwatka, Michael; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Banta, Matthew; Burch, William; McDonnell, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. This Scoring Record was coordinated by Michael Karwatka and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  1. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 690

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the YPC Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and by the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Scoring Committee...

  2. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 268

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and by the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  3. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 397

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Robitaille, George; Boutin, Matthew; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and by the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  4. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 898

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burch, William; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Lombardo, Leonardo; McDonnell, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Field. This Scoring Record was coordinated by William Burch and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  5. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 831

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teefy, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. This Scoring Record was coordinated by Dennis Teefy and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  6. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record Number 312

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Archiable, Robert; McClung, Christina; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the YPG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and by the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Scoring Committee...

  7. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 257

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Robitaille, George; Boutin, Matthew; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  8. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 896

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burch, William; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina

    2008-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Field. This Scoring Record was coordinated by William Burch and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  9. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 252

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Boutin, Matthew; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  10. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 834

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teefy, Dennis; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina

    2007-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. This Scoring Record was coordinated by Dennis Teefy and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  11. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 237

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Robitaille, George; Boutin, Matthew; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  12. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 805

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karwatka, Michael; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina

    2007-01-01

    ...) utilizing the YPG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. This Scoring Record was coordinated by Michael Karwatka and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  13. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 792

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karwatka, Mike; Packer, Bonnie

    2006-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. Scoring Records have been coordinated by Mike Karwatka and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  14. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 396

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Boutin, Matthew; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and by the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  15. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 764

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Watts, Kimberly

    2006-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. Scoring Records have been coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  16. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 906 (Sky Research, Inc.)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McClung, J. S; Burch, William; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Lombardo, Leonardo; McDonnell, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. This Scoring Record was coordinated by William Burch and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  17. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Blind Grid Scoring Record Number 431

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the YPG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and by the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  18. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record Number 691

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Jr., Larry; Watts, Kimberly; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Banta, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site blind grid. Scoring Records have been coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  19. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 830

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teefy, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. This Scoring Record was coordinated by Dennis Teefy and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  20. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 769

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Archiable, Robert; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Teefy, Dennis; Burch, William; Packer, Bonnie; Banta, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    ...) utilizing the YPG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. Scoring Records have been coordinated by Dennis Teefy and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  1. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 832

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teefy, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. This Scoring Record was coordinated by Dennis Teefy and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  2. Machine-to-machine communications architectures, technology, standards, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Misic, Vojislav B

    2014-01-01

    With the number of machine-to-machine (M2M)-enabled devices projected to reach 20 to 50 billion by 2020, there is a critical need to understand the demands imposed by such systems. Machine-to-Machine Communications: Architectures, Technology, Standards, and Applications offers rigorous treatment of the many facets of M2M communication, including its integration with current technology.Presenting the work of a different group of international experts in each chapter, the book begins by supplying an overview of M2M technology. It considers proposed standards, cutting-edge applications, architectures, and traffic modeling and includes case studies that highlight the differences between traditional and M2M communications technology.Details a practical scheme for the forward error correction code designInvestigates the effectiveness of the IEEE 802.15.4 low data rate wireless personal area network standard for use in M2M communicationsIdentifies algorithms that will ensure functionality, performance, reliability, ...

  3. Open Standards and Technologies in the S2S Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, A. R.; Rozell, E. A.; West, P.; Zednik, S.; Fox, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    The S2S Search Interface Framework provides tools and services to build customized user interfaces. It also serves as a focal point for repository managers to develop science data services and reusable components for search interfaces. The framework has been used to design a faceted browsing platform for web services, including OpenSearch and SAWSDL. This exemplar faceted browsing platform has been applied in our development of search interfaces for 1) an international open government dataset catalog and 2) a metadata catalog for biological and chemical oceanography. S2S was designed from the ground up using open standards and technologies. The framework was initially created to develop "data dashboard" interfaces on top of OpenSearch services, but has been generalized to support web services and standards with semantic annotation capabilities. We apply OWL, a W3C standard for ontologies on the Web, to create a vocabulary for the description of framework metadata. Our faceted browsing platform is heavily focused on the use of jQuery; we have created reusable user interface "widgets" that leverage OpenLayers and MapServer technology in geospatial selection and visualization, which can be used in this and future platforms. The use of open standards and technologies has enabled rapid iterations over software development lifecycles, and has kept the framework agile as new use cases and ideas have emerged.

  4. Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability Standards & Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    records and will introduce error resistance into networked medical device systems. We are producing a standardization framework consisting of a...We have also begun collecting data on the issue related to device clock time errors and erroneous data time-stamps in preparation for a White House...advances in mind. We also recognize that, as in all technological advances, interoperability poses safety and medico -legal challenges as well. The

  5. Standardization of green building technologies for environment design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benuzh Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the structure and field of standardization ISO / TC 205 “Building environment design”, provides examples of green building technologies. The main purpose of the article is to show the interaction between international ISO / TC 205 “Building environment design” and created in Russia in 2016 the Technical Committee of Standardization № 366 “Green technology of the build environment and green innovative products”. Both of these technical committees promote green building technologies for environment design, thereby deal with the negative impact on the environment and the reasons of global warming. Instead of buildings that attempt to suppress and overcome nature, why not design buildings that integrate with the environment, on every possible level? The international standardization work which ISO/TC 205 “Building environment design” performs seeks, in addition to lowering trade barriers for engineering design, to promote and facilitate the design of high performance buildings: higher performing as economic assets for their owners, higher performing as buildings that provide amenable indoor environment for their occupants, and higher performing with respect to resource utilization and environmental impact.

  6. Assessment of technologies to meet a low carbon fuel standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Sonia; Lutsey, Nicholas P; Parker, Nathan C

    2009-09-15

    California's low carbon fuel standard (LCFS) was designed to incentivize a diverse array of available strategies for reducing transportation greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It provides strong incentives for fuels with lower GHG emissions, while explicitly requiring a 10% reduction in California's transportation fuel GHG intensity by 2020. This paper investigates the potential for cost-effective GHG reductions from electrification and expanded use of biofuels. The analysis indicates that fuel providers could meetthe standard using a portfolio approach that employs both biofuels and electricity, which would reduce the risks and uncertainties associated with the progress of cellulosic and battery technologies, feedstock prices, land availability, and the sustainability of the various compliance approaches. Our analysis is based on the details of California's development of an LCFS; however, this research approach could be generalizable to a national U.S. standard and to similar programs in Europe and Canada.

  7. Limitations of Commercializing Fuel Cell Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Normayati

    2010-06-01

    Fuel cell is the technology that, nowadays, is deemed having a great potential to be used in supplying energy. Basically, fuel cells can be categorized particularly by the kind of employed electrolyte. Several fuel cells types which are currently identified having huge potential to be utilized, namely, Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC), Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFC), Alkaline Fuel Cells (AFC), Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells (PAFC), Polymer Electron Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC), Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) and Regenerative Fuel Cells (RFC). In general, each of these fuel cells types has their own characteristics and specifications which assign the capability and suitability of them to be utilized for any particular applications. Stationary power generations and transport applications are the two most significant applications currently aimed for the fuel cell market. It is generally accepted that there are lots of advantages if fuel cells can be excessively commercialized primarily in context of environmental concerns and energy security. Nevertheless, this is a demanding task to be accomplished, as there is some gap in fuel cells technology itself which needs a major enhancement. It can be concluded, from the previous study, cost, durability and performance are identified as the main limitations to be firstly overcome in enabling fuel cells technology become viable for the market.

  8. Space solar cell technology development - A perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Monck, J.

    1982-01-01

    The developmental history of photovoltaics is examined as a basis for predicting further advances to the year 2000. Transistor technology was the precursor of solar cell development. Terrestrial cells were modified for space through changes in geometry and size, as well as the use of Ag-Ti contacts and manufacture of a p-type base. The violet cell was produced for Comsat, and involved shallow junctions, new contacts, and an enhanced antireflection coating for better radiation tolerance. The driving force was the desire by private companies to reduce cost and weight for commercial satellite power supplies. Liquid phase epitaxial (LPE) GaAs cells are the latest advancement, having a 4 sq cm area and increased efficiency. GaAs cells are expected to be flight ready in the 1980s. Testing is still necessary to verify production techniques and the resistance to electron and photon damage. Research will continue in CVD cell technology, new panel technology, and ultrathin Si cells.

  9. Improving healthcare middleware standards with semantic methods and technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Isabel; Calvillo, Jorge; Roa, Laura M; Madinabeitia, Germán

    2008-01-01

    A critical issue in healthcare informatics is to facilitate the integration and interoperability of applications. This goal can be achieved through an open architecture based on a middleware independent from specific applications; useful for working with existing systems, as well as for the integration of new systems. Several standard organizations are making efforts toward this target. This work is based on the EN 12967-1,2,3, developed by CEN, that follows the ODP (Open Distributed Processing) methodology, providing a specification of distributed systems based on the definition of five viewpoints. However, only the three upper viewpoints are used to produce EN 12967, the two lower viewpoints should be considered in the implementation context. We are using Semantic Grid for lower views and Semantic Web and Web Services for the definition of the upper views. We analyze benefits of using these methods and technologies and expose methodology for the development of this semantic healthcare middleware observing European Standards.

  10. Reviews on Technology and Standard of Spatial Audio Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhwana Elfitri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Market demands on a more impressive entertainment media have motivated for delivery of three dimensional (3D audio content to home consumers through Ultra High Definition TV (UHDTV, the next generation of TV broadcasting, where spatial audio coding plays fundamental role. This paper reviews fundamental concept on spatial audio coding which includes technology, standard, and application. Basic principle of object-based audio reproduction system will also be elaborated, compared to the traditional channel-based system, to provide good understanding on this popular interactive audio reproduction system which gives end users flexibility to render their own preferred audio composition.

  11. Solar cell materials developing technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Conibeer, Gavin J

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a comparison of solar cell materials, including both new materials based on organics, nanostructures and novel inorganics and developments in more traditional photovoltaic materials. It surveys the materials and materials trends in the field including third generation solar cells (multiple energy level cells, thermal approaches and the modification of the solar spectrum) with an eye firmly on low costs, energy efficiency and the use of abundant non-toxic materials.

  12. Development of PEM fuel cell technology at international fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The PEM technology has not developed to the level of phosphoric acid fuel cells. Several factors have held the technology development back such as high membrane cost, sensitivity of PEM fuel cells to low level of carbon monoxide impurities, the requirement to maintain full humidification of the cell, and the need to pressurize the fuel cell in order to achieve the performance targets. International Fuel Cells has identified a hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell concept that leverages recent research advances to overcome major economic and technical obstacles.

  13. A critical assessment of fuel cell technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem, O.

    1994-01-01

    Cold combustion is a promised technology to mankind since the middle of the last century. The fuel cell may at last become the energy machine of the one to come after a long journey on a road bordered with expectations, successes and disappointments. Ten billion people will need the cell for their well-being. The progress and the state-of-art is assessed by means of figures of merit for performance, normalized to standard conditions, life and variability. State-of-art current densities for multi-kW stacks operating on atmospheric pressure air at 0.74 V cell voltage (50% efficiency, HHV) are estimated to be 150 mA/cm 2 for MCFC, 160 mA/cm 2 for AFC, 239 mA/cm 2 for PEFC and 270 mA/cm 2 for SOFC. PAFC gives 260 mA/cm 2 at 0.66 V and DMFC 100 mA/cm 2 at 0.37 V. Decay rates are about 1%/1000 h for PEFC, PAFC and SOFC compared to 2%/1000 h for AFC and 3%/1000 h for MCFC. Coefficients of variation for cell voltages amount to about 1% for all options, except for MCFC with 3-4%. Improvement of cell performance after 1975 is nil to moderate, except for SOFC with a consistent annual improvement of about 10%. There is room for further development of terrestrial AFCs towards 300-400 mA/cm 2 considering the figure 800 mA/cm 2 for oxygen AFCs. Life and cost will decide the future of the fuel cell. Prospects are not as good as they could be. The fuel cell community lacks understanding of the basics of fuel processing, as demonstrated by the widespread misbelief ('the CO 2 syndrome') that CO 2 cannot be removed cost effectively from a hydrogen feed (which is practiced in every NH 3 plant around the world). The competition, read the gas turbine, has to be taken very seriously. Emphasis has to be shifted from premature demonstrations to R and D on fundamental problems, which have been around too long. 34 refs

  14. 76 FR 3877 - Effectiveness of Federal Agency Participation in Standardization in Select Technology Sectors for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ... following technologies: 1. Smart Grid. 2. Health Information Technology. 3. Cyber Security. 4. Emergency... National Institute of Standards and Technology Effectiveness of Federal Agency Participation in Standardization in Select Technology Sectors for National Science and Technology Council's Sub-Committee on...

  15. Technologies for Single-Cell Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Andre; Schoendube, Jonas; Zimmermann, Stefan; Steeb, Maximilian; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2015-07-24

    The handling of single cells is of great importance in applications such as cell line development or single-cell analysis, e.g., for cancer research or for emerging diagnostic methods. This review provides an overview of technologies that are currently used or in development to isolate single cells for subsequent single-cell analysis. Data from a dedicated online market survey conducted to identify the most relevant technologies, presented here for the first time, shows that FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting) respectively Flow cytometry (33% usage), laser microdissection (17%), manual cell picking (17%), random seeding/dilution (15%), and microfluidics/lab-on-a-chip devices (12%) are currently the most frequently used technologies. These most prominent technologies are described in detail and key performance factors are discussed. The survey data indicates a further increasing interest in single-cell isolation tools for the coming years. Additionally, a worldwide patent search was performed to screen for emerging technologies that might become relevant in the future. In total 179 patents were found, out of which 25 were evaluated by screening the title and abstract to be relevant to the field.

  16. Exploring Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brus, David; Hotek, Doug

    2010-01-01

    One of the most significant technological issues of the 21st Century is finding a way to fulfill the energy demands without destroying the environment through global warming and climate change. Worldwide human population is on the rise, and with it, the demand for more energy in pursuit of a higher quality of life. In the meantime, as people use…

  17. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 671

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ... (UXO) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and by the Standardized UXO Technology Deomostration Site Scoring Committee...

  18. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 213

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Archiable, Robert; McClung, Christina; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ... (UXO) utilizing the YPG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and by the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Site Scoring Committee...

  19. Low power RF circuit design in standard CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarado, Unai; Adín, Iñigo

    2012-01-01

    Low Power Consumption is one of the critical issues in the performance of small battery-powered handheld devices. Mobile terminals feature an ever increasing number of wireless communication alternatives including GPS, Bluetooth, GSM, 3G, WiFi or DVB-H. Considering that the total power available for each terminal is limited by the relatively slow increase in battery performance expected in the near future, the need for efficient circuits is now critical. This book presents the basic techniques available to design low power RF CMOS analogue circuits. It gives circuit designers a complete guide of alternatives to optimize power consumption and explains the application of these rules in the most common RF building blocks: LNA, mixers and PLLs. It is set out using practical examples and offers a unique perspective as it targets designers working within the standard CMOS process and all the limitations inherent in these technologies.

  20. Technology of mammalian cell encapsulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uludag, H; De Vos, P; Tresco, PA

    2000-01-01

    Entrapment of mammalian cells in physical membranes has been practiced since the early 1950s when it was originally introduced as a basic research tool. The method has since been developed based on the promise of its therapeutic usefulness in tissue transplantation. Encapsulation physically isolates

  1. Education Technology Standards Self-Efficacy (ETSSE) Scale: A Validity and Reliability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Omer; Yazar, Taha

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: The educational technology standards for teachers set by the International Society for Technology in Education (the ISTE Standards-T) represent an important framework for using technology effectively in teaching and learning processes. These standards are widely used by universities, educational institutions, and schools. The…

  2. Technology advancement for integrative stem cell analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yoon; Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2014-12-01

    Scientists have endeavored to use stem cells for a variety of applications ranging from basic science research to translational medicine. Population-based characterization of such stem cells, while providing an important foundation to further development, often disregard the heterogeneity inherent among individual constituents within a given population. The population-based analysis and characterization of stem cells and the problems associated with such a blanket approach only underscore the need for the development of new analytical technology. In this article, we review current stem cell analytical technologies, along with the advantages and disadvantages of each, followed by applications of these technologies in the field of stem cells. Furthermore, while recent advances in micro/nano technology have led to a growth in the stem cell analytical field, underlying architectural concepts allow only for a vertical analytical approach, in which different desirable parameters are obtained from multiple individual experiments and there are many technical challenges that limit vertically integrated analytical tools. Therefore, we propose--by introducing a concept of vertical and horizontal approach--that there is the need of adequate methods to the integration of information, such that multiple descriptive parameters from a stem cell can be obtained from a single experiment.

  3. 77 FR 54163 - Health Information Technology: Standards, Implementation Specifications, and Certification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... Health Information Technology: Standards, Implementation Specifications, and Certification Criteria for... Health Information Technology AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information... information technology, including changing the program's name to the ONC HIT Certification Program. DATES...

  4. Keeping up with Our Students: The Evolution of Technology and Standards in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Ryan M.; Buffington, Melanie L.

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the standards of technology in the visual arts, arguing the standards function as de facto policy, the guidelines that shape what teachers teach. In this study, we investigate how art education standards approach technology as a teaching tool and artmaking medium, analyzing the current National Visual Arts Standards, the…

  5. Cell-based technologies for Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Santoro Haddad

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Huntington's disease (HD is a fatal genetic disorder, which causes the progressive breakdown of neurons in the human brain. HD deteriorates human physical and mental abilities over time and has no cure. Stem cell-based technologies are promising novel treatments, and in HD, they aim to replace lost neurons and/or to prevent neural cell death. Herein we discuss the use of human fetal tissue (hFT, neural stem cells (NSCs of hFT origin or embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs, in clinical and pre-clinical studies. The in vivo use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which are derived from non-neural tissues, will also be discussed. All these studies prove the potential of stem cells for transplantation therapy in HD, demonstrating cell grafting and the ability to differentiate into mature neurons, resulting in behavioral improvements. We claim that there are still many problems to overcome before these technologies become available for HD patient treatment, such as: a safety regarding the use of NSCs and pluripotent stem cells, which are potentially teratogenic; b safety regarding the transplantation procedure itself, which represents a risk and needs to be better studied; and finally c technical and ethical issues regarding cells of fetal and embryonic origin.

  6. 2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, B. [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-06-30

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general business strategy and market focus, as well as, financial information for select publicly-traded companies.

  7. 2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE

    2010-06-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general business strategy and market focus, as well as, financial information for select publicly-traded companies.

  8. Recent Progress in Cell Reprogramming Technology for Cell Transplantation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells opened the gate for reprogramming technology with which we can change the cell fate through overexpression of master transcriptional factors. Now we can prepare various kinds of neuronal cells directly induced from somatic cells. It has been reported that overexpression of a neuron-specific transcriptional factors might change the cell fate of endogenous astroglia to neuronal cells in vivo. In addition, some research groups demonstrated that chemical compound can induce chemical-induced neuronal cells, without transcriptional factors overexpression. In this review, we briefly review recent progress in the induced neuronal (iN) cells, and discuss the possibility of application for cell transplantation therapy.

  9. Development of uranium standard glass for fission tracks technology calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yunlong; Wu Zhaohui; Huang Qiuhong; Wang Bing; Zhai Pengji

    1997-07-01

    The uranium standard glass is developed to meet the need of application of fission tracks technology. It's main composition are SiO 2 , Na 2 O, CaO, Al 2 O 3 , etc. Tests indicate that uranium in the glass is well-distributed; the content (mass fraction) of element B is smaller than 3 μg/g, Cd smaller than 2.1 μg/g, and Th smaller than 0.3 μg/g. The acid-resisting property reaches the level of the first class optical glass; and the moist-resisting property reaches the level of the second class optical glass. The contents of uranium in UB1 and UB2 uranium glass determined by several laboratories are (1.89 +- 0.05) μg/g and (11.2 +- 0.2) μg/g respectively; the stability test after a year indicates that its properties are stable. (11 tabs., 1 figs.)

  10. Single-cell technologies in environmental omics

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2015-10-22

    Environmental studies are primarily done by culturing isolated microorganisms or by amplifying and sequencing conserved genes. Difficulties understanding the complexity of large numbers of various microorganisms in an environment led to the development of techniques to enrich specific microorganisms for upstream analysis, ultimately leading to single-cell isolation and analyses. We discuss the significance of single-cell technologies in omics studies with focus on metagenomics and metatranscriptomics. We propose that by reducing sample heterogeneity using single-cell genomics, metaomic studies can be simplified.

  11. Acceleration of cell factories engineering using CRISPR-based technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronda, Carlotta

    potentially be standardized in an automatable platform and, in the future be integrated with metabolic modeling tools. In particularly it describes the technologies developed in the three widely used organisms: E. coli, S. cerevisiae and CHO mammalian cells using the recent breakthrough CRISPR/ Cas9 system....... These include CRMAGE, a MAGE improved recombineering platform using CRISPR negative selection, CrEdit, a system for multi-loci marker-free simultaneous gene and pathway integrations and CRISPy a platform to accelerate genome editing in CHO cells....

  12. List of foreio.n standards in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brabec, D.

    1984-01-01

    The bibliography comprises international standards of CMEA, ISO, IEC and national standards of the USSR, GDR, FRG, France, UK, USA and Austria in the field of nuclear power, nuclear engineering and the peaceful uses of ionizing radiation and radionuclides. Also included are standards covering other industrial sectors where the standardized object or activity is linked with ionizing radiation or radionuclides, as well as standards covering metrology, quality control and testing. The bibliography is complete with instructions for use, sources and a subject index and index of standard numbers. (Ha)

  13. 45 CFR 170.210 - Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information created...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for health information technology to... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION... FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Standards and Implementation Specifications for Health Information...

  14. 77 FR 13831 - Health Information Technology: Standards, Implementation Specifications, and Certification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... Part 170 Health Information Technology: Standards, Implementation Specifications, and Certification... Program for Health Information Technology; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 45... Office of the Secretary 45 CFR Part 170 RIN 0991-AB82 Health Information Technology: Standards...

  15. Comparative study of different fuel cell technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado-Flores, J.

    2013-01-01

    Fuel cells generate electricity and heat during electrochemical reaction which happens between the oxygen and hydrogen to form the water. Fuel cell technology is a promising way to provide energy for rural areas where there is no access to the public grid or where there is a huge cost of wiring and transferring electricity. In addition, applications with essential secure electrical energy requirement such as uninterruptible power supplies (UPS), power generation stations and distributed systems can employ fuel cells as their source of energy. The current paper includes a comparative study of basic design, working principle, applications, advantages and disadvantages of various technologies available for fuel cells. In addition, techno-economic features of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCV) and internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEV) are compared. The results indicate that fuel cell systems have simple design, high reliability, noiseless operation, high efficiency and less environmental impact. The aim of this paper is to serve as a convenient reference for fuel cell power generation reviews. (Author)

  16. 75 FR 27708 - National Institute of Standards and Technology Performance Review Board Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... equitable treatment of these individuals. This notice lists the membership of the NIST PRB and supersedes... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology National Institute of Standards and Technology Performance Review Board Membership The National Institute of Standards and...

  17. 76 FR 55880 - National Institute of Standards and Technology; Performance Review Board Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... equitable treatment of these individuals. This notice lists the membership of the NIST PRB and supersedes... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology National Institute of Standards and Technology; Performance Review Board Membership The National Institute of Standards and...

  18. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 810 (FEREX Fluxgate Gradient Magnetometer/Sling)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Banta, Matthew; Burch, William; Karwatka, Michael; McDonnell, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. This Scoring Record was coordinated by Michael Karwatka and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  19. The Economics of Standards and Standardization in Information and Communication Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Kuhn; Fomin, Vladislav V.

    2006-01-01

    processes in the field of ICT taking place? How and why do open standards differ from other types of standards? How may open standards influence ICT government policy and the reverse: How will government need to take action in the face of the international trend toward open standards in ICT?...

  20. Modern standardization case studies at the crossroads of technology, economics, and politics

    CERN Document Server

    Schneiderman, R

    2015-01-01

    Modern Standardization -- Case Studies at the Crossroads of Technology, Economics, and Politics covers the development of new technical standards, how these standards are typically triggered, and how they are submitted to standards development organizations (SDOs) for review and evaluation. It fills the gap in the shortage of reference material in the development of real-world standards. The increasing pace of innovation in technology has accelerated the competitive nature of standardization, particularly in emerging markets. Modern Standardization addresses these and other issues through a series of case studies in a format designed for academics and their engineering, business, and law school students.

  1. The Development of a Skills Standard for Hazardous Materials Management Technology Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James; Bear, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    A multifaceted program, Goals 2000: Educate America," has as one of its top priorities the development of skills standards for certain key occupations. This articles examines the development of standards for Hazardous Materials Management Technology technicians. (LZ)

  2. New Rules, New Roles: Technology Standards and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, Becky; Adcock, Phyllis G.

    2007-01-01

    The digital age is infiltrating colleges of education around the country, but while some faculty are jumping on the bandwagon and working hard to improve their own technological literacy and that of their students, other faculty are resistant, afraid that technology may "dehumanize" education. School districts around the country are investing…

  3. 75 FR 8099 - Public Workshop on Marine Technology and Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Mechanical Engineers (ASME), in coordination with the USCG Office of Design and Engineering Standards. ASME... paper and presentation to Lieutenant Commander Rob Griffiths, Office of Design and Engineering Standards... questions on this notice, contact Lieutenant Commander Rob Griffiths, Office of Design and Engineering...

  4. The American Archival Profession and Information Technology Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of the use of standards by archivists highlights the U.S. MARC AMC (Archives-Manuscript Control) format for reporting archival records and manuscripts; their interest in specific standards being developed for the OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) reference model; and the management of records in electronic formats. (16 references) (LAE)

  5. Comparison of current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran with American Society of Extracorporeal Technology's standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faravan, Amir; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Alizadeh Ghavidel, Alireza; Toutounchi, Mohammad Zia; Ghanbari, Ameneh; Mazloomi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Standards have a significant role in showing the minimum level of optimal optimum and the expected performance. Since the perfusion technology staffs play an the leading role in providing the quality services to the patients undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass machine, this study aimed to assess the standards on how Iranian perfusion technology staffs evaluate and manage the patients during the cardiopulmonary bypass process and compare their practice with the recommended standards by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. In this descriptive study, data was collected from 48 Iranian public hospitals and educational health centers through a researcher-created questionnaire. The data collection questionnaire assessed the standards which are recommended by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Findings showed that appropriate measurements were carried out by the perfusion technology staffs to prevent the hemodilution and avoid the blood transfusion and unnecessary blood products, determine the initial dose of heparin based on one of the proposed methods, monitor the anticoagulants based on ACT measurement, and determine the additional doses of heparin during the cardiopulmonary bypass based on ACT or protamine titration. It was done only in 4.2% of hospitals and health centers. Current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran are inappropriate based on the standards of American Society of Cardiovascular Perfusion. This represents the necessity of authorities' attention to the validation programs and development of the caring standards on one hand and continuous assessment of using these standards on the other hand.

  6. Multijunction cells for concentrators: Technology prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferber, R. R. (Compiler); Costogue, E. N. (Compiler); Shimada, K. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Development of high-efficiency multijunction solar cells for concentrator applications is a key step in achieving the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy National Photovoltaics Program. This report summarizes findings of an issue study conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Photovoltaic Analysis and Integration Center, with the assistance of the Solar Energy Research Institute and Sandia National laboratoies, which surveyed multijunction cell research for concentrators undertaken by federal agencies and by private industry. The team evaluated the potentials of research activities sponsored by DOE and by corporate funding to achieve projected high-efficiency goals and developed summary statements regarding industry expectations. Recommendations are made for the direction of future work to address specific unresolved aspects of multijunction cell technology.

  7. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-08-01

    This report identifies the commercial and near-commercial (emerging) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  8. Reviews on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apinan Soottitantawat

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC is one type of high temperature fuel cell that appears to be one of the most promising technology to provide the efficient and clean energy production for wide range of applications (from small units to large scale power plants. This paper reviews the current status and related researches on SOFC technologies. In details, the research trend for the development of SOFC components(i.e. anode, electrolyte, cathode, and interconnect are presented. Later, the current important designs of SOFC (i.e. Seal-less Tubular Design, Segmented Cell in Series Design, Monolithic Design and Flat Plate Design are exampled. In addition, the possible operations of SOFC (i.e. external reforming, indirect internal reforming, and direct internal reforming are discussed. Lastly, the research studies on applications of SOFCs with co-generation (i.e. SOFC with Combined Heat and Power (SOFC-CHP, SOFC with Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT and SOFC with chemical production are given.

  9. Wildlife. Guide to Standards and Implementation. Career & Technology Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Standards Branch.

    This Alberta curriculum guide, focusing on wildlife, defines competencies that: help students build daily living skills; investigate career options in logistics occupations; use technology in the logistics field effectively and efficiently; and prepare for entry into the workplace or related postsecondary programs. Section A provides information…

  10. Logistics. Guide to Standards and Implementation. Career & Technology Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Standards Branch.

    This Alberta curriculum guide defines competencies that help students build daily living skills, investigate career options in logistics occupations, use technology in the logistics field effectively and efficiently, and prepare for entry into the workplace or related postsecondary programs. The first section provides a program rationale and…

  11. Technology standards and increasing returns: Microsoft versus Nokia and Linux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millar-Schijf, Carla C.J.M.; Millar, P.H.; Choi, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to advance theory on the concept of increasing returns by reviewing different strands of literature (Arthur, 1994; Liebowitz and Margolis, 1990; 1994; David, 1990) and to develop the concept of a 'critical mass' strategy which incorporates both technological effects

  12. Cosmetology Studies. Guide to Standards and Implementation. Career & Technology Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Standards Branch.

    This Alberta curriculum guide defines competencies that help students build daily living skills, investigate career options in cosmetology, use technology in the cosmetology field effectively and efficiently, and prepare for entry into the workplace or related postsecondary programs in the field. The first section provides a program rationale and…

  13. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Record No. 922

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Technology Division (NAVEODTECHDIV) (Indian Head) by Blackhawk GeoServices (now Zapata Blackhawk) with Geometrics and G&G Sciences, Inc. acting as...81505 Defense Technical Information Center PDF 8725 John J. Kingman Road, Suite 0944 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6218

  14. Strategic technology policy as a supplement to renewable energy standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Carolyn; Greaker, Mads; Rosendahl, Knut Einar

    2018-01-01

    In many regions, renewable energy targets are a primary decarbonization policy. Most of the same jurisdictions also subsidize the manufacturing and/or deployment of renewable energy technologies, some being sufficiently aggressive as to engender WTO disputes. We consider a downstream energy-using

  15. Standardized and Repeatable Technology Evaluation for Cybersecurity Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    include: DITEC+, an enterprise-level tool, and the Cyber-Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition ( SCADA ) Evaluation Capability (C-SEC), an...instantiation of DITEC for evaluating SCADA network cybersecurity technologies. iii CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...a product, where a network administrator would be more concerned with the ability to install a vendor update with minimal system downtime. The UPD

  16. REGULATION OF STANDARDS IN TECHNOLOGY MARKETS: TRACING CONNECTIONS BETWEEN COMPETITION LAW AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE

    OpenAIRE

    Tremolada, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    The implications of standardization cannot be overstated: today, the global economy relies heavily on technical standards because they foster technology diffusion and economic growth. Yet little is known about their implications for global competition policy, innovation and trade. This absence in legal analysis is particularly critical in the context of disruptive technological advancements featured in information and communication technology and other innovation-intensive sectors, characteri...

  17. Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability Standards and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    evaluating a variety of security technologies ranging from RFID access control to security testing products. Recently, there has been a dramatic...Award Number: W81XWH-09-1-0705 TITLE: “Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability Standards and Technology Leadership” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...20 Sept 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE “Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Standards and Technology Leadership” 5b

  18. 75 FR 44589 - Health Information Technology: Initial Set of Standards, Implementation Specifications, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... Part III Department of Health and Human Services 45 CFR Part 170 Health Information Technology... Secretary 45 CFR Part 170 RIN 0991-AB58 Health Information Technology: Initial Set of Standards... of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), Department of Health and Human...

  19. 78 FR 76627 - Health Information Technology Standards Committee Advisory Meeting: Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Information Technology Standards Committee Advisory Meeting: Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology... committee of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). These meeting...

  20. 25 CFR 542.16 - What are the minimum internal control standards for information technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... information technology? 542.16 Section 542.16 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE... standards for information technology? Link to an amendment published at 73 FR 60498, Oct. 10, 2008. This... adequately segregated and monitored to prevent error in general information technology procedures to go...

  1. 75 FR 2013 - Health Information Technology: Initial Set of Standards, Implementation Specifications, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... Part III Department of Health and Human Services 45 CFR Part 170 Health Information Technology... Secretary 45 CFR Part 170 RIN 0991-AB58 Health Information Technology: Initial Set of Standards... of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, Department of Health and Human...

  2. Dynamic RAM Technology and migration to DDR4 Standard

    OpenAIRE

    Rot, Gorazd

    2014-01-01

    Memory devices play a substantial role in developing increasingly fast computer systems. Most computers use a memory hierarchy consisting of different memory types with different features. This thesis examines dynamic random access memory (DRAM), which is used as the main memory. It looks at some fundamental features of computer memory technology and explains the structure and principle of operation of DRAM devices. A major focus is on synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM) and on d...

  3. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Record No. 946

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    electromagnetic induction (EMI) instrument, which has been updated for this demonstration with the intended purpose of improving the detection and...elements and access to electrical power for battery charging is required. This and workspace for the data quality control analyst located in the...background alarm rate EMI = electromagnetic induction EQT = Environmental Quality Technology ERDC = U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineering Research

  4. DOD Information Technology Standard Guidance (ITSG) Version 3.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-07

    application portability, znd information about how to tailor procurement specifications to avoid potability problems. The standards arena is broad and is...Facs~mile Apprrout (Adopts MTA 538-19U) 1500893 (Approved) I GPC NIST Wntial Geapitics Eau =& sepecification TOGES) (adopts FF5 PUB Iaforroatioaal... Potable Operating Systen Interface (POSIX) -Pant I: 1003. 1b:1993 Informational System Application Progism Interface (API) Amendment (Approved) _ _1

  5. Test Standards for Contingency Base Waste-to-Energy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    standard and challenge recipes by weight percent ........6 Table 3 Recommended breakout of plastic recipes by weight percent ...............7 Table 4...to select the appropriate VOC and SVOC target compounds, it is recommended to review the list of hazardous air pollutants provided in 42 United...Class A explosives, or Class B explosives classifications. Toxicity: Toxic wastes are harmful or fatal when ingested or absorbed. When toxic wastes

  6. High efficiency low cost GaAs/Ge cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on high efficiency low cost GaAs/Ge cell technology are presented. Topics covered include: high efficiency, low cost GaAs/Ge solar cells; advantages of Ge; comparison of typical production cells for space applications; panel level comparisons; and solar cell technology trends.

  7. Acceptance Factors Influencing Adoption of National Institute of Standards and Technology Information Security Standards: A Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriakou, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of a comprehensive information security governance model and security controls is the best option organizations may have to protect their information assets and comply with regulatory requirements. Understanding acceptance factors of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Risk Management Framework (RMF) comprehensive…

  8. Double Standards: Using Teachers' Perceptions to Develop a Standards-Based Technology Integration Method for Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hineman, John M.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative collective case study with an action research design identified teachers' perceptions of the use of technology in standards-based social studies education. Data were collected from semi-structured, one-on-one interviews conducted with a purposive sample of ten in-service social studies teachers from southwestern Pennsylvania.…

  9. RE/H2 Production Micro-System Based on Standard Alkaline Electrolytic Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moschetto, A.; Tina, G.M.; Ferraro, M.; Briguglio, N.; Antonucci, V.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the first task of a more comprehensive research project focused on the development of micro-scale (1-20 kW) Renewable Hydrogen (RE/H 2 ) production systems oriented to carry on a wide campaign of educational and demonstration projects. The paper proposes to rely on low-cost and rugged 'standard' alkaline electrolytic technology, well suited for decentralized hydrogen production, but requiring a certain R and D effort to get technical competitiveness. An electrolyser test facility has been designed and carried out. Then performance assessment of a commercial electrolyser and its sub-systems has been accomplished. First experimental results stated that the unit under test gets an average production efficiency of 51%, versus a stack (cell) efficiency of about 62%, while the aged AC/DC power converter, to be removed or replaced to adapt the unit to DC link with renewables, requires more than 16% of the incoming power. (authors)

  10. Advanced passive technology: A global standard for nuclear plant requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, V.

    1994-01-01

    Since 1984, Westinghouse has been developing AP8OO, a 800 MW, two-loop advanced passive plant, in response to an initiative established by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy' (DOE). The preliminary design was cornpleved in 1989. AP6OO's Standard Safety Analysis and Probabilistic Risk analysis Reports were submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for design certification in 1992. Design simplification is the key strategy behind the AP6OO. The basic technical concept Of simplification has resulted in a simplified reactor coolant systems, simplified plant systems, a simplified plant arrangement, reduced number of components, simplified operation and maintenance

  11. Sliver Solar Cells: High-Efficiency, Low-Cost PV Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Franklin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sliver cells are thin, single-crystal silicon solar cells fabricated using standard fabrication technology. Sliver modules, composed of several thousand individual Sliver cells, can be efficient, low-cost, bifacial, transparent, flexible, shadow tolerant, and lightweight. Compared with current PV technology, mature Sliver technology will need 10% of the pure silicon and fewer than 5% of the wafer starts per MW of factory output. This paper deals with two distinct challenges related to Sliver cell and Sliver module production: providing a mature and robust Sliver cell fabrication method which produces a high yield of highly efficient Sliver cells, and which is suitable for transfer to industry; and, handling, electrically interconnecting, and encapsulating billions of sliver cells at low cost. Sliver cells with efficiencies of 20% have been fabricated at ANU using a reliable, optimised processing sequence, while low-cost encapsulation methods have been demonstrated using a submodule technique.

  12. Exemplary Design Envelope Specification for Standard Modular Hydropower Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Brennan T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tsakiris, Achilleas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Papanicolaou, Thanos [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Pries, Jason L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burress, Timothy A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stewart, Kevin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Kyutae [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeNeale, Scott T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevelhimer, Mark S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pracheil, Brenda M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McManamay, Ryan A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ekici, Kivanc [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kutz, Benjamin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Curd, Shelaine L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bishop, Norm [Knight Piesold, Denver, CO (United States); Welch, Tim [U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); Rabon, Daniel [U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); Fernandez, Alisha [McKeown and Associates, Moberly, MO (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Hydropower is an established, affordable renewable energy generation technology supplying nearly 18% of the electricity consumed globally. A hydropower facility interacts continuously with the surrounding water resource environment, causing alterations of varying magnitude in the natural flow of water, energy, fish, sediment, and recreation upstream and downstream. A universal challenge in facility design is balancing the extraction of useful energy and power system services from a stream with the need to maintain ecosystem processes and natural environmental function. On one hand, hydroelectric power is a carbon-free, renewable, and flexible asset to the power system. On the other, the disruption of longitudinal connectivity and the artificial barrier to aquatic movement created by hydraulic structures can produce negative impacts that stress fresh water environments. The growing need for carbon-free, reliable, efficient distributed energy sources suggests there is significant potential for hydropower projects that can deploy with low installed costs, enhanced ecosystem service offerings, and minimal disruptions of the stream environment.

  13. [DEVELOPMENT OF CELL SHEET ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY IN ENGINEERING VASCULARIZED TISSUE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Ma, Dongyang; Ren, Liling

    2015-03-01

    To review the development of cell sheet engineering technology in engineering vascularized tissue. The literature about cell sheet engineering technology and engineering vascularized tissue was reviewed, analyzed, and summarized. Although there are many methods to engineer vascularized tissue, cell sheet engineering technology provides a promising potential to develop a vascularized tissue. Recently, cell sheet engineering technology has become a hot topic in engineering vascularized tissue. Co-culturing endothelial cells on a cell sheet, endothelial cells are able to form three-dimensional prevascularized networks and microvascular cavities in the cell sheet, which facilitate the formation of functional vascular networks in the transplanted tissue. Cell sheet engineering technology is a promising strategy to engineer vascularized tissue, which is still being studied to explore more potential.

  14. Technology and Technique Standards for Camera-Acquired Digital Dermatologic Images: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Elizabeth A; Tokay, Barbara A; Jewell, Sarah T; Marchetti, Michael A; Halpern, Allan C

    2015-08-01

    Photographs are invaluable dermatologic diagnostic, management, research, teaching, and documentation tools. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standards exist for many types of digital medical images, but there are no DICOM standards for camera-acquired dermatologic images to date. To identify and describe existing or proposed technology and technique standards for camera-acquired dermatologic images in the scientific literature. Systematic searches of the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were performed in January 2013 using photography and digital imaging, standardization, and medical specialty and medical illustration search terms and augmented by a gray literature search of 14 websites using Google. Two reviewers independently screened titles of 7371 unique publications, followed by 3 sequential full-text reviews, leading to the selection of 49 publications with the most recent (1985-2013) or detailed description of technology or technique standards related to the acquisition or use of images of skin disease (or related conditions). No universally accepted existing technology or technique standards for camera-based digital images in dermatology were identified. Recommendations are summarized for technology imaging standards, including spatial resolution, color resolution, reproduction (magnification) ratios, postacquisition image processing, color calibration, compression, output, archiving and storage, and security during storage and transmission. Recommendations are also summarized for technique imaging standards, including environmental conditions (lighting, background, and camera position), patient pose and standard view sets, and patient consent, privacy, and confidentiality. Proposed standards for specific-use cases in total body photography, teledermatology, and dermoscopy are described. The literature is replete with descriptions of obtaining photographs of skin disease, but universal imaging standards have not been developed

  15. Electric vehicle charging technologies analysis and standards : final research project report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This project has evaluated the technologies and standards associated with Electric : Vehicle Service Equipment (EVSE) and the related infrastructure, and the major cost : issue related to electric vehicle (EV) charging -- the cost of utility power. T...

  16. Guidelines on Active Content and Mobile Code: Recommendations of the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jansen, Wayne

    2001-01-01

    .... One such category of technologies is active content. Broadly speaking, active content refers to electronic documents that, unlike past character documents based on the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII...

  17. Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability Standards and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    will enable the creation of complete electronic health records and will introduce error resistance into networked medical device systems. We are...technological advances, interoperability poses safety and medico -legal challenges as well. The development of standards and production of

  18. Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-13

    Fact sheet describing the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project. NREL is seeking fuel cell industry partners from the United States and abroad to participate in an objective and credible analysis of commercially available fuel cell products to benchmark the current state of the technology and support industry growth.

  19. Social work, technology, and ethical practices: a review and evaluation of the national association of social workers' technology standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Amy

    2014-10-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are becoming essential to social work practice by providing increased treatment possibilities and reducing barriers to service. While recognizing the importance of ICTs in practice, social work practitioners have had concerns about ethical use. In response, NASW compiled the Standards for Technology and Social Work Practice. While the guidelines set the groundwork, they were not embedded in a process that would allow them to adapt to the swift pace of ICT changes. This article reviews the current Standards, evaluates how these have been implemented by practitioners, and offers suggestions for updates.

  20. Continued SOFC cell and stack technology and improved production methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wandel, M.; Brodersen, K.; Phair, J. (and others)

    2009-05-15

    Within this project significant results are obtained on a number of very diverse areas ranging from development of cell production, metallic creep in interconnect to assembling and test of stacks with foot print larger than 500 cm2. Out of 38 milestones 28 have been fulfilled and 10 have been partly fulfilled. This project has focused on three main areas: 1) The continued cell development and optimization of manufacturing processes aiming at production of large foot-print cells, improving cell performance and development environmentally more benign production methods. 2) Stack technology - especially stacks with large foot print and improving the stack design with respect to flow geometry and gas leakages. 3) Development of stack components with emphasis on sealing (for 2G as well as 3G), interconnect (coat, architecture and creep) and test development. Production of cells with a foot print larger than 500 cm2 is very difficult due to the brittleness of the cells and great effort has been put into this topic. Eight cells were successfully produced making it possible to assemble and test a real stack thereby giving valuable results on the prospects of stacks with large foot print. However, the yield rate is very low and a significant development to increase this yield lies ahead. Several lessons were learned on the stack level regarding 'large foot print' stacks. Modelling studies showed that the width of the cell primarily is limited by production and handling of the cell whereas the length (in the flow direction) is limited by e.g. pressure drop and necessary manifolding. The optimal cell size in the flow direction was calculated to be between approx20 cm and < 30 cm. From an economical point of view the production yield is crucial and stacks with large foot print cell area are only feasible if the cell production yield is significantly enhanced. Co-casting has been pursued as a production technique due to the possibilities in large scale production

  1. Agribusiness Standards: A Comparison of the Choices of Utah Agriscience and Technology Teachers and Agribusiness Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerger, Richard M.; Andreasen, Randall

    2000-01-01

    Secondary agriscience teachers (n=13) and agribusiness leaders (n=12) validated standards and objectives for agribusiness education in Utah, recommending a core of 12 standards. Written and oral communication skills and technologies for agricultural management and quality control were most important. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  2. Experience with local lymph node assay performance standards using standard radioactivity and nonradioactive cell count measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basketter, David; Kolle, Susanne N; Schrage, Arnhild; Honarvar, Naveed; Gamer, Armin O; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is the preferred test for identification of skin-sensitizing substances by measuring radioactive thymidine incorporation into the lymph node. To facilitate acceptance of nonradioactive variants, validation authorities have published harmonized minimum performance standards (PS) that the alternative endpoint assay must meet. In the present work, these standards were applied to a variant of the LLNA based on lymph node cell counts (LNCC) run in parallel as a control with the standard LLNA with radioactivity measurements, with threshold concentrations (EC3) being determined for the sensitizers. Of the 22 PS chemicals tested in this study, 21 yielded the same results from standard radioactivity and cell count measurements; only 2-mercaptobenzothiazole was positive by LLNA but negative by LNCC. Of the 16 PS positives, 15 were positive by LLNA and 14 by LNCC; methylmethacrylate was not identified as sensitizer by either of the measurements. Two of the six PS negatives tested negative in our study by both LLNA and LNCC. Of the four PS negatives which were positive in our study, chlorobenzene and methyl salicylate were tested at higher concentrations than the published PS, whereas the corresponding concentrations resulted in consistent negative results. Methylmethacrylate and nickel chloride tested positive within the concentration range used for the published PS. The results indicate cell counts and radioactive measurements are in good accordance within the same LLNA using the 22 PS test substances. Comparisons with the published PS results may, however, require balanced analysis rather than a simple checklist approach. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. [The practice and proposals for standardized management of neonatal insulation technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Xiong, Ying; Hu, Yanling; Zhang, Xuelong

    2012-05-01

    In clinical practice, incubators can contribute to better diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Currently, insulation medical equipment used for the newborn are mainly warm-boxes. With the use popularity of warm-boxes in the country, medical accidents caused by improper use are on the increase. According to neonatal insulation technology and standardized management of practice, this article puts forward technical requirements of infant incubators with constant temperature and humidity, operation regulations and management specifications to better regulate the use of such devices. Meanwhile, it also suggests national related departments to formulate "incubator technology management norms" and "warm-box technology and practice", intending to standardize industry behaviors and ensure medical safety.

  4. A Multi-Year Plan for Research, Development, and Prototype Testing of Standard Modular Hydropower Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Brennan T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Welch, Tim [U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Washington, DC (United States).Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); Witt, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stewart, Kevin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Kyutae [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeNeale, Scott T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevelhimer, Mark S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burress, Timothy A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pracheil, Brenda M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pries, Jason L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); O' Connor, Patrick W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Curd, Shelaine L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ekici, Kivanc [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Papanicolaou, Thanos [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Tsakiris, Achilleas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kutz, Benjamin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bishop, Norm [Knight Piesold, Denver, CO (United States); McKeown, Alisha [McKeown and Associates, Moberly, MO (United States); Rabon, Daniel [U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Washington, DC (United States).Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); Zimmerman, Gregory P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Uria Martinez, Rocio [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McManamay, Ryan A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The Multi-Year Plan for Research, Development, and Prototype Testing of Standard Modular Hydropower Technology (MYRP) presents a strategy for specifying, designing, testing, and demonstrating the efficacy of standard modular hydropower (SMH) as an environmentally compatible and cost-optimized renewable electricity generation technology. The MYRP provides the context, background, and vision for testing the SMH hypothesis: if standardization, modularity, and preservation of stream functionality become essential and fully realized features of hydropower technology, project design, and regulatory processes, they will enable previously unrealized levels of new project development with increased acceptance, reduced costs, increased predictability of outcomes, and increased value to stakeholders. To achieve success in this effort, the MYRP outlines a framework of stakeholder-validated criteria, models, design tools, testing facilities, and assessment protocols that will facilitate the development of next-generation hydropower technologies.

  5. Definition and compositions of standard wastestreams for evaluation of Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, S.O.

    1993-06-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Project was organized at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to support research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of emerging technologies that offer promising solutions to remediation of buried waste. BWID will identify emerging technologies, screen them for applicability to the identified needs, select technologies for demonstration, and then evaluate the technologies based on prescribed performance objectives. The technical objective of the project is to establish solutions to Environmental Restoration and Waste Management's technological deficiencies and improve baseline remediation systems. This report establishes a set of standard wastestream compositions that will be used by BWID to evaluate the emerging technologies. Five wastestreams are proposed that use four types of waste and a nominal case that is a homogenized combination of the four wastes. The five wastestreams will provide data on the compositional extremes and indicate the technologies' effectiveness over the complete range of expected wastestream compositions

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: FUEL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This techno...

  7. Optomechatronic load cell validation according to the American standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Serrano, Francisco Javier; Camacho P., Alma A.

    2009-09-01

    Productive activities require measuring systems as a key tool for manufacturing quality goods. Metal mechanical industries develop their processes based on the control of a high precision fit between two pieces of a pressureassembled product. Therefore, engineering materials are constantly subjected to resistance tests. Balance test equipment and mechanical vibrations work under the principle of force measurements. The most precise stress measurement methods are done with electromechanical devices known as load cells. They basically consist of a tiny electric resistor that is adhered to a mechanical element that may be under stress. Cyclic stresses also directly affect the performance of the measuring element including the resistance itself, which changes as the cyclic fatigue progresses (the measuring element is a very thin coil with limited strength). In this research, we developed an optomechatronic load cell1 whose operating principle is based on measuring the stress load applied to a mechanical element. The deformation causes a reduction in the distance between the emitter and the receptor producing an electrical signal. It must be established that the distribution of the light intensity varies between the emitter and the receptor due to the generated displacement. An infrared emitter was adapted to the load cell whose signal was received by the receptor at the other end. The second stage included a demonstration that the optoelectronic system is capable of measuring external stresses on a mechanical element by using an indirect method of measuring stresses. Here we present the results from those experiments, which include some adaptations on the mechanical element. We implemented a prototype sensitive to the deformation produced by the mechanical element (load cell). As a result of the two stages, we plan to test the system in academic and industrial applications. The third step in the research is to validate the optomechatronic load cell under the E74

  8. Evaluating and classifying the readiness of technology specifications for national standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dixie B; Perlin, Jonathan B; Halamka, John

    2015-05-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 clearly articulated the central role that health information technology (HIT) standards would play in improving healthcare quality, safety, and efficiency through the meaningful use of certified, standards based, electronic health record (EHR) technology. In 2012, the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) asked the Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN) Power Team of the Health Information Technology Standards Committee (HITSC) to develop comprehensive, objective, and, to the extent practical, quantitative criteria for evaluating technical standards and implementation specifications and classifying their readiness for national adoption. The Power Team defined criteria, attributes, and metrics for evaluating and classifying technical standards and specifications as 'emerging,' 'pilot,' or 'ready for national standardization' based on their maturity and adoptability. The ONC and the HITSC are now using these metrics for assessing the readiness of technical standards for national adoption. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The need for a common standard for voltage levels of HVDC VSC technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, H.K.; Torbaghan, S. Shariat; Gibescu, M.; Roggenkamp, M.M.; Meijden, M.A.M.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of offshore wind energy as well as the increase in electricity trade between the North Sea countries leads to a growing need for additional transmission capacity. Due to the predominantly remote locations of offshore wind farms, the majority of future connections will be high-voltage direct current (HVDC) connections. In order to make the construction of offshore infrastructure more efficient, the North Sea states are currently discussing the development of a common offshore grid. Although this development still stands at the very beginning, we argue in this paper that some crucial elements should be standardized from the outset; the most important one being a common voltage level. Without such standardization, the development of a European offshore grid may be suboptimal, not cost-efficient and might even be prevented from coming into existence. We examine the technical and legal issues associated with introducing a common voltage level for the use of HVDC VSC technology, and discuss the optimal standard as well as the way in which this common standard can best be achieved. - Highlights: • We highlight the need for a common standard for HVDC VSC technology. • We outline that a standardized voltage level at ± 500 kV should be the initial focus. • We discuss the developments regarding standardization of HVDC VSC technology. • We conclude that current developments are not sufficient

  10. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-01-08

    This FY 2015 report updates the results of an effort to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 to 5 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  11. From the primordial soup to self-driving cars: standards and their role in natural and technological innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andreas; Ortman, Scott; Maxfield, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Standards are specifications to which the elements of a technology must conform. Here, we apply this notion to the biochemical 'technologies' of nature, where objects like DNA and proteins, as well as processes like the regulation of gene activity are highly standardized. We introduce the concept of standards with multiple examples, ranging from the ancient genetic material RNA, to Palaeolithic stone axes, and digital electronics, and we discuss common ways in which standards emerge in nature and technology. We then focus on the question of how standards can facilitate technological and biological innovation. Innovation-enhancing standards include those of proteins and digital electronics. They share common features, such as that few standardized building blocks can be combined through standard interfaces to create myriad useful objects or processes. We argue that such features will also characterize the most innovation-enhancing standards of future technologies. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. NextGen Technologies on the FAA's Standard Terminal Automation Replacement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzberger, Kevin; Swenson, Harry; Martin, Lynne; Lin, Melody; Cheng, Jinn-Hwei

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the integration, evaluation, and results from a high-fidelity human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulation of key NASA Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration - 1 (ATD- 1) technologies implemented in an enhanced version of the FAA's Standard Terminal Automation Replacement System (STARS) platform. These ATD-1 technologies include: (1) a NASA enhanced version of the FAA's Time-Based Flow Management, (2) a NASA ground-based automation technology known as controller-managed spacing (CMS), and (3) a NASA advanced avionics airborne technology known as flight-deck interval management (FIM). These ATD-1 technologies have been extensively tested in large-scale HITL simulations using general-purpose workstations to study air transportation technologies. These general purpose workstations perform multiple functions and are collectively referred to as the Multi-Aircraft Control System (MACS). Researchers at NASA Ames Research Center and Raytheon collaborated to augment the STARS platform by including CMS and FIM advisory tools to validate the feasibility of integrating these automation enhancements into the current FAA automation infrastructure. NASA Ames acquired three STARS terminal controller workstations, and then integrated the ATD-1 technologies. HITL simulations were conducted to evaluate the ATD-1 technologies when using the STARS platform. These results were compared with the results obtained when the ATD-1 technologies were tested in the MACS environment. Results collected from the numerical data show acceptably minor differences, and, together with the subjective controller questionnaires showing a trend towards preferring STARS, validate the ATD-1/STARS integration.

  13. Recent Advances in Solar Cell Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The advances in solar cell efficiency, radiation tolerance, and cost over the last decade are reviewed. Potential performance of thin-film solar cells in space are discussed, and the cost and the historical trends in production capability of the photovoltaics industry are considered with respect to the requirements of space power systems. Concentrator cells with conversion efficiency over 30%, and nonconcentrating solar cells with efficiency over 25% are now available, and advanced radiation-tolerant cells and lightweight, thin-film arrays are both being developed. Nonsolar applications of solar cells, including thermophotovoltaics, alpha- and betavoltaics, and laser power receivers, are also discussed.

  14. Potential of thin-film solar cell module technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, K.; Ferber, R. R.; Costogue, E. N.

    1985-01-01

    During the past five years, thin-film cell technology has made remarkable progress as a potential alternative to crystalline silicon cell technology. The efficiency of a single-junction thin-film cell, which is the most promising for use in flat-plate modules, is now in the range of 11 percent with 1-sq cm cells consisting of amorphous silicon, CuInSe2 or CdTe materials. Cell efficiencies higher than 18 percent, suitable for 15 percent-efficient flat plate modules, would require a multijunction configuration such as the CdTe/CuInSe2 and tandem amorphous-silicon (a-Si) alloy cells. Assessments are presented of the technology status of thin-film-cell module research and the potential of achieving the higher efficiencies required for large-scale penetration into the photovoltaic (PV) energy market.

  15. Proceedings -- US Russian workshop on fuel cell technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, B.; Sylwester, A. [comps.

    1996-04-01

    On September 26--28, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored the first Joint US/Russian Workshop on Fuel Cell Technology at the Marriott Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This workshop brought together the US and Russian fuel cell communities as represented by users, producers, R and D establishments and government agencies. Customer needs and potential markets in both countries were discussed to establish a customer focus for the workshop. Parallel technical sessions defined research needs and opportunities for collaboration to advance fuel cell technology. A desired outcome of the workshop was the formation of a Russian/American Fuel Cell Consortium to advance fuel cell technology for application in emerging markets in both countries. This consortium is envisioned to involve industry and national labs in both countries. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Integrated Photodiodes in Standard CMOS Technology for CD and DVD Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radovanovic, S.; Annema, Anne J.; Nauta, Bram

    The influence of two different geometries (layouts) and two structures of high-speed photodiodes in fully standard 0.18 μm CMOS technology on their intrinsic (physical) and electrical bandwidths is analyzed. In addition, a possible application of the integrated photodiodes for the CD and DVD optical

  17. Technology Leadership and Its Relationship with School-Malaysia Standard of Education Quality (School-MSEQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Mohd Izham Mohd; Juraime, Faridah; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.; Nordin, Norazah; Attan, Noraini

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the level of technology leadership practice among administrators in High Performing Schools (HPS) and its relationship with School-Malaysia Standard of Education Quality (School-MSEQ). A set of questionnaires was administered to 96 administrators in 12 HPS of secondary schools category. The data were analysed and interpreted…

  18. 75 FR 76397 - Effectiveness of Federal Agency Participation in Standardization in Select Technology Sectors for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ..., understood and implemented for continuous process improvement. Such improvements can help ensure that Federal... constraints impact the successful completion of the standards efforts? Process Review and Improvement Metrics... Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 \\1\\ and the Office of Management and Budget Circular A-119.\\2...

  19. Developing a Strategy for Using Technology-Enhanced Items in Large-Scale Standardized Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, William

    2017-01-01

    As large-scale standardized tests move from paper-based to computer-based delivery, opportunities arise for test developers to make use of items beyond traditional selected and constructed response types. Technology-enhanced items (TEIs) have the potential to provide advantages over conventional items, including broadening construct measurement,…

  20. Towards the Development of a Model for Hardware Standards in Information Technology Procurement: Factors for Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    While research in academic and professional information technology (IT) journals address the need for strategic alignment and defined IT processes, there is little research about what factors should be considered when implementing specific IT hardware standards in an organization. The purpose of this study was to develop a set of factors for…

  1. Characterization of Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes in Standard 140-nm SOI CMOS Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, M.J.; Sun, P.; Charbon, E.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the characterization of single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) fabricated in standard 140-nm silicon on insulator (SOI) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. As a methodology for SPAD optimization, a test structure array, called SPAD farm, was realized with several

  2. Hybrid tooling technologies and standardization for the manufacturing of inserts for micro injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Fillon, Bertrand; Azcarate, Sabino

    2007-01-01

    . A metrological approach was applied to standardize the employed tooling processes (micro milling, µEDM, laser micromachining, electrochemical µ-milling). The micro tools were then tested with different polymers (PP, PP + nano fillers, PC, COC). The paper provides a comparison of these technologies concerning...

  3. 75 FR 62686 - Health Information Technology: Revisions to Initial Set of Standards, Implementation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... Health Information Technology: Revisions to Initial Set of Standards, Implementation Specifications, and... Health HL7 Health Level Seven NAICS North American Industry Classification System OMB Office of...-Authorized Testing and Certification Body PHSA Public Health Service Act RFA Regulatory Flexibility Act RIA...

  4. Pursuing frequency standards and control: the invention of quartz clock technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzir, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    The quartz clock, the first to replace the pendulum as the time standard and later a ubiquitous and highly influential technology, originated in research on means for determining frequency for the needs of telecommunication and the interests of its users. This article shows that a few groups in the US, Britain, Italy and the Netherlands developed technologies that enabled the construction of the new clock in 1927-28. To coordinate complex and large communication networks, the monopolistic American Telephone and Telegraph Company, and national laboratories needed to determine and maintain a common 'standard' frequency measurement unit. Exploiting novel piezoelectric quartz methods and valve electronics techniques, researchers in these organizations constructed a new crystal-based frequency standard. To ensure its accuracy they compared it to an accepted absolute standard - an astronomical clock, constructing thereby the first quartz clock. Other groups, however, had different, though connected, technological aims, which originated from the diverse interests of the industrial, governmental and academic institutes to which they belonged, and for which they needed to measure, control and manipulate with frequencies of electric oscillations. The present article suggests a comparative examination of the research and development paths of these groups on their incentives, the technological and scientific resources they utilized, and the kind of research carried out in the various institutional settings.

  5. Status note on solar cell technology; Statusnotat om solcelleteknologi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This status note briefly describes development and perspectives for solar cell technology internationally and nationally. The note will form part of the background for a coming proposal for a national solar cell strategy. The strategy will be prepared by the Danish Energy Authority in collaboration with the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, Elkraft System, Eltra, representatives from the industry and others. The proposal is expected to give an overall picture of Danish R and D niches and opportunities within solar cell technology. (BA)

  6. Standardized Low-Power Wireless Communication Technologies for Distributed Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Vilajosana

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent standardization efforts on low-power wireless communication technologies, including time-slotted channel hopping (TSCH and DASH7 Alliance Mode (D7AM, are starting to change industrial sensing applications, enabling networks to scale up to thousands of nodes whilst achieving high reliability. Past technologies, such as ZigBee, rooted in IEEE 802.15.4, and ISO 18000-7, rooted in frame-slotted ALOHA (FSA, are based on contention medium access control (MAC layers and have very poor performance in dense networks, thus preventing the Internet of Things (IoT paradigm from really taking off. Industrial sensing applications, such as those being deployed in oil refineries, have stringent requirements on data reliability and are being built using new standards. Despite the benefits of these new technologies, industrial shifts are not happening due to the enormous technology development and adoption costs and the fact that new standards are not well-known and completely understood. In this article, we provide a deep analysis of TSCH and D7AM, outlining operational and implementation details with the aim of facilitating the adoption of these technologies to sensor application developers.

  7. Micro and Nano-Scale Technologies for Cell Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Unal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell mechanics is a multidisciplinary field that bridges cell biology, fundamental mechanics, and micro and nanotechnology, which synergize to help us better understand the intricacies and the complex nature of cells in their native environment. With recent advances in nanotechnology, microfabrication methods and micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS, we are now well situated to tap into the complex micro world of cells. The field that brings biology and MEMS together is known as Biological MEMS (BioMEMS. BioMEMS take advantage of systematic design and fabrication methods to create platforms that allow us to study cells like never before. These new technologies have been rapidly advancing the study of cell mechanics. This review article provides a succinct overview of cell mechanics and comprehensively surveys micro and nano-scale technologies that have been specifically developed for and are relevant to the mechanics of cells. Here we focus on micro and nano-scale technologies, and their applications in biology and medicine, including imaging, single cell analysis, cancer cell mechanics, organ-on-a-chip systems, pathogen detection, implantable devices, neuroscience and neurophysiology. We also provide a perspective on the future directions and challenges of technologies that relate to the mechanics of cells.

  8. From XML to RDF: how semantic web technologies will change the design of 'omic' standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoshu; Gorlitsky, Robert; Almeida, Jonas S

    2005-09-01

    With the ongoing rapid increase in both volume and diversity of 'omic' data (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and others), the development and adoption of data standards is of paramount importance to realize the promise of systems biology. A recent trend in data standard development has been to use extensible markup language (XML) as the preferred mechanism to define data representations. But as illustrated here with a few examples from proteomics data, the syntactic and document-centric XML cannot achieve the level of interoperability required by the highly dynamic and integrated bioinformatics applications. In the present article, we discuss why semantic web technologies, as recommended by the World Wide Web consortium (W3C), expand current data standard technology for biological data representation and management.

  9. An Examination of Secondary School Teachers' Technology Integration Recommended by ISTE's National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers and School Principal Support for Teacher Technology Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The National Educational Technology Standards for teachers (NETS-T) was adopted by New York State, and was critical to the development of students entering a global society. This study examines teachers' use of digital tools to promote student learning and reflection, promote digital citizenship, communicate and collaborate with parents and…

  10. New progress in wastewater treatment technology for standard-reaching discharge in sour gas fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Gas field water is generally characterized by complex contaminant components and high salinity. Its proper treatment has always been the great concern in the field of environmental protection of oil & gas fields. In this paper, the wastewater from a gas field in the Sichuan Basin with high salinity and more contaminants (e.g. sulfides was treated as a case study for the standard-reaching discharge. Lab experiments were carried out to analyze the adaptability and effectiveness of coagulation–desulfurization composite treatment technology, chemical oxidation based ammonia nitrogen removal technology and cryogenic multi-efficacy distillation technology in the treatment of wastewater in this field. The results show that the removal rate of sulfides and oils is over 90% if polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS is taken as the coagulant combined with TS-1 desulfurization agent. Besides, the removal rate of ammonia nitrogen is over 96% if CA-1 is taken as the oxidant. Finally, after the gas field water is treated by means of cryogenic three-efficacy distillation technology, chloride concentration of distilled water is below 150 mg/L and CODcr concentration is less than 60 mg/L. It is concluded that after the whole process treatment, the main contaminant indicators of wastewater in this case study can satisfy the grade one standard specified in the Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard (GB 8978–1996 and the chloride concentration can meet the requirement of the Standards for Irrigation Water Quality (GB 5084–2005. To sum up, the above mentioned composite technologies are efficient to the wastewater treatment in sour gas fields. Keywords: Sulfide-bearing gas field water, Coagulation, Desulfurization, Chemical oxidation, Standard discharge, Ammonia nitrogen, Chloride, Cryogenic multi-efficacy distillation, Sichuan Basin

  11. Single-cell technologies to study the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proserpio, Valentina; Mahata, Bidesh

    2016-02-01

    The immune system is composed of a variety of cells that act in a coordinated fashion to protect the organism against a multitude of different pathogens. The great variability of existing pathogens corresponds to a similar high heterogeneity of the immune cells. The study of individual immune cells, the fundamental unit of immunity, has recently transformed from a qualitative microscopic imaging to a nearly complete quantitative transcriptomic analysis. This shift has been driven by the rapid development of multiple single-cell technologies. These new advances are expected to boost the detection of less frequent cell types and transient or intermediate cell states. They will highlight the individuality of each single cell and greatly expand the resolution of current available classifications and differentiation trajectories. In this review we discuss the recent advancement and application of single-cell technologies, their limitations and future applications to study the immune system. © 2015 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Emerging Solar Technologies: Perovskite Solar Cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organic–inorganic halide perovskite, a newcomerin the solar cell industry has proved its potential forincreasing efficiency rapidly from 3.8% in 2009 to 22.1% in2016. High efficiency, flexibility, and cell architecture of theemerging hybrid halide perovskite have caught the attentionof researchers and technologists in the field.

  13. Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-02

    This presentation describing the FY 2016 accomplishments for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations project was presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7, 2016.

  14. Emerging Solar Technologies: Perovskite Solar Cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High efficiency, flexibility, and cell architecture of the emerging hybrid halide perovskite have caught the attention of researchers and technologists in the field. This article fo- cuses on the emergence, properties, and current research sta- tus of hybrid perovskite solar cells. 1. Introduction. Gradually, primary energy resources ...

  15. Advances in solar cell welding technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidester, L.G.; Lott, D.R.

    1982-09-01

    In addition to developing the rigid substrate welded conventional cell panels for an earlier U.S. flight program, LMSC recently demonstrated a welded lightweight array system using both 2 x 4 and 5.9 x 5.9 cm wraparound solar cells. This weld system uses infrared sensing of weld joint temperature at the cell contact metalization interface to precisely control weld energy on each joint. Modules fabricated using this weld control system survived lowearth-orbit simulated 5-year tests (over 30,000 cycles) without joint failure. The data from these specifically configured modules, printed circuit substrate with copper interconnect and dielectric wraparound solar cells, can be used as a basis for developing weld schedules for additional cell array panel types.

  16. An efficient auto TPT stitch guidance generation for optimized standard cell design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samboju, Nagaraj C.; Choi, Soo-Han; Arikati, Srini; Cilingir, Erdem

    2015-03-01

    As the technology continues to shrink below 14nm, triple patterning lithography (TPT) is a worthwhile lithography methodology for printing dense layers such as Metal1. However, this increases the complexity of standard cell design, as it is very difficult to develop a TPT compliant layout without compromising on the area. Hence, this emphasizes the importance to have an accurate stitch generation methodology to meet the standard cell area requirement as defined by the technology shrink factor. In this paper, we present an efficient auto TPT stitch guidance generation technique for optimized standard cell design. The basic idea here is to first identify the conflicting polygons based on the Fix Guidance [1] solution developed by Synopsys. Fix Guidance is a reduced sub-graph containing minimum set of edges along with the connecting polygons; by eliminating these edges in a design 3-color conflicts can be resolved. Once the conflicting polygons are identified using this method, they are categorized into four types [2] - (Type 1 to 4). The categorization is based on number of interactions a polygon has with the coloring links and the triangle loops of fix guidance. For each type a certain criteria for keep-out region is defined, based on which the final stitch guidance locations are generated. This technique provides various possible stitch locations to the user and helps the user to select the best stitch location considering both design flexibility (max. pin access/small area) and process-preferences. Based on this technique, a standard cell library for place and route (P and R) can be developed with colorless data and a stitch marker defined by designer using our proposed method. After P and R, the full chip (block) would contain the colorless data and standard cell stitch markers only. These stitch markers are considered as "must be stitch" candidates. Hence during full chip decomposition it is not required to generate and select the stitch markers again for the

  17. Radball Technology Testing For Hot Cell Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2010-01-01

    Operations at various U.S. Department of Energy sites have resulted in substantial radiological contamination of tools, equipment, and facilities. It is essential to use remote technologies for characterization and decommissioning to keep worker exposures as low as reasonably achievable in these highly contaminated environments. A significant initial step in planning and implementing D and D of contaminated facilities involves the development of an accurate assessment of the radiological, chemical, and structural conditions inside of the facilities. Collected information describing facility conditions using remote technologies could reduce the conservatism associated with planning initial worker entry (and associated cost).

  18. Future of health technology assessment studies in gene and cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The application of new knowledge and technological change is a key driver of the achievements in policy decisions in health care environments at macro and micro level to achieve better health outcomes. The newly emerging stem cell therapies and genomics technologies stay at the interface of Research and ...

  19. Standard guide for hot cell specialized support equipment and tools

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 Intent: 1.1.1 This guide presents practices and guidelines for the design and implementation of equipment and tools to assist assembly, disassembly, alignment, fastening, maintenance, or general handling of equipment in a hot cell. Operating in a remote hot cell environment significantly increases the difficulty and time required to perform a task compared to completing a similar task directly by hand. Successful specialized support equipment and tools minimize the required effort, reduce risks, and increase operating efficiencies. 1.2 Applicability: 1.2.1 This guide may apply to the design of specialized support equipment and tools anywhere it is remotely operated, maintained, and viewed through shielding windows or by other remote viewing systems. 1.2.2 Consideration should be given to the need for specialized support equipment and tools early in the design process. 1.2.3 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conv...

  20. IR-drop analysis for validating power grids and standard cell architectures in sub-10nm node designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yongchan; Wang, Chenchen; Zeng, Jia; Kye, Jongwook

    2017-03-01

    Since chip performance and power are highly dependent on the operating voltage, the robust power distribution network (PDN) is of utmost importance in designs to provide with the reliable voltage without voltage (IR)-drop. However, rapid increase of parasitic resistance and capacitance (RC) in interconnects makes IR-drop much worse with technology scaling. This paper shows various IR-drop analyses in sub 10nm designs. The major objectives are to validate standard cell architectures, where different sizes of power/ground and metal tracks are validated, and to validate PDN architecture, where types of power hook-up approaches are evaluated with IR-drop calculation. To estimate IR-drops in 10nm and below technologies, we first prepare physically routed designs given standard cell libraries, where we use open RISC RTL, synthesize the CPU, and apply placement & routing with process-design kits (PDK). Then, static and dynamic IR-drop flows are set up with commercial tools. Using the IR-drop flow, we compare standard cell architectures, and analysis impacts on performance, power, and area (PPA) with the previous technology-node designs. With this IR-drop flow, we can optimize the best PDN structure against IR-drops as well as types of standard cell library.

  1. Genome editing: a robust technology for human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Pandian; Song, Minjung; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2017-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells comprise induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells, which have tremendous potential for biological and therapeutic applications. The development of efficient technologies for the targeted genome alteration of stem cells in disease models is a prerequisite for utilizing stem cells to their full potential. Genome editing of stem cells is possible with the help of synthetic nucleases that facilitate site-specific modification of a gene of interest. Recent advances in genome editing techniques have improved the efficiency and speed of the development of stem cells for human disease models. Zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated system are powerful tools for editing DNA at specific loci. Here, we discuss recent technological advances in genome editing with site-specific nucleases in human stem cells.

  2. Early stage hot spot analysis through standard cell base random pattern generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Joong-Won; Song, Jaewan; Kim, Jeong-Lim; Park, Seongyul; Yang, Seung-Hune; Lee, Sooryong; Kang, Hokyu; Madkour, Kareem; ElManhawy, Wael; Lee, SeungJo; Kwan, Joe

    2017-04-01

    Due to limited availability of DRC clean patterns during the process and RET recipe development, OPC recipes are not tested with high pattern coverage. Various kinds of pattern can help OPC engineer to detect sensitive patterns to lithographic effects. Random pattern generation is needed to secure robust OPC recipe. However, simple random patterns without considering real product layout style can't cover patterning hotspot in production levels. It is not effective to use them for OPC optimization thus it is important to generate random patterns similar to real product patterns. This paper presents a strategy for generating random patterns based on design architecture information and preventing hotspot in early process development stage through a tool called Layout Schema Generator (LSG). Using LSG, we generate standard cell based on random patterns reflecting real design cell structure - fin pitch, gate pitch and cell height. The output standard cells from LSG are applied to an analysis methodology to assess their hotspot severity by assigning a score according to their optical image parameters - NILS, MEEF, %PV band and thus potential hotspots can be defined by determining their ranking. This flow is demonstrated on Samsung 7nm technology optimizing OPC recipe and early enough in the process avoiding using problematic patterns.

  3. Leveraging electronic healthcare record standards and semantic web technologies for the identification of patient cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Maldonado, José Alberto; Marcos, Mar; Legaz-García, María del Carmen; Moner, David; Torres-Sospedra, Joaquín; Esteban-Gil, Angel; Martínez-Salvador, Begoña; Robles, Montserrat

    2013-12-01

    The secondary use of electronic healthcare records (EHRs) often requires the identification of patient cohorts. In this context, an important problem is the heterogeneity of clinical data sources, which can be overcome with the combined use of standardized information models, virtual health records, and semantic technologies, since each of them contributes to solving aspects related to the semantic interoperability of EHR data. To develop methods allowing for a direct use of EHR data for the identification of patient cohorts leveraging current EHR standards and semantic web technologies. We propose to take advantage of the best features of working with EHR standards and ontologies. Our proposal is based on our previous results and experience working with both technological infrastructures. Our main principle is to perform each activity at the abstraction level with the most appropriate technology available. This means that part of the processing will be performed using archetypes (ie, data level) and the rest using ontologies (ie, knowledge level). Our approach will start working with EHR data in proprietary format, which will be first normalized and elaborated using EHR standards and then transformed into a semantic representation, which will be exploited by automated reasoning. We have applied our approach to protocols for colorectal cancer screening. The results comprise the archetypes, ontologies, and datasets developed for the standardization and semantic analysis of EHR data. Anonymized real data have been used and the patients have been successfully classified by the risk of developing colorectal cancer. This work provides new insights in how archetypes and ontologies can be effectively combined for EHR-driven phenotyping. The methodological approach can be applied to other problems provided that suitable archetypes, ontologies, and classification rules can be designed.

  4. Leveraging electronic healthcare record standards and semantic web technologies for the identification of patient cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Maldonado, José Alberto; Marcos, Mar; Legaz-García, María del Carmen; Moner, David; Torres-Sospedra, Joaquín; Esteban-Gil, Angel; Martínez-Salvador, Begoña; Robles, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Background The secondary use of electronic healthcare records (EHRs) often requires the identification of patient cohorts. In this context, an important problem is the heterogeneity of clinical data sources, which can be overcome with the combined use of standardized information models, virtual health records, and semantic technologies, since each of them contributes to solving aspects related to the semantic interoperability of EHR data. Objective To develop methods allowing for a direct use of EHR data for the identification of patient cohorts leveraging current EHR standards and semantic web technologies. Materials and methods We propose to take advantage of the best features of working with EHR standards and ontologies. Our proposal is based on our previous results and experience working with both technological infrastructures. Our main principle is to perform each activity at the abstraction level with the most appropriate technology available. This means that part of the processing will be performed using archetypes (ie, data level) and the rest using ontologies (ie, knowledge level). Our approach will start working with EHR data in proprietary format, which will be first normalized and elaborated using EHR standards and then transformed into a semantic representation, which will be exploited by automated reasoning. Results We have applied our approach to protocols for colorectal cancer screening. The results comprise the archetypes, ontologies, and datasets developed for the standardization and semantic analysis of EHR data. Anonymized real data have been used and the patients have been successfully classified by the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Conclusions This work provides new insights in how archetypes and ontologies can be effectively combined for EHR-driven phenotyping. The methodological approach can be applied to other problems provided that suitable archetypes, ontologies, and classification rules can be designed. PMID:23934950

  5. Reaping the benefits of evolutionary critical technology development - system 80+trademark standardized plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzie, R.A.; Davis, G.A.; Bagnal, C.W. Jr.; Turk, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    Light water reactors have proved themselves to be a critical part of the electrical power generation infrastructure in the United States as well as in the world. As society moves to improve the safety and economical viability of our critical technologies, we must decide the most beneficial means of making those improvements. In some cases, the critical technologies are propelled in a single leap; in others, it is the result of a continuous and deliberate series of carefully chosen steps. ABB Nuclear Systems was faced with making such a choice in the development of nuclear power plant technology. We elected to focus our development and commercialization efforts on the evolutionary System 80+ Advanced Standardized plant design. Obviously, this was because we have a strong indication that this would be the most beneficial way to meet customers' needs and reap the largest possible benefit from the development of these critical technologies. The evolutionary approach to critical technology development requires a reliance on making incremental improvements over time to the technology. This has the benefit of providing the following: 1. predictable performance based on experience, 2. enhanced safety, performance, economics 3. incremental changes in technology, 4. availability of proven equipment and systems, and 5. assured acceptance and licensability

  6. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-09-01

    This FY 2012 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  7. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-02-01

    This FY 2014 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  8. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-04-30

    This FY 2013 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  9. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This FY 2011 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  10. Review and evaluation of technology, equipment, codes and standards for digitization of industrial radiographic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This reports contains a review and evaluation of the technology, equipment, and codes and standards related to the digitization of industrial radiographic film. The report presents recommendations and equipment-performance specifications that will allow the digitization of radiographic film from nuclear power plant components in order to produce faithful reproductions of flaw images of interest on the films. Justification for the specifications selected are provided. Performance demonstration tests for the digitization process are required and criteria for such tests is presented. Also several comments related to implementation of the technology are presented and discussed

  11. Improving pest risk assessment and management through the aid of geospatial information technology standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trond Rafoss

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of geospatial information over the Internet for the management of risks from invasive alien species is an increasingly important service. The evolution of information technology standards for geospatial data is a key factor to simplify network publishing and exchange of maps and data. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C-geolocation specification is a recent addition that may prove useful for pest risk management. In this article we implement the W3C-geolocation specification and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC mapping standards in a Web browser application for smartphones and tablet computers to improve field surveys for alien invasive species. We report our first season field experiences using this tool for online mapping of plant disease outbreaks and host plant occurrence. It is expected that the improved field data collection tools will result in increased data availability and thereby new opportunities for risk assessment, because data-needs and availability are crucial for species distribution modelling and model-based forecasts of pest establishment potential. Finally, we close with a comment on the future potential of geospatial information standards to enhance the translation from data to decisions regarding pest risks, which should enable earlier detection of emerging risks as well as more robust projections of pest risks in novel areas. The forthcoming standard for processing of geospatial information, the Web Processing Standard (WPS, should open new technological capabilities both for automatic initiation and updating of risk assessment models based on new incoming data, and subsequent early warning.

  12. Recommendation of standardized health learning contents using archetypes and semantic web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaz-García, María del Carmen; Martínez-Costa, Catalina; Menárguez-Tortosa, Marcos; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Linking Electronic Healthcare Records (EHR) content to educational materials has been considered a key international recommendation to enable clinical engagement and to promote patient safety. This would suggest citizens to access reliable information available on the web and to guide them properly. In this paper, we describe an approach in that direction, based on the use of dual model EHR standards and standardized educational contents. The recommendation method will be based on the semantic coverage of the learning content repository for a particular archetype, which will be calculated by applying semantic web technologies like ontologies and semantic annotations.

  13. Designing media for animal cell culture: CHO cells, the industrial standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landauer, Karlheinz

    2014-01-01

    The success of culturing CHO cells solely depends on functionality of the used media. Cell culture technology is more than 50 years old, and the knowledge of cell requirements increased steadily. In the beginning, animal-sourced components were the key to growth. Nowadays state-of-the-art media do not contain any animal or naturally sourced components. The compositions are based on scientific awareness of the needs of the cells. The result is high lot-to-lot consistency and high performance.In this book section, a method for the development of a synthetic, animal component-free medium is described. The composition is based on public available formulations and information based on the work of many scientists printed in numerous papers and manuscripts. The method shall help beginners to design their own medium, although some knowledge of biochemistry and animal cells is still required.

  14. Plant cell technologies in space: Background, strategies and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkorian, A. D.; Scheld, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    An attempt is made to summarize work in plant cell technologies in space. The evolution of concepts and the general principles of plant tissue culture are discussed. The potential for production of high value secondary products by plant cells and differentiated tissue in automated, precisely controlled bioreactors is discussed. The general course of the development of the literature on plant tissue culture is highlighted.

  15. Effect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Blood Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focosi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Summary Population aging has imposed cost-effective alternatives to blood donations. Artificial blood is still at the preliminary stages of development, and the need for viable cells seems unsurmountable. Because large numbers of viable cells must be promptly available for clinical use, stem cell technologies, expansion, and banking represent ideal tools to ensure a regular supply. Provided key donors can be identified, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology could pave the way to a new era in transfusion medicine, just as it is already doing in many other fields of medicine. The present review summarizes the current state of research on iPSC technology in the field of blood banking, highlighting hurdles, and promises. Significance The aging population in Western countries is causing a progressive reduction of blood donors and a constant increase of blood recipients. Because blood is the main therapeutic option to treat acute hemorrhage, cost-effective alternatives to blood donations are being actively investigated. The enormous replication capability of induced pluripotent stem cells and their promising results in many other fields of medicine could be an apt solution to produce the large numbers of viable cells required in transfusion and usher in a new era in transfusion medicine. The present report describes the potentiality, technological hurdles, and promises of induced pluripotent stem cells to generate red blood cells by redifferentiation. PMID:26819256

  16. Development of New Technologies for Stem Cell Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibo Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1960s, the stem cells have been extensively studied including embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. In the recent years, several stem cells have been initially used in the treatment of diseases, such as in bone marrow transplant. At the same time, isolation and culture experimental technologies for stem cell research have been widely developed in recent years. In addition, molecular imaging technologies including optical molecular imaging, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, and computed tomography have been developed rapidly in recent the 10 years and have also been used in the research on disease mechanism and evaluation of treatment of disease related with stem cells. This paper will focus on recent typical isolation, culture, and observation techniques of stem cells followed by a concise introduction. Finally, the current challenges and the future applications of the new technologies in stem cells are given according to the understanding of the authors, and the paper is then concluded.

  17. New materials and technology for cell immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, G J; Kell, D B

    1991-06-01

    The choice of support materials for immobilizing cells is rapidly expanding. The literature that has appeared over the past year suggests that hydrogels will remain the first choice for the forseeable future, even though they are associated with many widely recognized problems. There is increasing interest in the use of tougher polymeric materials, and especially of inorganic ceramic supports. However, the most suitable cell support can be selected only after the process or form of reactor in which it is to be used has been assessed.

  18. Strategies for fuel cell product development. Developing fuel cell products in the technology supply chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the high cost of research and development and the broad spectrum of knowledge and competences required to develop fuel cell products, many product-developing firms outsource fuel cell technology, either partly or completely. This article addresses the inter-firm process of fuel cell product development from an Industrial Design Engineering perspective. The fuel cell product development can currently be characterised by a high degree of economic and technical uncertainty. Regarding the technology uncertainty: product-developing firms are more often then not unfamiliar with fuel cell technology technology. Yet there is a high interface complexity between the technology supplied and the product in which it is to be incorporated. In this paper the information exchange in three current fuel cell product development projects is analysed to determine the information required by a product designer to develop a fuel cell product. Technology transfer literature suggests that transfer effectiveness is greatest when the type of technology (technology uncertainty) and the type of relationship between the technology supplier and the recipient are carefully matched. In this line of thinking this paper proposes that the information required by a designer, determined by the design strategy and product/system volume, should be met by an appropriate level of communication interactivity with a technology specialist. (author)

  19. [Stem cell research and science and technology policy in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashiro, Yoshimi

    2011-12-01

    In this paper I review the present condition of the regeneration medicine research using pluripotency and a somatic stem cell, and I describe the subject of the science and technology policy in Japan towards realization of regeneration medicine. The Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) supported research promotion by the prompt action in 2007 when establishment of the iPS cell was reported by Shinya Yamanaka. Although the hospitable support of the Japanese government to an iPS cell is continued still now, there are some problems in respect of the support to other stem cell researches, and industrialization of regeneration medicine. In order to win a place in highly competitive area of investigation, MEXT needs to change policy so that funds may be widely supplied also to stem cell researches other than iPS cell research.

  20. Fuel cell vehicle technologies, infrastructure and requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) use hydrogen as fuel and exhaust only water and heat. They : provide driving ranges and fueling times comparable to gasoline vehicles. Despite the advantages, : FCEVs have been in and out of the spot light of the a...

  1. Emerging Solar Technologies: Perovskite Solar Cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tus of hybrid perovskite solar cells. 1. Introduction. Gradually, primary energy resources such as fossil fuels, coal, and natural gas are depleting, while the global energy consump- tion is increasing. Solar energy, along with wind, biomass, tidal, and geothermal sources is emerging as an answer to our energy- starved planet.

  2. Microbial Fuel Cells: Methodology and Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logan, B.E.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Rozendal, R.A.; Schröder, U.; Keller, J.; Freguia, S.; Aelterman, P.; Verstraete, W.; Rabaey, K.

    2006-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) research is a rapidly evolving field that lacks established terminology and methods for the analysis of system performance. This makes it difficult for researchers to compare devices on an equivalent basis. The construction and analysis of MFCs requires knowledge of

  3. SEU testing of a novel hardened register implemented using standard CMOS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, T.; Roche, F.M.; Cosculluela, J.; Velazco, R.

    1999-01-01

    A novel memory structure, designed to tolerate SEU perturbations, has been implemented in registers and tested. The design was completed using a standard submicron nonradiation hardened CMOS technology. This paper presents the results of heavy ions tests which evidence the noticeable improvement of the SEU-robustness with an increased LET threshold and reduced cross-section, without significant impact to die real estate, write time, or power consumption

  4. Critical parameters affecting the design of high frequency transmission lines in standard CMOS technology

    KAUST Repository

    Al Attar, Talal

    2017-05-13

    Different structures of transmission lines were designed and fabricated in standard CMOS technology to estimate some critical parameters including the RMS value of the surface roughness and the loss tangent. The input impedances for frequencies up to 50 GHz were modeled and compared with measurements. The results demonstrated a strong correlation between the used model with the proposed coefficients and the measured results, attesting the robustness of the model and the reliability of the incorporated coefficients values.

  5. Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    Integration of stationary fuel cells with biomass gasification is a developing technology that is in need of demonstration. Innovation for Our...the PureCell®400 Innovation for Our Energy Future Gasification of wood wastes is another potential source of useful fuel gas. Wood waste... Gasification → Cleanup → Fuel Cell Gasification uses high temperature to convert cellulosic materials to fuel gas • Hydrogen (H2) • Carbon monoxide (CO

  6. Effect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Blood Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focosi, Daniele; Pistello, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    Population aging has imposed cost-effective alternatives to blood donations. Artificial blood is still at the preliminary stages of development, and the need for viable cells seems unsurmountable. Because large numbers of viable cells must be promptly available for clinical use, stem cell technologies, expansion, and banking represent ideal tools to ensure a regular supply. Provided key donors can be identified, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology could pave the way to a new era in transfusion medicine, just as it is already doing in many other fields of medicine. The present review summarizes the current state of research on iPSC technology in the field of blood banking, highlighting hurdles, and promises. ©AlphaMed Press.

  7. Embedded Web Technology: Applying World Wide Web Standards to Embedded Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponyik, Joseph G.; York, David W.

    2002-01-01

    Embedded Systems have traditionally been developed in a highly customized manner. The user interface hardware and software along with the interface to the embedded system are typically unique to the system for which they are built, resulting in extra cost to the system in terms of development time and maintenance effort. World Wide Web standards have been developed in the passed ten years with the goal of allowing servers and clients to intemperate seamlessly. The client and server systems can consist of differing hardware and software platforms but the World Wide Web standards allow them to interface without knowing about the details of system at the other end of the interface. Embedded Web Technology is the merging of Embedded Systems with the World Wide Web. Embedded Web Technology decreases the cost of developing and maintaining the user interface by allowing the user to interface to the embedded system through a web browser running on a standard personal computer. Embedded Web Technology can also be used to simplify an Embedded System's internal network.

  8. New Advanced Technologies in Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    placenta capillaries leads to defects in sinusoidal integrity, a phenotype often observed during pregnancy complications due to diabetes, postmaturity, or...fromhuman adipose tissue provoke pancreatic cancer cell death both in vitro and in vivo,” PLoS ONE, vol. 4, no. 7, Article ID e6278, 2009. [160] S. Tottey...canonical NF-kappaB and Notch signaling pathways inhibits Ppargamma expression and promotes pancreatic cancer progression in mice. J Clin Invest 121:4685

  9. Digital health technology and trauma: development of an app to standardize care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jeremy M

    2015-04-01

    Standardized practice results in less variation, therefore reducing errors and improving outcome. Optimal trauma care is achieved through standardization, as is evidenced by the widespread adoption of the Advanced Trauma Life Support approach. The challenge for an individual institution is how does one educate and promulgate these standardized processes widely and efficiently? In today's world, digital health technology must be considered in the process. The aim of this study was to describe the process of developing an app, which includes standardized trauma algorithms. The objective of the app was to allow easy, real-time access to trauma algorithms, and therefore reduce omissions/errors. A set of trauma algorithms, relevant to the local setting, was derived from the best available evidence. After obtaining grant funding, a collaborative endeavour was undertaken with an external specialist app developing company. The process required 6 months to translate the existing trauma algorithms into an app. The app contains 32 separate trauma algorithms, formatted as a single-page flow diagram. It utilizes specific smartphone features such as 'pinch to zoom', jump-words and pop-ups to allow rapid access to the desired information. Improvements in trauma care outcomes result from reducing variation. By incorporating digital health technology, a trauma app has been developed, allowing easy and intuitive access to evidenced-based algorithms. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  10. [Monitoring of metastatic renal cell carcinoma--standards and challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Elke

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapies has led to a novel situation regarding monitoring of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC): patients treated with these new drugs have a significantly longer life expectancy than just a few years ago. In order to maximize the treatment benefit, new demands have come up on the assessment of tumor progression: timing and interpretation of imaging studies are crucial for optimal therapeutic management. Detailed knowledge of the new compounds' mode of action is important as it is different from that of classic cytotoxic drugs. The RECIST criteria constitute the standard for evaluation. Following recommendations made by the German Cancer Society's (DKG) interdisciplinary task force, targeted therapies should strive for a sufficient treatment duration in each line of therapy in order to achieve the best therapeutic outcome. Treatment is continued until clinical progression occurs. Assessing therapeutic efficacy with adequate imaging techniques 6-9 weeks after the beginning of therapy is recommended. Subsequent follow-up examinations should be repeated using identical imaging modalities every 2-3 months. For cyclically applied drugs such as Sunitinib, examinations should be carried out at identical time points within the treatment cycle. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Lab-on-a-chip technologies for stem cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Peter; Sticker, Drago; Charwat, Verena; Kasper, Cornelia; Lepperdinger, Günter

    2014-05-01

    The combination of microfabrication-based technologies with cell biology has laid the foundation for the development of advanced in vitro diagnostic systems capable of analyzing cell cultures under physiologically relevant conditions. In the present review, we address recent lab-on-a-chip developments for stem cell analysis. We highlight in particular the tangible advantages of microfluidic devices to overcome most of the challenges associated with stem cell identification, expansion and differentiation, with the greatest advantage being that lab-on-a-chip technology allows for the precise regulation of culturing conditions, while simultaneously monitoring relevant parameters using embedded sensory systems. State-of-the-art lab-on-a-chip platforms for in vitro assessment of stem cell cultures are presented and their potential future applications discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Prospective Benefits Assessment Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, T. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Taylor, C. H. [TA Engineering, Inc., Catonsville, MD (United States); Moore, J. S. [TA Engineering, Inc., Catonsville, MD (United States); Ward, J. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2016-02-23

    Under a diverse set of programs, the Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies offices of DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy invest in research, development, demonstration, and deployment of advanced vehicle, hydrogen production, delivery and storage, and fuel cell technologies. This report estimates the benefits of successfully developing and deploying these technologies (a “Program Success” case) relative to a base case (the “No Program” case). The Program Success case represents the future with completely successful deployment of Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) and Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) technologies. The No Program case represents a future in which there is no contribution after FY 2016 by the VTO or FCTO to these technologies. The benefits of advanced vehicle, hydrogen production, delivery and storage, and fuel cell technologies were estimated on the basis of differences in fuel use, primary energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from light-, medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, including energy and emissions from fuel production, between the base case and the Program Success case. Improvements in fuel economy of various vehicle types, growth in the stock of fuel cell vehicles and other advanced technology vehicles, and decreased GHG intensity of hydrogen production and delivery in the Program Success case over the No Program case were projected to result in savings in petroleum use and GHG emissions. Benefits were disaggregated by individual program technology areas, which included the FCTO program and the VTO subprograms of batteries and electric drives; advanced combustion engines; fuels and lubricants; materials (for reduction in vehicle mass, or “lightweighting”); and, for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, reduction in rolling and aerodynamic resistance. Projections for the Program Success case indicate that by 2035, the average fuel economy of on-road, light-duty vehicle stock could be 47% to 76

  13. Technological development and prospect of alkaline fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Ni; Michael KH Leung; Dennis YC Leung

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviewed the technological development of alkaline fuel cell (AFC). Although the technology was popular in 1970's and 1980's, there has been a decline in AFC research over the past decade, mainly due to the poisoning of CO 2 . Continuous efforts have demonstrated that CO 2 concentration could be reduced to an acceptable level by a number of viable methods such as absorption, adsorption, electrochemical process, electrolyte circulation, use of liquid hydrogen, and use of solid anionic exchange membranes. Literature survey showed that AFC lifetime could achieve up to 5000 hours. In addition, the use of ammonia as a fuel for AFC was identified as a promising technology. Comparison between AFC and proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was presented to evaluate the AFC technology and its economics. The present review and assessment showed the promise of AFC for the coming hydrogen economy and sustainable development. (authors)

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology: a decade of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanhong; Inoue, Haruhisa; Wu, Joseph C; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2017-02-01

    Since the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology a decade ago, enormous progress has been made in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Human iPSCs have been widely used for disease modelling, drug discovery and cell therapy development. Novel pathological mechanisms have been elucidated, new drugs originating from iPSC screens are in the pipeline and the first clinical trial using human iPSC-derived products has been initiated. In particular, the combination of human iPSC technology with recent developments in gene editing and 3D organoids makes iPSC-based platforms even more powerful in each area of their application, including precision medicine. In this Review, we discuss the progress in applications of iPSC technology that are particularly relevant to drug discovery and regenerative medicine, and consider the remaining challenges and the emerging opportunities in the field.

  15. Microbial electrolysis cells as innovative technology for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorbadzhiyska, Elitsa; Hristov, Georgi; Mitov, Mario; Hubenova, Yolina

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen production is becoming increasingly important in view of using hydrogen in fuel cells. However, most of the production of hydrogen so far comes from the combustion of fossil fuels and water electrolysis. Microbial Electrolysis Cell (MEC), also known as Bioelectrochemically Assisted Microbial Reactor, is an ecologically clean, renewable and innovative technology for hydrogen production. Microbial electrolysis cells produce hydrogen mainly from waste biomass assisted by various bacteria strains. The principle of MECs and their constructional elements are reviewed and discussed. Keywords: microbial Electrolysis Cells, hydrogen production, waste biomass purification

  16. Acid fuel cell technologies for vehicular power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, D. K.; McCormick, J. B.; Bobbett, R. E.; Huff, J. R.; Srinivasan, S.

    Three fuel cell technologies were assessed specifically for application as vehicular power plants. The considered cells include the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC), the trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMSA) fuel cell, and the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell. The results of the assessments were used to calculate the performance of a consumer vehicle with a number of different fuel cell power plants. It was found that the near-term PAFC system can power the base-line vehicle with reasonable acceleration, a range of over 400 miles on 20 gallons of methanol, and a 92% improvement in energy efficiency over the gasoline internal combustion engine (ICE) version. An SPE fuel cell system provides substantially improved performance and range with a 149% higher energy efficiency than the ICE-powered version. The advanced vehicle (ETV-1) with an SPE system provides performance competitive with today's gasoline ICE-powered vehicles and a gasoline energy equivalent of 66 mpg.

  17. Ensuring safety of fuel cell applications and hydrogen refuelling. Legislation and standards; Polttokennosovellusten ja vetytankkauksen turvallisuuden varmistaminen. Saeaedoeksiae ja standardeja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissila, M.; Sarsama, J.

    2013-09-15

    Fuel cell technology is considered a promising alternative in terms of viable energy systems. The advantages of fuel cell systems include a good efficiency rate and the lack of harmful environmental emissions. Factors which may slow down the commercialisation of fuel cell technology, e.g. fuel cell vehicles, include the high price of hydrogen and the insufficiency of the infrastructure required for the distribution of hydrogen. A large proportion of major car manufacturers are committed to introducing fuel cell cars to the market by 2014-2016. In order to ensure a successful market introduction of fuel cell vehicles, this has to be aligned with the development of the necessary hydrogen infrastructure. In the early commercialisation stages of a new technology, it is important to give the public correct, justified and understandable information on the safety of the fuel cell applications, and also on the measures taken to ensure the safety of applications. A lack of necessary information, inaccurate perceptions and prejudices can have an adverse effect on the public acceptance of fuel cell applications. Hazards and potential accidents related to fuel cell systems are mainly associated with the flammable substances (e.g. hydrogen, methane) used as fuel, the high pressure of hydrogen, electrical hazards, and dangers concerning technical systems in general. The fuel cell applications reviewed in this publication are transport applications and stationary applications and the refuelling system of gaseous hydrogen. The publication concentrates on fuel cells using hydrogen as fuel. The publication gives an overview of how EU-legislation (mainly various directives) and Finnish legislation applies to fuel cell systems and applications, and what kind of safety requirements the legislation sets. In addition, a brief overview of safety standards concerning fuel cell systems and hydrogen refuelling is presented. (orig.)

  18. Advances in tubular solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhal, S.C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The design, materials and fabrication processes for the earlier technology Westinghouse tubular geometry cell have been described in detail previously. In that design, the active cell components were deposited in the form of thin layers on a ceramic porous support tube (PST). The tubular design of these cells and the materials used therein have been validated by successful electrical testing for over 65,000 h (>7 years). In these early technology PST cells, the support tube, although sufficiently porous, presented an inherent impedance to air flow toward air electrode. In order to reduce such impedance to air flow, the wall thickness of the PST was first decreased from the original 2 mm (the thick-wall PST) to 1.2 mm (the thin-wall PST). The calcia-stabilized zirconia support tube has now been completely eliminated and replaced by a doped lanthanum manganite tube in state-of-the-art SOFCs. This doped lanthanum manganite tube is extruded and sintered to about 30 to 35 percent porosity, and serves as the air electrode onto which the other cell components are fabricated in thin layer form. These latest technology cells are designated as air electrode supported (AES) cells.

  19. Engineered Nanostructured MEA Technology for Low Temperature Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yimin

    2009-07-16

    The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalyst support technology based on unique engineered nanostructures for low temperature fuel cells which: (1) Achieves high catalyst activity and performance; (2) Improves catalyst durability over current technologies; and (3) Reduces catalyst cost. This project is directed at the development of durable catalysts supported by novel support that improves the catalyst utilization and hence reduce the catalyst loading. This project will develop a solid fundamental knowledge base necessary for the synthetic effort while at the same time demonstrating the catalyst advantages in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs).

  20. Technology standard-setting under the lens of global administrative law : Accountability, participation and transparency of standard-setting organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanevskaia, Olia

    2016-01-01

    The role of transnational non-governmental bodies in international standardization has often been in the limelight of recent academic discussions. While standards developed by Standard-Setting Organizations (SSOs) are typically non-binding, they can nevertheless acquire an obligatory character,

  1. Photovoltaic Technology: The Case for Thin-Film Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Arvind; Torres, Pedro; Tscharner, Reto; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Keppner, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of photovoltaic solar modules for energy generation are reviewed with their operation principles and physical efficiency limits. Although the main materials currently used or investigated and the associated fabrication technologies are individually described, emphasis is on silicon-based solar cells. Wafer-based crystalline silicon solar modules dominate in terms of production, but amorphous silicon solar cells have the potential to undercut costs owing, for exa...

  2. Building a logical EHR architecture based on ISO 13606 standard and semantic web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marcelo R; Bax, Marcello P; Kalra, Dipak

    2010-01-01

    Among the existing patterns of EHR interoperability, the ISO 13606 standard is an important consideration. It is believed that the use of this norm, in conjunction with semantic technologies, may aid in the construction of a robust architecture, keeping in mind the challenges of semantic interoperability. The objective of this paper is to present a proposal for an EHR architecture, based on ISO 13606 and on the utilization of semantic technologies, for a real EHR scenario. In order to accomplish that, a real EHR scenario is described, as well as its main interoperability requirements and a candidate architecture is proposed to solve the presented challenges of interoperability. The ability of the ISO 13606 EHR reference model to accommodate the scenario was highlighted, together with the support provided by the use of the ontology specification languages--RDF and OWL--in respect to the maintenance of a controlled vocabulary.

  3. ISO 19157 standard application in technological process of the production of digital topographic maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobnjak Siniša M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Standardization in the field of geographical information related to the definition of the system of collection, preparation, storage, maintenance, presentation and sharing of geographic information. Quality information of available spatial data are vital in the process of selecting a dataset where data value is directly related to its quality. Users of spatial data can choose data from multiple datasets. Therefore. It is necessary to compare the quality of datasets and determine which best meet customer requirements. Digital topographic maps for its visuality, brevity and easy of use have a big advantage over other spatial datasets and is therefore fully justified request for the development of the system of determining, evaluating and impart their quality. The main objective of this paper is to describe the possibilities of application of ISO 19157 'Geographic information - Data quality' standard in technological process of the production of digital topographic maps.

  4. Technology Innovations to Improve Biomass Cookstoves to Meet Tier 4 Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Still, Dean K [Aprovecho Research Center, Cottage Grove, OR (United States); Hatfield, Micheal S [Aprovecho Research Center, Cottage Grove, OR (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Technology Innovations to Improve Biomass Cookstoves to Meet Tier 4 Standards. Protecting public health has become a major motivation for investigating how improved cook stoves might function as a viable intervention. Currently, the great majority of cookstoves for sale in the developing world were not designed for this purpose but instead success was based on criteria such as reduced fuel use, affordability, and ease of use. With DOE funding Aprovecho Research Center spent three years creating stoves using an iterative development and modeling approach resulting in four stoves that in lab tests met the World Health Organization (2014) intermediate rate vented targets for PM2.5 and for CO.

  5. Nanotechnology Laboratory Continues Partnership with FDA and National Institute of Standards and Technology | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI-funded Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL)—a leader in evaluating promising nanomedicines to fight cancer—recently renewed its collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to continue its groundbreaking work on characterizing nanomedicines and moving them toward the clinic. In partnership with NIST and the FDA, NCL has laid a solid, scientific foundation for using the power of nanotechnology to increase the potency and target the delivery

  6. Progress in developing ultrathin solar cell blanket technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, R. E.; Mesch, H. G.; Scott-Monck, J.

    1984-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop technologies for welding interconnects to three types of 50-micron-thick, 2 by 2-cm solar cells. Parallel-gap resistance welding was used for interconnect attachment. Weld schedules were independently developed for each of the three cell types and were coincidentally identical. Six 48-cell modules were assembled with 50-micron (nominal) thick cells, frosted fused-silica covers, silver-plated Invar interconnectors, and four different substrate designs. Three modules (one for each cell type) have single-layer Kapton (50-micron-thick) substrates. The other three modules each have a different substrate (Kapton-Kevlar-Kapton, Kapton-graphite-Kapton, and Kapton-graphite-aluminum honeycomb-graphite). All six modules were subjected to 4112 thermal cycles from -175 to 65 C (corresponding to over 40 years of simulated geosynchronous orbit thermal cycling) and experienced only negligible electrical degradation (1.1 percent average of six 48-cell modules).

  7. A scheme for the audit of scientific and technological standards in clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.; Jarritt, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Audit is the process whereby the quality of a service is monitored and optimised. It forms an essential component of the quality assurance process, whether by self-assessment or by external peer review. In the UK the British Nuclear Medicine Society (BNMS) has undertaken external organisational audit of departments providing clinical nuclear medicine services. This work aimed to develop a more thorough and service specific process for the audit of scientific and technological standards in nuclear medicine. Materials and Methods: The audit process has been implemented using written audit documents to facilitate the audit procedure. A questionnaire forms part of the formal documentation for audit of the scientific and technical standards of a clinical service. Scientific and technical standards were derived from a number of sources including legal requirements, regulatory obligations, notes for guidance, peer reviewed publications and accepted good clinical practice (GCP). Results: The audit process graded the standards of an individual department according to legal or safety requirements (Grade A), good practice (Grade B) and desirable aspects of service delivery (Grade C). The standards have been allocated into eight main categories. These are: Instrumentation; Software and data protection; Electrical Safety; Mechanical Safety; Workstation Safety; The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH); Radiation Protection; Scientific and Technical staffing levels. During the audit visit a detailed inspection of clinical and laboratory areas and department written documentation is also necessary to validate the data obtained. Conclusion: The printed scheme now provides a means for external audit or self-assessment. There should be evidence of a well-organised and safe environment for both patients and staff. Health and Safety legislation requires written local rules and these records should be available to demonstrate the standard of service provision. Other

  8. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stickney, Zachary, E-mail: zstickney@scu.edu; Losacco, Joseph, E-mail: jlosacco@scu.edu; McDevitt, Sophie, E-mail: smmcdevitt@scu.edu; Zhang, Zhiwen, E-mail: zzhang@scu.edu; Lu, Biao, E-mail: blu2@scu.edu

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell–cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy.

  9. RADISH SEED PRODUCTION (TRANSPLANTATION CULTURE; STANDARD OF ORGANISATION FOR MODEL TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Pavlov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard of organization for model technological process of seed production waselaborated at VNIISSOK. Requirements established are for implementation of technological operation at radish seed production as transplantation culture as followed: seed plant growing in polyhouses to produce elite seeds, seedlings planting out, plant nursing, harvesting and postharvest processing. The standard is aimed to provide the qualified work in radish seed production through transplantation culture. Radish seed plants for elite seed production are grown on warmed soil beds in winter greenhouses with use of plastic roofing or in plastic houses supplied with heating system. Seeds with germination not less than 85 % according to GOST 32592-2013 are taken for seed production aims. Hand sowing under marker ensures the identical all-around nutrition for plants that is particularly important when growing and selecting the seed plants (1 hectare - 55-60 thousand seed plant roots. Approbation of seed plants is carried out just before harvesting. The terms of seed plant planting are the earliest. Scheme of planting is 70 x 15 - 20 (cm, 60 x 30 (cm or 90 x 15 (cm. To protect the seed production plantation of radish against weeds, diseases and pests, the pesticides are allowed to apply in accordance with State Catalogue of Pesticides and Agrochemicals, permitted to use in the territory of Russian Federation. Postharvest desiccation of seed plants enables to yield radish by means of direct combining. Radish seeds after processing on sowing qualities have to meet all sowing requirements according to the acting standard. The standard of organization is agreed and affirmed in 2016 CTO45727225-52-16.

  10. Use of Open Standards and Technologies at the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, E.; Malhotra, S.; Bui, B.; Chang, G.; Goodale, C. E.; Ramirez, P.; Kim, R. M.; Sadaqathulla, S.; Rodriguez, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Lunar Mapping and Modeling Project (LMMP), led by the Marshall Space Flight center (MSFC), is tasked by NASA. The project is responsible for the development of an information system to support lunar exploration activities. It provides lunar explorers a set of tools and lunar map and model products that are predominantly derived from present lunar missions (e.g., the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO)) and from historical missions (e.g., Apollo). At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), we have built the LMMP interoperable geospatial information system's underlying infrastructure and a single point of entry - the LMMP Portal by employing a number of open standards and technologies. The Portal exposes a set of services to users to allow search, visualization, subset, and download of lunar data managed by the system. Users also have access to a set of tools that visualize, analyze and annotate the data. The infrastructure and Portal are based on web service oriented architecture. We designed the system to support solar system bodies in general including asteroids, earth and planets. We employed a combination of custom software, commercial and open-source components, off-the-shelf hardware and pay-by-use cloud computing services. The use of open standards and web service interfaces facilitate platform and application independent access to the services and data, offering for instances, iPad and Android mobile applications and large screen multi-touch with 3-D terrain viewing functions, for a rich browsing and analysis experience from a variety of platforms. The web services made use of open standards including: Representational State Transfer (REST); and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)'s Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), Web Feature Service (WFS). Its data management services have been built on top of a set of open technologies including: Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) - open source data catalog, archive, file management, data grid framework

  11. Legal status of minister's notices and technology standards of 'Korea institute of nuclear safety'(KINS) to regulate nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S. K.; Jung, M. M.; Kim, S. W.; Jang, K. H.; Oh, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    Concerning nuclear safety or technology standards, each of 'notices' issued by minister of science and technology(MOST) empowered by law of its regulation is obviously forceful as a law, if not all. But the standards made by the chief of Korea institute of nuclear safety(KINS) to meet the tasks entrusted to KINS by MOST is only conditionally forceful as a law, that is, on the condition that law or regulation empowered the chief of KINS to make nuclear safety and/or technology standards

  12. Assessing the quality of decision support technologies using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards instrument (IPDASi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyn Elwyn

    Full Text Available To describe the development, validation and inter-rater reliability of an instrument to measure the quality of patient decision support technologies (decision aids.Scale development study, involving construct, item and scale development, validation and reliability testing.There has been increasing use of decision support technologies--adjuncts to the discussions clinicians have with patients about difficult decisions. A global interest in developing these interventions exists among both for-profit and not-for-profit organisations. It is therefore essential to have internationally accepted standards to assess the quality of their development, process, content, potential bias and method of field testing and evaluation.Scale development study, involving construct, item and scale development, validation and reliability testing.Twenty-five researcher-members of the International Patient Decision Aid Standards Collaboration worked together to develop the instrument (IPDASi. In the fourth Stage (reliability study, eight raters assessed thirty randomly selected decision support technologies.IPDASi measures quality in 10 dimensions, using 47 items, and provides an overall quality score (scaled from 0 to 100 for each intervention. Overall IPDASi scores ranged from 33 to 82 across the decision support technologies sampled (n = 30, enabling discrimination. The inter-rater intraclass correlation for the overall quality score was 0.80. Correlations of dimension scores with the overall score were all positive (0.31 to 0.68. Cronbach's alpha values for the 8 raters ranged from 0.72 to 0.93. Cronbach's alphas based on the dimension means ranged from 0.50 to 0.81, indicating that the dimensions, although well correlated, measure different aspects of decision support technology quality. A short version (19 items was also developed that had very similar mean scores to IPDASi and high correlation between short score and overall score 0.87 (CI 0.79 to 0.92.This work

  13. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  14. Thin Cell Layer technology in ornamental plant micropropagation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thin cell layer (TCL) technology originated almost 30 years ago with the controlled development of flowers, roots, shoots and somatic embryos on tobacco pedicel longitudinal TCLs. Since then TCLs have been successfully used in the micropropagation of many ornamental plant species whose previous in vitro ...

  15. Technology channel fuel cells; Reseau technologique piles a combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This document presents the PACo channel, its research and development program and the calendar of the first year. The PACo channel aims at stimulate the technology innovation in the domain of the fuel cells and organize collaborations between enterprises and research laboratories. (A.L.B.)

  16. [Research progress of cell sheet technology in oral tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Daqing; Mo, Jinlong; Li, Binzhong

    2014-09-01

    Cell sheet technology (CST) demonstrates the innovation and advantage by overcoming some immanent shortcomings of traditional tissue engineering. To review the research progress of CST in oral tissue engineering. The related home and abroad literature about CST and its application in stomatology was extensively reviewed and analyzed. Compared to the traditional tissue engineering technology, CST has the features of high seeding density, abundant matrix, good biological compatibility, and perfect operability, which can improve the survival rate of cell transplantation and promote functional reconstruction. It is reported that CST has been successfully used in the following fields, repair and reconstruction of periodontium, soft tissues of oral mucosa, and bones in maxillofacial region. With the development of CST and combined with the traditional tissue engineering technologies, it will promote the tissue engineering further progress in stomatology.

  17. APPLICATION OF MEMS TECHNOLOGY TO MICRO DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaowei; Suo, Chunguang; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Haifeng; Dhum, Ch.; Chen, Weiping; Lu, Xuebin

    2006-01-01

    Submitted on behalf of EDA Publishing Association (http://irevues.inist.fr/handle/2042/5920); International audience; In view of micro fuel cells, the silicon processes are employed for microfabrication of the micro direct methanol fuel cell (µDMFC). Using the MEMS technology we have successfully made single µDMFC as small as 10mm×8mm×3mm. The main reason for the use of MEMS processes is the prospective potential for miniaturization and economical mass production of small fuel cells. The doub...

  18. Nuclear reactors' construction costs: The role of lead-time, standardization and technological progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthelemy, Michel; Escobar Rangel, Lina

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides the first comparative analysis of nuclear reactor construction costs in France and the United States. Studying the cost of nuclear power has often been a challenge, owing to the lack of reliable data sources and heterogeneity between countries, as well as the long time horizon which requires controlling for input prices and structural changes. We build a simultaneous system of equations for overnight costs and construction time (lead-time) to control for endogeneity, using expected demand variation as an instrument. We argue that benefits from nuclear reactor program standardization can arise through short term coordination gains, when the diversity of nuclear reactors' technologies under construction is low, or through long term benefits from learning spillovers from past reactor construction experience, if those spillovers are limited to similar reactors. We find that overnight construction costs benefit directly from learning spillovers but that these spillovers are only significant for nuclear models built by the same Architect-Engineer (A- E). In addition, we show that the standardization of nuclear reactors under construction has an indirect and positive effect on construction costs through a reduction in lead-time, the latter being one of the main drivers of construction costs. Conversely, we also explore the possibility of learning by searching and find that, contrary to other energy technologies, innovation leads to construction costs increases. (authors)

  19. Proceedings of the 1999 Review Conference on Fuel Cell Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None Available

    2000-06-05

    The 1999 Review Conference on Fuel Cell Technology was jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Gas Research Institute (GRI), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). It was held August 3 to 5 in Chicago, Illinois. The goal of this conference was to provide a forum for reviewing fuel cell research and development (R&D) programs, assist in strategic R&D planning, promote awareness of sponsor activities, and enhance interactions between manufacturers, researchers, and stakeholders. This conference was attended by over 250 representatives from industry, academia, national laboratories, gas and electric utilities, DOE, and other Government agencies. The conference agenda included a keynote session, five presentation sessions, a poster presentation reception, and three breakout sessions. The presentation session topics were DOD Fuel Cell Applications, Low-Temperature Fuel Cell Manufacturers, Low-Temperature Component Research, High-Temperature Fuel Cell Manufacturers, and High-Temperature Component Research; the breakout session topics were Future R&D Directions for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells, Future R&D Directions for High-Temperature Fuel Cells, and a plenary summary session. All sessions were well attended.

  20. Standard-Cell, Open-Architecture Power Conversion Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boroyevich, D; Wang, F; Lee, F. C; Odendaal, W. G; Edwards, S

    2005-01-01

    ...). This project was purposefully aimed to develop a standardized hierarchical design and analysis methodology for modular power electronics conversion systems using as basis the ISO/OSI seven-layer reference model...

  1. AlliedSignal solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minh, N.; Barr, K.; Kelly, P.; Montgomery, K. [AlliedSignal Aerospace Equipment Systems, Torrance, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    AlliedSignal has been developing high-performance, lightweight solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology for a broad spectrum of electric power generation applications. This technology is well suited for use in a variety of power systems, ranging from commercial cogeneration to military mobile power sources. The AlliedSignal SOFC is based on stacking high-performance thin-electrolyte cells with lightweight metallic interconnect assemblies to form a compact structure. The fuel cell can be operated at reduced temperatures (600{degrees} to 800{degrees}C). SOFC stacks based on this design has the potential of producing 1 kW/kg and 1 ML. This paper summarizes the technical status of the design, manufacture, and operation of AlliedSignal SOFCs.

  2. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A.

    2012-09-28

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify patents related to hydrogen and fuel cells that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents’ current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs that are related to hydrogen and fuel cells.

  3. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A.; Brown, Scott A.

    2011-09-29

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). To do this, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related patents that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, and within the FCT portfolio.

  4. Clusters of Circulating Tumor Cells: a Biophysical and Technological Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Sam H; Edd, Jon; Haber, Daniel A; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet

    2017-09-01

    The vast majority of cancer associated deaths result from metastasis, yet the behaviors of its most potent cellular driver, circulating tumor cell clusters, are only beginning to be revealed. This review highlights recent advances to our understanding of tumor cell clusters with emphasis on enabling technologies. The importance of intercellular adhesions among cells in clusters have begun to be unraveled with the aid of promising microfluidic strategies for isolating clusters from patient blood. Due to their metastatic potency, the utility of circulating tumor cell clusters for cancer diagnosis, drug screening, precision oncology and as targets of antimetastatic therapeutics are being explored. The continued development of tools for exploring circulating tumor cell clusters will enhance our fundamental understanding of the metastatic process and may be instrumental in devising new strategies to suppress and eliminate metastasis.

  5. Advances in Materials and System Technology for Portable Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the materials and systems engineering used for portable fuel cells. The contents include: 1) Portable Power; 2) Technology Solution; 3) Portable Hydrogen Systems; 4) Direct Methanol Fuel Cell; 5) Direct Methanol Fuel Cell System Concept; 6) Overview of DMFC R&D at JPL; 7) 300-Watt Portable Fuel Cell for Army Applications; 8) DMFC units from Smart Fuel Cell Inc, Germany; 9) DMFC Status and Prospects; 10) Challenges; 11) Rapid Screening of Well-Controlled Catalyst Compositions; 12) Screening of Ni-Zr-Pt-Ru alloys; 13) Issues with New Membranes; 14) Membranes With Reduced Methanol Crossover; 15) Stacks; 16) Hybrid DMFC System; 17) Small Compact Systems; 18) Durability; and 19) Stack and System Parameters for Various Applications.

  6. Smart facility location planning using GIS technology & facility provision standards for pro-active planning of social facilities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, Cheri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available www.csir.co.za Smart facility location planning using GIS technology & facility provision standards for pro- active planning of social facilities Cheri Green BRICS Smart Cites, Jaipur India 17-19 August 2016 Council for Scientific...

  7. Consistency of the journal "Research reports : forest and wood science & technology" with ISO standards for information and documentation

    OpenAIRE

    Božič, Maja

    2008-01-01

    The article presents ISO standards for information and documentation and their use in the only Slovenian scientific forestry journal, Zbornik gozdarstva in lesarstva = Research reports: forest and wood science & technology, ISSN 0351-3114.

  8. Advances and Challenges on Cancer Cells Reprogramming Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Câmara, Diana Aparecida Dias; Mambelli, Lisley Inata; Porcacchia, Allan Saj; Kerkis, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells transformation into a normal state or into a cancer cell population which is less tumorigenic than the initial one is a challenge that has been discussed during last decades and it is still far to be solved. Due to the highly heterogeneous nature of cancer cells, such transformation involves many genetic and epigenetic factors which are specific for each type of tumor. Different methods of cancer cells reprogramming have been established and can represent a possibility to obtain less tumorigenic or even normal cells. These methods are quite complex, thus a simple and efficient method of reprogramming is still required. As soon as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) technology, which allowed to reprogram terminally differentiated cells into embryonic stem cells (ESC)-like, was developed, the method strongly attracted the attention of researches, opening new perspectives for stem cell (SC) personalized therapies and offering a powerful in vitro model for drug screening. This technology is also used to reprogram cancer cells, thus providing a modern platform to study cancer-related genes and the interaction between these genes and the cell environment before and after reprogramming, in order to elucidate the mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression. The present review summarizes recent advances on cancer cells reprogramming using iPSC technology and shows the progress achieved in such field.

  9. The strategic use of standardized information exchange technology in a university health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Lai, Feipei; Lai, Jin-Shin

    2010-04-01

    This article illustrates a Web-based health information system that is comprised of specific information exchange standards related to health information for healthcare services in National Taiwan University Health System. Through multidisciplinary teamwork, medical and informatics experts collaborated and studied on system scope definition, standard selection challenges, system implementation barriers, system management outcomes, and further expandability of other systems. After user requirement analysis and prototyping, from 2005 to 2008, an online clinical decision support system with multiple functions of reminding and information push was implemented. It was to replace its original legacy systems and serve among the main hospital and three branches of 180-200 clinics and 7,500-8,000 patient visits per day. To evaluate the effectiveness of this system, user surveys were performed, which revealed that the average score of user satisfaction increased from 2.80 to 3.18 on a 4-point scale. Among the items, especially e-learning for training service, courtesy communications for system requests, and courtesy communications for system operations showed statistically significant improvement. From this study, the authors concluded that standardized information exchange technologies can be used to create a brand new enterprise value and steadily obtain more competitive advantages for a prestige healthcare system.

  10. Commercialization of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, N.; Pant, A.; Sera, G.

    1995-01-01

    The MCTTC performed a market assessment for PEM Fuel Cells for terrestrial applications for the Center for Space Power (CSP). The purpose of the market assessment was to gauge the market and commercial potential for PEM fuel cell technology. Further, the market assessment was divided into subsections of technical and market overview, competitive environment, political environment, barriers to market entry, and keys to market entry. The market assessment conducted by the MCTTC involved both secondary and primary research. The primary target markets for PEM fuel cells were transportation and utilities in the power range of 10 kW to 100 kW. The fuel cell vehicle market size was estimated under a pessimistic scenario and an optimistic scenario. The estimated size of the fuel cell vehicle market in dollar terms for the year 2005 is $17.3 billion for the pessimistic scenario and $34.7 billion for the optimistic scenario. The fundamental and applied research funded and conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and DOE in the area of fuel cells presents an excellent opportunity to commercialize dual-use technology and enhance U.S. business competitiveness. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  11. Rheo-small-angle neutron scattering at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcar, L.; Pozzo, D.; Langenbucher, G.; Moyer, J.; Butler, P. D.

    2011-08-01

    We describe the design and operation of a modified commercial rheometer to simultaneously perform rheological measurements and structural studies by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The apparatus uses a Couette geometry shear cell allowing two of the three scattering planes to be observed by performing experiments in either the radial or tangential geometries. The device enables small angle neutron scattering patterns to be obtained simultaneously with a wide variety of rheological measurements such as stress/strain flow curves, oscillatory deformations, and creep, recovery and relaxation tests, from -20 °C to 150 °C, for samples with viscosities varying by several orders of magnitude. We give a brief report of recent experiments performed on a dispersion of acicular nanoparticles and biopolymer network under stress demonstrating the utility of such measurements. This device has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) and made available to the complex fluids community as part of the standard sample environment equipment.

  12. Rheo-small-angle neutron scattering at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcar, L; Pozzo, D; Langenbucher, G; Moyer, J; Butler, P D

    2011-08-01

    We describe the design and operation of a modified commercial rheometer to simultaneously perform rheological measurements and structural studies by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The apparatus uses a Couette geometry shear cell allowing two of the three scattering planes to be observed by performing experiments in either the radial or tangential geometries. The device enables small angle neutron scattering patterns to be obtained simultaneously with a wide variety of rheological measurements such as stress/strain flow curves, oscillatory deformations, and creep, recovery and relaxation tests, from -20 °C to 150 °C, for samples with viscosities varying by several orders of magnitude. We give a brief report of recent experiments performed on a dispersion of acicular nanoparticles and biopolymer network under stress demonstrating the utility of such measurements. This device has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) and made available to the complex fluids community as part of the standard sample environment equipment.

  13. Recent Developments in Chalcopyrite Solar Cell and Module Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Shogo; Komaki, Hironori; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Mizukoshi, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Akimasa; Niki, Shigeru

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In, Ga)Se2(CIGS) and related compounds belong to the semiconducting I-III-VI2 materials family and are most promising thin film solar cells which have demonstrated up to 20% cell efficiencies and over 15% module efficiencies to date. Many CIGS companies in EU, US, and Japan have started several ten MW/year scale commercial production and have announced to increase their production capacities further within a couple of years. In this review, recent developments in highly efficient CIGS module technologies and issues to be solved for further development are discussed. Recent progress in the development of reliable alkali incorporation control techniques which is required to demonstrate high cell efficiencies from flexible CIGS cells fabricated on alkali-free substrates is also introduced. The mechanism behind the beneficial effects of alkali doping into CIGS absorber layers is also discussed.

  14. Considerations on Configurable Multi-Standard Antennas for Mobile Terminals Realized in LTCC Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arnold

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an extended version of a paper presented at the EuCAP 2009 conference [1]. We present part of a long term research project that aims on designing a (re-configurable multi-standard antenna element for 4G (4th Generation mobile terminals based on LTCC (Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic technology. The antenna itself is a coupling element [2] that efficiently excites the chassis of the mobile terminal to radiate as an entire antenna. Coupling is optimized by a reactive tuning circuit. Several of these tuning circuits are realized in a single LTCC component and can be multiplexed to the antenna by a SPnT (Single Pole n Thru antenna switch integrated into the LTCC component. The coils and capacitor in the LTCC component are configurable on the top-layer of the component. Thus, the component is configurable according to different mobile terminal chassis configurations and multiple bands.

  15. Field Performance versus Standard Test Condition Efficiency of Tandem Solar Cells and the Specific Case of Perovskites/Silicon Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Dupre, Olivier

    2018-01-05

    Multijunction cells may offer a cost-effective route to boost the efficiency of industrial photovoltaics. For any technology to be deployed in the field, its performance under actual operating conditions is extremely important. In this perspective, we evaluate the impact of spectrum, light intensity, and module temperature variations on the efficiency of tandem devices with crystalline silicon bottom cells with a particular focus on perovskite top cells. We consider devices with different efficiencies and calculate their energy yields using field data from Denver. We find that annual losses due to differences between operating conditions and standard test conditions are similar for single-junction and four-terminal tandem devices. The additional loss for the two-terminal tandem configuration caused by current mismatch reduces its performance ratio by only 1.7% when an optimal top cell bandgap is used. Additionally, the unusual bandgap temperature dependence of perovskites is shown to have a positive, compensating effect on current mismatch.

  16. [Progress and potential applications of induced pluripotent stem cell technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cui-Ling; Zhang, Yu-Ming

    2014-08-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state through ectopic expression of specific transcription factors. These reprogrammed cells, which were designated as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are detected to exhibit unlimited self-renewal capacity and pluripotency. This breakthrough in stem cell research provides a powerful and novel tool for the studies on pathogenesis of diseases, reprogramming mechanism and development of new therapies. For this reason, the iPSC technology has currently become one of the hot topics in stem cells research. Recently, major progress in this field has been achieved: initially, researchers succeeded in inducing the reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts by retroviral transduction of four specific transcription factors; in succession, the accelerated development of iPSC technology by employing non-integrating viral vectors, non-viral vectors or removing the introduced foreign genes via gene knock-out has ensured the yields of much safer iPSC; meanwhile, some researches discovered the proofs that a number of micro molecular compounds were potent in accelerating the cellular reprogramming. For a prospect, iPSC are highly promising for regenerative medicine, disease modeling and drug screening. In this review, the recent progress in the generation of iPSC, prospects of their possible clinical applications and problems in the iPSC research are summarized and discussed.

  17. Solar cells: Operating principles, technology, and system applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. A.

    Solar cell theory, materials, fabrication, design, modules, and systems are discussed. The solar source of light energy is described and quantified, along with a review of semiconductor properties and the generation, recombination, and the basic equations of photovoltaic device physics. Particular attention is given to p-n junction diodes, including efficiency limits, losses, and measurements. Si solar cell technology is described for the production of solar-quality crystals and wafers, and design, improvements, and device structures are examined. Consideration is given to alternate semiconductor materials and applications in concentrating systems, storage, and the design and construction of stand-alone systems and systems for residential and centralized power generation.

  18. Human embryonic stem cell technologies and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Janne; Hyllner, Johan; Björquist, Petter

    2009-06-01

    Development of new drugs is costly and takes huge resources into consideration. The big pharmaceutical companies are currently facing increasing developmental costs and a lower success-rate of bringing new compounds to the market. Therefore, it is now of outmost importance that the drug-hunting companies minimize late attritions due to sub-optimal pharmacokinetic properties or unexpected toxicity when entering the clinical programs. To achieve this, a strong need to test new candidate drugs in assays of high human relevance in vitro as early as possible has been identified. The traditionally used cell systems are however remarkably limited in this sense, and new improved technologies are of greatest importance. The human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is one of the most powerful cell types known. They have not only the possibility to divide indefinitely; these cells can also differentiate into all mature cell types of the human body. This makes them potentially very valuable for pharmaceutical development, spanning from use as tools in early target studies, DMPK or safety assessment, as screening models to find new chemical entities modulating adult stem cell fate, or as the direct use in cell therapies. This review illustrates the use of hESC in the drug discovery process, today, as well as in a future perspective. This will specifically be exemplified with the most important cell type for pharmaceutical development-the hepatocyte. We discuss how hESC-derived hepatocyte-like cells could improve this process, and how these cells should be cultured if optimized functionality and usefulness should be achieved. J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 513-519, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Spectroscopy of Technological Defects in Si Solar Cells by Analysis of Temperature Dependent Generation Currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevgenij PAVLOV

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of solar cells considerably depends on the technological defects introduced by the formation of junctions, passivation layers and electrodes. Identification of these defects present in the high conductivity base layer of modern solar cells by usage of the standard techniques, such as capacitance deep level spectroscopy, is restricted by extremely small size of samples with inherent enhanced leakage current on sample boundaries. Therefore, it is important to develop the alternative methods for the defect spectroscopy in the high conductivity junction structures, to directly control a relative low concentration of the technological defects. In this work, the spectroscopy of deep traps has been performed by combining the temperature scans of the thermal generation currents extracted from barrier capacitance charging transients and capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy techniques. The dominant carrier traps ascribed to the Cu and Ni impurities were revealed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.5194

  20. A parallel row-based algorithm for standard cell placement with integrated error control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Jeff S.; Banerjee, Prith

    1989-01-01

    A new row-based parallel algorithm for standard-cell placement targeted for execution on a hypercube multiprocessor is presented. Key features of this implementation include a dynamic simulated-annealing schedule, row-partitioning of the VLSI chip image, and two novel approaches to control error in parallel cell-placement algorithms: (1) Heuristic Cell-Coloring; (2) Adaptive Sequence Length Control.

  1. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanis...

  2. Negotiating sustainable innovation? Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weert Canzler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the German Federal Government made the consequential decision to change its energy program. This not only as a result of the decision to shut down the existing nuclear power plants within the next few years, but also due to vital challenges like climate change and security of energy supply. The shift in the energy-technology paradigm from fossil fuel technologies to regenerative energies might appear as a merely technical process at first glance. Yet, the road to environmental sustainability is paved with economic and social stumbling blocks. The concept of sustainable development is not a blueprint for technical progress but requires deliberations on questions about innovations and governance: How do we want to live and how do we want to get there? This paper traces the negotiations of sustainable innovation on the example of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in Germany. The institutional set up in this field is analyzed and the new organizational actors are identified. These actors attempt to inform and persuade others of the benefits of hydrogen and fuel cells in order to establish a common view that is to guide the further development. However, while they succeeded in mobilizing enough actors to launch the largest Public Private Partnership in this sector in the EU, they could not attain the leadership in the public discourse on these technologies. It seems that an attractive guiding vision of a sustainable, post-fossil energy future and a broad acceptance in daily use would have been major prerequisites for such leadership.

  3. Technology and Curriculum Standards: How Well Do Internet-Based Learning Games Support Common Core Standards for Mathematics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Teri; Ray, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to keep up with the new generation of digital learners, educators are integrating multiple forms of technology into their teaching, including online learning game applications. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which internet-based learning game applications selected by preservice teachers were aligned with the…

  4. Novel dual-function CellDetect? staining technology: wedding morphology and tinctorial discrimination to detect cervical neoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Idelevich, Pavel; Elkeles, Adi; Okon, Elimelech; Kristt, Don; Terkieltaub, Dov; Rivkin, Ilia; Bruchim, Ilan; Fishman, Ami

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A persistent goal of oncologic histochemistry is to microscopically identify neoplasia tinctorially. Consequently, the newly developed CellDetect® staining technology, that appears to exhibit this property, warrants clinical evaluation. The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic results using CellDetect® to the outcomes of standard microscopic examination based on hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining for the recognition of different squamous epithelial pheno...

  5. A Standard Nomenclature for Referencing and Authentication of Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Andreas; Seltmann, Stefanie; Bairoch, Amos; Bittner, Marie-Sophie; Bruce, Kevin; Capes-Davis, Amanda; Clarke, Laura; Crook, Jeremy M; Daheron, Laurence; Dewender, Johannes; Faulconbridge, Adam; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Gutteridge, Alexander; Hei, Derek J; Kim, Yong-Ou; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kokocinski, Anja Kolb-; Lekschas, Fritz; Lomax, Geoffrey P; Loring, Jeanne F; Ludwig, Tenneille; Mah, Nancy; Matsui, Tohru; Müller, Robert; Parkinson, Helen; Sheldon, Michael; Smith, Kelly; Stachelscheid, Harald; Stacey, Glyn; Streeter, Ian; Veiga, Anna; Xu, Ren-He

    2018-01-09

    Unambiguous cell line authentication is essential to avoid loss of association between data and cells. The risk for loss of references increases with the rapidity that new human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) lines are generated, exchanged, and implemented. Ideally, a single name should be used as a generally applied reference for each cell line to access and unify cell-related information across publications, cell banks, cell registries, and databases and to ensure scientific reproducibility. We discuss the needs and requirements for such a unique identifier and implement a standard nomenclature for hPSCs, which can be automatically generated and registered by the human pluripotent stem cell registry (hPSCreg). To avoid ambiguities in PSC-line referencing, we strongly urge publishers to demand registration and use of the standard name when publishing research based on hPSC lines. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Standard Nomenclature for Referencing and Authentication of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kurtz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Unambiguous cell line authentication is essential to avoid loss of association between data and cells. The risk for loss of references increases with the rapidity that new human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC lines are generated, exchanged, and implemented. Ideally, a single name should be used as a generally applied reference for each cell line to access and unify cell-related information across publications, cell banks, cell registries, and databases and to ensure scientific reproducibility. We discuss the needs and requirements for such a unique identifier and implement a standard nomenclature for hPSCs, which can be automatically generated and registered by the human pluripotent stem cell registry (hPSCreg. To avoid ambiguities in PSC-line referencing, we strongly urge publishers to demand registration and use of the standard name when publishing research based on hPSC lines.

  7. CELL FORMATION IN GROUP TECHNOLOGY: A SIMILARITY ORDER CLUSTERING APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey C. Onwubolu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Grouping parts into families which can be produced by a cluster of machine cells is the cornerstone of cellular manufacturing, which in turn is the building block for flexible manufacturing systems. Cellular manufacturing is a group technology (GT concept that has recently attracted the attention of manufacturing firms operating under jobshop environment to consider redesigning their manufacturing systems so as to take advantage of increased throughput, reduction in work-in-progress, set-up time, and lead times; leading to product quality and customer satisfaction. The paper presents a generalised approach for machine cell formation from a jobshop using similarity order clustering technique for preliminary cell grouping and considering machine utilisation for the design of nonintergrouping material handling using the single-pass heuristic. The work addresses the shortcomings of cellular manufacturing systems design and implementations which ignore machine utilisations, group sizes and intergroup moves.

  8. Microfluidic single-cell technology in immunology and antibody screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Yu Fen Samantha; Hu, Hongxing; Merten, Christoph A

    2018-02-01

    Single-cell technology has a major impact on the field of immunology. It enables the kinetics and logic of immune signaling and immune cell migration to be elucidated, facilitates antibody screening and allows massively parallelized analysis of B- and T-cell repertoires. Impressive progress has been made over the last decade, strongly boosted by microfluidic approaches. In this review, we summarize the most powerful microfluidic systems based on continuous flow, nanowells, valves and droplets and we analyze their benefits for phenotypic characterization, drug discovery and next generation sequencing experiments. We describe current limitations and provide an outlook on important future applications. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Allogeneic cell therapy bioprocess economics and optimization: single-use cell expansion technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simaria, Ana S; Hassan, Sally; Varadaraju, Hemanthram; Rowley, Jon; Warren, Kim; Vanek, Philip; Farid, Suzanne S

    2014-01-01

    For allogeneic cell therapies to reach their therapeutic potential, challenges related to achieving scalable and robust manufacturing processes will need to be addressed. A particular challenge is producing lot-sizes capable of meeting commercial demands of up to 10(9) cells/dose for large patient numbers due to the current limitations of expansion technologies. This article describes the application of a decisional tool to identify the most cost-effective expansion technologies for different scales of production as well as current gaps in the technology capabilities for allogeneic cell therapy manufacture. The tool integrates bioprocess economics with optimization to assess the economic competitiveness of planar and microcarrier-based cell expansion technologies. Visualization methods were used to identify the production scales where planar technologies will cease to be cost-effective and where microcarrier-based bioreactors become the only option. The tool outputs also predict that for the industry to be sustainable for high demand scenarios, significant increases will likely be needed in the performance capabilities of microcarrier-based systems. These data are presented using a technology S-curve as well as windows of operation to identify the combination of cell productivities and scale of single-use bioreactors required to meet future lot sizes. The modeling insights can be used to identify where future R&D investment should be focused to improve the performance of the most promising technologies so that they become a robust and scalable option that enables the cell therapy industry reach commercially relevant lot sizes. The tool outputs can facilitate decision-making very early on in development and be used to predict, and better manage, the risk of process changes needed as products proceed through the development pathway. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Stem Cell Technology for (Epi)genetic Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemens, Renzo J M; Soares, Edilene S; Esteller, Manel; Delgado-Morales, Raul

    2017-01-01

    Despite the enormous efforts of the scientific community over the years, effective therapeutics for many (epi)genetic brain disorders remain unidentified. The common and persistent failures to translate preclinical findings into clinical success are partially attributed to the limited efficiency of current disease models. Although animal and cellular models have substantially improved our knowledge of the pathological processes involved in these disorders, human brain research has generally been hampered by a lack of satisfactory humanized model systems. This, together with our incomplete knowledge of the multifactorial causes in the majority of these disorders, as well as a thorough understanding of associated (epi)genetic alterations, has been impeding progress in gaining more mechanistic insights from translational studies. Over the last years, however, stem cell technology has been offering an alternative approach to study and treat human brain disorders. Owing to this technology, we are now able to obtain a theoretically inexhaustible source of human neural cells and precursors in vitro that offer a platform for disease modeling and the establishment of therapeutic interventions. In addition to the potential to increase our general understanding of how (epi)genetic alterations contribute to the pathology of brain disorders, stem cells and derivatives allow for high-throughput drugs and toxicity testing, and provide a cell source for transplant therapies in regenerative medicine. In the current chapter, we will demonstrate the validity of human stem cell-based models and address the utility of other stem cell-based applications for several human brain disorders with multifactorial and (epi)genetic bases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), fragile X syndrome (FXS), Angelman syndrome (AS), Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), and Rett syndrome (RTT).

  11. EarthServer: a Summary of Achievements in Technology, Services, and Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Peter

    2015-04-01

    based on OGC and W3C standards, in particular the Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) which defines a high-level coverage query language. Reviewers have attested EarthServer that "With no doubt the project has been shaping the Big Earth Data landscape through the standardization activities within OGC, ISO and beyond". We present the project approach, its outcomes and impact on standardization and Big Data technology, and vistas for the future.

  12. Leveraging Open Standards and Technologies to Enhance Community Access to Earth Science Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, C. J.; Nandigam, V.; Krishnan, S.; Cowart, C.; Baru, C.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2011-12-01

    Lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) data, collected from space, airborne and terrestrial platforms, have emerged as an invaluable tool for a variety of Earth science applications ranging from ice sheet monitoring to modeling of earth surface processes. However, lidar present a unique suite of challenges from the perspective of building cyberinfrastructure systems that enable the scientific community to access these valuable research datasets. Lidar data are typically characterized by millions to billions of individual measurements of x,y,z position plus attributes; these "raw" data are also often accompanied by derived raster products and are frequently terabytes in size. As a relatively new and rapidly evolving data collection technology, relevant open data standards and software projects are immature compared to those for other remote sensing platforms. The NSF-funded OpenTopography Facility project has developed an online lidar data access and processing system that co-locates data with on-demand processing tools to enable users to access both raw point cloud data as well as custom derived products and visualizations. OpenTopography is built on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) in which applications and data resources are deployed as standards compliant (XML and SOAP) Web services with the open source Opal Toolkit. To develop the underlying applications for data access, filtering and conversion, and various processing tasks, OpenTopography has heavily leveraged existing open source software efforts for both lidar and raster data. Operating on the de facto LAS binary point cloud format (maintained by ASPRS), open source libLAS and LASlib libraries provide OpenTopography data ingestion, query and translation capabilities. Similarly, raster data manipulation is performed through a suite of services built on the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). OpenTopography has also developed our own algorithm for high-performance gridding of lidar point cloud data

  13. WIAMan Technology Demonstrator Sensor Codes Conforming to International Organization for Standardization/Technical Standard (ISO/TS) 13499

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    lumbar to coccyx interface bracket for collection of each of the ischial tuberosity and pelvic rami load-cells. The MAIN LOCATION code for this region...is PELV, and the permissible codes are shown in Table 6. As the ischial tuberosity and pelvic rami load-cells collectively use only 5 channels for...FO Z Right ischial Z force PELV FR LE DM MO X Left pubic rami X bending moment PELV FR LE DM MO Z Left pubic rami Z bending moment PELV FR RI DM MO X

  14. Standard guide for general design considerations for hot cell equipment

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 Intent: 1.1.1 The intent of this guide is to provide general design and operating considerations for the safe and dependable operation of remotely operated hot cell equipment. Hot cell equipment is hardware used to handle, process, or analyze nuclear or radioactive material in a shielded room. The equipment is placed behind radiation shield walls and cannot be directly accessed by the operators or by maintenance personnel because of the radiation exposure hazards. Therefore, the equipment is operated remotely, either with or without the aid of viewing. 1.1.2 This guide may apply to equipment in other radioactive remotely operated facilities such as suited entry repair areas, canyons or caves, but does not apply to equipment used in commercial power reactors. 1.1.3 This guide does not apply to equipment used in gloveboxes. 1.2 Applicability: 1.2.1 This guide is intended for persons who are tasked with the planning, design, procurement, fabrication, installation, or testing of equipment used in rem...

  15. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Innovations Enabled by the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-10-11

    This report published in October 2017 updates the results of an effort to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 to 5 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  16. Classification of large circulating tumor cells isolated with ultra-high throughput microfluidic Vortex technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, James; Yu, Victor; Dhar, Manjima; Renier, Corinne; Matsumoto, Melissa; Heirich, Kyra; Garon, Edward B.; Goldman, Jonathan; Rao, Jianyu; Sledge, George W.; Pegram, Mark D.; Sheth, Shruti; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Sollier, Elodie; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are emerging as rare but clinically significant non-invasive cellular biomarkers for cancer patient prognosis, treatment selection, and treatment monitoring. Current CTC isolation approaches, such as immunoaffinity, filtration, or size-based techniques, are often limited by throughput, purity, large output volumes, or inability to obtain viable cells for downstream analysis. For all technologies, traditional immunofluorescent staining alone has been employed to distinguish and confirm the presence of isolated CTCs among contaminating blood cells, although cells isolated by size may express vastly different phenotypes. Consequently, CTC definitions have been non-trivial, researcher-dependent, and evolving. Here we describe a complete set of objective criteria, leveraging well-established cytomorphological features of malignancy, by which we identify large CTCs. We apply the criteria to CTCs enriched from stage IV lung and breast cancer patient blood samples using the High Throughput Vortex Chip (Vortex HT), an improved microfluidic technology for the label-free, size-based enrichment and concentration of rare cells. We achieve improved capture efficiency (up to 83%), high speed of processing (8 mL/min of 10x diluted blood, or 800 μL/min of whole blood), and high purity (avg. background of 28.8±23.6 white blood cells per mL of whole blood). We show markedly improved performance of CTC capture (84% positive test rate) in comparison to previous Vortex designs and the current FDA-approved gold standard CellSearch assay. The results demonstrate the ability to quickly collect viable and pure populations of abnormal large circulating cells unbiased by molecular characteristics, which helps uncover further heterogeneity in these cells. PMID:26863573

  17. Fabrication of a thermoresponsive cell culture dish: a key technology for cell sheet tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Kobayashi and Teruo Okano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the properties and characterization of an intelligent thermoresponsive surface, which is a key technology for cell sheet-based tissue engineering. Intelligent thermoresponsive surfaces grafted with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide exhibit hydrophilic/hydrophobic alteration in response to temperature change. Cultured cells are harvested on thermoresponsive cell culture dishes by decreasing the temperature without the use of digestive enzymes or chelating agents. Our group has developed cell sheet-based tissue engineering for therapeutic uses with single layer or multilayered cell sheets, which were recovered from the thermoresponsive cell culture dish. Using surface derivation techniques, we developed a new generation of thermoresponsive cell culture dishes to improve culture conditions. We also designed a new methodology for constructing well-defined organs using microfabrication techniques.

  18. A new approach to standardize multicenter studies: mobile lab technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Lermen

    Full Text Available Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120-150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab in the project "Labor der Zukunft" (future's lab technology. This laboratory includes a 14.7 m(2 reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m(2 examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m(2 biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m(2 personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for

  19. Nuclear technology transfer via standards: the OMB Circular A-119 in action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    The Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) has 23 nuclear energy (NE) standards in some phase of conversion to the national consensus standards, and identified three new NE standards for possible conversion. The author describes the methods of developing a consensus for standards through the use of working groups and ballots and the process of adopting a standard. Voluntary NE standards categories cover operation, instrumentation and controls, equipment, programs and procedures, materials, electrical, and structures and building. 4 references, 2 tables

  20. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology and aquatic animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Alexis M; Spyropoulos, Demetri D

    2014-06-01

    Aquatic animal species are the overall leaders in the scientific investigation of tough but important global health issues, including environmental toxicants and climate change. Historically, aquatic animal species also stand at the forefront of experimental biology, embryology and stem cell research. Over the past decade, intensive and high-powered investigations principally involving mouse and human cells have brought the generation and study of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to a level that facilitates widespread use in a spectrum of species. A review of key features of these investigations is presented here as a primer for the use of iPSC technology to enhance ongoing aquatic animal species studies. iPSC and other cutting edge technologies create the potential to study individuals from "the wild" closer to the level of investigation applied to sophisticated inbred mouse models. A wide variety of surveys and hypothesis-driven investigations can be envisioned using this new capability, including comparisons of organism-specific development and exposure response and the testing of fundamental dogmas established using inbred mice. However, with these new capabilities, also come new criteria for rigorous baseline assessments and testing. Both the methods for inducing pluripotency and the source material can negatively impact iPSC quality and bourgeoning applications. Therefore, more rigorous strategies not required for inbred mouse models will have to be implemented to approach global health issues using individuals from "the wild" for aquatic animal species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed.

  2. COMPENDIUM: SURVEYS EVALUATING KNOWLEDGE AND OPINIONS CONCERNING HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truett, Lorena Faith [ORNL; Cooper, Christy [U.S. Department of Energy; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    This compendium updates a 2003 literature review of surveys of knowledge and opinions of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Its purpose is to ensure that results of comparable surveys are considered in surveys conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Over twice as many studies related to the DOE survey have been published since 2003 than prior to that date. The fact that there have been significantly more studies implies that there have been further demonstration projects and/or increased interest in hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The primary findings of these 15 new surveys, all of which were conducted in Europe (E) or North America (NA), to the DOE surveys are as follows: 1.Respondents who are more educated are more accepting of hydrogen technologies (NA). 2.Respondents who are more knowledgeable about hydrogen and/or fuel cells are more accepting of hydrogen technologies (E, NA). 3.When asked about issues of trust, respondents generally expressed distrust of the government or political parties but trusted scientists and environmental protection organizations (E). 4.Technical knowledge about hydrogen and fuel cell technologies is low (E, NA). 5.Respondents may express opinions about a technology even when they are lacking in knowledge of that technology (E). 6.Women and men have different priorities when deciding on an automobile purchase (E). 7.Public acceptance to hydrogen is vulnerable to perceptions of decreased safety (E, NA). 8.Public acceptance to hydrogen is vulnerable to perceptions of increased cost (E, NA). The DOE surveys are similar to surveys that examine technical knowledge of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, although the technical questions are certainly different. The DOE surveys are also similar to the opinion surveys in that they address many of the same issues, such as safety, sources of energy information, or trust. There are many differences between the surveys reviewed in this compendium and the DOE surveys. The

  3. Single-cell technologies in molecular marine studies

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2015-01-24

    Middle Eastern countries are experiencing a renaissance, with heavy investment in both in infrastructure and science. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) is a new and modern university in Saudi Arabia. At the Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC) we are working on exploring the Red Sea and beyond, collaborating with Japanese and other research centers. We are using the environment to collect and analyze the microorganisms present. The platform being established at CBRC allows to process samples in a pipeline. The pipeline components consist of sample collection, processing and sequencing, following the in silico analysis, determining the gene functions, identifying the organisms. The genomes of microorganisms of interest are targeted modified by genome editing technology such as CRISPR and desired properties are selected by single cell instrumentation. The final output is to identify valuable microorganisms with production of bio-energy, nutrients, the food and fine chemicals.

  4. Dry technologies for the production of crystalline silicon solar cells; Trockentechnologien zur Herstellung von kristallinen Siliziumsolarzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rentsch, J.

    2005-04-15

    Within this work, dynamic plasma etching technologies for the industrial production of crystalline silicon solar cells has been investigated. The research activity can be separated into three major steps: the characterisation of the etching behaviour of a newly developed dynamic plasma etching system, the development and analysis of dry etching processes for solar cell production and the determination of the ecological and economical impacts of such a new technology compared to standard up to date technologies. The characterisation of the etching behaviour has been carried out for two different etching sources, a low frequency (110 kHz) and a microwave (2.45 GHz) plasma source. The parameter of interest was the delivered ion energy of each source mainly determining the reachable etch rate. The etch rate turned out to be the main most critical parameter concerning the reachable wafer throughput per hour. Other points of interest in characterisation of the etching system were the material of the transport carriers, the silicon load as well as the process temperatures. The development of different dry etching processes targets the design of a complete dry production process for crystalline silicon solar cells. Therefore etching processes for saw damage removal, texturing, edge isolation as well as etching of dielectric layers have been developed and optimised. The major benefits of a complete dry production process would be the reduction of handling steps in between process steps and therefore offers a large cost reduction potential. For multicrystalline silicon solar cells a cost reduction potential of 5 % compared to a standard wet chemical based reference process could be realized only including the dry etching of a phosphorus silicate glass layer after diffusion. Further reduction potential offers the implementation of a dry texturing process due to a significant efficiency increase. (orig.)

  5. Status and prospects of fuel cell technology in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dijkum

    1998-01-01

    Fuel Cells attract a lot of press attention today and an some example of a recent press heading is: ''Orders for Onsi's fuel cells hit $111 million''. The principle of fuel cell technology is explained and examples of realized applications given. In short: fuel cells can be used everywhere where power (and heat) is needed. Regarding the status of fuel cells, Europe is way behind Japan and the US. The 15 PAFC-200 kWe units in operation in Europe (worldwide > 90 units) produced 46,796 MWhe during 296,704 cumulative operating hours with an availability % over 70.00. The world record on continuous operation is held by Japan with 9,478 hours reached at 14th September 1996 and two PAFC-units passed their 40,000 hours of cumulative operation (US and Japan). In Japan, market enabling support is continued with subsidies of one third of the costs for 7 PAFC-units. In the Netherlands, Energy Distribution Companies test their tubular 100 kWe SOFC-unit. During 1,335 hours of continuous operation, the unit produced 165 MWhe in total at 3rd March. EnergieNed, CLC/Ansaldo and Gastec evaluated changes for co-generation and small power production with packaged fuel cell power plants in EU and EFTA countries. In general the authors concluded that implementation of fuel cell power plants in all EU and EFTA countries will be probably possible with today' s technical regulations. On might wonder: What has fuel cell technology to offer in one of the most efficient and low-priced gas economies in Europe, the Netherlands. An example of efficient energy use are greenhouses with artificial lighting and CO 2 -fertilization and energy (heat) storage device. Applying relatively favorable depreciation periods and (utility) interest rate, a PAFC 200 kWe generates just a positive return (IRR = 1.7 % after taxes and subsidies) when part of a gas-engine capacity is replaced

  6. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Y Hsiao

    Full Text Available The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments.

  7. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments.

  8. Reverse engineering human neurodegenerative disease using pluripotent stem cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    With the technology of reprogramming somatic cells by introducing defined transcription factors that enables the generation of "induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)" with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), it has become possible to use this technology to produce various cells and tissues that have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is bringing forth rapid progress in iPSC-based disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. More and more studies have demonstrated that phenotypes of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders could be rather faithfully recapitulated in iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. Moreover, despite the adult-onset nature of the diseases, pathogenic phenotypes and cellular abnormalities often exist in early developmental stages, providing new "windows of opportunity" for understanding mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and for discovering new medicines. The cell reprogramming technology enables a reverse engineering approach for modeling the cellular degenerative phenotypes of a wide range of human disorders. An excellent example is the study of the human neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using iPSCs. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs), culminating in muscle wasting and death from respiratory failure. The iPSC approach provides innovative cell culture platforms to serve as ALS patient-derived model systems. Researchers have converted iPSCs derived from ALS patients into MNs and various types of glial cells, all of which are involved in ALS, to study the disease. The iPSC technology could be used to determine the role of specific genetic factors to track down what's wrong in the neurodegenerative disease process in the "disease-in-a-dish" model. Meanwhile, parallel experiments of targeting the same specific genes in human ESCs could also be performed to control

  9. Science and Math Lesson Plans to Meet the Ohio Revised Science Standards and the Next Generation of Standards for Today; Technology (Excel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Lunsford

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pre-service teachers (K-12 developed and taught lesson plans that met the state and national science and technology standards by integrating Excel and PowerPoint into their lesson. A sample of 74 pre-service teachers in our science education program were required to integrate technology (Excel as they developed science and math lesson plans with graphing as a requirement. These students took pre-test and post-test (n=74 to determine their understanding of Excel in relation to the need of current technology for todays' science classroom. The test results showed that students obtained content gains in Excel graphing in all the inquiry-based lab experiments. They also gained experience in developing math skills, inquiry-based science lesson plans, and communication and presentation skills.

  10. How to Collect National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Traceable Fluorescence Excitation and Emission Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Adam Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary spectrofluorimeters comprise exciting light sources, excitation and emission monochromators, and detectors that without correction yield data not conforming to an ideal spectral response. The correction of the spectral properties of the exciting and emission light paths first requires calibration of the wavelength and spectral accuracy. The exciting beam path can be corrected up to the sample position using a spectrally corrected reference detection system. The corrected reference response accounts for both the spectral intensity and drift of the exciting light source relative to emission and/or transmission detector responses. The emission detection path must also be corrected for the combined spectral bias of the sample compartment optics, emission monochromator, and detector. There are several crucial issues associated with both excitation and emission correction including the requirement to account for spectral band-pass and resolution, optical band-pass or neutral density filters, and the position and direction of polarizing elements in the light paths. In addition, secondary correction factors are described including (1) subtraction of the solvent's fluorescence background, (2) removal of Rayleigh and Raman scattering lines, as well as (3) correcting for sample concentration-dependent inner-filter effects. The importance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable calibration and correction protocols is explained in light of valid intra- and interlaboratory studies and effective spectral qualitative and quantitative analyses including multivariate spectral modeling.

  11. TDT in Argentine and Chile: dynamics of power in the process of adoption of the technological standard ISDB-TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla RODRÍGUEZ MIRANDA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the media policymaking process about the adoption of the technological standard for the digital terrestrial television in Argentine and Chile. The explorative and descriptive study inquires about the tensions, articulations and dynamics of the national and supranational parties (State, broadcasters, lobbies of technical standards and civil society that played in the politic process from the late 90s when the issue of digital television inserted into public agenda until August/September on 2009 when both countries adopted the Japanese- Brazilian technology system.

  12. Hydrogen and fuel cells emerging technologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sorensen (Sorensen), Bent

    2011-01-01

    A hydrogen economy, in which this one gas provides the source of all energy needs, is often touted as the long-term solution to the environmental and security problems associated with fossil fuels. However, before hydrogen can be used as fuel on a global scale we must establish cost effective means of producing, storing, and distributing the gas, develop cost efficient technologies for converting hydrogen to electricity (e.g. fuel cells), and creating the infrastructure to support all this. Sorensen is the only text available that provides up to date coverage of all these issues at a level

  13. Standard house with integrated solar cell system. Technical final report; Typehus med integreret solcelleanlaeg. Faglig slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The interest in solar cell technology among Danish house owners is increasing, but there are many considerations to be made before the house owner choose to install solar cells on the house. Major barriers are the solar cell systems' price and appearance. This interdisciplinary development project will show that both aesthetic and economic advantages can be derived from integrating solar cells already when the first sketches of the house are being made. In order to promote utilization of solar cells in Denmark the solutions must be attractive, both economically and aesthetically. Therefore the solar cell solutions in this project are developed in preparation for marketing both as an aesthetic expression and a high-technological, green and prestigious element. (BA)

  14. Recent developments in microbial fuel cell technologies for sustainable bioenergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuya

    2008-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microbial catabolic activities to generate electricity from a variety of materials, including complex organic waste and renewable biomass. These sources provide MFCs with a great advantage over chemical fuel cells that can utilize only purified reactive fuels (e.g., hydrogen). A developing primary application of MFCs is its use in the production of sustainable bioenergy, e.g., organic waste treatment coupled with electricity generation, although further technical developments are necessary for its practical use. In this article, recent advances in MFC technologies that can become fundamentals for future practical MFC developments are summarized. Results of recent studies suggest that MFCs will be of practical use in the near future and will become a preferred option among sustainable bioenergy processes.

  15. European hydrogen and fuel cell technology platform. Strategic overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleau, Th.

    2005-01-01

    In January 2004, following the recommendation of the High Level Group, the European Commission set up the European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform (HFP) a partnership of over 300 stakeholders. Its brief? To prepare and direct an effective strategy for bringing hydrogen and fuel cells to market in order to exploit their outstanding environmental and economic potential. An Advisory Council of 35 representatives from a broad range of industry, EC, public authority, academic and NGO stakeholders was set up to guide the activity, together with a number of subsidiary bodies. Two steering panels were then charged with defining a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) and Deployment Strategy (DS) respectively in order to drive the transition forward. This report gives a work in progress strategic overview, with further details provided in the Executive Summaries of the Strategic Research Agenda and Deployment Strategy foundation documents. (authors)

  16. European hydrogen and fuel cell technology platform. Strategic overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alleau, Th

    2005-07-01

    In January 2004, following the recommendation of the High Level Group, the European Commission set up the European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform (HFP) a partnership of over 300 stakeholders. Its brief? To prepare and direct an effective strategy for bringing hydrogen and fuel cells to market in order to exploit their outstanding environmental and economic potential. An Advisory Council of 35 representatives from a broad range of industry, EC, public authority, academic and NGO stakeholders was set up to guide the activity, together with a number of subsidiary bodies. Two steering panels were then charged with defining a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) and Deployment Strategy (DS) respectively in order to drive the transition forward. This report gives a work in progress strategic overview, with further details provided in the Executive Summaries of the Strategic Research Agenda and Deployment Strategy foundation documents. (authors)

  17. Physical Principles of Development of the State Standard of Biological Cell Polarizability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvalov, G. V.; Generalov, K. V.; Generalov, V. M.; Kruchinina, M. V.; Koptev, E. S.; Minin, O. V.; Minin, I. V.

    2018-03-01

    A new state standard of biological cell polarizability based on micron-size latex particles has been developed. As a standard material, it is suggested to use polystyrene. Values of the polarizability calculated for erythrocytes and values of the polarizability of micron-size spherical latex particles measured with measuring-computing complexes agree within the limits of satisfactory relative error. The Standard allows one the unit of polarizability measurements [m3] to be assigned to cells and erythrocytes for the needs of medicine.

  18. Progress in N-type Si Solar Cell and Module Technology for High Efficiency and Low Cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dengyuan; Xiong, Jingfeng; Hu, Zhiyan; Li, Gaofei; Wang, Hongfang; An, Haijiao; Yu, Bo; Grenko, Brian; Borden, Kevin; Sauer, Kenneth; Cui, Jianhua; Wang, Haitao [Yingli Green Energy Holding Co., LTD, 071051 Boading (China); Roessler, T. [Yingli Green Energy Europe GmbH, Heimeranstr. 37, 80339 Munich (Germany); Bultman, J. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Vlooswijk, A.H.G.; Venema, P.R. [Tempress Systems BV, Radeweg 31, 8171 Vaassen (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    A novel high efficiency solar cell and module technology, named PANDA, using crystalline n-type CZ Si wafers has moved into large-scale production at Yingli. The first commercial sales of the PANDA modules commenced in mid 2010. Up to 600MW of mass production capacity from crystal-Si growth, wafer slicing, cell processing and module assembly have been implemented by the end of 2011. The PANDA technology was developed specifically for high efficiency and low cost. In contrast to the existing n-type Si solar cell manufacturing methods in mass production, this new technology is largely compatible with a traditional p-type Si solar cell production line by conventional diffusion, SiNx coating and screen-printing technology. With optimizing all technologies, Yingli's PANDA solar cells on semi-square 6-inch n-type CZ wafers (cell size 239cm{sup 2}) have been improved to currently have an average efficiency on commercial production lines exceeding 19.0% and up to 20.0% in pilot production. The PANDA modules have been produced and were certified according to UL1703, IEC 61215 and IEC 61730 standards. Nearly two years of full production on scale-up lines show that the PANDA modules have a high efficiency and power density, superior high temperature performance, near zero initial light induced degradation, and excellent efficiency at low irradiance.

  19. Reliable and accurate CD4+ T cell count and percent by the portable flow cytometer CyFlow MiniPOC and "CD4 Easy Count Kit-Dry", as revealed by the comparison with the gold standard dual platform technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Nasi

    Full Text Available An accurate and affordable CD4+ T cells count is an essential tool in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Flow cytometry (FCM is the "gold standard" for counting such cells, but this technique is expensive and requires sophisticated equipment, temperature-sensitive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and trained personnel. The lack of access to technical support and quality assurance programs thus limits the use of FCM in resource-constrained countries. We have tested the accuracy, the precision and the carry-over contamination of Partec CyFlow MiniPOC, a portable and economically affordable flow cytometer designed for CD4+ count and percentage, used along with the "CD4% Count Kit-Dry".Venous blood from 59 adult HIV+ patients (age: 25-58 years; 43 males and 16 females was collected and stained with the "MiniPOC CD4% Count Kit-Dry". CD4+ count and percentage were then determined in triplicate by the CyFlow MiniPOC. In parallel, CD4 count was performed using mAbs and a CyFlow Counter, or by a dual platform system (from Beckman Coulter based upon Cytomic FC500 ("Cytostat tetrachrome kit" for mAbs and Coulter HmX Hematology Analyzer (for absolute cell count.The accuracy of CyFlow MiniPOC against Cytomic FC500 showed a correlation coefficient (CC of 0.98 and 0.97 for CD4+ count and percentage, respectively. The accuracy of CyFlow MiniPOC against CyFlow Counter showed a CC of 0.99 and 0.99 for CD4 T cell count and percentage, respectively. CyFlow MiniPOC showed an excellent repeatability: CD4+ cell count and percentage were analyzed on two instruments, with an intra-assay precision below ± 5% deviation. Finally, there was no carry-over contamination for samples at all CD4 values, regardless of their position in the sequence of analysis.The cost-effective CyFlow MiniPOC produces rapid, reliable and accurate results that are fully comparable with those from highly expensive dual platform systems.

  20. A reliable parameter to standardize the scoring of stem cell spheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Zhou

    Full Text Available Sphere formation assay is widely used in selection and enrichment of normal stem cells or cancer stem cells (CSCs, also known as tumor initiating cells (TICs, based on their ability to grow in serum-free suspension culture for clonal proliferation. However, there is no standardized parameter to accurately score the spheres, which should be reflected by both the number and size of the spheres. Here we define a novel parameter, designated as Standardized Sphere Score (SSS, which is expressed by the total volume of selected spheres divided by the number of cells initially plated. SSS was validated in quantification of both tumor spheres from cancer cell lines and embryonic bodies (EB from mouse embryonic stem cells with high sensitivity and reproducibility.

  1. National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC); (NREL) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer; Sprik, Sam

    2014-03-11

    This presentation gives an overview of the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC), describes how NFCTEC benefits the hydrogen and fuel cell community, and introduces a new fuel cell cost/price aggregation project.

  2. Overview of molten carbonate fuel cell technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. C.; Parsons, E. L., Jr.; Mayfield, M. J.

    The molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) has been identified as a promising energy conversion product for development and commercialization. Overall DOE MCFC program goal is to develop and commercialize low-cost, simple fuel cell systems. Objective of the MCFC program is to develop and demonstrate MCFC power plant systems. Significant progress has already been made in developing the MCFC technology in the U.S. Manufacturing and test facility development and testing by the MCFC developers has also been significant. Product improvement issues need to be resolved to vector the MCFC technology from its current status to a multi-fuel, integrated, simple, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant product. MCFC's must undergo continuing product refinement to ensure that durability and cost reduction through modularization and stack manufacturing scale-up occurs. MCFC developers need to continue to be responsive to end-users in potential markets. MCFC's appear to have a place in a decentralized power industry future. Natural gas availability appears to play a key role in MCFC commercialization.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS - STANDARD FILTER CORPORATION PE16ZU FILTER SAMPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) pilot of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of th...

  4. Questioning Faculty Use of Information Technology by Context of NETS-T Standards in Bologna Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmas, Muzaffer

    2013-01-01

    Using technology in and out of class has been becoming more and more important recently. University settings also become more dependent to technology. Bologna process requires university and faculty diffuse and

  5. Relationship of Technology Skill Competencies and Reading and Math Standardized Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Stacie L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship exists between technology skills and academic achievement among eighth-grade students. Previous studies investigated the relationship between the use of technology as a teaching tool and student outcomes, but none had specifically examined students' technology skill competencies with…

  6. Silicon solar cell technology state of the art and a proposed double sided cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddik, M.M.

    1987-08-01

    A review of the silicon technology state of the art is given. It had been found that single crystal silicon efficiency was limitd to ≥ 20%. The reason was identified to be due to the recombination current loss mechanisms. However, use of new technologies such as back-surface field, surface passivation, double anti-reflection coatings and back-surface illumination demonstrated to achieve higher efficiencies. Experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of back surfaces illumination on the cell efficiency enhancement. It was found that for single cell, back-surface illumination contribute a 12% increase in efficiency whereas for double cell illumination (back-to-back cells) the improvement was 59% increase in efficiency. A V-shaped flat mirror reflector with optimum angle of 45 deg. to the plane of the cell from both sides achieved the ultimate efficiency performance. Finally, a proposed high current - high efficiency solar cell called ''Double Drift'' - Double Sided Illumination Cell'' was presented. The new structures were in the form of n + pn + or p + np + double junctions. The expected efficiency ranges 50-60% with proper material design, double anti-reflection coatings and V-shaped irregular plane mirror reflector illumination. (author). 43 refs, 4 figs, 7 tabs

  7. 6. Seminar of the IIE-ININ-IMP on technological specialties. Topic 11: standards and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The document includes 8 papers presented at the 6. Seminar of the IIE-ININ-IMP (Mexico) on technological specialties in the field of standards and quality assurance. (Topic 11). From these, 2 papers were in INIS subject scope and a separate abstract was prepared for each of them

  8. E-learning as a technological tool to meet the requirements of occupational standards in training of it specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, N. A.; Tyatyushkina, O. Y.; Cheremisina, E. N.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss issues of updating educational programs to meet requirements of the labor market and occupational standards of IT industry. We suggest the technology of e-learning that utilizes an open educational resource to provide the employers' participation in the development of educational content and the intensification of practical training.

  9. Basement Construction of Measurement Standardization for Thermal Property and Basement Preparation of Industrial Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Song, Kee Chan; Park, Chang Je

    2007-02-15

    There are three main categories in this report : 1)Basement construction of measurement standardization for nuclear material thermal property, 2) Reliability evaluation of measurement instrument, and 3) Standardization and industrial propagation.

  10. Application of cell sheet technology to bone marrow stromal cell transplantation for rat brain infarct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masaki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2017-02-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplantation enhances functional recovery after cerebral infarct, but the optimal delivery route is undetermined. This study was aimed to assess whether a novel cell-sheet technology non-invasively serves therapeutic benefits to ischemic stroke. First, the monolayered cell sheet was engineered by culturing rat BMSCs on a temperature-responsive dish. The cell sheet was analysed histologically and then transplanted onto the ipsilateral neocortex of rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion at 7 days after the insult. Their behaviours and histology were compared with those in the animals treated with direct injection of BMSCs or vehicle over 4 weeks post-transplantation. The cell sheet was 27.9 ± 8.0 μm thick and was composed of 9.8 ± 2.4 × 10 5 cells. Cell sheet transplantation significantly improved motor function when compared with the vehicle-injected animals. Histological analysis revealed that the BMSCs were densely distributed to the neocortex adjacent to the cerebral infarct and expressed neuronal phenotype in the cell sheet-transplanted animals. These findings were almost equal to those for the animals treated with direct BMSC injection. The attachment of the BMSC sheet to the brain surface did not induce reactive astrocytes in the adjacent neocortex, although direct injection of BMSCs profoundly induced reactive astrocytes around the injection site. These findings suggest that the BMSCs in cell sheets preserve their biological capacity of migration and neural differentiation. Cell-sheet technology may enhance functional recovery after ischaemic stroke, using a less invasive method. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Technology and Standardization Strategies Related to The Diffusion of Smart Houses: The Case of ECHONET in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumiko Miyazaki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an analysis is made of the technology and standardization strategies regarding ECHONET and KNX, which are the de jure standards for smart houses in Japan and Europe. Eleven interviews with the main actors related to the ECHONET Consortium and KNX were conducted. Three research questions were set. What are the technology strategy related concerns of the main actors related to ECHONET? What are the issues related to the diffusion of smart houses? What are the underlying strengths and weaknesses of ECHONET when compared with KNX? The analyses showed that the strategies of the various actors towards the diffusion of smart houses were different, based on their different perspectives, visions and competences. A comparison between Japanese and European case highlighted the different standardization strategies and areas of focus. The main bottlenecks towards the diffusion of smart houses were identified.

  12. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology Stationary Power Application Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Pierre

    2009-03-05

    The objectives of this program were to: (1) Develop a reliable, cost-effective, and production-friendly technique to apply the power-enhancing layer at the interface of the air electrode and electrolyte of the Siemens SOFC; (2) Design, build, install, and operate in the field two 5 kWe SOFC systems fabricated with the state-of-the-art cylindrical, tubular cell and bundle technology and incorporating advanced module design features. Siemens successfully demonstrated, first in a number of single cell tests and subsequently in a 48-cell bundle test, a significant power enhancement by employing a power-enhancing composite interlayer at the interface between the air electrode and electrolyte. While successful from a cell power enhancement perspective, the interlayer application process was not suitable for mass manufacturing. The application process was of inconsistent quality, labor intensive, and did not have an acceptable yield. This program evaluated the technical feasibility of four interlayer application techniques. The candidate techniques were selected based on their potential to achieve the technical requirements of the interlayer, to minimize costs (both labor and material), and suitably for large-scale manufacturing. Preliminary screening, utilizing lessons learned in manufacturing tubular cells, narrowed the candidate processes to two, ink-roller coating (IRC) and dip coating (DC). Prototype fixtures were successfully built and utilized to further evaluate the two candidate processes for applying the interlayer to the high power density Delta8 cell geometry. The electrical performance of interlayer cells manufactured via the candidate processes was validated. Dip coating was eventually selected as the application technique of choice for applying the interlayer to the high power Delta8 cell. The technical readiness of the DC process and product quality was successfully and repeatedly demonstrated, and its throughput and cost are amenable to large scale

  13. Microenvironments and different nanoparticle dynamics in living cells revealed by a standard nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Chan Gi; Song, Mi Ryoung; Tae, Eunju Lee; Hiroshima, Michio; Byun, Kyung Hee; Kim, Jun Sung; Sako, Yasushi

    2012-11-10

    For quantitative analysis of nanoparticle diffusions and submicro-environments in living cells, use of newly synthesized silica-based fluorescent nanoparticle (Si-FNP) as a standard nanoprobe is successfully demonstrated. The appropriate characteristics of a standard probe were fully analyzed in vitro by single molecule detection, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Using fluorescence correlation analysis in single living cells, we quantitatively compared the diffusional properties of the standard Si-FNP with a diameter of 50 nm, peptide coated Si-FNP, streptavidin coated Qdot, and GFP molecule which have different sizes and surface properties. The result demonstrates that the standard Si-FNP without coat is minimally trapped in the vesicles in the process of cellular endocytosis. Interestingly, a large proportion of Si-FNP introduced into the cells by electroporation diffuses freely in the cells during a cell cycle suggesting free diffusing NPs are hardly trapped in the vesicles. The simple but highly sensitive method will provide insight into strategies to understanding the hydrodynamic process of nanoparticle delivery into living cells as well as the cellular microenvironment in the view of submicro-size. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. "The good into the pot, the bad into the crop!"--a new technology to free stem cells from feeder cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Schneider

    Full Text Available A variety of embryonic and adult stem cell lines require an initial co-culturing with feeder cells for non-differentiated growth, self renewal and maintenance of pluripotency. However for many downstream ES cell applications the feeder cells have to be considered contaminations that might interfere not just with the analysis of experimental data but also with clinical application and tissue engineering approaches. Here we introduce a novel technique that allows for the selection of pure feeder-freed stem cells, following stem cell proliferation on feeder cell layers. Complete and reproducible separation of feeder and embryonic stem cells was accomplished by adaptation of an automated cell selection system that resulted in the aspiration of distinct cell colonies or fraction of colonies according to predefined physical parameters. Analyzing neuronal differentiation we demonstrated feeder-freed stem cells to exhibit differentiation potentials comparable to embryonic stem cells differentiated under standard conditions. However, embryoid body growth as well as differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes was significantly enhanced in feeder-freed cells, indicating a feeder cell dependent modulation of lineage differentiation during early embryoid body development. These findings underline the necessity to separate stem and feeder cells before the initiation of in vitro differentiation. The complete separation of stem and feeder cells by this new technology results in pure stem cell populations for translational approaches. Furthermore, a more detailed analysis of the effect of feeder cells on stem cell differentiation is now possible, that might facilitate the identification and development of new optimized human or genetically modified feeder cell lines.

  15. Development of molten-carbonate fuel-cell technology. Final report, February-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the work was to focus on the basic technology for producing molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) components. This included the development and fabrication of stable anode structures, preparation of lithiated nickel oxide cathodes, synthesis and characterization of a high surface area (gamma-lithium-aluminate) electrolyte support, pressurized cell testing and modeling of the overall electrolyte distribution within a cell to aid performance optimization of the different cell components. The electrode development program is highlighted by two successful 5000 hour bench-scale tests using stabilized anode structures. One of these provided better performance than in any previous state-of-the-art, bench-scale cell (865 mV at 115 mA/cm/sup 2/ under standard conditions). Pressurized testing at 10 atmosphere of a similar stabilized, high surface area, Ni/Co anode structure in a 300 cm/sup 2/ cell showed that the 160 mA/cm/sup 2/ performance goal of 850 mV on low Btu fuel (80% conversion) can be readily met. A study of the H/sub 2/S-effects on molten carbonate fuel cells showed that ERC's Ni/Co anode provided better tolerance than a Ni/Cr anode. Prelithiated nickel oxide plaques were prepared from materials made by a low temperature and a high temperature powder-production process. The methods for fabricating handleable cathodes of various thicknesses were also investigated. In electrolyte matrix development, accelerated out-of-cell and in-cell tests have confirmed the superior stability of ..gamma..-LiAlO/sub 2/.

  16. A standard methodology for cost-effectiveness analysis of new environmental technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, S.R.; Trocki, L.K.; Bowling, L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper outlines a methodology that is being applied to assess the cost-effectiveness of new environmental technologies under development by EM-50, DOE. Performance, total system effects, and life-cycle costs are all considered in the methodology to compare new technologies with existing or base-line technologies. An example of performance characterization is given in the paper. Sources of data for cost estimates and technology characterizations also appear in the paper. The Department of Energy (DOE) is facing a massive clean up effort of waste sites that contain hazardous, radioactive, or mixed materials. DOE has recognized that improvements in environmental restoration and waste management methods can potentially save the taxpayers billions of dollars as older, less-effective technologies are displaced. Consequently, DOE has targeted significant funding to search for new technologies and to test and demonstrate them in rapid and cost-effective manner with the goal of applying them quickly to address environmental problems

  17. Environmental impacts of energy facilities: fuel cell technology compared with coal and conventional gas technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seip, Knut L.; Thorstensen, Bernt; Wang, Hagbarth

    We compare the environmental side effects of power plants based on fuel cell technology with the side effects of conventional electric power plants based on coal and natural gas. The environmental impact of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant is very much less than that of a coal-fired plant (a factor of {1}/{300} for air pollution and a factor of {1}/{5} for water pollution). Compared with a conventional gas plant, impact is reduced by between 50 and 98%. Damage to cultural monuments and buildings is negligible from a fuel cell plant. Socioeconomic negative impacts are reduced by about 30% relative to conventional gas plants (aesthetics and noise) whereas employment is unaltered. Impact on health and safety is greatly reduced compared with that from coal-fired plants and is about 70% of that from conventional gas plants. Preliminary results suggest that society's willingness to pay (WTP) for clean air, and thereby better health, matches the cost of installing emission-reducing equipment on conventional power plants. There is probably an additional WTP for other benefits (e.g., decreased risk of global warming). Thus, the utility of very small emissions, lower CO 2 discharges, and other benefits from SOFC generators may compensate for the increased cost incurred in producing electricity by SOFC generators.

  18. Comparative analysis of dynamic cell viability, migration and invasion assessments by novel real-time technology and classic endpoint assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Limame

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell viability and motility comprise ubiquitous mechanisms involved in a variety of (pathobiological processes including cancer. We report a technical comparative analysis of the novel impedance-based xCELLigence Real-Time Cell Analysis detection platform, with conventional label-based endpoint methods, hereby indicating performance characteristics and correlating dynamic observations of cell proliferation, cytotoxicity, migration and invasion on cancer cells in highly standardized experimental conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Dynamic high-resolution assessments of proliferation, cytotoxicity and migration were performed using xCELLigence technology on the MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer and A549 (lung cancer cell lines. Proliferation kinetics were compared with the Sulforhodamine B (SRB assay in a series of four cell concentrations, yielding fair to good correlations (Spearman's Rho 0.688 to 0.964. Cytotoxic action by paclitaxel (0-100 nM correlated well with SRB (Rho>0.95 with similar IC(50 values. Reference cell migration experiments were performed using Transwell plates and correlated by pixel area calculation of crystal violet-stained membranes (Rho 0.90 and optical density (OD measurement of extracted dye (Rho>0.95. Invasion was observed on MDA-MB-231 cells alone using Matrigel-coated Transwells as standard reference method and correlated by OD reading for two Matrigel densities (Rho>0.95. Variance component analysis revealed increased variances associated with impedance-based detection of migration and invasion, potentially caused by the sensitive nature of this method. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The xCELLigence RTCA technology provides an accurate platform for non-invasive detection of cell viability and motility. The strong correlations with conventional methods imply a similar observation of cell behavior and interchangeability with other systems, illustrated by the highly correlating kinetic invasion profiles on

  19. A Virtual Geophysical Network: Using Industry Standard Technology to Link Geographically Distributed Sensors and Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, T. K.; Benson, R. B.; Crotwell, H. P.

    2003-12-01

    The IRIS Data Management System has long supported distributed data centers as a method of providing scientific researchers access to data from seismological networks around the world. For nearly a decade, the NetDC system used email as the method through which users could access data centers located around the globe in a seamless fashion. More recently the IRIS DMC has partnered with the University of South Carolina to develop a new method through which a virtual data center can be created. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) technology is an industry standard distributed computing architecture. Traditionally used by major corporations, IRIS has developed a Data Handling Interface (DHI) system that is capable of connecting services at participating data centers (servers) to applications running on end-users computing platforms (clients). For seismology we have identified three services. 1) A network service that provides information about geophysical observatories around the world such as where the sensors exist, what types of information are recorded on the sensors, and calibration information that allows proper use of the data, 2) an event service that allows applications to access information about earthquakes and seismological events and 3) waveform services that allow users to gain access to seismograms or time series data from other geophysical sensors. Seismological Data Centers operate the servers thereby allowing a variety of client applications to directly access the information at these data centers. Currently IRIS, the U. of South Carolina, UC Berkeley, and a European Data Center (ORFEUS) have been involved in the DHI project. This talk will highlight some of the DHI enabled clients that allow geophysical information to be directly transferred to the clients. Since the data center servers appear with the same interface specification (Interface Definition Language) a client that can talk to one DHI server can talk to any DHI enabled

  20. Long life 80Ah standard IPV NiH2 battery cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armantrout, Jon D.; Waller, J. S.

    1995-02-01

    A standard Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) battery cell is needed to meet future low cost, high performance mission requirements for NASA, military, and civil space programs. A common or standard cell design has evolved from the heritage of HST, Milstar, and other Air Force Mantech cell designs with substantial flight experience, while incorporating some of the historical COMSAT cell design features described in a previous NASA publication. Key features include slurry process nickel electrodes having high strength, long life and high yield (lower cost), and dual layer zircar separators for improved KOH retention, uniformality, and longer life. The cell design will have a zirconium oxide wall wick inside the pressure vessel to redistribute electrolyte and extend life. The slurry electrode will be 35 mils thick to take advantage of qualified cell mechanical configurations and proven assembly and activation techniques developed by Eagle Picher Industries (EPI) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) RNH-90-3 and 'Generic HST' RNH-90-5 cell designs with back-to-back nickel electrodes produced by the dry sinter process. The 80Ah common cell design can be scaled to meet capacity requirements from 60Ah to 100Ah. Producibility, commonality, and long life performance will be enhanced with the robust cell design described herein.

  1. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-08-01

    This report documents the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  2. 3D Technology Selection for a Virtual Learning Environment by Blending ISO 9126 Standard and AHP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Aydin; Guler, Inan

    2011-01-01

    Web3D presents many opportunities for learners in a virtual world or virtual environment over the web. This is a great opportunity for open-distance education institutions to benefit from web3d technologies to create courses with interactive 3d materials. There are many open source and commercial products offering 3d technologies over the web…

  3. [The application progress of three-dimensional cell culture technology in ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture technology is a kind of technology that cultures the cells in a three-dimensional cultivation by using a kind of scaffold materials in vitro. Its advantage is that the vivo microenvironment simulating degrees of the three-dimensional culture technology is higher than that of the two-dimensional planar cell culture model, and the controllability is also higher than the animal experiment. In recent years, with the development of tissue engineering technology, a varietiy of the stent of biological materials also a fast development, which provided a favorable platform for three-dimensional cell culture technology. In ophthalmology, three-dimensional cell culture has been applied to the cornea, retina and the visual system development and other optic tumor researches. The objective of this paper is to making a review the application status of the three-dimensional cell culture technology in the basic research and clinical treatment in ophthalmology.

  4. A new single-photon avalanche diode in 90nm standard CMOS technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karami, M.A.; Gersbach, M.; Charbon, E.

    2010-01-01

    A single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) fabricated in a 90nm standard CMOS process is reported. The detector comprises an octagonal multiplication region and a guard ring to prevent premature edge breakdown using exclusively standard layers. The proposed structure is the result of a systematic study

  5. An integrated experimental and economic evaluation of cell therapy affinity purification technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Benjamin D; Jenkins, Michael J; Uddin, Siddique; Bracewell, Daniel G; Wellings, Donald; Farid, Suzanne S; Veraitch, Farlan

    2017-04-01

    To present an integrated techno-economic analysis assessing the feasibility of affinity purification technologies using the manufacture of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived progenitor photoreceptors for retinal dystrophies as a case study. Sort purity, progenitor yield and viable cell recovery were investigated for three cell sorting techniques: fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS); magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS); and a novel technology SpheriTech beads. Experimentally derived metrics were incorporated into an advanced bioprocess economics tool to determine cost of goods per dose for each technology. Technical and bioprocess benefits were noted with SpheriTech beads which, unlike FACS and MACS, require no cell labeling. This simplifies the bioprocess, reduces cell loss and leaves target cells label free. The economic tool predicted cost drivers and a critical dose (7 × 10 7 cells per dose) shifting the most cost-effective technology from FACS to MACS. Process optimization is required for SpheriTech to compete economically.

  6. Comparison between the neutron parameters for CANDU-6 standard and SEU-43 fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaceanu, V.; Constantin, M.

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays the efforts in nuclear energy industry are focused on the growing of the fuel cycles' efficiency, the decreasing of the spent fuel volumes simultaneously with a decreasing of the production costs. In INR Pitesti the project for a new fuel bundle named SEU-43 (Slightly Enriched Uranium, bundle with 43 elements) was started in the late of '80s (Horhoianu et al., 2001), like an alternative for the CANDU-6 standard bundle (Natural Uranium, bundle with 37 elements). This paper presents a comparison between the SEU-43 fuel and CANDU-6 Standard fuel with the a special regard to the neutron cell parameters (k-inf, multigroup fluxes, pin powers). SEU-43 CANDU cell consists of a single cluster (43-fuel elements bundle, 2 fuel type element sizes). The other elements of the cell are the same as those of the Standard cell. The enrichment in 235 U (nearly 1%) is present. The WIMS-5B library was used (Halsall and Taubman, 1986) for cross-sections generation and CP 2 D, a two-dimensional transport the first collision probability code for detailed fuel assembly hyperfine flux distribution calculation (Constantin, 1999) was used for the computing of the neutron local parameters. A comparison between the SEU-43 and CANDU-6 Standard fuel cell parameters are performed. The analysis shows the SEU-43 fuel can be used successfully in CANDU-6 reactor, its local neutron performances being similar with those of the CANDU-6 Standard fuel. The major advantage of the SEU-43 fuel bundle is that it can reach a maximum burnup of 25000 MWd/tU compared to the Standard 37-fuel bundle where the maximum burnup is about of 13000 MWd/TU (reached only for some fuel bundles of the core). (authors)

  7. Fundamentals of automotive and engine technology standard drives, hybrid drives, brakes, safety systems

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid drives and the operation of hybrid vehicles are characteristic of contemporary automotive technology. Together with the electronic driver assistant systems, hybrid technology is of the greatest importance and both cannot be ignored by today’s car drivers. This technical reference book provides the reader with a firsthand comprehensive description of significant components of automotive technology. All texts are complemented by numerous detailed illustrations. Contents History of the automobile.- History of the Diesel engine.- Areas of use for Diesel engines.- Basic principles of the Diesel engine.- Basic principles of Diesel fuel-injection.- Basic principles of the gasoline engine.- Inductive ignition system.- Transmissions for motor vehicles.- Motor vehicle safety.- Basic principles of vehicle dynamics.- Car braking systems.- Vehicle electrical systems.- Overview of electrical and electronic systems in the vehicle.- Control of gasoline engines.- Control of Diesel engines.- Lighting technology.- Elec...

  8. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) cybersecurity risk management framework applied to modern vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The primary objective of the work described in this report is to review the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) guidelines and foundational publications from an automotive : cybersecurity risk management stand-point. The NIST approach...

  9. Assessing the quality of decision support technologies using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards instrument (IPDASi).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwyn, G.; O'Connor, A.M.; Bennett, C.; Newcombe, R.G.; Politi, M.; Durand, M.A.; Drake, E.; Joseph-Williams, N.; Khangura, S.; Saarimaki, A.; Sivell, S.; Stiel, M.; Bernstein, S.J.; Col, N.; Coulter, A.; Eden, K.; Harter, M.; Rovner, M.H.; Moumjid, N.; Stacey, D.; Thomson, R.; Whelan, T.; Weijden, G.D.E.M. van der; Edwards, A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the development, validation and inter-rater reliability of an instrument to measure the quality of patient decision support technologies (decision aids). DESIGN: Scale development study, involving construct, item and scale development, validation and reliability testing.

  10. A brain-computer interface as input channel for a standard assistive technology software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickler, Claudia; Riccio, Angela; Leotta, Francesco; Hillian-Tress, Sandra; Halder, Sebastian; Holz, Elisa; Staiger-Sälzer, Pit; Hoogerwerf, Evert-Jan; Desideri, Lorenzo; Mattia, Donatella; Kübler, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    Recently brain-computer interface (BCI) control was integrated into the commercial assistive technology product QualiWORLD (QualiLife Inc., Paradiso-Lugano, CH). Usability of the first prototype was evaluated in terms of effectiveness (accuracy), efficiency (information transfer rate and subjective workload/NASA Task Load Index) and user satisfaction (Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology, QUEST 2.0) by four end-users with severe disabilities. Three assistive technology experts evaluated the device from a third person perspective. The results revealed high performance levels in communication and internet tasks. Users and assistive technology experts were quite satisfied with the device. However, none could imagine using the device in daily life without improvements. Main obstacles were the EEG-cap and low speed.

  11. Wright meets Markowitz: How standard portfolio theory changes when assets are technologies following experience curves

    OpenAIRE

    Way, Rupert; Lafond, François; Farmer, J. Doyne; Lillo, Fabrizio; Panchenko, Valentyn

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers how to optimally allocate investments in a portfolio of competing technologies. We introduce a simple model representing the underlying trade-off - between investing enough effort in any one project to spur rapid progress, and diversifying effort over many projects simultaneously to hedge against failure. We use stochastic experience curves to model the idea that investing more in a technology reduces its unit costs, and we use a mean-variance objective function to unders...

  12. Development of a Standard Test to Assess the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Cells to Disinfectants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luppens, S.B.I.; Reij, M.W.; Heijden, van der R.W.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    2002-01-01

    A standardized disinfectant test for Staphylococcus aureus cells in biofilms was developed. Two disinfectants, the membrane-active compound benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and the oxidizing agent sodium hypochlorite, were used to evaluate the biofilm test. S. aureus formed biofilms on glass, stainless

  13. The Potential of Digital Technologies to Support Literacy Instruction Relevant to the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Amy C.; Colwell, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Digital tools have the potential to transform instruction and promote literacies outlined in the Common Core State Standards. Empirical research is examined to illustrate this potential in grades 6-12 instruction.

  14. Towards the development of consistent and unambiguous financial accounting standards using ontology technologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gerber, MC

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available accounting standards including an conceptual framework that were developed to facilitate the reporting of financial information of entities so that investors, analysts, creditors as well as the entities themselves can make informed financial decisions. Due...

  15. Validation of next generation sequencing technologies in comparison to current diagnostic gold standards for BRAF, EGFR and KRAS mutational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Clare M; McArt, Darragh G; Mills, Ken; Catherwood, Mark A; Maxwell, Perry; Waugh, David J; Hamilton, Peter; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has the potential of becoming an important tool in clinical diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making in oncology owing to its enhanced sensitivity in DNA mutation detection, fast-turnaround of samples in comparison to current gold standard methods and the potential to sequence a large number of cancer-driving genes at the one time. We aim to test the diagnostic accuracy of current NGS technology in the analysis of mutations that represent current standard-of-care, and its reliability to generate concomitant information on other key genes in human oncogenesis. Thirteen clinical samples (8 lung adenocarcinomas, 3 colon carcinomas and 2 malignant melanomas) already genotyped for EGFR, KRAS and BRAF mutations by current standard-of-care methods (Sanger Sequencing and q-PCR), were analysed for detection of mutations in the same three genes using two NGS platforms and an additional 43 genes with one of these platforms. The results were analysed using closed platform-specific proprietary bioinformatics software as well as open third party applications. Our results indicate that the existing format of the NGS technology performed well in detecting the clinically relevant mutations stated above but may not be reliable for a broader unsupervised analysis of the wider genome in its current design. Our study represents a diagnostically lead validation of the major strengths and weaknesses of this technology before consideration for diagnostic use.

  16. Utilizing GIS to Examine the Relationship Between State Renewable Portfolio Standards and the Adoption of Renewable Energy Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Schelly

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, there is no comprehensive energy policy at the federal level. To address issues as diverse as climate change, energy security, and economic development, individual states have increasingly implemented Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPSs, which mandate that utility providers include a specified amount of electricity from renewable energy sources in their total energy portfolios. Some states have included incentives for individual energy technologies in their RPS, such as solar electric (also called photovoltaic or PV technology. Here, we use GIS to visualize adoption of RPSs and electricity generation from renewable energy sources in the US and examine changes in renewable electricity and solar electric generation over time with the goal of informing future policies aimed at promoting the adoption of renewable energy technologies.

  17. Using technology to promote mobile learning: engaging students with cell phones in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Meigan; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in cell phone technology have impacted every aspect of society. Individuals have instant access to social networks, Web sites, and applications. Faculty need to consider using these mobile devices to enrich the classroom. The authors discuss how they successfully designed and incorporated cell phone learning activities into their classrooms. Teaching-learning strategies using cell phone technology and recommendations for overcoming challenges associated with cell phone use in the classroom are discussed.

  18. Viwithan, a StandardizedWithania somniferaRoot Extract Induces Apoptosis in Murine Melanoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudeep, H V; Gouthamchandra, K; Venkatesh, B J; Prasad, K Shyam

    2018-01-01

    Withania somnifera is an Indian medicinal herb known for the multipotential ability to cure various therapeutic ailments as described in the ayurvedic system of medicine. In the present study, we have evaluated the antiproliferative activity of a standardized W. somnifera root extract (Viwithan) against different human and murine cancer cell lines. The cytotoxicity of Viwithan was determined using thiazolyl blue tetrazolium blue assay and crystal violet staining. The apoptotic changes in B16F1 cells following treatment with Viwithan were observed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining and DNA fragmentation assay. The binding affinity of withanolides in Viwithan with antiapoptotic proteins B-cell lymphoma 2, B-cell lymphoma-extra large, and myeloid cell leukemia 1 (MCL-1) were studied using in silico approach. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of Viwithan against liver hepatocellular carcinoma, Henrietta Lacks cervical carcinoma cells, human colorectal carcinoma cell line, and Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells were 1830, 968, 2715, and 633 μg/ml, respectively. Interestingly, Viwithan was highly effective against B16F1 cells with an IC50 value of 220 μg/ml after 24 h treatment. The morphological alterations of apoptotic cell death were clearly observed in the AO/EB-stained cells after treatment with Viwithan. Viwithan induced late apoptotic changes in treated B16F1 cells as evident by the ladder formation of fragmented DNA in a time-dependent manner. The findings of molecular docking showed that withanolides present in Viwithan have a more binding affinity with the antiapoptotic proteins, particularly MCL-1. We have reported for the first time that Viwithan with 5% withanolides has a potent cytotoxic effect, particularly against B16F1 murine melanoma cells among the different cancer cell lines tested. The present study reports for the first time that Viwithan, a standardized 5% Withania somnifera root extract, has potent

  19. Use and clinical efficacy of standard and health information technology fall risk assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Ruth C; Wilson, Anne; Ranasinghe, Damith; Visvanathan, Renuka

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the health information technology (HIT) compared to Fall Risk for Older Persons (FROP) tool in fall risk screening. A HIT tool trial was conducted on the geriatric evaluation and management (GEM, n = 111) and acute medical units (AMU, n = 424). Health information technology and FROP scores were higher on GEM versus AMU, with no differences between people who fell and people who did not fall. Both score completion rates were similar, and their values correlated marginally (Spearman's correlation coefficient 0.33, P technology tool acceptability and scoring were comparable to FROP screening, with mixed effects on fall rate with HIT tool implementation. Clinician partnership remains key to effective tool development. © 2017 AJA Inc.

  20. Cell Surface and Membrane Engineering: Emerging Technologies and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T. Saeui

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Membranes constitute the interface between the basic unit of life—a single cell—and the outside environment and thus in many ways comprise the ultimate “functional biomaterial”. To perform the many and often conflicting functions required in this role, for example to partition intracellular contents from the outside environment while maintaining rapid intake of nutrients and efflux of waste products, biological membranes have evolved tremendous complexity and versatility. This article describes how membranes, mainly in the context of living cells, are increasingly being manipulated for practical purposes with drug discovery, biofuels, and biosensors providing specific, illustrative examples. Attention is also given to biology-inspired, but completely synthetic, membrane-based technologies that are being enabled by emerging methods such as bio-3D printers. The diverse set of applications covered in this article are intended to illustrate how these versatile technologies—as they rapidly mature—hold tremendous promise to benefit human health in numerous ways ranging from the development of new medicines to sensitive and cost-effective environmental monitoring for pathogens and pollutants to replacing hydrocarbon-based fossil fuels.

  1. Radiation-based quantitative bioimaging at the national institute of standards and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Building on a long history of providing physical measurements and standards for medical x rays and nuclear medicine radionuclides, the laboratory has expanded its focus to better support the extensive use of medical physics in the United States today, providing confidence in key results needed for drug and device development and marketing, therapy planning and efficacy and disease screening. In particular, to support more quantitative medical imaging, this laboratory has implemented a program to provide key measurement infrastructure to support radiation-based imaging through developing standard, benchmark phantoms, which contain radioactive sources calibrated to national measurement standards, to allow more quantitative imaging through traceable instrument calibration for clinical trials or patient management. Working closely with colleagues at the National Institutes of Health, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the Food and Drug Administration and Cornell University, this laboratory has taken the initial steps in developing phantoms, and the protocols to use them, for more accurate calibration of positron emission tomography (PET or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT cameras, including recently standardizing 68 Ge. X-ray measurements of the laboratory′s recently developed small, resilient and inexpensive length standard phantom have shown the potential usefulness of such a "pocket" phantom for patient-based calibration of computed tomography (alone or with PET systems. The ability to calibrate diagnostic imaging tools in a way that is traceable to national standards will lead to a more quantitative approach; both physician and patient benefit from increased accuracy in treatment planning, as well as increased safety for the patient.

  2. [Research progress of cell sheet technology and its applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongyang; Ren, Liling; Mao, Tianqiu

    2014-10-01

    Cell sheet engineering is an important technology to harvest the cultured cells in the form of confluent monolayers using a continuous culture method and a physical approach. Avoiding the use of enzymes, expended cells can be harvested together with endogenous extracellular matrix, cell-matrix contacts, and cell-cell contacts. With high efficiency of cell loading ability and without using exogenous scaffolds, cell sheet engineering has several advantages over traditional tissue engineering methods. In this article, we give an overview on cell sheet technology about its applications in the filed of tissue regeneration, including the construction of soft tissues (corneal, mucous membrane, myocardium, blood vessel, pancreas islet, liver, bladder and skin) and hard tissues (bone, cartilage and tooth root). This techonoly is promising to provide a novel strategy for the development of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. And further works should be carried out on the operability of this technology and its feasibility to construct thick tissues.

  3. 40 CFR 268.42 - Treatment standards expressed as specified technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) chelation/solvent extraction; (5) freeze crystalization; (6) ultrafiltration and/or (7) simple precipitation... operating requirements; and certain non-combustive technologies, such as the Catalytic Extraction Process... requirements of 40 CFR part 264 subpart 0 and part 265 subpart 0. LLEXT: Liquid-liquid extraction (often...

  4. Cornell Fuel Cell Institute: Materials Discovery to Enable Fuel Cell Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abruna, H.D.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2012-06-29

    The discovery and understanding of new, improved materials to advance fuel cell technology are the objectives of the Cornell Fuel Cell Institute (CFCI) research program. CFCI was initially formed in 2003. This report highlights the accomplishments from 2006-2009. Many of the grand challenges in energy science and technology are based on the need for materials with greatly improved or even revolutionary properties and performance. This is certainly true for fuel cells, which have the promise of being highly efficient in the conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy. Fuel cells offer the possibility of efficiencies perhaps up to 90 % based on the free energy of reaction. Here, the challenges are clearly in the materials used to construct the heart of the fuel cell: the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The MEA consists of two electrodes separated by an ionically conducting membrane. Each electrode is a nanocomposite of electronically conducting catalyst support, ionic conductor and open porosity, that together form three percolation networks that must connect to each catalyst nanoparticle; otherwise the catalyst is inactive. This report highlights the findings of the three years completing the CFCI funding, and incudes developments in materials for electrocatalyts, catalyst supports, materials with structured and functional porosity for electrodes, and novel electrolyte membranes. The report also discusses developments at understanding electrocatalytic mechanisms, especially on novel catalyst surfaces, plus in situ characterization techniques and contributions from theory. Much of the research of the CFCI continues within the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2), a DOE funded, Office of Science Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC).

  5. Study on Construction Technology Standardization of Primary Guide Rope Laying by Multi-rotor Aircraft in Stringing Construction of Transmission Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Tang, Guang-Rui; Jiang, Ming; Dong, Yu-Ming

    2017-09-01

    According to the practical situation of stringing construction for Ultra High Voltage (UHV) overhead transmission line, construction technology standardization of primary guide rope laying by multi-rotor aircraft is studied. This paper mainly focuses on the construction preparation, test flight and technology of laying primary guide rope. The summary of the construction technology standardization of primary guide rope laying by multi-rotor aircraft in stringing construction are useful in further guiding practical construction of transmission line.

  6. Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability Standards and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    reflect our vision of progressing medical device interoperability standards, whether specifically ICE-related or more generally applicable, and...White Coat Notes,” the Boston Globe online, June 2007. http://www.boston.com/yourlife/health/ blog /2007/06/getting_medical_1.html 6. Carr S, “Plug and

  7. 77 FR 36485 - Alternative Personnel Management System (APMS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... comments to Amy K. Cubert, Supervisory Human Resources Specialist, National Institute of Standards and... is more competitive for talent, and NIST managers report significantly more authority to make... v. Department of Health & Human Services, 197 F.3d 1144 (Fed. Cir. 1999), and McCormick v...

  8. Process engineering and economic evaluations of diaphragm and membrane chlorine cell technologies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The chlor-alkali manufacturing technologies of (1), diaphragm cells (2), current technology membrane cells (3), catalytic cathode membrane cells (4), oxygen-cathode membrane cells and to a lesser extent several other related emerging processes are studied. Comparisons have been made on the two bases of (1) conventional industrial economics, and (2) energy consumption. The current diaphragm cell may have a small economic advantage over the other technologies at the plant size of 544 metric T/D (600 T/D). The three membrane cells all consume less energy, with the oxygen-cathode cell being the lowest. The oxygen-cathode cell appears promising as a low energy chlor-alkali cell where there is no chemical market for hydrogen. Federal funding of the oxygen-cathode cell has been beneficial to the development of the technology, to electrochemical cell research, and may help maintain the US's position in the international chlor-alkali technology marketplace. Tax law changes inducing the installation of additional cells in existing plants would produce the quickest reduction in power consumption by the chlor-alkali industry. Alternative technologies such as the solid polymer electrolyte cell, the coupling of diaphragm cells with fuel cells and the dynamic gel diaphragm have a strong potential for reducing chloralkali industry power consumption. Adding up all the recent and expected improvements that have become cost-effective, the electrical energy required to produce a unit of chlorine by 1990 should be only 50% to 60% of that used in 1970. In the United States the majority of the market does not demand salt-free caustic. About 75% of the electrolytic caustic is produced in diaphragm cells and only a small part of that is purified. This study indicates that unless membrane cell costs are greatly reduced or a stronger demand develops for salt-free caustic, the diaphragm cells will remain competitive. (WHK)

  9. Secondary Organic Aerosol Production from Gasoline Vehicle Exhaust: Effects of Engine Technology, Cold Start, and Emission Certification Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunliang; Lambe, Andrew T; Saleh, Rawad; Saliba, Georges; Robinson, Allen L

    2018-02-06

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from dilute exhaust from 16 gasoline vehicles was investigated using a potential aerosol mass (PAM) oxidation flow reactor during chassis dynamometer testing using the cold-start unified cycle (UC). Ten vehicles were equipped with gasoline direct injection engines (GDI vehicles) and six with port fuel injection engines (PFI vehicles) certified to a wide range of emissions standards. We measured similar SOA production from GDI and PFI vehicles certified to the same emissions standard; less SOA production from vehicles certified to stricter emissions standards; and, after accounting for differences in gas-particle partitioning, similar effective SOA yields across different engine technologies and certification standards. Therefore the ongoing, dramatic shift from PFI to GDI vehicles in the United States should not alter the contribution of gasoline vehicles to ambient SOA and the natural replacement of older vehicles with newer ones certified to stricter emissions standards should reduce atmospheric SOA levels. Compared to hot operations, cold-start exhaust had lower effective SOA yields, but still contributed more SOA overall because of substantially higher organic gas emissions. We demonstrate that the PAM reactor can be used as a screening tool for vehicle SOA production by carefully accounting for the effects of the large variations in emission rates.

  10. Fabrication of advanced targets for laser driven nuclear fusion reactions through standard microelectronics technology approaches.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Picciotto, A.; Crivellari, M.; Bellutti, P.; Barozzi, M.; Kucharik, M.; Krása, Josef; Swidlovsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Velyhan, Andriy; Ullschmied, Jiří; Margarone, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, October (2017), č. článku P10001. ISSN 1748-0221 Grant - others:OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Nuclear instruments and methods for hot plasma diagnostics * Plasma generation (laserproduced, RF, x ray-produced) * Plasma diagnostics - charged-particle spectroscopy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: 2.11 Other engineering and technologies; 2.11 Other engineering and technologies (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-0221/12/10/P10001/meta

  11. OneGeology Web Services and Portal as a global geological SDI - latest standards and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Tim; Tellez-Arenas, Agnes

    2014-05-01

    The global coverage of OneGeology Web Services (www.onegeology.org and portal.onegeology.org) achieved since 2007 from the 120 participating geological surveys will be reviewed and issues arising discussed. Recent enhancements to the OneGeology Web Services capabilities will be covered including new up to 5 star service accreditation scheme utilising the ISO/OGC Web Mapping Service standard version 1.3, core ISO 19115 metadata additions and Version 2.0 Web Feature Services (WFS) serving the new IUGS-CGI GeoSciML V3.2 geological web data exchange language standard (http://www.geosciml.org/) with its associated 30+ IUGS-CGI available vocabularies (http://resource.geosciml.org/ and http://srvgeosciml.brgm.fr/eXist2010/brgm/client.html). Use of the CGI simpelithology and timescale dictionaries now allow those who wish to do so to offer data harmonisation to query their GeoSciML 3.2 based Web Feature Services and their GeoSciML_Portrayal V2.0.1 (http://www.geosciml.org/) Web Map Services in the OneGeology portal (http://portal.onegeology.org). Contributing to OneGeology involves offering to serve ideally 1:1000,000 scale geological data (in practice any scale now is warmly welcomed) as an OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) standard based WMS (Web Mapping Service) service from an available WWW server. This may either be hosted within the Geological Survey or a neighbouring, regional or elsewhere institution that offers to serve that data for them i.e. offers to help technically by providing the web serving IT infrastructure as a 'buddy'. OneGeology is a standards focussed Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) and works to ensure that these standards work together and it is now possible for European Geological Surveys to register their INSPIRE web services within the OneGeology SDI (e.g. see http://www.geosciml.org/geosciml/3.2/documentation/cookbook/INSPIRE_GeoSciML_Cookbook%20_1.0.pdf). The Onegeology portal (http://portal.onegeology.org) is the first port of call for anyone

  12. NREL Topic 1 Final Report: Cohesive Application of Standards-Based Connected Devices to Enable Clean Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudgins, Andrew P [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sparn, Bethany F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jin, Xin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Seal, Brian [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

    2018-02-21

    This document is the final report of a two-year development, test, and demonstration project entitled 'Cohesive Application of Standards-Based Connected Devices to Enable Clean Energy Technologies.' The project was part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Integrated Network Test-bed for Energy Grid Research and Technology (INTEGRATE) initiative. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and a team of partners were selected by NREL to carry out a project to develop and test how smart, connected consumer devices can act to enable the use of more clean energy technologies on the electric power grid. The project team includes a set of leading companies that produce key products in relation to achieving this vision: thermostats, water heaters, pool pumps, solar inverters, electric vehicle supply equipment, and battery storage systems. A key requirement of the project was open access at the device level - a feature seen as foundational to achieving a future of widespread distributed generation and storage. The internal intelligence, standard functionality and communication interfaces utilized in this project result in the ability to integrate devices at any level, to work collectively at the level of the home/business, microgrid, community, distribution circuit or other. Collectively, the set of products serve as a platform on which a wide range of control strategies may be developed and deployed.

  13. Standardization and performance evaluation of mononuclear cell cytokine secretion assays in a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grindle Kristine

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryopreservation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells has been used to preserve and standardize immunologic measurements for multicenter studies, however, effects of cryopreservation on cytokine responses are incompletely understood. In designing immunologic studies for a new multicenter birth cohort study of childhood asthma, we performed a series of experiments to determine the effects of two different methods of cryopreservation on the cytokine responses of cord and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results Paired samples of PBMC were processed freshly, or after cryopreservation in a Nalgene container (NC or a controlled-rate freezer (CRF. Although there were some differences between the methods, cryopreservation inhibited PHA-induced IL-10 secretion and Der f 1-induced IL-2 secretion, and augmented PHA-induced IL-2 secretion and spontaneous secretion of TNF-α. In separate experiments, NC cryopreservation inhibited secretion of several cytokines (IL-13, IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α by PHA-stimulated cord blood mononuclear cells. With the exception of PHA-induced IL-13, results from fresh and cryopreserved cord blood samples were not significantly correlated. Finally, in reproducibility studies involving processing of identical cell samples in up to 4 separate laboratories, variances in cytokine responses of fresh cells stimulated at separate sites did not exceed those in cryopreserved cells stimulated at a central site. Conclusion Collectively, these studies indicate that cryopreservation can affect mononuclear cell cytokine response profiles, and that IL-10 secretion and antigen-induced responses may be especially vulnerable. These studies also demonstrate that mononuclear cell responses can be standardized for performance in a small number of laboratories for multicenter studies, and underscore the importance of measuring reproducibility and of testing whether cryopreservation techniques alter specific immunologic outcomes.

  14. A new asymmetric 6T SRAM cell with a write assist technique in 65nm CMOS technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farkhani, Hooman; Peiravi, Ali; Moradi, Farshad

    2014-01-01

    A new asymmetric 6T-SRAM cell design is presented for low-voltage low-power operation under process variations. The write margin of the proposed cell is improved by the use of a new write-assist technique. Simulation results in 65nm technology show that the proposed cell achieves the same RSNM...... as the asymmetric 5T-SRAM cell and 77% higher RSNM than the standard 6T-SRAM cell while it is able to perform write operation without any write assist at VDD=1V. Monte Carlo simulations for an 8Kb SRAM (256×32) array indicate that the scalability of operating supply voltage of the proposed cell can be improved...... overhead for the write assist, replica column and the replica column driver of 2.6%, the overall area reduction in die area is 6.3% and 16.3% as compared with array designs with asymmetric 5T- and standard 6T-SRAM cells....

  15. Technical Standards for Command and Control Information Systems (CCISs) and Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Submission to ISO Through ANSI .......................................................................... 323 xxi UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 0 Table 40...TmnspoX 4 • P. XX 4~ XXI 0 S---Om XXM2 < )𔃾 A Z XU11 XX:r 4b-XX41 Chapter 16 347 Standrdize Profiles UNCLASSIFIED 0A WMM -t-X 3n X = UNCLASSIFIED...doninated programa , tactical commnimacations systems designed to comon standards S 012 on Information Systems0 *WG2 on Dam Nocessing mad Muafaeenta -AHWG

  16. Single-cell manipulation and DNA delivery technology using atomic force microscopy and nanoneedle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung-Woong; Nakamura, Chikashi; Miyake, Jun; Chang, Sang-Mok; Adachi, Taiji

    2014-01-01

    The recent single-cell manipulation technology using atomic force microscopy (AFM) not only allows high-resolution visualization and probing of biomolecules and cells but also provides spatial and temporal access to the interior of living cells via the nanoneedle technology. Here we review the development and application of single-cell manipulations and the DNA delivery technology using a nanoneedle. We briefly describe various DNA delivery methods and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Fabrication of the nanoneedle, visualization of nanoneedle insertion into living cells, DNA modification on the nanoneedle surface, and the invasiveness of nanoneedle insertion into living cells are described. Different methods of DNA delivery into a living cell, such as lipofection, microinjection, and nanoneedles, are then compared. Finally, single-cell diagnostics using the nanoneedle and the perspectives of the nanoneedle technology are outlined. The nanoneedle-based DNA delivery technology provides new opportunities for efficient and specific introduction of DNA and other biomolecules into precious living cells with a high spatial resolution within a desired time frame. This technology has the potential to be applied for many basic cellular studies and for clinical studies such as single-cell diagnostics.

  17. A Three-Dimensional Model of the Gas-Cell Atomic Frequency Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-25

    Clock Model Calculations ......................................................... 8 11. Exponents for Power-Law Formulas: oy -P a, S -P B, and PY...iz not substantiated oy the three-dimensional model. Considering Fig. 4 and Table IIi, it is more accurate tu state that the clock’s frequency offset...1985). [71 H. E. Williams, T. M. Kwon and T. McClelland, "Compact rectangular cavity for rubidium vapor cell frequency standards," Proceeding of the

  18. Neuritogenic effect of standardized extract of Centella asiatica ECa233 on human neuroblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In order to gain insight into neuroprotective effects of ECa 233, a standardized extract of Centella asiatica, previously demonstrated in animal models of memory impairment induced by transient global ischemia or intracerebroventricular injection of β-amyloid, the effect of ECa 233 on neurite outgrowth of human IMR-32 neuroblastoma cell line was investigated. Methods Cells were seeded and incubated with various concentrations of ECa 233. Morphometric analysis was carried out by a measurement of the longest neurite growth of cells at 24 and 48 h. Contributing signaling pathways possibly involved were subsequently elucidated by western blot analysis. Results While ECa 233 had only limited effects on cell viability, it significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth of IMR-32 cells at the concentrations of 1–100 μg/ml. Western blot analysis revealed that ECa 233 significantly upregulated the level of activated ERK1/2 and Akt of the treated cells suggesting their involvement in the neuritogenic effect observed, which was subsequently verified by the finding that an addition of their respective inhibitors could reverse the effect of ECa 233 on these cells. Conclusions The present study clearly demonstrated neurite outgrowth promoting activity of ECa 233. ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways seemed to account for the neurotrophic effect observed. In conjunction with in vivo neuroprotective effect of ECa 233 previously reported, the results obtained support further development of ECa 233 for clinical use in neuronal injury or neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23915016

  19. Minimum Information about T Regulatory Cells: A Step toward Reproducibility and Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Anke; Gliwiński, Mateusz; Grageda, Nathali; Spiering, Rachel; Abbas, Abul K; Appel, Silke; Bacchetta, Rosa; Battaglia, Manuela; Berglund, David; Blazar, Bruce; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ten Brinke, Anja; Brusko, Todd M; Cools, Nathalie; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Geissler, Edward; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gołab, Karolina; Hafler, David A; van Ham, S Marieke; Hester, Joanna; Hippen, Keli; Di Ianni, Mauro; Ilic, Natasa; Isaacs, John; Issa, Fadi; Iwaszkiewicz-Grześ, Dorota; Jaeckel, Elmar; Joosten, Irma; Klatzmann, David; Koenen, Hans; van Kooten, Cees; Korsgren, Olle; Kretschmer, Karsten; Levings, Megan; Marek-Trzonkowska, Natalia Maria; Martinez-Llordella, Marc; Miljkovic, Djordje; Mills, Kingston H G; Miranda, Joana P; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A; Putnam, Amy L; Ritter, Thomas; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Sawitzki, Birgit; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Sykes, Megan; Tang, Qizhi; Vives-Pi, Marta; Waldmann, Herman; Witkowski, Piotr; Wood, Kathryn J; Gregori, Silvia; Hilkens, Catharien M U; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lord, Phillip; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M; Trzonkowski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Cellular therapies with CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) hold promise of efficacious treatment for the variety of autoimmune and allergic diseases as well as posttransplant complications. Nevertheless, current manufacturing of Tregs as a cellular medicinal product varies between different laboratories, which in turn hampers precise comparisons of the results between the studies performed. While the number of clinical trials testing Tregs is already substantial, it seems to be crucial to provide some standardized characteristics of Treg products in order to minimize the problem. We have previously developed reporting guidelines called minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells, which allows the comparison between different preparations of tolerance-inducing antigen-presenting cells. Having this experience, here we describe another minimum information about Tregs (MITREG). It is important to note that MITREG does not dictate how investigators should generate or characterize Tregs, but it does require investigators to report their Treg data in a consistent and transparent manner. We hope this will, therefore, be a useful tool facilitating standardized reporting on the manufacturing of Tregs, either for research purposes or for clinical application. This way MITREG might also be an important step toward more standardized and reproducible testing of the Tregs preparations in clinical applications.

  20. Minimum Information about T Regulatory Cells: A Step toward Reproducibility and Standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Fuchs

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapies with CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs hold promise of efficacious treatment for the variety of autoimmune and allergic diseases as well as posttransplant complications. Nevertheless, current manufacturing of Tregs as a cellular medicinal product varies between different laboratories, which in turn hampers precise comparisons of the results between the studies performed. While the number of clinical trials testing Tregs is already substantial, it seems to be crucial to provide some standardized characteristics of Treg products in order to minimize the problem. We have previously developed reporting guidelines called minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells, which allows the comparison between different preparations of tolerance-inducing antigen-presenting cells. Having this experience, here we describe another minimum information about Tregs (MITREG. It is important to note that MITREG does not dictate how investigators should generate or characterize Tregs, but it does require investigators to report their Treg data in a consistent and transparent manner. We hope this will, therefore, be a useful tool facilitating standardized reporting on the manufacturing of Tregs, either for research purposes or for clinical application. This way MITREG might also be an important step toward more standardized and reproducible testing of the Tregs preparations in clinical applications.

  1. The method of using current regulations and standards in designing management and technologies of construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinenko Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic efficiency of using funds in construction of buildings and structures begins from an effective, proper design, which is based on modern, cutting-edge, advanced equipment, streamlined organization and process solutions of construction operations. In the light of this it is considered application of “Self-Organization and Technology of Building” multifunctional software package capable of solving various engineering tasks on designing management of construction operations in accordance with the applicable rules and regulations in view of using software for automatic generation of workflow. Implementing this software in the construction management processes may help to solve management tasks at the construction site.

  2. Early embryonic development, assisted reproductive technologies, and pluripotent stem cell biology in domestic mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane; Hinrichs, K.; Lazzari, G.

    2013-01-01

    Over many decades assisted reproductive technologies, including artificial insemination, embryo transfer, in vitro production (IVP) of embryos, cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and stem cell culture, have been developed with the aim of refining breeding strategies for improved...... of pre-implantation development in cattle, pigs, horses, and dogs. Biological aspects and impact of assisted reproductive technologies including IVP, SCNT, and culture of pluripotent stem cells are also addressed....

  3. Cell and molecular biology for diagnostic and therapeutic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Our body contains 100 trillion cells. However, each cell has certain function and structure. For maintaining their integrity, cells will be collaborating with each other and with extracellular matrix surround them to form a tissue. These interactions effect internally on many networks or pathway such as signalling pathway, metabolic pathway and transport network in the cell. These networks interact with each other to maintain cell survival, cell structure and function and moreover the tissue as well as the organ which the cells built. Therefore, as part of a tissue, genetic and epigenetic abnormality of a cell can also alter these networks, and moreover disturb the function of the tissue itself. Hence, condition of genetic and epigenetic of the cell may affect other conditions in omics level such as transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics characteristics which can be differentiated by a particular unique molecular profile from each level, which can be used for diagnostic as well as for targeted therapy.

  4. Reviews on Fuel Cell Technology for Valuable Chemicals and Energy Co-Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Wisitsree Wiyaratn

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review of co-generation process in fuel cell type reactor to produce valuable chemical compounds along with electricity. The chemicals and energy co-generation processes have been shown to be a promising alternative to conventional reactors and conventional fuel cells with pure water as a byproduct. This paper reviews researches on chemicals and energy co-generation technologies of three types of promising fuel cell i.e. solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), alkaline fuel cell (...

  5. p-Type MWT. Integrated cell and module technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tool, C.J.J.; Kossen, E.J.; Bennett, I.J.

    2013-10-15

    A major issue of concern in MWT solar cells is the increased leakage current at reversed bias voltage through the vias compared. At ECN we have been working on reducing this leakage current to levels comparable to H-pattern cells. In this study we present the results of this work. We further show the benefit of a combined cell and module design for MWT solar cells. At the cell level, MWT production costs per wafer are comparable with H-pattern while the cell output increases. At the module level this design results in a further increase of the power output.

  6. Standard drug concentrations and smart-pump technology reduce continuous-medication-infusion errors in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Gitte Y; Parker, Howard B; Cash, Jared; O'Connell, Mary; Grant, MaryJo C

    2005-07-01

    To determine if combining standard drug concentrations with "smart-pump" technology reduces reported medication-infusion errors. Preintervention and postintervention comparison of reported medication errors related to infusion therapies during the calendar years 2002 and 2003. A 242-bed university-affiliated tertiary pediatric hospital. Change in continuous-medication-infusion process, comprising the adoption of (1) standard drug concentrations, (2) "smart" syringe pumps, and (3) human-engineered medication labels. Comparison of reported continuous-medication-infusion errors before and after the intervention. The number of reported errors dropped by 73% for an absolute risk reduction of 3.1 to 0.8 per 1000 doses. Preparation errors that occurred in the pharmacy decreased from 0.66 to 0.16 per 1000 doses; the number of 10-fold errors in dosage decreased from 0.41 to 0.08 per 1000 doses. The use of standard drug concentrations, smart syringe pumps, and user-friendly labels reduces reported errors associated with continuous medication infusions. Standard drug concentrations can be chosen to allow most neonates to receive needed medications without concerns related to excess fluid administration.

  7. Advancing pluripotent stem cell culture: it is a matter of setting the standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartipy, Peter

    2013-04-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), defined by their ability to proliferate indefinitely and the capacity to differentiate into all tissue cell types of the adult, represent a platform for the realization of breakthrough technologies for industrial and regenerative medicine applications. We have witnessed tremendous developments over the last decade related to methods for establishment, maintenance, differentiation, and applications of hPSCs and their derivatives. Despite all progress made in the hPSC field, there are still fundamental issues yet to be resolved. For example, our understanding of the pluripotent state remains limited, which in turn may have substantial consequences on how we interpret and communicate scientific data concerning hPSCs. This brief commentary aims to highlight recent important findings that demonstrate additional levels of complexity to the current assessment of pluripotent stem cell cultures. In addition, these data may help to provide some explanations for the challenges in reproducing hPSC differentiation protocols across laboratories.

  8. Biological effects of tritium on fish cells in the concentration range of international drinking water standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Marilyne; Festarini, Amy; Schleicher, Krista; Tan, Elizabeth; Kim, Sang Bog; Wen, Kendall; Gawlik, Jilian; Ulsh, Brant

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate whether the current Canadian tritium drinking water limit is protective of aquatic biota, an in vitro study was designed to assess the biological effects of low concentrations of tritium, similar to what would typically be found near a Canadian nuclear power station, and higher concentrations spanning the range of international tritium drinking water standards. Channel catfish peripheral blood B-lymphoblast and fathead minnow testis cells were exposed to 10-100,000 Bq l(-1) of tritium, after which eight molecular and cellular endpoints were assessed. Increased numbers of DNA strand breaks were observed and ATP levels were increased. There were no increases in γH2AX-mediated DNA repair. No differences in cell growth were noted. Exposure to the lowest concentrations of tritium were associated with a modest increase in the viability of fathead minnow testicular cells. Using the micronucleus assay, an adaptive response was observed in catfish B-lymphoblasts. Using molecular endpoints, biological responses to tritium in the range of Canadian and international drinking water standards were observed. At the cellular level, no detrimental effects were noted on growth or cycling, and protective effects were observed as an increase in cell viability and an induced resistance to a large challenge dose.

  9. Advanced technologies for plant cell wall evolution and diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik

    Plant cell walls consist of polysaccharides, glycoproteins and phenolic polymers interlinked together in a highly complex network. The detailed analysis of cell walls is challenging because of their inherent complexity and heterogeneity. Also, complex carbohydrates, unlike proteins and nucleotide...

  10. Silicon bulk growth for solar cells: Science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Koichi; Gao, Bing; Nakano, Satoshi; Harada, Hirofumi; Miyamura, Yoshiji

    2017-02-01

    The photovoltaic industry is in a phase of rapid expansion, growing by more than 30% per annum over the last few decades. Almost all commercial solar cells presently use single-crystalline or multicrystalline silicon wafers similar to those used in microelectronics; meanwhile, thin-film compounds and alloy solar cells are currently under development. The laboratory performance of these cells, at 26% solar energy conversion efficiency, is now approaching thermodynamic limits, with the challenge being to incorporate these improvements into low-cost commercial products. Improvements in the optical design of cells, particularly in their ability to trap weakly absorbed light, have also led to increasing interest in thin-film cells based on polycrystalline silicon; these cells have advantages over other thin-film photovoltaic candidates. This paper provides an overview of silicon-based solar cell research, especially the development of silicon wafers for solar cells, from the viewpoint of growing both single-crystalline and multicrystalline wafers.

  11. 2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report, June 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-06-01

    This report summarizes 2010 data on fuel cells, including market penetration and industry trends. It also covers cost, price, and performance trends, along with policy and market drivers and the future outlook for fuel cells.

  12. A review of performance standards to monitor, evaluate and assess the impact of technology transfer offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibongile Gumbi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of scientific discoveries to new products and processes and their launch onto the market can be a lengthy process. Similarly, it takes many years before the impact of scientific research on society and the economy is realised and a further length of time before its performance can be measured. Higher education and research institutions, and their governments, often make significant investments into intellectual property management and technology transfer activities through legislative and policy development, human resource development, financial allocation and infrastructure improvement. Since returns on such investments are not immediately apparent, it is important to establish a means by which the impact of their efforts can be determined. In this paper, I examined the measures and indicators that could be developed by institutions and their stakeholders in order to monitor, evaluate and determine the impact of research output and outcomes on the market.

  13. Experimental design and reporting standards for metabolomics studies of mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayton, Sarah; Maker, Garth L; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert D

    2017-12-01

    Metabolomics is an analytical technique that investigates the small biochemical molecules present within a biological sample isolated from a plant, animal, or cultured cells. It can be an extremely powerful tool in elucidating the specific metabolic changes within a biological system in response to an environmental challenge such as disease, infection, drugs, or toxins. A historically difficult step in the metabolomics pipeline is in data interpretation to a meaningful biological context, for such high-variability biological samples and in untargeted metabolomics studies that are hypothesis-generating by design. One way to achieve stronger biological context of metabolomic data is via the use of cultured cell models, particularly for mammalian biological systems. The benefits of in vitro metabolomics include a much greater control of external variables and no ethical concerns. The current concerns are with inconsistencies in experimental procedures and level of reporting standards between different studies. This review discusses some of these discrepancies between recent studies, such as metabolite extraction and data normalisation. The aim of this review is to highlight the importance of a standardised experimental approach to any cultured cell metabolomics study and suggests an example procedure fully inclusive of information that should be disclosed in regard to the cell type/s used and their culture conditions. Metabolomics of cultured cells has the potential to uncover previously unknown information about cell biology, functions and response mechanisms, and so the accurate biological interpretation of the data produced and its ability to be compared to other studies should be considered vitally important.

  14. Transformation of standardized clinical models based on OWL technologies: from CEM to OpenEHR archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaz-García, María del Carmen; Menárguez-Tortosa, Marcos; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Chute, Christopher G; Tao, Cui

    2015-05-01

    The semantic interoperability of electronic healthcare records (EHRs) systems is a major challenge in the medical informatics area. International initiatives pursue the use of semantically interoperable clinical models, and ontologies have frequently been used in semantic interoperability efforts. The objective of this paper is to propose a generic, ontology-based, flexible approach for supporting the automatic transformation of clinical models, which is illustrated for the transformation of Clinical Element Models (CEMs) into openEHR archetypes. Our transformation method exploits the fact that the information models of the most relevant EHR specifications are available in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). The transformation approach is based on defining mappings between those ontological structures. We propose a way in which CEM entities can be transformed into openEHR by using transformation templates and OWL as common representation formalism. The transformation architecture exploits the reasoning and inferencing capabilities of OWL technologies. We have devised a generic, flexible approach for the transformation of clinical models, implemented for the unidirectional transformation from CEM to openEHR, a series of reusable transformation templates, a proof-of-concept implementation, and a set of openEHR archetypes that validate the methodological approach. We have been able to transform CEM into archetypes in an automatic, flexible, reusable transformation approach that could be extended to other clinical model specifications. We exploit the potential of OWL technologies for supporting the transformation process. We believe that our approach could be useful for international efforts in the area of semantic interoperability of EHR systems. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. [Research and implementation of the TLS network transport security technology based on DICOM standard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoqi; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Jianfeng

    2012-02-01

    With the development of medical information, Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS), Hospital Information System/Radiology Information System(HIS/RIS) and other medical information management system become popular and developed, and interoperability between these systems becomes more frequent. So, these enclosed systems will be open and regionalized by means of network, and this is inevitable. If the trend becomes true, the security of information transmission may be the first problem to be solved. Based on the need for network security, we investigated the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Standard and Transport Layer Security (TLS) Protocol, and implemented the TLS transmission of the DICOM medical information with OpenSSL toolkit and DCMTK toolkit.

  16. Analysis of multiple types of human cells subsequent to bioprinting with electrospraying technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yu; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Xiangsheng; Qu, Miao; Tan, Andy; Bogari, Melia; Zhu, Ming; Lin, Li; Hu, Qingxi; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yan

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate bioprinting with electrospraying technology using multiple types of human cell suspensions as bio-ink, in order to lay the initial foundations for the application of the bioprinting technology in tissue engineering. In the current study, six types of human cells were selected and cultured, including human fibroblasts, human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs), human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLCs), adult human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19), human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1). Each cell type was divided into two groups, the experimental and control group. All the experimental group cells were electrosprayed using an electrospraying printer (voltage, 15 kV; flow rate, 150 µl/min) and collected in a petri dish placed 15 cm away from the needle (needle diameter, 0.5 mm). Subsequently, cell viability was detected by flow cytometry with a Live/Dead Viability kit. In addition, the cell morphological characteristics were observed with a phase-contrast microscope after 6 h of culturing in order to obtain adherent cells, while cell proliferation was analyzed using a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. The control groups, without printing, were subjected to the same procedures as the experimental groups. The results of the cell viability and proliferation assays indicated a statistically significant difference after printing between the experiments and control groups only for the hADSCs (P0.05). In addition, there were no observable differences between all experimental and the control groups at any examined time point in the terms of cell morphological characteristics. In conclusion, bioprinting based on electrospraying technology demonstrated no distinct negative effect on cell vitality, proliferation and morphology in the present study, and thus the application of this novel technology to cell printing may provide a promising method in tissue engineering.

  17. Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Office Research and Development Programs: Prospective Benefits Assessment Report for Fiscal Year 2018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, T. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Birky, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohlke, David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Under a diverse set of programs, the Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Offices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy invest in early-stage research of advanced batteries and electrification, engines and fuels, materials, and energy-efficient mobility systems; hydrogen production, delivery, and storage; and fuel cell technologies. This report documents the estimated benefits of successful development and implementation of advanced vehicle technologies. It presents a comparison of a scenario with completely successful implementation of Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) and Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) technologies (the Program Success case) to a future in which there is no contribution after Fiscal Year 2017 by the VTO or FCTO to these technologies (the No Program case). Benefits were attributed to individual program technology areas, which included FCTO research and development and the VTO programs of electrification, advanced combustion engines and fuels, and materials technology. Projections for the Program Success case indicate that by 2035, the average fuel economy of on-road, light-duty vehicle stock could be 24% to 30% higher than in the No Program case, while fuel economy for on-road medium- and heavy-duty vehicle stock could be as much as 13% higher. The resulting petroleum savings in 2035 were estimated to be as high as 1.9 million barrels of oil per day, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions were estimated to be as high as 320 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per year. Projections of light-duty vehicle adoption indicate that although advanced-technology vehicles may be somewhat more expensive to purchase, the fuel savings result in a net reduction of consumer cost. In 2035, reductions in annual fuel expenditures for vehicles (both light- and heavy-duty) are projected to range from $86 billion to $109 billion (2015$), while the projected increase in new vehicle

  18. Increasing cDNA yields from single-cell quantities of mRNA in standard laboratory reverse transcriptase reactions using acoustic microstreaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Wah Chin; Petkovic-Duran, Karolina; Zhu, Yonggang; Manasseh, Richard; Horne, Malcolm K; Aumann, Tim D

    2011-07-11

    Correlating gene expression with cell behavior is ideally done at the single-cell level. However, this is not easily achieved because the small amount of labile mRNA present in a single cell (1-5% of 1-50 pg total RNA, or 0.01-2.5 pg mRNA, per cell) mostly degrades before it can be reverse transcribed into a stable cDNA copy. For example, using standard laboratory reagents and hardware, only a small number of genes can be qualitatively assessed per cell. One way to increase the efficiency of standard laboratory reverse transcriptase (RT) reactions (i.e. standard reagents in microliter volumes) comprising single-cell amounts of mRNA would be to more rapidly mix the reagents so the mRNA can be converted to cDNA before it degrades. However this is not trivial because at microliter scales liquid flow is laminar, i.e. currently available methods of mixing (i.e. shaking, vortexing and trituration) fail to produce sufficient chaotic motion to effectively mix reagents. To solve this problem, micro-scale mixing techniques have to be used. A number of microfluidic-based mixing technologies have been developed which successfully increase RT reaction yields. However, microfluidics technologies require specialized hardware that is relatively expensive and not yet widely available. A cheaper, more convenient solution is desirable. The main objective of this study is to demonstrate how application of a novel "micromixing" technique to standard laboratory RT reactions comprising single-cell quantities of mRNA significantly increases their cDNA yields. We find cDNA yields increase by approximately 10-100-fold, which enables: greater numbers of genes to be analyzed per cell; more quantitative analysis of gene expression; and better detection of low-abundance genes in single cells. The micromixing is based on acoustic microstreaming, a phenomenon where sound waves propagating around a small obstacle create a mean flow near the obstacle. We have developed an acoustic microstreaming

  19. Fiscal 1997 report on the results of the international standardization R and D. R and D of the standardization of a method to test acceleration life of phosphorous acid fuel cells; 1997 nendo seika hokokusho kokusai hyojun soseigata kenkyu kaihatsu. Rinsangata nenryo denchi no kasoku jumyo shiken hoho no hyojunka ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    As for fuel cells, which are expected as a new clean energy, the R and D are being proceeded with in various fields of the world, but the standardization has not been made both in Japan and abroad. In Japan, the situation is that the information on technical terms, indication method, performance test method, and environment/safety test methods of the phosphorous acid fuel cell power generation is publicly spread. In relation to the international promotion of fuel cells to be predicted, it is necessary to internationally standardize cells themselves which are a key component of fuel cell power generation facilities. Phosphorous acid fuel cells are expected of the earliest commercialization of all, but the common test method to evaluate life characteristics of the cell stack has not been established yet. In the R and D, for the purpose of internationally standardizing test methods to evaluate life characteristics of the cell stack, a study on the acceleration life test method of phosphoric acid fuel cells was conducted in terms of the technical trend, data, standard, etc. A plan was prepared on general rules of the method to test acceleration life at the cell reaction part of the small cell, and activities also were started for setting up a technical committee for the fuel cell power system in President`s Advisory Committee on Future Technology. 29 figs., 20 tabs.

  20. Advancement in bioprocess technology: parallels between microbial natural products and cell culture biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arpan A; Khetan, Anurag; Malmberg, Li-Hong; Zhou, Weichang; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2017-05-01

    The emergence of natural products and industrial microbiology nearly eight decades ago propelled an era of bioprocess innovation. Half a century later, recombinant protein technology spurred the tremendous growth of biologics and added mammalian cells to the forefront of industrial producing cells in terms of the value of products generated. This review highlights the process technology of natural products and protein biologics. Despite the separation in time, there is a remarkable similarity in their progression. As the new generation of therapeutics for gene and cell therapy emerges, its process technology development can take inspiration from that of natural products and biologics.

  1. Smelling Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections using a whole-cell biosensor - An alternative for the gold-standard culturing assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kviatkovski, Igor; Shushan, Sagit; Oron, Yahav; Frumin, Idan; Amir, Daniel; Secundo, Lavi; Livne, Eitan; Weissbrod, Aharon; Sobel, Noam; Helman, Yael

    2018-02-10

    Improved easy-to-use diagnostic tools for infections are in strong demand worldwide. Yet, despite dramatic advances in diagnostic technologies, the gold-standard remains culturing. Here we offer an alternative tool demonstrating that a bacterial biosensor can efficiently detect Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients suffering from otitis externa. Detection was based on specific binding between the biosensor and 2-aminoacetophenone (2-AA), a volatile produced by P. aeruginosa in high amounts. We collected pus samples from ears of 26 subjects exhibiting symptoms of otitis externa. Detection of P. aeruginosa using the biosensor was compared to detection using gold-standard culturing assay and to gas-chromatograph-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of 2-AA. The biosensor strain test matched the culture assay in 24 samples (92%) and the GC-MS analyses in 25 samples (96%). With this result in hand, we designed a device containing a whole-cell luminescent biosensor combined with a photo-multiplier tube. This device allowed detection of 2-AA at levels as low as 2 nmol, on par with detection level of GC-MS. The results of the described study demonstrate that the volatile 2-AA serves as an effective biomarker for P. aeruginosa in ear infections, and that activation of the biosensor strain by 2-AA provides a unique opportunity to design an easy-to-use device that can specifically detect P. aeruginosa infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementing new technologies for public safety communication: competing frequency demands and standardization issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kathryn J.

    1997-01-01

    Attempting to incorporate new technology into an existing environment is often very difficult. The problems are lengthy to resolve, wrought with confusion and seldom turn out like anyone expected. This document represents an overview of one such attempt. It outlines the general areas of concern which could be affected by a transition, and potential problems that may be encountered as a result of the effort. Over the past several decades, many local, state and federal agencies are pressing for more efficient use of frequency spectrums. The urgency of this issue has grown due to the demands of several groups wanting access to these channels for commercial use. Pager systems, cellular telephones, radio systems for private businesses all demand more space. Public safety agencies are starting to fear their needs will diminish in importance as the available channel spectrums are consumed by commercial ventures. How to share these channels, purchase appropriate equipment to meet your needs, and stay within a reasonable budget are not easy tasks. Public safety agencies who rely on communication networks in the performance of their jobs also know why encryption is important. Protecting the rights of citizens as police exchange information over the air, maintaining the integrity of an investigation and officer safety are all concerns police must address each time they use a radio.

  3. Impact of New Camera Technologies on Discoveries in Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuurman, Nico; Vale, Ronald D

    2016-08-01

    New technologies can make previously invisible phenomena visible. Nowhere is this more obvious than in the field of light microscopy. Beginning with the observation of "animalcules" by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, when he figured out how to achieve high magnification by shaping lenses, microscopy has advanced to this day by a continued march of discoveries driven by technical innovations. Recent advances in single-molecule-based technologies have achieved unprecedented resolution, and were the basis of the Nobel prize in Chemistry in 2014. In this article, we focus on developments in camera technologies and associated image processing that have been a major driver of technical innovations in light microscopy. We describe five types of developments in camera technology: video-based analog contrast enhancement, charge-coupled devices (CCDs), intensified sensors, electron multiplying gain, and scientific complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor cameras, which, together, have had major impacts in light microscopy. © 2016 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  4. Assessing the accuracy of forecasting: applying standard diagnostic assessment tools to a health technology early warning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Sue; Hyde, Chris; Cook, Alison; Packer, Claire; Stevens, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Early warning systems are an integral part of many health technology assessment programs. Despite this finding, to date, there have been no quantitative evaluations of the accuracy of predictions made by these systems. We report a study evaluating the accuracy of predictions made by the main United Kingdom early warning system. As prediction of impact is analogous to diagnosis, a method normally applied to determine the accuracy of diagnostic tests was used. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the National Horizon Scanning Centre's prediction methods were estimated with reference to an (imperfect) gold standard, that is, expert opinion of impact 3 to 5 years after prediction. The sensitivity of predictions was 71 percent (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.36-0.92), and the specificity was 73 percent (95 percent CI, 0.64-0.8). The negative predictive value was 98 percent (95 percent CI, 0.92-0.99), and the positive predictive value was 14 percent (95 percent CI, 0.06-0.3). Forecasting is difficult, but the results suggest that this early warning system's predictions have an acceptable level of accuracy. However, there are caveats. The first is that early warning systems may themselves reduce the impact of a technology, as helping to control adoption and diffusion is their main purpose. The second is that the use of an imperfect gold standard may bias the results. As early warning systems are viewed as an increasingly important component of health technology assessment and decision making, their outcomes must be evaluated. The method used here should be investigated further and the accuracy of other early warning systems explored.

  5. Technology development for evaluation of operational quantities and measurement standard in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Si Young; Lee, T. Y.; Kim, J. L.; Kim, B. H.; Chung, K. K.; Lee, J. I.; Park, T. S.; Ha, S. H.; Oh, P. J.; Jun, K. J

    1999-03-01

    A study on the fabrication of a new personal thermo-luminescence dosimeter, which can evaluate the personal dose equivalent H{sub p}(d), has been performed. Optimum conditions for fabrications of a LiF:Mg, Cu, Na, Si TL phosphor powder has been determined and a disc type TL pellet has been fabricated from this TL powder. Another type of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy, Mo TL material has been also fabricated. These two TL materials have shown greater TL sensitivity than the foreign-made commercial TL materials. Mono-energetic florescence X-rays from 8.6 response have been constructed and evaluated for the performance of the purity, air kerma, beam uniformity and distribution,and scattered fraction of X-rays.A free-air ionization chamber for the absolute measurement of air kerma in medium X-ray has been designed and constructed. Experimental results showed that the homemade chamber leaves nothing to be desired, compared with the national standard chambers in other advanced countries. Gas proportional counting system has been designed and constructed for absolute activity measurements of gaseous radionuclides. Unattached fractions of radon progeny were evaluated in the characteristic study on the detection of radon progeny.

  6. Advanced technologies for plant cell wall evolution and diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik

    Plant cell walls consist of polysaccharides, glycoproteins and phenolic polymers interlinked together in a highly complex network. The detailed analysis of cell walls is challenging because of their inherent complexity and heterogeneity. Also, complex carbohydrates, unlike proteins and nucleotide...... angiosperms. This analysis has enabled cell wall diversity to be placed in a phylogenetic context, and, when integrated with transcriptomic and genomic analysis has contributed to our understanding of important aspects of plant evolution....... produced has provided new insight into cell wall evolution and biosynthesis and has contributed to the commercial development of cell wall materials. A major focus of the work has been the wide scale sampling of cell wall diversity across the plant kingdom, from unicellular algae to highly evolved...

  7. Using Semantic Web technologies for the generation of domain-specific templates to support clinical study metadata standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqian; Evans, Julie; Endle, Cory M; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    The Biomedical Research Integrated Domain Group (BRIDG) model is a formal domain analysis model for protocol-driven biomedical research, and serves as a semantic foundation for application and message development in the standards developing organizations (SDOs). The increasing sophistication and complexity of the BRIDG model requires new approaches to the management and utilization of the underlying semantics to harmonize domain-specific standards. The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based approach that integrates the BRIDG model with ISO 21090 data types to generate domain-specific templates to support clinical study metadata standards development. We developed a template generation and visualization system based on an open source Resource Description Framework (RDF) store backend, a SmartGWT-based web user interface, and a "mind map" based tool for the visualization of generated domain-specific templates. We also developed a RESTful Web Service informed by the Clinical Information Modeling Initiative (CIMI) reference model for access to the generated domain-specific templates. A preliminary usability study is performed and all reviewers (n = 3) had very positive responses for the evaluation questions in terms of the usability and the capability of meeting the system requirements (with the average score of 4.6). Semantic Web technologies provide a scalable infrastructure and have great potential to enable computable semantic interoperability of models in the intersection of health care and clinical research.

  8. Force-controlled spatial manipulation of viable mammalian cells and micro-organisms by means of FluidFM technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörig, Pablo; Stiefel, Philipp; Behr, Pascal; Sarajlic, Edin; Bijl, Daniel; Gabi, Michael; Vörös, János; Vorholt, Julia A.; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2010-07-01

    The FluidFM technology uses microchanneled atomic force microscope cantilevers that are fixed to a drilled atomic force microscope cantilevers probeholder. A continuous fluidic circuit is thereby achieved extending from an external liquid reservoir, through the probeholder and the hollow cantilever to the tip aperture. In this way, both overpressure and an underpressure can be applied to the liquid reservoir and hence to the built-in fluidic circuit. We describe in this letter how standard atomic force microscopy in combination with regulated pressure differences inside the microchanneled cantilevers can be used to displace living organisms with micrometric precision in a nondestructive way. The protocol is applicable to both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells (e.g., mammalian cells, yeasts, and bacteria) in physiological buffer. By means of this procedure, cells can also be transferred from one glass slide to another one or onto an agar medium.

  9. Standardization of technology for preparation and storage of wild apricot fruit bar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Satish Kumar; Chaudhary, Shyam Prakash; Rao, Virendra Kumar; Yadav, Vijay Kumar; Bisht, Tejpal Singh

    2013-08-01

    The study was conducted to standardize the protocol for preparation of wild apricot fruit bar. Wild apricot fruits were harvested at optimum maturity from Distt Tehri Garhwal, Uttarakhand and after thorough sorting and proper washing, used for hot extraction of pulp through a pulper. Pulp was preserved in 500 ppm SO2 (using potassium metabisulphite). For preparation of fruit bars, additives like sugar and pectin were added to the pulp in different proportions and the mixture dried in mechanical dehydrator. Dried fruit bar sheets were cut into rectangular shapes (2.5 × 4.0 cm(2)) using a stainless steel knife and wrapped in polythene paper. Best recipe was selected on the basis of sensory evaluation. For storage, wild apricot fruit bar was packed in aluminium laminated pouches and polyethylene pouches, kept for 6 months and analyzed periodically for changes in quality. Results of the sensory evaluation indicate that a very good quality fruit bar can be prepared by using wild apricot pulp +60% sugar +0.30% pectin and drying the mixture in a mechanical dehydrator at 55 ± 2 °C for 6 h. During 6 months of storage, there was about 3% moisture gain, 6.00 and 9.35% loss in total sugars and vitamin C respectively, along with slight losses in titratable acidity and sensory quality. The changes in chemical and sensory quality attributes were minimum in wild apricot fruit bar, packed in aluminium laminated pouches as compared to those packed in polyethylene pouches, and the product stored under vacuum than that under normal atmosphere. Further, the products were stable up to 6 months during storage under ambient condition.

  10. A Self-Assembling Protein Hydrogel Technology for Enzyme Incorporation onto Electrodes in Biofuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0369 A Self-Assembling Protein Hydrogel Technology for Enzyme Incorporation onto Electrodes in Biofuel Cells (YIP) Zhilei Chen...Incorporation Onto Electrodes in Biofuel Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER C12-00857 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0330 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...activity enzyme immobilization on electrodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. Enzymatic biofuel cells hold great potential for providing flexible, compact

  11. Solar Cell and Array Technology Development for NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszczor, Michael; McNatt, Jeremiah; Mercer, Carolyn; Kerslake, Tom; Pappa, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NASA is currently developing advanced solar cell and solar array technologies to support future exploration activities. These advanced photovoltaic technology development efforts are needed to enable very large (multi-hundred kilowatt) power systems that must be compatible with solar electric propulsion (SEP) missions. The technology being developed must address a wide variety of requirements and cover the necessary advances in solar cell, blanket integration, and large solar array structures that are needed for this class of missions. Th is paper will summarize NASA's plans for high power SEP missions, initi al mission studies and power system requirements, plans for advanced photovoltaic technology development, and the status of specific cell and array technology development and testing that have already been conducted.

  12. Perspectives for induced pluripotent stem cell technology: new insights into human physiology involved in somatic mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Naoki; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2014-01-31

    Induced pluripotent stem cell technology makes in vitro reprogramming of somatic cells from individuals with various genetic backgrounds possible. By applying this technology, it is possible to produce pluripotent stem cells from biopsy samples of arbitrarily selected individuals with various genetic backgrounds and to subsequently maintain, expand, and stock these cells. From these induced pluripotent stem cells, target cells and tissues can be generated after certain differentiation processes. These target cells/tissues are expected to be useful in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, drug screening, toxicology testing, and proof-of-concept studies in drug development. Therefore, the number of publications concerning induced pluripotent stem cells has recently been increasing rapidly, demonstrating that this technology has begun to infiltrate many aspects of stem cell biology and medical applications. In this review, we discuss the perspectives of induced pluripotent stem cell technology for modeling human diseases. In particular, we focus on the cloning event occurring through the reprogramming process and its ability to let us analyze the development of complex disease-harboring somatic mosaicism.

  13. A standard photomap of ovarian nurse cell chromosomes and inversion polymorphism in Anopheles beklemishevi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemov, Gleb N; Gordeev, Mikhail I; Kokhanenko, Alina A; Moskaev, Anton V; Velichevskaya, Alena I; Stegniy, Vladimir N; Sharakhov, Igor V; Sharakhova, Maria V

    2018-03-27

    Anopheles beklemishevi is a member of the Maculipennis group of malaria mosquitoes that has the most northern distribution among other members of the group. Although a cytogenetic map for the larval salivary gland chromosomes of this species has been developed, a high-quality standard cytogenetic photomap that enables genomics and population genetics studies of this mosquito at the adult stage is still lacking. In this study, a cytogenetic map for the polytene chromosomes of An. beklemishevi from ovarian nurse cells was developed using high-resolution digital imaging from field collected mosquitoes. PCR-amplified DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were designed based on the genome of An. atroparvus. The DNA probe obtained by microdissection procedures from the breakpoint region was labelled in a DOP-PCR reaction. Population analysis was performed on 371 specimens collected in 18 locations. We report the development of a high-quality standard photomap for the polytene chromosomes from ovarian nurse cells of An. beklemishevi. To confirm the suitability of the map for physical mapping, several PCR-amplified probes were mapped to the chromosomes of An. beklemishevi using FISH. In addition, we identified and mapped DNA probes to flanking regions of the breakpoints of two inversions on chromosome X of this species. Inversion polymorphism was determined in 13 geographically distant populations of An. beklemishevi. Four polymorphic inversions were detected. The positions of common chromosomal inversions were indicated on the map. The study constructed a standard photomap for ovarian nurse cell chromosomes of An. beklemishevi and tested its suitability for physical genome mapping and population studies. Cytogenetic analysis determined inversion polymorphism in natural populations of An. beklemishevi related to this species' adaptation.

  14. Phenothiazine-Based Dyes in Solar Cell Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Bejan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenothiazine is a fused heterocyclic ring with strong electron-donating character which makes it an important building block for designing organic materials for solar cells applications. The present paper reviews the most recent achievements of phenothiazine-based compounds as dyes in solar cells, with special emphasis on the structure – performance relationship.

  15. Future of health technology assessment studies in gene and cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-18

    Jul 18, 2007 ... makes the time still early for these R&D applications to be disseminated and used extensively on broad international settings. .... disease 'Z', and development of a strategy to answer these questions? ii) Systematic retrieval ... ways to promote the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into specific cell types ...

  16. Stem Cell Tracking Technologies for Neurological Regenerative Medicine Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongtao Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing field of stem cell therapy is moving toward clinical trials in a variety of applications, particularly for neurological diseases. However, this translation of cell therapies into humans has prompted a need to create innovative and breakthrough methods for stem cell tracing, to explore the migration routes and its reciprocity with microenvironment targets in the body, to monitor and track the outcome after stem cell transplantation therapy, and to track the distribution and cell viability of transplanted cells noninvasively and longitudinally. Recently, a larger number of cell tracking methods in vivo were developed and applied in animals and humans, including magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine imaging, and optical imaging. This review has been intended to summarize the current use of those imaging tools in tracking stem cells, detailing their main features and drawbacks, including image resolution, tissue penetrating depth, and biosafety aspects. Finally, we address that multimodality imaging method will be a more potential tracking tool in the future clinical application.

  17. Biomedical foundation supports technology aimed at destroying cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nystrom, Lynn A.

    2008-01-01

    A new technology, using electric pulses to destroy cancer tissue and named by NASA Tech Briefs as one of seven key technological breakthroughs of 2007, is receiving additional support aimed at moving the procedure to the marketplace. One of its lead developers, Rafael V. Davalos, a faculty member of the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences (SBES), received a $240,000 grant from the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation and $25,000 from the Wake Forest Com...

  18. Development of materials for fuel cell application by radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Chang Kyu; Lee, Min Ku; Park, Junju; Lee, Gyoungja; Lee, Byung Cheol; Shin, Junhwa; Nho, Youngchang; Kang, Philhyun; Sohn, Joon Yong; Rang, Uhm Young

    2012-06-01

    The development of the single cell of SOFC with low operation temperature at and below 650 .deg. C(above 400 mW/cm 2 ) Ο The development of fabrication method for the single cell of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) by dip-coating of nanoparticles such as NiO, YSZ, Ag, and Ag/C, etc. Ο The optimization of the preparation and performance of SOFC by using nanoparticles. Ο The preparation of samples for SOFC with large dimension. The development of fluoropolymer-based fuel cell membranes with crosslinked structure by radiation grafting technique Ο The development of fuel cell membranes with low methanol permeability via the introduction of novel monomers (e. g. vinylbenzyl chloride and vinylether chloride) by radiation grafting technique Ο The development of hydrocarbon fuel cell membrane by radiation crosslinking technique Ο The structure analysis and the evaluations of the property, performance, and radiation effect of the prepared membranes Ο The optimization of the preparation and performance of DMFC fuel cell membrane via the structure-property analysis (power: above 130 mW/cm 2 /50 cm 2 at 5M methanol) Ο The preparation of samples for MEA stack assembly

  19. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swathirajan, S. [General Motors R& D Center, Warren, MI (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are extremely promising as future power plants in the transportation sector to achieve an increase in energy efficiency and eliminate environmental pollution due to vehicles. GM is currently involved in a multiphase program with the US Department of Energy for developing a proof-of-concept hybrid vehicle based on a PEM fuel cell power plant and a methanol fuel processor. Other participants in the program are Los Alamos National Labs, Dow Chemical Co., Ballard Power Systems and DuPont Co., In the just completed phase 1 of the program, a 10 kW PEM fuel cell power plant was built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating a methanol fuel processor with a PEM fuel cell stack. However, the fuel cell power plant must overcome stiff technical and economic challenges before it can be commercialized for light duty vehicle applications. Progress achieved in phase I on the use of monolithic catalyst reactors in the fuel processor, managing CO impurity in the fuel cell stack, low-cost electrode-membrane assembles, and on the integration of the fuel processor with a Ballard PEM fuel cell stack will be presented.

  20. Microfluidics and numerical simulation as methods for standardization of zebrafish sperm cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Thomas; Knapp, Gerald L; Guitreau, Amy; Park, Daniel Sang-Won; Tiersch, Terrence; Nandakumar, Krishnaswamy; Monroe, W Todd

    2015-01-01

    Sperm cell activation plays a critical role in a range of biological and engineering processes, from fertilization to cryopreservation protocol evaluation. Across a range of species, ionic and osmotic effects have been discovered that lead to activation. Sperm cells of zebrafish (Danio rerio) initiate motility in a hypoosmotic environment. In this study, we employ a microfluidic mixer for the purpose of rapidly diluting the extracellular medium to initiate the onset of cell motility. The use of a microchannel offers a rapid and reproducible mixing profile throughout the device. This greatly reduces variability from trial to trial relative to the current methods of analysis. Coupling these experiments with numerical simulations, we were able to investigate the dynamics of intracellular osmolality as each cell moves along its path through the micromixer. Our results suggest that intracellular osmolality, and hence intracellular ion concentration, only slightly decreases, contrary to the common thought that larger changes in these parameters are required for activation. Utilizing this framework, microfluidics for controlled extracellular environments and associated numerical modeling, has practical applicability in standardizing high-throughput aquatic sperm activation, and more fundamentally, investigations of the intracellular environment leading to motility.

  1. Comparison of clinical grade type 1 polarized and standard matured dendritic cells for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Donia, Marco

    2013-01-01

    induction of type 1 effector T cells. Standard matured clinical grade DCs “sDCs” were compared with DCs matured with either of two type 1 polarizing maturation cocktails; the alpha-type-1 DCs “αDC1s” (TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ, IFN-α, Poly(I:C)) and “mDCs” (monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), IFN-γ) or a mixed cocktail....... αDC1s and mDCs were functionally superior to sDCs as they polarized naïve CD4+ T cells most efficiently into T helper type 1 effector cells and primed more functional MART-1 specific CD8+ T cells although with variation between donors. αDC1s and mDCs were transiently less capable of CCL21-directed......DCs and strikingly had the highest expression of the inhibitory molecules PD-L1 and CD25. Thus, further studies with type 1 polarized DCs are warranted for use in immunotherapy, but when combined with PGE2 as in mpDCs, they seems to be less optimal for maturation of DCs....

  2. Overview of micro- and nano-technology tools for stem cell applications: micropatterned and microelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnin, Stefano; Cimetta, Elisa; Guiducci, Carlotta; Martini, Paolo; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo

    2012-11-19

    In the past few decades the scientific community has been recognizing the paramount role of the cell microenvironment in determining cell behavior. In parallel, the study of human stem cells for their potential therapeutic applications has been progressing constantly. The use of advanced technologies, enabling one to mimic the in vivo stem cell microenviroment and to study stem cell physiology and physio-pathology, in settings that better predict human cell biology, is becoming the object of much research effort. In this review we will detail the most relevant and recent advances in the field of biosensors and micro- and nano-technologies in general, highlighting advantages and disadvantages. Particular attention will be devoted to those applications employing stem cells as a sensing element.

  3. Evolution of MHC-based technologies used for detection of antigen-responsive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2017-01-01

    detection of 1-2 different T cell specificities per cell sample, to include more than 1000 evaluable pMHC molecules using novel technologies. Here, we provide an overview of MHC multimer-based detection technologies developed over two decades, focusing primarily on MHC class I interactions.......T cell-mediated recognition of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) class I and II molecules is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens and cancer, as well as for stimulation and maintenance of efficient cytotoxic responses. Such interactions may also play a role...... class I molecules provided sufficient stability to T cell receptor (TCR)-pMHC interactions, allowing detection of MHC multimer-binding T cells using flow cytometry. Since this breakthrough the scientific community has aimed for expanding the capacity of MHC multimer-based detection technologies...

  4. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2013-01-01

    SunLine Transit Agency, which provides public transit services to the Coachella Valley area of California, has demonstrated hydrogen and fuel cell bus technologies for more than 10 years. In May 2010, SunLine began demonstrating the advanced technology (AT) fuel cell bus with a hybrid electric propulsion system, fuel cell power system, and lithium-based hybrid batteries. This report describes operations at SunLine for the AT fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas buses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with SunLine to evaluate the bus in real-world service to document the results and help determine the progress toward technology readiness. NREL has previously published three reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from February 2012 through November 2012.

  5. LABS, cells and organs on chip : Technologies and biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Berg, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few decades both micro/ nanofabrication and microfluidics technologies have been crucial for the rapid development of Lab on a Chip systems. Here we present a few examples of this. Firstly, a capillary electrophoresis system on chip for blood analysis will be presented. Secondly, we

  6. Future technology fuel cells; Zukunftstechnologie Brennstoffzelle. Themen 1999/2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertlein, H.P. (comp.)

    2000-02-01

    The proceedings volume contains 14 papers and presents a survey of the state of the art of fuel cell developments. [German] Dieser Band gibt in 14 Beitraegen einen Ueberblick ueber den Stand der Entwicklung der Brennstoffzellen.

  7. Transferability of soil cleanup standards in remedial actions associated with technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials: Geochemical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landa, E.

    1999-01-01

    The regulation of public exposures to technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other regulatory and advisory organizations is the subject of a report released early this year by the National Research Council. Some organizations have developed guidelines for TENORM in soil based on concentration limits in current EPA guidelines for cleanup of soil contaminated with 226 Ra at uranium mill tailings sites. A conclusion of the National Research Council report is that the transferability of standards developed for a specific class of TENORM is limited to the extent that the physical and chemical properties of the TENORM being considered, as well as projected exposure pathways, are similar to those considered for uranium mill tailings. The radon emanation coefficient and leachability of 226 Ra for TENORMs can vary over a considerable range, thus influencing the inhalation and ingestion pathways of radiation exposure. (author)

  8. End-user satisfaction analysis on library management system unnes using technology acceptance model towards national standard of integrated library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardyanto, W.; Purwinarko, A.; Adhi, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    The library which is the gate of the University should be supported by the existence of an adequate information system, to provide excellent service and optimal to every user. Library management system that has been in existence since 2009 needs to be re-evaluated so that the system can meet the needs of both operator and Unnes user in particular, and users from outside Unnes in general. This study aims to evaluate and improve the existing library management system to produce a system that is accountable and able to meet the needs of end users, as well as produce a library management system that is integrated Unnes. Research is directed to produce evaluation report with Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) approach and library management system integrated with the national standard.

  9. Reconstruction of Ligament and Tendon Defects Using Cell Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chailakhyan, R K; Shekhter, A B; Ivannikov, S V; Tel'pukhov, V I; Suslin, D S; Gerasimov, Yu V; Tonenkov, A M; Grosheva, A G; Panyushkin, P V; Moskvina, I L; Vorob'eva, N N; Bagratashvili, V N

    2017-02-01

    We studied the possibility of restoring the integrity of the Achilles tendon in rabbits using autologous multipotent stromal cells. Collagen or gelatin sponges populated with cells were placed in a resorbable Vicryl mesh tube and this tissue-engineered construct was introduced into a defect of the middle part of the Achilles tendon. In 4 months, histological analysis showed complete regeneration of the tendon with the formation of parallel collagen fibers, spindle-shaped tenocytes, and newly formed vessels.

  10. Importance of methodological standardization for the ektacytometric measures of red blood cell deformability in sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renoux, Céline; Parrow, Nermi; Faes, Camille; Joly, Philippe; Hardeman, Max; Tisdale, John; Levine, Mark; Garnier, Nathalie; Bertrand, Yves; Kebaili, Kamila; Cuzzubbo, Daniela; Cannas, Giovanna; Martin, Cyril; Connes, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) deformability is severely decreased in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA), which plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. However, investigation of RBC deformability from SCA patients demands careful methodological considerations. We assessed RBC deformability by ektacytometry (LORRCA MaxSis, Mechatronics, The Netherlands) in 6 healthy individuals and 49 SCA patients and tested the effects of different heights of the RBC diffraction patterns, obtained by altering the camera gain of the LORRCA, on the result of RBC deformability measurements, expressed as Elongation Index (EI). Results indicate that the pattern of RBCs from control subjects adopts an elliptical shape under shear stress, whereas the pattern of RBCs from individuals with SCA adopts a diamond shape arising from the superposition of elliptical and circular patterns. The latter represent rigid RBCs. While the EI measures did not change with the variations of the RBC diffraction pattern heights in the control subjects, we observed a decrease of EI when the RBC diffraction pattern height is increased in the SCA group. The differences in SCA EI values measured at 5 Pa between the different diffraction pattern heights correlated with the percent of hemoglobin S and the percent of sickled RBC observed by microscopy. Our study confirms that the camera gain or aperture of the ektacytometer should be used to standardize the size of the RBC diffraction pattern height when measuring RBC deformability in sickle cell patients and underscores the potential clinical utility of this technique.

  11. Standardized cell and source frame geometries for conveyor type industrial irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Jain Reji; Kohli, A.K.

    2005-01-01

    The Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology is involved in propagating the use of radiation processing of food and sterilization of medical products using Cobalt 60. In this respect, a large number of Radiation Processing Plants are proposed to be set up in the private sector with the technical assistance from BRIT. To streamline the facilitation of providing information to the entrepreneurs desirous of setting up such plants, it is important to standardize certain designs of components/sub-assemblies etc. which can straightaway be provided. Source frame is one such design. Two source frame geometries, one for high dose irradiation and another one for low dose irradiation and their shielding requirements are presented in this paper. (author)

  12. Developing a "Research Test Bed" to introduce innovative Emission Testing Technology to improve New Zealand's Vehicle Emission Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Stephen J.

    2012-05-01

    Vehicle exhaust emissions arise from the combustion of the fuel and air mixture in the engine. Exhaust emission gases generally include carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), hydrocarbons (HC), particulates, and the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2). In New Zealand improvements have occurred in emissions standards over the past 20 years however significant health related issues are now being discovered in Auckland as a direct effect of high vehicle emission levels. Pollution in New Zealand, especially via vehicle emissions are an increasing concern and threatens New Zealand's "clean and green" image. Unitec Institute of Technology proposes establishing a Vehicle Emissions Testing Facility, and with an understanding with Auckland University, National Institute of Water & Atmosphere Research Ltd (NIWA) this research group can work collaboratively on vehicle emissions testing. New Zealand research providers would support an application in the UK led by the University of Huddersfield to a range of European Union Structural Funds. New Zealand has an ideal "vehicle emissions research environment" supported by significant expertise in vehicle emission control technology and associated protocols at the University of Auckland, and the effects of high vehicle emissions on health at the National Institutes of Water and Atmosphere (NIWA).

  13. Estimating the Value of Utility-Scale Solar Technologies in California Under a 40% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2014-05-01

    Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) is a unique source of solar energy in that its output can be shifted over time. The ability of CSP-TES to be a flexible source of generation may be particularly valuable in regions with high overall penetration of solar energy, such as the state of California. California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requires the state to increase generation from eligible renewable energy resources to reach 33% of retail electricity sales by 2020. Beyond 2020, California targets a further reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. To help reach this goal, current California governor Jerry Brown has stated that a higher 40% RPS might be reachable in the near term. The levelized cost of energy is generally emphasized when assessing the economic viability of renewable energy systems implemented to achieve the RPS. However, the operational and capacity benefits of such systems are often ignored, which can lead to incorrect economic comparisons between CSP-TES and variable renewable generation technologies such as solar photovoltaics (PV). Here we evaluate a 40% RPS scenario in a California grid model with PV or CSP-TES providing the last 1% of RPS energy. We compare the technical and economic implications of integrating either solar technology under several sensitivities, finding that the ability to displace new conventional thermal generation capacity may be the largest source of value of CSP-TES compared to PV at high solar penetrations.

  14. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Regenerative Medicine and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Duanqing; Xu, Jianyong; Zhuang, Qiang; Tse, Hung-Fat; Esteban, Miguel A.

    The potential of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) for regenerative medicine is unquestionable, but practical and ethical considerations have hampered clinical application and research. In an attempt to overcome these issues, the conversion of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells similar to ESCs, commonly termed nuclear reprogramming, has been a top objective of contemporary biology. More than 40 years ago, King, Briggs, and Gurdon pioneered somatic cell nuclear reprogramming in frogs, and in 1981 Evans successfully isolated mouse ESCs. In 1997 Wilmut and collaborators produced the first cloned mammal using nuclear transfer, and then Thomson obtained human ESCs from in vitro fertilized blastocysts in 1998. Over the last 2 decades we have also seen remarkable findings regarding how ESC behavior is controlled, the importance of which should not be underestimated. This knowledge allowed the laboratory of Shinya Yamanaka to overcome brilliantly conceptual and technical barriers in 2006 and generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse fibroblasts by overexpressing defined combinations of ESC-enriched transcription factors. Here, we discuss some important implications of human iPSCs for biology and medicine and also point to possible future directions.

  15. Theralase Technologies uses Virginia Tech research to successfully destroy breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Compounds developed by researchers at Virginia Tech, have proven effective in destroying breast cancer cells when used with lasers developed by Theralase Technologies (TSX-V: TLT) out of Toronto. Theralase, an international manufacturer of laser medical devices, reports that its patented photodynamic compounds (PDCs) developed at the university, when used with its lasers, destroy breast cancer cells in pre-clinical trials.

  16. Technological aspects in synthesis and characterization of proton conducting polyetheretherketone (PEEK) membranes for fuel cell applications.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vaivars, G

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The research on ion-exchange membranes has grown considerably in recent years with the growing interest in fuel cell technology for the automotive and portable applications. The requirements for a fuel cell membrane are the following: high chemical...

  17. [In vitro cell culture technology in cosmetology research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojniczek, Katarzyna; Garncarczyk, Agnieszka; Pytel, Agata

    2005-01-01

    For ages the humanity has been looking for all kind of active substances, which could be used in improving the health and the appearance of our skin. People try to find out how to protect the skin from harmful, environmental factors. Every year a lot of new natural and synthetic, chemical substances are discovered. All of them potentially could be used as a cosmetic ingredient. In cosmetology research most of new xenobiotics were tested in vivo on animals. Alternative methods to in vivo tests are in vitro tests with skin cell culture system. The aim of this work was to describe two-dimensional and tree-dimensional skin cell cultures. Additionally, in this work we wanted to prove the usefulness of in vitro skin cell cultures in cosmetology research.

  18. Microencapsulation technology: a powerful tool for integrating expansion and cryopreservation of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Serra

    Full Text Available The successful implementation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs-based technologies requires the production of relevant numbers of well-characterized cells and their efficient long-term storage. In this study, cells were microencapsulated in alginate to develop an integrated bioprocess for expansion and cryopreservation of pluripotent hESCs. Different three-dimensional (3D culture strategies were evaluated and compared, specifically, microencapsulation of hESCs as: i single cells, ii aggregates and iii immobilized on microcarriers. In order to establish a scalable bioprocess, hESC-microcapsules were cultured in stirred tank bioreactors.The combination of microencapsulation and microcarrier technology resulted in a highly efficient protocol for the production and storage of pluripotent hESCs. This strategy ensured high expansion ratios (an approximately twenty-fold increase in cell concentration and high cell recovery yields (>70% after cryopreservation. When compared with non-encapsulated cells, cell survival post-thawing demonstrated a three-fold improvement without compromising hESC characteristics.Microencapsulation also improved the culture of hESC aggregates by protecting cells from hydrodynamic shear stress, controlling aggregate size and maintaining cell pluripotency for two weeks.This work establishes that microencapsulation technology may prove a powerful tool for integrating the expansion and cryopreservation of pluripotent hESCs. The 3D culture strategy developed herein represents a significant breakthrough towards the implementation of hESCs in clinical and industrial applications.

  19. Microencapsulation Technology: A Powerful Tool for Integrating Expansion and Cryopreservation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpique, Rita; Brito, Catarina; Jensen, Janne; Bjorquist, Petter; Carrondo, Manuel J. T.; Alves, Paula M.

    2011-01-01

    The successful implementation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)-based technologies requires the production of relevant numbers of well-characterized cells and their efficient long-term storage. In this study, cells were microencapsulated in alginate to develop an integrated bioprocess for expansion and cryopreservation of pluripotent hESCs. Different three-dimensional (3D) culture strategies were evaluated and compared, specifically, microencapsulation of hESCs as: i) single cells, ii) aggregates and iii) immobilized on microcarriers. In order to establish a scalable bioprocess, hESC-microcapsules were cultured in stirred tank bioreactors. The combination of microencapsulation and microcarrier technology resulted in a highly efficient protocol for the production and storage of pluripotent hESCs. This strategy ensured high expansion ratios (an approximately twenty-fold increase in cell concentration) and high cell recovery yields (>70%) after cryopreservation. When compared with non-encapsulated cells, cell survival post-thawing demonstrated a three-fold improvement without compromising hESC characteristics. Microencapsulation also improved the culture of hESC aggregates by protecting cells from hydrodynamic shear stress, controlling aggregate size and maintaining cell pluripotency for two weeks. This work establishes that microencapsulation technology may prove a powerful tool for integrating the expansion and cryopreservation of pluripotent hESCs. The 3D culture strategy developed herein represents a significant breakthrough towards the implementation of hESCs in clinical and industrial applications. PMID:21850261

  20. Prognostic value of tumor-to-blood standardized uptake ratio in patients with resectable non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seung Hyeon; Pak, Kyoung June; Kim, In Joo [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan(Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Seong Jang [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Previously published studies showed that the standard tumor-to-blood standardized uptake value (SUV) ratio (SUR) was a more accurate prognostic method than tumor maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). This study evaluated and compared prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters and normalized value of PET parameters by blood pool SUV in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who received curative surgery.

  1. Fuel cell technology in Switzerland; Die Brennstoffzellen-Technologie in der Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieba, L.; Tauer, A.

    2001-07-01

    This is a short report assessing the present status of fuel cell technology development in Switzerland. In a first section the basic fuel cell variants are described, together with their potential uses according to their power and operating temperature ranges. The authors then highlight the expected market segments to be covered by Swiss fuel cells. In the mid term (10 years) they mainly see opportunities for combined heat and power (CHP) generation in residential buildings in the 1-10 kW power range by means of solid oxide fuel cells, for CHP generation in the 200 kW power range by means of phosphoric acid fuel cells as well as for devices replacing generators and motors in the 1 kW power range. In the longer run, many more opportunities may appear for fuel cells. Technology transfer from research and education institutes to industry has begun and should further be promoted.

  2. Solid oxide cell R&D at Riso National Laboratory-and its transfer to technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Risø National Laboratory has conducted R&D on solid oxide cells for almost 20 years—all the time together with industries with interest in deploying the technology when mature. Risø National Laboratory (Risø) and Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S (TOFC) have for several years jointly carried out a development...... by the consortium, e.g. a metal-supported cell. TOFC has an extended program to develop the SOFC technology all the way to a marketable product....

  3. Teach Battery Technology with Class-Built Wet Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    With some simple metal samples and common household liquids, teachers can build wet cell batteries and use them to teach students about batteries and how they work. In this article, the author offers information that is derived from some simple experiments he conducted in his basement workshop and can easily be applied in the classroom or lab. He…

  4. Review of Fuel Cell Technologies for Military Land Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Methanol Fuel Cell ICE Internal Combustion Engine MOTS Military Off-the-Shelf...refuelled. Fuel cells’ advantages over internal combustion engine auxiliary power units (ICE APUs) are their near silent operation and higher energy...an internal combustion engine (ICE) auxiliary power unit (APU) which can be run when the vehicle’s main engine is off. When considering

  5. Status of solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology and potential for transportation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, J. F.; Nuttall, L. J.

    The solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell represents the first fuel cell technology known to be used operationally. Current activities are mainly related to the development of a space regenerative fuel cell system for energy storage on board space stations, or other large orbiting vehicles and platforms. During 1981, a study was performed to determine the feasibility of using SPE fuel cells for automotive or other vehicular applications, using methanol as the fuel. The results of this study were very encouraging. Details concerning a conceptual automotive fuel cell power plant study are discussed, taking into account also a layout of major components for compact passenger car installation.

  6. Performance Analysis and Implementation of Full Adder Cells Using 0.18 um CMOS Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Tesanovic, Goran

    2003-01-01

    0.18 um CMOS technology is increasingly used in design and implementation of full adder cells. Hence, there is a need for better understanding of the effects of different cell designs on cell performance, including power dissipation and time delays. This thesis contributes to better understanding of the behavior of single-bit full adder cells when low power-delay products are essential. Thirty one single-bit full adder cells have been implemented in Cadence tool suit and simulated using 0.18...

  7. Towards successful bioaugmentation with entrapped cells as a soil remediation technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Dechesne, Arnaud; Binning, Philip John

    2010-01-01

    Soil remediation technologies are proposed that rely on inoculation with degrading microorganisms entrapped in protective carriers. A mathematical model developed to model entrapped cell bioaugmentation describes the 3-D diffusion-driven mass transfer of benzoate, and its mineralization by Pseudo...... but is restricted in dry conditions, as confirmed by performing cell counts. This highlights the potential of entrapped cells when they act as seeds for soil colonization....

  8. Editorial: Advanced Learning Technologies, Performance Technologies, Open Contents, and Standards - Some Papers from the Best Papers of the Conference ICCE C3 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Klett (IEEE Fellow

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This special issue deals with several cutting edge research outcomes from recent advancement of learning technologies. Advanced learning technologies are the composition of various related technologies and concepts such as i internet technologies and mobile technologies, ii human and organizational performance/knowledge management, and iii underlying trends toward open technology, open content and open education. This editorial note describes the overview of these topics related to the advanced learning technologies to provide the common framework for the accepted papers in this special issue.

  9. Estimating the Theoretical Value for LAN Network Throughput Based Power Line Communications Technology Under the Homeplug 1.0 Standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Fabiola Contreras Higuera

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Power Line Communications (PLC refers to a group of technologies that allow to establish communication processes under the use of the grid as a physical means of transmission. The use of the grid as a physical means of transmission of information is not a new idea. Until a few years ago, the use of PLC had been limited to the implementation of solutions of control, automation and monitoring of sensors; which did not require a high bandwidth for its operation.During the late 1990s due to the new technological developments and the need to implement new alternatives for transfer of information, it was possible to reach speeds on the order of the Mbps, establishing the possibility of making use of the electricity network as a network of access. The current state of technology PLC allows to reach speeds of up to 200Mbps, which has enabled the transformation of the grid in a true network of band wide, capable of supporting data, voice and video provided by a telecommunications operator. The use of PLC-based network adapters allow easily design LANs and broadband communications through the electrical network, making any outlet in a point of connection for the user, without the need for wiring additional to existing ones.  The electrical network is a structure which so far has been exclusively used for the transport of electrical energy. However, it is possible to make use of this network in processes of communication and transmission of information such as: voice, data and video; Bearing in mind that grid had not been designed for this purpose. The performance is without doubt one of the aspects of greatest interest in the global analysis in networks LAN, due to the effect it produces on the end user. Basically, the most common parameters for evaluating the performance of a network are: Throughput, use of the canal and various measures of retardation. In this article is presented a simple analysis of the HomePlug 1.0 standard applied to the

  10. The development of standard samples with a defined number of antigen-specific T cells to harmonize T cell assays: a proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satwinder Kaur; Tummers, Bart; Schumacher, Ton N; Gomez, Raquel; Franken, Kees L M C; Verdegaal, Els M; Laske, Karoline; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Ottensmeier, Christian; Welters, Marij J P; Britten, Cedrik M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2013-03-01

    The validation of assays that quantify antigen-specific T cell responses is critically dependent on cell samples that contain clearly defined measurable numbers of antigen-specific T cells. An important requirement is that such cell samples are handled and analyzed in a comparable fashion to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We performed a proof-of-principle study to show that retrovirally TCR-transduced T cells spiked at defined numbers in autologous PBMC can be used as standard samples for HLA/peptide multimer staining. NY-ESO-1157-165-specific, TCR-transduced CD8+ T cell batches were successfully generated from PBMC of several HLA-A*0201 healthy donors, purified by magnetic cell sorting on the basis of HLA tetramer (TM) staining and expanded with specific antigen in vitro. When subsequently spiked into autologous PBMC, the detection of these CD3+CD8+TM+ T cells was highly accurate with a mean accuracy of 91.6 %. The standard cells can be preserved for a substantial period of time in liquid nitrogen. Furthermore, TM staining of fresh and cryopreserved standard samples diluted at decreasing concentrations into autologous cryopreserved unspiked PBMC revealed that the spiked CD3+CD8+TM+ T cells could be accurately detected at all dilutions in a linear fashion with a goodness-of-fit of over 0.99 at a frequency of at least 0.02 % among the CD3+CD8+ T cell population. Notably, the CD3+CD8+TM+ cells of the standard samples were located exactly within the gates used to analyze patient samples and displayed a similar scatter pattern. The performance of the cryopreserved standard samples in the hands of 5 external investigators was good with an inter-laboratory variation of 32.9 % and the doubtless identification of one outlier.

  11. Characterizing the Radiation Survivability of Space Solar Cell Technologies for Heliospheric Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Walker, D.; Mann, C. J.; Yue, Y.; Nocerino, J. C.; Smith, B. S.; Mulligan, T.

    2016-12-01

    Space solar cells are responsible for powering the majority of heliospheric space missions. This paper will discuss methods for characterizing space solar cell technologies for on-orbit operations that rely on a series of laboratory tests that include measuring the solar cells' beginning of life performance under simulated (e.g. AM0 or air mass zero) sunlight over different operating temperatures and observing their end of life performance following exposure to laboratory-generated charged particle radiation (protons and electrons). The Aerospace Corporation operates a proton implanter as well as electron gun facilities and collaborates with external radiation effects facilities to expose space solar cells or other space technologies to representative space radiation environments (i.e. heliosphere or magnetosphere of Earth or other planets), with goals of characterizing how the technologies perform over an anticipated space mission timeline and, through the application of precision diagnostic capabilities, understanding what part of the solar cell is impacted by varying space radiation environments. More recently, Aerospace has been hosting solar cell flight tests on its previously-flown CubeSat avionics bus, providing opportunities to compare the laboratory tests to on-orbit observations. We hope through discussion of the lessons learned and methods we use to characterize how solar cells perform after space radiation exposure that similar methodology could be adopted by others to improve the state of knowledge on the survivability of other space technologies required for future space missions.

  12. Fuel cells science and engineering. Materials, processes, systems and technology. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolten, Detlef; Emonts, Bernd (eds.) [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energieforschung (IEF), Brennstoffzellen (IEF-3)

    2012-07-01

    The first volume is divided in four parts and 22 chapters. It is structured as follows: PART I: Technology. Chapter 1: Technical Advancement of Fuel-Cell Research and Development (Dr. Bernd Emonts, Ludger Blum, Thomas Grube, Werner Lehnert, Juergen Mergel, Martin Mueller and Ralf Peters); 2: Single-Chamber Fuel Cells (Teko W. Napporn and Melanie Kuhn); 3: Technology and Applications of Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (Barbara Bosio, Elisabetta Arato and Paolo Greppi); 4: Alkaline Fuel Cells (Erich Guelzow); 5: Micro Fuel Cells (Ulf Groos and Dietmar Gerteisen); 6: Principles and Technology of Microbial Fuel Cells (Jan B. A. Arends, Joachim Desloover, Sebastia Puig and Willy Verstraete); 7: Micro-Reactors for Fuel Processing (Gunther Kolb); 8: Regenerative Fuel Cells (Martin Mueller). PART II: Materials and Production Processes. Chapter 9: Advances in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development between 1995 and 2010 at Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Germany (Vincent Haanappel); 10: Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrode Fabrication by Infiltration (Evren Gunen); 11: Sealing Technology for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (K. Scott Weil); 12: Phosphoric Acid, an Electrolyte for Fuel Cells - Temperature and Composition Dependence of Vapor Pressure and Proton Conductivity (Carsten Korte); 13: Materials and Coatings for Metallic Bipolar Plates in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (Heli Wang and John A. Turner); 14: Nanostructured Materials for Fuel Cells (John F. Elter); 15: Catalysis in Low-Temperature Fuel Cells - An Overview (Sabine Schimpf and Michael Bron). PART III: Analytics and Diagnostics. Chapter 16: Impedance Spectroscopy for High-Temperature Fuel Cells (Ellen Ivers-Tiffee, Andre Leonide, Helge Schichlein, Volker Sonn and Andre Weber); 17: Post-Test Characterization of Solid Oxide Fuel-Cell Stacks (Norbert H. Menzler and Peter Batfalsky); 18: In Situ Imaging at Large-Scale Facilities (Christian Toetzke, Ingo Manke and Werner Lehnert); 19: Analytics of Physical Properties of Low

  13. Slit-scanning technique using standard cell sorter instruments for analyzing and sorting nonacrocentric human chromosomes, including small ones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rens, W.; van Oven, C. H.; Stap, J.; Jakobs, M. E.; Aten, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the performance of two types of standard flow cell sorter instruments, a System 50 Cytofluorograph and a FACSTar PLUS cell sorter, for the on-line centromeric index (CI) analysis of human chromosomes. To optimize the results, we improved the detection efficiency for centromeres

  14. Screen printing technology applied to silicon solar cell fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, J. W.; Sipperly, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The process for producing space qualified solar cells in both the conventional and wraparound configuration using screen printing techniques was investigated. Process modifications were chosen that could be easily automated or mechanized. Work was accomplished to optimize the tradeoffs associated with gridline spacing, gridline definition and junction depth. An extensive search for possible front contact metallization was completed. The back surface field structures along with the screen printed back contacts were optimized to produce open circuit voltages of at least an average of 600 millivolts. After all intended modifications on the process sequence were accomplished, the cells were exhaustively tested. Electrical tests at AMO and 28 C were made before and after boiling water immersion, thermal shock, and storage under conditions of high temperature and high humidity.

  15. Advancing cartilage tissue engineering: the application of stem cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Joanne; Salacinski, Henryk J; Sales, Kevin M; Butler, Peter E; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2005-10-01

    The treatment of cartilage pathology and trauma face the challenges of poor regenerative potential and inferior repair. Nevertheless, recent advances in tissue engineering indicate that adult stem cells could provide a source of chondrocytes for tissue engineering that the isolation of mature chondrocytes has failed to achieve. Various adjuncts to their propagation and differentiation have been explored, such as biomaterials, bioreactors and growth hormones. To date, all tissue engineered cartilage has been significantly mechanically inferior to its natural counterparts and further problems in vivo relate to poor integration and deterioration of tissue quality over time. However, adult stem cells--with their high rate of proliferation and ease of isolation--are expected to greatly further the development and usefulness of tissue engineered cartilage.

  16. Silver-free Metallization Technology for Producing High Efficiency, Industrial Silicon Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelson, Lynne M [Technic Inc; Munoz, Krystal [Technic Inc.; Karas, Joseph [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Bowden, Stuart [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Rand, James A; Gallegos, Anthony [Technic Inc.; Tyson, Tom [Technic Inc.; Buonassisi, Tonio [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2018-03-30

    The goal of this project is to provide a commercially viable Ag-free metallization technology that will both reduce cost and increase efficiency of standard silicon solar cells. By removing silver from the front grid metallization and replacing it with lower cost nickel, copper, and tin metal, the front grid direct materials costs will decrease. This reduction in material costs should provide a path to meeting the Sunshot 2020 goal of $1 / WDC. As of today, plated contacts are not widely implemented in large scale manufacturing. For organizations that wish to implement pilot scale manufacturing, only two equipment choices exist. These equipment manufacturers do not supply plating chemistry. The main goal of this project is to provide a chemistry and equipment solution to the industry that enables reliable manufacturing of plated contacts marked by passing reliability results and higher efficiencies than silver paste front grid contacts. To date, there have been several key findings that point to plated contacts performing equal to or better than the current state of the art silver paste contacts. Poor adhesion and reliability concerns are a few of the hurdles for plated contacts, specifically plated nickel directly on silicon. A key finding of the Phase 1 budget period is that the plated contacts have the same adhesion as the silver paste controls. This is a huge win for plated contacts. With very little optimization work, state of the art electrical results for plated contacts on laser ablated lines have been demonstrated with efficiencies up to 19.1% and fill factors ~80% on grid lines 40-50 um wide. The silver paste controls with similar line widths demonstrate similar electrical results. By optimizing the emitter and grid design for the plated contacts, it is expected that the electrical performance will exceed the silver paste controls. In addition, cells plated using Technic chemistry and equipment pass reliability testing; i.e. 1000 hours damp heat and 200

  17. Sliver{sup (R)} solar cells: A new thin-crystalline silicon photovoltaic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlinden, P.J.; Kerr, M.J.; Stuckings, M.F.; Gordeev, D.; Stocks, M.J. [Origin Energy Solar, G.P.O Box 1097, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Blakers, A.W.; Weber, K.J.; Babaei, J.; Everett, V. [Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems, ANU, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2006-11-23

    A new technique for producing thin single-crystal silicon solar cells has been developed. The new technology allows for large decreases in silicon usage by a factor of 12 (including kerf losses) compared to conventional crystalline silicon wafer technologies. The new Sliver{sup (R)} cell process uses a micromachining technique to form 60{mu}m-thick solar cells, fully processed while they are still supported by the silicon substrate at the edge of the wafer. The Sliver{sup (R)} solar cells are capable of excellent performance due to their thickness and unique cell design with demonstrated efficiencies over 19.3% and open-circuit voltages of 683mV. In addition, the cells are bifacial (accepts light from either sides) and very flexible. Several prototype modules have been fabricated using a new design approach that introduces a diffuse reflector to the rear of a bi-glass module. To save expensive silicon material, a significant gap is kept between cells. The light striking between cells is scattered from the rear reflector and is directed onto the rear surface of the bifacial Sliver{sup (R)} cells. Module efficiency of 13% (AM1.5, 25C) has been demonstrated with a module presenting a 50% solar-cell coverage fraction, and 18.3% with a 100% Sliver{sup (R)} cell coverage fraction. (author)

  18. Microspectrophotometric studies of Romanowsky stained blood cells. I. Subtraction analysis of a standardized procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, W; Marshall, P N; Bacus, J W

    1980-08-01

    This paper describes a microspectrophotometric study of blood smears stained by a simple, standardized Romanowsky technique, using only the dyes azure B and cosin. Absorbance spectra are presented for twenty-two classes of cellular object, and for the two dyes in solution, together with tabulations of spectral maxima, and suitable wavelengths for use in automated image processing. The colours of objects stained with azure B/eosin are discussed in terms of absorbance spectra. By a spectral subtraction technique, it is shown that the differential colouration of various cell structures may be explained satisfactorily in terms of the varying proportions of only four dye components. These are the monomers and dimers of azure B and eosin. Polymerization was found to occur both in solution and on binding to biopolymers. A similar analysis of a conventional Romanowsky stain would present much greater difficulties, due to the greater number of dye components, which, however, contribute little to the colours observed.

  19. Standard guide for mechanical drive systems for remote operation in hot cell facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 Intent: 1.1.1 The intent of this standard is to provide general guidelines for the design, selection, quality assurance, installation, operation, and maintenance of mechanical drive systems used in remote hot cell environments. The term mechanical drive systems used herein, encompasses all individual components used for imparting motion to equipment systems, subsystems, assemblies, and other components. It also includes complete positioning systems and individual units that provide motive power and any position indicators necessary to monitor the motion. 1.2 Applicability: 1.2.1 This standard is intended to be applicable to equipment used under one or more of the following conditions: 1.2.1.1 The materials handled or processed constitute a significant radiation hazard to man or to the environment. 1.2.1.2 The equipment will generally be used over a long-term life cycle (for example, in excess of two years), but equipment intended for use over a shorter life cycle is not excluded. 1.2.1.3 The ...

  20. Energy Technology Analysis Prospects for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    Energy security, economic prosperity and environmental protection are prominent challenges for all countries. The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier and fuel cells as motive devices in transportation and energy distribution systems are possible solutions. This book provides the reader with an authoritative and objective analysis of policy responses and hurdles and business opportunities. Information regarding the latest RD&D, policy initiatives and private sector plans are assessed from the perspective of the rapidly changing global energy system in the next half century. This book prov

  1. Novel dual-function CellDetect® staining technology: wedding morphology and tinctorial discrimination to detect cervical neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelevich, Pavel; Elkeles, Adi; Okon, Elimelech; Kristt, Don; Terkieltaub, Dov; Rivkin, Ilia; Bruchim, Ilan; Fishman, Ami

    2010-11-11

    A persistent goal of oncologic histochemistry is to microscopically identify neoplasia tinctorially. Consequently, the newly developed CellDetect® staining technology, that appears to exhibit this property, warrants clinical evaluation. The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic results using CellDetect® to the outcomes of standard microscopic examination based on hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining for the recognition of different squamous epithelial phenotypes of the uterine cervix. Pairs of adjacent sections were made from 60 cervical biopsy cases that were diagnosed originally as either normal or neoplastic (CIN, SCC). One section of the pair was stained for H&E; the second section, with CellDetect®. Based on the examination of these pairs by two experienced pathologists, we investigated the following issues:(1) diagnostic agreement between the pathologists on each pair; (2) agreement between H&E and CellDetect® for each pair (3) tinctorial characteristics in micro-regions (n = 130) evaluated as either normal, reactive or neoplastic. Qualitatively, CellDetect®-stained preparations displayed cyto-morphological detail comparable to H&E images. Tinctorially, non-neoplastic cells appeared green/blue when stained withCellDetect®, contrasting with cytologically neoplastic foci, where cells of every grade were red/magenta in color. Due to these tinctorial characteristics, even small foci of neoplasia could be readily distinguished that were inconspicuous on H&E at low magnification. In some instances, this prompted re-examination of the H&E and revision of the diagnosis. Quantitatively, we found that despite diagnostic variation between pathologists, in about 3% of the cases, each pathologist made the same diagnosis regardless of whether CellDetect® or H&E was used, i.e. there was 100% self-agreement for each pathologist between stains. Particularly noteworthy was the finding of a 0% false negative rate, coupled with a 10-15% false positive rate

  2. MHC ligand generation in T cell-mediated immunity and MHC multimer technologies for T cell detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Arnold Hendrik

    2009-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the generation of MHC ligands and their use in analyzing T cell immunity, both in mouse and men. It is roughly split into two sections: the first part deals specifically with the rules governing the generation of MHC ligands, while the second part describes technological

  3. Codes and Standards Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Hydrogen Codes and Standards Tech Team (CSTT) mission is to enable and facilitate the appropriate research, development, & demonstration (RD&D) for the development of safe, performance-based defensible technical codes and standards that support the technology readiness and are appropriate for widespread consumer use of fuel cells and hydrogen-based technologies with commercialization by 2020. Therefore, it is important that the necessary codes and standards be in place no later than 2015.

  4. Web technology to support work processes in energy policy research - A case study with energy efficiency standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benenson, Peter; McMahon, James E.; Brown, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on a process to design and build a web-based system to assist staff in day-to-day management and contemporaneous documentation of their work. Other groups that want to use web technology to support their work could apply the approach presented here, but the design itself pertains to a particular set of issues in a unique context. Each user must apply the approach to identify their objectives and design a site to meet them. The main question that the Energy Efficiency Standards Group addressed was: ''How can we facilitate documentation of interim results and final products while conducting a complex, interdependent set of analyses by multiple authors under time pressures for delivering a final product?'' The approach to address this question includes categorization of the components of the work, discussions with staff, development of infrastructure support for documentation, implementation of the documentation process and integration with the workflow, and follow- up with staff. The search for a solution raised a number of issues such as the need for a thorough understanding of the work, consensus building by inclusion of key staff, and deliverable scheduling to allow for contemporaneous documentation. Documentation results vary among the product analyses, from extensive internal and external use to much slower adoption. Complaints include the length of the input forms and pressure from clients to deliver results. But with repeated demand for interim output, the need for thorough contemporaneous documentation still remains. Accordingly, as problems arise there is continued commitment among the staff to address them

  5. Avanti lipid tools: connecting lipids, technology, and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Kacee H; Tytler, Ewan M; Tipton, John; Hill, Kasey L; Burgess, Stephen W; Shaw, Walter A

    2014-08-01

    Lipid research is challenging owing to the complexity and diversity of the lipidome. Here we review a set of experimental tools developed for the seasoned lipid researcher, as well as, those who are new to the field of lipid research. Novel tools for probing protein-lipid interactions, applications for lipid binding antibodies, enhanced systems for the cellular delivery of lipids, improved visualization of lipid membranes using gold-labeled lipids, and advances in mass spectrometric analysis techniques will be discussed. Because lipid mediators are known to participate in a host of signal transduction and trafficking pathways within the cell, a comprehensive lipid toolbox that aids the science of lipidomics research is essential to better understand the molecular mechanisms of interactions between cellular components. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Direct methanol fuel cell stack based on MEMS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Tang, Xiaochuan; Yuan, Zhenyu; Liu, Xiaowei

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a design configuration of silicon-based micro direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) stack in a planar array. The integrated series connection is oriented in a "flip-flop" configuration with electrical interconnections made by thin-film metal layers that coat the flow channels etched in the silicon substrate. The configuration features small connection space and low contact resistance. The MEMS fabrication process was utilized to fabricate the silicon plates of DMFC stack. This DMFC stack with an active area of 64mm x 11mm was characterized at room temperature and normal atmosphere. Experimental results show that the prototype stack is able to generate an open-circuit voltage of 2.7V and a maximum power density of 2.2mW/cm2, which demonstrate the feasibility of this new DMFC stack configuration.

  7. Provision of a draft version for standard classification structure for information of radiation technologies through analyzing their information and derivation of its applicable requirements to the information system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sol Ah; Kim, Joo Yeon; Yoo, Ji Yup; Shin, Woo Ho; Park, Tai Jin; Song, Myung Jae [Korean Association for Radiation Application, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Radiation technology is the one for developing new products or processes by applying radiation or for creating new functions in industry, research and medical fields, and its application is increasing consistently. For securing an advanced technology competitiveness, it is required to create a new added value by information consumer through providing an efficient system for supporting information, which is the infrastructure for research and development, contributed to its collection, analysis and use with a rapidity and structure in addition to some direct research and development. Provision of the management structure for information resources is especially crucial for efficient operating the system for supporting information in radiation technology, and then a standard classification structure of information must be first developed as the system for supporting information will be constructed. The standard classification structure has been analyzed by reviewing the definition of information resources in radiation technology, and those classification structures in similar systems operated by institute in radiation and other scientific fields. And, a draft version of the standard classification structure has been then provided as 7 large, 25 medium and 71 small classifications, respectively. The standard classification structure in radiation technology will be developed in 2015 through reviewing this draft version and experts' opinion. Finally, developed classification structure will be applied to the system for supporting information by considering the plan for constructing this system and database, and requirements for designing the system. Furthermore, this structure will be designed in the system for searching information by working to the individual need of information consumers.

  8. Provision of a draft version for standard classification structure for information of radiation technologies through analyzing their information and derivation of its applicable requirements to the information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Sol Ah; Kim, Joo Yeon; Yoo, Ji Yup; Shin, Woo Ho; Park, Tai Jin; Song, Myung Jae

    2015-01-01

    Radiation technology is the one for developing new products or processes by applying radiation or for creating new functions in industry, research and medical fields, and its application is increasing consistently. For securing an advanced technology competitiveness, it is required to create a new added value by information consumer through providing an efficient system for supporting information, which is the infrastructure for research and development, contributed to its collection, analysis and use with a rapidity and structure in addition to some direct research and development. Provision of the management structure for information resources is especially crucial for efficient operating the system for supporting information in radiation technology, and then a standard classification structure of information must be first developed as the system for supporting information will be constructed. The standard classification structure has been analyzed by reviewing the definition of information resources in radiation technology, and those classification structures in similar systems operated by institute in radiation and other scientific fields. And, a draft version of the standard classification structure has been then provided as 7 large, 25 medium and 71 small classifications, respectively. The standard classification structure in radiation technology will be developed in 2015 through reviewing this draft version and experts' opinion. Finally, developed classification structure will be applied to the system for supporting information by considering the plan for constructing this system and database, and requirements for designing the system. Furthermore, this structure will be designed in the system for searching information by working to the individual need of information consumers

  9. The information society today and tomorrow the market, services/products, technologies and standards of communications and IT (CiT)

    OpenAIRE

    GREU, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The paper is an introduction for an articles series having as theme the role of market, services/products, technologies and standards of communications and information technology in the information society evolution process. Taking into account this process importance, complexity and dynamic, the main structural features as defined by the EU regulations (the novel impact to all spheres of human activity, with specific elements for enterprise and individual), motion forces and evolution trends...

  10. Integrating cell phones and mobile technologies into public health practice: a social marketing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Craig

    2009-10-01

    Mobile communications are being used for many purposes, from instant messaging (IM), mobile or microblogging (Twitter), social networking sites (Facebook, MySpace), e-mail to basic voicemail. A brief background on cell phone and mobile technology use in public health is reviewed. The focus of the article is framing the use of mobile technologies in public health from a social marketer's perspective--using the 4 Ps marketing mix as a guide.

  11. Evolution of MHC-based technologies used for detection of antigen-responsive T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2017-05-01

    T cell-mediated recognition of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) class I and II molecules is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens and cancer, as well as for stimulation and maintenance of efficient cytotoxic responses. Such interactions may also play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases. Novel insights into this mechanism are crucial to understanding disease development and establishing new treatment strategies. MHC multimers have been used for detection of antigen-responsive T cells since the first report by Altman et al. showed that tetramerization of pMHC class I molecules provided sufficient stability to T cell receptor (TCR)-pMHC interactions, allowing detection of MHC multimer-binding T cells using flow cytometry. Since this breakthrough the scientific community has aimed for expanding the capacity of MHC multimer-based detection technologies to facilitate large-scale epitope discovery and immune monitoring in limited biological material. Screening of T cell specificity using large libraries of pMHC molecules is suitable for analyses of T cell recognition potentially at genome-wide levels rather than analyses restricted to a selection of model antigens. Such strategies provide novel insights into the immune specificities involved in disease development and response to immunotherapy, and extend fundamental knowledge related to T cell recognition patterns and cross-recognition by TCRs. MHC multimer-based technologies have now evolved from detection of 1-2 different T cell specificities per cell sample, to include more than 1000 evaluable pMHC molecules using novel technologies. Here, we provide an overview of MHC multimer-based detection technologies developed over two decades, focusing primarily on MHC class I interactions.

  12. Cell phones and male infertility: a review of recent innovations in technology and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Agarwal

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell phones have become a vital part of everyday life. However, the health risks associated with their usage are often overlooked. Recently, evidence from several studies supports a growing claim that cell phone usage may have a detrimental effect on sperm parameters leading to decreased male fertility. Nonetheless, other studies showed no conclusive link between male infertility and cell phone usage. The ambiguity of such results is attributed to the lack of a centralized assay for measuring inflicted damage caused by cell phones. Study design, ethics, and reproducibility are all aspects which must be standardized before any conclusions can be made.

  13. Dendritic-cell-based technology landscape: Insights from patents and citation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangjun; Hu, Yuanjia; Cai, Zhifang; Yang, Fengqing; Zhang, Qianru

    2015-01-01

    As the most potent antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells (DCs) are pivotal players in regulating immune responses. DC-based technologies have generated a series of typical and promising therapeutic options, especially after the first DC-based cancer vaccine was approved by US. Food and Drug Administration (US. FDA). In this context, this paper employs patents and citation networks to conduct a fundamental analysis in order to show overall landscape of DC-based technologies. The results in this research can be used as references for decision-making in developing efficacious DC therapeutic products. PMID:25714961

  14. Cellular Cultivation: Growing HeLa Cells Using Standard High School Laboratory Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloschak, Gayle; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes experiments to culture cells in a laboratory that provide students with hands-on experience in manipulating cells and a chance to observe cell growth characteristics first hand. Exposes students to sterile technique, cell culture, cell growth concepts, and eukaryotic cell structure. (JRH)

  15. The influence of printing parameters on cell survival rate and printability in microextrusion-based 3D cell printing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Yang; Mao, Shuangshuang; Sun, Wei; Yao, Rui

    2015-11-02

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell printing technology has provided a versatile methodology to fabricate cell-laden tissue-like constructs and in vitro tissue/pathological models for tissue engineering, drug testing and screening applications. However, it still remains a challenge to print bioinks with high viscoelasticity to achieve long-term stable structure and maintain high cell survival rate after printing at the same time. In this study, we systematically investigated the influence of 3D cell printing parameters, i.e. composition and concentration of bioink, holding temperature and holding time, on the printability and cell survival rate in microextrusion-based 3D cell printing technology. Rheological measurements were utilized to characterize the viscoelasticity of gelatin-based bioinks. Results demonstrated that the bioink viscoelasticity was increased when increasing the bioink concentration, increasing holding time and decreasing holding temperature below gelation temperature. The decline of cell survival rate after 3D cell printing process was observed when increasing the viscoelasticity of the gelatin-based bioinks. However, different process parameter combinations would result in the similar rheological characteristics and thus showed similar cell survival rate after 3D bioprinting process. On the other hand, bioink viscoelasticity should also reach a certain point to ensure good printability and shape fidelity. At last, we proposed a protocol for 3D bioprinting of temperature-sensitive gelatin-based hydrogel bioinks with both high cell survival rate and good printability. This research would be useful for biofabrication researchers to adjust the 3D bioprinting process parameters quickly and as a referable template for designing new bioinks.

  16. Innovations in fuel cells and related hydrogen technology in Norway – OECD Case Study in the Energy Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Godø, Helge; Nerdrum, Lars; Rapmund, Antje; Nygaard, Stian

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the results of an analysis undertaken by NIFU on innovations in fuel cells and related hydrogen technology in Norway. This country study is part of a larger effort jointly organized by the OECD’s Working Group on Technology and Innovation Policy (TIP) and IEA’s Committee on Energy Research and Technology. Organized as a Focus Group, a number of national case studies have been made on different energy technologies and energy sources, fuel cells and related hydrogen technol...

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cell technology using bioceramics: hard tissue regeneration towards clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Oda, Yasuaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which show differentiation capabilities toward various cell lineages. We have already used MSCs for treatments of osteoarthritis, bone necrosis and bone tumor. For this purpose, culture expanded MSCs were combined with various ceramics and then implanted. Because of rejection response to allogeneic MSC implantation, we have utilized patients' own MSCs for the treatment. Bone marrow is a good cell source of MSCs, although the MSCs also exist in adipose tissue. When comparing osteogenic differentiation of these MSCs, bone marrow MSCs show more extensive bone forming capability than adipose MSCs. Thus, the bone marrow MSCs are useful for bone tissue regeneration. However, the MSCs show limited proliferation and differentiation capabilities that hindered clinical applications in some cases. Recent advances reveal that transduction of plural transcription factors into human adult cells results in generation of new type of stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). A drawback of the iPS cells for clinical applications is tumor formation after their in vivo implantation; therefore it is difficult to use iPS cells for the treatment. To circumvent the problem, we transduced a single factor of either SOX2 or NANOG into the MSCs and found high proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation capabilities of the MSCs. The stem cells could be combined with bioceramics for clinical applications. Here, we summarize our recent technologies using adult stem cells in viewpoints of bone tissue regeneration.

  18. On-Orbit Measurement of Next Generation Space Solar Cell Technology on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, David S.; Myers, Matthew G.; Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Parker, David S.; Cassidy, Justin C.; Davies, William E.; Vorreiter, Janelle O.; Piszczor, Michael F.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement is essential for the evaluation of new photovoltaic (PV) technology for space solar cells. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is in the process of measuring several solar cells in a supplemental experiment on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Robotic Refueling Mission's (RRM) Task Board 4 (TB4). Four industry and government partners have provided advanced PV devices for measurement and orbital environment testing. The experiment will be on-orbit for approximately 18 months. It is completely self-contained and will provide its own power and internal data storage. Several new cell technologies including four- junction (4J) Inverted Metamorphic Multijunction (IMM) cells will be evaluated and the results compared to ground-based measurements.

  19. New method for selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted bifidobacteria cells using continuous culture and immobilized cell technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meile Leo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress can severely compromise viability of bifidobacteria. Exposure of Bifidobacterium cells to oxygen causes accumulation of reactive oxygen species, mainly hydrogen peroxide, leading to cell death. In this study, we tested the suitability of continuous culture under increasing selective pressure combined with immobilized cell technology for the selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted Bifidobacterium cells. Cells of B. longum NCC2705 were immobilized in gellan-xanthan gum gel beads and used to continuously ferment MRS medium containing increasing concentration of H2O2 from 0 to 130 ppm. Results At the beginning of the culture, high cell density of 1013 CFU per litre of reactor was tested. The continuous culture gradually adapted to increasing H2O2 concentrations. However, after increasing the H2O2 concentration to 130 ppm the OD of the culture decreased to 0. Full wash out was prevented by the immobilization of the cells in gel matrix. Hence after stopping the stress, it was possible to re-grow the cells that survived the highest lethal dose of H2O2 and to select two adapted colonies (HPR1 and HPR2 after plating of the culture effluent. In contrast to HPR1, HPR2 showed stable characteristics over at least 70 generations and exhibited also higher tolerance to O2 than non adapted wild type cells. Preliminary characterization of HPR2 was carried out by global genome expression profile analysis. Two genes coding for a protein with unknown function and possessing trans-membrane domains and an ABC-type transporter protein were overexpressed in HPR2 cells compared to wild type cells. Conclusions Our study showed that continuous culture with cell immobilization is a valid approach for selecting cells adapted to hydrogen peroxide. Elucidation of H2O2 adaptation mechanisms in HPR2 could be helpful to develop oxygen resistant bifidobacteria.

  20. BHD Tumor Cell Line and Renal Cell Carcinoma Line | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the National Cancer Institute  have developed a novel renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell line designated UOK257, which was derived from the surgical kidney tissue of a patient with hereditary Birt-Hogg-Dube''''(BHD) syndrome and companion cell line UOK257-2 in which FLCN expression has been restored by lentivirus infection. The NCI Urologic Oncology Branch seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize kidney cancer tumor cell lines.

  1. Awareness of Emerging Wireless Technologies: Ad-hoc and Personal Area Networks Standards and Emerging Technologies (Sensibilisation a l'emergence des technologies sans fil: technologies emergeantes et normes de reseaux personnels et ad-hoc)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stassinopoulos, George; Boucher, L; Churavy, M; Plesse, T; Marquart, D; Kyriazakos, S; Papaoulakis, N; Nikitopoulos, D; Maseng, T

    2007-01-01

    .... The report starts with ad-hoc networking concepts and maturing technological solutions. Ad-hoc networking is a necessary companion to wireless communication, due to the inherent lack of reliability of any wireless based link level protocol...

  2. A Structural Study of Escherichia coli Cells Using an In Situ Liquid Chamber TEM Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying cell microstructures and their behaviors under living conditions has been a challenging subject in microbiology. In this work, in situ liquid chamber TEM was used to study structures of Escherichia coli cells in aqueous solutions at a nanometer-scale resolution. Most of the cells remained intact under electron beam irradiation, and nanoscale structures were observed during the TEM imaging. The analysis revealed structures of pili surrounding the E. coli cells; the movements of the pili in the liquid were also observed during the in situ tests. This technology also allowed the observation of features of the nucleoid in the E. coli cells. Overall, in situ TEM can be applied as a valuable tool to study real-time microscopic structures and processes in microbial cells residing in native aqueous solutions.

  3. What is the role of apheresis technology in stem cell transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiki, Ilhami

    2017-12-01

    Since the demonstration that hematopoietic cells are present in circulating blood, peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) has become an area of interest. The invention of growth factors such as the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and the availability of apheresis techniques allowed the wide application of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) in both autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation settings. It has been since 1986 that clinically introduced, peripheral blood stem cells replaced bone marrow as a stem-cell source to nearly 100% in the autologous and to approximately 75% in the allogeneic transplantation setting. During this period of time, remarkable development occurred in both stem cell mobilizing agents (i.e. CXCR4 antagonists) and apheresis techniques. Currently, apheresis technology is being increasingly used in not only for collection of PBSC or blood product support, but also for treatment and/or prevention of several transplantations related complications. Apheresis technology also allows to manipulate stem cells and thus provides opportunity to curative treatment of certain diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tower-based greenhouse gas measurement network design—The National Institute of Standards and Technology North East Corridor Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Coto, Israel; Ghosh, Subhomoy; Prasad, Kuldeep; Whetstone, James

    2017-09-01

    The North-East Corridor (NEC) Testbed project is the 3rd of three NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) greenhouse gas emissions testbeds designed to advance greenhouse gas measurements capabilities. A design approach for a dense observing network combined with atmospheric inversion methodologies is described. The Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model with the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model were used to derive the sensitivity of hypothetical observations to surface greenhouse gas emissions (footprints). Unlike other network design algorithms, an iterative selection algorithm, based on a k-means clustering method, was applied to minimize the similarities between the temporal response of each site and maximize sensitivity to the urban emissions contribution. Once a network was selected, a synthetic inversion Bayesian Kalman filter was used to evaluate observing system performance. We present the performances of various measurement network configurations consisting of differing numbers of towers and tower locations. Results show that an overly spatially compact network has decreased spatial coverage, as the spatial information added per site is then suboptimal as to cover the largest possible area, whilst networks dispersed too broadly lose capabilities of constraining flux uncertainties. In addition, we explore the possibility of using a very high density network of lower cost and performance sensors characterized by larger uncertainties and temporal drift. Analysis convergence is faster with a large number of observing locations, reducing the response time of the filter. Larger uncertainties in the observations implies lower values of uncertainty reduction. On the other hand, the drift is a bias in nature, which is added to the observations and, therefore, biasing the retrieved fluxes.

  5. Tower-Based Greenhouse Gas Measurement Network Design---The National Institute of Standards and Technology North East Corridor Testbed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Coto, Israel; Ghosh, Subhomoy; Prasad, Kuldeep; Whetstone, James

    2017-09-01

    The North-East Corridor (NEC) Testbed project is the 3rd of three NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) greenhouse gas emissions testbeds designed to advance greenhouse gas measurements capabilities. A design approach for a dense observing network combined with atmospheric inversion methodologies is described. The Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model with the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model were used to derive the sensitivity of hypothetical observations to surface greenhouse gas emissions (footprints). Unlike other network design algorithms, an iterative selection algorithm, based on a k -means clustering method, was applied to minimize the similarities between the temporal response of each site and maximize sensitivity to the urban emissions contribution. Once a network was selected, a synthetic inversion Bayesian Kalman filter was used to evaluate observing system performance. We present the performances of various measurement network configurations consisting of differing numbers of towers and tower locations. Results show that an overly spatially compact network has decreased spatial coverage, as the spatial information added per site is then suboptimal as to cover the largest possible area, whilst networks dispersed too broadly lose capabilities of constraining flux uncertainties. In addition, we explore the possibility of using a very high density network of lower cost and performance sensors characterized by larger uncertainties and temporal drift. Analysis convergence is faster with a large number of observing locations, reducing the response time of the filter. Larger uncertainties in the observations implies lower values of uncertainty reduction. On the other hand, the drift is a bias in nature, which is added to the observations and, therefore, biasing the retrieved fluxes.

  6. The effect of patterning options on embedded memory cells in logic technologies at iN10 and iN7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appeltans, Raf; Weckx, Pieter; Raghavan, Praveen; Kim, Ryoung-Han; Kar, Gouri Sankar; Furnémont, Arnaud; Van der Perre, Liesbet; Dehaene, Wim

    2017-03-01

    Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) cells are used together with logic standard cells as the benchmark to develop the process flow for new logic technologies. In order to achieve successful integration of Spin-Transfer Torque Magnetic Random Access Memory (STT-MRAM) as area efficient higher level embedded cache, it also needs to be included as a benchmark. The simple cell structure of STT-MRAM brings extra patterning challenges to achieve high density. The two memory types are compared in terms of minimum area and critical design rules in both the iN10 and iN7 node, with an extra focus on patterning options in iN7. Both the use of Self-Aligned Quadruple Patterning (SAQP) mandrel and spacer engineering, as well as multi-level via's are explored. These patterning options result in large area gains for the STT-MRAM cell and moreover determine which cell variant is the smallest.

  7. Development of molten carbonate fuel cell technology at M-C Power Corporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilger, D. [M-C Power Corp., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    M-C Power Corporation was founded in 1987 with the mission to further develop and subsequently commercialize molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC). The technology chosen for commercialization was initially developed by the Institute of Gas technology (IGT). At the center of this MCFC technology is the Internally Manifolded Heat EXchange (IMHEX) separator plate design. The IMHEX technology design provides several functions within one component assembly. These functions include integrating the gas manifold structure into the fuel cell stack, separating the fuel gas stream from the oxidant gas stream, providing the required electrical contact between cells to achieve desired power output, and removing excess heat generated in the electrochemical process. Development of this MCFC technology from lab-scale sizes too a commercial area size of 1m{sup 2} has focused our efforts an demonstrating feasibility and evolutionary progress. The development effort will culminate in a proof-of-concept- 250kW power plant demonstration in 1996. The remainder of our commercialization program focuses upon lowering the costs associated with the MCFC power plant system in low production volumes.

  8. Laminin-521 Promotes Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheet Formation on Light-Induced Cell Sheet Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell sheets (rBMSC sheets are attractive for cell-based tissue engineering. However, methods of culturing rBMSC sheets are critically limited. In order to obtain intact rBMSC sheets, a light-induced cell sheet method was used in this study. TiO2 nanodot films were coated with (TL or without (TN laminin-521. We investigated the effects of laminin-521 on rBMSCs during cell sheet culturing. The fabricated rBMSC sheets were subsequently assessed to study cell sheet viability, reattachment ability, cell sheet thickness, collagen type I deposition, and multilineage potential. The results showed that laminin-521 could promote the formation of rBMSC sheets with good viability under hyperconfluent conditions. Cell sheet thickness increased from an initial 26.7 ± 1.5 μm (day 5 up to 47.7 ± 3.0 μm (day 10. Moreover, rBMSC sheets maintained their potential of osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation. This study provides a new strategy to obtain rBMSC sheets using light-induced cell sheet technology.

  9. Topochip: technology for instructing cell fate and morphology via designed surface topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, G.F.B.

    2016-01-01

    The control of biomaterial surface topography is emerging as a tool to influence cells and tissues. Due to a lack a theoretical framework of the underlying molecular mechanisms, high-throughput screening (HTS) technology is valuable to identify and study bioactive surface topographies. To identify

  10. A novel technology to target adenovirus vectors : application in cells involved in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, Jan Cornelis Emile

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis a novel technology is described to target adenovirus vectors. Adenovirus vectors are powerful tools to modulate gene expression. The use of these vectors however, is hampered by the fact that many for gene therapy interesting cell types do not, or only at low levels express the CAR

  11. Advancing induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology by assessing genetic instability and immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Requena Osete, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    [eng] Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) can be made from adult somatic cells by reprogramming them with Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. IPSC have given rise to a new technology to study and treat human disease (Takahashi et al., 2007). However, before iPSC clinical application, we need to step back and address two main challenges: (i) Genetic stability of iPSC. (ii) Immune response of iPSC-derived cells. To address these key issues, the overall mission of this PhD thesis is to adva...

  12. Examination of thermophotovoltaic GaSb cell technology in low and medium temperatures waste heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utlu, Z.; Önal, B. S.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, waste heat was evaluated and examined by means of thermophotovoltaic systems with the application of energy production potential GaSb cells. The aim of our study is to examine GaSb cell technology at low and medium temperature waste heat. The evaluation of the waste heat to be used in the system is designed to be used in the electricity, industry and iron and steel industry. Our work is research. Graphic analysis is done with Matlab program. The low and medium temperature waste heat graphs applied on the GaSb cell are in the results section. Our study aims to provide a source for future studies.

  13. Performance evaluation of thermophotovoltaic GaSb cell technology in high temperature waste heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utlu, Z.; Önal, B. S.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, waste heat was evaluated and examined by means of thermophotovoltaic systems with the application of energy production potential GaSb cells. The aim of our study is to examine GaSb cell technology at high temperature waste heat. The evaluation of the waste heat to be used in the system is designed to be used in the electricity, industry and iron and steel industry. Our work is research. Graphic analysis is done with Matlab program. The high temperature waste heat graphs applied on the GaSb cell are in the results section. Our study aims to provide a source for future studies.

  14. Life Cycle Assessment of Titania Perovskite Solar Cell Technology for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Gao, Xianfeng; Deng, Yelin; Li, Bingbing; Yuan, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Perovskite solar cells have attracted enormous attention in recent years due to their low cost and superior technical performance. However, the use of toxic metals, such as lead, in the perovskite dye and toxic chemicals in perovskite solar cell manufacturing causes grave concerns for its environmental performance. To understand and facilitate the sustainable development of perovskite solar cell technology from its design to manufacturing, a comprehensive environmental impact assessment has been conducted on titanium dioxide nanotube based perovskite solar cells by using an attributional life cycle assessment approach, from cradle to gate, with manufacturing data from our laboratory-scale experiments and upstream data collected from professional databases and the literature. The results indicate that the perovskite dye is the primary source of environmental impact, associated with 64.77% total embodied energy and 31.38% embodied materials consumption, contributing to more than 50% of the life cycle impact in almost all impact categories, although lead used in the perovskite dye only contributes to about 1.14% of the human toxicity potential. A comparison of perovskite solar cells with commercial silicon and cadmium-tellurium solar cells reveals that perovskite solar cells could be a promising alternative technology for future large-scale industrial applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Current State of Technology of Fuel Cell Power Systems for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Mendez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs are vehicles that are primarily used to accomplish oceanographic research data collection and auxiliary offshore tasks. At the present time, they are usually powered by lithium-ion secondary batteries, which have insufficient specific energies. In order for this technology to achieve a mature state, increased endurance is required. Fuel cell power systems have been identified as an effective means to achieve this endurance but no implementation in a commercial device has yet been realized. This paper summarizes the current state of development of the technology in this field of research. First, the most adequate type of fuel cell for this application is discussed. The prototypes and design concepts of AUVs powered by fuel cells which have been developed in the last few years are described. Possible commercial and experimental fuel cell stack options are analyzed, examining solutions adopted in the analogous aerial vehicle applications, as well as the underwater ones, to see if integration in an AUV is feasible. Current solutions in oxygen and hydrogen storage systems are overviewed and energy density is objectively compared between battery power systems and fuel cell power systems for AUVs. A couple of system configuration solutions are described including the necessary lithium-ion battery hybrid system. Finally, some closing remarks on the future of this technology are given.

  16. Cell broadcast trials in The Netherlands: Using mobile phone technology for citizens' alarming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagtman, H.M.

    2010-01-01

    In emergency situations authorities need to warn the public. The conventionally used method for warning citizens in The Netherlands is the use of a siren. Modern telecommunication technologies, especially the use of text-based features of mobile phones, have great potential for warning the public. In the years 2005-2007 cell broadcast was tested during several large-scale field trials with citizens in The Netherlands. One of the questions was to determine the penetration of cell broadcast for citizens' alarming. This article argues that the definition of penetration in the light of warning citizens in case of emergencies should include the citizens' responses to warning messages. In addition, the approach to determining the penetration, the data and validity issues regarding these data is discussed. The trials have shown cell broadcast has potential to become an effective citizens' alarming technology. This however requires the entire technological and organisational chain of the warning system to function correctly. Attention is required to network management, handset improvements and correct communication to the public about the conditions under which a cell broadcast message can be received. The latter includes managing realistic expectations including circumstances in which cell broadcast will not reach a citizen.

  17. Telemedicine through the use of digital cell phone technology in pediatric neurosurgery: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirris, Stephen M; Monaco, Edward A; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C

    2010-05-01

    Advances in medicine have largely followed advances in technology. Medical strides have been made when physicians and researchers have adapted growing science to target specific problems. A new medical field, telemedicine, has emerged that links physicians with colleagues and patients. Cell phone technology is affordable for almost everyone, and basic models include digital photography. We present a case series exhibiting the utility of digital pictures taken with patients' cell phones. Our patients had wound infections requiring daily intravenous antibiotics and dressing changes. In years past, these patients would have required prolonged hospitalizations. In the era of managed care, patients with these infections are discharged from the hospital, but close outpatient observation is required to monitor the wound. Our patients lived up to 8 hours away from the hospital. Daily appointments for wound checks in the clinic were not practical. Wounds were thus monitored via cell phone images without the inconvenience of travel and the expense of staying in a local hotel, along with leaving appointments in the clinic available for others with new neurosurgical issues. Wound evaluations were conducted with the cameras on patients' cell phones. These images were transmitted to the surgeon via text messaging and emails. This application of cell phone technology has been documented previously in the literature of other specialties and could attain greater stature as a legitimate method for close outpatient observation by neurosurgeons if medicolegal issues are addressed.

  18. A DNA vector-based RNAi technology to suppress gene expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Guangchao; Soohoo, Christina; Affar, El Bachir; Gay, Frédérique; Shi, Yujiang; Forrester, William C; Shi, Yang

    2002-04-16

    Double-stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) has recently emerged as a powerful reverse genetic tool to silence gene expression in multiple organisms including plants, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila. The discovery that synthetic double-stranded, 21-nt small interfering RNA triggers gene-specific silencing in mammalian cells has further expanded the utility of RNAi into mammalian systems. Here we report a technology that allows synthesis of small interfering RNAs from DNA templates in vivo to efficiently inhibit endogenous gene expression. Significantly, we were able to use this approach to demonstrate, in multiple cell lines, robust inhibition of several endogenous genes of diverse functions. These findings highlight the general utility of this DNA vector-based RNAi technology in suppressing gene expression in mammalian cells.

  19. Adapting to Student Learning Styles: Using Cell Phone Technology in Undergraduate Science Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Pennington

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Students of science traditionally make 3x5 flash cards to assist learning nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Advances in educational technology have enabled flashcards viewed on computers, offering an endless array of drilling and feedback opportunities for students. The current generation of students is less inclined to use computers, but they use their cell phones 24 hours a day. This report outlines these trends and an even more recent educational technology initiative, that of using cell phone flash cards to help students learn biology and chemistry nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Students responded positively to cell phone flash cards in a pilot study and a more detailed study is planned for the coming year.

  20. The next generation CdTe technology- Substrate foil based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferekides, Chris [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2017-03-22

    The main objective of this project was the development of one of the most promising Photovoltaic (PV) materials CdTe into a versatile, cost effective, and high throughput technology, by demonstrating substrate devices on foil substrates using high throughput fabrication conditions. The typical CdTe cell is of the superstrate configuration where the solar cell is fabricated on a glass superstrate by the sequential deposition of a TCO, n-type heterojunction partner, p-CdTe absorber, and back contact. Large glass modules are heavy and present significant challenges during manufacturing (uniform heating, etc.). If a substrate CdTe cell could be developed (the main goal of this project) a roll-to-toll high throughput technology could be developed.

  1. Small Molecule-Photoactive Yellow Protein Labeling Technology in Live Cell Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Gao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the chemical environment, movement, trafficking and interactions of proteins in live cells is essential to understanding their functions. Labeling protein with functional molecules is a widely used approach in protein research to elucidate the protein location and functions both in vitro and in live cells or in vivo. A peptide or a protein tag fused to the protein of interest and provides the opportunities for an attachment of small molecule probes or other fluorophore to image the dynamics of protein localization. Here we reviewed the recent development of no-wash small molecular probes for photoactive yellow protein (PYP-tag, by the means of utilizing a quenching mechanism based on the intramolecular interactions, or an environmental-sensitive fluorophore. Several fluorogenic probes have been developed, with fast labeling kinetics and cell permeability. This technology allows quick live-cell imaging of cell-surface and intracellular proteins without a wash-out procedure.

  2. Awareness of Emerging Wireless Technologies: Ad-hoc and Personal Area Networks Standards and Emerging Technologies (Sensibilisation a l’emergence des technologies sans fil: technologies emergeantes et normes de reseaux personnels et ad-hoc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    rubrique PAN (réseaux personnels). Ces technologies, avec un accent sur une faible alimentation , doivent être également vues dans le contexte d’une...the smart healthy home, the professional environment and the fancy futuristic multimedia traveler. Corresponding environment for military

  3. Repeatability of differential goat bulk milk culture and associations with somatic cell count, total bacterial count, and standard plate count

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, G.; Dik, N.; Nielen, M.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how different bacterial groups in bulk milk are related to bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), bulk milk total bacterial count (TBC), and bulk milk standard plate count (SPC) and to measure the repeatability of bulk milk culturing. On 53 Dutch dairy goat farms,

  4. Hydroxycarbamine: from an Old Drug Used in Malignant Hemopathies to a Current Standard in Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Giovanna; Poutrel, Solène; Thomas, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    While hydroxycarbamide (hydroxyurea, HU) has less and fewer indications in malignant hemopathies, it represents the only widely used drug which modifies sickle cell disease pathogenesis. Clinical experience with HU for patients with sickle cell disease has been accumulated over the past 25 years in Western countries. The review of the literature provides increasing support for safety and efficacy in both children and adults for reducing acute vaso-occlusive events including pain episodes and acute chest syndrome. No increased incidence of leukemia and teratogenicity was demonstrated. HU has become the standard-of-care for sickle cell anemia but remains underused. Barriers to its use should be identified and overcome. PMID:28293403

  5. HYDROXYCARBAMINE: FROM AN OLD DRUG USED IN MALIGNANT HEMOPATHIES TO A CURRENT STANDARD IN SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Cannas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available While hydroxycarbamine (hydroxyurea, HU has less and less indications in malignant hemopathies, it represents the only widely used drug which modifies sickle cell disease pathogenesis. Clinical experience with HU for patients with sickle cell disease has been accumulated over the past 25 years in Western countries. The review of the literature provides increasing support of safety and efficacy in both children and adults for reducing acute vaso-occlusive events including pain episodes and acute chest syndrome. HU has become the standard-of-care for sickle cell anemia, but remains underused. Barriers to its use should be identified and overcome.

  6. Geo-Information Technology of 8-Level Responsibility: Concept and Standard of Construction Management for Implementation of The BIM-Technology in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komosko, Vladimir; Serebryakov, Sergey; Strokov, Vladimir

    2017-12-01

    Currently, the increase in construction efficiency in the world is associated with the introduction and development of information modelling of construction objects (BIM-technology). The BIM-technology is a process of collective creation and use of information about a structure that forms the basis for all decisions throughout the life cycle of an object. The BIM-technology with the help of a number of software products provides automation of production, it does not provide a methodology for the introduction of these products. The article describes the technology of 8-level responsibility, which is guaranteed to give systematically a new quality of management in construction, related to the requirements of the Russian Government Decree No. 87 of February 16, 2008. The technology of 8-level responsibility (8LR) in the detailed specification of GD No. 87, (territory, construction stage, master plan object, section (part) of the project) extends the number of inseparable levels to 8 (part of the object, element, mark, position), where the “position” is the last indivisible detail of the object. There is reason to argue that the use of the “8LR Technology” in addition to the BIM-technology will provide a synergistic effect and will remove a number of obstacles to the BIM introduction in Russia and system control in the construction and operation of objects of any complexity in Russia.

  7. Staging in Patients with Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma; PET-CT versus Standard Staging Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Yalçın

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The most important factor for accurate treatment of patients with small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC is accuracy of the initial staging. The aim of this study was to determine how often patients, staged as local or local-advanced disease by standard staging procedures (SSPs, would be staged to have a metastatic disease based on the findings of the positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET-CT scan. Methods: Patients with SCLC who were staged as I, II, or III disease by SSPs (according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging, 7th edition formed the study population. SSPs included computed tomography of chest, abdomen, brain (or magnetic resonance imaging of brain, and bone scintigraphy. These patients were re-staged with 18F-FDG PET-CT scan. Results: Between 2013 and 2015, 27 patients were prospectively studied. Of these patients, 92.5% were male and the median age was 61. Among 27 patients, distant metastasis was detected by PET-CT in 7 (25.9% patients. Two of 7 patients were determined as stage IIIA by SSPs and 5 of 17 patients that were determined as stage IIIB by SSPs were upstaged to metastatic disease by PET-CT. All of the 7 patients had bone metastasis by PET-CT. But bone metastasis could not be detected with bone scintigraphy. Conclusion: PET-CT detected distant metastasis in one quarter of SCLC stage III patients by SSPs. Patients who staged local-advanced SCLC with CT of the chest have to be assessed by PET-CT for extracranial distant metastasis.

  8. Complex heterogeneous tissue constructs containing multiple cell types prepared by inkjet printing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Zhao, Weixin; Zhu, Jian-Ming; Albanna, Mohammad Z; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to develop a versatile method for fabricating complex and heterogeneous three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs using simultaneous ink-jetting of multiple cell types. Human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs), canine smooth muscle cells (dSMCs), and bovine aortic endothelial cells (bECs), were separately mixed with ionic cross-linker calcium chloride (CaCl(2)), loaded into separate ink cartridges and printed using a modified thermal inkjet printer. The three cell types were delivered layer-by-layer to pre-determined locations in a sodium alginate-collagen composite located in a chamber under the printer. The reaction between CaCl(2) and sodium alginate resulted in a rapid formation of a solid composite gel and the printed cells were anchored in designated areas within the gel. The printing process was repeated for several cycles leading to a complex 3D multi-cell hybrid construct. The biological functions of the 3D printed constructs were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Each of the printed cell types maintained their viability and normal proliferation rates, phenotypic expression, and physiological functions within the heterogeneous constructs. The bioprinted constructs were able to survive and mature into functional tissues with adequate vascularization in vivo. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating complex heterogeneous tissue constructs containing multiple cell types using inkjet printing technology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of Cell-SELEX Technology and Its Application in Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Man; Yu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Feng; Zhou, Junwei; Li, Yongshu; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) is a process involving the progressive isolation of high selective ssDNA/RNA from a combinatorial single-stranded oligonucleotide library through repeated rounds of binding, partitioning and amplification. SELEX-derived single-stranded DNA/RNA molecules, called aptamers, are selected against a wide range of targets, including purified proteins, live cells, tissues, microorganisms, small molecules and so on. With the development of SELEX technology over the last two decades, various modified SELEX processes have been arisen. A majority of aptamers are selected against purified proteins through traditional SELEX. Unfortunately, more and more evidence showed aptamers selected against purified membrane proteins failed to recognize their targets in live cells. Cell-SELEX could develop aptamers against a particular target cell line to discriminate this cell line from others. Therefore, cell-SELEX has been widely used to select aptamers for the application of both diagnosis and therapy of various diseases, especially for cancer. In this review, the advantages and limitations of cell-SELEX and SELEX against purified protein will be compared. Various modified cell-SELEX techniques will be summarized, and application of cell-SELEX in cancer diagnosis and therapy will be discussed. PMID:27973403

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: UTC FUEL CELLS' PC25C POWER PLANT - GAS PROCESSING UNIT PERFORMANCE FOR ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification program, which provides objective and scientific third party analysis of new technology that can benefit the environment, a combined heat and power system based on the UTC Fuel Cell's PC25C Fuel Cell Power Plant was evaluated. The...

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION USING THE PLUG POWER SU1 FUEL CELL SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Plug Power SU1 Fuel Cell System manufactured by Plug Power. The SU1 is a proton exchange membrane fuel cell that requires hydrogen (H2) as fuel. H2 is generally not available, so the ...

  12. Image Format Conversion to DICOM and Lookup Table Conversion to Presentation Value of the Japanese Society of Radiological Technology (JSRT) Standard Digital Image Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagita, Satoshi; Imahana, Masato; Suwa, Kazuaki; Sugimura, Hitomi; Nishiki, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Japanese Society of Radiological Technology (JSRT) standard digital image database contains many useful cases of chest X-ray images, and has been used in many state-of-the-art researches. However, the pixel values of all the images are simply digitized as relative density values by utilizing a scanned film digitizer. As a result, the pixel values are completely different from the standardized display system input value of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM), called presentation value (P-value), which can maintain a visual consistency when observing images using different display luminance. Therefore, we converted all the images from JSRT standard digital image database to DICOM format followed by the conversion of the pixel values to P-value using an original program developed by ourselves. Consequently, JSRT standard digital image database has been modified so that the visual consistency of images is maintained among different luminance displays.

  13. Media Discourse on Cell Phone Technology and “Left-Behind Children” in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Hua Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Through critical analysis of selected news stories from sina.com from 2010 to 2015 about cell phones and “left-behind children” in China, this article examines media discourses on the relationship between migrant families and communication technology. The author finds that the roles of cell phones in their lives are portrayed in the following narratives: 1 cell phones are highly valuable for connecting family members living apart; 2 cell phones are used as a problem-solver in charity giving and rural development projects; 3 cell phones can bring unexpected risks to children lacking media literacy; and 4 cell phones could harbour or unleash evil—associated with increasing cases of juvenile delinquency or crime stories. The author discusses how the different institutional goals of social agencies, corporations, educators, and law enforcement contribute to the polarity of the discourses, reflecting the societal anxieties over unsupervised use of mobile devices by adolescents, as well as the cultural and political implications of empowering the “have-nots” of the digital divide by improving access to communication technology.

  14. Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis using cell-free fetal DNA technology: applications and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alison; Bostanci, A; Wright, C F

    2010-01-01

    Cell-free fetal DNA and RNA circulating in maternal blood can be used for the early non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) of an increasing number of genetic conditions, both for pregnancy management and to aid reproductive decision-making. Here we present a brief review of the scientific and clinical status of the technology, and an overview of key ethical, legal and social issues raised by the analysis of cell-free fetal DNA for NIPD. We suggest that the less invasive nature of the technology brings some distinctive issues into focus, such as the possibility of broader uptake of prenatal diagnosis and access to the technology directly by the consumer via the internet, which have not been emphasised in previous work in this area. We also revisit significant issues that are familiar from previous debates about prenatal testing. Since the technology seems to transect existing distinctions between screening and diagnostic tests, there are important implications for the form and process involved in obtaining informed consent or choice. This analysis forms part of the work undertaken by a multidisciplinary group of experts which made recommendations about the implementation of this technology within the UK National Health Service. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Development of traceable measurement of the diffuse optical properties of solid reference standards for biomedical optics at National Institute of Standards and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Allen, David W

    2015-07-01

    The development of a national reference instrument dedicated to the measurement of the scattering and absorption properties of solid tissue-mimicking phantoms used as reference standards is presented. The optical properties of the phantoms are measured with a double-integrating sphere setup in the steady-state domain, coupled with an inversion routine of the adding-doubling procedure that allows for the computation of the uncertainty budget for the measurements. The results are compared to the phantom manufacturer's values obtained by a time-resolved approach. The results suggest that the agreement between these two independent methods is within the estimated uncertainties. This new reference instrument will provide optical biomedical research laboratories with reference values for absolute diffuse optical properties of phantom materials.

  16. Standard Test Method for Calibration of Non-Concentrator Photovoltaic Secondary Reference Cells

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers calibration and characterization of secondary terrestrial photovoltaic reference cells to a desired reference spectral irradiance distribution. The recommended physical requirements for these reference cells are described in Specification E1040. Reference cells are principally used in the determination of the electrical performance of a photovoltaic device. 1.2 Secondary reference cells are calibrated indoors using simulated sunlight or outdoors in natural sunlight by reference to a primary reference cell previously calibrated to the same desired reference spectral irradiance distribution. 1.3 Secondary reference cells calibrated according to this test method will have the same radiometric traceability as the of the primary reference cell used for the calibration. Therefore, if the primary reference cell is traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR, see Test Method E816), the resulting secondary reference cell will also be traceable to the WRR. 1.4 This test method appli...

  17. Review of New Technology for Preparing Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials by Metallurgical Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Dai, Yongnian; Ma, Wenhui; Yang, Bin; Chu, Qingmei

    2017-11-01

    The goals of greatly reducing the photovoltaic power cost and making it less than that of thermal power to realize photovoltaic power grid parity without state subsidies are focused on in this paper. The research status, key technologies and development of the new technology for preparing crystalline silicon solar cell materials by metallurgical method at home and abroad are reviewed. The important effects of impurities and defects in crystalline silicon on its properties are analysed. The importance of new technology on reducing production costs and improving its quality to increase the cell conversion efficiency are emphasized. The previous research results show that the raw materials of crystalline silicon are extremely abundant. The product of crystalline silicon can meet the quality requirements of solar cell materials: Si ≥ 6 N, P 1 Ω cm, minority carrier life > 25 μs cell conversion efficiency of about 19.3%, the product costs dollars / kg, the product energy consumption < 30 kwh / kg. The existing problems are pointed out. The prospect of the new metallurgical process with low cost, low energy consumption, low carbon and sustainable development are prospected.

  18. Development of new stem cell-based technologies for carnivore reproduction research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, A J; Kim, Y; Meyers-Wallen, V

    2009-07-01

    New reproductive technologies based on stem cells offer several potential benefits to carnivore species. For example, development of lines of embryonic stem cells in cats and dogs would allow for the generation of transgenic animal models, which could be used to advance both veterinary and human health. Techniques such as spermatogonial stem cell transplantation (SSCT) and testis xenografting offer new approaches to propagate genetically valuable individual males, even if they should die before producing sperm. These techniques might therefore have application to the conservation of endangered species of carnivores, as well as to biomedical research. Recently, our laboratory has successfully performed SSCT in the dog, with a recipient dog producing sperm of donor genetic origin. Testis xenografting has been used to produce sperm from pre-pubertal testis tissue from both cats and ferrets. These early steps reinforce the need not only for research on stem cell technologies, but also for additional research into complementary technologies of assisted reproduction in carnivores, so that the widest array of research and clinical benefits can be realized.

  19. Determine equilibrium dissociation constant of drug-membrane receptor affinity using the cell membrane chromatography relative standard method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weina; Yang, Liu; Lv, Yanni; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Yanmin; He, Langchong

    2017-06-23

    The equilibrium dissociation constant (K D ) of drug-membrane receptor affinity is the basic parameter that reflects the strength of interaction. The cell membrane chromatography (CMC) method is an effective technique to study the characteristics of drug-membrane receptor affinity. In this study, the K D value of CMC relative standard method for the determination of drug-membrane receptor affinity was established to analyze the relative K D values of drugs binding to the membrane receptors (Epidermal growth factor receptor and angiotensin II receptor). The K D values obtained by the CMC relative standard method had a strong correlation with those obtained by the frontal analysis method. Additionally, the K D values obtained by CMC relative standard method correlated with pharmacological activity of the drug being evaluated. The CMC relative standard method is a convenient and effective method to evaluate drug-membrane receptor affinity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Preclinical Testing of an Oncolytic Parvovirus: Standard Protoparvovirus H-1PV Efficiently Induces Osteosarcoma Cell Lysis In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Geiss

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most frequent malignant disease of the bone. On the basis of early clinical experience in the 1960s with H-1 protoparvovirus (H-1PV in osteosarcoma patients, this effective oncolytic virus was selected for systematic preclinical testing on various osteosarcoma cell cultures. A panel of five human osteosarcoma cell lines (CAL 72, H-OS, MG-63, SaOS-2, U-2OS was tested. Virus oncoselectivity was confirmed by infecting non-malignant human neonatal fibroblasts and osteoblasts used as culture models of non-transformed mesenchymal cells. H-1PV was found to enter osteosarcoma cells and to induce viral DNA replication, transcription of viral genes, and translation to viral proteins. After H-1PV infection, release of infectious viral particles from osteosarcoma cells into the supernatant indicated successful viral assembly and egress. Crystal violet staining revealed progressive cytomorphological changes in all osteosarcoma cell lines. Infection of osteosarcoma cell lines with the standard H-1PV caused an arrest of the cell cycle in the G2 phase, and these lines had a limited capacity for standard H-1PV virus replication. The cytotoxicity of wild-type H-1PV virus towards osteosarcoma cells was compared in vitro with that of two variants, Del H-1PV and DM H-1PV, previously described as fitness variants displaying higher infectivity and spreading in human transformed cell lines of different origins. Surprisingly, wild-type H-1PV displayed the strongest cytostatic and cytotoxic effects in this analysis and thus seems the most promising for the next preclinical validation steps in vivo.