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Sample records for cell symposium incorporating

  1. Symposium overview: incorporating ecosystem objectives within fisheries management

    Gislason, Henrik; Sinclair, M.; Sainsbury, K.

    2000-01-01

    into account ecosystem considerations. There was not, however, a consensus on what additional restrictions are required, or on what features of ecosystems need to be protected. A way forward is to add ecosystem objectives to the conservation component of fisheries management plans, as well as to the management...... and a greater workload added to the process of provision of scientific advice through peer review. Of equal importance would be the challenges of establishing a governance framework to address multiple uses of marine resources. The spirit of the Symposium was that these coupled scientific and governance...

  2. In Light of the 2012 NASPE Symposium, to What Extent Should Physical Educators Incorporate Pop Culture in Their Classes?

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In this "Issues" column, "The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance" provides responses to the question: "In Light of the 2012 NASPE Symposium, to What Extent Should Physical Educators Incorporate Pop Culture in Their Classes?" Responses this month come from an assistant professor who says that:…

  3. Cell phone data and travel behavior research: symposium summary report

    2014-07-01

    This report summarizes the key themes from a symposium held on February 12, 2014, to discuss opportunities and challenges using cellular location data for national travel behavior analysis. Participants discussed the availability of cellular data and...

  4. The Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing: Proceedings of a Symposium.

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Inst. of Lab. Animal Resources.

    This volume contains the prepared papers and discussions of a National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council Symposium on the Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing. The purpose of the symposium was to examine the past, present, and future contributions of animals to human health…

  5. Rates of incorporation of radioactive molecules during the cell cycle

    Gray, J.W.; Pallavicini, M.G.; George, Y.S.; Groppi, V.; Look, M.; Dean, P.N.

    1981-01-01

    We report measurements of the incorporation of radioactive molecules during short labeling periods, as a function of cell-cycle stage, using a cell-sorter-based technique that does not require cell synchronization. We have determined: (1) tritiated thymidine ( 3 H-TdR) incorporation throughout S-phase in Lewis lung tumor cells in vitro both before and after treatment with cytosine arabinoside; (2) 3 H-TdR incorporation throughout S-phase in KHT tumor cells in vitro and in vivo; (3) 3 H-TdR incorporation throughout S-phase in Chinese hamster ovary cells and compared it with DNA synthesis throughout S-phase; (4) a mathematical expression describing 3 H-TdR incorporation throughout S-phase in Chinese hamster M3-1 cells; and (5) the simultaneous incorporation of 3 H-TdR and 35 S-methionine as they are related to cell size and DNA content in S49 mouse lymphoma cells. In asynchronously growing cells in vitro and in vivo, 3 H-TdR incorporation was generally low in early and late S-phase and highest in mid-S-phase. However, in Lewis lung tumor cells treated with cytosine arabinoside 3 H-TdR incorporation was highest in early and late S-phase and lowest in mid-S-phase. Incorporation of 35 S-methionine increased continuously with cell size and DNA content. Incorporation of 3 H-TdR in CHO cells was proportional to DNA synthesis

  6. Symposium on single cell analysis and genomic approaches, Experimental Biology 2017 Chicago, Illinois, April 23, 2017.

    Coller, Hilary A

    2017-09-01

    Emerging technologies for the analysis of genome-wide information in single cells have the potential to transform many fields of biology, including our understanding of cell states, the response of cells to external stimuli, mosaicism, and intratumor heterogeneity. At Experimental Biology 2017 in Chicago, Physiological Genomics hosted a symposium in which five leaders in the field of single cell genomics presented their recent research. The speakers discussed emerging methodologies in single cell analysis and critical issues for the analysis of single cell data. Also discussed were applications of single cell genomics to understanding the different types of cells within an organism or tissue and the basis for cell-to-cell variability in response to stimuli. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Fuel cell subassemblies incorporating subgasketed thrifted membranes

    Iverson, Eric J.; Pierpont, Daniel M.; Yandrasits, Michael A.; Hamrock, Steven J.; Obradovich, Stephan J.; Peterson, Donald G.

    2016-03-01

    A fuel cell roll good subassembly is described that includes a plurality of individual electrolyte membranes. One or more first subgaskets are attached to the individual electrolyte membranes. Each of the first subgaskets has at least one aperture and the first subgaskets are arranged so the center regions of the individual electrolyte membranes are exposed through the apertures of the first subgaskets. A second subgasket comprises a web having a plurality of apertures. The second subgasket web is attached to the one or more first subgaskets so the center regions of the individual electrolyte membranes are exposed through the apertures of the second subgasket web. The second subgasket web may have little or no adhesive on the subgasket surface facing the electrolyte membrane.

  8. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    Paves Heiti

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area.

  9. Symposium GC: Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells

    Bommisetty, Venkat [Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States)

    2011-06-23

    This paper provides a summary only and table of contents of the sessions. Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

  10. Cell biology symposium: Membrane trafficking and signal transduction

    In general, membrane trafficking is a broad group of processes where proteins and other large molecules are distributed throughout the cell as well as adjacent extracellular spaces. Whereas signal transduction is a process where signals are transmitted through a series of chemical or molecular event...

  11. The Fourth Nagoya International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Symposium: new horizons in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation--2001 revolution.

    Sao, Hiroshi; Morishita, Yoshihisa

    2002-02-01

    In this symposium, we saw new horizons in allogeneic transplantation. Are these truly revolutionary? We do not yet know the answer. However, there is no question about the importance of allogeneic T cells. T cells are much more powerful than any pharmacological drug man has ever generated. The question is, how do we take the most advantage of their potential. Every participant was encouraged to search for good answers to this question until the next meeting.

  12. Ocular Stem Cell Research from Basic Science to Clinical Application: A Report from Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium

    Hong Ouyang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells hold promise for treating a wide variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders of the eye. The eye is an ideal organ for stem cell therapy because of its relative immunological privilege, surgical accessibility, and its being a self-contained system. The eye also has many potential target diseases amenable to stem cell-based treatment, such as corneal limbal stem cell deficiency, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, and retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Among them, AMD and glaucoma are the two most common diseases, affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Recent results on the clinical trial of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs in treating dry AMD and Stargardt’s disease in the US, Japan, England, and China have generated great excitement and hope. This marks the beginning of the ocular stem cell therapy era. The recent Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium discussed the potential applications of various stem cell types in stem cell-based therapies, drug discoveries and tissue engineering for treating ocular diseases.

  13. Honoring the work and life of Leroy C. Stevens. A symposium as part of the International Stem Cell Initiative Workshop.

    Graham, Christopher F; Solter, Davor; Gearhart, John D; Nadeau, Joseph H; Knowles, Barbara B

    2016-01-01

    In 2016, a symposium was convened in Leroy C. Stevens' honor, in association with a meeting of the International Stem Cell Initiative (ISCI). ISCI, funded internationally, is composed of a group of ~100 scientists from many countries, under the leadership of Peter Andrews, who have worked together to characterize a significant number of human pluripotent stem cell lines, to monitor their genetic stability and their differentiation into mature cell types and tissues in vitro and in vivo. Those at the ISCI meeting puzzled through one of the thorniest problems in the therapeutic use of the differentiated derivatives of pluripotent stem cells for human therapy; namely, pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into any cell type in the adult organism, but they also have the capacity for unlimited self-renewal, hence if mutated they may have tumorigenic potential. The meeting considered how these cells might become genetically or epigenetically abnormal and how the safety of these cells for human therapeutic uses could be assessed and assured. The symposium was an opportunity to pay tribute to Leroy Stevens and to the basic science origins of this newest aspect of regenerative medicine. It was a time to reflect on the past and on how it can influence the future of our field.

  14. Symposium on hydrogen technology and fuel cells - opportunities for the economy; Symposium Wassertechnologie und Brennstoffzellen - Chancen fuer die Wirtschaft

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This volume contains 17 contributions on fuel cell technology and on the infrastructure required for hydrogen production and supply, in the form of abstracts and short reports. [German] Dieser Band enthaelt 17 Beitraege zum Themenkreis Brennstoffzellentechnologie und die dazu erforderliche Infrastruktur fuer die Wasserstofferzeugung und -versorgung in Form von Kurzfassungen und Vortragsfolien.

  15. Selective incorporation of 5-hydroxytryptophan into proteins in mammalian cells

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G

    2014-02-25

    This invention provides methods and compositions for incorporation of an unnatural amino acid into a peptide using an orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA synthetase/tRNA pair. In particular, an orthogonal pair is provided to incorporate 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan in a position encoded by an opal mutation.

  16. India Symposium

    JNCASR

    Impact of Women's research in Science and Technology in the new millennium'. The. Symposium will showcase the work done by young Indian Women Scientists in different branches of Science and Engineering, at a wide spectrum of Research ...

  17. IUTAM Symposium

    1995-01-01

    The International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (IUTAM) decided in 1992 to sponsor the fourth Symposium on Laminar-Turbulent Transition, Sendai/Japan, 1994. The objectives of the present Symposium were to deepen the fundamental knowledge of stability and laminar­ turbulent transition in three-dimensional and compressible flows and to contribute to recent developing technologies in the field. This Symposium followed the three previous IUTAM-Symposia (Stuttgart 1979, Novosibirsk 1984 and Toulouse 1989). The Scientific Committee selected two keynote lectures and 62 technical papers. The Symposium was held on the 5th to 9th of September, 1994, at the Sendai International Center in Sendai. The participants were 82 scientists from 10 countries. The keynote lectures have critically reviewed recent development of researches concerning the laminar-to-turbulent transition phenomena from the fundamental and the application aspects. Many papers presented were concerned about the detailed mechanism of the bo...

  18. A Symposium.

    Rachal, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the framework of a symposium to present an imagined discussion by historical figures about whether and how knowledge might be acquired. Discussants include Democritus, Protagoras, Heraclitus, Socrates, Jesus, Gorgias, Nietzsche, Buddha, and Kierkegaard. (Contains 40 endnotes.) (SK)

  19. Panoramic view of the Fifth International Symposium on Stem Cell Therapy and Applied Cardiovascular Biotechnology, April 2008, Madrid (Spain).

    Villa, Adolfo; Sanz, Ricardo; Fernandez, M Eugenia; Elizaga, Jaime; Ludwig, Indrig; Sanchez, Pedro L; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco

    2009-03-01

    The Fifth International Symposium on Stem Cell Therapy and Applied Cardiovascular Biotechnology was held on April 24th-25th, 2008, at the Auditorium of the High Council of Scientific Research of Spain (CSIC) in Madrid, as a continuation of a series of yearly meetings, organized in an attempt to encourage translational research in this field and facilitate a positive interaction among experts from several countries, along with industry representatives and journalists. In addition, members of the Task Force of the European Society concerning the clinical investigation of the use of autologous adult stem cells for repair of the heart gathered and discussed an update of the previous consensus, still pending of publication. In this article, we summarize some of the main topics of discussion, the state-of-the-art and latest advances in this field, and new challenges brought up for the near future.

  20. Incorporating pushing in exclusion-process models of cell migration.

    Yates, Christian A; Parker, Andrew; Baker, Ruth E

    2015-05-01

    The macroscale movement behavior of a wide range of isolated migrating cells has been well characterized experimentally. Recently, attention has turned to understanding the behavior of cells in crowded environments. In such scenarios it is possible for cells to interact, inducing neighboring cells to move in order to make room for their own movements or progeny. Although the behavior of interacting cells has been modeled extensively through volume-exclusion processes, few models, thus far, have explicitly accounted for the ability of cells to actively displace each other in order to create space for themselves. In this work we consider both on- and off-lattice volume-exclusion position-jump processes in which cells are explicitly allowed to induce movements in their near neighbors in order to create space for themselves to move or proliferate into. We refer to this behavior as pushing. From these simple individual-level representations we derive continuum partial differential equations for the average occupancy of the domain. We find that, for limited amounts of pushing, comparison between the averaged individual-level simulations and the population-level model is nearly as good as in the scenario without pushing. Interestingly, we find that, in the on-lattice case, the diffusion coefficient of the population-level model is increased by pushing, whereas, for the particular off-lattice model that we investigate, the diffusion coefficient is reduced. We conclude, therefore, that it is important to consider carefully the appropriate individual-level model to use when representing complex cell-cell interactions such as pushing.

  1. IUTAM Symposium

    Whitelaw, James; Wung, T

    1992-01-01

    A Symposium on Aerothermodynamics of Combustors was held at the Institute of Applied Mechanics of the National Taiwan University from 3 to 5 June 1991 and was attended by 130 delegates from eight countries. The topics of the forty formal presentations included measurements and calculations of isothermal simulations and of combusting flows with one and two phases, and with consideration of configurations ranging from simple diffusion to gas-turbine flows. The discussions inside and outside of the Symposium Hall were lively and an open forum session demonstrated the range of opinions currently and strongly held. The International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics initiated the Symposium under the chairmanship of Professor R S L Lee and with the Scientific Committee listed below. It benefited from sponsorship, again as listed below, and from contributors who presented interesting and up-to-date descriptions of their research. Invited lectures were delivered by Professors R Bilger and F Weinberg and set ...

  2. Human cultured cells are capable to incorporate isolated plant mitochondria loaded with exogenous DNA

    Laktionov P. P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the possibility of human cultured cells to incorporate isolated mitochondria together with exogenous DNA introduced into organelles. Methods. Two approaches were used for this purpose, fluorescent labelling of mitochondria and/or DNA with subsequent analysis of the cells subjected to incubation by microscopy or by quantitative PCR. Results. We have shown that human cultured cells lines, HeLa and HUVEC, are capable to uptake isolated plant mitochondria and that this process depends on the incubation time and concentration of organelles present in medium. The incorporated mitochondria can serve as vehicles to deliver exogenous DNA into human cells, this DNA is then distributed in different cell compartments. Conclusions. These results are preliminary and need further investigations, including testing the possibility of human cells to incorporate the mitochondria of human or animal origin and creating genetic construction which could provide certain selectivity or stability of the transferred exogenous DNA upon cell uptake of the mitochondria as vectors.

  3. Fuel wood symposium; Symposium Energieholz

    Wild, C.; Wauer, A. (comps.)

    2001-07-01

    The Bavarian State Institute of Forestry (LWF) organised a 'Fuel Wood Symposium' in Freising-Weihenstephan on 17.11.2000. The purpose of this specialist conference was to give an overview of the use of biomass, especially wood, as an source of energy. (orig.) [German] Die Bayerische Landesanstalt fuer Wald und Forstwirtschaft richtete am 17.11.2000 in Freising-Weihenstephan das 'Symposium Energieholz' aus. Ziel der Fachtagung war es, einen Ueberblick ueber die energetische Nutzung von Biomasse, insbesondere Holz, zu geben. (orig.)

  4. Solar cell structure incorporating a novel single crystal silicon material

    Pankove, Jacques I.; Wu, Chung P.

    1983-01-01

    A novel hydrogen rich single crystal silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystal silicon without out-gassing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semiconductor devices such as single crystal silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystal silicon without hydrogen.

  5. LHRH inhibits [3H]thymidine incorporation by pituitary cells cultured IN VITRO

    Stepien, H.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of two synthetic neuropeptides, LHRH and neurotensin, on tritiated thymidine uptake by dispersed anterior pituitary cells were investigated. It was found that LHRH but not neurotensin (at concentrations between 10 -7 - 10 -11 M) inhibits incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA of pituitary cell nuclei, in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that LHRH can regulate not only secretory activity of the gonadotrophic cells but also can be involved in the control of anterior pituitary cell replication

  6. Cell-free unnatural amino acid incorporation with alternative energy systems and linear expression templates.

    Shrestha, Prashanta; Smith, Mark Thomas; Bundy, Bradley Charles

    2014-01-25

    Site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids (uAAs) during protein synthesis expands the proteomic code through the addition of unique residue chemistry. This field provides a unique tool to improve pharmacokinetics, cancer treatments, vaccine development, proteomics and protein engineering. The limited ability to predict the characteristics of proteins with uAA-incorporation creates a need for a low-cost system with the potential for rapid screening. Escherichia coli-based cell-free protein synthesis is a compelling platform for uAA incorporation due to the open and accessible nature of the reaction environment. However, typical cell-free systems can be expensive due to the high cost of energizing reagents. By employing alternative energy sources, we reduce the cost of uAA-incorporation in CFPS by 55%. While alternative energy systems reduce cost, the time investment to develop gene libraries can remain cumbersome. Cell-free systems allow the direct use of PCR products known as linear expression templates, thus alleviating tedious plasmid library preparations steps. We report the specific costs of CFPS with uAA incorporation, demonstrate that LETs are suitable expression templates with uAA-incorporation, and consider the substantial reduction in labor intensity using LET-based expression for CFPS uAA incorporation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Symposium Highlights

    Owen-Whitred, K.

    2015-01-01

    Overview/Highlights: To begin, I'd like to take a moment to highlight some of the novel elements of this Symposium as compared to those that have been held in the past. For the first time ever, this Symposium was organized around five concurrent sessions, covering over 300 papers and presentations. These sessions were complemented by an active series of exhibits put on by vendors, universities, ESARDA, INMM, and Member State Support Programmes. We also had live demonstrations throughout the week on everything from software to destructive analysis to instrumentation, which provided the participants the opportunity to see recent developments that are ready for implementation. I'm sure you all had a chance to observe - and, more importantly, interact with - the electronic Poster, or ePoster format used this past week. This technology was used here for the first time ever by the IAEA, and I'm sure was a first for many of us as well. The ePoster format allowed participants to interact with the subject matter, and the subject matter experts, in a dynamic, engaging way. In addition to the novel technology used here, I have to say that having the posters strategically embedded in the sessions on the same topic, by having each poster author introduce his or her topic to the assembled group in order to lure us to the poster area during the breaks, was also a novel and highly effective technique. A final highlight I'd like to touch on in terms of the Symposium organization is the diversity of participation. This chart shows the breakdown by geographical distribution for the Symposium, in terms of participants. There are no labels, so don't try to read any, I simply wanted to demonstrate that we had great representation in terms of both the Symposium participants in general and the session chairs more specifically-and on that note, I would just mention here that 59 Member States participated in the Symposium. But what I find especially interesting and

  8. Proceedings of DAE-BRNS life sciences symposium 2011 on advances in molecular and cell biology of stress response

    2011-01-01

    This series of symposia in life sciences was initiated for the purpose of facilitating strong interactions among the national research fraternity working in the areas of bio-medical and agricultural sciences of relevance and interest for the Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India. Dedicated research efforts in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre and other DAE institutions for nearly four decades have not only resulted in the development of technologies and products to improve the quality of human life, but have made impactful contributions in several contemporary areas in basic biological sciences. It is natural that keep visiting certain themes more than once. Biology of stress response is one such theme. The first symposium in the series was devoted to this field. And six years is long enough a time for catching up with the new developments. Stress to a system at equilibrium induces homeostatic mechanisms that ameliorate the stress. Entire living world, from microbes to man, have evolved such response mechanisms. Often a given battery of responsive genes may take care of more than one stresses and there may also be some redundancy in signalling or effector pathways to a response. Oxidative stress in one of the most common stresses that most living systems have to endure. Such a stress could be induced by a wide variety of insults including ionizing radiation, visible light, antibiotics, xenobiotics, metal ions, environmental pollutants, carcinogens, infectious agents etc. It may contribute to some inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. It also plays an important role in killing of intracellular pathogens. In recent years mechanistic details of body's antioxidant defences are being increasingly revealed. Even more interesting are the new findings that suggest that prooxidants may induce an adaptive response to help cells survive against death induced by higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The role of prosurvival transcription factors like NRF-2

  9. Spin symposium

    Anon.

    1989-01-15

    The recent 8th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minnesota, opened with a bang when L. Pondrom (Wisconsin), donning a hard hat borrowed from construction workers, ventured that 'spin, the notorious inessential complication of hadronic physics, is finally telling us what real QCD (quantum chromodynamics, the field theory of quarks and gluons) looks like.' He was referring to an animated discussion on the meaning of the recent spin oriented (polarized) scattering results from the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) at CERN and reported at the Symposium by R. Garnet (Liverpool) and P. Schuler (Yale) which show that the proton spin is not simply a reflection of the spins of its constituent quarks.

  10. IUTAM Symposium

    Stefanou, George

    2014-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the IUTAM Symposium on Multiscale Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification of Materials and Structures that was held at Santorini, Greece, September 9 – 11, 2013. It consists of 20 chapters which are divided in five thematic topics: Damage and fracture, homogenization, inverse problems–identification, multiscale stochastic mechanics and stochastic dynamics. Over the last few years, the intense research activity at microscale and nanoscale reflected the need to account for disparate levels of uncertainty from various sources and across scales. As even over-refined deterministic approaches are not able to account for this issue, an efficient blending of stochastic and multiscale methodologies is required to provide a rational framework for the analysis and design of materials and structures. The purpose of this IUTAM Symposium was to promote achievements in uncertainty quantification combined with multiscale modeling and to encourage research and development in this grow...

  11. Red blood cells, still vital after all these years: Commentary on Canadian Blood Services' International Symposium 2017.

    Qadri, Syed M; Donkor, David A; Yan, Matthew; Ning, Shuoyan; Branch, Donald R; Seghatchian, Jerard; Sheffield, William P

    2018-04-01

    Canadian Blood Services (CBS), Canada's national blood transfusion service, has for many years sponsored an annual conference, for the education and awareness of interested participants, showcasing the latest evidence-based understanding of both basic science and clinical issues in transfusion medicine and science. The 15th iteration of this symposium took place September 9, 2017 and focused on some of the vital aspects of red blood cells (RBC), in line with the" 3Rs" concept, namely the provision of the Right red blood cell (RBC) product to the Right patient at the Right time. Presentations touched upon: the evolution of blood banking in North America; the monocyte monolayer assay as a predictor of post-transfusion hemolysis; hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers; RBC alloimmunization; serological approaches to complex RBC antibody problems; randomized clinical trials related to the age of stored RBC; RBC genotyping; pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN); and testing and timing in perinatal serology. This commentary provides summaries of all speakers' presentations annotated with relevant references. Special thanks are due to all contributors for their praiseworthy approaches in sharing their experiences and knowledge on this interesting scientific/clinical and management theme. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. IUTAM Symposium

    Shioiri, Jumpei

    1996-01-01

    The IUTAM Symposium on Constitutive Relation in High/Very High Strain Rates (CRHVHSR) was held October 16 - 19, 1995, at Seminar House, Science University of Tokyo, under the sponsorship of IUTAM, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, The Commemorative Association for the Japan World Exposition (1970), Inoue Foundation for Science, The Japan Society for Aeronautical and Space Sciences, and Science University of Tokyo. The proposal to hold the symposium was accepted by the General Assembly of IUT AM held in Haifa, Israel, in August 1992, and the scientists mentioned below were appointed by the Bureau of IUTAM to serve as members of the Scientific Committee. The main object of the symposium was to make a general survey of recent developments in the research of constitutive relations in high and very high strain rates and related problems in high velocity solid mechanics, and to explore further new ideas for dealing with unresolved problems of a fundamental nature as well as of practical importance. The su...

  13. Increasing the fidelity of noncanonical amino acid incorporation in cell-free protein synthesis.

    Gan, Qinglei; Fan, Chenguang

    2017-11-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis provides a robust platform for co-translational incorporation of noncanonical amino acid (ncAA) into proteins to facilitate biological studies and biotechnological applications. Recently, eliminating the activity of release factor 1 has been shown to increase ncAA incorporation in response to amber codons. However, this approach could promote mis-incorporation of canonical amino acids by near cognate suppression. We performed a facile protocol to remove near cognate tRNA isoacceptors of the amber codon from total tRNAs, and used the phosphoserine (Sep) incorporation system as validation. By manipulating codon usage of target genes and tRNA species introduced into the cell-free protein synthesis system, we increased the fidelity of Sep incorporation at a specific position. By removing three near cognate tRNA isoacceptors of the amber stop codon [tRNA Lys , tRNA Tyr , and tRNA Gln (CUG)] from the total tRNA, the near cognate suppression decreased by 5-fold without impairing normal protein synthesis in the cell-free protein synthesis system. Mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the fidelity of ncAA incorporation was improved. Removal of near cognate tRNA isoacceptors of the amber codon could increase ncAA incorporation fidelity towards the amber stop codon in release factor deficiency systems. We provide a general strategy to improve fidelity of ncAA incorporation towards stop, quadruplet and sense codons in cell-free protein synthesis systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biochemistry of Synthetic Biology - Recent Developments" Guest Editor: Dr. Ilka Heinemann and Dr. Patrick O'Donoghue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETE's) by adrenal glomerulosa cells and incorporation into cellular lipids

    Campbell, W.B.; Richards, C.F.; Brady, M.T.; Falck, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The role of lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) in the regulation of aldosterone secretion was studied in isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells. Cells were incubated with 14 C-AA in the presence of angiotensin (AII). The media was extracted, metabolites isolated by HPLC, and structures of the metabolites determined by UV absorbance and mass spectrometry. The major products were 12- and 15-HETE with lesser amounts of 11- and 5-HETE. When adrenal cells were incubated with 15-, 12- or 5-HPETE or their respective HETE's (0.03-300nM), there was no significant change in basal or AII-stimulated aldosterone release. Cells were incubated with [ 3 H]-AA, -5-HETE, -15-HETE, -12-HETE or -LTB. The cellular lipids were extracted and analyzed by TLC. AA was incorporated into phospholipids (22%), cholesterol esters (50%) and triglycerides (21%). Neither the HETE's or LTB 4 were incorporated into phospholipids. 5-HETE was taken up into di- and mono-glycerides. The rates of incorporation of AA and 5-HETE were similar (+ 1/2 = 10 min). The incorporation of 5-HETE into glycerol esters did not modify the release of aldosterone by the cells. Thus, while adrenal cells synthesize HETE's, these eicosanoids do not appear to alter the synthesis of aldosterone

  15. Carbon nanotube-incorporated collagen hydrogels improve cell alignment and the performance of cardiac constructs

    Sun HY

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hongyu Sun,* Jing Zhou,* Zhu Huang,* Linlin Qu,* Ning Lin,* Chengxiao Liang, Ruiwu Dai, Lijun Tang, Fuzhou Tian General Surgery Center, Chengdu Military General Hospital, Chengdu, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs provide an essential 2-D microenvironment for cardiomyocyte growth and function. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CNT nanostructures can promote cell–cell integrity and facilitate the formation of functional tissues in 3-D hydrogels. Here, single-walled CNTs were incorporated into collagen hydrogels to fabricate (CNT/Col hydrogels, which improved mechanical and electrical properties. The incorporation of CNTs (up to 1 wt% exhibited no toxicity to cardiomyocytes and enhanced cell adhesion and elongation. Through the use of immunohistochemical staining, transmission electron microscopy, and intracellular calcium-transient measurement, the incorporation of CNTs was found to improve cell alignment and assembly remarkably, which led to the formation of engineered cardiac tissues with stronger contraction potential. Importantly, cardiac tissues based on CNT/Col hydrogels were noted to have better functionality. Collectively, the incorporation of CNTs into the Col hydrogels improved cell alignment and the performance of cardiac constructs. Our study suggests that CNT/Col hydrogels offer a promising tissue scaffold for cardiac constructs, and might serve as injectable biomaterials to deliver cell or drug molecules for cardiac regeneration following myocardial infarction in the near future. Keywords: carbon nanotubes, collagen hydrogel, cardiac constructs, cell alignment, tissue functionality

  16. Enhanced incorporation of radioactive inorganic phosphate into phospholipids of HeLa cells by tumor promoters

    Nishino, H.; Fujiki, H.; Terada, M.; Sato, S.

    1983-01-01

    Teleocidin, a new tumor promoter, increased incorporation of radioactive inorganic phosphate ( 32 P/sub i/) into phospholipids in HeLa cells. This effect was detected within 1 h on incubation of the cells in medium containing teleocidin. The half-maximum effective dose of teleocidin was approximately 10 ng/ml. The main effect of teleocidin was on the incorporation of 32 P/sub i/ into the phosphatidylcholine fraction, with a lesser effect on 32 P/sub i/ incorporation into other phospholipid fractions. Increased incorporation of 32 P/sub i/ into phospholipids was also observed on incubation of the cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), dihydroteleocidin B, or lyngbyatoxin A, which are all complete tumor promoters, and also with mezerein, which is an incomplete and second stage promoter. On the other hand, at concentrations of up to 1 microgram/ml, 4-O-methyl TPA and C/sub a/ 2 + ionophore A23187, which are incomplete and first stage promoters, and phorbol, which has no promoting activity in skin carcinogenesis, did not cause any increased incorporation of 32 P/sub i/ into phospholipid fractions of HeLa cells

  17. Lactoperoxidase catalyzed radioiodination of cell surface immunoglobulin: incorporated radioactivity may not reflect relative cell surface Ig density

    Wilder, R.L.; Yuen, C.C.; Mage, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Rabbit and mouse splenic lymphocytes were radioiodinated by the lactoperoxidase technique, extracted with non-ionic detergent, immunoprecipitated with high titered rabbit anti-kappa antisera, and compared by SDS-PAGE. Mouse sIg peaks were reproducibly larger in size than rabbit sIg peaks (often greater than 10 times). Neither differences in incorporation of label into the rabbit cell surface, nor differences in average sIg density explain this result. Total TCA-precipitable radioactivity was similar in each species. Estimation of the relative amounts of sIg in the mouse and rabbit showed similar average sIg densities. Differences in detergent solubility, proteolytic lability, or antisera used also do not adequately account for this difference. Thus, these data indicate that radioactivity incorporated after lactoperoxidase catalyzed cell surface radioiodination may not reflect cell surface Ig density. Conclusions about cell surface density based upon relative incorporation of radioactivity should be confirmed by other approaches

  18. Carbon nanotube-incorporated collagen hydrogels improve cell alignment and the performance of cardiac constructs

    Sun, Hongyu; Zhou, Jing; Huang, Zhu; Qu, Linlin; Lin, Ning; Liang, Chengxiao; Dai, Ruiwu; Tang, Lijun; Tian, Fuzhou

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) provide an essential 2-D microenvironment for cardiomyocyte growth and function. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CNT nanostructures can promote cell–cell integrity and facilitate the formation of functional tissues in 3-D hydrogels. Here, single-walled CNTs were incorporated into collagen hydrogels to fabricate (CNT/Col) hydrogels, which improved mechanical and electrical properties. The incorporation of CNTs (up to 1 wt%) exhibited no toxicity to cardiomyocytes and enhanced cell adhesion and elongation. Through the use of immunohistochemical staining, transmission electron microscopy, and intracellular calcium-transient measurement, the incorporation of CNTs was found to improve cell alignment and assembly remarkably, which led to the formation of engineered cardiac tissues with stronger contraction potential. Importantly, cardiac tissues based on CNT/Col hydrogels were noted to have better functionality. Collectively, the incorporation of CNTs into the Col hydrogels improved cell alignment and the performance of cardiac constructs. Our study suggests that CNT/Col hydrogels offer a promising tissue scaffold for cardiac constructs, and might serve as injectable biomaterials to deliver cell or drug molecules for cardiac regeneration following myocardial infarction in the near future. PMID:28450785

  19. Calculation of cell production from [3H]Thymidine incorporation with freshwater bacteria

    Smits, J.D.; Riemann, B.

    1988-01-01

    The conversion factor for the calculation of bacterial production from rates of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation was examined with diluted batch cultures of freshwater bacteria. Natural bacterial assemblages were grown in aged, normal, and enriched media at 10 to 20 degree C. The generation time during 101 growth cycles covered a range from 4 to >200 h. The average conversion factor was 2.15 x 10 18 cells mol -1 of thymidine incorporated into the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitate, when the generation time exceeded 20 h. At generation times of 18 cells mol -1 of thymidine incorporated into TCA precipitate. The amount of radioactivity in purified DNA increased with decreasing generation time and increasing conversion factor (calculated from the TCA precipitate), corresponding to a decrease in the percentage in protein. The conversion factors calculated from purified DNA or from the TCA precipitate gave the same variability. Conversion factors did not change significantly with the medium, but were significantly higher at 20 degree C that at 15 and 10 degree C. Results suggests that incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA is probably limited by uptake during period with generation times of 18 cells mol -1 of thymidine incorporated is used

  20. Improving Efficiency of Multicrystalline Silicon and CIGS Solar Cells by Incorporating Metal Nanoparticles

    Ming-Jer Jeng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work studies the use of gold (Au and silver (Ag nanoparticles in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si and copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS solar cells. Au and Ag nanoparticles are deposited by spin-coating method, which is a simple and low cost process. The random distribution of nanoparticles by spin coating broadens the resonance wavelength of the transmittance. This broadening favors solar cell applications. Metal shadowing competes with light scattering in a manner that varies with nanoparticle concentration. Experimental results reveal that the mc-Si solar cells that incorporate Au nanoparticles outperform those with Ag nanoparticles. The incorporation of suitable concentration of Au and Ag nanoparticles into mc-Si solar cells increases their efficiency enhancement by 5.6% and 4.8%, respectively. Incorporating Au and Ag nanoparticles into CIGS solar cells improve their efficiency enhancement by 1.2% and 1.4%, respectively. The enhancement of the photocurrent in mc-Si solar cells is lower than that in CIGS solar cells, owing to their different light scattering behaviors and material absorption coefficients.

  1. Incorporation of Biomaterials in Multicellular Aggregates Modulates Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation

    Bratt-Leal, Andrés M.; Carpenedo, Richard L.; Ungrin, Mark; Zandstra, Peter W.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials are increasingly being used to engineer the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular stem cell microenvironment in order to tailor niche characteristics and direct cell phenotype. To date, stem cell-biomaterial interactions have largely been studied by introducing stem cells into artificial environments, such as 2D cell culture on biomaterial surfaces, encapsulation of cell suspensions within hydrogel materials, or cell seeding on 3D polymeric scaffolds. In this study, microparticles fabricated from different materials, such as agarose, PLGA and gelatin, were stably integrated, in a dose-dependent manner, within aggregates of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) prior to differentiation as a means to directly examine stem cell-biomaterial interactions in 3D. Interestingly, the presence of the materials within the stem cell aggregates differentially modulated the gene and protein expression patterns of several differentiation markers without adversely affecting cell viability. Microparticle incorporation within 3D stem cell aggregates can control the spatial presentation of extracellular environmental cues (i.e. soluble factors, extracellular matrix and intercellular adhesion molecules) as a means to direct the differentiation of stem cells for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In addition, these results suggest that the physical presence of microparticles within stem cell aggregates does not compromise PSC differentiation, but in fact the choice of biomaterials can impact the propensity of stem cells to adopt particular differentiated cell phenotypes. PMID:20864164

  2. Symposium Summary

    Levesque, Emily M.

    2017-11-01

    This proceeding summarizes the highlights of IAU 329, ``The Lives and Death-Throes of Massive Stars'', held in Auckland, NZ from 28 Nov - 2 Dec. I consider the progress that has been made in the field over the course of these ``beach symposia'', outline the overall content of the conference, and discuss how the current subfields in massive stellar astrophysics have evolved in recent years. I summarize some of the new results and innovative approaches that were presented during the symposium, and conclude with a discussion of how current and future resources in astronomy can serve as valuable tools for studying massive stars in the coming years.

  3. PREFACE: 9th International Fröhlich's Symposium: Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells (Including Microtubule Coherent Modes and Cancer Cell Physics)

    Cifra, Michal; Pokorný, Jirí; Kucera, Ondrej

    2011-12-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International Fröhlich's Symposium entitled 'Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells' (1-3 July 2011, Prague, Czech Republic). The Symposium was the 9th meeting devoted to physical processes in living matter organized in Prague since 1987. The hypothesis of oscillation systems in living cells featured by non-linear interaction between elastic and electrical polarization fields, non-linear interactions between the system and the heat bath leading to energy downconversion along the frequency scale, energy condensation in the lowest frequency mode and creation of a coherent state was formulated by H Fröhlich, founder of the theory of dielectric materials. He assumed that biological activity is based not only on biochemical but also on biophysical mechanisms and that their disturbances form basic links along the cancer transformation pathway. Fröhlich outlined general ideas of non-linear physical processes in biological systems. The downconversion and the elastic-polarization interactions should be connected in a unified theory and the solution based on comprehensive non-linear characteristics. Biochemical and genetic research of biological systems are highly developed and have disclosed a variety of cellular and subcellular structures, chemical reactions, molecular information transfer, and genetic code sequences - including their pathological development. Nevertheless, the cancer problem is still a big challenge. Warburg's discovery of suppressed oxidative metabolism in mitochondria in cancer cells suggested the essential role of physical mechanisms (but his discovery has remained without impact on cancer research and on the study of physical properties of biological systems for a long time). Mitochondria, the power plants of the cell, have several areas of activity-oxidative energy production is connected with the formation of a strong static electric field around them, water ordering, and liberation of non

  4. Sixth BHD Symposium and First International Upstate Kidney Cancer Symposium: latest scientific and clinical discoveries

    Bratslavsky, Gennady; Woodford, Mark R.; Daneshvar, Michael; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The Sixth BHD Symposium and First International Upstate Kidney Cancer Symposium concluded in September 2015, in Syracuse, NY, USA. The program highlighted recent findings in a variety of areas, including drug development, therapeutics and surgical management of patients with BHD and multi-focal renal tumors, as well as multidisciplinary approaches for patients with localized, locally advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  5. Sixth BHD Symposium and First International Upstate Kidney Cancer Symposium: latest scientific and clinical discoveries.

    Bratslavsky, Gennady; Woodford, Mark R; Daneshvar, Michael; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-03-29

    The Sixth BHD Symposium and First International Upstate Kidney Cancer Symposium concluded in September 2015, in Syracuse, NY, USA. The program highlighted recent findings in a variety of areas, including drug development, therapeutics and surgical management of patients with BHD and multi-focal renal tumors, as well as multidisciplinary approaches for patients with localized, locally advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  6. Infection of neuroblastoma cells with Semliki Forest virus. Incorporation of 35S or 32P

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Phosphate-free medium is used for the incorporation of 32 P and methionine-free medium for 35 S-methionine labelling. After virus replication, the culture shows a clear CPE all of the cells appearing round and dead. Materials used are presented and experimental procedure is described

  7. Antitumor activity of vorinostat-incorporated nanoparticles against human cholangiocarcinoma cells

    Kwak, Tae Won; Kim, Do Hyung; Jeong, Young-Il; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to evaluate the anticancer activity of vorinostat-incorporated nanoparticles (vorinostat-NPs) against HuCC-T1 human cholangiocarcinoma cells. Vorinostat-NPs were fabricated by a nanoprecipitation method using poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide)/poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer. Results Vorinostat-NPs exhibited spherical shapes with sizes

  8. IUTAM Symposium

    Pedley, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    The IUTAM Symposium on Flow in Collapsible Tubes and Past Other Highly Compliant Boundaries was held on 26-30 March, 2001, at the University of Warwick. As this was the first scientific meeting of its kind we considered it important to mark the occasion by producing a book. Accordingly, at the end of the Symposium the Scientific Committee met to discuss the most appropriate format for the book. We wished to avoid the format of the conventional conference book consisting of a large number of short articles of varying quality. It was agreed that instead we should produce a limited number of rigorously refereed and edited articles by selected participants who would aim to sum up the state of the art in their particular research area. The outcome is the present book. Peter W. Ca rpenter, Warwick Timothy J. Pedley, Cambridge May, 2002. VB SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE Co-Chair: P.W. Carpenter, Engineering, Warwiek, UK Co-Chair: TJ. Pedley, DAMTP, Cambridge, UK V.V. Babenko, Hydromechanics, Kiev, Ukraine R. Bannasch, Bionik...

  9. The effect of insulin on amino acid incorporation into exocrine pancreatic cells of the rat

    Kramer, M.F.; Poort, C.

    1975-01-01

    The rate of incorporation of radioactive leucine per cell in the acinar pancreatic cells of the rat increases by 50 per cent within one hour after subcutaneous administration of insulin, an effect that lasts for at least one more hour. The rate of incorporation has been measured by quantitative radioautography and by determination of the radioactivity per μg DNA in TCA-precipitable material from tissue homogenates. The capacity for amino acid (leucine and lysine) incorporation as measured by incubating pancreatic fragments in vitro is not enhanced by insulin treatment of the rat in vivo during one or more hours. Insulin was found to lower the serum concentration of most amino acids significantly, leucine by 50 per cent. The apparent effect of insulin on the incorporation of radioactive leucine in vivo can be explained by the difference in the specific radioactivity of the circulating amino acid in the treated rats as compared to the untreated ones. A change in amino acid concentration in the serum may likewise be the explanation of the decrease in amino acid incorporation rate in alloxan diabetic rats. (orig./GSE) [de

  10. Revised mechanism of d-alanine incorporation into cell wall polymers in Gram-positive bacteria

    Reichmann, Nathalie T.; Cassona, Carolina Picarra

    2013-01-01

    Teichoic acids (TAs) are important for growth, biofilm formation, adhesion and virulence of Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. The chemical structures of the TAs vary between bacteria, though they typically consist of zwitterionic polymers that are anchored to either the peptidoglycan layer as in the case of wall teichoic acid (WTA) or the cell membrane and named lipoteichoic acid (LTA). The polymers are modified with d-alanines and a lack of this decoration leads to increased susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Four proteins, DltA–D, are essential for the incorporation of d-alanines into cell wall polymers and it has been established that DltA transfers d-alanines in the cytoplasm of the cell onto the carrier protein DltC. However, two conflicting models have been proposed for the remainder of the mechanism. Using a cellular protein localization and membrane topology analysis, we show here that DltC does not traverse the membrane and that DltD is anchored to the outside of the cell. These data are in agreement with the originally proposed model for d-alanine incorporation through a process that has been proposed to proceed via a d-alanine undecaprenyl phosphate membrane intermediate. Furthermore, we found that WTA isolated from a Staphylococcus aureus strain lacking LTA contains only a small amount of d-alanine, indicating that LTA has a role, either direct or indirect, in the efficient d-alanine incorporation into WTA in living cells. PMID:23858088

  11. In vitro incorporation studies of 99mTc-alendronate sodium at different bone cell lines

    Evren Gundogdu; Derya Ilem-Ozdemir; Makbule Asikoglu

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates can be labeled with Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) and are used for bone imaging because of their good localization in the skeleton and rapid clearance from soft tissues. Over the last decades bone scintigraphy has been used extensively in the evaluation of oncological patients to provide information about the sites of bone lesions, their prognosis and the effectiveness of therapy by showing the sequential changes in tracer uptake. Since the lesion visualization and lesion/bone ratio are important utilities for a bone scanning radiopharmaceutic; in this study incorporation of 99m Tc labeled alendronate sodium ( 99m Tc-ALD) was evaluated in U 2 OS (human bone osteosarcoma) and NCI-H209 (human bone carcinoma) cell lines. ALD was directly labeled by 99m Tc, radiochemical purity and stability of the complex were analyzed by radioactive thin layer chromatography and radioactive high performance liquid chromatography studies. For cell incorporation study, NCI-H209 and U 2 OS cell lines were used with standard cell culture methods. The six well plates were used for all experiments and the integrity of each cell monolayer was checked by measuring its transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) with an epithelial voltammeter. Results confirmed that ALD was successfully radiolabeled with 99m Tc. 99m Tc-ALD incorporated with NCI-H209 and U 2 OS cells. The uptake percentages of 99m Tc-ALD in NCI-H209 and U 2 OS cell lines were found significantly different. Since 99m Tc-ALD highly uptake in cancer cell line, the results demonstrated that radiolabeled ALD may be a promising agent for bone cancer diagnosis. (author)

  12. IUTAM Symposium

    Bui, Huy

    1993-01-01

    Inverse problems occur in a wide variey of fields. In general, the inverse problem can be defined as one where one should estimate the cause from the result, while the direct problem is concerned with how to obtain the result from the cause. The aim of this symposium was to gather scientists and researchers in engineering mechanics concerned with inverse problems in order to exchange research result and develop computational and experimentalapproaches to solve inverse problems. The contributions in this volume cover the following subjects: mathematical and computational aspects of inverse problems, parameter or system identification, shape determination, sensitivity analysis, optimization, material property characterization, ultrasonic nondestructive testing, elastodynamic inverse problems, thermal inverse problems, and other miscellaneous engineering applications.

  13. SPPEXA Symposium

    Neumann, Philipp; Nagel, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The research and its outcomes presented in this collection focus on various aspects of high-performance computing (HPC) software and its development which is confronted with various challenges as today's supercomputer technology heads towards exascale computing. The individual chapters address one or more of the research directions (1) computational algorithms, (2) system software, (3) application software, (4) data management and exploration, (5) programming, and (6) software tools. The collection thereby highlights pioneering research findings as well as innovative concepts in exascale software development that have been conducted under the umbrella of the priority programme "Software for Exascale Computing" (SPPEXA) of the German Research Foundation (DFG) and that have been presented at the SPPEXA Symposium, Jan 25-27 2016, in Munich. The book has an interdisciplinary appeal: scholars from computational sub-fields in computer science, mathematics, physics, or engineering will find it of particular interest...

  14. Seventh International Beaver Symposium

    Yuri A. Gorshkov

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents data on the seventh international Beaver Symposium. Brief historical background about previous Beaver Symposia beaver is shown. Data on the sections of symposium, number of participants and reports are presented.

  15. Seventh International Beaver Symposium

    Yuri A. Gorshkov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data on the seventh international Beaver Symposium. Brief historical background about previous Beaver Symposia beaver is shown. Data on the sections of symposium, number of participants and reports are presented.

  16. HORSE SPECIES SYMPOSIUM: Use of mesenchymal stem cells in fracture repair in horses.

    Govoni, K E

    2015-03-01

    Equine bone fractures are often catastrophic, potentially fatal, and costly to repair. Traditional methods of healing fractures have limited success, long recovery periods, and a high rate of reinjury. Current research in the equine industry has demonstrated that stem cell therapy is a promising novel therapy to improve fracture healing and reduce the incidence of reinjury; however, reports of success in horses have been variable and limited. Stem cells can be derived from embryonic, fetal, and adult tissue. Based on the ease of collection, opportunity for autologous cells, and proven success in other models, adipose- or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are often used in equine therapies. Methods for isolation, proliferation, and differentiation of MSC are well established in rodent and human models but are not well characterized in horses. There is recent evidence that equine bone marrow MSC are able to proliferate in culture for several passages in the presence of autologous and fetal bovine serum, which is important for expansion of cells. Mesenchymal stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts, the bone forming cells, and this complex process is regulated by a number of transcription factors including runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and osterix (Osx). However, it has not been well established if equine MSC are regulated in a similar manner. The data presented in this review support the view that equine bone marrow MSC are regulated by the same transcription factors that control the differentiation of rodent and human MSC into osteoblasts. Although stem cell therapy is promising in equine bone repair, additional research is needed to identify optimal methods for reintroduction and potential manipulations to improve their ability to form new bone.

  17. Fiscal 1991 report. International Fuel Cell Conference; Nenryo denchi kokusai symposium hokokusho

    NONE

    1992-03-01

    Lectures, presentations, and questions given at the event involved items 1) Plenary session, 2) Technology development strategies, 3) Phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC), 4) Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), 5) Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), 6) Other fuel cells, and item 7) Closing session. Under item 1), current states and prospects of technological development were reported by Agency of Industrial Science and Technology of Japan and by industrial technology developing organizations of the U.S. and Europe. Under item 2), a report was given by the U.S. about a fuel cell-driven automobile developing program. Under item 3), a report was given on the exchange of information about plant operation, maintenance, and inspection with importance attached to accuracy. Under item 4), reports were given about a 70kW stack operating program of the U.S. and a 1MW stack pilot plant program of Japan. Under item 5), some NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) projects and a 25kW stack operating test of Westinghouse Electric Corporation were reported. What were learned through participation in this conference are mentioned below. Japan is in the forefront as far as the development of PAFC and MCFC technologies are concerned. The U.S. is ahead of Japan in the development of SOFC while also in Japan efforts to develop element technologies for SOFC are in progress steadily. The U.S. and European countries lead Japan in the development of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). (NEDO)

  18. Enhancement of the incorporation of 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate into DNA of HL-60 cells by metabolic modulations

    Tanaka, M.; Kimura, K.; Yoshida, S.

    1983-01-01

    The exposure of HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells to 0.5 microM 5-fluoro-2'-[ 3 H]deoxyuridine (FdUrd) for 16 hr resulted in the incorporation of 5.14 +/- 0.31 (S.D.) X 10(-7) mol FdUrd into DNA per mol of DNA nucleotide, which corresponds to 0.146 +/- 0.082 pmol FdUrd per 10(7) cells. Pretreatment with 50 microM deoxythymidine for 24 hr led to a 2.7-fold increase in the incorporation of this analogue into newly synthesized DNA during the ensuing 16-hr exposure to 0.5 microM [ 3 H]FdUrd. Pretreatment with 0.5 microM methotrexate for 3 hr also increased the [ 3 H]FdUrd incorporation into newly synthesized DNA approximately 5-fold. The coexistence of deoxythymidine or methotrexate with [ 3 H]FdUrd, however, led to decreased incorporation of FdUrd into DNA. More than 50% of the radioactivity in DNA separated by Cs2SO4 equilibrium density gradient centrifugation was proven to be fluorodeoxyuridylate by means of its binding to Lactobacillus casei deoxythymidine monophosphate synthetase

  19. Enhanced incorporation of fatty acid into phosphatidyl choline that parallels histamine discharge in mast cells

    Castle, J.D.; Castle, A.M.; Ma, A.K.; Stukenbrok, H.

    1984-01-01

    Purified rat peritoneal and pleural mast cells preincubated briefly with radioactively labeled fatty acid were treated with A23187, which bypasses primary receptors in stimulating exocytosis. An enhanced incorporation of fatty acid into phosphatidyl choline (PC) that occurred in parallel with histamine release at 24-25 degrees C was observed and was initially proportional to the total amount of histamine discharged. Enhanced PC labeling and histamine secretion were also proportional at temperatures ranging from 17-37 degrees C. Both radioactive linoleic and palmitic acids were incorporated selectively at the beta-position of the glycerol backbone of PC. PC labeling by [3H]choline was not detectably different in control and stimulated cells, and phosphatidic acid did not exhibit selectively enhanced beta-acylation. Thus, the stimulated labeling in A23187-treated cells may occur secondary to the action of a phospholipase A2 that favors PC as a substrate. Other peritoneal cell types exhibit a very similar A23187-stimulated selective labeling of PC. Therefore, autoradiography has been used to provide a direct demonstration that in purified preparations, mast cells are the principal cell type engaged in A23187-elicited incorporation of fatty acid into PC. The efficacy of this approach has relied on special procedures devised to obtain significantly different autoradiographic grain densities between control and stimulated preparations that can be attributed to differences in the level of [3H]palmitate-labeled PC. Preliminary tests using compound 48/80 as a secretory stimulus for mast cells have identified a similar selectively enhanced PC labeling. In either case, however, consideration of possible relationships between PC metabolism and the secretory process are premature since they have not been tested directly

  20. Exogenous Gene Integration for Microalgal Cell Transformation Using a Nanowire-Incorporated Microdevice.

    Bae, Sunwoong; Park, Seunghye; Kim, Jung; Choi, Jong Seob; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Kwon, Donguk; Jin, EonSeon; Park, Inkyu; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2015-12-16

    Superior green algal cells showing high lipid production and rapid growth rate are considered as an alternative for the next generation green energy resources. To achieve the biomass based energy generation, transformed microalgae with superlative properties should be developed through genetic engineering. Contrary to the normal cells, microalgae have rigid cell walls, so that target gene delivery into cells is challengeable. In this study, we report a ZnO nanowire-incorporated microdevice for a high throughput microalgal transformation. The proposed microdevice was equipped with not only a ZnO nanowire in the microchannel for gene delivery into cells but also a pneumatic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microvalve to modulate the cellular attachment and detachment from the nanowire. As a model, hygromycin B resistance gene cassette (Hyg3) was functionalized on the hydrothermally grown ZnO nanowires through a disulfide bond and released into green algal cells, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, by reductive cleavage. During Hyg3 gene delivery, a monolithic PDMS membrane was bent down, so that algal cells were pushed down toward ZnO nanowires. The supply of vacuum in the pneumatic line made the PDMS membrane bend up, enabling the gene delivered algal cells to be recovered from the outlet of the microchannel. We successfully confirmed Hyg3 gene integrated in microalgae by amplifying the inserted gene through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The efficiency of the gene delivery to algal cells using the ZnO nanowire-incorporated microdevice was 6.52 × 10(4)- and 9.66 × 10(4)-fold higher than that of a traditional glass bead beating and electroporation.

  1. Improved Power Conversion Efficiency of Inverted Organic Solar Cells by Incorporating Au Nanorods into Active Layer.

    He, Yeyuan; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Jinfeng; Zhang, Xinyuan; Li, Zhiqi; Shen, Liang; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2015-07-29

    This Research Article describes a cooperative plasmonic effect on improving the performance of organic solar cells. When Au nanorods(NRs) are incorporated into the active layers, the designed project shows superior enhanced light absorption behavior comparing with control devices, which leads to the realization of organic solar cell with power conversion efficiency of 6.83%, accounting for 18.9% improvement. Further investigations unravel the influence of plasmonic nanostructures on light trapping, exciton generation, dissociation, and charge recombination and transport inside the thin films devices. Moreover, the introduction of high-conductivity Au NRs improves electrical conductivity of the whole device, which contributes to the enhanced fill factor.

  2. Incorporating placental tissue in cord blood banking for stem cell transplantation.

    Teofili, Luciana; Silini, Antonietta R; Bianchi, Maria; Valentini, Caterina Giovanna; Parolini, Ornella

    2018-06-01

    Human term placenta is comprised of various tissues from which different cell populations can be obtained, including hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). Areas covered: This review will discuss the possibility to incorporate placental tissue cells in cord blood banking. It will discuss general features of human placenta, with a brief review of the immune cells at the fetal-maternal interface and the different cell populations isolated from placenta, with a particular focus on MSCs. It will address the question as to why placenta-derived MSCs should be banked with their hematopoietic counterparts. It will discuss clinical trials which are studying safety and efficacy of placenta tissue-derived MSCs in selected diseases, and preclinical studies which have proven their therapeutic properties in other diseases. It will discuss banking of umbilical cord blood and raise several issues for improvement, and the applications of cord blood cells in non-malignant disorders. Expert Commentary: Umbilical cord blood banking saves lives worldwide. The concomitant banking of non-hematopoietic cells from placenta, which could be applied therapeutically in the future, alone or in combination to their hematopoietic counterparts, could exploit current banking processes while laying the foundation for clinical trials exploring placenta-derived cell therapies in regenerative medicine.

  3. Radiation-induced DNA damage in halogenated pyrimidine incorporated cells and its correlation with radiosensitivity

    Watanabe, R.; Nikjoo, H.

    2003-01-01

    Cells with DNA containing 5-halogenated pyrimidines in place of thymidine show significant reductions of slope (Do) and shoulder (Dq) of their radiation survival curves. Similar radiosensitization has also been observed in the yield of DNA strand breaks. The purpose of this study is to obtain an insight into the mechanism of cell lethality by examining the relationship between the spectrum of DNA damage and the cell survival. In this study we estimated the enhancement of strand breaks due to incorporation of halogenated pyrimidine, the complexity of DNA damage and the probability of the initial DNA damage leading to cell inactivation. Monte Carlo track structure methods were used to model and simulate the induction of strand breakage by X-rays. The increase of DNA strand break was estimated by assuming the excess strand break was caused by the highly reactive uracil radicals at the halouracil substituted sites. The assumption of the enhancement mechanism of strand breaks was examined and verified by comparison with experimental data for induction of SSB and DSB. The calculated DNA damage spectrum shows the increase in complexity of strand breaks is due to incorporation of halogenated pyrimidines. The increase in the yield of DSB and cell lethality show similar trend at various degrees of halogenated pyrimidine substitution. We asked the question whether this agreement supports the hypothesis that DSB is responsible for cell lethality? The estimated number of lethal damage from the cell survival using a linear-quadratic model is much less than the initial yield of DSB. This work examines the correlation of cell lethality as a function of frequencies of complex form of double strand breaks

  4. Incorporation study of 18FDG through its uptake into tumour-derived cell lines

    Costa, Flavia M.; Nascimento, Leonardo T.C.; Santos, Raquel G.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro tests of radiopharmaceuticals are an important instrument to study their mechanisms of action, binding and incorporation. 18 FDG is the most used radiopharmaceutical for diagnostics positron emission tomography (PET) on oncology, on the basis of accelerated rates of absorption of glucose in cell malignancies. This radiotracer has been routinely produced at CDTN; and therefore, it was selected for preliminary assays due to its availability. Nowadays, UPPR at CDTN produces routinely 18 FDG for the local PET Centers but others PET radiopharmaceuticals are in development such as 18 F-Fluorocholine and 18 F-Fluorothymidine. According to the Brazilian Health Regulatory Agency (ANVISA) it is necessary to validate and register these new radiopharmaceuticals in order to get the approval for their commercialization. Targeting efficacy is one of the important issues to be evaluated during radiopharmaceutical validation. The aim of this study was to develop a standard protocol to determine tumor targeting efficacy of PET radiopharmaceuticals in vitro. Therefore it was developed a protocol based on the incorporation og 18 FDG through the uptake in different tumor-derived cell lines. Three variables were investigated for the standardization of the test: the number of cells to be seeded in 96-well plates, the time of incubation with the radiopharmaceutical and the radiotracer concentration. The standardized protocol was considered suitable for 18 FDG incorporation assay and showed reproductive results. The protocol developed in this work will pave the way for the in vitro studies of incorporation of the new PET radiopharmaceuticals to be produced at UPPR-CDTN, such as: 18 F-Fluorocholine and 18 F-Fluorothymidine. (author)

  5. Incorporation of functionalized gold nanoparticles into nanofibers for enhanced attachment and differentiation of mammalian cells

    Jung Dongju

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrospun nanofibers have been widely used as substrata for mammalian cell culture owing to their structural similarity to natural extracellular matrices. Structurally consistent electrospun nanofibers can be produced with synthetic polymers but require chemical modification to graft cell-adhesive molecules to make the nanofibers functional. Development of a facile method of grafting functional molecules on the nanofibers will contribute to the production of diverse cell type-specific nanofiber substrata. Results Small molecules, peptides, and functionalized gold nanoparticles were successfully incorporated with polymethylglutarimide (PMGI nanofibers through electrospinning. The PMGI nanofibers functionalized by the grafted AuNPs, which were labeled with cell-adhesive peptides, enhanced HeLa cell attachment and potentiated cardiomyocyte differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. Conclusions PMGI nanofibers can be functionalized simply by co-electrospinning with the grafting materials. In addition, grafting functionalized AuNPs enable high-density localization of the cell-adhesive peptides on the nanofiber. The results of the present study suggest that more cell type-specific synthetic substrata can be fabricated with molecule-doped nanofibers, in which diverse functional molecules are grafted alone or in combination with other molecules at different concentrations.

  6. Gene amplification in Chinese hamster embryo cells by the decay of incorporated iodine-125

    Luecke-Huhle, Christine; Ehrfeld, Angelika; Rau, Waltraud

    1988-01-01

    Simian Virus 40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cells (Co631) contain 5 viral copies integrated per cell genome. These SV40 sequences were used as an endogenous indicator gene to study response of mammalian cells to radiation at gene level. Cells were internally irradiated by Auger electrons emitted by Iodine-125 which was incorporated in cell DNA in form of 5-[ 125 I] iododeoxyuridine ( 125 IdU). An increase in gene copy number was measured using dispersed cell blotting and Southern analysis in combination with highly sensitive DNA hybridization. A 13-fold amplification of the SV40 sequences and a 2-fold amplification of two cellular oncogenes of the ras family were found. Other cellular genes, like the α-actin gene, are not amplified and no variation in gene copy number was observed after incubation of cells with cold IdU. Thus, specific gene amplification seems to be the consequence of radiation-induced DNA damage and the resulting cell cycle arrest. (author)

  7. Symposium summary

    Lawford, R.G.; Hubbard, K.G.

    1991-01-01

    For the purposes of the symposium, the Great Plains area was defined as the three Canadian Prairie provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and eight north central states including North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Montana, Minnesota, Wyoming, Colorado and Kansas, covering over 3.5 million square kilometers. The presentations during the plenary sessions provided a comprehensive overview of the climate change subject and uncertainties, and the resource base and socio-economic structure which it will impact. There was a high degree of unanimity concerning research needs, which fell into seven areas: lack of understanding and models of linkages between climate, the resource base, and socio-economic structures; need for better regional climate change scenarios for use in impact studies; inadequate understanding of natural processes, particularly where physical, biophysical and biogeochemical parameters are operating; need for policy research to enable change of policies and informed decisions; readily available common databases for use in joint U.S./Canada climate studies; an information base and mechanisms to enable more effective communications; and networks to monitor the progress of global warming and its impact on resources

  8. Incorporation of UDPglucose into cell wall glucans and lipids by intact cotton fibers

    Dugger, W.M.; Palmer, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The [ 14 C] moiety from [ 3 H]UDP[ 14 C]glucose was incorporated by intact cotton fibers into hot water soluble, acetic-nitric reagent soluble and insoluble components, and chloroform-methanol soluble lipids; the [ 3 H]UDP moiety was not incorporated. The 3 H-label can be exchanged rapidly with unlabeled substrate in a chase experiment. The cell wall apparent free space of cotton fibers was in the order of 30 picomoles per milligram of dry fibers; 25 picomoles per milligram easily exchanged and about 5 picomoles per milligram more tightly adsorbed. At 50 micromolar UDPglucose, 70% of the [ 14 C]glucose was found in the lipid fraction after both a short labeling period and chase. The percent of [ 14 C]glucose incorporated into total glucan increased within a 30-minute chase period. The data supports the concept that glucan synthesis, including cellulose, as well as the synthesis of steryl glucosides, acetylated steryl glucosides, and glucosyl-phosphoryl-polyprenol from externally supplied UDPglucose occurs at the plasma membrane-cell wall interface. The synthase enzymes for such synthesis must be part of this interfacial membrane system

  9. Incorporation of glycine and serine into sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis

    Mitani, Takahiko; Kadota, Hajime

    1976-01-01

    The changes during growth and sporulation in activities of cells of Bacillus subtilis to incorporate various amino acids were investigated with wild-type strain and its asporogenous mutant. In the case of wild type strain the uptake of valine, phenylalanine, and proline was largest during the logarithmic growth period. The uptake of these amino acids decreased rapidly during the early stationary phase. The uptake of valine and cysteine increased again to some extent just prior to the forespore stage. The uptake of glycine and serine, however, was largest at the forespore stage at which the formation of spore coat took place. From these observed phenomena it was assumed that the remarkable incorporation of glycine and serine into the wild type strain during sporulation was closely related to the formation of spore coat. (auth.)

  10. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  11. Selective incorporation of various C-22 polyunsaturated fatty acids in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    Masuzawa, Y.; Okano, S.; Waku, K.; Sprecher, H.; Lands, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    Three 14 C-labeled 22-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids, 7,10,13,16-[ 14 C]docosatetraenoic acid (22:4(n-6)), 7,10,13,16,19-[ 14 C]docosapentaenoic acid (22:5(n-3)), and 4,7,10,13,16,19-[ 14 C]docosahexaenoic acid (22:6(n-3)), were compared with [ 3 H]arachidonic acid (20:4(n-6] and [14C]linoleic acid (18:2(n-6)) to characterize their incorporation into the lipids of Ehrlich ascites cells. The relatively rapid incorporation of the labeled 22-carbon acids into phosphatidic acid indicated that substantial amounts of these acids may be incorporated through the de novo pathway of phospholipid synthesis. In marked contrast to 20:4(n-6), the 22-carbon acids were incorporated much less into choline glycerophospholipids (CGP) and inositol glycerophospholipids (IGP). No selective preference was apparent for the (n-3) or (n-6) type of fatty acids. The amounts of the acids incorporated into diacylglycerophosphoethanolamine were in the order of: 22:6(n-3) greater than 20:4(n-6) much greater than 22:5(n-3) greater than or equal to 22:4(n-6) greater than 18:2(n-6), whereas for alkylacylglycerophosphoethanolamine they were in the order of: 22:4(n-6) greater than 22:6(n-3) greater than 22:5(n-3) much greater than 20:4(n-6) greater than 18:2(n-6). Of the mechanisms possibly responsible for the selective entry of 22-carbon acids into ethanolamine glycerophospholipids, the most reasonable explanation was that the cytidine-mediated ethanolamine phosphotransferase may have a unique double selectivity: for hexaenoic species of diacylglycerol and for 22-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing species of alkylacylglycerol. The relative distribution of fatty acids between newly incorporated and already maintained lipid classes suggested that IGP may function in Ehrlich cells as an intermediate pool for the retention of polyunsaturated fatty acids in glycerolipids

  12. Incorporation of graphene into SnO2 photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Batmunkh, Munkhbayar; Dadkhah, Mahnaz; Shearer, Cameron J.; Biggs, Mark J.; Shapter, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Incorporation of a graphene structure into SnO 2 dye-sensitized solar cell photoanode films has been demonstrated for the first time. The use of graphene in the SnO 2 has been found to be a promising strategy to address many problems of photovoltaic cells based on SnO 2 photoanodes. - Highlights: • SnO 2 -reduced graphene oxide (RGO) hybrid is prepared using a microwave technique. • The first SnO 2 -RGO photoanode based DSSC is fabricated. • Use of RGO addresses the major shortcoming of SnO 2 when employed as a DSSC photoanode. • RGO significantly improved the electron transport rate within the DSSC devices. • Incorporation of RGO into the SnO 2 photoanode enhanced the DSSC efficiency by 91.5%. - Abstract: In dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) photoanodes, tin dioxide (SnO 2 ) structures present a promising alternative semiconducting oxide to the conventional titania (TiO 2 ), but they suffer from poor photovoltaic (PV) efficiency caused by insufficient dye adsorption and low energy value of the conduction band. A hybrid structure consisting of SnO 2 and reduced graphene oxide (SnO 2 -RGO) was synthesized via a microwave-assisted method and has been employed as a photoanode in DSSCs. Incorporation of RGO into the SnO 2 photoanode enhanced the power conversion efficiency of DSSC device by 91.5%, as compared to the device assembled without RGO. This efficiency improvement can be attributed to increased dye loading, enhanced electron transfer and addition of suitable energy levels in the photoanode. Finally, the use of RGO addresses the major shortcoming of SnO 2 when employed as a DSSC photoanode, namely poor dye adsorption and slow electron transfer rate.

  13. Incorporation of graphene into SnO{sub 2} photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Batmunkh, Munkhbayar [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia 5042 (Australia); Dadkhah, Mahnaz; Shearer, Cameron J. [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia 5042 (Australia); Biggs, Mark J. [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); School of Science, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Shapter, Joseph G., E-mail: joe.shapter@flinders.edu.au [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia 5042 (Australia)

    2016-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Incorporation of a graphene structure into SnO{sub 2} dye-sensitized solar cell photoanode films has been demonstrated for the first time. The use of graphene in the SnO{sub 2} has been found to be a promising strategy to address many problems of photovoltaic cells based on SnO{sub 2} photoanodes. - Highlights: • SnO{sub 2}-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) hybrid is prepared using a microwave technique. • The first SnO{sub 2}-RGO photoanode based DSSC is fabricated. • Use of RGO addresses the major shortcoming of SnO{sub 2} when employed as a DSSC photoanode. • RGO significantly improved the electron transport rate within the DSSC devices. • Incorporation of RGO into the SnO{sub 2} photoanode enhanced the DSSC efficiency by 91.5%. - Abstract: In dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) photoanodes, tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) structures present a promising alternative semiconducting oxide to the conventional titania (TiO{sub 2}), but they suffer from poor photovoltaic (PV) efficiency caused by insufficient dye adsorption and low energy value of the conduction band. A hybrid structure consisting of SnO{sub 2} and reduced graphene oxide (SnO{sub 2}-RGO) was synthesized via a microwave-assisted method and has been employed as a photoanode in DSSCs. Incorporation of RGO into the SnO{sub 2} photoanode enhanced the power conversion efficiency of DSSC device by 91.5%, as compared to the device assembled without RGO. This efficiency improvement can be attributed to increased dye loading, enhanced electron transfer and addition of suitable energy levels in the photoanode. Finally, the use of RGO addresses the major shortcoming of SnO{sub 2} when employed as a DSSC photoanode, namely poor dye adsorption and slow electron transfer rate.

  14. Antitumor activity of vorinostat-incorporated nanoparticles against human cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    Kwak, Tae Won; Kim, Do Hyung; Jeong, Young-Il; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2015-09-26

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the anticancer activity of vorinostat-incorporated nanoparticles (vorinostat-NPs) against HuCC-T1 human cholangiocarcinoma cells. Vorinostat-NPs were fabricated by a nanoprecipitation method using poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide)/poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer. Vorinostat-NPs exhibited spherical shapes with sizes Vorinostat-NPs have anticancer activity similar to that of vorinostat in vitro. Vorinostat-NPs as well as vorinostat itself increased acetylation of histone-H3. Furthermore, vorinostat-NPs have similar effectiveness in the suppression or expression of histone deacetylase, mutant type p53, p21, and PARP/cleaved caspase-3. However, vorinostat-NPs showed improved antitumor activity against HuCC-T1 cancer cell-bearing mice compared to vorinostat, whereas empty nanoparticles had no effect on tumor growth. Furthermore, vorinostat-NPs increased the expression of acetylated histone H3 in tumor tissue and suppressed histone deacetylase (HDAC) expression in vivo. The improved antitumor activity of vorinostat-NPs can be explained by molecular imaging studies using near-infrared (NIR) dye-incorporated nanoparticles, i.e. NIR-dye-incorporated nanoparticles were intensively accumulated in the tumor region rather than normal one. Our results demonstrate that vorinostat and vorinostat-NPs exert anticancer activity against HuCC-T1 cholangiocarcinoma cells by specific inhibition of HDAC expression. Thus, we suggest that vorinostat-NPs are a promising candidate for anticancer chemotherapy in cholangiocarcinoma. Graphical abstract Local delivery strategy of vorinostat-NPs against cholangiocarcinomas.

  15. Use of digitonin permeabilization for characterization of calcium incorporated into. beta. cells in response to glucose

    Wesslen, N [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1985-01-01

    ..beta.. cell-rich pancreatic islets were used to characterize /sup 45/Ca uptake into pools with different sensitivities to permeabilization with digitonin. The plasma and secretory granule membranes were among the membranes most sensitive to digitonin treatment whereas the mitochondria were more resistant. Most of the /sup 45/Ca incorporated in response to glucose was found in a fraction released after exposure to a high concentration of digitonin. The results suggest that glucose promotes active sequestration of calcium in mitochondria and that the uptake of /sup 45/Ca in the secretory granules in secondary to a raised cytosolic Ca/sup 2 +/ activity.

  16. 2-Fluoro-L-Fucose Is a Metabolically Incorporated Inhibitor of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Fucosylation.

    Jose A Villalobos

    Full Text Available The monosaccharide L-fucose (L-Fuc is a common component of plant cell wall polysaccharides and other plant glycans, including the hemicellulose xyloglucan, pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I and rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II, arabinogalactan proteins, and N-linked glycans. Mutations compromising the biosynthesis of many plant cell wall polysaccharides are lethal, and as a result, small molecule inhibitors of plant cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis have been developed because these molecules can be applied at defined concentrations and developmental stages. In this study, we characterize novel small molecule inhibitors of plant fucosylation. 2-fluoro-L-fucose (2F-Fuc analogs caused severe growth phenotypes when applied to Arabidopsis seedlings, including reduced root growth and altered root morphology. These phenotypic defects were dependent upon the L-Fuc salvage pathway enzyme L-Fucose Kinase/ GDP-L-Fucose Pyrophosphorylase (FKGP, suggesting that 2F-Fuc is metabolically converted to the sugar nucleotide GDP-2F-Fuc, which serves as the active inhibitory molecule. The L-Fuc content of cell wall matrix polysaccharides was reduced in plants treated with 2F-Fuc, suggesting that this molecule inhibits the incorporation of L-Fuc into these polysaccharides. Additionally, phenotypic defects induced by 2F-Fuc treatment could be partially relieved by the exogenous application of boric acid, suggesting that 2F-Fuc inhibits RG-II biosynthesis. Overall, the results presented here suggest that 2F-Fuc is a metabolically incorporated inhibitor of plant cellular fucosylation events, and potentially suggest that other 2-fluorinated monosaccharides could serve as useful chemical probes for the inhibition of cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis.

  17. 2-Fluoro-L-Fucose Is a Metabolically Incorporated Inhibitor of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Fucosylation

    Wallace, Ian S.

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide L-fucose (L-Fuc) is a common component of plant cell wall polysaccharides and other plant glycans, including the hemicellulose xyloglucan, pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) and rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II), arabinogalactan proteins, and N-linked glycans. Mutations compromising the biosynthesis of many plant cell wall polysaccharides are lethal, and as a result, small molecule inhibitors of plant cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis have been developed because these molecules can be applied at defined concentrations and developmental stages. In this study, we characterize novel small molecule inhibitors of plant fucosylation. 2-fluoro-L-fucose (2F-Fuc) analogs caused severe growth phenotypes when applied to Arabidopsis seedlings, including reduced root growth and altered root morphology. These phenotypic defects were dependent upon the L-Fuc salvage pathway enzyme L-Fucose Kinase/ GDP-L-Fucose Pyrophosphorylase (FKGP), suggesting that 2F-Fuc is metabolically converted to the sugar nucleotide GDP-2F-Fuc, which serves as the active inhibitory molecule. The L-Fuc content of cell wall matrix polysaccharides was reduced in plants treated with 2F-Fuc, suggesting that this molecule inhibits the incorporation of L-Fuc into these polysaccharides. Additionally, phenotypic defects induced by 2F-Fuc treatment could be partially relieved by the exogenous application of boric acid, suggesting that 2F-Fuc inhibits RG-II biosynthesis. Overall, the results presented here suggest that 2F-Fuc is a metabolically incorporated inhibitor of plant cellular fucosylation events, and potentially suggest that other 2-fluorinated monosaccharides could serve as useful chemical probes for the inhibition of cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis. PMID:26414071

  18. The relationship between DNA synthesis and incorporation of (14C) lysine into different histone fractions in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells

    Malec, J.; Kornacka, L.; Wojnarowska, M.; Moscicka, M.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of inhibition of DNA synthesis by hydroxyurea on ( 14 C) lysine incorporation into the main four histone fractions in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, was examined in vitro. The radioactivity of lysine-rich histones, especially of histone f1, was preferentially decreased. The smallest decrease was observed for histone f3. The incorporation into other cellular proteins was but slightly affected. (author)

  19. The different electron transport of two nanotubes incorporated in working electrode of dye-sensitized solar cells

    Zhang, Xiaobo, E-mail: zhangxiaobo@chnu.edu.cn [School of Physics, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000, Anhui (China); Eco-Materials and Renewable Energy Research Centre (ERERC), Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Tian, Hanmin; Wang, Xiangyan; Xue, Guogang; Tian, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jiyuan; Yuan, Shikui [Eco-Materials and Renewable Energy Research Centre (ERERC), Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Yu, Tao; Zou, Zhigang [Eco-Materials and Renewable Energy Research Centre (ERERC), Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-11-25

    Highlights: •Two TiO{sub 2} nanotubes are separately incorporated in working electrode of DSSCs. •The 6-μm-tubes incorporation improves electron transport in the cell. •The 1-μm-tubes incorporation impedes electron transport in the cell. •Both 1-D electron diffusion and nanotube percolation promote electron transport. •Electron residing at the end of 1-μm-tubes maybe impedes electron transport. -- Abstract: Two different-length (6 μm and 1 μm) TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were prepared and incorporated in working electrode of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The analyses of the electrochemical impedance spectra of cells demonstrate that, the electron transport resistance R{sub w} decreases and increases separately to 0.3 Ω in 6-μm-tubes-cell and to 15.1 Ω in 1-μm-tubes-cell comparing with that 1.4 Ω in P25-cell, reflecting the improved electron transport in 6-μm-tubes-cell and impeded electron transport in 1-μm-tubes-cell. The reason is ascribed to the different electron transport in working electrode due to the incorporation of nanotubes. For the 6-μm-tubes incorporation, both 1-D electron diffusion along nanotubes and nanotube percolation improve electron transport in working electrode, but they cannot improve electron transport for the 1-μm-tubes incorporation. On the contrary, the 1-μm-tubes incorporation may impede electron transport because of electron residing occurring seriously at the end of 1-μm-tubes. The results of this work will help to understand the specific nature of electron transport in TiO{sub 2} nanotubes in DSSCs.

  20. Uracil incorporation in the forespore and the mother cell during spore development in Bacillus subtilis

    Ryter, A.; Whitehouse, R.

    1978-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the two genomes of the sporangium during spore formation was determined by pulse-labeling bacteria with 3 H-uracil at different times of sporulation and preparing them for high resolution autoradiography. The quantitative analysis of autoradiographs shows that uracile incorporation in the whole sporangium decreases considerably between stages II and IV. However, the variations of the transpcriptional activity are not identical in the mother cell and in the forespore. The one of the mother cell decreases rapidly between stages II and III and then remains stable until the end of stage IV, whereas that of the forespore which is low at stage II increases as the forespore grows ovoid and then quickly diminishes. It is very weak at the beginning of stage IV and negligible at the end of this stage. (orig.) [de

  1. Cell suspension culture-mediated incorporation of the rice bel gene into transgenic cotton.

    Liping Ke

    Full Text Available Cotton plants engineered for resistance to the herbicides, glyphosate or glufosinate have made a considerable impact on the production of the crop worldwide. In this work, embryogenic cell cultures derived from Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Coker 312 hypocotyl callus were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens with the rice cytochrome P450 gene, CYP81A6 (bel. In rice, bel has been shown to confer resistance to both bentazon and sulfanylurea herbicides. Transformed cells were selected on a liquid medium supplemented alternately or simultaneously with kanamycin (50mg/L and bentazon (4.2 µmol. A total of 17 transgenic cotton lines were recovered, based on the initial resistance to bentazon and on PCR detection of the bel transgene. Bel integration into the cotton genome was confirmed by Southern blot and expression of the transgene was verified by RT-PCR. In greenhouse and experimental plot trials, herbicide (bentazon tolerance of up to 1250 mg/L was demonstrated in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines with a single copy of the bel gene showed normal Mendelian inheritance of the characteristic. Importantly, resistance to bentazon was shown to be stably incorporated in the T1, T2 and T3 generations of self-fertilised descendents and in plants outcrossed to another upland cotton cultivar. Engineering resistance to bentazon in cotton through the heterologous expression of bel opens the possibility of incorporating this trait into elite cultivars, a strategy that would give growers a more flexible alternative to weed management in cotton crops.

  2. 4th Abel Symposium

    Friedlander, Eric; Jahren, Björn; Østvær, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The 2007 Abel Symposium took place at the University of Oslo in August 2007. The goal of the symposium was to bring together mathematicians whose research efforts have led to recent advances in algebraic geometry, algebraic K-theory, algebraic topology, and mathematical physics. A common theme of this symposium was the development of new perspectives and new constructions with a categorical flavor. As the lectures at the symposium and the papers of this volume demonstrate, these perspectives and constructions have enabled a broadening of vistas, a synergy between once-differentiated subjects, and solutions to mathematical problems both old and new.

  3. Bottlenecks in deriving definitive hematopoietic stem cells from human pluripotent stem cells: a CIRM mini-symposium and workshop report.

    Shepard, Kelly A; Talib, Sohel

    2014-07-01

    On August 29, 2013, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) convened a small group of investigators in San Francisco, CA, to discuss a longstanding challenge in the stem cell field: the inability to derive fully functional, definitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). To date, PSC-derived HSCs have been deficient in their developmental potential and their ability to self-renew and engraft upon transplantation. Tasked with identifying key challenges to overcoming this "HSC bottleneck", workshop participants identified critical knowledge gaps in two key areas: (a) understanding the ontogeny of human HSCs, and (b) understanding of the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that govern HSC behavior and function. They agreed that development of new methods and tools is critical for addressing these knowledge gaps. These include molecular profiling of key HSC properties, development of new model systems/assays for predicting and assessing HSC function, and novel technological advancements for manipulating cell culture conditions and genetic programs. The workshop produced tangible advances, including providing a current definition of the nature and challenge of the HSC bottleneck and identifying key mechanistic studies of HSC biology that should be prioritized for future funding initiatives (e.g., including higher risk approaches that have potential for high gain). ©AlphaMed Press.

  4. E-cadherin promotes incorporation of mouse epiblast stem cells into normal development.

    Satoshi Ohtsuka

    Full Text Available Mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs are pluripotent stem cells derived from epiblasts of postimplantation mouse embryos. Their pluripotency is distinct from that of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs in several cell biological criteria. One of the distinctions is that mEpiSCs contribute either not at all or at much lower efficiency to chimeric embryos after blastocyst injection compared to mESCs. However, here we showed that mEpiSCs can be incorporated into normal development after blastocyst injection by forced expression of the E-cadherin transgene for 2 days in culture. Using this strategy, mEpiSCs gave rise to live-born chimeras from 5% of the manipulated blastocysts. There were no obvious signs of reprogramming of mEpiSCs toward the mESC-like state during the 2 days after induction of the E-cadherin transgene, suggesting that mEpiSCs possess latent ability to integrate into the normal developmental process as its origin, epiblasts.

  5. Cell cycle- and chaperone-mediated regulation of H3K56ac incorporation in yeast.

    Kaplan, Tommy; Liu, Chih Long; Erkmann, Judith A; Holik, John; Grunstein, Michael; Kaufman, Paul D; Friedman, Nir; Rando, Oliver J

    2008-11-01

    Acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 is a covalent modification best known as a mark of newly replicated chromatin, but it has also been linked to replication-independent histone replacement. Here, we measured H3K56ac levels at single-nucleosome resolution in asynchronously growing yeast cultures, as well as in yeast proceeding synchronously through the cell cycle. We developed a quantitative model of H3K56ac kinetics, which shows that H3K56ac is largely explained by the genomic replication timing and the turnover rate of each nucleosome, suggesting that cell cycle profiles of H3K56ac should reveal most first-time nucleosome incorporation events. However, since the deacetylases Hst3/4 prevent use of H3K56ac as a marker for histone deposition during M phase, we also directly measured M phase histone replacement rates. We report a global decrease in turnover rates during M phase and a further specific decrease in turnover at several early origins of replication, which switch from rapidly replaced in G1 phase to stably bound during M phase. Finally, by measuring H3 replacement in yeast deleted for the H3K56 acetyltransferase Rtt109 and its two co-chaperones Asf1 and Vps75, we find evidence that Rtt109 and Asf1 preferentially enhance histone replacement at rapidly replaced nucleosomes, whereas Vps75 appears to inhibit histone turnover at those loci. These results provide a broad perspective on histone replacement/incorporation throughout the cell cycle and suggest that H3K56 acetylation provides a positive-feedback loop by which replacement of a nucleosome enhances subsequent replacement at the same location.

  6. Cell cycle- and chaperone-mediated regulation of H3K56ac incorporation in yeast.

    Tommy Kaplan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 is a covalent modification best known as a mark of newly replicated chromatin, but it has also been linked to replication-independent histone replacement. Here, we measured H3K56ac levels at single-nucleosome resolution in asynchronously growing yeast cultures, as well as in yeast proceeding synchronously through the cell cycle. We developed a quantitative model of H3K56ac kinetics, which shows that H3K56ac is largely explained by the genomic replication timing and the turnover rate of each nucleosome, suggesting that cell cycle profiles of H3K56ac should reveal most first-time nucleosome incorporation events. However, since the deacetylases Hst3/4 prevent use of H3K56ac as a marker for histone deposition during M phase, we also directly measured M phase histone replacement rates. We report a global decrease in turnover rates during M phase and a further specific decrease in turnover at several early origins of replication, which switch from rapidly replaced in G1 phase to stably bound during M phase. Finally, by measuring H3 replacement in yeast deleted for the H3K56 acetyltransferase Rtt109 and its two co-chaperones Asf1 and Vps75, we find evidence that Rtt109 and Asf1 preferentially enhance histone replacement at rapidly replaced nucleosomes, whereas Vps75 appears to inhibit histone turnover at those loci. These results provide a broad perspective on histone replacement/incorporation throughout the cell cycle and suggest that H3K56 acetylation provides a positive-feedback loop by which replacement of a nucleosome enhances subsequent replacement at the same location.

  7. Construction and Characterization of Insect Cell-Derived Influenza VLP: Cell Binding, Fusion, and EGFP Incorporation

    Yi-Shin Pan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have constructed virus-like particles (VLPs harboring hemagglutinin (HA, neuraminidase (NA, matrix protein 1 (M1 ,and proton channel protein (M2 using baculovirus as a vector in the SF9 insect cell. The size of the expressed VLP was estimated to be ~100 nm by light scattering experiment and transmission electron microscopy. Recognition of HA on the VLP surface by the HA2-specific monoclonal antibody IIF4 at acidic pH, as probed by surface plasmon resonance, indicated the pH-induced structural rearrangement of HA. Uptake of the particle by A549 mediated by HA-sialylose receptor interaction was visualized by the fluorescent-labeled VLP. The HA-promoted cell-virus fusion activity was illustrated by fluorescence imaging on the Jurkat cells incubated with rhodamine-loaded VLP performed at fusogenic pH. Furthermore, the green fluorescence protein (GFP was fused to NA to produce VLP with a pH-sensitive probe, expanding the use of VLP as an antigen carrier and a tool for viral tracking.

  8. Quantitation of specific myeloid cells in rat bone marrow measured by in vitro /sup 35/S-sulphate incorporation

    Wright, A F; Rose, M S

    1984-08-01

    A biochemical measurement which can be used for quantitation of specific early myeloid cells in rat bone marrow has been developed. This measurement consists of a rapid, simple assay for the in vitro quantitation of /sup 35/S-sulfate incorporation into rat bone marrow cells. Incubation of bone marrow cells with /sup 35/S-sulfate led to a time-dependent increase in radioactivity obtained in perchloric acid insoluble fractions of bone marrow cell suspensions. This incorporation was inhibited by cyanide and puromycin. Autoradiography has demonstrated the radiolabel to be specifically associated with immature cells of the myeloid series. The cells most active in this respect were eosinophils. When rats were treated with endotoxin, the rate of /sup 35/S-sulfate incorporation was increased. Cell number measurements, using conventional histopathology and a Coulter Counter, demonstrated that endotoxin caused an initial release of mature granulocytes from the bone marrow. The regeneration of this mature population in the marrow was rapid, and was characterized by an increase in the number of immature cells and a concomitant increase in the rate of /sup 35/S-sulfate incorporation measured in preparations of bone marrow cells in vitro. Furthermore, this response to endotoxin has demonstrated that Coulter Counting techniques can be used to distinguish specific populations of cells (e.g. mature granulocytes) within the bone marrow.

  9. Incorporation of uridine-H3 into healthy and tobacco necrosis virus-infected mesophyll cells of Chenopodium amaranticolor

    Faccioli, G.; Rubies-Autonel, C.

    1975-01-01

    Tritiated uridine was selectively incorporated into the nucleus, nucleolus and cytoplasm of actinomycin D-treated Chenopodium amaranticolor cells locally infected with a strain of tobacco necrosis virus (TNV), 3 days after inoculation. Healthy cells did not show such an incorporation. Chloroplasts, in both types of cells, were free of label. Treatment with pancreatic ribonuclease removed the label completely in the majority of nuclei and nucleoli of infected cells. Since infectivity tests showed that AMD treatment increased virus multiplication by 10-12%, it is conceivable to think that the incorporation observed was due to virus synthesis. Preliminary infectivity experiments also showed that treatment of the cells with cycloheximide inhibited virus multiplication up to 80%, while chloramphenicol increased such multiplication. Our results lead to the conclusion that nucleus, nucleolus and cytoplasm but not chloroplasts are the sites involved in the synthesis of TNV. (orig.) [de

  10. Suppression of leukocyte inhibitory factor (LIF) production and [3H]thymidine incorporation by concanavalin A-activated mononuclear cells

    Lomnitzer, R.; Rabson, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The capacity of human mononuclear (MN) cells pretreated with concanavalin A (Con A) to suppress the activity of fresh phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-pulsed mononuclear cells was assessed. Con A-pretreated MN cells suppressed leukocyte inhibitory factor (LIF) activity in supernatants of PHA-pulsed cell cultures and [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation by these cells. Suppression was obtained in both allogeneic and autologous systems with mitomycin-treated, irradiated, or untreated Con A-induced cells. Lymphocytes from two patients that, following treatment with Con A, did not suppress mitogen-induced proliferative response of normal cells also did not suppress LIF production

  11. Ternary solution-processed organic solar cells incorporating 2D materials

    Stylianakis, Minas M.; Konios, Dimitrios; Petridis, Constantinos; Kakavelakis, George; Stratakis, Emmanuel; Kymakis, Emmanuel

    2017-12-01

    Recently, the study of ternary organic solar cells (OSCs) has attracted the efforts of the scientific community, leading to significantly higher performance due to the enhanced harvesting of incoming irradiation. Here, for the first time, and in order to promote this OSC architecture, we review the progress implemented by the application of two-dimensional (2D) materials in the field of blend bulk heterojunction ternary OSCs. Power conversion efficiency (PCE) improvements of the order of 40% compared to the reference binary devices, and PCEs in excess of 8% have been reported by incorporating graphene-based or other 2D materials as a third element inside the active layer. These OSCs combine the synergetic advantages of ternary devices and the superb properties of the 2D material family. In conclusion, the incorporation of the unique properties of graphene and other 2D materials inside the active layer opens up a very promising pathway in the design and construction of high-performance, simply fabricated and low- cost photovoltaic devices.

  12. Epigallocatechin gallate incorporation into lignin enhances the alkaline delignification and enzymatic saccharification of cell walls

    Elumalai Sasikumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignin is an integral component of the plant cell wall matrix but impedes the conversion of biomass into biofuels. The plasticity of lignin biosynthesis should permit the inclusion of new compatible phenolic monomers such as flavonoids into cell wall lignins that are consequently less recalcitrant to biomass processing. In the present study, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG was evaluated as a potential lignin bioengineering target for rendering biomass more amenable to processing for biofuel production. Results In vitro peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization experiments revealed that both gallate and pyrogallyl (B-ring moieties in EGCG underwent radical cross-coupling with monolignols mainly by β–O–4-type cross-coupling, producing benzodioxane units following rearomatization reactions. Biomimetic lignification of maize cell walls with a 3:1 molar ratio of monolignols and EGCG permitted extensive alkaline delignification of cell walls (72 to 92% that far exceeded that for lignified controls (44 to 62%. Alkali-insoluble residues from EGCG-lignified walls yielded up to 34% more glucose and total sugars following enzymatic saccharification than lignified controls. Conclusions It was found that EGCG readily copolymerized with monolignols to become integrally cross-coupled into cell wall lignins, where it greatly enhanced alkaline delignification and subsequent enzymatic saccharification. Improved delignification may be attributed to internal trapping of quinone-methide intermediates to prevent benzyl ether cross-linking of lignin to structural polysaccharides during lignification, and to the cleavage of ester intra-unit linkages within EGCG during pretreatment. Overall, our results suggest that apoplastic deposition of EGCG for incorporation into lignin would be a promising plant genetic engineering target for improving the delignification and saccharification of biomass crops.

  13. A Microdosimetric-Kinetic Model of Cell Killing by Irradiation from Permanently Incorporated Radionuclides.

    Hawkins, Roland B

    2018-01-01

    An expression for the surviving fraction of a replicating population of cells exposed to permanently incorporated radionuclide is derived from the microdosimetric-kinetic model. It includes dependency on total implant dose, linear energy transfer (LET), decay rate of the radionuclide, the repair rate of potentially lethal lesions in DNA and the volume doubling time of the target population. This is used to obtain an expression for the biologically effective dose ( BED α / β ) based on the minimum survival achieved by the implant that is equivalent to, and can be compared and combined with, the BED α / β calculated for a fractionated course of radiation treatment. Approximate relationships are presented that are useful in the calculation of BED α / β for alpha- or beta-emitting radionuclides with half-life significantly greater than, or nearly equal to, the approximately 1-h repair half-life of radiation-induced potentially lethal lesions.

  14. Symposium on neutron scattering

    Lehmann, M.S.; Saenger, W.; Hildebrandt, G.; Dachs, H.

    1984-01-01

    Extended abstracts of the named symposium are presented. The first part of this report contains the abstracts of the lectures, the second those of the posters. Topics discussed on the symposium include neutron diffraction and neutron scattering studies in magnetism, solid state chemistry and physics, materials research. Some papers discussing instruments and methods are included too. (GSCH)

  15. Incorporation of [14C]-palmitate into lipids of Brassica cells during the induction of freezing tolerance

    Lynch, D.V.; Joseph, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Changes in plasma membrane lipid composition have been causally related to increased freezing tolerance. Studies of lipid metabolism during ABA induction of freezing tolerance in Brassica napus suspension cultures were undertaken. Cells were labeled with [ 14 C]-palmitate four days after transfer to fresh medium (control) or medium containing ABA (which increases freezing tolerance). At times between one and 20 hrs after labeling, ABA-treated cells incorporated almost twice the amount of label as controls cells. Approximately 80% of the radioactivity was associated with neutral lipids in ABA-treated cells and controls. Incorporation of label into total cellular polar lipids was 4.9 x 10 5 dpm/mg protein for control cells and 1 x 10 6 dpm/mg protein for cells transferred to medium containing ABA. Analysis of lipids following alkaline hydrolysis indicated that incorporation of [ 14 C]-palmitate into glucosylceramide of ABA-treated cells was less than 60% of control values when expressed relative to that of the total polar lipids. Incorporation into ceramides was also depressed in ABA-treated cells

  16. Modification of potentially lethal damage in irradiated Chinese hamster V79 cells after incorporation of halogenated pyrimidines

    Franken, N. A.; van Bree, C. V.; Kipp, J. B.; Barendsen, G. W.

    1997-01-01

    Radiosensitization of exponentially growing and plateau phase Chinese hamster V79 cells by incorporation of halogenated pyrimidines (HP) was investigated for different culture conditions that influenced repair. For this purpose cells were grown for 72 h with 0, 1, 2 and 4 microM of chloro-(CldUrd),

  17. The 12th International Symposium on Spermatology

    Aitken, R John; Cummins, Jim M; Nixon, Brett

    2015-01-01

    The 12th International Symposium of Spermatology continued the excellent tradition of this meeting since its inception in 1969 when the first Symposium was held in Italy under the Chairmanship of Professor Baccio Baccetti. This unique Symposium is held every 4 years and serves as a beacon for sperm cell biologists from all over the world, regardless of which species, animal or plant, they are working on. This willingness to embrace the fundamental biology of this distinctive cell type without species limitations is one of the hallmarks of this Symposium. For sperm biologists – it is our Olympics. The meeting in Newcastle, NSW brought together around 300 biologists from more than 22 different countries covering North and South America, Africa, Europe, Asia and Australia. Given the considerable distances and high cost involved in travelling to the East Coast of NSW, this was an outstanding outcome. The Symposium featured a series of 31 plenary lectures culminating in the prestigious Thaddeus Mann Memorial Lecture, which was delivered with typical grace and brilliance by Professor Masaru Okabe. PMID:25994646

  18. Exciton delocalization incorporated drift-diffusion model for bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells

    Wang, Zi Shuai; Sha, Wei E. I.; Choy, Wallace C. H.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling the charge-generation process is highly important to understand device physics and optimize power conversion efficiency of bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells (OSCs). Free carriers are generated by both ultrafast exciton delocalization and slow exciton diffusion and dissociation at the heterojunction interface. In this work, we developed a systematic numerical simulation to describe the charge-generation process by a modified drift-diffusion model. The transport, recombination, and collection of free carriers are incorporated to fully capture the device response. The theoretical results match well with the state-of-the-art high-performance organic solar cells. It is demonstrated that the increase of exciton delocalization ratio reduces the energy loss in the exciton diffusion-dissociation process, and thus, significantly improves the device efficiency, especially for the short-circuit current. By changing the exciton delocalization ratio, OSC performances are comprehensively investigated under the conditions of short-circuit and open-circuit. Particularly, bulk recombination dependent fill factor saturation is unveiled and understood. As a fundamental electrical analysis of the delocalization mechanism, our work is important to understand and optimize the high-performance OSCs.

  19. Colloidal graphene quantum dots incorporated with a Cobalt electrolyte in a dye sensitized solar cell

    Lim, Hyuna

    The utilization of sun light as a renewable energy source has been pursued for a long time, but the ultimate goal of developing inexpensive and highly efficient photovoltaic devices remains elusive. To address this problem, colloidal graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were synthesized and used as a new sensitizer in dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Not only do the GQDs have a well-defined structure, but their large absorptivity, tunable bandgap, and size- and functional group-dependent redox potentials make them promising candidates for photovoltaic applications. Because volatile organic solvents in electrolyte solutions hinder long-term use and mass production of DSC devices, imidazolium based ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated. Cobalt-bipyridine complexes were successfully synthesized and characterized for use as new redox shuttles in DSCs. In the tested DSCs, J-V (current density-voltage) curves illustrate that the short circuit current and fill factor decrease significantly as the active area in the TiO2 photo anode increases. Dark current measurement indicated that the diode factor is bigger than one, which is different from the conventional p-n junction type solar cells, due to the high efficiency of photoelectron injection. The variation of the diode factor in dark and in light would show various types of recombination behaviors in DSCs. The performance of the DSC stained by GQDs incorporated with the cobalt redox couple was tested, but further study to improve the efficiency and to understand photochemical reaction in the DSCs is needed.

  20. /sup 3/H-UTP incorporation in polytene chromosomes of Chironomus permeabilized cells

    Diez, J L; de la Torre, C [Consejo Superior de Investigacionis Cientificas, Madrid (Spain). Inst. Biologia Celular

    1979-01-01

    A method is described that allows the cytologic detection of the transcriptional activity of endogenous RNA polymerase in fixed Chironomus polytene chromosomes. /sup 3/H-UTP is preferentially incorporated onto nucleoli and Balbiani rings where transcription is specially high. The former incorporation was sensitive to actinomycin D while incorporation on Balbiani rings was sensitive to ..cap alpha..-amanitin. The label pattern and frequency resemble those detected by /sup 3/H-uridine incorporation in the living state.

  1. Enhancing the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells by incorporating nanosilicate platelets in gel electrolyte

    Lai, Yi-Hsuan

    2009-10-01

    Two kinds of gel-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), composed of two types of electrolytes, were constructed and the respective cell performance was evaluated in this study. One electrolyte, TEOS-Triton X-100 gel, was based on a hybrid organic/inorganic gel electrolyte made by the sol-gel method and the other was based on poly(vinyidene fluoride-co-hexafluoro propylene) (PVDF-HFP) copolymer. TEOS-Triton X-100 gel was based on the reticulate structure of silica, formed by hydrolysis, and condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), while its organic subphase was a mixture of surfactant (Triton X-100) and ionic liquid electrolytes. Both DSSC gel-type electrolytes were composed of iodine, 1-propy-3-methyl-imidazolium iodide, and 3-methoxypropionitrile to create the redox couple of I3 -/I-. Based on the results obtained from the I-V characteristics, it was found that the optimal iodine concentrations for the TEOS-Triton X-100 gel electrolyte and PVDF-HFP gel electrolyte are 0.05 M and 0.1 M, respectively. Although the increase in the iodine concentration could enhance the short-circuit current density (JSC), a further increase in the iodine concentration would reduce the JSC due to increased dark current. Therefore, the concentration of I2 is a significant factor in determining the performance of DSSCs. In order to enhance cell performance, the addition of nanosilicate platelets (NSPs) in the above-mentioned gel electrolytes was investigated. By incorporating NSP-Triton X-100 into the electrolytes, the JSC of the cells increased due to the decrease of diffusion resistance, while the open circuit voltage (VOC) remained almost the same. As the loading of the NSP-Triton X-100 in the TEOS-Triton X-100 gel electrolyte increased to 0.5 wt%, the JSC and the conversion efficiency increased from 8.5 to 12 mA/cm2 and from 3.6% to 4.7%, respectively. However, the JSC decreased as the loading of NSP-Triton X-100 exceeded 0.5 wt%. At higher NSP-Triton X-100 loading, NSPs acted as

  2. Preparation, Characterization and Tests of Incorporation in Stem Cells of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide

    Haddad, P S; Britos, T N; Li, L M; Li, L D S

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have been produced and used as contrast-enhancing agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnostic use in a wide range of maladies including cardiovascular, neurological disorders, and cancer. The reasons why these SPIONs are attractive for medical purposes are based on their important and unique features. The large surface area of the nanoparticles and their manipulation through an external magnetic field are features that allow their use for carrying a large number of molecules such as biomolecules or drugs. In this scenario, the present work reports on the synthesis and characterization of SPIONs and in vitro MRI experiments to increase their capacity as probes for MRI applications on stem cells therapy. Initially, the SPIONs were prepared through the co-precipitation method using ferrous and ferric chlorides in acidic solution. The SPIONs were coated with two thiolmolecules such as mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) and cysteine (Cys) (molar ratio SPIONs:ligand = 1:20), leading to the formation of a stable aqueous dispersion of thiolated nanoparticles (SH-SPIONs). The SH-SPIONs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The results showed that the SH-SPIONs have a mean diameter of 14 nm and display superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. Preliminary tests of incorporation of SH-SPIONs were evaluated stem cells. The results showed that the thiolated nanoparticles have no toxic effects for stem cells and successfully internalized and enhance the contrast in MRI. (paper)

  3. The effects of functional magnetic nanotubes with incorporated nerve growth factor in neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells

    Xie Jining; Chen Linfeng; Varadan, Vijay K; Yancey, Justin; Srivatsan, Malathi

    2008-01-01

    In this in vitro study the efficiency of magnetic nanotubes to bind with nerve growth factor (NGF) and the ability of NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes to release the bound NGF are investigated using rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells). It is found that functional magnetic nanotubes with NGF incorporation enabled the differentiation of PC12 cells into neurons exhibiting growth cones and neurite outgrowth. Microscope observations show that filopodia extending from neuron growth cones were in close proximity to the NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes, at times appearing to extend towards or into them. These results show that magnetic nanotubes can be used as a delivery vehicle for NGF and thus may be exploited in attempts to treat neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease with neurotrophins. Further neurite outgrowth can be controlled by manipulating magnetic nanotubes with external magnetic fields, thus helping in directed regeneration

  4. Enhancing the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells by incorporating nanosilicate platelets in gel electrolyte

    Lai, Yi-Hsuan; Chiu, Chih-Wei; Chen, Jian-Ging; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lin, Jiang-Jen; Lin, King-Fu; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Two kinds of gel-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), composed of two types of electrolytes, were constructed and the respective cell performance was evaluated in this study. One electrolyte, TEOS-Triton X-100 gel, was based on a hybrid organic/inorganic gel electrolyte made by the sol-gel method and the other was based on poly(vinyidene fluoride-co-hexafluoro propylene) (PVDF-HFP) copolymer. TEOS-Triton X-100 gel was based on the reticulate structure of silica, formed by hydrolysis, and condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), while its organic subphase was a mixture of surfactant (Triton X-100) and ionic liquid electrolytes. Both DSSC gel-type electrolytes were composed of iodine, 1-propy-3-methyl-imidazolium iodide, and 3-methoxypropionitrile to create the redox couple of I3 -/I-. Based on the results obtained from the I-V characteristics, it was found that the optimal iodine concentrations for the TEOS-Triton X-100 gel electrolyte and PVDF-HFP gel electrolyte are 0.05 M and 0.1 M, respectively. Although the increase in the iodine concentration could enhance the short-circuit current density (JSC), a further increase in the iodine concentration would reduce the JSC due to increased dark current. Therefore, the concentration of I2 is a significant factor in determining the performance of DSSCs. In order to enhance cell performance, the addition of nanosilicate platelets (NSPs) in the above-mentioned gel electrolytes was investigated. By incorporating NSP-Triton X-100 into the electrolytes, the JSC of the cells increased due to the decrease of diffusion resistance, while the open circuit voltage (VOC) remained almost the same. As the loading of the NSP-Triton X-100 in the TEOS-Triton X-100 gel electrolyte increased to 0.5 wt%, the JSC and the conversion efficiency increased from 8.5 to 12 mA/cm2 and from 3.6% to 4.7%, respectively. However, the JSC decreased as the loading of NSP-Triton X-100 exceeded 0.5 wt%. At higher NSP-Triton X-100 loading, NSPs acted as

  5. Enhancing the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells by incorporating nanomica in gel electrolytes☆

    Lai, Yi-Hsuan

    2010-04-01

    Gel-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated with 5.0 wt% polyvinyidene fluoride-co-hexafluoro propylene (PVDF-HFP) in methoxy propionitrile (MPN) as gel polymer electrolyte (GPE), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium iodide (BMII)/iodine (I2) as redox couple, 4-tertiary butyl pyridine (TBP) and guanidine thiocyanate as additives. The incorporation of alkyl-modified nanomica (AMNM) in the PVDF-HFP gel electrolytes caused the reduction of crystallization of PVDF-HFP, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The short-circuit current density (JSC) of the cell increased due to the decrease of diffusion resistance, as judged by the electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) analysis, while the open-circuit voltage (VOC) remained almost the same. As the loading of AMNM in the PVDF-HFP gel electrolyte was increased to 3.0 wt%, the JSC and power conversion efficiency (η) of the cells increased from 8.3 to 13.6 mA/cm2 and 3.5% to 5.7%, respectively. However, the JSC decreased as the loading of AMNM exceeded 3.0 wt%. At higher AMNM loadings, nanomica acted as a barrier interface between the electrolyte and the dye molecules to hinder electron transfer, and thus reducing the cell\\'s photocurrent density. Furthermore, the DSSCs fabricated by dispersing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microspheres in the TiO2 electrode with the GPE containing 3.0 wt% AMNM improved the η to 6.70%. The TiO2 films would exhibit larger porosity by blending with PMMA, leading the penetration of GPEs into the porous TiO2 easier, thus improving the contact between the dye-adsorbed TiO2 surfaces and the GPEs, as characterized by EIS. Moreover, the η of gel-type DSSCs with a 25 μm thickness of surlyn reached 7.96% as compared with 6.70% for the DSSCs with a 60 μm surlyn. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids and phospholipids on [3H]-vitamin E incorporation into pulmonary artery endothelial cell membranes

    Sekharam, K.M.; Patel, J.M.; Block, E.R.

    1990-01-01

    Vitamin E, a dietary antioxidant, is presumed to be incorporated into the lipid bilayer of biological membranes to an extent proportional to the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids or phospholipids in the membrane. In the present study we evaluated the distribution of incorporated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in various membranes of pulmonary artery endothelial cells. We also studied whether incorporation of PUFA or PE is responsible for increased incorporation of [3H]-vitamin E into the membranes of these cells. Following a 24-hr incubation with linoleic acid (18:2), 18:2 was increased by 6.9-, 9.2-, and 13.2-fold in plasma, mitochondrial, and microsomal membranes, respectively. Incorporation of 18:2 caused significant increases in the unsaturation indexes of mitochondrial and microsomal polyunsaturated fatty acyl chains (P less than .01 versus control in both membranes). Incubation with arachidonic acid (20:4) for 24 hr resulted in 1.5-, 2.3-, and 2.4-fold increases in 20:4 in plasma, mitochondrial, and microsomal membranes, respectively. The unsaturation indexes of polyunsaturated fatty acyl chains of mitochondrial and microsomal membranes also increased (P less than .01 versus control in both membranes). Although incubations with 18:2 or 20:4 resulted in several-fold increases in membrane 18:2 or 20:4 fatty acids, incorporation of [3H]-vitamin E into these membranes was similar to that in controls. Following a 24-hr incubation with PE, membrane PE content was significantly increased, and [3H]-vitamin E incorporation was also increased to a comparable degree, i.e., plasma membrane greater than mitochondria greater than microsomes. Endogenous vitamin E content of the cells was not altered because of increased incorporation of PE and [3H]-vitamin E

  7. CONTEXT 2015 Doctorial Symposium

    Eklund, Peter; wegener, rebekah

    2015-01-01

    What is the CONTEXT 2015 Doctoral Symposium? The CONTEXT 2015 Doctoral Symposium is an opportunity for doctoral researchers to showcase their work and discuss problems, challenges, and ideas in an open and collegial environment with expert feedback. The Doctoral Symposium is a workshop for doctoral...... feedback and general advice in a constructive atmosphere. Doctoral researchers will present and discuss their research in a supportive atmosphere with other doctoral researchers and an international panel of established researchers that provide expert feedback. The workshop will take place on a single full...... day, Monday November 2, 2015, the day prior to the start of the main CONTEXT 2015 conference....

  8. Enhancing the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells by incorporating nanomica in gel electrolytes☆

    Lai, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Chia-Yu; Chen, Jian-Ging; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Kuan-Chieh; Liu, Ken-Yen; Lin, King-Fu; Lin, Jiang-Jen; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Gel-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated with 5.0 wt% polyvinyidene fluoride-co-hexafluoro propylene (PVDF-HFP) in methoxy propionitrile (MPN) as gel polymer electrolyte (GPE), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium iodide (BMII)/iodine (I2) as redox couple, 4-tertiary butyl pyridine (TBP) and guanidine thiocyanate as additives. The incorporation of alkyl-modified nanomica (AMNM) in the PVDF-HFP gel electrolytes caused the reduction of crystallization of PVDF-HFP, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The short-circuit current density (JSC) of the cell increased due to the decrease of diffusion resistance, as judged by the electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) analysis, while the open-circuit voltage (VOC) remained almost the same. As the loading of AMNM in the PVDF-HFP gel electrolyte was increased to 3.0 wt%, the JSC and power conversion efficiency (η) of the cells increased from 8.3 to 13.6 mA/cm2 and 3.5% to 5.7%, respectively. However, the JSC decreased as the loading of AMNM exceeded 3.0 wt%. At higher AMNM loadings, nanomica acted as a barrier interface between the electrolyte and the dye molecules to hinder electron transfer, and thus reducing the cell's photocurrent density. Furthermore, the DSSCs fabricated by dispersing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microspheres in the TiO2 electrode with the GPE containing 3.0 wt% AMNM improved the η to 6.70%. The TiO2 films would exhibit larger porosity by blending with PMMA, leading the penetration of GPEs into the porous TiO2 easier, thus improving the contact between the dye-adsorbed TiO2 surfaces and the GPEs, as characterized by EIS. Moreover, the η of gel-type DSSCs with a 25 μm thickness of surlyn reached 7.96% as compared with 6.70% for the DSSCs with a 60 μm surlyn. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Incorporation of graphene into SnO2 photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Batmunkh, Munkhbayar; Dadkhah, Mahnaz; Shearer, Cameron J.; Biggs, Mark J.; Shapter, Joseph G.

    2016-11-01

    In dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) photoanodes, tin dioxide (SnO2) structures present a promising alternative semiconducting oxide to the conventional titania (TiO2), but they suffer from poor photovoltaic (PV) efficiency caused by insufficient dye adsorption and low energy value of the conduction band. A hybrid structure consisting of SnO2 and reduced graphene oxide (SnO2-RGO) was synthesized via a microwave-assisted method and has been employed as a photoanode in DSSCs. Incorporation of RGO into the SnO2 photoanode enhanced the power conversion efficiency of DSSC device by 91.5%, as compared to the device assembled without RGO. This efficiency improvement can be attributed to increased dye loading, enhanced electron transfer and addition of suitable energy levels in the photoanode. Finally, the use of RGO addresses the major shortcoming of SnO2 when employed as a DSSC photoanode, namely poor dye adsorption and slow electron transfer rate.

  10. XXth symposium neuroradiologicum 2014

    NONE

    2014-09-15

    The volume includes abstracts from lectures and poster presentations during the XXth symposium neuroradiologicum 2014 covering the following issues: Stroke, head and neck, pediatric diagnostic neuroradiology, spine and interventional neuroradiology, adult diagnostic neuroradiology, intravascular interventional neuroradiology.

  11. COST 516 Tribology Symposium

    Ronkainen, H.; Holmberg, K. [eds.

    1998-11-01

    Cost 516 Tribology action is the first joint European research action focusing on tribology, which originates in the approval of its Memorandum of understanding in February 1994. The COST 516 Tribology Symposium took place in Espoo, Finland from 14th to 15th May 1998. This was the first Symposium of the COST 516 Tribology action. The large number of research contributions at the Symposium, altogether almost SO, and their scientific and technical level, is an indication of the importance and significance of tribology research. The symposium proceedings contain papers in a wide variety of subjects, covering the three categories of the COST 516 Tribology action, namely Grease lubrication (GRIT), Tribology of renewable environmentally adapted lubricants (REAL) and Coatings and surface treatments (CAST). (orig.)

  12. Short-term variability in bacterial abundance, cell properties, and incorporation of leucine and thymidine in subarctic sea ice

    Kaartokallio, H.; Sogaard, D. H.; Norman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Sea ice is a biome of immense size and provides a range of habitats for diverse microbial communities, many of which are adapted to living at low temperatures and high salinities in brines. We measured simultaneous incorporation of thymidine (TdR) and leucine (Leu), bacterial cell abundance...... and cell population properties (by flow cytometry) in subarctic sea ice in SW Greenland. Short-term temporal variability was moderate, and steep environmental gradients, typical for sea ice, were the main drivers of the variability in bacterial cell properties and activity. Low nucleic acid (LNA) bacteria...... and marine biofilm systems. Leu: TdR ratios were high (up to >300) in lowermost ice layers, and when compared to published respiration measurements, these results suggest non-specific Leu incorporation. There was evidence of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-containing bacteria in the sea ice, shown by brightly...

  13. Actions of exogenous histones and other proteins on [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA of Novikoff hepatoma cells

    Barra, R.; Beres, B.; Koch, M.R.; Lea, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of exogenous proteins on the incorporation of [ 3 H]-thymidine into DNA was studied in Novikoff hepatoma ascites cells incubated in Eagle's minimal essential medium. A liver cytosol fraction (8 mg protein/ml) caused approximately 80% inhibition of isotope incorporation. The inhibitory activity of cytosol fractions from Morris hepatomas 9618A 2 , 5123C and 20 were inversely related to their growth rate. Under conditions in which there appeared to be a density dependent inhibition of growth, a mean 10 to 20% stimulation of isotope incorporation was observed after addition of total calf thymus histones and individual fractions in the concentration range of 100 to 400μg/ml. In experiments with lower cell concentrations, a 60% or greater increase in [ 3 H]-thymidine incorporation could be obtained with total calf thymus histone and with Fl and arginine-rich histones from rat liver. At concentrations of 1 to 2 mg/ml, histones inhibited DNA synthesis. Bovine serum albumin had little effect on DNA synthesis. Polylysine caused an 80 to 90% inhibition at a concentration of 1 mg/ml, but stimulatory effects were detected under certain conditions at 10μg/ml. The results suggest critical dependence on the ratio of cell and exogenous protein concentration in the action of proteins on DNA synthesis. (author)

  14. A computational model incorporating neural stem cell dynamics reproduces glioma incidence across the lifespan in the human population.

    Roman Bauer

    Full Text Available Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Demographically, the risk of occurrence increases until old age. Here we present a novel computational model to reproduce the probability of glioma incidence across the lifespan. Previous mathematical models explaining glioma incidence are framed in a rather abstract way, and do not directly relate to empirical findings. To decrease this gap between theory and experimental observations, we incorporate recent data on cellular and molecular factors underlying gliomagenesis. Since evidence implicates the adult neural stem cell as the likely cell-of-origin of glioma, we have incorporated empirically-determined estimates of neural stem cell number, cell division rate, mutation rate and oncogenic potential into our model. We demonstrate that our model yields results which match actual demographic data in the human population. In particular, this model accounts for the observed peak incidence of glioma at approximately 80 years of age, without the need to assert differential susceptibility throughout the population. Overall, our model supports the hypothesis that glioma is caused by randomly-occurring oncogenic mutations within the neural stem cell population. Based on this model, we assess the influence of the (experimentally indicated decrease in the number of neural stem cells and increase of cell division rate during aging. Our model provides multiple testable predictions, and suggests that different temporal sequences of oncogenic mutations can lead to tumorigenesis. Finally, we conclude that four or five oncogenic mutations are sufficient for the formation of glioma.

  15. Amplification of oncogenes and integrated SV40 sequences in mammalian cells by the decay of incorporated iodine-125

    Ehrfeld, A.; Planas-Bohne, F.; Luecke-Huhle, C.

    1986-01-01

    Iodine-125, in the form of 5-[ 125 I]iododeoxyuridine (I-UdR), was incorporated into the DNA of SV40 transformed Chinese hamster embryo cells. Disintegration of the 125 I led to increased cell killing with increasing dose as measured by the colony-forming ability of single cells. The D37 (the dose at which 37% of the cells survive) amounts to 95 decays per cell, corresponding to 0.66 Gy. Variations in the copy number of specific DNA sequences was measured by using dispersed cell blotting with sensitive DNA hybridizations. A 13-fold amplification of the viral DNA sequences (SV40) and a twofold amplification of two cellular oncogenes of the ras-family (Ki-ras and Ha-ras) were found. Other cellular genes, like the alpha-actin gene, were not amplified, and no variation in gene copy number was detected after incubation of cells with cold I-UdR. We suggest the observed gene amplifications are induced by the densely ionizing radiation emitted by the decay of the incorporated 125 I atoms

  16. TRIENNIAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM: Dedifferentiated fat cells: Potential and perspectives for their use in clinical and animal science purpose.

    Duarte, M S; Bueno, R; Silva, W; Campos, C F; Gionbelli, M P; Guimarães, S E F; Silva, F F; Lopes, P S; Hausman, G J; Dodson, M V

    2017-05-01

    An increasing body of evidences has demonstrated the ability of the mature adipocyte to dedifferentiate into a population of proliferative-competent cells known as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. As early as the 1970s, in vitro studies showed that DFAT cells may be obtained by ceiling culture, which takes advantage of the buoyancy property of lipid-filled cells. It was documented that DFAT cells may acquire a phenotype similar to mesenchymal stem cells and yet may differentiate into multiple cell lineages, such as skeletal and smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, osteoblasts, and adipocytes. Additionally, recent studies showed the ability of isolated mature adipocytes to dedifferentiate in vivo and the capacity of the progeny cells to redifferentiate into mature adipocytes, contributing to the increase of body fatness. These findings shed light on the potential for use of DFAT cells, not only for clinical purposes but also within the animal science field, because increasing intramuscular fat without excessive increase in other fat depots is a challenge in livestock production. Knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and redifferentiation of DFAT cells will allow the development of strategies for their use for clinical and animal science purposes. In this review, we highlight several aspects of DFAT cells, their potential for clinical purposes, and their contribution to adipose tissue mass in livestock.

  17. Normal iron absorption determined by means of whole body counting and red cell incorporation of 59Fe

    Larsen, L.; Milman, N.

    1977-01-01

    Gastrointestinal iron absorption was measured in 27 normal subjects (19 females and 8 males) by means of whole body counting. Whole body retention 14 days after oral administration of 10μCi 59 Fe together with a carrier dose of 9.9 mg Fe 2+ (as sulphate), was used as an expression of absorption. The percentage incorporation in the total erythrocyte mass of administered 59 Fe (erythrocyte incorporation) and of absorbed 59 Fe (red cell utilization) was also estimated. Geometric mean iron absorption was 8.3+-2.1 (SD% in females, 9.1+-2.2 % in males and 8.5+-2.1 % in the entire series. The difference between males and females was not significant. Erythrocyte incorporation was 7.7+-2.2 (SD) % (geometric mean) in the entire series and the correlation between iron absorption and erythrocyte incorporation was highly significant (r = 0.96,P < 0.001). Red cell utilization averaged 92.9 +- 4.0 (SEM)% (arithmetic mean) in the entire series. (author)

  18. Effect of blood serum from irradiated mice on the incorporation of DNA, RNA and protein precursor in L929 cells

    Muehlensiepen, H.; Porschen, W.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    Serum from whole-body irradiated mice inhibits incorporation of DNA precursors into DNA of L929 cells in culture in a dose-dependent way. The humoral factor interfering with the incorporation of 3 H-thymidine and 125 I-iododeoxyuridine is identical to thymidine. The degree of depression of 125 I-iododeoxyuridine-uptake is more sensitive than that of 3 H-thymidine. Irradiation of donor mice does not confer a toxic effect of blood serum on cell growth in culture. Incorporation of 3 H-leucine into protein and 3 H-cytidine into DNA and RNA is not affected by the serum of irradiated mice; there is no effect on the incorporation of 3 H-cytidine from the intracellular precursor pool into DNA or RNA either. The present findings demonstrate the specificity and high sensitivity of the assay system for measuring thymidine concentration in mouse blood serum and point to possible applications of analysing abnormalities in DNA metabolism resulting in, or from, disturbances of the thymidine reutilization pathway. (orig.) [de

  19. The effect of incorporation of SDF-1alpha into PLGA scaffolds on stem cell recruitment and the inflammatory response.

    Thevenot, Paul T; Nair, Ashwin M; Shen, Jinhui; Lotfi, Parisa; Ko, Cheng-Yu; Tang, Liping

    2010-05-01

    Despite significant advances in the understanding of tissue responses to biomaterials, most implants are still plagued by inflammatory responses which can lead to fibrotic encapsulation. This is of dire consequence in tissue engineering, where seeded cells and bioactive components are separated from the native tissue, limiting the regenerative potential of the design. Additionally, these interactions prevent desired tissue integration and angiogenesis, preventing functionality of the design. Recent evidence supports that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) can have beneficial effects which alter the inflammatory responses and improve healing. The purpose of this study was to examine whether stem cells could be targeted to the site of biomaterial implantation and whether increasing local stem cell responses could improve the tissue response to PLGA scaffold implants. Through incorporation of SDF-1alpha through factor adsorption and mini-osmotic pump delivery, the host-derived stem cell response can be improved resulting in 3X increase in stem cell populations at the interface for up to 2 weeks. These interactions were found to significantly alter the acute mast cell responses, reducing the number of mast cells and degranulated mast cells near the scaffold implants. This led to subsequent downstream reduction in the inflammatory cell responses, and through altered mast cell activation and stem cell participation, increased angiogenesis and decreased fibrotic responses to the scaffold implants. These results support that enhanced recruitment of autologous stem cells can improve the tissue responses to biomaterial implants through modifying/bypassing inflammatory cell responses and jumpstarting stem cell participation in healing at the implant interface. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A rapid [3H]glucose incorporation assay for determination of lymphoid cell-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanissios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-01-01

    [ 3 H]glucose uptake by Candida albicans after interaction with lymphoid effector cells was used to provide a quick, accurate and objective assessment of the growth inhibitory potential of lymphoid cells on candida. After 18 h coincubation of effector cells with candida, [ 3 H]glucose was added for 3 h and the amount of radiolabel incorporated into residual candida was measured. The results showed that [ 3 H]glucose uptake was proportional to the number of candida organisms left in the microwell and is dose dependent on the effector/target (E/T) ratio. At an E/T ratio of 300/1, complete inhibition of candida was seen, with significant inhibition still present at 30/1. In addition, monocytes and polymorphonuclear cells were found to be the primary cells responsible for eliminating candida. (Auth.)

  1. Ultrarapid sonochemical synthesis of enzyme-incorporated copper nanoflowers and their application to mediatorless glucose biofuel cell

    Chung, Minsoo; Nguyen, Tuan Loi; Tran, Thao Quynh Ngan; Yoon, Hyon Hee; Kim, Il Tae; Kim, Moon Il

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a mediatorless glucose biofuel cell based on hybrid nanoflowers incorporating enzymes including glucose oxidase (GOx), laccase, or catalase with copper phosphate, which were further mixed and compressed with conductive multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT). The nanoflowers were simply synthesized within 5 min at room temperature using sonication method but yielded greatly improved stability as well as highly retained activity by the proper incorporation of enzyme molecules inside the flower-like structure. With glucose as biofuel, GOx and laccase nanoflowers were applied to form enzyme anode and cathode, respectively, and catalase nanoflowers were additionally employed to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, which may be deleterious for GOx, into oxygen and water. Using the enzyme nanoflowers-based biofuel cell system without any involved mediator, a high power density up to 200 μW cm-2 were obtained, which was approximately 80% to that from the biofuel cell system prepared with the corresponding free enzymes. Importantly, the enzyme nanoflowers-based biofuel cell maintained their initial power density over 90% during storage for two months at 4 °C, while most of the glucose biofuel cells in the literature present meaningful stability only in the range of one or two weeks. Based on this result, we expect that this simple but efficient strategy to prepare highly stable glucose biofuel cell using the rapidly-synthesized enzyme-inorganic hybrid nanoflowers can be readily extended to diverse applications in medical and environmental chemistry.

  2. In vitro incorporation of tritiated thymidine by the Sternberg-Reed cells in Hodgkin disease

    Marinello, M; Tkachenko, G; Gavilondo, J; Baeza, B [National Institute of Oncology and Radiology, Havana (Cuba)

    1975-01-01

    A new DNA synthesis by the Sternberg-Reed cells in Hodgkin disease was studied using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography. The results show that after incubation pulses of 30 and 60 minutes, cells with lobulated nucleus, binucleated and trinucleated cells identifiable to the diagnostic Sternberg-Reed cells could undergo a new DNA synthesis. This points to a more dynamic interpretation of this type of cell.

  3. Abel Symposium 2015

    Larsen, Nadia; Neshveyev, Sergey; Skau, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Like the first Abel Symposium, held in 2004, the Abel Symposium 2015 focused on operator algebras. It is interesting to see the remarkable advances that have been made in operator algebras over these years, which strikingly illustrate the vitality of the field. A total of 26 talks were given at the symposium on a variety of themes, all highlighting the richness of the subject. The field of operator algebras was created in the 1930s and was motivated by problems of quantum mechanics. It has subsequently developed well beyond its initial intended realm of applications and expanded into such diverse areas of mathematics as representation theory, dynamical systems, differential geometry, number theory and quantum algebra. One branch, known as “noncommutative geometry”, has become a powerful tool for studying phenomena that are beyond the reach of classical analysis. This volume includes research papers that present new results, surveys that discuss the development of a specific line of research, and articles ...

  4. Incorporation of bone marrow cells in pancreatic pseudoislets improves posttransplant vascularization and endocrine function.

    Christine Wittig

    Full Text Available Failure of revascularization is known to be the major reason for the poor outcome of pancreatic islet transplantation. In this study, we analyzed whether pseudoislets composed of islet cells and bone marrow cells can improve vascularization and function of islet transplants. Pancreatic islets isolated from Syrian golden hamsters were dispersed into single cells for the generation of pseudoislets containing 4×10(3 cells. To create bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets 2×10(3 islet cells were co-cultured with 2×10(3 bone marrow cells. Pseudoislets and bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets were transplanted syngeneically into skinfold chambers to study graft vascularization by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Native islet transplants served as controls. Bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets showed a significantly improved vascularization compared to native islets and pseudoislets. Moreover, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets but not pseudoislets normalized blood glucose levels after transplantation of 1000 islet equivalents under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals, although the bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets contained only 50% of islet cells compared to pseudoislets and native islets. Fluorescence microscopy of bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets composed of bone marrow cells from GFP-expressing mice showed a distinct fraction of cells expressing both GFP and insulin, indicating a differentiation of bone marrow-derived cells to an insulin-producing cell-type. Thus, enrichment of pseudoislets by bone marrow cells enhances vascularization after transplantation and increases the amount of insulin-producing tissue. Accordingly, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets may represent a novel approach to increase the success rate of islet transplantation.

  5. The Abel Symposium 2013

    Irgens, Marius; Wold, Erlend

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on complex geometry and covers highly active topics centered around geometric problems in several complex variables and complex dynamics, written by some of the world’s leading experts in their respective fields. This book features research and expository contributions from the 2013 Abel Symposium, held at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology Trondheim on July 2-5, 2013. The purpose of the symposium was to present the state of the art on the topics, and to discuss future research directions.

  6. DNA-incorporated 125I induces more than one double-strand break per decay in mammalian cells.

    Elmroth, Kecke; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2005-04-01

    The Auger-electron emitter 125I releases cascades of 20 electrons per decay that deposit a great amount of local energy, and for DNA-incorporated 125I, approximately one DNA double-strand break (DSB) is produced close to the decay site. To investigate the potential of 125I to induce additional DSBs within adjacent chromatin structures in mammalian cells, we applied DNA fragment-size analysis based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of hamster V79-379A cells exposed to DNA-incorporated 125IdU. After accumulation of decays at -70 degrees C in the presence of 10% DMSO, there was a non-random distribution of DNA fragments with an excess of fragments even higher. In contrast, using a conventional low-resolution assay without measurement of smaller DNA fragments, the yield was close to one DSB/decay. We conclude that a large fraction of the DSBs induced by DNA-incorporated 125I are nonrandomly distributed and that significantly more than one DSB/decay is induced in an intact cell. Thus, in addition to DSBs produced close to the decay site, DSBs may also be induced within neighboring chromatin fibers, releasing smaller DNA fragments that are not detected by conventional DSB assays.

  7. Incorporating spectroscopic on-line monitoring as a method of detection for a Lewis cell setup

    Heller, Forrest D.; Casella, Amanda J.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2017-01-01

    A Lewis cell was designed and constructed for investigating solvent extraction systems by spectrophotometrically monitoring both the organic and aqueous phases in real time. This new Lewis cell was tested and shown to perform well compared to other previously reported Lewis cell designs. The advantage of the new design is that the spectroscopic measurement allows determination of not only metal ion concentrations, but also information regarding chemical speciation—information not available with previous Lewis cell designs. For convenience, the new Lewis cell design was dubbed COSMOFLEX (COntinuous Spectroscopic MOnitoring of Forrest’s Liquid-liquid EXtraction cell).

  8. Effect of Rubidium Incorporation on the Structural, Electrical, and Photovoltaic Properties of Methylammonium Lead Iodide-Based Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Park, Ik Jae; Seo, Seongrok; Park, Min Ah; Lee, Sangwook; Kim, Dong Hoe; Zhu, Kai; Shin, Hyunjung; Kim, Jin Young

    2017-12-06

    We report the electrical properties of rubidium-incorporated methylammonium lead iodide ((Rb x MA 1-x )PbI 3 ) films and the photovoltaic performance of (Rb x MA 1-x )PbI 3 film-based p-i-n-type perovskite solar cells (PSCs). The incorporation of a small amount of Rb + (x = 0.05) increases both the open circuit voltage (V oc ) and the short circuit photocurrent density (J sc ) of the PSCs, leading to an improved power conversion efficiency (PCE). However, a high fraction of Rb + incorporation (x = 0.1 and 0.2) decreases the J sc and thus the PCE, which is attributed to the phase segregation of the single tetragonal perovskite phase to a MA-rich tetragonal perovskite phase and a RbPbI 3 orthorhombic phase at high Rb fractions. Conductive atomic force microscopic and admittance spectroscopic analyses reveal that the single-phase (Rb 0.05 MA 0.95 )PbI 3 film has a high electrical conductivity because of a reduced deep-level trap density. We also found that Rb substitution enhances the diode characteristics of the PSC, as evidenced by the reduced reverse saturation current (J 0 ). The optimized (Rb x MA 1-x )PbI 3 PSCs exhibited a PCE of 18.8% with negligible hysteresis in the photocurrent-voltage curve. The results from this work enhance the understanding of the effect of Rb incorporation into organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskites and enable the exploration of Rb-incorporated mixed perovskites for various applications, such as solar cells, photodetectors, and light-emitting diodes.

  9. Sensitivity and specificity of tritiated thymidine incorporation and ELISPOT assays in identifying antigen specific T cell immune responses

    MacLeod Beth

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardization of cell-based immunologic monitoring is becoming increasingly important as methods for measuring cellular immunity become more complex. We assessed the ability of two commonly used cell-based assays, tritiated thymidine incorporation (proliferation and IFN-gamma ELISPOT, to predict T cell responses to HER-2/neu, tetanus toxoid (tt, and cytomegalovirus (CMV antigens. These antigens were determined to be low (HER-2/neu, moderate (tt, and robustly (CMV immunogenic proteins. Samples from 27 Stage II, III, and IV HER-2/neu positive breast cancer patients, vaccinated against the HER-2/neu protein and tt, were analyzed by tritiated thymidine incorporation and IFN-gamma ELISPOT for T cell response. Results Linear regression analysis indicates that both stimulation index (SI (p = 0.011 and IFN-gamma secreting precursor frequency (p Conclusion These data underscore the importance of taking into consideration the performance characteristics of assays used to measure T cell immunity. This consideration is particularly necessary when determining which method to utilize for assessing responses to immunotherapeutic manipulations in cancer patients.

  10. Incorporation of radioactivity from [14C]lactate into the glycogen of cultured mouse astroglial cells. Evidence for gluconeogenesis in brain cells.

    Dringen, R; Schmoll, D; Cesar, M; Hamprecht, B

    1993-05-01

    A pure population of astroglial cells was selected from heterogeneous astroglia-rich primary cultures in a medium containing sorbitol instead of glucose. It was shown that astroglial cells synthesize glycogen when they are returned to a glucose-containing medium, and that when [14C]lactate is also present the synthesized glycogen is radioactively labelled. Compared with the degree of incorporation of radioactivity in the presence of tritiated glucose, the incorporation of radioactivity from lactate was small but significant. After incubation of astroglial cells with radioactively labelled lactate, the glycogen was isolated and enzymatically hydrolysed to glucose, which was found to be radioactively labelled. Astrocytes are therefore able to convert lactate to glucosyl residues, a metabolic pathway known as gluconeogenesis. It is proposed that astrocytic gluconeogenesis may consume lactic acid formed in neighboring cells such as neurons, during anaerobic glycolysis at times of high energy demand.

  11. 70th Birthday symposium of Prof. Dr. Riederer: autologous adult stem cells in ischemic and traumatic CNS disorders

    de Munter, J.P.J.M.; Wolters, E.C.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic and traumatic insults of the central nervous system both result in definite chronic disability, only to some extent responsive to rehabilitation. Recently, the application of autologous stem cells (fresh bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells including mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem

  12. Incorporation of 35S-sulfate and 3H-glucosamine into heparan and chondroitin sulfates during the cell cycle of B16-F10 cells

    Blair, O.C.; Sartorelli, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    Changes in glycosaminoglycan composition occurring during the cell cycle were determined in B16-F10 cells sorted flow cytometrically with respect to DNA content. Incorporation of 35 S-sulfate into heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate of unsorted and G1,S, and G2 +M sorted cells was determined following chondroitinase ABC or nitrous acid treatment; the incorporation into surface material was measured as the difference between the radioactivity of control and trypsin-treated cells. Incorporation of 35 S-sulfate and 3 H-glucosamine into cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC)-precipitable material was characterized before and after chondroitinase or nitrous acid treatment by Sephadex G50 chromatography. Long-term (48 h) and short-term (1 h) labeling studies demonstrate that (a) the amount of total cellular chondroitin sulfate is greater than that of heparan sulfate, with larger amounts of unsulfated heparan than chondroitin being present; (b) the rate of turnover of heparan sulfate is greater than that of chondroitin sulfate; (c) greatest short-term incorporation of 3H-glucosamine into CPC-precipitable material occurs during S phase; and (d) the rate of turnover of both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate is decreased in S phase relative to G1 and G2 + M

  13. Glucocorticoid effect on melphalan cytotoxicity, cell-cycle position, cell size, and [3H]uridine incorporation in one of three human melanoma cell lines

    Benckhuijsen, C.; Osman, A.M.; Hillebrand, M.J.; Smets, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Three human melanoma cell lines of known content of specific glucocorticoid-binding sites were studied for colony formation after a microM dose of glucocorticoid combined with melphalan. In one of the three cell lines, M-5A, subcloned from M-5 (formerly designated RPMI 8322), the effect of combined treatment was markedly increased compared to that of melphalan even if the glucocorticoid was applied for 1 h only, 10 h before the melphalan. Semilogarithmic dose-effect plots for a reduction of final plating efficiency by glucocorticoid were curvilinear, according to a receptor-mediated process. The effects of glucocorticoid, melphalan, and their combination were linearized by bilogarithmic median-effect plotting which allowed the quantitation of a synergism which was more marked in case of glucocorticoid pretreatment, for 1 or 24 h, than on simultaneous exposure. According to sequential DNA per cell cytophotometry, melphalan abolished in M-5A a glucocorticoid-induced arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The cytotoxic synergism correlated with an apparent stimulation by glucocorticoid of the rate of acid-insoluble incorporation of [ 3 H]uridine and [ 14 C]leucine and an increase in cell size and protein content in M-5A cells but not in the other two cell lines. The way in which glucocorticoids induce an enhanced susceptibility to melphalan is not clear. Our results appear compatible with a hypothesis that chromatin in a transcriptionally activated state is more vulnerable to cytotoxic attack by an alkylating agent than under average conditions

  14. Birch symposium proceedings

    W.T. Doolittle; P.E. Bruns

    1969-01-01

    This symposium on yellow and paper birch is the third in a series of meetings devoted to discussion of our fine hardwood timber species. The first meeting, held at Carbondale, Illinois, in 1966, dealt with black walnut. The second, held at Houghton, Michigan, in 1968, dealt with sugar maple. The purpose of this third meeting is to bring together our present knowledge...

  15. Symposium summary and prognosis

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1975-11-01

    The summary of the symposium on high energy physics experiments includes phenomena at low energies, the foundations of physics (considered to be mainly gravitation and quantum electrodynamics), standards of reference used for interpretation of experimental data, the new physics, particle proliferation, theoretical development, and a prognosis for the future

  16. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    Pattison,B

    1992-01-01

    13me Symposium qui se déroule du 27 au 31 juillet pour la première fois au Cern. Brian Pattison ouvre la cérémonie et donne la parole à Dr.Ugland (qui représente le DG C.Rubbia excusé) et d'autres intervenants

  17. Issues of HRD. Symposium.

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on issues of human resource development (HRD). "The Complex Roots of Human Resource Development" (Monica Lee) discusses the roots of HRD within the framework of the following views of management: (1) classic (the view that managers must be able to create appropriate rules and…

  18. Effect of medium replenishment or composition on [3H] thymidine incorporation in uv-irradiated CHO-K1 cells

    Newman, C.N.; Miller, J.H.

    1985-03-01

    Because culture medium contains uv-absorbing material, it is usually removed just before uv-irradiation of tissue culture monolayers. However, medium removal and replenishment with fresh medium alone (sham-irradiation) causes up to a 10-fold reduction in the rate of [ 3 H]TdR incorporation in CHO-K1 cells which persists for several hours. This reduction, which is much smaller ( 3 H]TdR pulse-label in conditioned (spent) and in fresh medium; TdR in the former is converted by cells to thymine. When responses of uv-irradiated cells are normalized to responses of corresponding sham-irradiated cultures, considerable variation is observed in replicate experiments because fresh medium appears to induce transient metabolic imbalances in irradiated cells which are not readily controlled. This problem can, in part, be circumvented by replenishing treated cultures with the original spent medium; however, the presence of CdR in the growth medium still causes an anomalous 2-3-fold greater uv-induced reduction in [ 3 H]TdR incorporation than is observed in the absence of CdR. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. International symposium 'Energetics 2006'. Symposium proceedings

    2006-01-01

    ZEMAK as a civil association, created in the term positive legitimate regulations of our country, presents non party, non political and non profitable association, which primary goal is animation of eperts and other scientific and non scientific workers in the function of permanent following, studying and giving directives for solve the energy problems for a long temporal period. Behind us are fourteen successful years of fertile and wealthy work, which is bringing maimal penetration in domestic as well as foreign scientific field. This successful work of ZEMAK deserves by all members which professional work is in the institutions like: MANU (Macedonian academy of science and art), Technical faculties from the Universities, state and private company from energy field and other civil persons. The main goal of this 9-th International Symposium traditionally is to collect all engineers and eperts from the field of energy, and those which professional life is energy. During this International Symposium will be present, analyze and discuss about 100 incoming papers, prepared by 100th or more authors and coauthors, divided in the following topics: Basic energy and ecology, Renewable energy sources, Energy efficiency and energy saving and Management in energy and regulations.

  20. Incorporating photon recycling into the analytical drift-diffusion model of high efficiency solar cells

    Lumb, Matthew P. [The George Washington University, 2121 I Street NW, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Walters, Robert J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-11-21

    The analytical drift-diffusion formalism is able to accurately simulate a wide range of solar cell architectures and was recently extended to include those with back surface reflectors. However, as solar cells approach the limits of material quality, photon recycling effects become increasingly important in predicting the behavior of these cells. In particular, the minority carrier diffusion length is significantly affected by the photon recycling, with consequences for the solar cell performance. In this paper, we outline an approach to account for photon recycling in the analytical Hovel model and compare analytical model predictions to GaAs-based experimental devices operating close to the fundamental efficiency limit.

  1. A selenium-deficient Caco-2 cell model for assessing differential incorporation of chemical or food selenium into glutathione peroxidase.

    Zeng, Huawei; Botnen, James H; Johnson, Luann K

    2008-01-01

    Assessing the ability of a selenium (Se) sample to induce cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in Se-deficient animals is the most commonly used method to determine Se bioavailability. Our goal is to establish a Se-deficient cell culture model with differential incorporation of Se chemical forms into GPx, which may complement the in vivo studies. In the present study, we developed a Se-deficient Caco-2 cell model with a serum gradual reduction method. It is well recognized that selenomethionine (SeMet) is the major nutritional source of Se; therefore, SeMet, selenite, or methylselenocysteine (SeMSC) was added to cell culture media with different concentrations and treatment time points. We found that selenite and SeMSC induced GPx more rapidly than SeMet. However, SeMet was better retained as it is incorporated into proteins in place of methionine; compared with 8-, 24-, or 48-h treatment, 72-h Se treatment was a more sensitive time point to measure the potential of GPx induction in all tested concentrations. Based on induction of GPx activity, the cellular bioavailability of Se from an extract of selenobroccoli after a simulated gastrointestinal digestion was comparable with that of SeMSC and SeMet. These in vitro data are, for the first time, consistent with previous published data regarding selenite and SeMet bioavailability in animal models and Se chemical speciation studies with broccoli. Thus, Se-deficient Caco-2 cell model with differential incorporation of chemical or food forms of Se into GPx provides a new tool to study the cellular mechanisms of Se bioavailability.

  2. Using a Module-Based Laboratory to Incorporate Inquiry into a Large Cell Biology Course

    Howard, David R.; Miskowski, Jennifer A.

    2005-01-01

    Because cell biology has rapidly increased in breadth and depth, instructors are challenged not only to provide undergraduate science students with a strong, up-to-date foundation of knowledge, but also to engage them in the scientific process. To these ends, revision of the Cell Biology Lab course at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse was…

  3. Incorporation of a hinge domain improves the expansion of chimeric antigen receptor T cells

    Le Qin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple iterations of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs have been developed, mainly focusing on intracellular signaling modules. However, the effect of non-signaling extracellular modules on the expansion and therapeutic efficacy of CARs remains largely undefined. Methods We generated two versions of CAR vectors, with or without a hinge domain, targeting CD19, mesothelin, PSCA, MUC1, and HER2, respectively. Then, we systematically compared the effect of the hinge domains on the growth kinetics, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity of CAR T cells in vitro and in vivo. Results During in vitro culture period, the percentages and absolute numbers of T cells expressing the CARs containing a hinge domain continuously increased, mainly through the promotion of CD4+ CAR T cell expansion, regardless of the single-chain variable fragment (scFv. In vitro migration assay showed that the hinges enhanced CAR T cells migratory capacity. The T cells expressing anti-CD19 CARs with or without a hinge had similar antitumor capacities in vivo, whereas the T cells expressing anti-mesothelin CARs containing a hinge domain showed enhanced antitumor activities. Conclusions Hence, our results demonstrate that a hinge contributes to CAR T cell expansion and is capable of increasing the antitumor efficacy of some specific CAR T cells. Our results suggest potential novel strategies in CAR vector design.

  4. Charge yield potential of indoor-operated solar cells incorporated into Product Integrated Photovoltaic (PIPV)

    Reich, N.H.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Turkenburg, W.C.

    2010-01-01

    Solar cell performance parameters (open circuit voltage, short circuit current, fill factor and efficiency) are derived for different solar cell types for the irradiance range 0.1–1000 W/m2. Also it is demonstrated how spectral mismatch factors for indoor lighting conditions are calculated. The

  5. Impact of elastin incorporation into electrochemically aligned collagen fibers on mechanical properties and smooth muscle cell phenotype.

    Nguyen, Thuy-Uyen; Bashur, Chris A; Kishore, Vipuil

    2016-03-17

    Application of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) for the replacement of small-diameter arteries is limited due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Previous studies have attempted to address the limitations of TEVGs by developing scaffolds that mimic the composition (collagen and elastin) of native arteries to better match the mechanical properties of the graft with the native tissue. However, most existing scaffolds do not recapitulate the aligned topography of the collagen fibers found in native vessels. In the current study, based on the principles of isoelectric focusing, two different types of elastin (soluble and insoluble) were incorporated into highly oriented electrochemically aligned collagen (ELAC) fibers and the effect of elastin incorporation on the mechanical properties of the ELAC fibers and smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype was investigated. The results indicate that elastin incorporation significantly decreased the modulus of ELAC fibers to converge upon that of native vessels. Further, a significant increase in yield strain and decrease in Young's modulus was observed on all fibers post SMC culture compared with before the culture. Real-time polymerase chain reaction results showed a significant increase in the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and calponin on ELAC fibers with insoluble elastin, suggesting that incorporation of insoluble elastin induces a contractile phenotype in SMCs after two weeks of culture on ELAC fibers. Immunofluorescence results showed that calponin expression increased with time on all fibers. In conclusion, insoluble elastin incorporated ELAC fibers have the potential to be used for the development of functional TEVGs for the repair and replacement of small-diameter arteries.

  6. Comparison of selenophene and thienothiophene incorporation into pentacyclic lactam-based conjugated polymers for organic solar cells

    Kroon, Renee; Melianas, Armantas; Zhuang, Wenliu; Bergqvist, Jonas; Diaz De Zerio Mendaza, Amaia; Steckler, Timothy T.; Yu, Liyang; Bradley, Siobhan J.; Musumeci, Chiara; Gedefaw, Desta; Nann, Thomas; Amassian, Aram; Mü ller, Christian; Inganä s, Olle; Andersson, Mats R.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we compare the effect of incorporating selenophene versus thienothiophene spacers into pentacyclic lactam-based conjugated polymers for organic solar cells. The two cyclic lactam-based copolymers were obtained via a new synthetic method for the lactam moiety. Selenophene incorporation results in a broader and red-shifted optical absorption while retaining a deep highest occupied molecular orbital level, whereas thienothienophene incorporation results in a blue-shifted optical absorption. Additionally, grazing-incidence wide angle X-ray scattering data indicates edge- and face-on solid state order for the selenophene-based polymer as compared to the thienothiophene-based polymer, which orders predominantly edge-on with respect to the substrate. In polymer:PCBM bulk heterojunction solar cells both materials show a similar open-circuit voltage of ∼0.80-0.84 V, however the selenophene-based polymer displays a higher fill factor of ∼0.70 vs. ∼0.65. This is due to the partial face-on backbone orientation of the selenophene-based polymer, leading to a higher hole mobility, as confirmed by single-carrier diode measurements, and a concomitantly higher fill factor. Combined with improved spectral coverage of the selenophene-based polymer, as confirmed by quantum efficiency experiments, it offers a larger short-circuit current density of ∼12 mA cm. Despite the relatively low molecular weight of both materials, a very robust power conversion efficiency ∼7% is achieved for the selenophene-based polymer, while the thienothiophene-based polymer demonstrates only a moderate maximum PCE of ∼5.5%. Hence, the favorable effects of selenophene incorporation on the photovoltaic performance of pentacyclic lactam-based conjugated polymers are clearly demonstrated.

  7. Comparison of selenophene and thienothiophene incorporation into pentacyclic lactam-based conjugated polymers for organic solar cells

    Kroon, Renee

    2015-09-08

    In this work, we compare the effect of incorporating selenophene versus thienothiophene spacers into pentacyclic lactam-based conjugated polymers for organic solar cells. The two cyclic lactam-based copolymers were obtained via a new synthetic method for the lactam moiety. Selenophene incorporation results in a broader and red-shifted optical absorption while retaining a deep highest occupied molecular orbital level, whereas thienothienophene incorporation results in a blue-shifted optical absorption. Additionally, grazing-incidence wide angle X-ray scattering data indicates edge- and face-on solid state order for the selenophene-based polymer as compared to the thienothiophene-based polymer, which orders predominantly edge-on with respect to the substrate. In polymer:PCBM bulk heterojunction solar cells both materials show a similar open-circuit voltage of ∼0.80-0.84 V, however the selenophene-based polymer displays a higher fill factor of ∼0.70 vs. ∼0.65. This is due to the partial face-on backbone orientation of the selenophene-based polymer, leading to a higher hole mobility, as confirmed by single-carrier diode measurements, and a concomitantly higher fill factor. Combined with improved spectral coverage of the selenophene-based polymer, as confirmed by quantum efficiency experiments, it offers a larger short-circuit current density of ∼12 mA cm. Despite the relatively low molecular weight of both materials, a very robust power conversion efficiency ∼7% is achieved for the selenophene-based polymer, while the thienothiophene-based polymer demonstrates only a moderate maximum PCE of ∼5.5%. Hence, the favorable effects of selenophene incorporation on the photovoltaic performance of pentacyclic lactam-based conjugated polymers are clearly demonstrated.

  8. Incorporation of cerium oxide into hydroxyapatite coating regulates osteogenic activity of mesenchymal stem cell and macrophage polarization.

    Li, Kai; Shen, Qingyi; Xie, Youtao; You, Mingyu; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2017-02-01

    Biomedical coatings for orthopedic implants should facilitate osseointegration and mitigate implant-induced inflammatory reactions. Cerium oxide (CeO 2 ) ceramics possess anti-oxidative properties and can be used to decrease mediators of inflammation, which makes them attractive for biomedical applications. In our work, two kinds of CeO 2 incorporated hydroxyapatite coatings (HA-10Ce and HA-30Ce) were prepared via plasma spraying technique and the effects of CeO 2 addition on the responses of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and RAW264.7 macrophages were investigated. An increase in CeO 2 content in the HA coatings resulted in better osteogenic behaviors of BMSCs in terms of cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation. RT-PCR and western blot analysis suggested that the incorporation of CeO 2 may promote the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs through the Smad-dependent BMP signaling pathway, which activated Runx2 expression and subsequently enhanced the expression of ALP and OCN. The expression profiles of macrophages cultured on the CeO 2 modified coating revealed a tendency toward a M2 phenotype, because of an upregulation of M2 surface markers (CD163 and CD206), anti-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and osteoblastogenesis-related genes (BMP2 and TGF-β1) as well as a downregulation of M1 surface markers (CCR7 and CD11c), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and IL-1ra) and reactive oxygen species production. The results suggested the regulation of BMSCs behaviors and macrophage-mediated responses at the coating's surface were associated with CeO 2 incorporation. The incorporation of CeO 2 in HA coatings can be a valuable strategy to promote osteogenic responses and reduce inflammatory reactions.

  9. Fourth Tennessee water resources symposium

    Sale, M.J.; Presley, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The annual Tennessee Water Resources Symposium was initiated in 1988 as a means to bring together people with common interests in the state's important water-related resources at a technical, professional level. Initially the symposium was sponsored by the American Institute of Hydrology and called the Hydrology Symposium, but the Tennessee Section of the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) has taken on the primary coordination role for the symposium over the last two years and the symposium name was changed in 1990 to water resources to emphasize a more inter-disciplinary theme. This year's symposium carries on the successful tradition of the last three years. Our goal is to promote communication and cooperation among Tennessee's water resources professionals: scientists, engineers, and researchers from federal, state, academic, and private institutions and organizations who have interests and responsibilities for the state's water resources. For these conference proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base

  10. Incorporation of ophiobolin a into novel chemoembolization particles for cancer cell treatment.

    Morrison, Rachel; Gardiner, Chris; Evidente, Antonio; Kiss, Robert; Townley, Helen

    2014-10-01

    To design and synthesize chemoembolization particles for the delivery of Ophiobolin A (OphA), a promising fungal-derived chemotherapeutic, directly at the tumour location. To investigate cell death mechanism of OphA on a Rhabdomyosarcoma cancer (RD) cell line. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children; with a 5-year survival rate of between 30 and 65%. Multimodal chemoembolization particles were prepared by sintering mesoporous silica nanoparticles, prepared by the sol-gel method, onto the surface of polystyrene microspheres, prepared by suspension copolymerisation. The chemoembolization particles were subsequently loaded with OphA. The effects of OphA in vitro were characterised by flow cytometry and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NanoSight). High loading of OphA onto the chemoembolization particles was achieved. The subsequent release of OphA onto RD cells in culture showed a 70% reduction in cell viability. OphA caused RD cells to round up and their membrane to bleb and caused cell death via apoptosis. OphA caused both an increase in the number of microvesicles produced and an increase in DNA content within these microvesicles. The prepared chemoembolization particles showed good efficacy against RD cells in culture.

  11. Chromosome damage in Chinese hamster cells produced by 125I-UdR at the site of its incorporation

    Hughes, W.L.; Weinblatt, A.C.; Prensky, W.

    1978-01-01

    Metaphase chromosomal aberrations were produced by 125 I-labeled iododeoxyuridine ( 125 I-UdR) incorporated into Chinese hamster Don cells at the end of the S-period of the cell cycle. Chromosome damage and the number of autoradiographic silver grains were recorded for whole cells, for chromosome pairs 4 and 5 and for the X and the Y chromosomes. The X and the Y chromosomes, which label late in S, were at least twice as heavily labeled as chromosome pairs 4 and 5 - two readily recognizable autosomes of similar size. The incidence of chromosome damage was at least six times that which would have been expected from equivalent doses of X-rays and the incidence of damage was directly related to the number of silver grains over each chromosome. It is estimated that it takes four to ten disintegrations to produce a visible chromosome aberration. The finding that chromosome damage is localized at the site of the 125 I decay is most readily explained by the high flux of low energy Auger electrons occurring at the site of the decay of the incorporated 125 I atom. (Auth.)

  12. Lightweight Hybrid Ablator Incorporating Aerogel-Filled Open-Cell Foam Structural Insulator, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In previous work for NASA and DoD, Ultramet developed lightweight open-cell foam insulators composed of a carbon or ceramic structural foam skeleton filled with a...

  13. High Efficiency Semi-Fuel Cell Incorporating an Ion Exchange Membrane

    Medeiros, Maria G; Dow, Eric G; Bessette, Russell R; Yan, Susan G; Dischert, Dwayne W

    2004-01-01

    It is a general purpose and object of the present invention to eliminate the parasitic direct reaction of the catholyte with the metal anode in a semi-fuel cell, thereby improving the overall energy...

  14. Incorporating Multiple Energy Relay Dyes in Liquid Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Yum, Jun-Ho; Hardin, Brian E.; Hoke, Eric T.; Baranoff, Etienne; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad K.; Torres, Tomas; McGehee, Michael D.; Grä tzel, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Panchromatic response is essential to increase the light-harvesting efficiency in solar conversion systems. Herein we show increased light harvesting from using multiple energy relay dyes inside dye-sensitized solar cells. Additional photoresponse

  15. Verslag 20th Symposium on Housing and Fiseases of Rabbits, Furprovinding animals and Pet animals

    Rommers, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Op 17 en 18 mei jl. werd in Celle (Duitsland) het Symposium on Housing
    and Diseases of Rabbits, Furproviding animals and Pet animals
    gehouden. Dit symposium wordt eenmaal per twee jaar georganiseerd
    door Duitsland. Er waren circa 60 deelnemers uit 12 verschillende
    landen, waaronder

  16. Radiometric study of the incorporation of labelled precursors of DNA, RNA and proteins in cell cultures inoculated with Herpes simplex virus

    Dundarov, S.; Todorov, S.; Kavaklova, L.; Tsilka, E.; Rangelova, S.; Dundarova, D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported of a comparative investigation of tritium-labelled thymidine, uridine and leucine incorporation in cells inoculated with HSV-1 and HSV-2. There were no essential differences in the dynamics of the biosynthesis processes in either type of herpes viruses. Viral infection led to a marked activation of DNA synthesis and progressive inhibition of overall RNA synthesis. The rate of labelled amino-acid incorporation remained almost unchanged. There was a gradual increase in 3 H-thymidine incorporation, reaching a minimum by the 12th-16th hour and a rapid decrese thereafter. After the 12th hour part of the thymidine already incorporated in DNA (the thymidine pool) starts leaving the cells as a result of increased cell membrane permeability. The rate of changes in the biosynthesis processes in HSV-inoculated cells depends on infection multiplicity. Even in high inoculation multiplicity the blockade of cell biosynthesis is incomplete which furnishes a better opportunity for HSV reproduction. (author)

  17. 5-chlorodeoxycytidine sensitizes cells to x-ray and is incorporated as 5-chlorodeoxyuridine in tumor DNA

    Perez, L.M.; Greer, S.

    1985-01-01

    5-Chlorodeoxycytidine (CldC) coadministered with tetrahydrouridine (H/sub 4/U), an inhibitor of its deamination, sensitizes HEp-2 cells to X-ray and is incorporated in DNA as 5-chlorodeoxyuridine (CldU). CldC possesses a reasonable Km value (56 μM) with respect to human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) in contrast to the low affinities of BrdC and IdC (400 and 1000μM, respectively; the Km value for dC = 2μM). Preincubation with N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA) and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdU), inhibitors of pyrimidine biosynthesis, enhances sensitization. X-ray survival curves of HEp-2 cells treated with PALA and FdU (or FdC + H/sub 4/U) and CldC + H/sub 4/U are characterized by dose enhancement ratios of 2.5 or greater. Substantial sensitization by CldC + H/sub 4/U also occurs with Sarcoma-180 and RIF-1 cells in culture . CldC + H/sub 4/U should result in circumvention of catabolism and selective toxicity to tumors via inhibition of nucleoside reductase by CldUTP as well as selective incorporation of CldU in tumors possessing high levels of dCMP deaminase and dCK, enzymes that are markedly elevated in many human tumors. CldU, derived from CldC, is incorporated to a greater extent in the DNA of a solid tumor (S-180) than in normal tissue of the mouse. This may result in selective tumor radiosensitization

  18. Yeast cells lacking all known ceramide synthases continue to make complex sphingolipids and to incorporate ceramides into glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors

    Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Ejsing, Christer S.

    2010-01-01

    In yeast, the inositolphosphorylceramides mostly contain C26:0 fatty acids. Inositolphosphorylceramides were considered to be important for viability, since the inositolphosphorylceramide synthase AUR1 is essential. Yet, lcb1 cells, unable to make sphingoid bases and inositolphosphorylceramides......, are viable if they harbor SLC1-1, a gain of function mutation in the 1-acyl-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase SLC1. SLC1-1 allows to incorporate C26:0 fatty acids into phosphatidylinositol (PI), thus generating PIii, an abnormal, C26-containing PI, presumably acting as surrogate...

  19. Incorporation of Novel Nanostructured Materials into Solar Cells and Nanoelectronic Devices

    Rodriguez, Rene; Pak, Joshua; Holland, Andrew; Hunt, Alan; Bitterwolf, Thomas; Qiang, You; Bergman, Leah; Berven, Christine; Punnoose, Alex; Tenne, Dmitri

    2011-11-11

    Each of the investigators on this project has had significant accomplishments toward the production of semiconductor nanoparticles, particles, and thin films and attempts to incorporate these materials into photovoltaics or sensors; to use them for improving fluorescence diagnostics; or to employ them as cancer fighting agents. The synthesis and characterization of the nanomaterials, and more recently the device construction and testing of these materials, have been the subject of several publications and presentations by team members. During the course of the investigations, several students were fully involved as part of their graduate and undergraduate training. The nature of these projects in material development dictates that the students have gained significant experience in a diverse array of material-related topics.

  20. Cell proliferation and 3H-proline incorporation in periodontal ligament exposed to mechanical stress

    Kunz, J.; Plascke, C.; Duncker, M.

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the metabolic processes induced in the periodontal ligament by mechanical influences, a tension spring was implanted in rats between the incisor and the first maxillary molar on the right-hand side, while the left maxilla of these animals as well as non-operated rats served as controls. Under such mechanical stress, there occurred at 3, 10 and 21 days after implantation a significant increase in the 3 H-thymidine labelling index, which was demonstrate histoautoradiographically. A change in cell density was not discovered. Therefore, the increase in S-phase fraction as equally recorded in both pressure and tension zones is regarded as an expression of an enhanced cell turnover. Cell renewal in the periodontal ligament can be modified by inflammatory processes within the gingival region. There is a slight enlargement of the periodontal space in the tension zone. Under experimental conditions, no change occurs in the silver grain number per cell after 3 H-proline administration. The results indicate that, following the impact of orthodontic forces, the reactivity of periodontal cell proliferation as compared to collagen synthesis is enhanced. (author)

  1. Incorporation of Furan into Low Band-Gap Polymers for Efficient Solar Cells

    Woo, Claire H.; Beaujuge, Pierre M.; Holcombe, Thomas W.; Lee, Olivia P.; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2010-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of the first examples of furan-containing low band-gap polymers, PDPP2FT and PDPP3F, with substantial power conversion efficiencies in organic solar cells are reported. Inserting furan moieties in the backbone of the conjugated polymers enables the use of relatively small solubilizing side chains because of the significant contribution of the furan rings to overall polymer solubility in common organic solvents. Bulk heterojunction solar cells fabricated from furan-containing polymers and PC71BM as the acceptor showed power conversion efficiencies reaching 5.0%. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  2. Incorporation of Furan into Low Band-Gap Polymers for Efficient Solar Cells

    Woo, Claire H.

    2010-11-10

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of the first examples of furan-containing low band-gap polymers, PDPP2FT and PDPP3F, with substantial power conversion efficiencies in organic solar cells are reported. Inserting furan moieties in the backbone of the conjugated polymers enables the use of relatively small solubilizing side chains because of the significant contribution of the furan rings to overall polymer solubility in common organic solvents. Bulk heterojunction solar cells fabricated from furan-containing polymers and PC71BM as the acceptor showed power conversion efficiencies reaching 5.0%. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  3. COMPUTING: International symposium

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Recent Developments in Computing, Processor, and Software Research for High Energy Physics, a four-day international symposium, was held in Guanajuato, Mexico, from 8-11 May, with 112 attendees from nine countries. The symposium was the third in a series of meetings exploring activities in leading-edge computing technology in both processor and software research and their effects on high energy physics. Topics covered included fixed-target on- and off-line reconstruction processors; lattice gauge and general theoretical processors and computing; multiprocessor projects; electron-positron collider on- and offline reconstruction processors; state-of-the-art in university computer science and industry; software research; accelerator processors; and proton-antiproton collider on and off-line reconstruction processors

  4. International RILEM Symposium

    Birgisson, Björn; Frost, David; Wang, Linbing

    2013-01-01

    The micro- and nano-modification of infrastructure materials and the associated multi-scale characterization and simulation has the potential to open up whole new uses and classes of materials, with wide-ranging implications for society. The use of multi-scale characterization and simulation brings the ability to target changes at the very small scale that predictably effect the bulk behavior of the material and thus allowing for the optimization of material behavior and performance.   The International RILEM Symposium on Multi-Scale Modeling and Characterization of Infrastructure Materials (Stockholm, June 10-12, 2013) brought together key researchers from around the world to present their findings and ongoing research in this field in a focused environment with extended discussion times. From asphalt to concrete, from chemistry to mechanics, from nano- to macro-scale: the collection of topics covered by the Symposium represents the width and depth of the currently ongoing efforts of developing more sustain...

  5. Symposium 2 of JENAM

    Pasquali, Anna; Environment and the Formation of Galaxies : 30 years later

    2011-01-01

    The publication of the morphology - density relation by Alan Dressler in 1980 brought into the limelight the role played by environment in the formation and evolution of galaxies. The symposium Environment and the Formation of Galaxies: 30 years later, was organised with the purpose of establishing the environmental impact on the evolution of galaxies and its dependence on look-back time. Special emphasis was placed on the physical mechanisms that are responsible for transforming galaxies once they are accreted by a group or a cluster, including the observable imprint left in the galaxy HI distribution. Other major topics of the symposium were the environmental dependence of galaxy properties at z ≥ 1 and the implementation of environmental effects in cosmological models of galaxy formation and evolution. This book presents the edited proceedings of this stimulating meeting.

  6. A quantitative model of the cardiac ventricular cell incorporating the transverse-axial tubular system

    Pásek, Michal; Christé, G.; Šimurda, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2003), s. 355-368 ISSN 0231-5882 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/02/D129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : cardiac cell * tubular system * quantitative modelling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.794, year: 2003

  7. Cloning, Stem Cells, and the Current National Debate: Incorporating Ethics into a Large Introductory Biology Course

    Fink, Rachel D.

    2002-01-01

    Discussing the ethical issues involved in topics such as cloning and stem cell research in a large introductory biology course is often difficult. Teachers may be wary of presenting material biased by personal beliefs, and students often feel inhibited speaking about moral issues in a large group. Yet, to ignore what is happening "out there"…

  8. Sensibilization of escherichia coli cells by cholesterol incorporated into their membrane

    Breslev, S.E.; Rozenberg, O.A.; Noskin, L.A.; Stepanova, I.M.; Beketova, A.G.; Loshakova, L.V.; Kovaleva, I.G.

    1984-01-01

    It has been established earlier that a level of cell radiosensitivity is defined by membrane viscosity changing in a wide temperature range. Therefore in epsilon coli cells of a natural type lethal doses of gamma rays are increased approximately a 3.5 times at 45 deg C, as compared to 4 deg C. Cholesterol changing a phase state of membrane lipids was used as a modifying factor. Liposomes were used with the goal of effective bacteria transfer to a membrane. It is established that liposomes without cholesterol do not affect their radioresistance and an increase of its content leads to resistance decrease. The effect is attained only at a sufficient long time of incubation of cells with liposomes (10-16 h). At 4 deg C lipids of E. coli membrane are in a solid-crystalline state independently on pholesterol presence, because of this, radiosensitivity does not change. Temperature increase up to 45 deg C transfer a part of lipids to a liquid-crystalline state, thus decreasing membrane viscosity. In this case cholesterol manifests itself. The authors explain viscosity increase with a violation in functioning of those enzyme systems, which activity is connected with membrane structural state, including enzymes of DNA repair. The authors assume that the radiosensibilization effect of cholesterol introduction into a bacterial membrane in high-temperature cell irradiation is explained by this phenomenon

  9. Idiotypic networks incorporating T-B cell co-operation. The conditions for percolation

    Boer, R.J. de; Hogeweg, P.

    1989-01-01

    Previous work was concerned with symmetric immune networks of idiotypic interactions amongst B cell clones. The behaviour of these networks was contrary to expectations. This was caused by an extensive percolation of idiotypic signals. Idiotypic activation was thus expected to affect almost all

  10. Competitor analogs for defined T cell antigens: peptides incorporating a putative binding motif and polyproline or polyglycine spacers.

    Maryanski, J L; Verdini, A S; Weber, P C; Salemme, F R; Corradin, G

    1990-01-12

    We describe a new approach for modeling antigenic peptides recognized by T cells. Peptide A24 170-182 can compete with other antigenic peptides that are recognized by H-2kd-restricted cytolytic T cells, presumably by binding to the Kd molecule. By comparing substituted A24 peptides as competitors in a functional competition assay, the A24 residues Tyr-171, Thr-178, and Leu-179 were identified as possible contact residues for Kd. A highly active competitor peptide analog was synthesized in which Tyr was separated from the Thr-Leu pair by a pentaproline spacer. The choice of proline allowed the prediction of a probable conformation for the analog when bound to the Kd molecule. The simplest conformation of the A24 peptide that allows the same spacing and orientation of the motif as in the analog would be a nearly extended polypeptide chain incorporating a single 3(10) helical turn or similar structural kink.

  11. Single and double strand breaks induced by 3H incorporated in DNA of cultured human kidney cells

    Tisljar-Lentulis, G.; Henneberg, P.; Mielke, T.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    In the course of the investigations of the biological effects of radionuclides incorporated in DNA single (SSB) and double strand breaks (DSB) caused tritium-decay were measured and compared with respective data resulting from 125 I. Tritium bound to thymidine and iododeoxyuridine seems to be more effective than tritium bound to other DNA-precursors. On the basis of decay, methyl- 3 H thymidine appears to be more effective with regard to the production of strand breaks than 3 H in position 6 of the pyrimidine ring. Based on the numbers of strand-breaks per rad, position 6 is more effective in accordance with data obtained by F. Krasin et al. The ratio of SSBs to DSBs per tritium decay appears to be approximately 8 in mammlian cells. Not only SSBs but also DSBs induced by 3 H in mammalian cells are reapairable. (orig./AJ) [de

  12. Space 2000 Symposium

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Space 2000 Symposium is to present the creativity and achievements of key figures of the 20th century. It offers a retrospective discussion on space exploration. It considers the future of the enterprise, and the legacy that will be left for future generations. The symposium includes panel discussions, smaller session meetings with some panelists, exhibits, and displays. The first session entitled "From Science Fiction to Science Facts" commences after a brief overview of the symposium. The panel discussions include talks on space exploration over many decades, and the missions of the millennium to search for life on Mars. The second session, "Risks and Rewards of Human Space Exploration," focuses on the training and health risks that astronauts face on their exploratory mission to space. Session three, "Messages and Messengers Informing and Inspire Space Exploration and the Public," focuses on the use of TV medium by educators and actors to inform and inspire a wide variety of audiences with adventures of space exploration. Session four, "The Legacy of Carl Sagan," discusses the influences made by Sagan to scientific research and the general public. In session five, "Space Exploration for a new Generation," two student speakers and the NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin address the group. Session six, "Destiny or Delusion? -- Humankind's Place in the Cosmos," ends the symposium with issues of space exploration and some thought provoking questions. Some of these issues and questions are: what will be the societal implications if we discover the origin of the universe, stars, or life; what will be the impact if scientists find clear evidence of life outside the domains of the Earth; should there be limits to what humans can or should learn; and what visionary steps should space-faring people take now for future generations.

  13. SYMPOSIUM: Rare decays

    Anon.

    1989-04-15

    Late last year, a symposium entitled 'Rare Decays' attracted 115 participants to a hotel in Vancouver, Canada. These participants were particle physicists interested in checking conventional selection rules to look for clues of possible new behaviour outside today's accepted 'Standard Model'. For physicists, 'rare decays' include processes that have so far not been seen, explicitly forbidden by the rules of the Standard Model, or processes highly suppressed because the decay is dominated by an easier route, or includes processes resulting from multiple transitions.

  14. 1979 DOE statistical symposium

    Gardiner, D.A.; Truett T. (comps. and eds.)

    1980-09-01

    The 1979 DOE Statistical Symposium was the fifth in the series of annual symposia designed to bring together statisticians and other interested parties who are actively engaged in helping to solve the nation's energy problems. The program included presentations of technical papers centered around exploration and disposal of nuclear fuel, general energy-related topics, and health-related issues, and workshops on model evaluation, risk analysis, analysis of large data sets, and resource estimation.

  15. Coal dust symposium

    1981-03-01

    This paper gives a report of the paper presented at the symposium held in Hanover on 9 and 10 February 1981. The topics include: the behaviour of dust and coal dust on combustion and explosion; a report on the accidents which occurred at the Laegerdorf cement works' coal crushing and drying plant; current safety requirements at coal crushing and drying plant; and coal crushing and drying. Four papers are individually abstracted. (In German)

  16. 1979 DOE statistical symposium

    Gardiner, D.A.; Truett, T.

    1980-09-01

    The 1979 DOE Statistical Symposium was the fifth in the series of annual symposia designed to bring together statisticians and other interested parties who are actively engaged in helping to solve the nation's energy problems. The program included presentations of technical papers centered around exploration and disposal of nuclear fuel, general energy-related topics, and health-related issues, and workshops on model evaluation, risk analysis, analysis of large data sets, and resource estimation

  17. XV ESLAB Symposium

    1981-01-01

    The 15th ESLAB symposium was held at the end of June 1981 in Amsterdam with the topic being X-ray astronomy. The aim of this symposium was to bring together the international astrophysical community in order to 1. review the present state of X-ray astronomy in the light of new observations gathered in recent missions and to review data on interesting objects in correlated wavelen8th regions; 2. discuss theoretical models describing the phenomena observed; 3. present ESA's European X-ray Observatory Satellite (EXOSAT) and to discuss future X-ray missions and their associated instrumenta­ tion. These topics seemed to be so interesting for the scientific community that more than 120 contributions were submitted. Of these, 94 were finally accepted and approximately 200 participants attended the 5-day meeting. The symposium was organised in nine sessions covering the whole field. Every main topic was introduced by a review lecture covering the state­ of-the-art. The aim of the meeting was to assess the impact of...

  18. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  19. Simulation on the Performance of Dye Solar Cell Incorporated with TiO2 Passivation Layer

    Unan Yusmaniar Oktiawati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye Solar Cell (DSC has started to gain interest in the recent years for practical application because of its ecofriendly, low cost, and easy fabrication. However, its efficiency is still not as competitive as the conventional silicon based solar cell. One of the research efforts to improve the efficiency of DSC is to use the passivation layer in between the photoelectrode material and the conductive oxide substrate. Thus, the objective of this simulation study is to investigate the effect of passivation layer on the performance of DSC. Properties from literatures which are based on physical work were captured as the input for the simulation using process, ATHENA, and device, ATLAS, simulator. Results have shown that the addition of two-20 nm TiO2 passivation layers on DSC can enhance the efficiency by 11% as the result of less recombination, higher electron mobility, and longer electron lifetime.

  20. Efficient small-molecule organic solar cells incorporating a doped buffer layer

    Chou, Dei-Wei [Department of aviation and Communication Electronics, Air Force Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kan-Lin [Department of Electronic Engineering, Fortune Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung 831, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chien-Jung, E-mail: chien@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Nanzih, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Yao-Jen [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Nanzih, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ray; Meen, Teen-Hang [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Formosa University, Hu-Wei, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)

    2013-06-01

    Small-molecule organic solar cells (OSCs) with an optimized structure of indium tin oxide/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) (10 nm)/CuPc: fullerene (C{sub 60}) mixed (20 nm)/C{sub 60} (20 nm)/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) (5 nm)/Ag were fabricated. In this study, the cesium carbonate-doped BPhen (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen) was adopted as the buffer layer to enhance the efficiency of the OSCs. The photovoltaic parameters of the OSCs, such as the short-circuit current density and fill factor, depend on the doping concentration of Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in the BPhen layer. The cell with a Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen (1:4) cathode buffer layer exhibits a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.51%, compared to 3.37% for the device with the pristine BPhen layer. The enhancement of PCE was attributed to the energy-level alignment between the C{sub 60} layer and the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen layer. In addition, the characterization measured using atomic force microscopy shows that the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen layers have smoother surfaces. - Highlight: • Cs2CO3-doped 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) cathode buffer layer. • Cs2CO3:BPhen layer with different ratios affects organic solar cells performance. • Cell with 1:4 (Cs2CO3:BPhen) ratio shows 3.51% power conversion efficiency.

  1. Optical spacing effect in organic photovoltaic cells incorporating a dilute acceptor layer

    Menke, S. Matthew; Lindsay, Christopher D.; Holmes, Russell J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    The addition of spacing layers in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) can enhance light absorption by optimizing the spatial distribution of the incident optical field in the multilayer structure. We explore the optical spacing effect in OPVs achieved using a diluted electron acceptor layer of C{sub 60}. While optical spacing is often realized by optimizing buffer layer thickness, we find that optical spacing via dilution leads to cells with similar or enhanced photocurrent. This is observed despite a smaller quantity of absorbing molecules, suggesting a more efficient use of absorbed photons. In fact, dilution is found to concentrate optical absorption near the electron donor-acceptor interface, resulting in a marked increase in the exciton diffusion efficiency. Contrasting the use of changes in thickness to engineer optical absorption, the use of dilution does not significantly alter the overall thickness of the OPV. Optical spacing via dilution is shown to be a viable alternative to more traditional optical spacing techniques and may be especially useful in the continued optimization of next-generation, tandem OPVs where it is important to minimize competition for optical absorption between individual sub-cells.

  2. Optical spacing effect in organic photovoltaic cells incorporating a dilute acceptor layer

    Menke, S. Matthew; Lindsay, Christopher D.; Holmes, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of spacing layers in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) can enhance light absorption by optimizing the spatial distribution of the incident optical field in the multilayer structure. We explore the optical spacing effect in OPVs achieved using a diluted electron acceptor layer of C 60 . While optical spacing is often realized by optimizing buffer layer thickness, we find that optical spacing via dilution leads to cells with similar or enhanced photocurrent. This is observed despite a smaller quantity of absorbing molecules, suggesting a more efficient use of absorbed photons. In fact, dilution is found to concentrate optical absorption near the electron donor-acceptor interface, resulting in a marked increase in the exciton diffusion efficiency. Contrasting the use of changes in thickness to engineer optical absorption, the use of dilution does not significantly alter the overall thickness of the OPV. Optical spacing via dilution is shown to be a viable alternative to more traditional optical spacing techniques and may be especially useful in the continued optimization of next-generation, tandem OPVs where it is important to minimize competition for optical absorption between individual sub-cells.

  3. Perturbation of N-linked oligosaccharide structure results in an altered incorporation of [3H]palmitate into specific proteins in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Wellner, R.B.; Ghosh, P.C.; Roecklein, B.; Wu, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Increased [ 3 H]palmitate incorporation into specific cellular proteins has been reported to occur in Chinese hamster ovary and yeast mutant cells. In this paper we report studies concerning the relationship between N-linked oligosaccharide structure and [ 3 H]palmitate incorporation into proteins of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We have compared the incorporation of [ 3 H]palmitate into proteins of wild-type and four different mutant CHO cell lines defective in various steps of N-linked protein glycosylation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoretic analysis showed that three of the mutants exhibited increased [ 3 H]palmitate incorporation into several CHO cellular proteins (approximately 30,000-38,000 molecular weight) as compared to the wild-type cells. One of the affected mutants which accumulates the Man5Gn2Asn intermediate structure was examined in detail. In agreement with earlier reports, virtually all of the [ 3 H] palmitate-labeled proteins of both wild-type and mutant cell lines are membrane-bound. Pretreatment of the mutant cell line with tunicamycin blocked the increased [ 3 H]palmitate incorporation into the two specific proteins (both of approximately 30,000 molecular weight) observed in untreated cells; the decreased incorporation of [ 3 H]palmitate into the 30,000 molecular weight species was accompanied by a concomitant increase in the incorporation of [ 3 H]palmitate into two proteins of approximately 20,000 molecular weight. Pretreatment of wild-type cells with tunicamycin also caused increased [ 3 H]palmitate incorporation into the 20,000 molecular weight species

  4. Photoelectrochemical characteristics of dye-sensitized solar cells incorporating innovative and inexpensive materials

    Harlow, Lisa Jean

    The use of energy is going to continue to increase rapidly due to population and economic advances occurring throughout the world. The most widely used energies produce carbon dioxide during their combustion and have finite limits on how much of these resources are available. A strong push to utilizing renewable energy is necessary to keep up with the demand. The only renewable energy that has unlimited supply is solar. Our goal is to find cost-effective alternatives to historically the most extensively used materials in dye-sensitized solar cells. In order to rely on efficiency changes coinciding with the introduction of a new component, a standard baseline of performance is necessary to establish. A reproducible fabrication procedure composed of standard materials was instituted; the efficiency parameters exhibited a less than 10% standard deviation for any set of solar cells. Any modifications to the cell components would be apparent in the change in efficiency. Our cell modifications focused on economical alternatives to the electrolyte, the counter electrode and the chromophore. Solution-based electrolytes were replaced with a non-volatile ionic liquid, 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide, and then a poly(imidazole-functionalized) silica nanoparticle. Solid-state electrolytes reduce or prevent leakage and could ease manufacturing in large-scale devices. Platinum has been the counter electrode catalyst primarily used with the iodide/triiodide redox couple, but is a rare metal making it rather costly. We reduce platinum loading by introducing a novel counter electrode that employs platinum nanoparticles embedded on a graphene nanoplatelet paper. The highly conductive carbon base also negates the use of the expensive conductive substrate necessary for the platinum catalyst, further reducing cost. We also study the differences in transitioning from ruthenium polypyridyls to iron-based chromophores in dye-sensitized solar cells. Iron introduces low-lying ligand

  5. ZnO nanoparticle incorporated nanostructured metallic titanium for increased mesenchymal stem cell response and antibacterial activity

    Elizabeth, Elmy; Baranwal, Gaurav; Krishnan, Amit G.; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Manitha

    2014-03-01

    Recent trends in titanium implants are towards the development of nanoscale topographies that mimic the nanoscale properties of bone tissue. Although the nanosurface promotes the integration of osteoblast cells, infection related problems can also occur, leading to implant failure. Therefore it is imperative to reduce bacterial adhesion on an implant surface, either with or without the use of drugs/antibacterial agents. Herein, we have investigated two different aspects of Ti surfaces in inhibiting bacterial adhesion and concurrently promoting mammalian cell adhesion. These include (i) the type of nanoscale topography (Titania nanotube (TNT) and Titania nanoleaf (TNL)) and (ii) the presence of an antibacterial agent like zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnOnp) on Ti nanosurfaces. To address this, periodically arranged TNT (80-120 nm) and non-periodically arranged TNL surfaces were generated by the anodization and hydrothermal techniques respectively, and incorporated with ZnOnp of different concentrations (375 μM, 750 μM, 1.125 mM and 1.5 mM). Interestingly, TNL surfaces decreased the adherence of staphylococcus aureus while increasing the adhesion and viability of human osteosarcoma MG63 cell line and human mesenchymal stem cells, even in the absence of ZnOnp. In contrast, TNT surfaces exhibited an increased bacterial and mammalian cell adhesion. The influence of ZnOnp on these surfaces in altering the bacterial and cell adhesion was found to be concentration dependent, with an optimal range of 375-750 μM. Above 750 μM, although bacterial adhesion was reduced, cellular viability was considerably affected. Thus our study helps us to infer that nanoscale topography by itself or its combination with an optimal concentration of antibacterial ZnOnp would provide a differential cell behavior and thereby a desirable biological response, facilitating the long term success of an implant.

  6. ZnO nanoparticle incorporated nanostructured metallic titanium for increased mesenchymal stem cell response and antibacterial activity

    Elizabeth, Elmy; Baranwal, Gaurav; Krishnan, Amit G; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Manitha

    2014-01-01

    Recent trends in titanium implants are towards the development of nanoscale topographies that mimic the nanoscale properties of bone tissue. Although the nanosurface promotes the integration of osteoblast cells, infection related problems can also occur, leading to implant failure. Therefore it is imperative to reduce bacterial adhesion on an implant surface, either with or without the use of drugs/antibacterial agents. Herein, we have investigated two different aspects of Ti surfaces in inhibiting bacterial adhesion and concurrently promoting mammalian cell adhesion. These include (i) the type of nanoscale topography (Titania nanotube (TNT) and Titania nanoleaf (TNL)) and (ii) the presence of an antibacterial agent like zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnOnp) on Ti nanosurfaces. To address this, periodically arranged TNT (80–120 nm) and non-periodically arranged TNL surfaces were generated by the anodization and hydrothermal techniques respectively, and incorporated with ZnOnp of different concentrations (375 μM, 750 μM, 1.125 mM and 1.5 mM). Interestingly, TNL surfaces decreased the adherence of staphylococcus aureus while increasing the adhesion and viability of human osteosarcoma MG63 cell line and human mesenchymal stem cells, even in the absence of ZnOnp. In contrast, TNT surfaces exhibited an increased bacterial and mammalian cell adhesion. The influence of ZnOnp on these surfaces in altering the bacterial and cell adhesion was found to be concentration dependent, with an optimal range of 375−750 μM. Above 750 μM, although bacterial adhesion was reduced, cellular viability was considerably affected. Thus our study helps us to infer that nanoscale topography by itself or its combination with an optimal concentration of antibacterial ZnOnp would provide a differential cell behavior and thereby a desirable biological response, facilitating the long term success of an implant. (paper)

  7. Welcome and introduction to symposium

    humanities, Symposium on Information and technology in the arts and; McLaughlin, Jeremy Lee; Matusiak, Krystyna; Hirsh, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Welcome and introduction slides used for presentation at the Virtual Symposium on Information and Technology in the Arts and Humanities, held April 22 and 23, 2015. The Symposium was co-sponsored by the ASIS&T (Association for Information Science and Technology) Special Interest Group for Arts and Humanities (SIG AH) and the Special Interest Group for Visualization, Images, and Sound (SIG VIS).

  8. Bio-Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells Incorporating Reaction Center and Reaction Center Plus Light Harvesting Complexes

    Yaghoubi, Houman

    Harvesting solar energy can potentially be a promising solution to the energy crisis now and in the future. However, material and processing costs continue to be the most important limitations for the commercial devices. A key solution to these problems might lie within the development of bio-hybrid solar cells that seeks to mimic photosynthesis to harvest solar energy and to take advantage of the low material costs, negative carbon footprint, and material abundance. The bio-photoelectrochemical cell technologies exploit biomimetic means of energy conversion by utilizing plant-derived photosystems which can be inexpensive and ultimately the most sustainable alternative. Plants and photosynthetic bacteria harvest light, through special proteins called reaction centers (RCs), with high efficiency and convert it into electrochemical energy. In theory, photosynthetic RCs can be used in a device to harvest solar energy and generate 1.1 V open circuit voltage and ~1 mA cm-2 short circuit photocurrent. Considering the nearly perfect quantum yield of photo-induced charge separation, efficiency of a protein-based solar cell might exceed 20%. In practice, the efficiency of fabricated devices has been limited mainly due to the challenges in the electron transfer between the protein complex and the device electrodes as well as limited light absorption. The overarching goal of this work is to increase the power conversion efficiency in protein-based solar cells by addressing those issues (i.e. electron transfer and light absorption). This work presents several approaches to increase the charge transfer rate between the photosynthetic RC and underlying electrode as well as increasing the light absorption to eventually enhance the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of bio-hybrid solar cells. The first approach is to decrease the electron transfer distance between one of the redox active sites in the RC and the underlying electrode by direct attachment of the of protein complex

  9. Chlorine-Incorporation-Induced Formation of the Layered Phase for Antimony-Based Lead-Free Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Jiang, Fangyuan; Yang, Dongwen; Jiang, Youyu; Liu, Tiefeng; Zhao, Xingang; Ming, Yue; Luo, Bangwu; Qin, Fei; Fan, Jiacheng; Han, Hongwei; Zhang, Lijun; Zhou, Yinhua

    2018-01-24

    The environmental toxicity of Pb in organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells remains an issue, which has triggered intense research on seeking alternative Pb-free perovskites for solar applications. Halide perovskites based on group-VA cations of Bi 3+ and Sb 3+ with the same lone-pair ns 2 state as Pb 2+ are promising candidates. Herein, through a joint experimental and theoretical study, we demonstrate that Cl-incorporated methylammonium Sb halide perovskites (CH 3 NH 3 ) 3 Sb 2 Cl X I 9-X show promise as efficient solar absorbers for Pb-free perovskite solar cells. Inclusion of methylammonium chloride into the precursor solutions suppresses the formation of the undesired zero-dimensional dimer phase and leads to the successful synthesis of high-quality perovskite films composed of the two-dimensional layered phase favored for photovoltaics. Solar cells based on the as-obtained (CH 3 NH 3 ) 3 Sb 2 Cl X I 9-X films reach a record-high power conversion efficiency over 2%. This finding offers a new perspective for the development of nontoxic and low-cost Sb-based perovskite solar cells.

  10. Effect of incorporation of silver nanoparticles in PEDOT:PSS layer on performance of organic solar cell

    Singh, Joginder; Nirwal, Varun Singh; Bhatnagar, P. K.; Peta, Koteswara Rao

    2018-05-01

    Solution processable organic solar cells have attracted significant interest in scientific community due to their easy processability, flexibility and eco friendly fabrication. In these organic solar cells structure, PEDOT:PSS layer has major importance as it used as hole transporting layer. In the present work, we have analyzed the effect of incorporation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in PEDOT:PSS layer for P3HT:PCBM based organic solar cells. The presence of Ag nanoparticles in PEDOT:PSS film is confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. It has been observed that PEDOT:PSS layer with AgNPs has ˜5.4% more transmittance than PEDOT:PSS layer in most of the visible region, which helps in reaching more light on active layer. Finally, solar cell with structure ITO/PEDOT:PSS:AgNPs/Al is fabricated and J-V characteristics are plotted under illumination. It is observed that there is a significant (˜10%) enhancement in short circuit current and slight increment in open circuit voltage with addition of AgNPs in PEDOT:PSS layer. The calculated value of power conversion efficiency (PCE) of fabricated device without AgNPs in PEDOT:PSS was 1.67%, which increased to 2.02% after addition of AgNPs in PEDOT:PSS layer.

  11. Silver nanoparticles-incorporated Nb2O5 surface passivation layer for efficiency enhancement in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Suresh, S; Unni, Gautam E; Satyanarayana, M; Sreekumaran Nair, A; Mahadevan Pillai, V P

    2018-08-15

    Guiding and capturing photons at the nanoscale by means of metal nanoparticles and interfacial engineering for preventing back-electron transfer are well documented techniques for performance enhancement in excitonic solar cells. Drifting from the conventional route, we propose a simple one-step process to integrate both metal nanoparticles and surface passivation layer in the porous photoanode matrix of a dye-sensitized solar cell. Silver nanoparticles and Nb 2 O 5 surface passivation layer are simultaneously deposited on the surface of a highly porous nanocrystalline TiO 2 photoanode, facilitating an absorption enhancement in the 465 nm and 570 nm wavelength region and a reduction in back-electron transfer in the fabricated dye-sensitized solar cells together. The TiO 2 photoanodes were prepared by spray pyrolysis deposition method from a colloidal solution of TiO 2 nanoparticles. An impressive 43% enhancement in device performance was accomplished in photoanodes having an Ag-incorporated Nb 2 O 5 passivation layer as against a cell without Ag nanoparticles. By introducing this idea, we were able to record two benefits - the metal nanoparticles function as the absorption enhancement agent, and the Nb 2 O 5 layer as surface passivation for TiO 2 nanoparticles and as an energy barrier layer for preventing back-electron transfer - in a single step. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Incorporation of ester groups into low band-gap diketopyrrolopyrrole containing polymers for solar cell applications

    Hu, Xiaolian; Zuo, Lijian; Fu, Weifei

    2012-01-01

    To increase the open circuit voltage (VOC) of polymer solar cells based on diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) containing polymers, the weakly electron-withdrawing thiophene-3,4-dicarboxylate unit was introduced into the polymer backbone. Two ester group functionalized DPP containing polymers, PCTDPP...... with a random structure and PDCTDPP with a regular structure, were designed and synthesized by the Stille coupling reaction. The resulting copolymers exhibit broad and strong absorption bands from 350 to 1000 nm with low optical band gaps below 1.40 eV. Through cyclic voltammetry measurements, it is found...

  13. Incorporating Multiple Energy Relay Dyes in Liquid Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Yum, Jun-Ho

    2011-01-05

    Panchromatic response is essential to increase the light-harvesting efficiency in solar conversion systems. Herein we show increased light harvesting from using multiple energy relay dyes inside dye-sensitized solar cells. Additional photoresponse from 400-590 nm matching the optical window of the zinc phthalocyanine sensitizer was observed due to Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the two energy relay dyes to the sensitizing dye. The complementary absorption spectra of the energy relay dyes and high excitation transfer efficiencies result in a 35% increase in photovoltaic performance. © 2011 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH& Co. KGaA.

  14. Effect of Magnesium Incorporation on Solution-Processed Kesterite Solar Cells.

    Caballero, Raquel; Haass, Stefan G; Andres, Christian; Arques, Laia; Oliva, Florian; Izquierdo-Roca, Victor; Romanyuk, Yaroslav E

    2018-01-01

    The introduction of the alkaline-earth element Magnesium (Mg) into Cu 2 ZnSn(S,Se) 4 (CTZSSe) is explored in view of potential photovoltaic applications. Cu 2 Zn 1-x Mg x Sn(S,Se) 4 absorber layers with variable Mg content x = 0…1 are deposited using the solution approach with dimethyl sulfoxide solvent followed by annealing in selenium atmosphere. For heavy Mg alloying with x = 0.55…1 the phase separation into Cu 2 SnSe 3 , MgSe 2 , MgSe and SnSe 2 occurs in agreement with literature predictions. A lower Mg content of x = 0.04 results in the kesterite phase as confirmed by XRD and Raman spectroscopy. A photoluminescence maximum is red-shifted by 0.02 eV as compared to the band-gap and a carrier concentration N CV of 1 × 10 16 cm -3 is measured for a Mg-containing kesterite solar cell device. Raman spectroscopy indicates that structural defects can be reduced in Mg-containing absorbers as compared to the Mg-free reference samples, however the best device efficiency of 7.2% for a Mg-containing cell measured in this study is lower than those frequently reported for the conventional Na doping.

  15. Effect of Magnesium Incorporation on Solution-Processed Kesterite Solar Cells

    Raquel Caballero

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of the alkaline-earth element Magnesium (Mg into Cu2ZnSn(S,Se4 (CTZSSe is explored in view of potential photovoltaic applications. Cu2Zn1−xMgxSn(S,Se4 absorber layers with variable Mg content x = 0…1 are deposited using the solution approach with dimethyl sulfoxide solvent followed by annealing in selenium atmosphere. For heavy Mg alloying with x = 0.55…1 the phase separation into Cu2SnSe3, MgSe2, MgSe and SnSe2 occurs in agreement with literature predictions. A lower Mg content of x = 0.04 results in the kesterite phase as confirmed by XRD and Raman spectroscopy. A photoluminescence maximum is red-shifted by 0.02 eV as compared to the band-gap and a carrier concentration NCV of 1 × 1016 cm−3 is measured for a Mg-containing kesterite solar cell device. Raman spectroscopy indicates that structural defects can be reduced in Mg-containing absorbers as compared to the Mg-free reference samples, however the best device efficiency of 7.2% for a Mg-containing cell measured in this study is lower than those frequently reported for the conventional Na doping.

  16. Au nanorods-incorporated plasmonic-enhanced inverted organic solar cells

    Peng, Ling; Mei, Yang; Chen, Shu-Fen; Zhang, Yu-Pei; Hao, Jing-Yu; Deng, Ling-Ling; Huang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    The effect of Au nanorods (NRs) on optical-to-electric conversion efficiency is investigated in inverted polymer solar cells, in which Au NRs are sandwiched between two layers of ZnO. Accompanied by the optimization of thickness of ZnO covered on Au NRs, a high-power conversion efficiency of 3.60% and an enhanced short-circuit current density (JSC) of 10.87 mA/cm2 are achieved in the poly(3-hexylthiophene): [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PC60BM)-based inverted cell and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) is enhanced by 19.6% compared with the control device. The detailed analyses of the light absorption characteristics, the simulated scattering induced by Au NRs, and the electromagnetic field around Au NRs show that the absorption improvement in the photoactive layer due to the light scattering from the longitudinal axis and the near-field increase around Au NRs induced by localized surface plasmon resonance plays a key role in enhancing the performances. Project supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 2012CB933301), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274065, 51173081, 61136003, BZ2010043, 51372119, and 51172110), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Provincial Higher Education Institutions and Synergetic Innovation Center for Organic Electronics and Information Displays, China.

  17. Early incorporation of cell-derived cholesterol into pre-beta-migrating high-density lipoprotein

    Castro, G.R.; Fielding, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    Cultures of human skin fibroblasts were labeled to high cholesterol specific activity with [ 3 H]cholesterol and incubated briefly (1-3 min) with normal human plasma. The plasma was fractionated by two-dimensional agarose-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the early appearance of cholesterol label among plasma lipoproteins determined. A major part of the label at 1-min incubation was in a pre-beta-migrating apo A-I lipoprotein fraction with a molecular weight of ca. 70,000. Label was enriched about 30-fold in this fraction relative to its content of apo A-I (1-2% of total apo A-I). The proportion of label in this lipoprotein was strongly correlated with its concentration in plasma. Further incubation (2 min) in the presence of unlabeled cells demonstrated transfer of label from this fraction to a higher molecular weight pre-beta apo A-I species, to low-density lipoprotein, and to the alpha-migrating apo A-I that made up the bulk (96%) of total apo A-I in plasma. The data suggest that a significant part of cell-derived cholesterol is transferred specifically to a pre-beta-migrating lipoprotein A-I species as part of a cholesterol transport transfer sequence in plasma

  18. Fabrication and characterization of rubidium/formamidinium-incorporated methylammonium-lead-halide perovskite solar cells

    Kato, Masataka; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ohishi, Yuya; Tanaka, Hiroki; Oku, Takeo

    2018-01-01

    Fabrication and characterization of perovskite solar cells using mesoporous TiO2 as an electron transporting layer and 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene as a hole-transporting layer were performed for improving the photovoltaic performance. Additive effects of formamidinium (FA), rubidium (Rb), chlorine (Cl) and bromine (Br) into the methylammonium-lead-halide perovskite crystal on the photovoltaic properties and microstructures were investigated. The photovoltaic parameters of short-circuit current density, conversion efficiency, the surface morphology and domain in the perovskite crystal were characterized. The slight addition of FACl and RbBr to the CH3NH3PbI3 crystal provided homogeneous microstructures with the dispersed crystal domains, which improved the photovoltaic performance. The excess addition of Cl to the perovskite crystal caused nanorod-like crystals, which degraded the photovoltaic performance.

  19. Should mediastinoscopy actually be incorporated into the FDG PET strategy for patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma?

    Hayashi, Katsumi; Abe, Katsumi; Yano, Fuzuki; Watanabe, Sadahiro; Iwasaki, Yoshie; Kosuda, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    Incorporating mediastinoscopy (MS) into the PET-based strategy for non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients might be cost-effective because MS can allow unnecessary thoracotomies to be avoided. The objective of our study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of incorporating MS into a PET strategy for NSCLC patients. To determine life expectancy (LE), quality adjusted life years (QALY), and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), a decision-tree sensitivity analysis was designed for histopathologically confirmed NSCLC patients with M0 disease, based on the three competing strategies of chest CT only vs. PET+CT vs. PET+CT+MS. A simulation of 1,000 NSCLC patients was created using baselines of other relevant variables in regard to sensitivity, specificity, mortality, LE, utilities and cost from published data. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the influences of mediastinal metastasis prevalence on LE, QALY and ICER. The LE and QALY per patient in the CT only strategy, PET+CT strategy and PET+CT+MS strategy were 4.79 and 4.35, 5.33 and 4.93 and 5.68 and 5.33 years, respectively, with a 20% prevalence of mediastinal metastasis. The ICERs were 906.6 yen x 10 3 (US$7,555)/QALY/patient at a 20% mediastinal metastasis prevalence, and 2,194 yen x 10 3 (US$18,282)/QALY/patient at a 50% prevalence, but exceeded 5,280 yen x 10 3 (US$44,000)/QALY/patient at 80%. Our study quantitatively showed the CT+PET+MS strategy in place of the PET+CT strategy in managing NSCLC patients to be cost-effective. MS should be incorporated into the PET+CT strategy for NSCLC patients except in those highly suspected of having mediastinal disease on chest CT or PET. (author)

  20. The Biomineralization of a Bioactive Glass-Incorporated Light-Curable Pulp Capping Material Using Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    Soo-Kyung Jun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the biomineralization of a newly introduced bioactive glass-incorporated light-curable pulp capping material using human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs. The product (Bioactive® [BA] was compared with a conventional calcium hydroxide-incorporated (Dycal [DC] and a light-curable (Theracal® [TC] counterpart. Eluates from set specimens were used for investigating the cytotoxicity and biomineralization ability, determined by alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and alizarin red staining (ARS. Cations and hydroxide ions in the extracts were measured. An hDPSC viability of less than 70% was observed with 50% diluted extract in all groups and with 25% diluted extract in the DC. Culturing with 12.5% diluted BA extract statistically lowered ALP activity and biomineralization compared to DC (p0.05. Ca (~110 ppm and hydroxide ions (pH 11 were only detected in DC and TC. Ionic supplement-added BA, which contained similar ion concentrations as TC, showed similar ARS mineralization compared to TC. In conclusion, the BA was similar to, yet more cytotoxic to hDPSCs than, its DC and TC. The BA was considered to stimulate biomineralization similar to DC and TC only when it released a similar amount of Ca and hydroxide ions.

  1. PEDOT:PSS incorporated silver nanoparticles prepared by gamma radiation for the application in organic solar cells

    Omayma A. Ghazy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:Polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS is a dispersion used as a buffer layer on the ITO electrode in the organic solar cells. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs are incorporated to the dispersion using two different strategies. The first is by reduction of silver ions in the PEDOT:PSS dispersion. Chemical reduction of silver ions using sodium borohydried is compared with reduction using gamma radiation. The TEM and UV-visible spectra indicates that smaller Ag NPs are obtained for the chemical reduction method than those obtained from the radiochemical. The second strategy, is by preparing Ag NPs in polyvinyl pyrolidone (PVP solution using gamma irradiation then adding them to the PEDOT:PSS dispersion. Layers of the PEDOT:PSS incorporated different concentrations of Ag NPs (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10% are formed. The SEM and AFM studies of the layers morphology reveal that smooth morphology on the obtained for layers containing Ag NPs up to concentrations of 4%.

  2. Angiogenin activates phospholipase C and elicits a rapid incorporation of fatty acid into cholesterol esters in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Moore, F.; Riordan, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Angiogenin activates the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells to yield a transient (30 s) peak of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) and inositol trisphosphate. Within 1 min, the DG level falls below that of the control and remains so for at least 20 min. A transient increase in monoacylglycerol indicates that depletion of DG may be the consequence of hydrolysis by DG lipase. In addition to these changes in second messengers, a rapid increase in incorporating of radiolabeled tracer into cellular cholesterol esters is observed. Stimulated cholesterol ester labeling is inhibited by preincubation with either the DG lipase inhibitor RHC 80267 or the acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase inhibitor Sandoz 58035. Cells prelabeled with [ 3 H]arachidonate show a sustained increase in labeling of cholesterol esters following exposure to angiogenin. In contrast, cells prelabeled with [ 3 H]oleate show only a transient elevation that returns to the basal level by 5 min. This suggests initial cholesterol esterification by oleate followed by arachidonate that is released by stimulation of the PLC/DG lipase pathway

  3. Energy-neutral sustainable nutrient recovery incorporated with the wastewater purification process in an enlarged microbial nutrient recovery cell

    Sun, Dongya; Gao, Yifan; Hou, Dianxun; Zuo, Kuichang; Chen, Xi; Liang, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Huang, Xia

    2018-04-01

    Recovery of nutrient resources from the wastewater is now an inevitable strategy to maintain the supply of both nutrient and water for our huge population. While the intensive energy consumption in conventional nutrient recovery technologies still remained as the bottleneck towards the sustainable nutrient recycle. This study proposed an enlarged microbial nutrient recovery cell (EMNRC) which was powered by the energy contained in wastewater and achieved multi-cycle nutrient recovery incorporated with in situ wastewater treatment. With the optimal recovery solution of 3 g/L NaCl and the optimal volume ratio of wastewater to recovery solution of 10:1, >89% of phosphorus and >62% of ammonium nitrogen were recovered into struvite. An extremely low water input ratio of water. It was proved the EMNRC system was a promising technology which could utilize the chemical energy contained in wastewater itself and energy-neutrally recover nutrient during the continuous wastewater purification process.

  4. SYMPOSIUM: Rare decays

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Late last year, a symposium entitled 'Rare Decays' attracted 115 participants to a hotel in Vancouver, Canada. These participants were particle physicists interested in checking conventional selection rules to look for clues of possible new behaviour outside today's accepted 'Standard Model'. For physicists, 'rare decays' include processes that have so far not been seen, explicitly forbidden by the rules of the Standard Model, or processes highly suppressed because the decay is dominated by an easier route, or includes processes resulting from multiple transitions

  5. Targeted transgene insertion into the CHO cell genome using Cre recombinase-incorporating integrase-defective retroviral vectors.

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Shimomura, Takuya; Huang, Shuohao; Imanishi, Suguru; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2016-07-01

    Retroviral vectors have served as efficient gene delivery tools in various biotechnology fields. However, viral DNA is randomly inserted into the genome, which can cause problems, such as insertional mutagenesis and gene silencing. Previously, we reported a site-specific gene integration system, in which a transgene is integrated into a predetermined chromosomal locus of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using integrase-defective retroviral vectors (IDRVs) and Cre recombinase. In this system, a Cre expression plasmid is transfected into founder cells before retroviral transduction. In practical applications of site-specific gene modification such as for hard-to-transfect cells or for in vivo gene delivery, both the transgene and the Cre protein into retroviral virions should be encapsulate. Here, we generated novel hybrid IDRVs in which viral genome and enzymatically active Cre can be delivered (Cre-IDRVs). Cre-IDRVs encoding marker genes, neomycin resistance and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), flanked by wild-type and mutated loxP sites were produced using an expression plasmid for a chimeric protein of Cre and retroviral gag-pol. After analyzing the incorporation of the Cre protein into retroviral virions by Western blotting, the Cre-IDRV was infected into founder CHO cells, in which marker genes (hygromycin resistance and red fluorescent protein) flanked with corresponding loxP sites are introduced into the genome. G418-resistant colonies expressing GFP appeared and the site-specific integration of the transgene into the expected chromosomal site was confirmed by PCR and sequencing of amplicons. Moreover, when Cre-IDRV carried a gene expression unit for a recombinant antibody, the recombinant cells in which the antibody expression cassette was integrated in a site-specific manner were generated and the cells produced the recombinant antibody. This method may provide a promising tool to perform site-specific gene modification according to Cre

  6. NIC symposium 2010. Proceedings

    Muenster, Gernot [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1; Wolf, Dietrich [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Duisburg (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Kremer, Manfred (eds.) [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Juelich Supercomputing Centre (JSC)

    2012-06-21

    The fifth NIC-Symposium gave an overview of the activities of the John von Neumann Institute for Computing (NIC) and of the results obtained in the last two years by research groups supported by the NIC. The large recent progress in supercomputing is highlighted by the fact that the newly installed Blue Gene/P system in Juelich - with a peak performance of 1 Petaflop/s - currently ranks number four in the TOP500 list. This development opens new dimensions in simulation science for researchers in Germany and Europe. NIC - a joint foundation of Forschungszentrum Juelich, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) and Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) - supports with its members' supercomputer facilities about 130 research groups at universities and national labs working on computer simulations in various fields of science. Fifteen invited lectures covered selected topics in the following fields: Astrophysics Biophysics Chemistry Elementary Particle Physics Condensed Matter Materials Science Soft Matter Science Environmental Research Hydrodynamics and turbulence Plasma Physics Computer Science The talks are intended to inform a broad audience of scientists and the interested public about the research activities at NIC. The proceedings of the symposium cover projects that have been supported by the IBM supercomputers JUMP and IBM Blue Gene/P in Juelich and the APE topical computer at DESY-Zeuthen in an even wider range than the lectures.

  7. NIC symposium 2010. Proceedings

    Muenster, Gernot

    2012-01-01

    The fifth NIC-Symposium gave an overview of the activities of the John von Neumann Institute for Computing (NIC) and of the results obtained in the last two years by research groups supported by the NIC. The large recent progress in supercomputing is highlighted by the fact that the newly installed Blue Gene/P system in Juelich - with a peak performance of 1 Petaflop/s - currently ranks number four in the TOP500 list. This development opens new dimensions in simulation science for researchers in Germany and Europe. NIC - a joint foundation of Forschungszentrum Juelich, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) and Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) - supports with its members' supercomputer facilities about 130 research groups at universities and national labs working on computer simulations in various fields of science. Fifteen invited lectures covered selected topics in the following fields: Astrophysics Biophysics Chemistry Elementary Particle Physics Condensed Matter Materials Science Soft Matter Science Environmental Research Hydrodynamics and turbulence Plasma Physics Computer Science The talks are intended to inform a broad audience of scientists and the interested public about the research activities at NIC. The proceedings of the symposium cover projects that have been supported by the IBM supercomputers JUMP and IBM Blue Gene/P in Juelich and the APE topical computer at DESY-Zeuthen in an even wider range than the lectures.

  8. NIC symposium 2010. Proceedings

    Muenster, Gernot [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1; Wolf, Dietrich [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Duisburg (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Kremer, Manfred [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Juelich Supercomputing Centre (JSC)

    2012-06-21

    The fifth NIC-Symposium gave an overview of the activities of the John von Neumann Institute for Computing (NIC) and of the results obtained in the last two years by research groups supported by the NIC. The large recent progress in supercomputing is highlighted by the fact that the newly installed Blue Gene/P system in Juelich - with a peak performance of 1 Petaflop/s - currently ranks number four in the TOP500 list. This development opens new dimensions in simulation science for researchers in Germany and Europe. NIC - a joint foundation of Forschungszentrum Juelich, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) and Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) - supports with its members' supercomputer facilities about 130 research groups at universities and national labs working on computer simulations in various fields of science. Fifteen invited lectures covered selected topics in the following fields: Astrophysics Biophysics Chemistry Elementary Particle Physics Condensed Matter Materials Science Soft Matter Science Environmental Research Hydrodynamics and turbulence Plasma Physics Computer Science The talks are intended to inform a broad audience of scientists and the interested public about the research activities at NIC. The proceedings of the symposium cover projects that have been supported by the IBM supercomputers JUMP and IBM Blue Gene/P in Juelich and the APE topical computer at DESY-Zeuthen in an even wider range than the lectures.

  9. International Evoked Potentials Symposium

    1980-01-01

    The past decade has seen great progress in the measurement of evoked potentials in man; a steady increase in our understanding of their charac­ teristics, their origins and their usefulness; and a growing application in the field of clinical diagnosis. The topic is a truly multidisciplinary one. Important research contributions have been made by workers of many different backgrounds and clinical applications span the specialities. This book represents a revised and updated version of the work originally presented at the international evoked potential symposium held in Nottingham 4-6 1978. The Nottingham Symposium provided a forum for a state-of-the-art discussion amongst workers from many different disciplines and from many different countries. For each major topic in the field an expert review set the scene for discussion of current research presentations. This format is retained in the book: the chapters in Part A provide the context in which the research presented in Part B is set. The task of selecting m...

  10. Symposium Gyro Technology 1997

    Sorg, H [ed.; Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. A fuer Mechanik

    1997-10-01

    This volume includes the twenty papers which were presented at the Symposium Gyro Technology 1997. The subjects that have been treated during the symposium were as follows: Performance and design of silicon micromachined gyro; improved rate gyroscope designs designated for fabrication by modern deep silicon etching; micromechanical vibratory rate gyroscopes fabricated in conventional CMOS; error modelling of silicon angular rate sensor; a capacitive accelerometer as an example for surface micromachined inertial sensors; initial production results of a new family of fiber optic gyroscopes; dual-axis multiplexed open loop fiber optic gyroscope; flattely supported vibratory gyro-sensor using a Trident-type tuning fork resonator; innovative mechanizations to optimize inertial sensors for high or low rate operations; design of a planar vibratory gyroscope using electrostatic actuation and electromanetic detection; fiber optic gyro based land navigation system; FOG AHRS and AHRS/GPS navigation system: the low cost solution; GPS/GLONASS/INS-navigation (GLOGINAV); small-sized integrated system of the sea mobile objects attitude and navigation; concepts for hybrid positioning; preliminary results from a large ring laser gyroscope for fundamental physics and geophysics; a `sense of balance` - AHRS with low-cost vibrating-gyroscopes for medical diagnostics; application of strapdown inertial systems of orientation and navigation in intrapipe moving diagnostic apparatus; investigation of a digital readout system for laser gyro; the use of angular rate multiple integrals as input signals for strapdown attitude algorithms. (AKF)

  11. P(MMA-EMA Random Copolymer Electrolytes Incorporating Sodium Iodide for Potential Application in a Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell

    Nurul Akmaliah Dzulkurnain

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymer electrolytes based on 90 wt% of methyl methacrylate and 10 wt% of ethyl methacrylate (90MMA-co-10EMA incorporating different weight ratios of sodium iodide were prepared using the solution casting method. The complexation between salt and copolymer host has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The ionic conductivity and thermal stability of the electrolytes were measured using impedance spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the morphology of the polymer electrolytes. The ionic conductivity and glass transition temperature increased up to 20 wt% of sodium iodide (5.19 × 10−6 S·cm−1 and decreased with the further addition of salt concentration, because of the crosslinked effect. The morphology behavior of the highest conducting sample also showed smaller pores compared to the other concentration. The total ionic transference number proved that this system was mainly due to ions, and the electrochemical stability window was up to 2.5 V, which is suitable for a dye-sensitized solar cell application. This sample was then tested in a dye-sensitized solar cell and exhibited an efficiency of 0.62%.

  12. Dye-Incorporated Polynaphthalenediimide Acceptor for Additive-Free High-Performance All-Polymer Solar Cells.

    Chen, Dong; Yao, Jia; Chen, Lie; Yin, Jingping; Lv, Ruizhi; Huang, Bin; Liu, Siqi; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Yang, Chunhe; Chen, Yiwang; Li, Yongfang

    2018-04-16

    All-polymer solar cells (all-PSCs) can offer unique advantages for applications in flexible devices, and naphthalene diimide (NDI)-based polymer acceptors are the widely used polymer acceptors. However, their power conversion efficiency (PCE) still lags behind that of state-of-the-art polymer solar cells, due to low light absorption, suboptimal energy levels and the strong aggregation of the NDI-based polymer acceptor. Herein, a rhodanine-based dye molecule was introduced into the NDI-based polymer acceptor by simple random copolymerization and showed an improved light absorption coefficient, an up-shifted lowest unoccupied molecular orbital level and reduced crystallization. Consequently, additive-free all-PSCs demonstrated a high PCE of 8.13 %, which is one of the highest performance characteristics reported for all-PSCs to date. These results indicate that incorporating a dye into the n-type polymer gives insight into the precise design of high-performance polymer acceptors for all-PSCs. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Design of a novel integration-deficient lentivector technology that incorporates genetic and posttranslational elements to target human dendritic cells.

    Tareen, Semih U; Kelley-Clarke, Brenna; Nicolai, Christopher J; Cassiano, Linda A; Nelson, Lisa T; Slough, Megan M; Vin, Chintan D; Odegard, Jared M; Sloan, Derek D; Van Hoeven, Neal; Allen, James M; Dubensky, Thomas W; Robbins, Scott H

    2014-03-01

    As sentinels of the immune system, dendritic cells (DCs) play an essential role in regulating cellular immune responses. One of the main challenges of developing DC-targeted therapies includes the delivery of antigen to DCs in order to promote the activation of antigen-specific effector CD8 T cells. With the goal of creating antigen-directed immunotherapeutics that can be safely administered directly to patients, Immune Design has developed a platform of novel integration-deficient lentiviral vectors that target and deliver antigen-encoding nucleic acids to human DCs. This platform, termed ID-VP02, utilizes a novel genetic variant of a Sindbis virus envelope glycoprotein with posttranslational carbohydrate modifications in combination with Vpx, a SIVmac viral accessory protein, to achieve efficient targeting and transduction of human DCs. In addition, ID-VP02 incorporates safety features in its design that include two redundant mechanisms to render ID-VP02 integration-deficient. Here, we describe the characteristics that allow ID-VP02 to specifically transduce human DCs, and the advances that ID-VP02 brings to conventional third-generation lentiviral vector design as well as demonstrate upstream production yields that will enable manufacturing feasibility studies to be conducted.

  14. The proceedings of the Tenth Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Hill, Colin; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Kok, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We were delighted to be asked by Microbial Cell Factories to act as guest editors for the manuscripts in this issue associated with the LAB10 Symposium. The LAB Sympo- sia have been very important benchmarks in the careers of many LAB researchers, charting the development of this field from the very

  15. Army symposium: Electrical energy engineering today; Wehrtechnisches Symposium: Moderne elektrische Energietechnik

    Busse, H. (ed.) [Bundesakademie fuer Wehrverwaltung und Wehrtechnik, Mannheim (Germany). Fachgebiet Elektrotechnik und Elektroenergiewesen

    2000-05-01

    This symposium was held in Mannheim on May 20/21, 2000. All aspects of energy engineering were discussed, including electrochemical energy sources like accumulator batteries and fuel cells. The proceedings volume contains 26 papers which reflect the state of the art and current trends in electrical energy engineering in the German army. [German] Das Wehrtechnische Symposium 'Moderne elektrische Energietechnik' wurde von der Lehrabteilung Wehrtechnik der Bundesakademie fuer Wehrverwaltung und Wehrtechnik in Mannheim in der Zeit vom 20.05.-21.05.2000 durchgefuehrt. Das Programm enthaelt die aktuellen Themen der elektrischen Energietechnik. Die elektroschemischen Energiequellen (Batterien und Brennstoffzellen) wurden in das Programm integriert. Dadurch konnte das gesamte Spektrum der Energietechnik vielschichtig dargestellt und in der Diskussion unter z.T. sehr verschiedenen Gesichtspunkten beleuchtet werden. Die im vorliegenden Tagungsband abgedruckten 26 Skripte wurden weder gekuerzt noch ergaenzt. Sie zeigen insgesamt den aktuellen Stand und die erfolgversprechenden Entwicklungstendenzen der elektrischen Energietechnik in der Bundeswehr auf. (orig.)

  16. Research symposium proceedings. Final report

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    THE research symposium was organized to present the cutting edge research for PET by individuals from leading institutions throughout the world. The Institute for Clinical PET (ICP) has focused its annual meeting on the clinical applications of PET.

  17. International symposium on NMR spectroscopy

    The publication consists of 32 papers and presentations from the field of NMR spectroscopy applications submitted to the International Symposium on NMR Spectroscopy held at Smolenice between 29 Sep and 3 Oct, 1980. (B.S.)

  18. Proceedings Forest & Field Fuels Symposium

    None

    1978-07-01

    The purpose of the symposium is to examine two specific renewable resources, forest and field fuels, to pinpoint areas where funding of RD&D would be effective in expanding their marketability and use as substitutes for imported oil.

  19. Third Symposium on Macrocyclic Compounds

    1979-01-01

    At the Third Symposium on Macrocyclic Compounds there were sessions on facilitated transport, analytical applications, organic synthesis and reactions, phase transfer catalysis, and metal complexation. Abstracts of the individual presentations are included

  20. VIII international electric vehicle symposium

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings from the symposium are presented. Major topics discussed include: battery technology, powertrains; hybrid vehicles, marketing and economics, propulsion, and electric vehicle design and performance. Each paper has been separately indexed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  1. Fourth symposium on macrocyclic compounds

    Christensen, J.J.; Izatt, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Both theoretical and experimental aspects of the properties and behavior of synthetic and naturally occurring macrocyclic compounds are covered in this symposium. This document contains abstracts of the papers

  2. ACS Symposium on Molecular Tribology

    Gellman, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    .... The aspects of tribology covered by the symposium were quite broad but included a number of areas of importance to Air Force technologies including vapor phase lubrication, lubrication of MEMS...

  3. Measurement of the capability of DNA synthesis of human fetal liver cells by the assay of 3H-TdR incorporation

    Wang Tao; Ma Xiangrui; Wang Hongyun; Cao Xia

    1987-01-01

    The fetal liver is one of the major sites of hematopoiesis during gestation. Under erythropoietin (EPO) stimulation, in erythroid precusor cells of fetal liver, proliferation and differentiation occurred and function of metabolism was enhanced. The technique of 3 H-TdR incorporation was used to measure the function of fetal liver cellular DNA synthesis. As EPO concentration at the range of approximately 20 ∼ 100 mU/ml, the counts of 3 H-TdR incorporation into fetal liver cells increased. As the concentration of EPO increased, however, its incorporation counts are lower than that in bone marrow of either the fetal or the adult. It suggested that precusors of erythrocyte of fetal liver has differentiated to later phases with the progressive accumulation of mature cells, therefore, both proliferation and function of metabolism are more or less decreased respectively. Under EPO stimulation, however, precusor of erythroid of fetal liver can greatly increase potential effects on DNA synthesis

  4. Hydrogen exchange during cell-free incorporation of deuterated amino acids and an approach to its inhibition

    Tonelli, Marco; Singarapu, Kiran K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (NMRFAM), Department of Biochemistry (United States); Makino, Shin-ichi; Sahu, Sarata C.; Matsubara, Yuko [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), Department of Biochemistry (United States); Endo, Yaeta [Ehime University, Cell-Free Science and Technology Research Center (Japan); Kainosho, Masatsune [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Center for Priority Areas (Japan); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (NMRFAM), Department of Biochemistry (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Perdeuteration, selective deuteration, and stereo array isotope labeling (SAIL) are valuable strategies for NMR studies of larger proteins and membrane proteins. To minimize scrambling of the label, it is best to use cell-free methods to prepare selectively labeled proteins. However, when proteins are prepared from deuterated amino acids by cell-free translation in H{sub 2}O, exchange reactions can lead to contamination of {sup 2}H sites by {sup 1}H from the solvent. Examination of a sample of SAIL-chlorella ubiquitin prepared by Escherichia coli cell-free synthesis revealed that exchange had occurred at several residues (mainly at Gly, Ala, Asp, Asn, Glu, and Gln). We present results from a study aimed at identifying the exchanging sites and level of exchange and at testing a strategy for minimizing {sup 1}H contamination during wheat germ cell-free translation of proteins produced from deuterated amino acids by adding known inhibitors of transaminases (1 mM aminooxyacetic acid) and glutamate synthetase (0.1 mM l-methionine sulfoximine). By using a wheat germ cell-free expression system, we produced [U-{sup 2}H, {sup 15}N]-chlorella ubiquitin without and with added inhibitors, and [U-{sup 15}N]-chlorella ubiquitin as a reference to determine the extent of deuterium incorporation. We also prepared a sample of [U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N]-chlorella ubiquitin, for use in assigning the sites of exchange. The added inhibitors did not reduce the protein yield and were successful in blocking hydrogen exchange at C{sup {alpha}} sites, with the exception of Gly, and at C{sup {beta}} sites of Ala. We discovered, in addition, that partial exchange occurred with or without the inhibitors at certain side-chain methyl and methylene groups: Asn-H{sup {beta}}, Asp-H{sup {beta}}, Gln-H{sup {gamma}}, Glu-H{sup {gamma}}, and Lys-H{sup {epsilon}}. The side-chain labeling pattern, in particular the mixed chiral labeling resulting from partial exchange at certain sites, should be of

  5. Effect of insulin on albumin production and incorporation of 14C-leucine into proteins in isolated parenchymal liver cells from normal rats

    Dich, J; Gluud, C N

    1975-01-01

    the immunologically determined increment in the incubation medium was 1.7 +/- 0.2 mug albumin/min per g liver wet wt. This is about 30% of the rate of production in the perfused liver. Addition of insulin (10(-6)-10(-10) M) enhanced albumin production (50-17%), and incorporation of 14C-leucine both into albumin (50......Parenchymal rat liver cells were isolated by a modification of the collagenase method of Quistorff, Bondesen and Grunnet. The cells secreted albumin into the medium and incorporated 14C-leucine both into cell proteins and proteins secreted into the medium. Albumin production measured from......-8%), secreted proteins (40-9%) and cell proteins (20-8%). Insulin does not increase the production of albumin by depleting the cells. The effect of insulin on albumin production is compatible with an effect on the rate of synthesis as the specific activity of albumin is unaffected by addition of insulin....

  6. Symposium 1 of JENAM 2010

    Molaro, Paolo; From Varying Couplings to Fundamental Physics

    2011-01-01

    Nature is characterized by a number of physical laws and fundamental dimensionless couplings. These determine the  properties of our physical universe, from the size of atoms, cells and mountains to the ultimate fate of the universe as a whole. Yet it is rather remarkable how little we know about them. The constancy of physical laws is one of the cornerstones of the scientific research method, but for fundamental couplings this is an assumption with no other justification  than a historical assumption. There is no 'theory of constants' describing their role in the underlying theories and how they relate to one another or how many  of them are truly fundamental.  Studying the behaviour of these quantities throughout the history of the universe is an effective way to probe fundamental physics. This explains why the ESA and ESO include varying fundamental constants among their key science drivers for the next generation of facilities. This symposium discussed the state-of-the-art in the field, as well as the...

  7. Automated Vehicles Symposium 2015

    Beiker, Sven

    2016-01-01

    This edited book comprises papers about the impacts, benefits and challenges of connected and automated cars. It is the third volume of the LNMOB series dealing with Road Vehicle Automation. The book comprises contributions from researchers, industry practitioners and policy makers, covering perspectives from the U.S., Europe and Japan. It is based on the Automated Vehicles Symposium 2015 which was jointly organized by the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in July 2015. The topical spectrum includes, but is not limited to, public sector activities, human factors, ethical and business aspects, energy and technological perspectives, vehicle systems and transportation infrastructure. This book is an indispensable source of information for academic researchers, industrial engineers and policy makers interested in the topic of road vehicle automation.

  8. 10th Schaeffler Symposium

    2014-01-01

    Every four years, Schaeffler provides an insight into its latest developments and technologies from the engine, transmission and chassis as well as hybridization and electric mobility sectors. In 2014 the Schaeffler Symposium with the motto “Solving the Powertrain Puzzle” took place from 3th to 4th of April in Baden-Baden. Mobility for tomorrow is the central theme of this proceeding. The authors are discussing the different requirements, which are placed on mobility in different regions of the world. In addition to the company's work in research and development, a comprehensive in-house mobility study also provides a reliable basis for the discussion. The authors are convinced that there will be a paradigm shift in the automotive industry. Issues such as increasing efficiency and advancing electrification of the powertrain, automatic and semi-automatic driving, as well as integration in information networks will define the automotive future. In addition, the variety of solutions available worldwide will ...

  9. NATO Telecommunications Symposium

    Lucas, William; Conrath, David

    1978-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the first international symposium devoted to research on the evaluation and planning of new person-to-person telecommunication systems. It was sponsored by NATO's Special Programme Panel on Systems Science and took place, in September 1977, at the University of Bergamo in the north of Italy. Telecommunication systems which provide for communication be­ tween people, rather than computers or other instruments, are of two kinds. There are mass communication systems (broadcast radio and television) and interpersonal systems (for example, the telephone and Telex) which join together individuals or small groups. Here we have included in the interpersonal category certain systems for re­ trieving information from computers, essentially those systems in which the role of the computer 1s primarily to act as a store and to identify that information which best fits a user's request. (This excludes management information systems in which the computer performs important transformat...

  10. Objectives of the symposium

    Genter, N.E.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this symposium was to discuss the sorts of evidence of molecular alterations in DNA which can be used to study causation of the stochastic effects of importance in radiation protection. Specifically, the aim was to address the following: what sort of indications might show whether a cancer was caused by radiation; whether there is a radiogenic signature to distinguish damage caused by ionizing radiation; whether bio-markers might be available for susceptibility, for exposure, for biological consequences. Despite a number of epidemiological studies (referred to), there is no clear, credible, defensible answer as to whether low-level radiation increases the risk of cancer. A new ethical question is, what rules should be in place for identifying and protecting genetically sensitive individuals. 1 tab

  11. Objectives of the symposium

    Osborne, R.V.

    1992-01-01

    The author defined the objectives of the symposium as follows: to present and examine the recent evidence associating clusters of leukemia with sources of ionizing radiation; to examine the statistical basis for the analysis of clustering; to examine the underlying assumptions in epidemiological studies that clusters must have an environmental cause; to examine the extent to which we can take into account the biological causes of non-randomness in populations, particularly those of geographic and genetic origin; to evaluate the relative merits of different kinds of epidemiological studies for yielding significant information concerning clustering; to consider the potential utility of combining the results from existing studies, and whether new epidemiological studies might be helpful; to consider what other directions, including application of the technologies of molecular biology, are likely to help clarify the underlying mechanisms or causes

  12. SYMPOSIUM: Particle identification

    Anon.

    1989-07-15

    Typical elementary particle experiments consist of a source of interactions (an external beam and a fixed target or two colliding beams) and a detector system including most of the following components: a tracking system and analysis magnet, calorimetry (measurement of energy deposition), hadron and electron identification, muon detection, trigger counters and processors, and data acquisition electronics. Experiments aimed at future high luminosity hadron collider (proton-proton or proton-antiproton) projects such as an upgraded Tevatron at Fermilab, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) idea at CERN, and the proposed US Superconducting Supercollider (SSC), must ideally cover the entire solid angle and be capable of not only surviving the collisions, but also providing high resolution event information at incredible interaction rates. The Symposium on Particle Identification at High Luminosity Hadron Colliders held at Fermilab from 5-7 April (sponsored by Fermilab, the US Department of Energy, and the SSC Central Design Group) focused on this single facet of detector technology.

  13. Design Modelling Symposium 2015

    Tamke, Martin; Gengnagel, Christoph; Faircloth, Billie; Scheurer, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    This book reflects and expands on the current trend in the building industry to understand, simulate and ultimately design buildings by taking into consideration the interlinked elements and forces that act on them. This approach overcomes the traditional, exclusive focus on building tasks, while posing new challenges in all areas of the industry from material and structural to the urban scale. Contributions from invited experts, papers and case studies provide the reader with a comprehensive overview of the field, as well as perspectives from related disciplines, such as computer science. The chapter authors were invited speakers at the 5th Symposium "Modelling Behaviour", which took place at the CITA in Copenhagen in September 2015.

  14. Automated Vehicles Symposium 2014

    Beiker, Sven; Road Vehicle Automation 2

    2015-01-01

    This paper collection is the second volume of the LNMOB series on Road Vehicle Automation. The book contains a comprehensive review of current technical, socio-economic, and legal perspectives written by experts coming from public authorities, companies and universities in the U.S., Europe and Japan. It originates from the Automated Vehicle Symposium 2014, which was jointly organized by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in Burlingame, CA, in July 2014. The contributions discuss the challenges arising from the integration of highly automated and self-driving vehicles into the transportation system, with a focus on human factors and different deployment scenarios. This book is an indispensable source of information for academic researchers, industrial engineers, and policy makers interested in the topic of road vehicle automation.

  15. 2nd Abel Symposium

    Nunno, Giulia; Lindstrøm, Tom; Øksendal, Bernt; Zhang, Tusheng

    2007-01-01

    Kiyosi Ito, the founder of stochastic calculus, is one of the few central figures of the twentieth century mathematics who reshaped the mathematical world. Today stochastic calculus is a central research field with applications in several other mathematical disciplines, for example physics, engineering, biology, economics and finance. The Abel Symposium 2005 was organized as a tribute to the work of Kiyosi Ito on the occasion of his 90th birthday. Distinguished researchers from all over the world were invited to present the newest developments within the exciting and fast growing field of stochastic analysis. The present volume combines both papers from the invited speakers and contributions by the presenting lecturers. A special feature is the Memoirs that Kiyoshi Ito wrote for this occasion. These are valuable pages for both young and established researchers in the field.

  16. SYMPOSIUM: Multiparticle 82

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The thirteenth symposium in the successful series on multiparticle dynamics was held from 6-11 June in the picturesque North Holland village of Volendam. While originally confined to hadron-hadron interactions, multiparticle dynamics is now of interest in all types of particle collision. Results on proton-antiproton collisions at CERN, both in the SPS and the ISR, are a talking point wherever particle physicists meet, and Volendam was no exception. Also prominent at Volendam were ultrarelativistic effects in nucleus-nucleus collisions. However the main aim of this year's meeting was to review the common features of hadrons produced in different types of collision (lepton-lepton, lepton-hadron and hadron-hadron)

  17. Renewable Energy Symposium

    2016-01-01

    Representatives of state universities, public institutions and Costa Rican private sector, and American experts have exposed projects or experiences about the use and generation of renewable energy in different fields. The thematics presented have been about: development of smart grids and design of electrical energy production systems that allow money saving and reducing emissions to the environment; studies on the use of non-traditional plants and agricultural waste; sustainable energy model in the process of coffee production; experiments from biomass for the fabrication of biodiesel, biogas production and storage; and the use of non-conventional energy. Researches were presented at the Renewable Energy Symposium, organized by the Centro de Investigacion en Estructuras Microscopicas and support of the Vicerrectoria de Investigacion, both from the Universidad de Costa Rica [es

  18. 3rd Abel Symposium

    Owren, Brynjulf

    2008-01-01

    The 2006 Abel symposium is focusing on contemporary research involving interaction between computer science, computational science and mathematics. In recent years, computation has been affecting pure mathematics in fundamental ways. Conversely, ideas and methods of pure mathematics are becoming increasingly important within computational and applied mathematics. At the core of computer science is the study of computability and complexity for discrete mathematical structures. Studying the foundations of computational mathematics raises similar questions concerning continuous mathematical structures. There are several reasons for these developments. The exponential growth of computing power is bringing computational methods into ever new application areas. Equally important is the advance of software and programming languages, which to an increasing degree allows the representation of abstract mathematical structures in program code. Symbolic computing is bringing algorithms from mathematical analysis into the...

  19. SYMPOSIUM: Multiparticle Dynamics

    Anon.

    1984-09-15

    How is the seemingly simple world of quarks and leptons related to the complicated phenomena that particle physicists see in their detectors? This was the theme of the 15th Symposium on multiparticle dynamics held in Lund, Sweden, from 11-16 June. Apart from the many results from the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, a recurrent theme during the conference was the growing awareness of the importance of quark 'hadronization'. Everyone knows that isolated quarks have never been found in Nature. Only those combinations of quarks and antiquarks that form hadrons have been detected. The dressing of the quarks to become hadrons goes under the name 'hadronization' and this process is very difficult to describe theoretically from first principles. Even the currently accepted theory for strong quark interactions — quantum chromodynamics, QCD — has difficulties. QCD has been shown to be a good theory describing 'small distance phenomena' — small compared to a hadron.

  20. Analysis of protein incorporation of radioactive isotopes in the Chinese hamster ovary cell cycle by electronic sorting and gel microelectrophoresis

    Pipkin, J.L.; Anson, J.F.; Hinson, W.G.; Schol, H.; Burns, E.R.; Casciano, D.A.

    1986-03-01

    The patterns of (3H)-leucine and (32P)-phosphate incorporation of proteins extracted with varying molarities of sodium chloride were analyzed from nuclei physically sorted from six fluorescence windows after propidium iodine staining of the G0 + G1 and G2 + M phases of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cycle. Eight hundred nanograms of protein were used in each electrophoretic analysis obtained from 200,000 nuclei, a portion of the sample, from each window. Autoradiography was performed in a two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel ultra-microelectrophoresis apparatus (UMEA) designed and fabricated in this laboratory. There was a net reduction and/or loss of (3H)-leucine- and (32P)-phosphate-labeled protein regions from the autoradiographs occurring primarily in the G2 + M phase. Two phosphorylated proteins that were stage specific were observed in partitions of the G2 + M phase. The use of isolated proteins and the coelectrophoresis of these markers demonstrated the similarity in mobility of a number of proteins seen in the autoradiographs of proteins extracted with high and low salt molarities and implied they are synonymous. Coelectrophoresis indicated that a substantial number of high molecular weight proteins that decreased or disappeared at late stages of G2 + M and early mitosis were composed, in part, of nucleolar proteins.

  1. Improvement of minority carrier lifetime and conversion efficiency by Na incorporation in Cu2ZnSnSe4 solar cells

    Tampo, Hitoshi; Kim, Kang Min; Kim, Shinho; Shibata, Hajime; Niki, Shigeru

    2017-07-01

    The effect of Na incorporation in Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) solar cells grown by the coevaporation method was investigated via photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL (TRPL) measurements as well as photovoltaic properties. The TRPL decay curves showed a monotonic increase in CZTSe lifetime from 2 to 15 ns with increasing Na incorporation, which corresponds to the increase in the correction length estimated by quantum efficiency measurements. The TRPL decay curves included two decay components, fast and slow, which were discussed and concluded as originating from the recombination at the surface and bulk of CZTSe, respectively, which is also supported by TPRL measurements with various excitation wavelengths. The lifetime of CZTSe is limited by the surface-related nonradiative recombination compared to Cu(In,Ga)Se2 devices which are fabricated with the same device structure except for the absorber, and at present, it is concluded that the surface recombination of the CZTSe limits the cell performance. In addition to the above investigations, the relationship between the CZTSe bulk lifetime and carrier concentration is discussed; deep nonradiative recombination centers in the CZTSe bulk were found to decrease by one order of magnitude with Na incorporation. The Na incorporation primarily resulted in improvement in the short circuit current density and fill factor and not in the open circuit voltage, and the results are discussed. The best performing CZTSe solar cell with Na incorporation showed a conversion efficiency of 9.57%.

  2. Proceedings of DAE-BRNS third international symposium on materials chemistry

    Tyagi, Deepak; Banerjee, Atindra Mohan; Nigam, Sandeep; Varma, Salil; Tripathi, Arvind Kumar; Bharadwaj, Shyamala Rajkumar; Das, Dasarathi

    2010-12-01

    The present volume consists of the proceedings of the DAE-BRNS Third International Symposium on Materials Chemistry. In order to keep pace with the advancements made in the area of materials chemistry, new topics like materials for energy conversion, biomaterials, carbon based materials, soft condensed materials, thin films, surface chemistry, polymer based materials, organic and organometallics, magnetic materials and high purity materials have been included in this symposium while topics like nuclear materials, nanomaterials and clusters, catalysis, chemical sensors, fuel cell materials and computational research in materials chemistry have been continued as important features of the symposium. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. Effect of hydroxyurea on mitotic activity 3H-thymidine and 3H-phenylalanine incorporation in the antheridial filament cells of Chara vulgaris

    Bielecka, A.

    1979-01-01

    Hydroxyurea inhibits mitotic activity in cells of the antheridial filaments of Chara vulgaris by blocking phase S and phase G 2 . Blocking of cells in phase G 2 also occurs in the case of the root meristem cells of Helianthus annuus and Vicia faba var. minor. 3 H-thine incorporation confirmed autoradiographically the blocking of cells of the antheridial filaments in Chara vulgaris at phase S and slowing down of the rate of DNA replication. Incubation with 3 H-phenylalanine demonstrated that hydroxyurea inhibits protein synthesis. (author)

  4. Differing sensitivity to fluorescent light in Chinese hamster cells containing equally incorporated quantities of BUdR versus IUdR

    Mitchell, J.B.; Morstyn, G.; Russo, A.; Kinsella, T.J.; Fornace, A. Jr.; McPherson, S.; Glatstein, E.

    1984-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells that had incorporated approximately equal levels of either BUdR or IUdR into their DNA were found to be equal sensitizers to x rays. However, BUdR-substituted cells were much more sensitive to fluorescent light than IUdR-substituted cells, both on a cell survival basis and by the initial number of single strand DNA breaks induced. Since a major toxicity to the use of BUdR clinically has been light-induced skin rash, these data indicate that the use of IUdR clinically might cause less untoward toxicity but yet provide the same radiosensitization as BUdR

  5. Symposium Promotes Technological Literacy through STEM

    Havice, Bill; Marshall, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a symposium which promotes technological literacy through science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The three-day symposium titled, "The Anderson, Oconee, Pickens Symposium on Teaching and Learning STEM Standards for the 21st Century," was held August 4-6, 2008 at the Tri-County Technical College…

  6. Permeability changes and incorporation of labelled thymidine into DNA and whole cells of the fibroblast culture of Chinese hamsters affected by MEA and low temperature

    Ermekova, V.M.; Kondakova, N.V.; Levitman, M.Kh.; Saugabaeva, K.M.; Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1976-01-01

    Action of MEA and low temperature (20degC) on the incorporation of labelled thymidine into DNA and whole cells of the fibroblast culture of chinese hamsters has been studied. It has been found that each of the above-mentioned factors equally decreases the label uptake into the cell and DNA. It is concluded that MEA and low temperature do not substantially influence the rate of DNA synthesis

  7. Incorporating functionalized polyethylene glycol lipids into reprecipitated conjugated polymer nanoparticles for bioconjugation and targeted labeling of cells

    Kandel, Prakash K.; Fernando, Lawrence P.; Ackroyd, P. Christine; Christensen, Kenneth A.

    2011-03-01

    We report a simple and rapid method to prepare extremely bright, functionalized, stable, and biocompatible conjugated polymer nanoparticles incorporating functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG) lipids by reprecipitation. These nanoparticles retain the fundamental spectroscopic properties of conjugated polymer nanoparticles prepared without PEG lipid, but demonstrate greater hydrophilicity and quantum yield compared to unmodified conjugated polymer nanoparticles. The sizes of these nanoparticles, as determined by TEM, were 21-26 nm. Notably, these nanoparticles were prepared with several PEG lipid functional end groups, including biotin and carboxy moieties that can be easily conjugated to biomolecules. We have demonstrated the availability of these end groups for functionalization using the interaction of biotin PEG lipid conjugated polymer nanoparticles with streptavidin. Biotinylated PEG lipid conjugated polymer nanoparticles bound streptavidin-linked magnetic beads, while carboxy and methoxy PEG lipid modified nanoparticles did not. Similarly, biotinylated PEG lipid conjugated polymer nanoparticles bound streptavidin-coated glass slides and could be visualized as diffraction-limited spots, while nanoparticles without PEG lipid or with non-biotin PEG lipid end groups were not bound. To demonstrate that nanoparticle functionalization could be used for targeted labelling of specific cellular proteins, biotinylated PEG lipid conjugated polymer nanoparticles were bound to biotinylated anti-CD16/32 antibodies on J774A.1 cell surface receptors, using streptavidin as a linker. This work represents the first demonstration of targeted delivery of conjugated polymer nanoparticles and demonstrates the utility of these new nanoparticles for fluorescence based imaging and sensing.We report a simple and rapid method to prepare extremely bright, functionalized, stable, and biocompatible conjugated polymer nanoparticles incorporating functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG

  8. Annual symposium on Frontiers in Science

    Metzger, N.; Fulton, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    This final report summarizes activities conducted for the National Academy of Sciences' Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Science with support from the US Department of Energy for the period July 1, 1993 through May 31, 1998. During the report period, five Frontiers of Science symposia were held at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. For each Symposium, an organizing committee appointed by the NAS President selected and planned the eight sessions for the Symposium and identified general participants for invitation by the NAS President. These Symposia accomplished their goal of bringing together outstanding younger (age 45 or less) scientists to hear presentations in disciplines outside their own and to discuss exciting advances and opportunities in their fields in a format that encourages, and allows adequate time for, informal one-on-one discussions among participants. Of the 458 younger scientists who participated, over a quarter (124) were women. Participant lists for all symposia (1993--1997) are attached. The scientific participants were leaders in basic research from academic, industrial, and federal laboratories in such disciplines as astronomy, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biochemistry, cell biology, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, engineering, genetics, material sciences, mathematics, microbiology, neuroscience, physics, and physiology. For each symposia, the 24 speakers and discussants on the program were urged to focus their presentations on current cutting-edge research in their field for a scientifically sophisticated but non-specialist audience, and to provide a sense of the experimental data--what is actually measured and seen in the various fields. They were also asked to address questions such as: What are the major research problems and unique tools in their field? What are the current limitations on advances as well as the frontiers? Speakers were asked to provide a

  9. International Symposium on Nuclear Safety

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and the Embassy of Japan in the Slovak Republic, under the auspices of the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign and European Affairs Mr Lajcak organized International Symposium on Nuclear Safety on 14 and 15 March 2013. The symposium took place almost exactly two years after the occurrence of accidents at the Japanese nuclear power plant Fukushima Daichi. The main mission of the symposium was an attempt to contribute to the improvement of nuclear safety by sharing information and lessons presented by Japanese experts with experts from the region, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the European Commission. The aim of the symposium, unlike many other events organized in connection with the events in Fukushima Daichi NPP, was a summary of the results of stress tests and measures update adopted by the international community, especially within Europe. Panel discussion was included to the program of the symposium for this aim was, mainly focused on the current state of implementation of the National Action Plan of the Slovak Republic, the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine and Switzerland and the IAEA Action Plan.

  10. Incorporation of podoplanin into HIV released from HEK-293T cells, but not PBMC, is required for efficient binding to the attachment factor CLEC-2

    2010-01-01

    Background Platelets are associated with HIV in the blood of infected individuals and might modulate viral dissemination, particularly if the virus is directly transmitted into the bloodstream. The C-type lectin DC-SIGN and the novel HIV attachment factor CLEC-2 are expressed by platelets and facilitate HIV transmission from platelets to T-cells. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms behind CLEC-2-mediated HIV-1 transmission. Results Binding studies with soluble proteins indicated that CLEC-2, in contrast to DC-SIGN, does not recognize the viral envelope protein, but a cellular factor expressed on kidney-derived 293T cells. Subsequent analyses revealed that the cellular mucin-like membranous glycoprotein podoplanin, a CLEC-2 ligand, was expressed on 293T cells and incorporated into virions released from these cells. Knock-down of podoplanin in 293T cells by shRNA showed that virion incorporation of podoplanin was required for efficient CLEC-2-dependent HIV-1 interactions with cell lines and platelets. Flow cytometry revealed no evidence for podoplanin expression on viable T-cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Podoplanin was also not detected on HIV-1 infected T-cells. However, apoptotic bystander cells in HIV-1 infected cultures reacted with anti-podoplanin antibodies, and similar results were obtained upon induction of apoptosis in a cell line and in PBMCs suggesting an unexpected link between apoptosis and podoplanin expression. Despite the absence of detectable podoplanin expression, HIV-1 produced in PBMC was transmitted to T-cells in a CLEC-2-dependent manner, indicating that T-cells might express an as yet unidentified CLEC-2 ligand. Conclusions Virion incorporation of podoplanin mediates CLEC-2 interactions of HIV-1 derived from 293T cells, while incorporation of a different cellular factor seems to be responsible for CLEC-2-dependent capture of PBMC-derived viruses. Furthermore, evidence was obtained that podoplanin expression is

  11. Incorporation of podoplanin into HIV released from HEK-293T cells, but not PBMC, is required for efficient binding to the attachment factor CLEC-2

    Münch Jan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelets are associated with HIV in the blood of infected individuals and might modulate viral dissemination, particularly if the virus is directly transmitted into the bloodstream. The C-type lectin DC-SIGN and the novel HIV attachment factor CLEC-2 are expressed by platelets and facilitate HIV transmission from platelets to T-cells. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms behind CLEC-2-mediated HIV-1 transmission. Results Binding studies with soluble proteins indicated that CLEC-2, in contrast to DC-SIGN, does not recognize the viral envelope protein, but a cellular factor expressed on kidney-derived 293T cells. Subsequent analyses revealed that the cellular mucin-like membranous glycoprotein podoplanin, a CLEC-2 ligand, was expressed on 293T cells and incorporated into virions released from these cells. Knock-down of podoplanin in 293T cells by shRNA showed that virion incorporation of podoplanin was required for efficient CLEC-2-dependent HIV-1 interactions with cell lines and platelets. Flow cytometry revealed no evidence for podoplanin expression on viable T-cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Podoplanin was also not detected on HIV-1 infected T-cells. However, apoptotic bystander cells in HIV-1 infected cultures reacted with anti-podoplanin antibodies, and similar results were obtained upon induction of apoptosis in a cell line and in PBMCs suggesting an unexpected link between apoptosis and podoplanin expression. Despite the absence of detectable podoplanin expression, HIV-1 produced in PBMC was transmitted to T-cells in a CLEC-2-dependent manner, indicating that T-cells might express an as yet unidentified CLEC-2 ligand. Conclusions Virion incorporation of podoplanin mediates CLEC-2 interactions of HIV-1 derived from 293T cells, while incorporation of a different cellular factor seems to be responsible for CLEC-2-dependent capture of PBMC-derived viruses. Furthermore, evidence was obtained that

  12. Proceedings of the second US Department of Energy environmental control symposium. Volume 1. Fossil energy

    None

    1980-06-01

    These proceedings document the presentations given at the Second Environmental Control Symposium. Symposium presentations highlighted environmental control activities which span the entire DOE. Volume I contains papers relating to coal preparation, oil shales, coal combustion, advanced coal utilization (fluidized bed combustion, MHD generators, OCGT, fuel cells), coal gasification, coal liquefaction, and fossil resource extraction (enhanced recovery). Separate abstracts for individual papers are prepared for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  13. Commemorative Symposium on the Hall Effect and its Applications

    Westgate, C

    1980-01-01

    In 1879, while a graduate student under Henry Rowland at the Physics Department of The Johns Hopkins University, Edwin Herbert Hall discovered what is now universally known as the Hall effect. A symposium was held at The Johns Hopkins University on November 13, 1979 to commemorate the lOOth anniversary of the discovery. Over 170 participants attended the symposium which included eleven in­ vited lectures and three speeches during the luncheon. During the past one hundred years, we have witnessed ever ex­ panding activities in the field of the Hall effect. The Hall effect is now an indispensable tool in the studies of many branches of condensed matter physics, especially in metals, semiconductors, and magnetic solids. Various components (over 200 million!) that utilize the Hall effect have been successfully incorporated into such devices as keyboards, automobile ignitions, gaussmeters, and satellites. This volume attempts to capture the important aspects of the Hall effect and its applications. It includes t...

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial Examining the Effects of Fish Oil and Multivitamin Supplementation on the Incorporation of n-3 and n-6 Fatty Acids into Red Blood Cells

    Andrew Pipingas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-groups clinical trial examined the effects of fish oil and multivitamin supplementation on the incorporation of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids into red blood cells. Healthy adult humans (n = 160 were randomized to receive 6 g of fish oil, 6 g of fish oil plus a multivitamin, 3 g of fish oil plus a multivitamin or a placebo daily for 16 weeks. Treatment with 6 g of fish oil, with or without a daily multivitamin, led to higher eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA composition at endpoint. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA composition was unchanged following treatment. The long chain LC n-3 PUFA index was only higher, compared to placebo, in the group receiving the combination of 6 g of fish oil and the multivitamin. Analysis by gender revealed that all treatments increased EPA incorporation in females while, in males, EPA was only significantly increased by the 6 g fish oil multivitamin combination. There was considerable individual variability in the red blood cell incorporation of EPA and DHA at endpoint. Gender contributed to a large proportion of this variability with females generally showing higher LC n-3 PUFA composition at endpoint. In conclusion, the incorporation of LC n-3 PUFA into red blood cells was influenced by dosage, the concurrent intake of vitamin/minerals and gender.

  15. Memorial Symposium for Willibald Jentschke

    2002-01-01

    Willibald 'Willi' Jentschke, Director General of CERN from 1971 to 1975 and founder of the DESY Laboratory in Hamburg, died last March, just a few months after celebrating his 90th birthday. At that time, the Bulletin dedicated an article to him (Bulletin n°19-20/2002). Now, CERN has organised a Memorial Symposium for next Thursday 31 October, where you are cordially invited. This tribute will include the following speechs: L. Maiani : Welcome E. Lohrmann : Message from DESY H. Schopper : Willi Jentschke M. Veltman and D. Perkins : The Neutral Currents K. Johnsen : The ISR in Jentschke's time K. Winter : Some recollections of Jentschke The Memorial Symposium will take place in the Council Chamber, Thursday 31 October at 15 hrs. Drinks will be served at 17:30 hrs following the symposium.

  16. Effect of glucagon on cyclic AMP, albumin metabolism and incorporation of 14C-leucine into proteins in isolated parenchymal rat liver cells

    Dich, J; Gluud, C N

    1976-01-01

    wet wt. This is about the rate found in the perfused liver, Glucagon (10(-8-10(-6) M) inhibited albumin secretion and the incorporation of 14C-leucine into albumin, into total proteins in the medium and into total proteins in the cell suspension. The effect of glucagon on albumin secretion...... is compatible with an effect on the rate of synthesis. A positive correlation existed between the maximal level of cyclic AMP after glucagon administration and the inhibition of both albumin secretion and the incorporation of 149leucine....

  17. The 1956 CERN Symposium

    Jarlskog, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    CERN, currently the largest organization in the world for particle physics, was founded in 1954. Originally located in Meyrin, at the outskirts of the city of Geneva in Switzerland, it has with time extended into neighboring France. The Theoretical Study Division of CERN, however, was created already in 1952, i.e., before the official inauguration of CERN. It was situated in Copenhagen. Christian Møller [1] was appointed (part-time) as the Director and there were two full time senior staff members, Gunnar Källén and Ben R. Mottelson. While constructing buildings and accelerators were in progress, an international conference was organized by CERN in the city of Geneva. This “CERN Symposium on High Energy Accelerators and Pion Physics”, 11–23 June 1956, attracted about 250 participants from outside CERN, among them at least 18 Nobel Laureates or future Laureates. Unfortunately, the participants from CERN are not listed in the Proceedings [2]. The conference focused on measuring devices such as bubbl...

  18. 43rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    Boesiger, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Sponsored and organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, responsibility for hosting the AMS is shared by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC). Now in its 43rd symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 43rd AMS was held in Santa Clara, California on May 4, 5 and 6, 2016. During these three days, 42 papers were presented. Topics included payload and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and mechanism testing. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components. The high quality of this symposium is a result of the work of many people, and their efforts are gratefully acknowledged. This extends to the voluntary members of the symposium organizing committee representing the eight NASA field centers, LMSSC, and the European Space Agency. Appreciation is also extended to the session chairs, the authors, and particularly the personnel at ARC responsible for the symposium arrangements and the publication of these proceedings. A sincere thank you also goes to the symposium executive committee who is responsible for the year-to-year management of the AMS, including paper processing and preparation of the program. The use of trade names of manufacturers in this publication does not constitute an official endorsement of such products or manufacturers, either expressed or implied, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. Inhibition of exogenous 3-deoxy-D-manno octulosonate incorporation into lipid A precursor of toluene-treated Salmonella typhimurium cells

    Capobianco, J.O.; Darveau, R.P.; Goldman, R.C.; Lartey, P.A.; Pernet, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Analogs of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate (KDO) were designed to inhibit CTP:CMP-KDO cytidylyltransferase (CMP-KDO synthetase). Since these analogs lacked whole-cell antibacterial activity, a permeabilized-cell method was developed to measure intracellular compound activity directly. The method employed a mutant of Salmonella typhimurium defective in KDO-8-phosphate synthetase (kdsA), which accumulated lipid A precursor at 42 0 C. Cells permeabilized with 1% toluene were used to evaluate inhibitor effect on [ 3 H]KDO incorporation into preformed lipid A precursor. KDO incorporation proceeded through the enzymes CMP-DKO synthetase and CMP-KDO:lipid A KDO transferase. Optimum KDO incorporation occurred between pH 8 and 9 and required CTP, prior lipid A precursor accumulation, and a functional kdsB gene product, CMP-KDO synthetase. The apparent K/sub m/ for KDO in this coupled system at pH 7.6 was 1.38 mM. The reaction products isolated and characterized contained 1 and 2 KDO residues per lipid A precursor molecule. Several KDO analogs produced concentration-related reductions of DKO incorporation in toluenized cells with 50% inhibitor concentrations comparable to those obtained in purified CMP-DKO synthetase systems. Two compounds, 8-amino-2-deoxy-KDO (A-60478) and 8-aminomethyl-2-deoxy-KDO (A-60821), competitively inhibited KDO incorporation, displaying K/sub i/s of 4.2 + M for A=60478 and 2.5 + M for A-60821

  20. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  1. Improving Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin as a vaccine delivery vector for viral antigens by incorporation of glycolipid activators of NKT cells.

    Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Ng, Tony W; Kharkwal, Shalu S; Carreño, Leandro J; Johnson, Alison J; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Jervis, Peter J; Cox, Liam R; Besra, Gurdyal S; Wen, Xiangshu; Yuan, Weiming; Tsuji, Moriya; Li, Xiangming; Ho, David D; Chan, John; Lee, Sunhee; Frothingham, Richard; Haynes, Barton F; Panas, Michael W; Gillard, Geoffrey O; Sixsmith, Jaimie D; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Schmitz, Joern E; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R; Porcelli, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG) has been explored as a vector for vaccines against HIV because of its ability to induce long lasting humoral and cell mediated immune responses. To maximize the potential for rBCG vaccines to induce effective immunity against HIV, various strategies are being employed to improve its ability to prime CD8+ T cells, which play an important role in the control of HIV infections. In this study we adopted a previously described approach of incorporating glycolipids that activate CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells to enhance priming of CD8+ T cells by rBCG strains expressing an SIV Gag antigen (rBCG-SIV gag). We found that the incorporation of the synthetic NKT activating glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC) into rBCG-SIV gag significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell responses against an immunodominant Gag epitope, compared to responses primed by unmodified rBCG-SIV gag. The abilities of structural analogues of α-GC to enhance CD8+ T cell responses to rBCG were compared in both wild type and partially humanized mice that express human CD1d molecules in place of mouse CD1d. These studies identified an α-GC analogue known as 7DW8-5, which has previously been used successfully as an adjuvant in non-human primates, as a promising compound for enhancing immunogenicity of antigens delivered by rBCG.vectors. Our findings support the incorporation of synthetic glycolipid activators of NKT cells as a novel approach to enhance the immunogenicity of rBCG-vectored antigens for induction of CD8+ T cell responses. The glycolipid adjuvant 7DW8-5 may be a promising candidate for advancing to non-human primate and human clinical studies for the development of HIV vaccines based on rBCG vectors.

  2. Improving Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin as a vaccine delivery vector for viral antigens by incorporation of glycolipid activators of NKT cells.

    Manjunatha M Venkataswamy

    Full Text Available Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG has been explored as a vector for vaccines against HIV because of its ability to induce long lasting humoral and cell mediated immune responses. To maximize the potential for rBCG vaccines to induce effective immunity against HIV, various strategies are being employed to improve its ability to prime CD8+ T cells, which play an important role in the control of HIV infections. In this study we adopted a previously described approach of incorporating glycolipids that activate CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT cells to enhance priming of CD8+ T cells by rBCG strains expressing an SIV Gag antigen (rBCG-SIV gag. We found that the incorporation of the synthetic NKT activating glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC into rBCG-SIV gag significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell responses against an immunodominant Gag epitope, compared to responses primed by unmodified rBCG-SIV gag. The abilities of structural analogues of α-GC to enhance CD8+ T cell responses to rBCG were compared in both wild type and partially humanized mice that express human CD1d molecules in place of mouse CD1d. These studies identified an α-GC analogue known as 7DW8-5, which has previously been used successfully as an adjuvant in non-human primates, as a promising compound for enhancing immunogenicity of antigens delivered by rBCG.vectors. Our findings support the incorporation of synthetic glycolipid activators of NKT cells as a novel approach to enhance the immunogenicity of rBCG-vectored antigens for induction of CD8+ T cell responses. The glycolipid adjuvant 7DW8-5 may be a promising candidate for advancing to non-human primate and human clinical studies for the development of HIV vaccines based on rBCG vectors.

  3. The Third International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology: Symposium proceedings

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the symposium are presented that are relevant to the generation, detection, and use of the terahertz spectral region for space astronomy and remote sensing of the Earth's upper atmosphere. The program included thirteen sessions covering a wide variety of topics including solid-state oscillators, power-combining techniques, mixers, harmonic multipliers, antennas and antenna arrays, submillimeter receivers, and measurement techniques.

  4. Evidence that Vpu modulates HIV-1 Gag-envelope interaction towards envelope incorporation and infectivity in a cell type dependent manner.

    Archana Gautam

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 Vpu is required for efficient virus particle release from the plasma membrane and intracellular CD4 degradation in infected cells. In the present study, we found that the loss of virus infectivity as a result of envelope (Env incorporation defect caused by a Gag matrix (MA mutation (L30E was significantly alleviated by introducing a start codon mutation in vpu. Inactivation of Vpu partially restored the Env incorporation defect imposed by L30E substitution in MA. This effect was found to be comparable in cell types such as 293T, HeLa, NP2 and GHOST as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM. However, in HeLa cells BST-2 knockdown was found to further alleviate the effect of Vpu inactivation on infectivity of L30E mutant. Our data demonstrated that the impaired infectivity of virus particles due to Env incorporation defect caused by MA mutation was modulated by start codon mutation in Vpu.

  5. Incorporation of Viral Glycoprotein VSV-G Improves the Delivery of DNA by Erythrocyte Ghost into Cells Refractory to Conventional Transfection.

    Liu, Xin; Li, Yun-Pan; Zhong, Zhen-Min; Tan, Hui-Qi; Lin, Hao-Peng; Chen, Shao-Jun; Fu, Yu-Cai; Xu, Wen-Can; Wei, Chi-Ju

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate a novel gene delivery system based on the erythrocyte ghost (EG) integrated with fusogenic viral glycoprotein vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G). VSV-G proteins were harvested as condition medium of Ad293 cells carrying a VSV-G transgene and then incorporated into EG. Plasmid DNA was condensed by various transfection reagents. A luciferase expression construct (pGL3-control) and a DsRed expression cassette (pCMV-DsRed) were used to evaluate the delivery efficiency of DNA/EG/VSV-G complexes. VSV-G proteins could be incorporated into EG in static incubation under acidic conditions as evidenced by the Western blot analysis. Condensed plasmid DNA was bound mostly to the outer surface of EG, which could be detected by electromicroscopy and measured by electrophoresis. EG/VSV-G complexes stimulated the delivery of pGL3-control into Ad293 cells significantly with the luciferase activity increased about 4-fold as compared to that of the control. The delivery of pCMV-DsRed was also enhanced with the percentage of DsRed-positive Ad293 cells increased from 55 % to about 80 %. Moreover, the transfection efficiency in 3T3, HeLa, INS-1, and bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) cells increased about 2-3-fold. Finally, confocal microscopy analysis showed that incorporation of VSV-G significantly enhanced the endocytosis of EG into target cells. In the present study, a novel type of non-viral DNA delivery vehicle consisting of EG and fusogenic VSV-G proteins was formulated, which showed superior transfection efficiency even in cells resistant to classical transfection.

  6. Metabolism of the carbocyclic analogue of (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine in herpes simplex virus-infected cells. Incorporation of C-IVDU into DNA

    De Clercq, E.; Bernaerts, R.; Balzarini, J.; Herdewijn, P.; Verbruggen, A.

    1985-01-01

    The carbocyclic analogues of (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (BVDU) and (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (IVDU), in which the sugar moiety is replaced by a cyclopentane ring and which have been designated as C-BVDU and C-IVDU, respectively, are, like their parent compounds BVDU and IVDU, potent and selective inhibitors of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and, to a lesser extent, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) replication. The authors have now synthesized the radiolabeled C-IVDU analogue, C-[ 125 I]IVDU, and determined its metabolism by HSV-infected and mock-infected Vero cells. C-[ 125 I]IVDU was effectively phosphorylated by HSV-1-infected cells and, to a lesser extent, HSV-2-infected cells. C-[ 125 I]IVDU was not phosphorylated to an appreciable extent by either mock-infected cells or cells that had been infected with a thymidine kinase-deficient mutant of HSV-1. Furthermore, C-[ 125 I]IVDU was incorporated into both viral and cellular DNA of HSV-1-infected Vero cells. This finding represents the first demonstration of the incorporation of a cyclopentylpyrimidine into DNA

  7. Symposium: What Is College English?

    Bloom, Lynn Z.; White, Edward M.; Enoch, Jessica; Hawk, Byron

    2013-01-01

    This symposium explores the role(s) College English has (or has not) had in the scholarly work of four scholars. Lynn Bloom explores the many ways College English influenced her work and the work of others throughout their scholarly lives. Edward M. White examines four articles he has published in College English and draws connections between…

  8. Diversity in the Workplace. Symposium.

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on diversity in the workplace. "Factors That Assist and Barriers That Hinder the Success of Diversity Initiatives in Multinational Corporations" (Rose Mary Wentling) reports that factors that assisted in the success were classified under diversity department, human, and work environment; barriers were…

  9. Indian symposium reviews tsunami response

    Paula Banerjee

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A symposium of academics and human rights activists organised by the Calcutta Research Group assessed the extent to which relief and rehabilitation initiatives in Tamil Nadu and the Andaman and Nicobar islands have recognised the rights of those affected to receive aid without discrimination based on caste, religion or gender.

  10. National symposium on food irradiation

    Beyers, M.; Brodrick, H.T.; Van Niekerk, W.C.A.

    1980-01-01

    This report contains proceedings of papers delivered at the national symposium on food irradiation held in Pretoria. The proceedings have been grouped into the following sections: general background; meat; agricultural products; marketing; and radiation facilities - cost and plant design. Each paper has been submitted separately to INIS. Tables listing irradiated food products cleared for human consumption in different countries are given

  11. 44th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2018-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms.

  12. 2016 Gilbert W. Beebe symposium

    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is hosting the 2016 Gilbert W. Beebe Symposium. Its focus will be on commemorating the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident and discussing the achievements of 30 years of studies on the radiation health effects following the accident and future research directions.

  13. AAAI 1993 Fall Symposium Reports

    Levinson, Robert; Epstein, Susan; Terveen, Loren; Bonasso, R. Peter; Miller, David P.; Bowyer, Kevin; Hall, Lawrence

    1994-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence held its 1993 Fall Symposium Series on October 22-24 in Raleigh, North Carolina. This article contains summaries of the six symposia that were conducted: Automated Deduction in Nonstandard Logics; Games: Planning and Learning; Human-Computer Collaboration: Reconciling Theory, Synthesizing Practice; Instantiating Intelligent Agents; and Machine Learning and Computer Vision: What, Why, and How?

  14. 11. European cosmic ray symposium

    1989-03-01

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific programme was organized under three main headings: Cosmic rays in the heliosphere, Cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, Properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Seven invited talks were indexed seprately for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  15. The VLT Opening Symposium

    1999-02-01

    Scientists Meet in Antofagasta to Discuss Front-Line Astrophysics To mark the beginning of the VLT era, the European Southern Observatory is organizing a VLT Opening Symposium which will take place in Antofagasta (Chile) on 1-4 March 1999, just before the start of regular observations with the ESO Very Large Telescope on April 1, 1999. The Symposium occupies four full days and is held on the campus of the Universidad Catolica del Norte. It consists of plenary sessions on "Science in the VLT Era and Beyond" and three parallel Workshops on "Clusters of Galaxies at High Redshift" , "Star-way to the Universe" and "From Extrasolar Planets to Brown Dwarfs" . There will be many presentations of recent work at the major astronomical facilities in the world. The meeting provides a very useful forum to discuss the latest developments and, in this sense, contributes to the planning of future research with the VLT and other large telescopes. The symposium will be opened with a talk by the ESO Director General, Prof. Riccardo Giacconi , on "Paranal - an observatory for the 21st century". It will be followed by reports about the first scientific results from the main astronomical instruments on VLT UT1, FORS1 and ISAAC. The Symposium participants will see the VLT in operation during special visits to the Paranal Observatory. Press conferences are being arranged each afternoon to inform about the highlights of the conference. After the Symposium, there will be an Official Inauguration Ceremony at Paranal on 5 March Contributions from ESO ESO scientists will make several presentations at the Symposium. They include general reviews of various research fields as well as important new data and results from the VLT that show the great potential of this new astronomical facility. Some of the recent work is described in this Press Release, together with images and spectra of a large variety of objects. Note that all of these data will soon become publicly available via the VLT Archive

  16. IAEA symposium on international safeguards

    1999-01-01

    The eighth IAEA Symposium on International Safeguards was organized by the IAEA in cooperation with the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management and the European Safeguards Research and Development Association. It was attended by over 350 specialists and policy makers in the field of nuclear safeguards and verification from more than 50 countries and organizations. The purpose of the Symposium was to foster a broad exchange of information on concepts and technologies related to important developments in the areas of international safeguards and security. For the first time in the history of the symposia, the IAEA is issuing proceedings free of charge to participants on CD-ROM. The twenty-two plenary, technical, and poster sessions featured topics related to technological and policy aspects from national, regional and global perspectives. The theme of the Symposium: Four Decades of Development - Safeguarding into the New Millennium set the stage for the commemoration of a number of significant events in the annals of safeguards. 1997 marked the Fortieth Anniversary of the IAEA, the Thirtieth Anniversary of the Tlatelolco Treaty, and the Twentieth Anniversary of the Department of Safeguards Member State Support Programmes. There were special events and noted presentations featuring these anniversaries and giving the participants an informative retrospective view of safeguards development over the past four decades. The proceedings of this symposium provide the international community with a comprehensive view of where nuclear safeguards and verification stood in 1997 in terms of the growing demands and expectations. The Symposium offered thoughtful perspectives on where safeguards are headed within the broader context of verification issues. As the world of international nuclear verification looks towards the next millennium, the implementation of the expanding and strengthened safeguards system presents formidable challenges

  17. Incorporation of thymidine into onion root meristematic cell nuclei in presence of hydroxyurea and its role in recovery of mitotic activity

    Habdas, H.

    1977-01-01

    Hydroxyurea treatment of onion roots induced mitotic block which was released by transfer of bulbs to water, and also to some extent by addition of cold or 3 H-thymidine to hydroxyurea solutions. In presence of hydroxyurea there was noted very intense incorporation of 3 H-thymidine into cell nuclei, giving labelling index of 40-70%. However, all the mitotic figures appearing in presence of hydroxyurea and 3 H-thymidine were unlabelled. On the other hand, labelled mitotic figures were obtained when roots incubated with 3 H-thymidine in presence of hydroxyurea had been transferred to water. Incorporation of 3 H-uridine was unaffected by hydroxyurea. The results show that hydroxyurea arrests onion root meristematic cells, either in the S phase and the G 2 phase. Enhanced incorporation of 3 H-thymidine in the presence of hydroxyurea, and release by added thymidine of the mitotic block indicate that hydroxyurea induces in onion root meristematic cells a particular shortage of thymidylate. (author)

  18. Radiation dose to trabecular bone marrow stem cells from 3H, 14C and selected α-emitters incorporated in a bone remodeling compartment

    Nie Huiling; Richardson, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of repeated cubic units representing trabecular bone cavities in adult bone was employed to determine absorbed dose fractions evaluated for 3 H, 14 C and a set of α-emitters incorporated within a bone remodeling compartment (BRC). The BRC consists of a well-oxygenated vascular microenvironment located within a canopy of bone-lining cells. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) considers that an important target for radiation-induced bone cancer is the endosteum marrow layer adjacent to bone surface where quiescent bone stem cells reside. It is proposed that the active stem cells and progenitor cells located above the BRC canopy, the 'BRC stem cell niche', is a more important radiation-induced cancer target volume. Simulation results from a static model, where no remodeling occurs, indicate that the mean dose from bone and bone surface to the 50 μm quiescent bone stem cell niche, the current ICRP target, was substantially lower (two to three times lower) than that to the narrower and hypoxic 10 μm endosteum for 3 H, 14 C and α-particles with energy range 0.5-10 MeV. The results from a dynamic model indicate that the temporal α-radiation dose to active stem/progenitor cells located in the BRC stem cell niche from the material incorporated in and buried by forming bone was 9- to 111-fold greater than the dose to the quiescent bone stem cell niche. This work indicates that the remodeling portion of the bone surface, rather than the quiescent (endosteal) surface, has the greatest risk of radiation-induced bone cancer, particularly from short-range radiation, due to the elevated dose and the radiosensitizing oxygen effect.

  19. 6th International Symposium on Molecular Allergology (ISMA)

    Hilger, Christiane; Swiontek, Kyra; Fischer, J?rg; Hentges, Fran?ois; Lehners, Christiane; Morisset, Martine; Eberlein, Bernadette; Biedermann, Tilo; Ollert, Markus; Wildner, Sabrina; Stemeseder, Teresa; Freier, Regina; Briza, Peter; Lang, Roland; Batanero, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents ORAL ABSTRACTS Symposium 1: Biochemistry, structure and environment of the allergen: what makes a protein an allergen? O1 Two cell-membrane peptidases carrying galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose are implicated in delayed anaphylactic reactions upon pork kidney ingestion in patients with IgE-antibodies to alpha-Gal Christiane Hilger, Kyra Swiontek, Jörg Fischer, François Hentges, Christiane Lehners, Martine Morisset, Bernadette Eberlein, Tilo Biedermann, Markus Ollert O2 Structure...

  20. An in vitro drug sensitivity test using a higher 3H-TdR incorporation and a modified human tumor stem cell assay

    Wang Enzhong

    1991-01-01

    An in vitro drug sensitivity test was developed to evaluate the lethal effects of drugs on human pulmonary carcinoma cells (HPCC). This method was a variant and combination of Human Tumor Stem (HTSCA) and a short-term test using 3 H-TdR incorporation. It consisted of a cell containing liquid top layer and a soft agar bottom layer in 24-well microplates. The medium was RPMI 1640 supplemented with 20% malignant pleural effusion, which could enhance 3 H-TdR incorporation into malignant cells. When 50%, 40%, 30% and 30% of cell survival rate defined as sensitivity-threshold for VCR, MMC, DDP and ADM respectively, in the vitro effectiveness were close to those of clinical single-drug treatment in HPCC by Wright et al. This method was also compared with HTSCA in ten human lung cancer cell lines and four pulmonary carcinoma tissues. The agreement rates were 83% and 100% respectively. Thus we presume this system is more useful for oncological clinics than the others

  1. Phosphatidylserine biosynthesis in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. I. Inhibition of de novo phosphatidylserine biosynthesis by exogenous phosphatidylserine and its efficient incorporation

    Nishijima, M.; Kuge, O.; Akamatsu, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of phosphatidylserine exogenously added to the medium on de novo biosynthesis of phosphatidylserine was investigated in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. When cells were cultured for several generations in medium supplemented with phosphatidylserine and 32 Pi, the incorporation of 32 Pi into cellular phosphatidylserine was remarkably inhibited, the degree of inhibition being dependent upon the concentration of added phosphatidylserine. 32 Pi uptake into cellular phosphatidylethanolamine was also partly reduced by the addition of exogenous phosphatidylserine, consistent with the idea that phosphatidylethanolamine is biosynthesized via decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine. However, incorporation of 32 Pi into phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylinositol was not significantly affected. In contrast, the addition of either phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylethanolamine, or phosphatidylinositol to the medium did not inhibit endogenous biosynthesis of the corresponding phospholipid. Radiochemical and chemical analyses of the cellular phospholipid composition revealed that phosphatidylserine in cells grown with 80 microM phosphatidylserine was almost entirely derived from the added phospholipid. Phosphatidylserine uptake was also directly determined by using [ 3 H]serine-labeled phospholipid. Pulse and pulse-chase experiments with L-[U- 14 C] serine showed that when cells were cultured with 80 microM phosphatidylserine, the rate of synthesis of phosphatidylserine was reduced 3-5-fold. Enzyme assaying of extracts prepared from cells grown with and without phosphatidylserine indicated that the inhibition of de novo phosphatidylserine biosynthesis by the added phosphatidylserine appeared not to be caused by a reduction in the level of the enzyme involved in the base-exchange reaction between phospholipids and serine

  2. Incorporation of mesoporous silica nanoparticles into random electrospun PLGA and PLGA/gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds enhances mechanical and cell proliferation properties

    Mehrasa, Mohammad; Asadollahi, Mohammad Ali; Nasri-Nasrabadi, Bijan; Ghaedi, Kamran; Salehi, Hossein; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-01-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PLGA/gelatin random nanofibrous scaffolds embedded with different amounts of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) were fabricated using electrospinning method. To evaluate the effects of nanoparticles on the scaffolds, physical, chemical, and mechanical properties as well as in vitro degradation behavior of scaffolds were investigated. The mean diameters of nanofibers were 974 ± 68 nm for the pure PLGA scaffolds vs 832 ± 70, 764 ± 80, and 486 ± 64 for the PLGA/gelatin, PLGA/10 wt% MSNPs, and the PLGA/gelatin/10 wt% MSNPs scaffolds, respectively. The results suggested that the incorporation of gelatin and MSNPs into PLGA-based scaffolds enhances the hydrophilicity of scaffolds due to an increase of hydrophilic functional groups on the surface of nanofibers. With porosity examination, it was concluded that the incorporation of MSNPs and gelatin decrease the porosity of scaffolds. Nanoparticles also improved the tensile mechanical properties of scaffolds. Using in vitro degradation analysis, it was shown that the addition of nanoparticles to the nanofibers matrix increases the weight loss percentage of PLGA-based samples, whereas it decreases the weight loss percentage in the PLGA/gelatin composites. Cultivation of rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12), as precursor cells of dopaminergic neural cells, on the scaffolds demonstrated that the introduction of MSNPs into PLGA and PLGA/gelatin matrix leads to improved cell attachment and proliferation and enhances cellular processes. - Highlights: • PLGA-based random nanofibers embedded with mesoporous silica nanoparticles were fabricated using electrospinning method • Incorporation of gelatin and MSNPs into PLGA-based scaffolds increased the hydrophilicity of scaffold • Addition of nanoparticles also improved the tensile mechanical properties of scaffolds • Introduction of MSNPs led to improved cell attachment and proliferation

  3. Incorporation of mesoporous silica nanoparticles into random electrospun PLGA and PLGA/gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds enhances mechanical and cell proliferation properties

    Mehrasa, Mohammad [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Industrial and Environmental Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asadollahi, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: ma.asadollahi@ast.ui.ac.ir [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nasri-Nasrabadi, Bijan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaedi, Kamran [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salehi, Hossein [Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza [DTU Nanotech, Center for Nanomedicine and Theranostics, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Arpanaei, Ayyoob, E-mail: arpanaei@yahoo.com [Department of Industrial and Environmental Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PLGA/gelatin random nanofibrous scaffolds embedded with different amounts of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) were fabricated using electrospinning method. To evaluate the effects of nanoparticles on the scaffolds, physical, chemical, and mechanical properties as well as in vitro degradation behavior of scaffolds were investigated. The mean diameters of nanofibers were 974 ± 68 nm for the pure PLGA scaffolds vs 832 ± 70, 764 ± 80, and 486 ± 64 for the PLGA/gelatin, PLGA/10 wt% MSNPs, and the PLGA/gelatin/10 wt% MSNPs scaffolds, respectively. The results suggested that the incorporation of gelatin and MSNPs into PLGA-based scaffolds enhances the hydrophilicity of scaffolds due to an increase of hydrophilic functional groups on the surface of nanofibers. With porosity examination, it was concluded that the incorporation of MSNPs and gelatin decrease the porosity of scaffolds. Nanoparticles also improved the tensile mechanical properties of scaffolds. Using in vitro degradation analysis, it was shown that the addition of nanoparticles to the nanofibers matrix increases the weight loss percentage of PLGA-based samples, whereas it decreases the weight loss percentage in the PLGA/gelatin composites. Cultivation of rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12), as precursor cells of dopaminergic neural cells, on the scaffolds demonstrated that the introduction of MSNPs into PLGA and PLGA/gelatin matrix leads to improved cell attachment and proliferation and enhances cellular processes. - Highlights: • PLGA-based random nanofibers embedded with mesoporous silica nanoparticles were fabricated using electrospinning method • Incorporation of gelatin and MSNPs into PLGA-based scaffolds increased the hydrophilicity of scaffold • Addition of nanoparticles also improved the tensile mechanical properties of scaffolds • Introduction of MSNPs led to improved cell attachment and proliferation.

  4. Enhanced transfection efficiency of human embryonic stem cells by the incorporation of DNA liposomes in extracellular matrix.

    Villa-Diaz, Luis G; Garcia-Perez, Jose L; Krebsbach, Paul H

    2010-12-01

    Because human embryonic stem (hES) cells can differentiate into virtually any cell type in the human body, these cells hold promise for regenerative medicine. The genetic manipulation of hES cells will enhance our understanding of genes involved in early development and will accelerate their potential use and application for regenerative medicine. The objective of this study was to increase the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA into hES cells by modifying a standard reverse transfection (RT) protocol of lipofection. We hypothesized that immobilization of plasmid DNA in extracellular matrix would be a more efficient method for plasmid transfer due to the affinity of hES cells for substrates such as Matrigel and to the prolonged exposure of cells to plasmid DNA. Our results demonstrate that this modification doubled the transfection efficiency of hES cells and the generation of clonal cell lines containing a piece of foreign DNA stably inserted in their genomes compared to results obtained with standard forward transfection. In addition, treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide further increased the transfection efficiency of hES cells. In conclusion, modifications to the RT protocol of lipofection result in a significant and robust increase in the transfection efficiency of hES cells.

  5. Proceedings of the European Symposium on Pressure Equipment - ESOPE 2004

    2004-01-01

    The symposium on Pressure Equipment Technology, organised every three years by the AFIAP (Association Francaise des Ingenieurs en Appareils a Pression), for the second time is organised at the European level. It is the 'European Symposium on Pressure Equipment, ESOPE 2004'. This symposium is placed under the patronage of the Minister of Industry. The central theme of ESOPE 2001 has been the European Directives for Fixed Equipment (PED) and for Transportable Equipment (TPED). ESOPE 2004 will be a state on the application of these Directives after 3 years of use. The first plenary session will made the comparison of some National codes with EN13445 standard and of the evolution of the Asme code. But the principal theme of the second plenary session and the panel, where European experts will answer to your questions, will be on 'Pressure equipment life management'. It therefore seems important to incorporate this subject into the agenda of this symposium in order to allow widespread dialogue between the industrial members concerned. Our association, AFIAP, has the advantage of regrouping all the industrial partners concerned, from the end user and the administrative body responsible for equipment safety, to the pressure equipment fabricator and his materials suppliers, also including those bodies responsible for design, inspection and certification. To improve availability of equipment and reduce production costs the most efficient way is the development of technology. It is essential to improve competitiveness of European companies. Research is necessary, but the results must be available to everyone, including small and medium-sized industries. ESOPE 2004 has 3 technical sessions in parallel, which will be followed, by many fruitful exchanges of experience: - design/materials - fabrication/welding/inspection - fitness for service. You will find on a CD-Rom all the contributions which have been presented. (authors)

  6. A Real-Time Systems Symposium Preprint.

    1983-09-01

    Real - Time Systems Symposium Preprint Interim Tech...estimate of the occurence of the error. Unclassii ledSECUqITY CLASSIF’ICA T" NO MI*IA If’ inDI /’rrd erter for~~ble. ’Corrputnqg A REAL - TIME SYSTEMS SYMPOSIUM...ABSTRACT This technical report contains a preprint of a paper accepted for presentation at the REAL - TIME SYSTEMS SYMPOSIUM, Arlington,

  7. Radiation-induced DNA damage and repair: Argonne National Laboratory symposium, Argonne, Illinois 60439, 15 April, 1988. Symposium report

    Peak, M J; Peak, J G; Blazek, E R

    1988-10-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory Symposium brought together 109 scientists from five countries to discuss the molecular effects of radiation on DNA and the responses of cells to radiation exposure. Six speakers covered three general areas: (1) DNA damages caused by radiations; (2) repair of these damages in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; and (3) aminothiols as radioprotectors. In addition, a round table discussion chaired by J. Ward dealt with alkaline and neutral elution methodology.

  8. Visualization of the African swine fever virus infection in living cells by incorporation into the virus particle of green fluorescent protein-p54 membrane protein chimera

    Hernaez, Bruno; Escribano, Jose M.; Alonso, Covadonga

    2006-01-01

    Many stages of African swine fever virus infection have not yet been studied in detail. To track the behavior of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in the infected cells in real time, we produced an infectious recombinant ASFV (B54GFP-2) that expresses and incorporates into the virus particle a chimera of the p54 envelope protein fused to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The incorporation of the fusion protein into the virus particle was confirmed immunologically and it was determined that p54-EGFP was fully functional by confirmation that the recombinant virus made normal-sized plaques and presented similar growth curves to the wild-type virus. The tagged virus was visualized as individual fluorescent particles during the first stages of infection and allowed to visualize the infection progression in living cells through the viral life cycle by confocal microscopy. In this work, diverse potential applications of B54GFP-2 to study different aspects of ASFV infection are shown. By using this recombinant virus it was possible to determine the trajectory and speed of intracellular virus movement. Additionally, we have been able to visualize for first time the ASFV factory formation dynamics and the cytophatic effect of the virus in live infected cells. Finally, we have analyzed virus progression along the infection cycle and infected cell death as time-lapse animations

  9. Biomimetic modification of synthetic hydrogels by incorporation of adhesive peptides and calcium phosphate nanoparticles: in vitro evaluation of cell behavior

    M Bongio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of this work was to develop a biocompatible and biomimetic in situ crosslinkable hydrogel scaffold with an instructive capacity for bone regenerative treatment. To this end, synthetic hydrogels were functionalized with two key components of the extracellular matrix of native bone tissue, i.e. the three-amino acid peptide sequence RGD (which is the principal integrin-binding domain responsible for cell adhesion and survival of anchorage-dependent cells and calcium phosphate (CaP nanoparticles in the form of hydroxyapatite (which are similar to the inorganic phase of bone tissue. Rat bone marrow osteoblast-like cells (OBLCs were encapsulated in four different biomaterials (plain oligo(poly(ethylene glycol fumarate (OPF, RGD-modified OPF, OPF enriched with CaP nanoparticles and RGD-modified OPF enriched with CaP nanoparticles and cell survival, cell spreading, proliferation and mineralized matrix formation were determined via cell viability assay, histology and biochemical analysis for alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium. This study showed that RGD peptide sequences promoted cell spreading in OPF hydrogels and hence play a crucial role in cell survival during the early stage of culture, whereas CaP nanoparticles significantly enhanced cell-mediated hydrogel mineralization. Although cell spreading and proliferation activity were inhibited, the combined effect of RGD peptide sequences and CaP nanoparticles within OPF hydrogel systems elicited a better biological response than that of the individual components. Specifically, both a sustained cell viability and mineralized matrix production mediated by encapsulated OBLCs were observed within these novel biomimetic composite systems.

  10. Effects of piracetam on the incorporation of 32P into the phospholipids of neurons and glial cells isolated from rabbit cerebral cortex

    Woelk, H.

    1979-01-01

    In the search for the biochemical basis of the action of Piracetam, the effects of this encephalotropic substance on the neuronal and glial phospholipid metabolism was investigated. Piracetam increases the incorporation of 32 P into phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidyl choline of both glia and neuronal cell bodies. When taking the important role of phosphatidylinoitol in the processes of synaptic transmission and axonal conduction into consideration, the data obtained in the present work suggest that piracetam may stimulate excitatory neurons and may be involved in the process of synaptic transmission. The stimulatory effect of piracetam on the incorporation of 32 P into phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidyl choline appears to be mediated by norepinephrine or another neurotransmitter. (orig.) [de

  11. SaOS-2 cell response to macro-porous boron-incorporated TiO{sub 2} coating prepared by micro-arc oxidation on titanium

    Huang, Qianli [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Elkhooly, Tarek A. [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Ceramics, Inorganic Chemical Industries Division, National Research Centre, Dokki, 12622 Cairo (Egypt); Liu, Xujie [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhang, Ranran; Yang, Xing; Shen, Zhijian [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Feng, Qingling, E-mail: biomater@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of China, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-10-01

    The aims of the present study were to develop boron-incorporated TiO{sub 2} coating (B-TiO{sub 2} coating) through micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and subsequently evaluate the effect of boron incorporation on the in vitro biological performance of the coatings. The physicochemical properties of B-TiO{sub 2} coating and its response to osteoblast like cells (SaOS-2) were investigated compared to the control group without boron (TiO{sub 2} coating). The morphological and X-ray diffraction results showed that both coatings exhibited similar surface topography and phase composition, respectively. However, the incorporation of B led to an enhancement in the surface hydrophilicity of B-TiO{sub 2} coating. The spreading of SaOS-2 cells on B-TiO{sub 2} coating was faster than that on TiO{sub 2} coating. The proliferation rate of SaOS-2 cells cultured on B-TiO{sub 2} decreased after 5 days of culture compared to that on TiO{sub 2} coating. SaOS-2 cells cultured on B-TiO{sub 2} coating exhibited an enhanced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, Collagen I synthesis and in vitro mineralization compared to those on TiO{sub 2} coating. The present findings suggest that B-TiO{sub 2} coating is a promising candidate surface for orthopedic implants. - Highlights: • SaOS-2 cell response to pure TiO{sub 2} and B-TiO{sub 2} coatings was investigated. • Initial cell spreading on B-TiO{sub 2} coating was accelerated compared to that on TiO{sub 2} coating. • Cell proliferation on B-TiO{sub 2} coating was inhibited compared to that on TiO{sub 2} coating. • Cell differentiation on B-TiO{sub 2} coating was enhanced compared to that on TiO{sub 2} coating.

  12. Detection of cell proliferation in adults of the water bear Hypsibius dujardini (Tardigrada) via incorporation of a thymidine analog.

    Gross, V; Bährle, R; Mayer, G

    2018-04-01

    The taxon Tardigrada, commonly called "water bears", consists of microscopic, eight-legged invertebrates that are well known for their ability to tolerate extreme environmental conditions. Their miniscule body size means that tardigrades possess a small total number of cells, the number and arrangement of which may be highly conserved in some organs. Although mitoses have been observed in several organs, the rate and pattern of cell divisions in adult tardigrades has never been characterized. In this study, we incubated live tardigrades over a period of several days with a thymidine analog in order to visualize all cells that had divided during this time. We focus on the midgut, the largest part of the digestive system. Our results show that new cells in the midgut arise from the anterior and posterior ends of this organ and either migrate or divide toward its middle. These cells divide at a constant rate and all cells of the midgut epithelium are replaced in approximately one week. On the other hand, we found no cell divisions in the nervous system or any other major organs, suggesting that the cell turnover of these organs may be extremely slow or dependent on changing environmental conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Incorporation of radioactive sulfate (Na235SO4) by mouse adrenal medullary cells as shown by radioautography

    Munhoz, C.O.G.; Merzel, J.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary radioautographic results, observed in the adreno-medullary cells of mice injected with radiosulfate, suggested that the cells might synthetize sulfur-containing compounds. Only further studies could make-clear if sulfate groups are linked to carbohydrate molecules and/or chromaffin granules [pt

  14. Ninth international symposium on radiopharmacology

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this Symposium is to provide a forum for those international scientists involved in applying the principles of pharmacology and radiation biology to the development of agents for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The program will highlight state-of-the-art progress in the development of those agents used in conjunction with some form of radiation such as radiopharmaceuticals, radiopaques, photo- and radiosensitizing drugs, and neutron capture agents. An underlying pharmacokinetic parameter associated with all these agents is the need for site-specific delivery to an organ or tumor. Therefore, a major goal of the symposium will be to address those pharmacologic principles for targeting molecules to specific tissue sites. Accordingly, session themes will include receptor-mediated processes, membrane transporters, antibody interactions, metabolic trapping, and oligonucleotide-antisense mechanisms

  15. Memorial Symposium for Victor Weisskopf

    2002-01-01

    Victor 'Viki' Weisskopf, former Director General of CERN from 1961 to 1965, passed away five months ago. At that time, the Bulletin dedicated its coverpage to this brilliant physicist (19-20/2002). Now, CERN has organised a Memorial Symposium for next Tuesday 17 September, where you are cordially invited. This tribute will include the following speechs: L. Maiani: Welcome J. D. Jackson: Highlights from the career and scientific works of Victor F. Weisskopf M. Hine and K. Johnsen: Working with Viki at CERN M. Jacob: Knowledge and Wonder A member of Viki's family: Reminiscences. The Memorial Symposium will take place in the Main Auditorium at 15h. Drinks will be served in Pas Perdus at 17h 30.

  16. Ninth international symposium on radiopharmacology

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this Symposium is to provide a forum for those international scientists involved in applying the principles of pharmacology and radiation biology to the development of agents for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The program will highlight state-of-the-art progress in the development of those agents used in conjunction with some form of radiation such as radiopharmaceuticals, radiopaques, photo- and radiosensitizing drugs, and neutron capture agents. An underlying pharmacokinetic parameter associated with all these agents is the need for site-specific delivery to an organ or tumor. Therefore, a major goal of the symposium will be to address those pharmacologic principles for targeting molecules to specific tissue sites. Accordingly, session themes will include receptor-mediated processes, membrane transporters, antibody interactions, metabolic trapping, and oligonucleotide-antisense mechanisms.

  17. Symposium 3 of JENAM 2011

    Georgieva, Katya; Nagovitsyn, Yury; The sun : new challenges

    2012-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the Symposium 3 of JENAM 2011 on new scientific challenges posed by the Sun. The topics covered are   1. The unusual sunspot minimum, which poses challenges to the solar dynamo theory 2. The Sun’s Terra-Hertz emission, which opens a new observational window 3. Corona wave activity 4. Space weather agents - initiation, propagation, and forecasting In 21 in-depth contributions, the reader will be presented with the latest findings.

  18. Memorial symposium for Victor Weisskopf.

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    A memorial symposium for Victor Weisskopf, CERN Director-General from 1961 to 1965, was held at CERN on 17 September 2002. Photo 01: L. Maiani: Welcome.Photo 02: J. D. Jackson: Highlights from the career and scientific works of Victor F. Weisskopf.Photos 05 09: M. Hine and K. Johnsen: Working with Viki at CERN.Photo 10: M. Jacob: Knowledge and Wonder.Photo 14: K. Worth (Viki's daughter): Reminiscences.

  19. Scandinavian Symposium on Reactor Waste

    1981-09-01

    More than 100 delegates forom the Scandinavian countries were gathered for a symposium on September 14-16 1981 at Kungaelv Sweden to discuss nuclear reactor waste. The organisation for the handling of radioactive waste at different countries was presented and the principles of radioactive safety were discussed. The planning of the deposition and storage of waste was described. The proceedings are reproduced on some twenty papers, a number of them written in English. (G.B.)

  20. Symposium on Nuclear Energy. Proceedings

    1981-01-01

    The energy problem poses a big challenge to a developing country like the Philippines. The development of renewable energy sources is not enough. Aware then of the limitations of these energy sources, in spite of arguments against nuclear energy we have no other recourse but to go nuclear. This symposium emphasizes the importance of energy development to attain the country's progress and discusses the pros and economics of nuclear power. (RTD)

  1. National symposium on food irradiation

    1979-10-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers delivered at the National symposium on food irradiation held in Pretoria. The abstracts have been grouped into the following sections: General background, meat, agricultural products, marketing and radiation facilities - cost and plant design. Each abstract has been submutted separately to INIS. Tables listing irradiated food products cleared for human consumption in different countries are given as well as a table listing those irradiated food items that have been cleared in South Africa

  2. Rapporteurs report of the symposium

    Myerscough, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the symposium was to share current practice, experiences and innovations within the management of contaminated metallic radioactive material. The symposium was a forum for: Learning about current practices, Highlight strategic issues related to metals recycling, Exchange of experiences, Discussion of innovative and new techniques and needs for improvements, Developing and maintenance of networks in the area of metals recycling. The aim was to bring together operators, regulators, decision makers, scientists, consultants, contractors and other stakeholders. A short introduction by representatives from Studsvik, IAEA and OECD/NEA started the symposium followed by presentations by invited speakers from international organisations. Seven topical sessions covered issues relating to: 1 - Regulations and recommendations: - International recommendations and national legislation, - Application of regulations, - Regulator views; 2 - Minimising waste amounts: - Experience in minimising the generation of waste in the form of radioactive or potentially radioactive metals, - Activities to minimise the waste volumes for disposal; 3 - Characterisation and categorisation of metals to be recycled; 4 - Decontamination of metals for clearance; 5 - Melting of metals for clearance, reuse or volume reduction; 6 - Best practice in management of metals for clearance and recycling; 7 - Sustainability and public acceptance. Each session contained three to five presentations and group discussions. Each session was concluded with a short analysis of the presentations and the outcome of the group discussions. Conclusions of each session and outcome of the group discussions were presented on a Summing up the third day. The symposium also held a poster session with topics as above. This report provides a short summary of the various presentations and discussions concentrating on the key messages and outcomes of the sessions

  3. Proceedings of the 2016 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium.

    Elmore, Susan A; Chen, Vivian S; Hayes-Bouknight, Schantel; Hoane, Jessica S; Janardhan, Kyathanahalli; Kooistra, Linda H; Nolte, Thomas; Szabo, Kathleen A; Willson, Gabrielle A; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Malarkey, David E

    2017-01-01

    The 2016 annual National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium, entitled "Pathology Potpourri" was held in San Diego, CA, at the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's (STP) 35th annual meeting. The goal of this symposium was to present and discuss challenging diagnostic pathology and/or nomenclature issues. This article presents summaries of the speakers' talks, along with select images that were used by the audience for voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included malignant glioma and histiocytic sarcoma in the rodent brain; a new statistical method designed for histopathology data evaluation; uterine stromal/glandular polyp in a rat; malignant plasma cell tumor in a mouse brain; Schwann cell proliferative lesions in rat hearts; axillary schwannoma in a cat; necrosis and granulomatous inflammation in a rat brain; adenoma/carcinoma in a rat adrenal gland; hepatocyte maturation defect and liver/spleen hematopoietic defects in an embryonic mouse; distinguishing malignant glioma, malignant mixed glioma, and malignant oligodendroglioma in the rat; comparison of mammary gland whole mounts and histopathology from mice; and discussion of the International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria collaborations.

  4. An amino acid depleted cell-free protein synthesis system for the incorporation of non-canonical amino acid analogs into proteins.

    Singh-Blom, Amrita; Hughes, Randall A; Ellington, Andrew D

    2014-05-20

    Residue-specific incorporation of non-canonical amino acids into proteins is usually performed in vivo using amino acid auxotrophic strains and replacing the natural amino acid with an unnatural amino acid analog. Herein, we present an efficient amino acid depleted cell-free protein synthesis system that can be used to study residue-specific replacement of a natural amino acid by an unnatural amino acid analog. This system combines a simple methodology and high protein expression titers with a high-efficiency analog substitution into a target protein. To demonstrate the productivity and efficacy of a cell-free synthesis system for residue-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in vitro, we use this system to show that 5-fluorotryptophan and 6-fluorotryptophan substituted streptavidin retain the ability to bind biotin despite protein-wide replacement of a natural amino acid for the amino acid analog. We envisage this amino acid depleted cell-free synthesis system being an economical and convenient format for the high-throughput screening of a myriad of amino acid analogs with a variety of protein targets for the study and functional characterization of proteins substituted with unnatural amino acids when compared to the currently employed in vivo methodologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fabrication and Characterization of Chitosan Nanoparticle-Incorporated Quaternized Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Composite Membranes as Solid Electrolytes for Direct Methanol Alkaline Fuel Cells

    Li, Pin-Chieh; Liao, Guan–Ming; Kumar, S. Rajesh; Shih, Chao-Ming; Yang, Chun-Chen; Wang, Da-Ming; Lue, Shingjiang Jessie

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Preparation of chitosan nanoparticles from bulk to enhance the degree of deacetylation. • The incorporation of chitosan nanoparticles into a QPVA matrix to form a nanocomposite membrane. • The nanocomposite constructed into thin-film membranes using the solution casting method. • To improve permeability, glutaraldehyde was cross-linked with the nanocomposite membranes. • A direct methanol alkaline fuel cell was studied at different temperatures. - Abstract: In this study, we designed a method for the preparation of chitosan nanoparticles incorporated into a quaternized poly(vinyl alcohol) (QPVA) matrix for direct methanol alkaline fuel cells (DMAFCs). The structural and morphological properties of the prepared nanocomposites were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and dynamic laser-light scattering (DLS). The crystallinity of the nanocomposite solid electrolytes containing 0 and 10% chitosan nanoparticles were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The electrochemical measurement of resulting nanocomposite membranes were analyzed according to the following parameters: methanol permeability, liquid uptakes, ionic conductivity and cell performances. The composite membranes with 10% chitosan nanoparticles in a QPVA matrix (CQPVA) show suppressed methanol permeability and higher ionic conductivity than pristine QPVA. In addition, the glutaraldehyde cross-linked nanocomposite film exhibited improvement on the methanol barrier property at 80 °C. The peak power density of the DMAFCs reached 67 mW cm −2 when fed into 1 M of methanol in 6 M of KOH.

  6. European symposium on cytometry

    1987-01-01

    This book of abstracts contains 59 contributions about cervical prescreening, expert systems, breast cancer, ploidy analysis, system and data evaluation, sampling, preparation and staining, image cytometry, general cytometry, cell kinetics with clinical applications. (AJ)

  7. Selenium Incorporated Cationic Organochalcogen: Live Cell Compatible and Highly Photostable Molecular Stain for Imaging and Localization of Intracellular DNA.

    Gaur, Pankaj; Kumar, Ajay; Dey, Gourab; Kumar, Rajendra; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli; Ghosh, Subrata

    2016-05-04

    Successful integration of selenium unit into a newly designed cationic chemical architecture led to the development of a highly photostable molecular maker PA5 to be used in fluorescence microscopy as cellular nucleus staining agent for longer duration imaging under continuous laser illumination. Adaptation of a targeted single-atom modification strategy led to the development of a series of proficient DNA light-up probes (PA1-PA5). Further, their comparative photophysical studies in the presence of DNA revealed the potential of electron rich heteroatoms of chalcogen family in improving binding efficiency and specificity of molecular probes toward DNA. The findings of cell studies confirmed the outstanding cell compatibility of probe PA5 in terms of cell permeability, biostability, and extremely low cytotoxicity. Moreover, the photostability experiment employing continuous laser illumination in solution phase as well as in cell assay (both fixed and live cells) revealed the admirable photobleaching resistance of PA5. Finally, while investigating the phototoxicity of PA5, the probe was found not to exhibit light-induced toxicity even when irradiated for longer duration. All these experimental results demonstrated the promising standing of PA5 as a futuristic cell compatible potential stain for bioimaging and temporal profiling of DNA.

  8. Crispy Cracks Symposium Explores Crispness and Water Management

    Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, van T.

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the first international symposium on crispness creation and retention. The symposium, entitled, ¿Crispy Cracks Symposium,¿ was organized by Cereals & Europe and TI Food and Nutrition. The symposium contained three sessions: 1) Crispiness¿The Fundamentals; 2)

  9. Incorporation of thymidine into onion root meristematic cell nuclei in presence of hydroxyurea and its role in recovery of mitotic activity

    H. Habdas

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyurea treatment of onion roots induced mitotic block which was released by transfer of bulbs to water, and also to some extent by addition of cold or 3H-thymidine to hydroxyurea solutions. In presence of hydroxyurea there was noted very intense incorporation of 3H-thymidine into cell nuclei, giving labelling index of 40-70%. However, all the mitotic figures appearing in presence of hydroxyurea and 3H-thymidine were unlabelled. On the other hand, labelled mitotic figures were obtained wh...

  10. Enhanced conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells using a CNT-incorporated TiO2 slurry-based photoanode

    Jiaoping Cai; Zexiang Chen; Jun Li; Yan Wang; Dong Xiang; Jijun Zhang; Hai Li

    2015-01-01

    A new titanium dioxide (TiO2) slurry formulation is herein reported for the fabrication of TiO2 photoanode for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The prepared TiO2 photoanode featured a highly uniform mesoporous structure with well-dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles. The energy conversion efficiency of the resulting TiO2 slurry-based DSSC was ∼63% higher than that achieved by a DSSC prepared using a commercial TiO2 slurry. Subsequently, the incorporation of acid-treated multi-walled carbon ...

  11. Symposium on Differential Geometry and Differential Equations

    Berger, Marcel; Bryant, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The DD6 Symposium was, like its predecessors DD1 to DD5 both a research symposium and a summer seminar and concentrated on differential geometry. This volume contains a selection of the invited papers and some additional contributions. They cover recent advances and principal trends in current research in differential geometry.

  12. Conserving biodiversity on native rangelands: Symposium proceedings

    Daniel W. Uresk; Greg L. Schenbeck; James T. O' Rourke

    1997-01-01

    These proceedings are the result of a symposium, "Conserving biodiversity on native rangelands" held on August 17, 1995 in Fort Robinson State Park, NE. The purpose of this symposium was to provide a forum to discuss how elements of rangeland biodiversity are being conserved today. We asked, "How resilient and sustainable are rangeland systems to the...

  13. 4th International Language Management Symposium

    Prošek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 3 (2016), s. 233-240 ISSN 0037-7031. [international language management symposium] Institutional support: RVO:68378092 Keywords : language management theory * international language symposium * language management Subject RIV: AI - Linguistics OBOR OECD: Linguistics Impact factor: 0.625, year: 2016

  14. Coal economics and taxation discussed at symposium

    1978-06-01

    Some of the highlights from the Symposium on Coal Economics and Taxation Symposium, Regina Saskatchewan May 7-9, 1978, sponsored by the Coal Association of Canada are presented. Investment, provincial policy, sources of funds, uncertainty, tax policies, and operating costs are discussed.

  15. 6th European symposium on uroradiology

    Bujlov, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    Materials of the 6th European symposium on uroradiology held in Strasbourg (France) in September, 1998. Symposium topics included problems of radiological diagnosis of kidneys, renovascular hypertension, man and woman sterility, pelvis organs of men and women, functional studies of lower urinary tract, pediatric and interventional uroradiology. Great attention is paid to magnetic resonance tomography, ultrasonography and conventional biomedical radiography [ru

  16. Proton conducting membranes prepared by incorporation of organophosphorus acids into alcohol barrier polymers for direct methanol fuel cells

    Jiang, Zhongyi; Zheng, Xiaohong; Wu, Hong; Pan, Fusheng

    A novel type of DMFC membrane was developed via incorporation of organophosphorus acids (OPAs) into alcohol barrier materials (polyvinyl alcohol/chitosan, PVA/CS) to simultaneously acquire high proton conductivity and low methanol permeability. Three kinds of OPAs including amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP), ethylene diamine tetra(methylene phosphonic acid) (EDTMP) and hexamethylene diamine tetra(methylene phosphonic acid) (HDTMP), with different molecular structure and phosphonic acid groups content were added into PVA/CS blends and served the dual functions as proton conductor as well as crosslinker. The as-prepared OPA-doped PVA/CS membranes exhibited remarkably enhanced proton conducting ability, 2-4 times higher than that of the pristine PVA/CS membrane, comparable with that for Nafion ®117 membrane (5.04 × 10 -2 S cm -1). The highest proton conductivities 3.58 × 10 -2, 3.51 × 10 -2 and 2.61 × 10 -2 S cm -1 for ATMP-, EDTMP- and HDTMP-doped membranes, respectively were all achieved at highest initial OPA doping content (23.1 wt.%) at room temperature. The EDTMP-doped PVA/CS membrane with an acid content of 13.9 wt.% showed the lowest methanol permeability of 2.32 × 10 -7 cm 2 s -1 which was 16 times lower than that of Nafion ®117 membrane. In addition, the thermal stability and oxidative durability were both significantly improved by the incorporation of OPAs in comparison with pristine PVA/CS membranes.

  17. Proton conducting membranes prepared by incorporation of organophosphorus acids into alcohol barrier polymers for direct methanol fuel cells

    Jiang, Zhongyi; Zheng, Xiaohong; Wu, Hong; Pan, Fusheng [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2008-10-15

    A novel type of DMFC membrane was developed via incorporation of organophosphorus acids (OPAs) into alcohol barrier materials (polyvinyl alcohol/chitosan, PVA/CS) to simultaneously acquire high proton conductivity and low methanol permeability. Three kinds of OPAs including amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP), ethylene diamine tetra(methylene phosphonic acid) (EDTMP) and hexamethylene diamine tetra(methylene phosphonic acid) (HDTMP), with different molecular structure and phosphonic acid groups content were added into PVA/CS blends and served the dual functions as proton conductor as well as crosslinker. The as-prepared OPA-doped PVA/CS membranes exhibited remarkably enhanced proton conducting ability, 2-4 times higher than that of the pristine PVA/CS membrane, comparable with that for Nafion {sup registered} 117 membrane (5.04 x 10{sup -2} S cm{sup -1}). The highest proton conductivities 3.58 x 10{sup -2}, 3.51 x 10{sup -2} and 2.61 x 10{sup -2} S cm{sup -1} for ATMP-, EDTMP- and HDTMP-doped membranes, respectively were all achieved at highest initial OPA doping content (23.1 wt.%) at room temperature. The EDTMP-doped PVA/CS membrane with an acid content of 13.9 wt.% showed the lowest methanol permeability of 2.32 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} which was 16 times lower than that of Nafion {sup registered} 117 membrane. In addition, the thermal stability and oxidative durability were both significantly improved by the incorporation of OPAs in comparison with pristine PVA/CS membranes. (author)

  18. Neural-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells incorporated into muscle stuffed vein scaffold forms a stable living nerve conduit.

    Hassan, Nur Hidayah; Sulong, Ahmad Fadzli; Ng, Min-Hwei; Htwe, Ohnmar; Idrus, Ruszymah B H; Roohi, Sharifah; Naicker, Amaramalar S; Abdullah, Shalimar

    2012-10-01

    Autologous nerve grafts to bridge nerve gaps have donor site morbidity and possible neuroma formation resulting in development of various methods of bridging nerve gaps without using autologous nerve grafts. We have fabricated an acellular muscle stuffed vein seeded with differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a substitute for nerve autografts. Human vein and muscle were both decellularized by liquid nitrogen immersion with subsequent hydrolysis in hydrochloric acid. Human MSCs were subjected to a series of treatments with a reducing agent, retinoic acid, and a combination of trophic factors. The differentiated MSCs were seeded on the surface of acellular muscle tissue and then stuffed into the vein. Our study showed that 35-75% of the cells expressed neural markers such as S100b, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), p75 NGF receptor, and Nestin after differentiation. Histological and ultra structural analyses of muscle stuffed veins showed attachment of cells onto the surface of the acellular muscle and penetration of the cells into the hydrolyzed fraction of muscle fibers. We implanted these muscle stuffed veins into athymic mice and at 8 weeks post-implantation, the acellular muscle tissue had fully degraded and replaced with new matrix produced by the seeded cells. The vein was still intact and no inflammatory reactions were observed proving the biocompatibility and biodegradability of the conduit. In conclusion, we have successfully formed a stable living nerve conduit which may serve as a substitute for autologous nerves. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  19. Somatostatin reduces 3H-thymidine incorporation and c-myc, but not thyroglobulin ribonucleic acid levels in human thyroid follicular cells in vitro

    degli Uberti, E.C.; Hanau, S.; Rossi, R.; Piva, R.; Margutti, A.; Trasforini, G.; Pansini, G.; del Senno, L.

    1991-01-01

    The action of somatostatin (SRIH) on 3 H-thymidine (thy) incorporation and on c-myc and thyroglobulin RNA levels in a suspension of follicles from normal and goitrous human thyroid was examined. SRIH, at 10 - 7 M concentration, inhibited basal thy incorporation (maximally by 4 h lasting for up 24 h), which effect was greater in goiter than in normal thyroid and was also detected in growing adherent epithelial cells. Moreover, in a follicle suspension SRIH prevented TSH-stimulated thy incorporation, both in normal and in goitrous thyroid. Basal expression of c-myc RNA was not affected by SRIH in either tissue, whereas the TSH-stimulated c-myc RNA level was significantly reduced in goiter. No effect of SRIH was observed on basal or TSH-stimulated thyroglobulin RNA levels. SRIH did not alter basal cAMP concentrations in normal or goitrous follicles, but it significantly reduced TSH-stimulated cAMP accumulation both in normal thyroid and in goiter. Overall, our data indicate a direct inhibitory action of SRIH on growth, but not on differentiation, of human thyroid, probably by a mechanism not entirely cAMP dependent

  20. The N-Linked Outer Chain Mannans and the Dfg5p and Dcw1p Endo-α-1,6-Mannanases Are Needed for Incorporation of Candida albicans Glycoproteins into the Cell Wall

    Ao, Jie; Chinnici, Jennifer L.; Maddi, Abhiram

    2015-01-01

    A biochemical pathway for the incorporation of cell wall protein into the cell wall of Neurospora crassa was recently proposed. In this pathway, the DFG-5 and DCW-1 endo-α-1,6-mannanases function to covalently cross-link cell wall protein-associated N-linked galactomannans, which are structurally related to the yeast outer chain mannans, into the cell wall glucan-chitin matrix. In this report, we demonstrate that the mannosyltransferase enzyme Och1p, which is needed for the synthesis of the N-linked outer chain mannan, is essential for the incorporation of cell wall glycoproteins into the Candida albicans cell wall. Using endoglycosidases, we show that C. albicans cell wall proteins are cross-linked into the cell wall via their N-linked outer chain mannans. We further demonstrate that the Dfg5p and Dcw1p α-1,6-mannanases are needed for the incorporation of cell wall glycoproteins into the C. albicans cell wall. Our results support the hypothesis that the Dfg5p and Dcw1p α-1,6-mannanases incorporate cell wall glycoproteins into the C. albicans cell wall by cross-linking outer chain mannans into the cell wall glucan-chitin matrix. PMID:26048011

  1. Symposium on Electrochemical and Thermal Modeling of Battery, Fuel Cell, and Photoenergy Conversion Systems, San Diego, CA, Oct. 20-22, 1986, Proceedings

    Selman, J. Robert; Maru, Hans C.

    Papers are presented on modeling of the zinc chlorine battery, design modeling of zinc/bromine battery systems, the modeling of aluminum-air battery systems, and a point defect model for a nickel electrode structure. Also considered are the impedance of a tubular electrode under laminar flow, mathematical modeling of a LiAl/Cl2 cell with a gas diffusion Cl2 electrode, ultrahigh power batteries, and battery thermal modeling. Other topics include an Na/beta-alumina/NaAlCl4, Cl2/C circulating cell, leakage currents in electrochemical systems having common electrodes, modeling for CO poisoning of a fuel cell anode, electrochemical corrosion of carbonaceous materials, and electrolyte management in molten carbonate fuel cells.

  2. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  3. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  4. Photovoltaic performance enhancement of dye-sensitized solar cells by incorporating poly(sodium-4-styrenesulfonate)-physisorbed MWCNTs into photoelectrode

    Shih, Yen-Chen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chia-Wen [Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lin, King-Fu, E-mail: kflin@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with the surface physisorbed by poly(sodium-4-styrenesulfonate) (denoted as NaPSS-MWCNTs) were able to well disperse in the TiO{sub 2} paste, resulting in the increase of anatase crystalline phase and higher light transmittance after casting into film and sintering. To fabricate the photoelectrode for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), incorporating 0.03 wt% NaPSS-MWCNTs into the TiO{sub 2} mesoporous film increased the short-circuit current density (Jsc) from 18.85 ± 0.04 to 20.68 ± 0.11 mA/cm{sup 2} and power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 7.86 ± 0.05 to 8.42 ± 0.02% under AM 1.5 illumination at full sunlight. It suggested that well dispersed MWCNTs provided not only extra electron transport channels among TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles but also more light absorption of ruthenium dyes leading to higher Jsc and PCE. - Highlights: • MWCNTs physisorbed by NaPSS are able to well disperse in the TiO{sub 2} paste. • Incorporation of NaPSS-MWCNTs increases the anatase crystalline phase of TiO{sub 2}. • Incorporation of NaPSS-MWCNTs increases the light transmittance of TiO{sub 2}. • Incorporation of NaPSS-MWCNTs to the TiO{sub 2} photoanode of DSSC increases Jsc and PCE.

  5. Incorporation of Ortho- and Meta-Tyrosine Into Cellular Proteins Leads to Erythropoietin-Resistance in an Erythroid Cell Line

    Esztella Mikolás

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Erythropoietin-resistance is an unsolved concern in the treatment of renal anaemia. We aimed to investigate the possible role of ortho- and meta-tyrosine - the hydroxyl free radical products of L-phenylalanine - in the development of erythropoietin-resistance. Methods: TF-1 erythroblast cell line was used. Cell concentration was determined on day 1; 2 and 3 by two independent observers simultaneously in Bürker cell counting chambers. Protein concentration was determined with colorimetric method. Para-, ortho- and meta-tyrosine levels were measured using reverse phase-HPLC with fluorescence detection. Using Western blot method activating phosphorylation of STAT5 and ERK1/2 were investigated. Results: We found a time- and concentration-dependent decrease of erythropoietin-induced proliferative activity in case of ortho- and meta-tyrosine treated TF-1 erythroblasts, compared to the para-tyrosine cultured cells. Decreased erythropoietin-response could be regained with a competitive dose of para-tyrosine. Proteins of erythroblasts treated by ortho- or meta-tyrosine had lower para-tyrosine and higher ortho- or meta-tyrosine content. Activating phosphorylation of ERK and STAT5 due to erythropoietin was practically prevented by ortho- or meta-tyrosine treatment. Conclusion: According to this study elevated ortho- and meta-tyrosine content of erythroblasts may lead to the dysfunction of intracellular signaling, resulting in erythropoietin-hyporesponsiveness.

  6. Tracking heavy water (D2O) incorporation for identifying and sorting active microbial cells

    Berry, David; Mader, Esther; Lee, Tae Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities are essential to the function of virtually all ecosystems and eukaryotes, including humans. However, it is still a major challenge to identify microbial cells active under natural conditions in complex systems. In this study, we developed a new method to identify and sort ac...

  7. Incorporation of stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha in PCL/gelatin electrospun membranes for guided bone regeneration

    Ji, W.; Yang, F.; Ma, J.L.; Bouma, M.J.; Boerman, O.C.; Chen, Z.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Jansen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of membrane functionalization with a chemotactic factor on cell recruitment and bone formation in order to develop a bioactive membrane for guided bone regeneration (GBR) applications. To this end. GBR membranes were prepared by electrospinning using

  8. Presentation to the symposium

    Goodhead, D.

    1997-01-01

    A novel theory, the Second Event theory, advanced by Chris Busby, suggested that certain man-made radioisotopes could bypass cellular genetic repair mechanisms and cause cancer at very low dose. The present paper, after some introductory comments on the effects of particle tracks on cells, goes on to present the author's own perception of this Second Event theory. (UK)

  9. Stimulation of neural differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields incorporated with MNPs.

    Choi, Yun-Kyong; Lee, Dong Heon; Seo, Young-Kwon; Jung, Hyun; Park, Jung-Keug; Cho, Hyunjin

    2014-10-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) have been investigated as a new cell-therapeutic solution due to their capacity that could differentiate into neural-like cells. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) therapy has emerged as a novel technique, using mechanical stimulus to differentiate hBM-MSCs and significantly enhance neuronal differentiation to affect cellular and molecular reactions. Magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs) have recently achieved widespread use for biomedical applications and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-labeled nanoparticles are used to increase their circulation time, aqueous solubility, biocompatibility, and nonspecific cellular uptake as well as to decrease immunogenicity. Many studies have used MNP-labeled cells for differentiation, but there have been no reports of MNP-labeled neural differentiation combined with EMFs. In this study, synthesized PEG-phospholipid encapsulated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles are used on hBM-MSCs to improve their intracellular uptake. The PEGylated nanoparticles were exposed to the cells under 50 Hz of EMFs to improve neural differentiation. First, we measured cell viability and intracellular iron content in hBM-MSCs after treatment with MNPs. Analysis was conducted by RT-PCR, and immunohistological analysis using neural cell type-specific genes and antibodies after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields. These results suggest that electromagnetic fields enhance neural differentiation in hBM-MSCs incorporated with MNPs and would be an effective method for differentiating neural cells.

  10. Exogenous incorporation of neugc-rich mucin augments n-glycolyl sialic acid content and promotes malignant phenotype in mouse tumor cell lines

    Alonso Daniel F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbohydrates embedded in the plasma membrane are one of the main actors involved in the communication of cells with the microenvironment. Neuraminic sialic acids are glycocalyx sugars that play important roles in the modulation of malignant cell behaviour. N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc is synthesized by the cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH, an enzyme expressed in all mammals except humans. In mice, this sugar is synthesized in several somatic tissues. Methods We used the B16 melanoma and F3II mammary carcinoma mouse tumor cell lines. By CMAH directed RT-PCR and NeuGc detection with the specific anti-NeuGc-GM3 antibody 14F7 we evaluated enzyme and ganglioside expression in tumor cells, respectively. Expression of NeuGc-GM3 ganglioside was reached by in vitro incubation with NeuGc-rich bovine submaxillary mucin and evaluated by slot-blot and immunohistochemistry assays using the 14F7 antibody. Tumor cells treated with mucin or purified NeuGc were injected s.c. and i.v. in syngeneic mice to evaluate tumor and metastatic growth. Results In the present work we demonstrated the absence of expression of CMAH enzyme in B16 melanoma and F3II mammary carcinoma cells. In vitro incubation of these NeuGc-negative cells with NeuGc-rich mucin increased the presence of NeuGc in cell membranes for at least 48-72 h, as a component of the GM3 ganglioside. Preincubation with NeuGc-rich mucin reduced tumor latency and increased the metastatic potential of tumor cells in syngeneic animals. Similar results were obtained when cells were incubated with purified NeuGc alone. Conclusion Our results indicate that B16 and F3II mouse tumor cell lines do not express NeuGc in cell membranes but they are able to incorporate NeuGc from an exogenous source, contributing to the malignant phenotype of melanoma and mammary carcinoma cells.

  11. Rapid, High-Throughput, and Direct Molecular Beacon Delivery to Human Cancer Cells Using a Nanowire-Incorporated and Pneumatic Pressure-Driven Microdevice.

    Kim, Kyung Hoon; Kim, Jung; Choi, Jong Seob; Bae, Sunwoong; Kwon, Donguk; Park, Inkyu; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2015-12-01

    Tracking and monitoring the intracellular behavior of mRNA is of paramount importance for understanding real-time gene expression in cell biology. To detect specific mRNA sequences, molecular beacons (MBs) have been widely employed as sensing probes. Although numerous strategies for MB delivery into the target cells have been reported, many issues such as the cytotoxicity of the carriers, dependence on the random probability of MB transfer, and critical cellular damage still need to be overcome. Herein, we have developed a nanowire-incorporated and pneumatic pressure-driven microdevice for rapid, high-throughput, and direct MB delivery to human breast cancer MCF-7 cells to monitor survivin mRNA expression. The proposed microdevice is composed of three layers: a pump-associated glass manifold layer, a monolithic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane, and a ZnO nanowire-patterned microchannel layer. The MB is immobilized on the ZnO nanowires by disulfide bonding, and the glass manifold and PDMS membrane serve as a microvalve, so that the cellular attachment and detachment on the MB-coated nanowire array can be manipulated. The combination of the nanowire-mediated MB delivery and the microvalve function enable the transfer of MB into the cells in a controllable way with high cell viability and to detect survivin mRNA expression quantitatively after docetaxel treatment. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Influence of incorporated bromodeoxyuridine on the induction of chromosomal alterations by ionizing radiation and long-wave UV in CHO cells.

    Zwanenburg, T S; van Zeeland, A A; Natarajan, A T

    1985-01-01

    Incorporation of BrdUrd into nuclear DNA sensitizes CHO cells (1) to the induction of chromosomal aberrations by X-rays and 0.5 MeV neutrons and (2) to induction of chromosomal aberrations and SCEs by lw-UV. We have attempted to establish a correlation between induced chromosomal alterations and induced single- or double-strand breaks in DNA. The data show that while DSBs correlate very well with X-ray-induced aberrations, no clear correlation could be established between lw-UV induced SSBs (including alkali-labile sites) and chromosomal alterations. In addition the effect of 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) on the induction of chromosomal aberrations and SCEs induced by lw-UV has been determined. It is shown that 3AB is without any effect when lw-UV-irradiated cells are posttreated with this inhibitor. The significance of these results is discussed.

  13. Incorporation of [1-C14] Isopentenyl Pyrophosphate into Carotenoids and Homo carotenoids using a Cell-free Preparation of Micrococcus Luteus

    Al-Wandawi, H.

    1998-01-01

    The early steps up to the formation of acyclic unsaturated carotenes (e.g.,phytoene to lycopene) are presumed to be common to the biosynthesis of all carotenoids with 40 or more carbon atoms, nevertheless, no direct evidence so far available to confirm this for homo carotenoids (c 45 and c 50 carotenoids). In the present study, an active cell-free preparation was obtained from diphenylamine-inhibited cells of Micrococcus Iuteus and found to be capable to incorporate radioactivity from Isopentenyl pyrophosphate (labelled with C-14)into carotenoids and homo carotenoids, providing for the first time a direct evidence which suggests that both carotenoids and homo carotenoids are sharing the same biological origin. Furthermore, the technique developed in this study may be considered as a valuable method for preparation of biological-active labelled compounds which may have some advantages over conventional chemical syntheses methods

  14. Kinetics of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into nuclei of cells of the regenerating liver of rats exposed to various doses of x rays

    Aksenovich, T I; Polishchuk, A M [AN SSSR, Novosibirsk. Inst. Tsitologii i Genetiki

    1976-01-01

    Action of x radiation on the incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into nuclei of cells of the regenerating liver of rats has been studied. A whole-body exposure of rats to 150 to 300 R has been found to inhibit /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake into DNA of S-cells of the regenerating liver, and this effect can be attributed to the inhibition of DNA synthesis rather than to changes in the concentration of a label in the intracellular pool of DNA precursors. In addition to the DNA synthesis decrease, inhibition of the label uptake into the pool is observed after doses of 600 to 1200 R. On the basis of the data obtained, a hypothesis is proposed that explains the mechanism of inhibition of DNA synthesis under the action of radiation.

  15. International symposium 'Energetics 2004'. Symposium proceedings. Book 1

    2004-01-01

    The holding of this Symposium was initiated by ZEMAK - Macedonian Energy Association that for the last tens of years established itself in the national and international scientific and professional circles as a competent association of professionals with the main goal to follow, promote and improve the energy sector in the country. Having in mind the fact that the power energy sector as a fundamental sector plays a main role in the development and the improvement of the rest of the industry, and in the same time has a tremendous impact on the sustainable development of the entire economy of a country, power energy sector in fact has the paramount importance in the business environment of our country. Thus, ZEMAK has historically important role as a responsible and permanent driver, promoter and initiator for resolving of all-important questions directly or indirectly interconnected with the power energy sector in the country, and therefore the entire economy in the country as well. Following the past, ZEMAK had and would always have needs of organizing national and international symposiums and workshops as a panel where directly at one place national and international power energy experts could initiate, debate and resolve all up-to-date questions in the present energy sector in Macedonia, could analyze the modern world trends in the energy sector and try to find appropriate models for their application for further development and improvement of the energy sector in our country. This international symposium has the main goal to concentrate on a single place everybody who has power energy as a permanent preoccupation and/or vocation and professional interest. To aggregate on one place various experts, from the Academy and Universities, from the business circles and companies who are preoccupied with power energy directly or indirectly in their everyday life and work. During the Symposium more than 90 scientific and/or professional papers were presented and discussed

  16. 14. European cosmic ray symposium. Symposium program and abstracts

    1994-08-01

    The abstracts of the 14. European Cosmic Ray Symposium are presented. The papers cover a large variety of topics in cosmic ray physics, both from the theoretical and the experimental point of view. Sun physics, and the effects on the inner heliosphere, the composition, and the properties of the primary and secondary cosmic radiation, galactic acceleration and the results of accelerator physics relevant to cosmic radiation physics, and the description and the results of large detector systems are presented. 63 items are indexed for INIS database. (K.A.)

  17. International symposium 'Energetics 2004'. Symposium proceedings. Book 2

    2004-01-01

    The holding of this Symposium was initiated by ZEMAK - Macedonian Energy Association that for the last tens of years established itself in the national and international scientific and professional circles as a competent association of professionals with the main goal to follow, promote and improve the energy sector in the country. Having in mind the fact that the power energy sector as a fundamental sector plays a main role in the development and the improvement of the rest of the industry, and in the same time has a tremendous impact on the sustainable development of the entire economy of a country, power energy sector in fact has the paramount importance in the business environment of our country. Thus, ZEMAK has historically important role as a responsible and permanent driver, promoter and initiator for resolving of all-important questions directly or indirectly interconnected with the power energy sector in the country, and therefore the entire economy in the country as well. Following the past, ZEMAK had and would always have needs of organizing national and international symposiums and workshops as a panel where directly at one place national and international power energy experts could initiate, debate and resolve all up-to-date questions in the present energy sector in Macedonia, could analyze the modern world trends in the energy sector and try to find appropriate models for their application for further development and improvement of the energy sector in our country. This international symposium has the main goal to concentrate on a single place everybody who has power energy as a permanent preoccupation and/or vocation and professional interest. To aggregate on one place various experts, from the Academy and Universities, from the business circles and companies who are preoccupied with power energy directly or indirectly in their everyday life and work. During the Symposium more than 90 scientific and/or professional papers were presented and discussed

  18. In Vivo Assessment of Bone Regeneration in Alginate/Bone ECM Hydrogels with Incorporated Skeletal Stem Cells and Single Growth Factors

    Gothard, David; Smith, Emma L.; Kanczler, Janos M.; Black, Cameron R.; Wells, Julia A.; Roberts, Carol A.; White, Lisa J.; Qutachi, Omar; Peto, Heather; Rashidi, Hassan; Rojo, Luis; Stevens, Molly M.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Rose, Felicity R. A. J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.

    2015-01-01

    The current study has investigated the use of decellularised, demineralised bone extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel constructs for in vivo tissue mineralisation and bone formation. Stro-1-enriched human bone marrow stromal cells were incorporated together with select growth factors including VEGF, TGF-β3, BMP-2, PTHrP and VitD3, to augment bone formation, and mixed with alginate for structural support. Growth factors were delivered through fast (non-osteogenic factors) and slow (osteogenic factors) release PLGA microparticles. Constructs of 5 mm length were implanted in vivo for 28 days within mice. Dense tissue assessed by micro-CT correlated with histologically assessed mineralised bone formation in all constructs. Exogenous growth factor addition did not enhance bone formation further compared to alginate/bone ECM (ALG/ECM) hydrogels alone. UV irradiation reduced bone formation through degradation of intrinsic growth factors within the bone ECM component and possibly also ECM cross-linking. BMP-2 and VitD3 rescued osteogenic induction. ALG/ECM hydrogels appeared highly osteoinductive and delivery of angiogenic or chondrogenic growth factors led to altered bone formation. All constructs demonstrated extensive host tissue invasion and vascularisation aiding integration and implant longevity. The proposed hydrogel system functioned without the need for growth factor incorporation or an exogenous inducible cell source. Optimal growth factor concentrations and spatiotemporal release profiles require further assessment, as the bone ECM component may suffer batch variability between donor materials. In summary, ALG/ECM hydrogels provide a versatile biomaterial scaffold for utilisation within regenerative medicine which may be tailored, ultimately, to form the tissue of choice through incorporation of select growth factors. PMID:26675008

  19. The Effect of Incorporation of SDF-1α into PLGA Scaffolds on Stem Cell Recruitment and the Inflammatory Response

    Thevenot, Paul; Nair, Ashwin; Shen, Jinhui; Lotfi, Parisa; Ko, Cheng Yu; Tang, Liping

    2010-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the understanding of tissue responses to biomaterials, most implants are still plagued by inflammatory responses which can lead to fibrotic encapsulation. This is of dire consequence in tissue engineering, where seeded cells and bioactive components are separated from the native tissue, limiting the regenerative potential of the design. Additionally, these interactions prevent desired tissue integration and angiogenesis, preventing functionality of the design. ...

  20. p38α phosphorylates serine 258 within the cytoplasmic domain of tissue factor and prevents its incorporation into cell-derived microparticles.

    Ettelaie, Camille; Elkeeb, Azza M; Maraveyas, Anthony; Collier, Mary Elizabeth W

    2013-03-01

    We previously showed that the phosphorylation of Ser253 within the cytoplasmic domain of human tissue factor (TF) initiates the incorporation and release of this protein into cell-derived microparticles. Furthermore, subsequent phosphorylation of Ser258 terminates this process. However, the identity of the kinase responsible for the phosphorylation of Ser258 and mode of action of this enzyme remain unknown. In this study, p38α was identified as the proline-directed kinase capable of phosphorylating Ser258 specifically, and without any detectable activity towards Ser253. Furthermore, using synthetic peptides, it was shown that the Km for the reaction decreased by approximately 10 fold on substitution of Ser253 with phospho-Ser253. Either inhibition of p38 using SB202190 or knockdown of p38α expression in coronary artery endothelial cells overexpressing wild-type TF, resulted in decreased phosphorylation of Ser258, following activation of cells with PAR2-agonist peptide (PAR2-AP). In agreement with our previous data, inhibition of phosphorylation of this residue maintained the release of TF. Activation of PAR2 in cells transfected to overexpress TF, resulted in two separate peaks of p38 activity at approximately 40 and 120 min post-activation. Furthermore, overexpression of Ala253-substituted TF enhanced the second p38 activation peak. However, the second peak was absent in cells devoid of TF or in cells overexpressing the Asp253-substituted TF. Our data clearly identifies p38α as a kinase capable of phosphorylating Ser258 within the cytoplasmic domain of TF. Moreover, it appears that the presence of TF within the cells regulates the late activation of p38 and consequently the termination of TF release into microparticles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 6th Asian Physics Symposium

    2016-01-01

    Preface: The 6th Asian Physics Symposium 2015 (APS 2015) The 6th Asian Physics Symposium 2015 (APS 2015) is organized by the Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, in collaboration with HFI (Indonesian Physical Society), PAPSI (Physics and Applied Physics Society of Indonesia), HANI (Indonesian Nuclear Scientist Society), HRMI (Indonesian Material Research Society), HAGI (Indonesian Geophysicist Society) - West Java Chapter, and HFMBI (Indonesian Medical Physicist and Biophysicist Society). APS 2015 is aimed at providing a forum of scientific communication and interaction among distinguished scientists working in physics and its related fields. In this scientific event the latest research will be presented, and state-of-the-art developments in the field discussed, to help to guide our future research directions. It is also designed to offer the opportunity for young Indonesian scientists and students to make direct contacts with well-known scientists abroad and thereby foster the existing research collaborations and extend international research networking for the future. The scope of research presented and discussed in this symposium covers theoretical high energy physics, materials sciences and technology, biophysics and medical physics, nuclear science and engineering, earth and planetary sciences, computational physics, instrumentation and measurement, physics education, and interdisciplinary physics. The program of APS 2016 features 6 invited talks and 208 contributed oral presentations, which come from 7 different countries: Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, Iraq, Ethiopia, and Indonesia. All papers have been reviewed after they are presented in this event. Selected papers are published in this Institute of Physics (IoP) Conference Series. Finally, I would like to express my sincere appreciation to all of authors for their valuable contributions and also to the members of the committee for

  2. Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS)

    Foldager, Casper B.; Bendtsen, Michael; Berg, Lise C.

    2016-01-01

    to musculoskeletal pain and disability. The Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS) 2015 was motivated by the need to address regenerative challenges in an ageing population by engaging clinicians, basic scientists, and engineers. In this position paper, we review our contemporary understanding of societal......, patient-related, and basic science-related challenges in order to provide a reasoned roadmap for the future to deal with this compelling and urgent healthcare problem. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Taylor & Francis on behalf of the Nordic Orthopedic Federation....

  3. Third symposium on underground mining

    None

    1977-01-01

    The Third Symposium on Underground Mining was held at the Kentucky Fair and Exposition Center, Louisville, KY, October 18--20, 1977. Thirty-one papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. The topics covered include mining system (longwall, shortwall, room and pillar, etc.), mining equipment (continuous miners, longwall equipment, supports, roof bolters, shaft excavation equipment, monitoring and control systems. Maintenance and rebuilding facilities, lighting systems, etc.), ventilation, noise abatement, economics, accidents (cost), dust control and on-line computer systems. (LTN)

  4. Stanford Lepton-Photon Symposium

    Anon.

    1989-10-15

    With CERN's new LEP electron-positron collider poised to make its physics debut, the physics at the 14th International Symposium on Lepton and Photon Interactions, held at Stanford from 7-12 August, featured a ripple of new results on the Z and W bosons, the carriers of respectively the electrically neutral and charged components of the weak nuclear force. These new W and Z results, combined with refined measurements in other sectors, have interesting implications for expected but as yet unseen particles, notably the sixth ('top') quark.

  5. International Ocean Symposium (IOS) 1996; Kokusai kaiyo symposium 1996

    NONE

    1997-02-18

    This is a proceedings of the International Ocean Symposium 1996. On the first day of the symposium, the following were given with a theme `The Ocean, Can She Save Us`: Underwater research and future of mankind as a commemorative speech; The ocean, can she save us -- trying to discover the true figure of the ocean as a keynote speech. Panel discussion was held on The global environment and the infinite potential of the ocean. On the second day, an approach was made mostly from a cultural aspect with a theme `The Ocean and the Japanese.` The following were given: Human links between east and west as a commemorative speech; The ocean and Japanese culture as a keynote speech; Civilization spanning across oceans as a panel discussion. The Japanese have been developing their individual technologies in shipbuilding, shipping, and ocean development, have been raised by Mother Ocean, and have lived together. Ocean has been supplying humans food, water, oxygen, marine routes, and even dream and hope. The environmental pollution is the result of the human greediness. It is fear and friendship between humans and ocean that can save humans and ocean.

  6. Enhancement in irradiated mononuclear cells in culture of mitogen-induced incorporation of [3H]thymidine by homologous conditioned medium

    Sandru, G.; Greiner, R.

    1994-01-01

    Incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine in irradiated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures irradiated in vitro was stimulated significantly by either concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin only in the presence of homologous conditioned medium. Production of this activity by mononuclear cells was enhanced by irradiation and/or pulsed exposure to puromycin but was abolished by actinomycin D. Addition of anti-interleukin 1 or anti-interleukin 2 monoclonal antibodies to the conditioned medium before assay did not influence the stimulatory action. A similar significant stimulation of mononuclear cell cultures irradiated with 6 Gy by concanavalin A was obtained when purified preparations of homologous conditioned medium were used in the assay. Purification was done by ultrafiltration and concentration, heparin agarose chromatography, ammonium sulfate precipitation, concanavalin A agarose chromatography, DEAE-ion exchange chromatography and HPLC gel filtration chromatography. With SDS-PAGE and silver staining, the active HPLC fraction gave one band of 50 kDa, suggesting that this protein is responsible for the co-stimulatory effect of homologous conditioned medium for both mitogen-induced irradiated and nonirradiated mononuclear cell cultures. 42 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Abstracts for student symposium

    Goldman, B.

    1994-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Science and Engineering Research Semester (SERS) students are participants in a national program sponsored by the DOE Office of Energy Research. Presented topics from Fall 1993 include: Laser glass, wiring codes, lead in food and food containers, chromium removal from ground water, fiber optic sensors for ph measurement, CFC replacement, predator/prey simulation, detection of micronuclei in germ cells, DNA conformation, stimulated brillouin scattering, DNA sequencing, evaluation of education programs, neural network analysis of nuclear glass, lithium ion batteries, Indonesian snails, optical switching systems, and photoreceiver design. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Data Base.

  8. Interaction between the immune system and acute myeloid leukemia: A model incorporating promotion of regulatory T cell expansion by leukemic cells.

    Nishiyama, Yoshiaki; Saikawa, Yutaka; Nishiyama, Nobuaki

    2018-03-01

    Population dynamics of regulatory T cells (Treg) are crucial for the underlying interplay between leukemic and immune cells in progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The goal of this work is to elucidate the dynamics of a model that includes Treg, which can be qualitatively assessed by accumulating clinical findings on the impact of activated immune cell infusion after selective Treg depletion. We constructed an ordinary differential equation model to describe the dynamics of three components in AML: leukemic blast cells, mature regulatory T cells (Treg), and mature effective T cells (Teff), including cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The model includes promotion of Treg expansion by leukemic blast cells, leukemic stem cell and progenitor cell targeting by Teff, and Treg-mediated Teff suppression, and exhibits two coexisting, stable steady states, corresponding to high leukemic cell load at diagnosis or relapse, and to long-term complete remission. Our model is capable of explaining the clinical findings that the survival of patients with AML after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is influenced by the duration of complete remission, and that cut-off minimal residual disease thresholds associated with a 100% relapse rate are identified in AML. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Beneficial effects of amino acid-functionalized graphene nanosheets incorporated in the photoanode material of dye-sensitized solar cells: A practical and theoretical study

    Taki, Mahmood; Rezaei, Behzad; Fani, Najmeh; Borandeh, Sedigheh; Abdolmaleki, Amir; Ensafi, Ali A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrochemical properties of GO was improved with incorporated amino acids. • Functionalized amino acids could act as a reducing agent for GO. • Aromatic amino acids-GO had improved photovoltaic properties over aliphatic ones. • Aromatic ring of tyrosine was aligned in parallel to the GO sheet. • A bang gap for GO was emerged with functionalizing with amino acids. - Abstract: In this research, covalently functionalized graphene oxide (GO) with some biocompatible amino acids were incorporated to the TiO_2 film and employed as the photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Electrochemical analysis of the amino acids-functionalized graphene oxide (AFGs) confirmed that the attached amino acids could be acted as a reducing agent of the GO. The photovoltaic performance of the assembled DSSCs under illumination of simulated AM 1.5 sunlight (100 mW cm"−"2) showed an enhancement of about 4.1 and 1.8 fold for the solar cell assembled with the tyrosine-functionalized GO in relation to the control solar cells constructed with GO-TiO_2 composite and blank TiO_2 film, respectively. These results were in accordance with electron life time and transport time resulted from the open circuit voltage decay (OCVD), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) analysis. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations exhibited a proper spacial arrangement for the tyrosine-GO structure that could improve electron transfer between the adjucent GO sheets. Density of electronic states (DOS) exhibited a gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels for the simulated AFG structures. This effect could facilitate the light adsorption process in near-IR region.

  10. Beneficial effects of amino acid-functionalized graphene nanosheets incorporated in the photoanode material of dye-sensitized solar cells: A practical and theoretical study

    Taki, Mahmood [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei, Behzad, E-mail: rezaei@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fani, Najmeh [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Borandeh, Sedigheh [Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, Shiraz University of Medical Science, Shiraz 71345, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdolmaleki, Amir; Ensafi, Ali A. [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Electrochemical properties of GO was improved with incorporated amino acids. • Functionalized amino acids could act as a reducing agent for GO. • Aromatic amino acids-GO had improved photovoltaic properties over aliphatic ones. • Aromatic ring of tyrosine was aligned in parallel to the GO sheet. • A bang gap for GO was emerged with functionalizing with amino acids. - Abstract: In this research, covalently functionalized graphene oxide (GO) with some biocompatible amino acids were incorporated to the TiO{sub 2} film and employed as the photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Electrochemical analysis of the amino acids-functionalized graphene oxide (AFGs) confirmed that the attached amino acids could be acted as a reducing agent of the GO. The photovoltaic performance of the assembled DSSCs under illumination of simulated AM 1.5 sunlight (100 mW cm{sup −2}) showed an enhancement of about 4.1 and 1.8 fold for the solar cell assembled with the tyrosine-functionalized GO in relation to the control solar cells constructed with GO-TiO{sub 2} composite and blank TiO{sub 2} film, respectively. These results were in accordance with electron life time and transport time resulted from the open circuit voltage decay (OCVD), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) analysis. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations exhibited a proper spacial arrangement for the tyrosine-GO structure that could improve electron transfer between the adjucent GO sheets. Density of electronic states (DOS) exhibited a gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels for the simulated AFG structures. This effect could facilitate the light adsorption process in near-IR region.

  11. Influence of Blend Morphology and Energetics on Charge Separation and Recombination Dynamics in Organic Solar Cells Incorporating a Nonfullerene Acceptor

    Cha, Hyojung; Wheeler, Scot; Holliday, Sarah; Dimitrov, Stoichko D.; Wadsworth, Andrew; Lee, Hyun Hwi; Baran, Derya; McCulloch, Iain; Durrant, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Nonfullerene acceptors (NFAs) in blends with highly crystalline donor polymers have been shown to yield particularly high device voltage outputs, but typically more modest quantum yields for photocurrent generation as well as often lower fill factors (FF). In this study, we employ transient optical and optoelectronic analysis to elucidate the factors determining device photocurrent and FF in blends of the highly crystalline donor polymer PffBT4T-2OD with the promising NFA FBR or the more widely studied fullerene acceptor PC71BM. Geminate recombination losses, as measured by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy, are observed to be significantly higher for PffBT4T-2OD:FBR blends. This is assigned to the smaller LUMO-LUMO offset of the PffBT4T-2OD:FBR blends relative to PffBT4T-2OD:PC71BM, resulting in the lower photocurrent generation efficiency obtained with FBR. Employing time delayed charge extraction measurements, these geminate recombination losses are observed to be field dependent, resulting in the lower FF observed with PffBT4T-2OD:FBR devices. These data therefore provide a detailed understanding of the impact of acceptor design, and particularly acceptor energetics, on organic solar cell performance. Our study concludes with a discussion of the implications of these results for the design of NFAs in organic solar cells.

  12. Influence of Blend Morphology and Energetics on Charge Separation and Recombination Dynamics in Organic Solar Cells Incorporating a Nonfullerene Acceptor

    Cha, Hyojung

    2017-11-27

    Nonfullerene acceptors (NFAs) in blends with highly crystalline donor polymers have been shown to yield particularly high device voltage outputs, but typically more modest quantum yields for photocurrent generation as well as often lower fill factors (FF). In this study, we employ transient optical and optoelectronic analysis to elucidate the factors determining device photocurrent and FF in blends of the highly crystalline donor polymer PffBT4T-2OD with the promising NFA FBR or the more widely studied fullerene acceptor PC71BM. Geminate recombination losses, as measured by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy, are observed to be significantly higher for PffBT4T-2OD:FBR blends. This is assigned to the smaller LUMO-LUMO offset of the PffBT4T-2OD:FBR blends relative to PffBT4T-2OD:PC71BM, resulting in the lower photocurrent generation efficiency obtained with FBR. Employing time delayed charge extraction measurements, these geminate recombination losses are observed to be field dependent, resulting in the lower FF observed with PffBT4T-2OD:FBR devices. These data therefore provide a detailed understanding of the impact of acceptor design, and particularly acceptor energetics, on organic solar cell performance. Our study concludes with a discussion of the implications of these results for the design of NFAs in organic solar cells.

  13. Incorporating genomic, transcriptomic and clinical data: a prognostic and stem cell-like MYC and PRC imbalance in high-risk neuroblastoma.

    Yang, Xinan Holly; Tang, Fangming; Shin, Jisu; Cunningham, John M

    2017-10-03

    the PRC2-mediated tumor cell growth and differentiation in neuroblastoma, which may exert oncogenic effects together with MYC regulation. Our results propose a prognostic effect of imbalanced MYC and PRC2 moderations in pediatric HR-NB for the first time. This study demonstrates an incorporation of genomic landscapes and transcriptomic profiles into the hypothesis-driven precision prognosis and biomarker discovery. The application of this approach to neuroblastoma, as well as other cancer more broadly, could contribute to reduced relapse and mortality rates in the long term.

  14. The fifth Finnish national aerosol symposium

    Mikkanen, P.; Haemeri, K.; Kauppinen, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Fifth Finnish Aerosol Symposium was held June 1-3, 1993. Symposium is jointly organized by FAAR, Aerosol Technology Group of Technical Research Centre of Finland and Helsinki University, Department of Physics. Aerosols, the suspensions of solid and liquid particles and gases, are receiving increasing importance in many areas of science and technology. These include industrial hygiene, ambient and indoor air pollution, pollution control technologies, cloud physics, nuclear safety engineering, combustion science and engineering, clean manufacturing technologies and material processing. The importance of aerosol issues during the development of advanced fuel conversion and material processing technologies can be realized when looking at the numerous papers presented on these topics at the Symposium

  15. 6th interventional MRI symposium. Abstracts

    2006-01-01

    The ongoing progress in the field of interventional MRI and the great success of our last symposium 2004 in Boston have stimulated us to organize the 6th Interventional MRI Symposium to be held September 15-16, 2006 in Leipzig. This meeting will highlight ground-breaking research as well as cutting-edge reports from many groups. The symposium also provides a forum to network with leaders and innovators in the field. Session topics are: intraoperative MRI, vascular applications, targeted drug delivery, cryotherapy, thermometry, pulse sequences, LITT, percutaneous procedures, navigation, robotics, focused ultrasound. (uke)

  16. 10th German nuclear law symposium

    Koch, H.J.; Rossnagel, A.

    2000-01-01

    This 10th symposium on nuclear law in Germany was held eight years after the 9th symposium. Due to the change of government after the last general elections, there had been a turnaround in Germany's energy policy. 'Phasing out nuclear energy' was the major strategy of the new Federal Government. The topics of the papers presented at the symposium therefore focus on: a new time frame for NPP shutdown and termination of operating licences; ensuring the safe operation of nuclear power plants for the remaining operating periods; new concepts for radwaste management and ultimate disposal. (orig./CB) [de

  17. 6{sup th} interventional MRI symposium. Abstracts

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The ongoing progress in the field of interventional MRI and the great success of our last symposium 2004 in Boston have stimulated us to organize the 6th Interventional MRI Symposium to be held September 15-16, 2006 in Leipzig. This meeting will highlight ground-breaking research as well as cutting-edge reports from many groups. The symposium also provides a forum to network with leaders and innovators in the field. Session topics are: intraoperative MRI, vascular applications, targeted drug delivery, cryotherapy, thermometry, pulse sequences, LITT, percutaneous procedures, navigation, robotics, focused ultrasound. (uke)

  18. Incorporation of the Pore Size Variation to Modeling of the Elastic Behavior of Metallic Open-Cell Foams

    Ćwieka K.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we present the approach for modeling of the elastic behavior of open-cell metallic foams concerning non-uniform pore size distribution. This approach combines design of foam structures and numerical simulations of compression tests using finite element method (FEM. In the design stage, Laguerre-Voronoi tessellations (LVT were performed on several sets of packed spheres with defined variation of radii, bringing about a set of foam structures with porosity ranging from 74 to 98% and different pore size variation quantified by the coefficient of pore volume variation, CV(V, from 0.5 to 2.1. Each structure was numerically subjected to uni-axial compression test along three directions within the elastic region. Basing on the numerical response, the effective Young’s modulus, Eeff, was calculated for each structure. It is shown that the Eeff is not only dependent on the porosity but also on the pore size variation.

  19. Incorporation of Kojic Acid-Azo Dyes on TiO2 Thin Films for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Applications

    Carolynne Zie Wei Sie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitization of heavy metal free organic dyes onto TiO2 thin films has gained much attention in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. A series of new kojic acid based organic dyes KA1–4 were synthesized via nucleophilic substitution of azobenzene bearing different vinyl chains A1–4 with kojyl chloride 4. Azo dyes KA1–4 were characterized for photophysical properties employing absorption spectrometry and photovoltaic characteristic in TiO2 thin film. The presence of vinyl chain in A1–4 improved the photovoltaic performance from 0.20 to 0.60%. The introduction of kojic acid obtained from sago waste further increases the efficiency to 0.82–1.54%. Based on photovoltaic performance, KA4 achieved the highest solar to electrical energy conversion efficiency (η = 1.54% in the series.

  20. Orthotopic Transplantation of Achilles Tendon Allograft in Rats: With or without Incorporation of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Aynardi, Michael; Zahoor, Talal; Mitchell, Reed; Loube, Jeffrey; Feltham, Tyler; Manandhar, Lumanti; Paudel, Sharada; Schon, Lew; Zhang, Zijun

    2018-02-01

    The biology and function of orthotopic transplantation of Achilles tendon allograft are unknown. Particularly, the revitalization of Achilles allograft is a clinical concern. Achilles allografts were harvested from donor rats and stored at -80 °C. Subcutaneous adipose tissue was harvested from the would-be allograft recipient rats for isolation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs were cultured with growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) and applied onto Achilles allografts on the day of transplantation. After the native Achilles tendon was resected from the left hind limb of the rats, Achilles allograft, with or without autologous MSCs, was implanted and sutured with calf muscles proximally and calcaneus distally. Animal gait was recorded presurgery and postsurgery weekly. The animals were sacrificed at week 4, and the transplanted Achilles allografts were collected for biomechanical testing and histology. The operated limbs had altered gait. By week 4, the paw print intensity, stance time, and duty cycle (percentage of the stance phase in a step cycle) of the reconstructed limbs were mostly recovered to the baselines recorded before surgery. Maximum load of failure was not different between Achilles allografts, with or without MSCs, and the native tendons. The Achilles allograft supplemented with MSCs had higher cellularity than the Achilles allograft without MSCs. Deposition of fine collagen (type III) fibers was active in Achilles allograft, with or without MSCs, but it was more evenly distributed in the allografts that were incubated with MSCs. In conclusion, orthotopically transplanted Achilles allograft healed with host tissues, regained strength, and largely restored Achilles function in 4 wk in rats. It is therefore a viable option for the reconstruction of a large Achilles tendon defect. Supplementation of MSCs improved repopulation of Achilles allograft, but large animal models, with long-term follow up and cell tracking, may be required to fully

  1. Annual Symposium in Electronics Packaging

    1991-01-01

    Each May, the Continuing Education Division of the T.J.Watson School of Engineering, Applied Science and Technology at the State University of New York at Binghamton sponsors an Annual Symposium in Electronics Packaging in cooperation with local professional societies (IEEE, ASME, SME, IEPS) and UnlPEG (the University-Industry Partnership for Economic Growth.) Each volume of this Electronics Packaging Forum series is based on the the preceding Symposium, with Volume Two based on the 1990 presentations. The Preface to Volume One included a brief definition of the broad scope of the electronics packaging field with some comments on why it has recently assumed such a more prominent priority for research and development. Those remarks will not be repeated here; at this point it is assumed that the reader is a professional in the packaging field, or possibly a student of one of the many academic disciplines which contribute to it. It is worthwhile repeating the series objectives, however, so the reader will be cle...

  2. 2015 International Symposium in Statistics

    2016-01-01

    This proceedings volume contains eight selected papers that were presented in the International Symposium in Statistics (ISS) 2015 On Advances in Parametric and Semi-parametric Analysis of Multivariate, Time Series, Spatial-temporal, and Familial-longitudinal Data, held in St. John’s, Canada from July 6 to 8, 2015. The main objective of the ISS-2015 was the discussion on advances and challenges in parametric and semi-parametric analysis for correlated data in both continuous and discrete setups. Thus, as a reflection of the theme of the symposium, the eight papers of this proceedings volume are presented in four parts. Part I is comprised of papers examining Elliptical t Distribution Theory. In Part II, the papers cover spatial and temporal data analysis. Part III is focused on longitudinal multinomial models in parametric and semi-parametric setups. Finally Part IV concludes with a paper on the inferences for longitudinal data subject to a challenge of important covariates selection from a set of large num...

  3. International senior expert symposium on electricity and the environment: Highlights and conclusions from Helsinki

    Bennett, L.L.

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes briefly the Senior Expert Symposium on Electricity and the Environment, held in May 1991. Four Expert Groups considered key issues: the implications for the global environment of energy and electricity supply and demand; energy sources and technologies for electricity generation; comparative environmental and health effects of different energy sources for electricity generation; and the incorporation of environmental and health impacts into policy, planning and decision making for the electricity sector. The conclusions of these groups are presented

  4. VIII All-Russian symposium on molecular liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Program. Summary of reports

    2001-01-01

    Program and summary of reports of the VIII All-Russian symposium on molecular liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis are performed. The meeting took place 15-19 October, 2001 in Moscow. Many problems of liquid and ion exchange chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, thin-layer chromatography have been discussed extensively. Reports covering properties of sorbents and devices for chromatography are incorporated in the collection [ru

  5. Enhanced conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells using a CNT-incorporated TiO2 slurry-based photoanode

    Jiaoping Cai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A new titanium dioxide (TiO2 slurry formulation is herein reported for the fabrication of TiO2 photoanode for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. The prepared TiO2 photoanode featured a highly uniform mesoporous structure with well-dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles. The energy conversion efficiency of the resulting TiO2 slurry-based DSSC was ∼63% higher than that achieved by a DSSC prepared using a commercial TiO2 slurry. Subsequently, the incorporation of acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs into the TiO2 slurry was examined. More specifically, the effect of varying the concentration of the CNTs in this slurry on the performance of the resulting DSSCs was studied. The chemical state of the CNTs-incorporated TiO2 photoanode was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A high energy conversion efficiency of 6.23% was obtained at an optimum CNT concentration of ∼0.06 wt.%. The obtained efficiency corresponds to a 63% enhancement when compared with that obtained from a DSSC based on a commercial TiO2 slurry. The higher efficiency was attributed to the improvement in the collection and transport of excited electrons in the presence of the CNTs.

  6. Enhanced conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells using a CNT-incorporated TiO2 slurry-based photoanode

    Cai, Jiaoping; Chen, Zexiang; Li, Jun; Wang, Yan; Xiang, Dong; Zhang, Jijun; Li, Hai

    2015-02-01

    A new titanium dioxide (TiO2) slurry formulation is herein reported for the fabrication of TiO2 photoanode for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The prepared TiO2 photoanode featured a highly uniform mesoporous structure with well-dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles. The energy conversion efficiency of the resulting TiO2 slurry-based DSSC was ˜63% higher than that achieved by a DSSC prepared using a commercial TiO2 slurry. Subsequently, the incorporation of acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into the TiO2 slurry was examined. More specifically, the effect of varying the concentration of the CNTs in this slurry on the performance of the resulting DSSCs was studied. The chemical state of the CNTs-incorporated TiO2 photoanode was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A high energy conversion efficiency of 6.23% was obtained at an optimum CNT concentration of ˜0.06 wt.%. The obtained efficiency corresponds to a 63% enhancement when compared with that obtained from a DSSC based on a commercial TiO2 slurry. The higher efficiency was attributed to the improvement in the collection and transport of excited electrons in the presence of the CNTs.

  7. Incorporating an Electrode Modification Layer with a Vertical Phase Separated Photoactive Layer for Efficient and Stable Inverted Nonfullerene Polymer Solar Cells.

    Shi, Zhenzhen; Liu, Hao; Wang, Yaping; Li, Jinyan; Bai, Yiming; Wang, Fuzhi; Bian, Xingming; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Tan, Zhan'ao

    2017-12-20

    For bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells (PSCs), the donors and acceptors featuring specific phase separation and concentration distribution within the electron donor/acceptor blends crucially affect the exciton dissociation and charge transportation. Herein, efficient and stable nonfullerene inverted PSCs incorporating a phase separated photoactive layer and a titanium chelate electrode modification layer are demonstrated. Water contact angle (WCA), scanning kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques are implemented to characterize the morphology of photoactive layers. Compared with the control conventional device, the short-circuit current density (J sc ) is enhanced from 14.74 to 17.45 mAcm -2 . The power conversion efficiency (PCE) for the inverted PSCs with a titanium (diisopropoxide)-bis-(2,4-pentanedionate) (TIPD) layer increases from 9.67% to 11.69% benefiting from the declined exciton recombination and fairly enhanced charge transportation. Furthermore, the nonencapsulated inverted device with a TIPD layer demonstrates the best long-term stability, 85% of initial PCE remaining and an almost undecayed open-circuit voltage (V oc ) after 1440 h. Our results reveal that the titanium chelate is an excellent electrode modification layer to incorporate with a vertical phase separated photoactive layer for producing high-efficiency and high-stability inverted nonfullerene PSCs.

  8. The incorporation of SPECT functional lung imaging into inverse radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer

    Christian, Judith A.; Partridge, Mike; Nioutsikou, Elena; Cook, Gary; McNair, Helen A.; Cronin, Bernadette; Courbon, Frederic; Bedford, James L.; Brada, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often have inhomogeneous lung perfusion. Radiotherapy planning computed tomography (CT) scans have been accurately co-registered with lung perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans to design radiotherapy treatments which limit dose to healthy 'perfused' lung. Patients and methods: Patients with localised NSCLC had CT and SPECT scans accurately co-registered in the planning system. The SPECT images were used to define a volume of perfused 'functioning' lung (FL). Inverse planning software was used to create 3D-conformal plans, the planning objective being either to minimise the dose to whole lungs (WL) or to minimise the dose to FL. Results: Four plans were created for each of six patients. The mean difference in volume between WL and FL was 1011.7 cm 3 (range 596.2-1581.1 cm 3 ). One patient with bilateral upper lobe perfusion deficits had a 16% reduction in FLV 2 (the percentage volume of functioning lung receiving ≥20 Gy). The remaining patients had inhomogeneous perfusion deficits such that inverse planning was not able to sufficiently optimise beam angles to avoid functioning lung. Conclusion: SPECT perfusion images can be accurately co-registered with radiotherapy planning CT scans and may be helpful in creating treatment plans for patients with large perfusion deficits

  9. Comparison of Nanohole-Type and Nanopillar-Type Patterned Metallic Electrodes Incorporated in Organic Solar Cells

    Wang, Wenyan; Cui, Yanxia; Fung, Kin Hung; Zhang, Ye; Ji, Ting; Hao, Yuying

    2017-09-01

    Both the nanohole- and nanopillar-type patterned metallic electrodes (PMEs) have been introduced in organic solar cells (OSCs) for improving device performances experimentally, but there is few work addressing the similarities and differences between them. In this theoretical work, we systematically compare the impact of the nanohole- and nanopillar-type PMEs on the performance of an OSC based on hybridized cavity resonances. By optimizing the geometrical parameters of each PME, we obtained an interesting result that the integrated absorption efficiencies in the active layer with different optimized PMEs are almost the same (both are equal to 82.4%), outperforming that of the planar control by 9.9%. Though the absorption enhancement spectra of the two different optimal devices are similar as well, the mechanisms of light trapping at the corresponding enhancement peaks are distinct from each other. In a comprehensive view, the nanopillar-type PME is suggested to be applied in the present system, since its optimal design has a moderate filling ratio, which is much easier to fabricate than its counterpart. This work could contribute to the development of high-efficiency OSCs.

  10. Oslo Epigenetics Symposium 2012. Oslo, Norway, 8-9 November 2012.

    Collas, Philippe; Eskeland, Ragnhild

    2013-02-01

    The Oslo Epigenetics Symposium 2012 held in Oslo, Norway, brought together ten speakers from several European countries and the USA for an evening public lecture and a full day of presentations on emerging topics in the field of epigenetics, gene regulation and organization of the cell nucleus.

  11. Proceedings of the DAE-BRNS life sciences symposium on current trends in biology and medicine

    2010-01-01

    This year's Life Sciences Symposium is focused on Health Sciences. It will provide an interactive platform for deliberations on current developments in basic research on cancer, diabetes, infectious diseases, reproduction, stem cells and degenerative diseases. Several aspects like metabolism, use of biophysical techniques, detection methods, micro RNA based regulation, assisted reproductive technologies etc. are covered. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. Senior expert symposium on electricity and the environment, Helsinki, Finland, 13-17 May 1991. Key issues papers

    1991-07-01

    This volume contains the four Key Issues Papers prepared as background papers by international expert groups for the Senior Expert Symposium on Electricity and the Environment held in Helsinki, Finland in May 1991. The papers are on topics selected as the central themes of the symposium: energy and electricity supply and demand - implications for the global environment; energy sources and technologies for electricity generation; comparative environmental and health effects of different energy systems for electricity generation; and the incorporation of environmental and health impacts into policy, planning and decision making for the electricity sector. The four papers have been indexed separately. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Symposium on high spin phenomena in nuclei

    1979-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 44 of the papers given at this symposium. Six other papers have already been cited in ERA; these papers can be located by reference to the entry CONF-790323 - in the Report Number Index

  14. Proceedings of the 1994 nuclear simulation symposium

    Laughton, P J [ed.; Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1994-12-31

    This symposium on nuclear simulation included sessions on reactor physics, on thermalhydraulics, and on fuel and fuel channels of CANDU type reactors. The individual papers have all been abstracted separately.

  15. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted

  16. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W. (eds.)

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  17. CUBE (Computer Use By Engineers) symposium abstracts

    Ruminer, J.J.

    1978-07-01

    This report presents the abstracts for the CUBE (Computer Use by Engineers) Symposium, October 4, through 6, 1978. Contributors are from Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, and Sandia Laboratories

  18. Proceedings of the symposium on 'radiation research in life science'

    Ikushima, Takaji

    1993-06-01

    This report is the collection of the papers presented at the title symposium on radiation research in life science. The themes included in this report are as follows: (1) cellular aging process, (2) senescence gene and cellular immortalization, (3) molecular mechanism of replicative senescence, (4) programmed cell death during differentiation, (5) thymocyte apoptosis, (6) neuronal death, (7) apoptosis by HIV infection, (8) apoptosis and immunology, (9) radiation induced apoptosis, and so on. Separate abstract was prepared for 1 of the papers in this report. The remaining 10 papers were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  19. Study of the Mg incorporation in CdTe for developing wide band gap Cd1−xMgxTe thin films for possible use as top-cell absorber in a tandem solar cell

    Martínez, Omar S.; Millán, Aduljay Remolina; Huerta, L.; Santana, G.; Mathews, N.R.; Ramon-Garcia, M.L.; Morales, Erik R.; Mathew, X.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thin films of Cd 1−x Mg x Te with high spatial uniformity and band gap in the range of 1.6–1.96 eV were deposited by vacuum co-evaporation of CdTe and Mg. ► Obtained Cd 1−x Mg x Te films have the structural characteristics of the CdTe, evidence of the change in atomic scattering due to incorporation of Mg was observed. ► XRD and XPS data confirmed the incorporation of Mg in the lattice of CdTe. ► SEM images revealed the impact of Mg incorporation on the morphology of the films, the changes in grain size and grain morphology are noticeable. - Abstract: Thin films of Cd 1−x Mg x Te with band gap in the range of 1.6–1.96 eV were deposited by vacuum co-evaporation of CdTe and Mg on glass substrates heated at 300 °C. Different experimental techniques such as XRD, UV–vis spectroscopy, SEM, and XPS were used to study the effect of Mg incorporation into the lattice of CdTe. The band gap of the films showed a clear tendency to increase as the Mg content in the film is increased. The Cd 1−x Mg x Te films maintain all the structural characteristics of the CdTe, however, diminishing of intensity for the XRD patterns is observed due to both change in preferential orientation and change in atomic scattering due to the incorporation of Mg. SEM images showed significant evidences of morphological changes due to the presence of Mg. XRD, UV–vis spectroscopy, and XPS data confirmed the incorporation of Mg in the lattice of CdTe. The significant increase in band gap of CdTe due to incorporation of Mg suggests that the Cd 1−x Mg x Te thin film is a candidate material to use as absorber layer in the top-cell of a tandem solar cell.

  20. Study of the Mg incorporation in CdTe for developing wide band gap Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te thin films for possible use as top-cell absorber in a tandem solar cell

    Martinez, Omar S. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Universidad Politecnica del Estado de Guerrero, Comunidad de Puente Campuzano, C.P. 40325 Taxco de Alarcon, Guerrero (Mexico); Millan, Aduljay Remolina [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Huerta, L.; Santana, G. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. C.P 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Mathews, N.R.; Ramon-Garcia, M.L.; Morales, Erik R. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Mathew, X., E-mail: xm@cie.unam.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films of Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te with high spatial uniformity and band gap in the range of 1.6-1.96 eV were deposited by vacuum co-evaporation of CdTe and Mg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Obtained Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te films have the structural characteristics of the CdTe, evidence of the change in atomic scattering due to incorporation of Mg was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRD and XPS data confirmed the incorporation of Mg in the lattice of CdTe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEM images revealed the impact of Mg incorporation on the morphology of the films, the changes in grain size and grain morphology are noticeable. - Abstract: Thin films of Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te with band gap in the range of 1.6-1.96 eV were deposited by vacuum co-evaporation of CdTe and Mg on glass substrates heated at 300 Degree-Sign C. Different experimental techniques such as XRD, UV-vis spectroscopy, SEM, and XPS were used to study the effect of Mg incorporation into the lattice of CdTe. The band gap of the films showed a clear tendency to increase as the Mg content in the film is increased. The Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te films maintain all the structural characteristics of the CdTe, however, diminishing of intensity for the XRD patterns is observed due to both change in preferential orientation and change in atomic scattering due to the incorporation of Mg. SEM images showed significant evidences of morphological changes due to the presence of Mg. XRD, UV-vis spectroscopy, and XPS data confirmed the incorporation of Mg in the lattice of CdTe. The significant increase in band gap of CdTe due to incorporation of Mg suggests that the Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te thin film is a candidate material to use as absorber layer in the top-cell of a tandem solar cell.

  1. The 2002 Starting Artificial Intelligence Researchers Symposium

    Vidal, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    During the 2002 European Conference on Artificial Intelligence (ECAI-02) was introduced the Starting Artificial Intelligence Researchers Symposium STAIRS), the first-ever international symposium specifically aimed at Ph.D. students in AI. The outcome was a thorough, high-quality, and successful event, with all the features one usually finds in the best international conferences: large international committees, comprehensive coverage, published proceedings, renowned speakers and panelists, sub...

  2. Welcome and introduction to symposium - Day 2

    humanities, Symposium on Information and technology in the arts and; McLaughlin, Jeremy Lee; Matusiak, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Welcome and introduction slides used for presentation at Day 2 of the Virtual Symposium on Information and Technology in the Arts and Humanities, held April 22 and 23, 2015. The Symposium was co-sponsored by the ASIS&T (Association for Information Science and Technology) Special Interest Group for Arts and Humanities (SIG AH) and the Special Interest Group for Visualization, Images, and Sound (SIG VIS).

  3. XXXIX Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    Acosta, Luis; Bijker, Roelof

    2016-01-01

    In the present volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series we publish the proceedings of the “XXXIX Symposium on Nuclear Physics”, that was held from January 5-8, 2016 at the Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico. The proceedings consist of 20 contributions that were presented as plenary talks at the meeting. The abstracts of all contributions, invited talks and posters, were published in the Conference Handbook. The Symposium on Nuclear Physics has a long and distinguished history. From the beginning it was intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in the field. Its most distinctive feature is to provide a forum for specialists in different areas of nuclear physics, both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists, in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. After the first meeting in Oaxtepec in 1978, the Symposium was organized every year without interruption which makes the present one the 39th in a row. The scientific program consisted of 29 invited talks and a poster session on a wide variety of hot topics in contemporary nuclear physics, ranging from the traditional fields of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions to radioactive beams, nuclear astrophysics, hadronic physics, fundamental symmetries and relativistic heavy ions, as well as progress reports of large international projects like the HAWC Observatory in Puebla, Mexico, and the ATLAS and ALICE Collaborations of the LHC accelerator at CERN, Switzerland. In addition, there were several contributions highlighting interesting new results from foreign laboratories like Notre Dame, RIKEN, Jefferson Lab, Oak Ridge, INFN-Legnaro and INFN-LNS, as well as Mexican laboratories at ININ, LEMA and the Carlos Graef Laboratory at IF-UNAM. On the theoretical side there were talks on recent developments in nuclear structure, weakly bound nuclei, cluster models

  4. Proceedings of the TOUGH Symposium 2009

    Moridis, George J.; Doughty, Christine; Finsterle, Stefan; Sonnenthal, Eric

    2009-10-01

    Welcome to the TOUGH Symposium 2009. Within this volume are the Symposium Program for eighty-nine papers to be presented in both oral and poster formats. The full papers are available as pdfs linked from the Symposium Program posted on the TOUGH Symposium 2009 website http://esd.lbl.gov/newsandevents/events/toughsymposium09/program.html Additional updated information including any changes to the Program will also be available at the website. The papers cover a wide range of application areas and reflect the continuing trend toward increased sophistication of the TOUGH codes. A CD containing the proceedings papers will be published immediately following the Symposium and sent to all participants. As in the prior Symposium, selected papers will be invited for submission to a number of journals for inclusion in Special Issues focused on applications and developments of the TOUGH codes. These journals include, Transport in Porous Media, Geothermics, Energy Conversion and Management, Journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, and the Vadose Zone Journal.

  5. Tendon Reattachment to Bone in an Ovine Tendon Defect Model of Retraction Using Allogenic and Xenogenic Demineralised Bone Matrix Incorporated with Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Tanujan Thangarajah

    Full Text Available Tendon-bone healing following rotator cuff repairs is mainly impaired by poor tissue quality. Demineralised bone matrix promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface but its role in the treatment of tendon tears with retraction has not been investigated. We hypothesized that cortical demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells will result in improved function and restoration of the tendon-bone interface with no difference between xenogenic and allogenic scaffolds.In an ovine model, the patellar tendon was detached from the tibial tuberosity and a complete distal tendon transverse defect measuring 1 cm was created. Suture anchors were used to reattach the tendon and xenogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5, or allogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5 were used to bridge the defect. Graft incorporation into the tendon and its effect on regeneration of the enthesis was assessed using histomorphometry. Force plate analysis was used to assess functional recovery.Compared to the xenograft, the allograft was associated with significantly higher functional weight bearing at 6 (P = 0.047, 9 (P = 0.028, and 12 weeks (P = 0.009. In the allogenic group this was accompanied by greater remodeling of the demineralised bone matrix into tendon-like tissue in the region of the defect (p = 0.015, and a more direct type of enthesis characterized by significantly more fibrocartilage (p = 0.039. No failures of tendon-bone healing were noted in either group.Demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface in an ovine model of acute tendon retraction, with superior mechanical and histological results associated with use of an allograft.

  6. Challenges of Implementing New Technologies for Sustainable Energy. Opening address at the Sixth Grove Fuel Cell Symposium, London, 13-16 September 1999

    Jørgen Koch, Hans

    To meet the commitments made in Kyoto, energy-related CO 2 emissions would have to fall to almost 30% below the level projected for a "Business-As-Usual" scenario. Meeting this goal will require a large-scale shift toward climate-friendly technologies such as fuel cells, which have a large long-term potential for both stationary generation and transportation. The deployment of a technology is the last major stage in the process of technological shift. Climate-friendly technologies are not being deployed at a sufficient rate or in sufficient amount to allow IEA countries to meet their targets. Hence, if technology is to play an important roll in reducing emissions within the Kyoto time frame (2008-2012) and beyond, immediate and sustained action to accelerate technology deployment will be required. Obstacles in the way of the deployment of technologies that are ready or near-ready for normal use have come to be referred to as market barriers. The simplest yet most significant form of market barrier to a new technology is the out-of-pocket cost to the user relative to the cost of technologies currently in use. Some market barriers also involve market failure, where the market fails to take account of all the costs and benefits involved, such as omitting external environmental costs, and therefore retard the deployment of more environmentally sustainable technologies. Other barriers include poor information dissemination, excessive and costly regulations, slow capital turnover rates, and inadequate financing. Efforts by governments to alleviate market barriers play an important role to complement private-sector activities, and there are many policies and measures each government could take. In addition, international technology collaboration can help promote the best use of available R&D resources and can contribute to more effective deployment of the result of research and development by sharing costs, pooling information and avoiding duplication of efforts.

  7. Risk of Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation to Humans Symposium Annual Meeting of the Environmental Mutagen Society: Agenda and Abstracts

    Veigl, Martina L. [Environmental Mutagen Society (EMS), Reston, VA (United States); Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Morgan, William F. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schwartz, Jeffrey L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2009-11-11

    The low dose symposium thoughtfully addressed controversy of risk from low dose radiation exposure, hormesis and radon therapy. The stem cell symposium cogently considered the role of DNA damage and repair in hematopoietic stem cells underlying aging and malignancy and provocatively presented evidence that stem cells may have distinct morphologies and replicative properties, as well as special roles in cancer initiation. In the epigenetics symposium, studies illustrated the long range interaction of epigenetic mechanisms, the roles of CTCF and BORIS in region/specific regulation of epigenetic processes, the impact of DNA damage on epigenetic processes as well as links between epigenetic mechanisms and early nutrition and bystander effects. This report shows the agenda and abstracts for this symposium.

  8. Wood chemistry symposium: from muka to lignin

    MacLeod, M.

    1979-01-01

    The Canadian Wood Chemistry Symposium held during September, 1979, is reviewed. The chemical and physical explanations of delignification were debated. Problems of mechanical pulping include insufficient brightness, yellowing, and low strength relative to energy consumption. A session on chemicals, energy, and food from wood began with criteria for a viable project, which included adequate return on investment, modest capital investment requirements, identified pre-existing markets, and favorable thermodynamic balances. The pulp and paper industry should improve its methods of using bark and wood waste in direct combustion (by pre-drying wastes and improving furnace efficiency) rather than supporting oil-from-wood projects, since using a waste for fuel will free fossil fuels for uses in synthetic fibers and thermoplastics. In the area of food, there are modest successes with cellulose fiber additives to bread and snack food and single cell protein (which, though made from wastes, cannot compete with soy protein). However, making monomeric sugars from wood polysaccharides is not an efficient process, and muka, animal feed supplement from foliage, is successful only in Russia. In Canada it cannot compete with agricultural products. Alpha cellulose is a major wood chemical product. Promising uses include cellulose derived thermoplastics and lignosulphonates for secondary oil recovery. Instead of breaking wood polysaccharides and lignin into monomers and then repolymerizing them, it is possible to use the pre-built polymers; such an approach is illustrated by use of lignin in polyurethane foams, adhesives, and coatings.

  9. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base

  10. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    None

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  11. World Population Day special symposium.

    1998-08-01

    This article describes Japan's celebration of World Population Day, and provides excerpts from speeches at the symposium held on July 8, 1998. The symposium, in Tokyo, was attended by about 300 people. The Chairman of JOICFP gave the opening address. The executive director of UNFPA congratulated Japan for its efforts in the field of population awareness and noted Japan's self-sufficiency despite its importation of 40% of its food and most of its raw materials. A keynote address was delivered by the president of CPE and the former UN Secretary General, who stressed income inequities in the 66% of developing countries within the 185 UN member states. The UN has been promoting sustainable development, but is facing the issue of limited arable land and population growth. The Tutsi and Hutus are fighting due to population based issues. The emphasis should be on women's reproductive rights and protection of women's human rights. 1998 is the 50th year of human rights; progress has been made. The UNFPA Goodwill Ambassador spoke about the disparity between the rich and poor in the Philippines. A small donation reaps incredible progress. Manila has high levels of adolescent childbearing. Men appear to be unaware of the disadvantages of childbearing too early. Rural areas are dominated by strict Roman Catholic beliefs. Manila has commercial sex workers who provide services to Japanese men. The 1998 Kato Award was given to women who raised awareness about coercion in the sex trade and female genital mutilation. The economic situation in Japan creates even greater need to promote family planning and reproductive health.

  12. International waste-management symposium

    Shoup, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    An International Symposium on the Management of Wastes from the LWR Fuel Cycle was held in Denver, Colo., on July 11 to 16, 1976. The symposium covered a broad range of topics, from policy issues to technology. Presentations were made by national and international speakers involved in all aspects of waste management, government and agency officials; laboratory managers, directors, and researchers; and industrial representatives. Many speakers advocated pragmatic action on programs for the management of commercial nuclear wastes to complete the light-water reactor (LWR) fuel cycle. The industrialized nations' demand for increasing supplies of energy and their increasing dependence on nuclear energy to fulfill this demand will necessitate the development of an acceptable solution to the disposal of nuclear wastes within the next decade for some industrial nations. Waste-disposal technology should be implemented on a commercial scale, but the commercialization must be accompanied by the decision to use the technology. An important issue in the use of nuclear energy is the question of sharing the technology with the less industrialized nations and with nations that may not have suitable means to dispose of nuclear wastes. The establishment of international and multinational cooperation will be an important key in realizing this objective. Pressing issues that international organizations or task groups will have to address are ocean disposal, plutonium recycling and safeguards, and disposal criteria. The importance of achieving a viable waste-management program is made evident by the increased funding and attention that the back end of the fuel cycle is now receiving

  13. Introduction and Overview of the Symposium Anil Kumar (Indian ...

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Introduction and Overview of the Symposium Anil Kumar (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore). Symposium on Quantum Computing and Quantum Information. Notes:

  14. Changes in 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose incorporation, hexokinase activity and lactate production by breast cancer cells responding to treatment with the anti-HER-2 antibody trastuzumab

    Cheyne, Richard W. [School of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Trembleau, Laurent; McLaughlin, Abbie [School of Natural and Computing Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Smith, Tim A.D., E-mail: t.smith@abdn.ac.u [School of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: Changes in 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) incorporation by tumors, detected using positron emission tomography, during response to chemotherapy are utilized clinically in patient management. Here, the effect of treatment with growth-inhibitory doses of the anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) on the incorporation of FDG by breast tumor cells was measured along with hexokinase (HK) and glucose transport to determine the potential of FDG-positron emission tomography in predicting response to these biological anti-cancer therapies and their modulatory effects on the steps involved in FDG incorporation. Methods: The sensitivity to trastuzumab of three breast tumor cell lines, SKBr3, MDA-MB-453 and MDA-MB-468, expressing human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 at high, medium and low levels, respectively, was determined using MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay over a 6-day period, and a clonogenic assay was carried out after 7- and 10-day exposures. FDG incorporation by cells treated with growth-inhibitory doses of trastuzumab was carried out after 4 h and 2, 4 and 6 days of treatment. Glucose transport (rate of uptake of the non-metabolizable analogue [{sup 3}H]O-methyl-D-glucose), HK activity and lactate production were measured on cells treated with inhibitory doses of trastuzumab for 6 days. Results: The IC{sub 50} doses for SKBr3 and MDA-MB-453 and the IC{sub 20} dose for MDA-MB-468 after 6 days of treatment with trastuzumab were 0.25, 1 and 170 {mu}g/ml, respectively. FDG incorporation by SKBr3 and MDA-MB-453 cells was found to be decreased using IC{sub 50} doses of trastuzumab for 6 days. At the IC{sub 50} doses, FDG incorporation was also decreased at 4 days and, in the case of MDA-MB-453, even after 4 h of treatment. Decreased FDG incorporation corresponded with decreased HK activity in these cells. Lactate production, previously suggested to be a

  15. 2. Symposium environmental geotechnics. Papers; 2. Symposium Umweltgeotechnik. Konferenzband

    Klapperich, H. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Geotechnik]|[Kompetenz-Zentrum fuer interdisziplinaeres Flaechenrecycling CIF e.V., Freiberg (ED); Katzenbach, R. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Geotechnike e.V., Essen (Germany); Witt, K.J. [Bauhaus-Universitaet Weimar (Germany); Griessl, D. (eds.) [Verein Freiberger Geotechniker e.V. (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The 2nd symposium of the chapter section 'Environmental Geotechnics' of DGGT follows the event in Weimar 2003 and focuses on the central topics of Landfill - Contaminated Sites - Brownfields. The stream 'Waste management - Waste Site technology' discusses legal requirements and technical alternatives, especially in view of many upcoming closures of landfill sites and associated surface sealing, as well as technical reports of case studies and developments. The contribution 'Ultimate storage of radioactive waste' illustrates the wider dimensions to geotechnical questions. Between the streams of 'Remediation Techniques' and 'Land Recycling/Land Management' a panel discussion 'From Brownfield Remediation to Land Management' is taking place. The aim is to discuss the way forward and the need to take up the opportunity for future town planning as well as the design of conversion sites and expansive former mining areas. Representatives of authorities involved and project participants have submitted their statements in advance to the following question: 1.) status of remediation - research and practice 2.) what practical significance is attributed to different remediation techniques for the remediation of brownfields? 3.) modern town planning/redevelopment of former mining areas - spatial planning - real estate economy - financing models for redeveloping land - which parameters/instruments work? (orig.)

  16. Toward human organ printing: Charleston Bioprinting Symposium.

    Mironov, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The First Annual Charleston Bioprinting Symposium was organized by the Bioprinting Research Center of the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and convened July 21, 2006, in Charleston, South Carolina. In broad terms, bioprinting is the application of rapid prototyping technology to the biomedical field. More specifically, it is defined as the layer by layer deposition of biologically relevant material. The 2006 Symposium included four sessions: Computer-aided design and Bioprinting, Bioprinting Technologies; Hydrogel for Bioprinting and, finally, a special session devoted to ongoing research projects at the MUSC Bioprinting Research Center. The Symposium highlight was the presentation of the multidisciplinary Charleston Bioengineered Kidney Project. This symposium demonstrated that bioprinting or robotic biofabrication is one of the most exciting and fast-emerging branches in the tissue engineering field. Robotic biofabrication will eventually lead to industrial production of living human organs suitable for clinical transplantation. The symposium demonstrated that although there are still many technological challenges, organ printing is a rapidly evolving feasible technology.

  17. Proceedings of the symposium on networking

    Karita, Yukio; Abe, Fumio

    1989-06-01

    The first symposium on networking was held on February 6-7, 1989. Due to the increase of the needs of computer networks, several networks which connect among universities and laboratories are going to be constructed in Japan. However, the techniques in networking are not familiar to most people, and the information about these techniques is sometimes difficult to get, especially in multivendor connection. In such situation, an opportunity to hold a symposium on networking at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK) was given. More than 200 people took part in this symposium, and the local area networks in institutions, the networks among institutions, the networks for high energy physics, the application of networks, the networks for academic research and so on are reported. The valuable discussion about networks was carried out, including the plans for near future. At the time of this symposium, the construction of the Gakujo-net and the Pacific network project of University of Hawaii were in progress, and many Japanese universities are going to construct their campus LANs, so the symposium seemed to be very timely. (K.I.)

  18. 7th International Fermi Symposium

    2017-10-01

    especially encourage guest investigators worldwide to participate in this symposium to share results and to learn about upcoming opportunities. This meeting will focus on the new scientific investigations and results enabled by Fermi, the mission and instrument characteristics, future opportunities, coordinated observations and analysis techniques. In particular, we also encourage discussion of future prospects/science with Fermi in preparation for the upcoming NASA senior review. Details on the 7th International Fermi Symposium can be found here: https://events.mpe.mpg.de/Fermi2017

  19. Enhanced photovoltaic performance and long-term stability of dye-sensitized solar cells by incorporating SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in binary ionic liquid electrolytes

    Lee, Hsin-Fang; Wu, Jhih-Lin; Hsu, Po-Ya [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tung, Yung-Liang [Energy and Environment Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Ouyang, Fan-Yi [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kai, Ji-Jung, E-mail: jjkai@ess.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-02-01

    Hydrophilic SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in a binary ionic liquid (bi-IL) consisting of 1-propyl-3-methylimidazolium iodide (PMII) and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium dicyanimide (EMIDCA) facilitated electron transfer and solidified the electrolyte for a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC). We investigated the dependence of charge transport and photovoltaic performance on the composition of bi-IL electrolytes with varied ratio of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. The electrochemical impedance spectra revealed a decreased resistance to charge transfer at the Pt counter electrode (R{sub ct1}) when SiO{sub 2} (up to 2.0 wt.%) was added, improving the photovoltaic parameters. The DSC based on a TiO{sub 2} nanocrystalline film (thickness 14.2 μm) with a composite ionic gel electrolyte of EMIDCA/PMII bi-IL (33 vol.% of EMIDCA) incorporating SiO{sub 2} (2 wt.%) exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 5.28% under simulated solar illumination (AM 1.5 G, 100 mW cm{sup −} {sup 2}). The durability of DSC with a SiO{sub 2} solidified electrolyte was superior to that of a liquid one, exhibiting good stability at 60 °C in darkness during an accelerated test for 1000 h. - Highlights: ► SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were introduced in a binary ionic liquid electrolyte. ► Effect of various ratios of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in gel electrolytes was studied. ► Mechanism of charge transfer with addition of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was discussed. ► An enhanced solar to electric energy conversion efficiency of 5.28% was achieved. ► Thermal stability of a quasi-solid state dye-sensitized solar cell was improved.

  20. Incorporating C60 as Nucleation Sites Optimizing PbI2 Films To Achieve Perovskite Solar Cells Showing Excellent Efficiency and Stability via Vapor-Assisted Deposition Method.

    Chen, Hai-Bin; Ding, Xi-Hong; Pan, Xu; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Ding, Yong; Dai, Song-Yuan

    2018-01-24

    To achieve high-quality perovskite solar cells (PSCs), the morphology and carrier transportation of perovskite films need to be optimized. Herein, C 60 is employed as nucleation sites in PbI 2 precursor solution to optimize the morphology of perovskite films via vapor-assisted deposition process. Accompanying the homogeneous nucleation of PbI 2 , the incorporation of C 60 as heterogeneous nucleation sites can lower the nucleation free energy of PbI 2 , which facilitates the diffusion and reaction between PbI 2 and organic source. Meanwhile, C 60 could enhance carrier transportation and reduce charge recombination in the perovskite layer due to its high electron mobility and conductivity. In addition, the grain sizes of perovskite get larger with C 60 optimizing, which can reduce the grain boundaries and voids in perovskite and prevent the corrosion because of moisture. As a result, we obtain PSCs with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 18.33% and excellent stability. The PCEs of unsealed devices drop less than 10% in a dehumidification cabinet after 100 days and remain at 75% of the initial PCE during exposure to ambient air (humidity > 60% RH, temperature > 30 °C) for 30 days.

  1. Theoretical Insight into Organic Dyes Incorporating Triphenylamine-Based Donors and Binary π-Conjugated Bridges for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Shuxian Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of light-absorbent sensitizers with sustainable and environment-friendly material is one of the key issues for the future development of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. In this work, a series of organic sensitizers incorporating alkoxy-substituted triphenylamine (tpa donors and binary π-conjugated bridges were investigated using density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT. Molecular geometry, electronic structure, and optical absorption spectra are analyzed in the gas phase, chloroform, and dimethylformamide (DMF solutions. Our results show that properly choosing the heteroaromatic atoms and/or adding one more alkoxy-substituted tpa group can finely adjust the molecular orbital energy. The solvent effect renders the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the tpa-based sensitizers decrease in the sequence of DMF solution < chloroform solution < gas phase. The absorption spectra are assigned to the ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT characteristics via transitions mainly from tpa, 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (edot, and alkyl-substituted dithienosilole (dts groups to edot, dts, and cyanoacrylic acid groups. The binary π-conjugated bridges play different roles in balancing the electron transfer and recombination for the different tpa-based sensitizers. The protonation/deprotonation effect has great effect on the HOMO-LUMO gaps and thus has great influence on the bands at the long wavelength region, but little influence on the bands at the short wavelength region.

  2. Optical-Electrical-Chemical Engineering of PEDOT:PSS by Incorporation of Hydrophobic Nafion for Efficient and Stable Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Ma, Shuang; Qiao, Wenyuan; Cheng, Tai; Zhang, Bing; Yao, Jianxi; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hayat, Tasawar; Ding, Yong; Tan, Zhan'ao; Dai, Songyuan

    2018-01-31

    In PIN-type perovskite solar cells (PSCs), the hydroscopicity and acidity of the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene-sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) hole transport layer (HTL) have critical influences on the device stability. To eliminate these problems, Nafion, the hydrophobic perfluorosulfonic copolymer, is incorporated into PEDOT:PSS by a simple spin-coating process. For the modified film, Nafion/PSSH (poly(styrene sulfonate) acid) acts as an electron-blocking layer on the surface and the PEDOT-rich domain tends to gather into larger particles with better interchain charge transfer inside the film. Consequently, the modified PEDOT:PSS HTL shows enhanced conductivity and light transmittance as well as more favorable work function, ending up with the increased short-circuit current density (J sc ) and open-circuit voltage (V oc ) of the device. Finally, PSCs with Nafion-modified HTLs achieve the best power conversion efficiency of 16.72%, with 23.76% improvement compared with PEDOT:PSS-only devices (13.51%). Most importantly, the device stability is obviously enhanced because of the hydrophobicity and chemical and mechanical stability of the Nafion polymer that is enriched on the surface of the PEDOT:PSS film.

  3. Incorporation of Mn2+ into CdSe quantum dots by chemical bath co-deposition method for photovoltaic enhancement of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    Zhang, Chenguang; Liu, Shaowen; Liu, Xingwei; Deng, Fei; Xiong, Yan; Tsai, Fang-Chang

    2018-03-01

    A photoelectric conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.9% was obtained under 100 mW cm -2 illumination by quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) using a CdS/Mn : CdSe sensitizer. CdS quantum dots (QDs) were deposited on a TiO 2 mesoporous oxide film by successive ionic layer absorption and reaction. Mn 2+ doping into CdSe QDs is an innovative and simple method-chemical bath co-deposition, that is, mixing the Mn ion source with CdSe precursor solution for Mn : CdSe QD deposition. Compared with the CdS/CdSe sensitizer without Mn 2+ incorporation, the PCE was increased from 3.4% to 4.9%. The effects of Mn 2+ doping on the chemical, physical and photovoltaic properties of the QDSSCs were investigated by energy dispersive spectrometry, absorption spectroscopy, photocurrent density-voltage characteristics and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Mn-doped CdSe QDs in QDSSCs can obtain superior light absorption, faster electron transport and slower charge recombination than CdSe QDs.

  4. Cell cycle synchronization and BrdU incorporation as a tool to study the possible selective elimination of ErbB1 gene in the micronuclei in A549 cells

    Lauand, C.; Niero, E.L.; Dias, V.M.; Machado-Santelli, G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer often exhibits molecular changes, such as the overexpression of the ErbB1 gene that encodes epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). ErbB1 amplification and mutation are associated with tumor aggressiveness and low response to therapy. The aim of the present study was to design a schedule to synchronize the cell cycle of A549 cell line (a non-small cell lung cancer) and to analyze the possible association between the micronuclei (MNs) and the extrusion of ErbB1 gene extra-copies. After double blocking, by the process of fetal bovine serum deprivation and vincristine treatment, MNs formation was monitored with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, which is an S-phase marker. Statistical analyses allowed us to infer that MNs may arise both in mitosis as well as in interphase. The MNs were able to replicate their DNA and this process seemed to be non-synchronous with the main cell nuclei. The presence of ErbB1 gene in the MNs was evaluated by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). ErbB1 sequences were detected in the MNs, but a relation between the MNs formation and extrusion of amplified ErbB1could not be established. The present study sought to elucidate the meaning of MNs formation and its association with the elimination of oncogenes or other amplified sequences from the tumor cells

  5. Cell cycle synchronization and BrdU incorporation as a tool to study the possible selective elimination of ErbB1 gene in the micronuclei in A549 cells

    Lauand, C.; Niero, E.L.; Dias, V.M.; Machado-Santelli, G.M. [Departamento de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-06

    Lung cancer often exhibits molecular changes, such as the overexpression of the ErbB1 gene that encodes epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). ErbB1 amplification and mutation are associated with tumor aggressiveness and low response to therapy. The aim of the present study was to design a schedule to synchronize the cell cycle of A549 cell line (a non-small cell lung cancer) and to analyze the possible association between the micronuclei (MNs) and the extrusion of ErbB1 gene extra-copies. After double blocking, by the process of fetal bovine serum deprivation and vincristine treatment, MNs formation was monitored with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, which is an S-phase marker. Statistical analyses allowed us to infer that MNs may arise both in mitosis as well as in interphase. The MNs were able to replicate their DNA and this process seemed to be non-synchronous with the main cell nuclei. The presence of ErbB1 gene in the MNs was evaluated by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). ErbB1 sequences were detected in the MNs, but a relation between the MNs formation and extrusion of amplified ErbB1could not be established. The present study sought to elucidate the meaning of MNs formation and its association with the elimination of oncogenes or other amplified sequences from the tumor cells.

  6. Bioinformatics Symposium of the Analytical Division of the American Chemical Society Meeting. Final Technical Report from 03/15/2000 to 03/14/2001 [sample pages of agenda, abstracts, index

    Kennedy, Robert T.

    2000-03-28

    Sparked by the Human Genome Project, biological and biomedical research has become an information science. Information tools are now being generated for proteins, cell modeling, and genomics. The opportunity for analytical chemistry in this new environment is profound. New analytical techniques that can provide the information on genes, SNPs, proteins, protein modifications, cells, and cell chemistry are required. In this symposium, we brought together both informatics experts and leading analytical chemists to discuss this interface. Over 200 people attended this highly successful symposium.

  7. 28th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    2012-01-01

    The University of Manchester hosted the 28th International Symposium on Shock Waves between 17 and 22 July 2011. The International Symposium on Shock Waves first took place in 1957 in Boston and has since become an internationally acclaimed series of meetings for the wider Shock Wave Community. The ISSW28 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reacting Flows, Dense Gases and Rarefied Flows, Detonation and Combustion, Diagnostics, Facilities, Flow Visualisation, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Multiphase Flow, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov, Shockwave Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shockwave Phenomena and Applications, as well as Medical and Biological Applications. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 28 and individuals interested in these fields.

  8. Proceedings of the second ERDA statistical symposium

    Tietjen, G.; Campbell, K. (comps.)

    1977-04-01

    The Second ERDA Statistical Symposium, sponsored by the Energy Research and Development Administration, was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 25-27, 1976. This was the second annual symposium designed to promote interlaboratory communications among ERDA statisticians as well as contacts with statisticians from other institutions. The proceedings of the first symposium, held at Los Alamos in November, 1975, have been published by Batelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNWL-1986). Separate abstracts were prepared for seven of the papers in this proceeding, all going in ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) and two in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). The remaining four have already been cited in ERA and can be found by referring to CONF-761023-- in the report number index. (RWR)

  9. 6th International Symposium on Thermal Expansion

    1978-01-01

    This 6th International Symposium on Thermal Expansion, the first outside the USA, was held on August 29-31, 1977 at the Gull Harbour Resort on Hecla Island, Manitoba, Canada. Symposium Chairman was Ian D. Peggs, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and our continuing sponsor was CINDAS/Purdue University. We made considerable efforts to broaden the base this year to include more users of expansion data but with little success. We were successful, however, in establishing a session on liquids, an area which is receiving more attention as a logical extension to the high-speed thermophysical property measurements on materials at temperatures close to their melting points. The Symposium had good international representation but the overall attendance was, disappointingly, relatively low. Neverthe­ less, this enhanced the informal atmosphere throughout the meeting with a resultant frank exchange of information and ideas which all attendees appreciated. A totally new item this year was the presentation of a bursary to ...

  10. 22nd DAE High Energy Physics Symposium

    2018-01-01

    These proceedings gather invited and contributed talks presented at the XXII DAE-BRNS High Energy Physics (HEP) Symposium, which was held at the University of Delhi, India, on 12–16 December 2016. The contributions cover a variety of topics in particle physics, astroparticle physics, cosmology and related areas from both experimental and theoretical perspectives, namely (1) Neutrino Physics, (2) Standard Model Physics (including Electroweak, Flavour Physics), (3) Beyond Standard Model Physics, (4) Heavy Ion Physics & QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics), (5) Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology, (6) Future Experiments and Detector Development, (7) Formal Theory, and (8) Societal Applications: Medical Physics, Imaging, etc. The DAE-BRNS High Energy Physics Symposium, widely considered to be one of the leading symposiums in the field of Elementary Particle Physics, is held every other year in India and supported by the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences (BRNS), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), India. As man...

  11. 28th International Acoustical Imaging Symposium

    André, Michael P; Andre, Michael; Arnold, Walter; Bamber, Jeff; Burov, Valentin; Chubachi, Noriyoshi; Erikson, Kenneth; Ermert, Helmut; Fink, Mathias; Gan, Woon S; Granz, Bernd; Greenleaf, James; Hu, Jiankai; Jones, Joie P; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Laugier, Pascal; Lee, Hua; Lees, Sidney; Levin, Vadim M; Maev, Roman; Masotti, Leonardo; Nowicki, Andrzej; O’Brien, William; Prasad, Manika; Rafter, Patrick; Rouseff, Daniel; Thijssen, Johan; Tittmann, Bernard; Tortoli, Piero; Steen, Anton; Waag, Robert; Wells, Peter; Acoustical Imaging

    2007-01-01

    The International Acoustical Imaging Symposium has been held continuously since 1968 as a unique forum for advanced research, promoting the sharing of technology, developments, methods and theory among all areas of acoustics. The interdisciplinary nature of the Symposium and the wide international participation are two of its main strengths. Scientists from around the world present their papers in an informal environment conducive to lively discussion and cross-fertilization. The fact that a loyal community of scientists has supported this Series since 1968 is evidence of its impact on the field. The Symposium Series continues to thrive in a busy calendar of scientific meetings without the infrastructure of a professional society. It does so because those who attend and those who rely on the Proceedings as a well-known reference work acknowledge its value. This Volume 28 of the Proceedings likewise contains an excellent collection of papers presented in six major categories, offering both a broad perspective ...

  12. 30th International Acoustical Imaging Symposium

    Jones, Joie; Lee, Hua

    2011-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2009 the 30th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Monterey, CA, USA, March 1-4. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 30 in the Series contains an excellent collection of forty three papers presented in five major categories: Biomedical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation Systems Analysis Signal Analysis and Image Processing Audience Researchers in medical imaging and biomedical instrumentation experts.

  13. Interdisciplinary Symposium on Complex Systems

    Zelinka, Ivan; Rössler, Otto

    2014-01-01

    The book you hold in your hands is the outcome of the "ISCS 2013: Interdisciplinary Symposium on Complex Systems" held at the historical capital of Bohemia as a continuation of our series of symposia in the science of complex systems. Prague, one of the most beautiful European cities, has its own beautiful genius loci. Here, a great number of important discoveries were made and many important scientists spent fruitful and creative years to leave unforgettable traces. The perhaps most significant period was the time of Rudolf II who was a great supporter of the art and the science and attracted a great number of prominent minds to Prague. This trend would continue. Tycho Brahe, Niels Henrik Abel, Johannes Kepler, Bernard Bolzano, August Cauchy Christian Doppler, Ernst Mach, Albert Einstein and many others followed developing fundamental mathematical and physical theories or expanding them. Thus in the beginning of the 17th century, Kepler formulated here the first two of his three laws of planetary motion on ...

  14. Fourth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.; Watson, E.E.

    1986-04-01

    The focus of the Fourth International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium was to explore the impact of current developments in nuclear medicine on absorbed dose calculations. This book contains the proceedings of the meeting including the edited discussion that followed the presentations. Topics that were addressed included the dosimetry associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and blood elements, ultrashort-lived radionuclides, and positron emitters. Some specific areas of discussion were variations in absorbed dose as a result of alterations in the kinetics, the influence of radioactive contaminants on dose, dose in children and in the fetus, available instrumentation and techniques for collecting the kinetic data needed for dose calculation, dosimetry requirements for the review and approval of new radiopharmaceuticals, and a comparison of the effect on the thyroid of internal versus external irradiation. New models for the urinary blader, skeleton including the active marrow, and the blood were presented. Several papers dealt with the validity of traditional ''average-organ'' dose estimates to express the dose from particulate radiation that has a short range in tissue. These problems are particularly important in the use of monoclonal antibodies and agents used to measure intracellular functions. These proceedings have been published to provide a resource volume for anyone interested in the calculation of absorbed radiation dose

  15. Symposium 3 of JENAM 2010

    Recchi, Simone; Hensler, Gerhard; Dwarf Galaxies Keys to Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    2012-01-01

    Dwarf galaxy research constitutes an extremely vibrant field of astrophysical research, with many long-standing questions still unsettled and new ones constantly arising. The intriguing diversity of the dwarf galaxy population, observed with advanced ground-based and space-borne observatories over a wide spectral window providing an unprecedented level of detail, poses new challenges for both observers and theoreticians. The aim of this symposium was to bring together these two groups to exchange ideas and new results on the many evolutionary aspects of and open issues concerning dwarf galaxies. The main topics addressed include: • the birth of dwarf galaxies: theoretical concepts and observable relics across wavelength and time • the morphological, structural and chemical evolution of dwarf galaxies • possible evolutionary connections between early-type and late-type dwarfs • the star formation history of dwarf galaxies and its dependence on intrinsic and environmental properties • the origin ...

  16. Symposium 5 of JENAM 2010 /

    Alves, João; Star clusters in the era of large surveys

    2012-01-01

    The symposium “Star Clusters in the Era of Large Surveys” was held in Lisbon on Sep 9-10 during the JENAM 2010. It served as a platform for discussing what and how recent, on-going and planned large-area ground-based and space-based surveys can contribute to producing a major leap in this research field, which has a strong European history. Scientific topics addressed included: • Cluster searches • Clustered vs. isolated star formation, large-scale star formation, enrichment of the field population • Structure, populations and evolution of the Milky Way • Cluster dynamics (internal and within the Milky Way) • Variability of stars in clusters (from time-resolved surveys) • Analysis techniques for large samples • Archiving This proceedings book provides a snapshot of the ongoing discussion on the role of large surveys in star cluster research, and serves as a reference volume for the state-of-the art in the field.

  17. 2. Symposium environmental geotechnics. Papers

    Klapperich, H.; Katzenbach, R.; Witt, K.J.; Griessl, D.

    2005-01-01

    The 2nd symposium of the chapter section 'Environmental Geotechnics' of DGGT follows the event in Weimar 2003 and focuses on the central topics of Landfill - Contaminated Sites - Brownfields. The stream 'Waste management - Waste Site technology' discusses legal requirements and technical alternatives, especially in view of many upcoming closures of landfill sites and associated surface sealing, as well as technical reports of case studies and developments. The contribution 'Ultimate storage of radioactive waste' illustrates the wider dimensions to geotechnical questions. Between the streams of 'Remediation Techniques' and 'Land Recycling/Land Management' a panel discussion 'From Brownfield Remediation to Land Management' is taking place. The aim is to discuss the way forward and the need to take up the opportunity for future town planning as well as the design of conversion sites and expansive former mining areas. Representatives of authorities involved and project participants have submitted their statements in advance to the following question: 1.) status of remediation - research and practice 2.) what practical significance is attributed to different remediation techniques for the remediation of brownfields? 3.) modern town planning/redevelopment of former mining areas - spatial planning - real estate economy - financing models for redeveloping land - which parameters/instruments work? (orig.)

  18. 2016 AMS Mario J. Molina Symposium

    Zhang, Renyi [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-11-29

    A named symposium to honor Dr. Mario J. Molina was held 10–14 January 2016, as part of the 96th American Meteorological Society (AMS) Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Molina first demonstrated that industrially produced chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) decompose in the stratosphere and release chlorine atoms, leading to catalytic ozone destruction. His research in stratospheric chemistry was instrumental to the establishment of the 1987 United Nations Montreal Protocol to ban ozone-depleting substances worldwide. Dr. Molina’s contributions to preserving the planet Earth not only save the atmospheric ozone layer, but also protect the climate by reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases. He was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering research in understanding the stratospheric ozone loss mechanism. In 2013, President Barack Obama announced Dr. Molina as a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The 2016 AMS Molina Symposium honored Dr. Molina’s distinguished contributions to research related to atmospheric chemistry. The symposium contained an integrated theme related to atmospheric chemistry, climate, and policy. Dr. Molina delivered a keynote speech at the Symposium. The conference included invited keynote speeches and invited and contributed oral and poster sessions, and a banquet was held on Tuesday January 12, 2016. The symposium covered all aspects of atmospheric chemistry, with topics including (1) Stratospheric chemistry, (2) Tropospheric chemistry, (3) Aerosol nucleation, growth, and transformation, (4) Aerosol properties, (5) Megacity air pollution, and (6) Atmospheric chemistry laboratory, field, and modeling studies. This DOE project supported 14 scientists, including graduate students, post docs, junior research scientists, and non-tenured assistant professors to attend this symposium.

  19. 11th AG STAB/DGLR Symposium

    Heinemann, Hans-Joachim; Hilbig, Reinhard

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains the papers of the 11th Symposium of the AG STAB (German Aerospace Aerodynamics Association). In this association those scientists and engineers from universities, research-establishments and industry are involved, who are doing research and project work in numerical and experimental fluid mechanics and aerodynamics for aerospace and other applications. Many of the contributions are giving results from the "Luftfahrtforschungsprogramm der Bundesregierung (German Aeronautical Research Programme). Some of the papers report on work sponsored by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG, which also was presented at the symposium. The volume gives a broad overview over the ongoing work in this field in Germany.

  20. Transport arrangements for the scientific symposium

    2000-01-01

    Parking in the region of building 180 will be severely restricted during the LEPFest scientific symposium of 10-11 October, and a special bus service will operate to ferry people to and from the event. From 8:00 am, buses will leave the reception at building 33, stop to pickup passengers outside the hostels (buildings 38 and 39), and drop people off at the symposium venue - building 180. At the end of each day’s proceedings, the buses will bring people back, and through out the day a shuttle service will operate around every 15-20 minutes. Attendees are strongly recommended to use the buses.

  1. Outcome of UNIDO symposium on biomass energy

    Nazemi, A.H.

    1997-01-01

    The results of the UNIDO symposium are presented. The symposium covered a variety of subjects, beginning with a comparison of biomass energy production and potential uses in different regions, specific country case studies about the present situation and trends in biomass energy utilisation. Technological aspects discussed included the production of biomass resources, their conversion into energy carriers and technology transfer to developing countries. An analysis of financial resources available and mechanisms for funding biomass projects were given. Environmental effects and some relatively successful biomass projects under development were described. (K.A.)

  2. Proceedings of the international symposium NUCEF 2005

    NONE

    2005-08-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) held the international symposium NUCEF 2005 at Techno Community Square RICOTTI in Tokai-mura on February 9 and 10, 2005. This symposium was co-organized by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), and Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Research Committee authorized the program. Two hundred thirty-nine participants from 11 countries presented fifty-nine papers, and discussed recent research activities and its outputs on waste disposal safety, fuel cycle facility safety including criticality safety, and separation process development. The presented papers are compiled in the proceedings. (author)

  3. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions

  4. Quality assurance and demolition: 2006 symposium

    Thierfeldt, S.

    2006-01-01

    The '2006 Symposium: Quality Assurance and Demolition' jointly organized by compra GmbH and Brenk Systemplanung GmbH this year again focused on quality assurance and the demolition of nuclear facilities as its main topics. The papers presented ranged from issues of clearance and disposal to demolition technologies and status reports about specific demolition projects. The sixteen presentations at the '2006 Symposium: Quality Assurance and Demolition' offered an interesting and very topical cross section of decommissioning and demolition of nuclear facilities in Germany. In 2007, the conference about similar main topics will again be held at the Schloss Bensberg Grand Hotel. (orig.)

  5. Eleventh symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings

    1993-01-01

    The Eleventh Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences was held on May 3--5, 1993, at the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. These proceedings include the program, list of participants, and the papers that were presented during the eight technical sessions held at this meeting. This symposium was organized into eight technical sessions: Surfaces and interfaces; thermophysical properties and processes; inelastic behavior; nondestructive characterization; multiphase flow and thermal processes; optical and other measurement systems; stochastic processes; and large systems and control. Individual projects were processed separately for the databases

  6. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

  7. 2. symposium energy crops 2009; 2. Symposium Energiepflanzen 2009

    NONE

    2010-07-27

    Within the meeting '2nd Symposium energy plants 2009', held at 17th to 18th November, 2009, in Berlin (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) The bio energy policy of the Federal Government in the area of attention between climatic protection, ecology and economy (Ilse Aigner); (2) Chances and threatens of cultivation of energy plants for a sustainable energy supply (Alois Heissenhuber); (3) Certification as a prerequisite of the global exploration of bio energy (Andreas Feige); (4) A project support in the field of cultivation of energy plants, a review (Andreas Schuette); (5) Results from the investigation of the crop rotation in the EVA network (Armin Vater); (6) Optimisation of the cultivation technology of sorghum millets (Christian Roehricht); (7) The two-culture utilization system - a comparison between ecologic and conventional cultivation (Reinhold Stuelpnagel); (8) Crop rotation with energy plants - Chances and threatens for the plant protection (Baerbel Gerowitt); (9) Efficiency of utilization of water for energy plants (Siegfried Schittenhelm); (10) Utilization of arable food grasses and permanent grassland as a substrate for biogas (Matthias Benke); (11) Economical evaluation of plant fermentation substrates (Dominik Reus); (12) Energy plants as a challenge for the agricultural engineering (Heiner Bruening); (13) Influence of the design of cultivation on the subsequent effects of the cultivation of energy plants (Michael Glemnitz); (14) Energy plants and waters protection - Key aspects and possible options of action (Heike Nitsch); (15) Neophytes as energy plants - Chances and threatens (Werner Kuhn); (16) Manifold in te landscape - extensive cultivation systems with renewable raw materials as an option for nature protection? (Peer Heck); (17) Ecologic aspects of agro forestry systems (Holger Gruenewald); (18) Enhancement of the potential of energy yield of winter wheat (Wolfgang Friedt); (19) Interspersed silphie

  8. Summary Report on the SAE 2016 Range Extenders for Electric Vehicles Symposium

    Curran, Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wagner, Robert M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Campbell, Russ [SRA International, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The SAE 2016 Range Extenders for Electric Vehicles Symposium was a 2-day technical meeting focused on the role of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) and other novel energy converter technologies for extending the range of electric vehicles (EVs). The first-of-its-kind symposium was notable for focusing solely on the range extender (REx) technologies and not the EVs. The technical program featured presentations from international leaders from industry, government, national laboratories, and academia. The opening keynote presentations covered a broad range of topics including consumer behavior, policy implications, regulatory considerations, and REx architectures as enablers for advanced technologies. The technical sessions focused on an array of REx technologies including conventional ICEs, as well as less conventional or emerging technologies such as microturbines, fuel cells, low-temperature combustion engines, and aluminum-air batteries. The symposium included two panel sessions. The trend toward increasing vehicle electrification and the changing role of ICEs and other auxiliary power unit technologies for use as REx’s is leading to new research and design development needs. The symposium captured the interest of the industry and research communities in exploring the opportunities and challenges associated with REx’s for EVs. This report includes key takeaways, summarized below, and draft notes for each presentation and panel discussion.

  9. Symposium report of Inter-COE international symposium on energy systems

    2006-10-01

    The symposium of the title aims to discuss a comprehensive possibility of energy system technologies for future society utilizing both specialties of five COEs in energy technology field. The symposium topics include, 'Primary energy production', 'Energy conversion, storage and transportation', 'Energy materials', 'Energy system' by specialists from the COEs. Posters were presented by doctoral course students and others in the COEs, in addition special session 'Energy Research and Human Resources Development'. (J.P.N.)

  10. Incorporating Embedded Microporous Layers into Topologically Equivalent Pore Network Models for Oxygen Diffusivity Calculations in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Gas Diffusion Layers

    Fazeli, Mohammadreza; Hinebaugh, James; Bazylak, Aimy

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pore network model for modeling PEMFC MPL-coated GDL effective diffusivity. • Bilayered GDL (substrate and MPL) is modeled with a hybrid network of block MPL elements combined with discrete substrate pores. • Diffusivities of MPL-coated GDLs agree with analytical solutions. - Abstract: In this work, a voxel-based methodology is introduced for the hybridization of a pore network with interspersed nano-porous material elements allowing pore network based oxygen diffusivity calculations in a 3D image of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell gas diffusion layer (GDL) with an embedded microporous layer (MPL). The composite GDL is modeled by combining a hybrid network of block MPL elements with prescribed bulk material properties and a topologically equivalent network of larger discrete pores and throats that are directly derived from the 3D image of the GDL substrate. This hybrid network was incorporated into a pore network model, and effective diffusivity predictions of GDL materials with MPL coatings were obtained. Stochastically generated numerical models of carbon paper substrates with and without MPLs were used, and the pore space was directly extracted from this realistic geometry as the input for the pore network model. The effective diffusion coefficient of MPL-coated GDL materials was predicted from 3D images in a pore network modeling environment without resolving the nano-scale structure of the MPL. This method is particularly useful due to the disparate length scales that are involved when attempting to capture pore-scale transport in the GDL. Validation was performed by comparing our predicted diffusivity values to analytical predictions, and excellent agreement was observed. Upon conducting a mesh sensitivity study, it was determined that an MPL element size of 7 μm provided sufficiently high resolution for accurately describing the MPL nano-structure.

  11. Enhanced Proton Conductivity of Sulfonated Hybrid Poly(arylene ether ketone) Membranes by Incorporating an Amino-Sulfo Bifunctionalized Metal-Organic Framework for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    Ru, Chunyu; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Chengji; Duan, Yuting; Zhuang, Zhuang; Bu, Fanzhe; Na, Hui

    2018-03-07

    Novel side-chain-type sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) (SNF-PAEK) containing naphthalene and fluorine moieties on the main chain was prepared in this work, and a new amino-sulfo-bifunctionalized metal-organic framework (MNS, short for MIL-101-NH 2 -SO 3 H) was synthesized via a hydrothermal technology and postmodification. Then, MNS was incorporated into a SNF-PAEK matrix as an inorganic nanofiller to prepare a series of organic-inorganic hybrid membranes (MNS@SNF-PAEK-XX). The mechanical property, methanol resistance, electrochemistry, and other properties of MNS@SNF-PAEK-XX hybrid membranes were characterized in detail. We found that the mechanical strength and methanol resistances of these hybrid membranes were improved by the formation of an ionic cross-linking structure between -NH 2 of MNS and -SO 3 H on the side chain of SNF-PAEK. Particularly, the proton conductivity of these hybrid membranes increased obviously after the addition of MNS. MNS@SNF-PAEK-3% exhibited the proton conductivity of 0.192 S·cm -1 , which was much higher than those of the pristine membrane (0.145 S·cm -1 ) and recast Nafion (0.134 S·cm -1 ) at 80 °C. This result indicated that bifunctionalized MNS rearranged the microstructure of hybrid membranes, which could accelerate the transfer of protons. The hybrid membrane (MNS@SNF-PAEK-3%) showed a better direct methanol fuel cell performance with a higher peak power density of 125.7 mW/cm 2 at 80 °C and a higher open-circuit voltage (0.839 V) than the pristine membrane.

  12. Solid-Phase Synthesis of Difficult Purine-Rich PNAs through Selective Hmb Incorporation: Application to the Total Synthesis of Cell Penetrating Peptide-PNAs

    Julien Tailhades

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-based drug development is gaining significant momentum following the recent FDA approval of Eteplirsen (an ASO based on phosphorodiamidate morpholino and Spinraza (2′-O-methoxyethyl-phosphorothioate in late 2016. Their attractiveness is mainly due to the backbone modifications which have improved the in vivo characteristics of oligonucleotide drugs. Another class of ASO, based on peptide nucleic acid (PNA chemistry, is also gaining popularity as a platform for development of gene-specific therapy for various disorders. However, the chemical synthesis of long PNAs, which are more target-specific, remains an ongoing challenge. Most of the reported methodology for the solid-phase synthesis of PNA suffer from poor coupling efficiency which limits production to short PNA sequences of less than 15 residues. Here, we have studied the effect of backbone modifications with Hmb (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzyl and Dmb (2,4-dimethoxybenzyl to ameliorate difficult couplings and reduce “on-resin” aggregation. We firstly synthesized a library of PNA dimers incorporating either Hmb or Dmb and identified that Hmb is superior to Dmb in terms of its ease of removal. Subsequently, we used Hmb backbone modification to synthesize a 22-mer purine-rich PNA, targeting dystrophin RNA splicing, which could not be synthesized by standard coupling methodology. Hmb backbone modification allowed this difficult PNA to be synthesized as well as to be continued to include a cell-penetrating peptide on the same solid support. This approach provides a novel and straightforward strategy for facile solid-phase synthesis of difficult purine-rich PNA sequences.

  13. Solid-phase synthesis of difficult purine-rich PNAs through selective Hmb incorporation: Application to the total synthesis of cell penetrating peptide-PNAs

    Tailhades, Julien; Takizawa, Hotake; Gait, Michael J.; Wellings, Don A.; Wade, John D.; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Shabanpoor, Fazel

    2017-10-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide (ASO)-based drug development is gaining significant momentum following the recent FDA approval of Eteplirsen (an ASO based on phosphorodiamidate morpholino) and Spinraza (2’-O-methoxyethyl-phosphorothioate) in late 2016. Their attractiveness is mainly due to the backbone modifications which have improved the in vivo characteristics of oligonucleotide drugs. Another class of ASO, based on peptide nucleic acid (PNA) chemistry, is also gaining popularity as a platform for development of gene-specific therapy for various disorders. However, the chemical synthesis of long PNAs, which are more target-specific, remains an ongoing challenge. Most of the reported methodology for the solid-phase synthesis of PNA suffer from poor coupling efficiency which limits production to short PNA sequences of less than 15 residues. Here we have studied the effect of backbone modifications with Hmb (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzyl) and Dmb (2,4-dimethoxybenzyl) to ameliorate difficult couplings and reduce “on-resin” aggregation. We firstly synthesized a library of PNA dimers incorporating either Hmb or Dmb and identified that Hmb is superior to Dmb in terms of its ease of removal. Subsequently, we used Hmb backbone modification to synthesize a 22-mer purine-rich PNA, targeting dystrophin RNA splicing, which could not be synthesized by standard coupling methodology. Hmb backbone modification allowed this difficult PNA to be synthesized as well as to be continued to include a cell-penetrating peptide on the same solid support. This approach provides a novel and straightforward strategy for facile solid-phase synthesis of difficult purine-rich PNA sequences.

  14. Assessment of 3H-TdR incorporation for the viability of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells after freezing and thawing

    Zhang Hongquan; Shen Baijun; Fu Zengju

    1993-01-01

    The authors have studied 3 H-TdR incorporation rates of bone marrow MNC at different concentrations and incubation periods. The rates are compared with the viability of MNC preserved at different range of time and temperatures by means of 3 H-TdR incorporation combined with Trypan Blue and CFU-GM culture methods. The result suggested that 3 H-TdR incorporation was a sensitive and reliable assess to evaluate the viability of bone marrow MNC after cryopreservation and thawing

  15. Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genome and Epigenome Instability Symposium and Epigenetic Mechanisms, DNA Repair, and Chromatin Symposium at the EMS 2008 Annual Meeting - October 2008

    Morgan, William F; Kovalchuk, Olga; Dolinoy, Dana C; Dubrova, Yuri E; Coleman, Matthew A; Schär, Primo; Pogribny, Igor; Hendzel, Michael

    2010-02-19

    The Low Dose Radiation Symposium thoughtfully addressed ionizing radiation non-mutational but transmissable alterations in surviving cells. Deregulation of epigenetic processes has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, and there is increasing realization that a significant fraction of non-targeted and adaptive mechanisms in response to ionizing radiation are likely to be epigenetic in nature. Much remains to be learned about how chromatin and epigenetic regulators affect responses to low doses of radiation, and how low dose radiation impacts other epigenetic processes. The Epigenetic Mechanisms Symposium focused on on epigenetic mechanisms and their interplay with DNA repair and chromatin changes. Addressing the fact that the most well understood mediators of epigenetic regulation are histone modifications and DNA methylation. Low levels of radiation can lead to changes in the methylation status of certain gene promoters and the expression of DNA methyltransferases, However, epigenetic regulation can also involve changes in higher order chromosome structure.

  16. Data on cell growth inhibition induced by anti-VEGF siRNA delivered by Stealth liposomes incorporating G2 PAMAM-cholesterol versus Metafectene® as a function of exposure time and siRNA concentration

    Nasim Golkar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this data article, carboxyfluorescein-loaded liposomes were prepared and purified from free carboxyfluorescein using gel filtration chromatography in the first part. In the next part, following preparation of anti-VEGF siRNA loaded liposomes incorporating hydrophobically modified G2 PAMAM dendrimer (G2-Chol40% (Golkar et al., 2016 [1], the cell growth inhibition induced by the formulations (siRNA/Metafectene complexes and siRNA loaded liposomes incorporating hydrophobic G2 was evaluated at two exposure times through MTT assay in a breast cancer cell (SKBR-3 and compared by two-way ANOVA. Keywords: Anti-VEGF siRNA, Cell growth inhibition, Polyamidoaminedendrimer, Liposome

  17. 4. Danish symposium in analytical chemistry

    1996-01-01

    At the 4th Danish Symposium of Analytical Chemistry 11 lectures and 32 posters were presented during two session days on the 20 and 21 August 1996. Various analytical techniques were discussed for foodstuff, pesticide, pharmaceutical, industrial and other analyses. (EG)

  18. Proceedings of radiation and occupational health Symposium

    Ng Kwan Hoong

    1995-07-01

    This book compiled the papers presented at this symposium. The were papers on policy of radiation safety regulations, radiation safety measures, radiation in medicine and radiation protection, radiation measurements, radon measurement, radiation in petroleum industry, radiation monitoring and non ionizing radiation safety

  19. 12th International Symposium Continuous Surface Mining

    2015-01-01

    This edited volume contains research results presented at the 12th International Symposium Continuous Surface Mining, ISCSM Aachen 2014. The target audience primarily comprises researchers in the lignite mining industry and practitioners in this field but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  20. SIAM symposium on control problems in industry

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This symposium focused on industrial control applications that have benefited from recent mathematical and technological developments. The themes featured included: applications of control techniques in aerospace industry, automotive industry, environmental sciences, manufacturing processes, and petroleum industry; optimal shape design in aerospace applications; optimal design of micro-optics; robust control and H-infinity methods.

  1. The seventh international symposium on radiopharmacology

    1991-01-01

    Abstracts are presented from the symposium on radiopharmacology. Sessions included: pharmokinetics of Tc-99m labeled agents; pharmokinetics and tumor imaging; miscellaneous pharmokinetic studies; pharmokinetics of brain/receptor imaging; pharmokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies; pharmokinetics of radiolabeled lipids; pharmokinetics of heart/infection imaging. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases

  2. 7th International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics

    James, David

    1994-01-01

    The Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, U. S. A. , on April 24-28, 1994. The symposium continued the interdisciplinary character and comprehensive approach of the preceding six symposia. Gaseous DielecIries VII is a detailed record of the symposium proceedings. It covers recent advances and developments in a wide range of basic, applied and industrial areas of gaseous dielectrics. It is hoped that Gaseous DielecIries VII will aid future research and development in, and encourage wider industrial use of, gaseous dielectrics. The Organizing Committee of the Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics consisted of G. Addis (U. S. A. ), L. G. Christophorou (U. S. A. ), F. Y. Chu (Canada), A. H. Cookson (U. S. A. ), O. Farish (U. K. ), I. Gallimberti (Italy) , A. Garscadden (U. S. A. ), D. R. James (U. S. A. ), E. Marode (France), T. Nitta (Japan), W. Pfeiffer (Germany), Y. Qiu (China), I. Sauers (U. S. A. ), R. J. Van Brunt (U. S. A. ), and W. Zaengl...

  3. 8. European sewage and refuse symposium. Documentation

    1990-01-01

    The subject of the 8. European Sewage and Refuse Symposium is covered under the following headings: collection and control in sewers, industrial waste water management, pretreatment, combined treatment, special cases, industrial waste water sludges disposal and the European waste business. (orig./BBR)

  4. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Biotechnology

    2008-01-01

    This is a book of abstracts of oral communications and posters that were presented during the International Symposium on Biotechnology that was held in Sfax, Tunisia from May 4th to 8th, 2008. The following themes were covered : - Biotechnology for animal and human health and biopharmaceuticals; - Microbial and environmental biotechnology; - Agricultural, Food and marine biotechnology

  5. Symposium on Massive Open Online Courses

    Krause, Steven D.; Rice, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    In this Symposium focused on MOOCs, this journal carries forward a tradition of attending to the technologies associated with composing and the teaching of composing. In the May 1983 issue of "College Composition and Communication," for example, most of the articles focus on composing and include a mix of inquiries, from Jack Selzer's on the…

  6. First symposium accelerated partial breast irradiation

    2012-01-01

    The First symposium accelerated partial breast irradiation, was organized by the Marie Curie Foundation, between the 14 to 16 june 2012, in the Cordoba city of Argentina. In this event were presented some papers on the following topics: radiotherapy in breast cancer; interaction between systemic treatments and radiotherapy; interstitial brachytherapy.

  7. Second invitational well-testing symposium proceedings

    1978-01-01

    The symposium dealt with the state of the art of injection of fluids underground, and its application to geothermal systems in particular. Separate abstracts were prepared for fourteen papers and three abstracts of papers were listed by title. Three papers were previously abstracted for EDB.

  8. Highlights of the heavy ion fusion symposium

    Keefe, D.

    1986-01-01

    The current status and prospects for inertial confinement fusion based on the use of intense beams of heavy ions will be described in the light of results presented at the International Symposium on Heavy Ion Fusion, (Washington, DC, May 27-29, 1986)

  9. Highlights of the heavy ion fusion symposium

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    The current status and prospects for inertial confinement fusion based on the use of intense beams of heavy ions will be described in the light of results presented at the International Symposium on Heavy Ion Fusion, (Washington, DC, May 27-29, 1986)

  10. The ninth international veterinary immunology symposium

    This Introduction to the special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August, 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune...

  11. The Psychology of Adolescents: Symposium IV A.

    Keng, Chiam Heng; Park, Joon Hee

    These two symposium papers provide: (1) a profile of rural adolescents in Malaysia, by Chiam Heng Keng; and (2) report the findings of a study of the psychology and life of Korean children and adolescents, by Joon Hee Park. In the former report, 521 boys and 550 girls completed a checklist consisting of 195 problems and indicated problems which…

  12. Culinary Arts Hospitality Symposium Planning Guide.

    Borgie, Karen; Wang, Yeimei

    This guide was developed as part of a project to standardize California's statewide culinary arts curriculum based on industry guidelines and standards. It details a process that California community colleges can use to plan a hospitality symposium that will accomplish the following objectives: provide students with a forum to demonstrate their…

  13. The Wharton Symposium: Facing the Issues.

    Sullivan, David M.

    1982-01-01

    A public relations practitioner reports enthusiastically on his return to the campus for an "intellectually-broadening" public relations symposium. He summarizes critical social and economic issues addressed by distinguished scholars and experienced practitioners. For journal availability, see CS 705 902. (PD)

  14. Abstracts: 2nd interventional MRI symposium

    Anon.

    1997-09-01

    Main topics of the 2nd interventional MRI symposium were: MR compatibility and pulse sequences; MR thermometry, biopsy, musculoskeletal system; laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy, radiofrequency ablations; intraoperative MR; vascular applications, breast, endoscopy; focused ultrasound, cryotherapy, perspectives; poster session with 34 posters described. (AJ)

  15. Abstracts: 2nd interventional MRI symposium

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    Main topics of the 2nd interventional MRI symposium were: MR compatibility and pulse sequences; MR thermometry, biopsy, musculoskeletal system; laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy, radiofrequency ablations; intraoperative MR; vascular applications, breast, endoscopy; focused ultrasound, cryotherapy, perspectives; poster session with 34 posters described. (AJ)

  16. 16. International oil field chemistry symposium

    2006-03-01

    The symposium deals with topics on well chemicals, petrochemicals, well injection fluids, reservoir describing methods, reservoir exploitation enhancing chemicals, corrosion inhibitors, production methods and chemical aspects of maintenance, multiphase flow and reservoir geochemistry. The environmental effects of the chemicals and preservation of the environment is also focussed on. Some aspects of decommissioning of oil fields are dealt with

  17. MEMORIAL SYMPOSIUM:
    Willi Jentschke

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    - Welcome by L. Maiani - Message from DESY by E. Lohrmann - Willi Jentschke by H. Schopper - The Neutral Currents by M. Veltman and D. Perkins - The ISR in Jentschke's time by K. Johnsen - Some recollections of Jentschke by K. WinterNote: Participants are cordially invited to drinks at 17h.30 following the symposium

  18. SNEAP 78: symposium of Northeastern accelerator personnel

    Bair, J.K.; Jones, C.M. (comps.)

    1979-06-01

    Session topics of the symposium include: tubes, vacuum, and conditioning; gaseous insulation and gas handling systems; charging systems; safety; ion sources; projects recently completed or under construction; stripping; beam transport; control systems; and telemetry. Twenty eight items were included separately in the data base. (GHT)

  19. Aircraft Piston Engine Exhaust Emission Symposium

    1976-01-01

    A 2-day symposium on the reduction of exhaust emissions from aircraft piston engines was held on September 14 and 15, 1976, at the Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Papers were presented by both government organizations and the general aviation industry on the status of government contracts, emission measurement problems, data reduction procedures, flight testing, and emission reduction techniques.

  20. Counselling and Career Planning: Symposium V A.

    Awang, Amir; And Others

    Focusing generally on counseling and career planning, this symposium provides (1) a review and critique of guidance and counseling in Malaysian schools, by Amir Awang and Latiff Mirasa; (2) a discussion of the needs of Malaysian youth, by Mohd. Yunus Mohd. Noor; and (3) an abstract of the findings of a study of some aspects of student development…

  1. Intergas `95: International unconventional gas symposium. Proceedings

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The International Unconventional Gas Symposium was held on May 14--20, 1995 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama where 52 reports were presented. These reports are grouped in this proceedings under: geology and resources; mine degasification and safety; international developments; reservoir characterization/coal science; and environmental/legal and regulatory. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Abstracts, Third Space Processing Symposium, Skylab results

    1974-01-01

    Skylab experiments results are reported in abstracts of papers presented at the Third Space Processing Symposium. Specific areas of interest include: exothermic brazing, metals melting, crystals, reinforced composites, glasses, eutectics; physics of the low-g processes; electrophoresis, heat flow, and convection demonstrations flown on Apollo missions; and apparatus for containerless processing, heating, cooling, and containing materials.

  3. Studies on lipids and fatty acids in rats with streptozotocin-induced insulin deficiency II. Incorporation of 1-(14)C-sodium acetate into lipids and fatty acids of liver slices and whole blood cells

    三宅,寛治

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the lipid and fatty acid metabolism in the insulin deficient state, the in vitro incorporation of 1-(14)C-sodium acetate into major lipid fractions and fatty acids of liver slices and whole blood cells was determined. Rats were studied one week, one month and three months after insulin deficiency was induced by administration of streptozotocin.The net incorporation of (14)C into lipid fractions and total fatty acids of liver slices significantly decreased after one week. On ...

  4. Impacts of climate change on resource management of the north: Symposium summary

    Goos, T.; Wall, G.

    1994-01-01

    A Canada/USA symposium was held to address critical issues related to the impacts of climatic changes on Arctic regions. A review of the papers presented at the symposium and the symposium findings and recommendations is presented. Highlights of the proceedings are as follows. An improved understanding of Arctic processes, such as the hydrological cycle, ocean circulation, and permafrost is required. This information should be incorporated as it becomes available into global climate models at scales which will allow representation and assessment of regional consequences. Improved mechanisms are needed to facilitate the use of the results of scientific work in the formulation of resource management options and decisions. If climate change occurs as expected, the presence of ice and permafrost will be reduced throughout much of the north, with profound implications for such aspects of northern living as life styles, transport, land use, and resource development. Improved knowledge is required regarding the sensitivities of Arctic species and ecosystems and their responses when thresholds are exceeded. There is also a need to assess the relative importance of climate in the context of other factors which have implications for resource management decisions

  5. Amo 1618 effects on incorporation of 14C-MVA and 14C-acetate into sterols in Nicotiana and Digitalis seedlings and cell-free preparations from Nicotiana

    Douglas, T.J.; Paleg, L.G.

    1978-01-01

    Incorporation of radioactivity from acetate-[ 14 C] and MVA-[ 14 C] into sterols and sterol precursors in tobacco was inhibited by Amo 1618; differing patterns of accumulation were obtained with the two precursors, suggesting more than one point of inhibition. This was borne out with cell-free preparations with which it was demonstrated that both HMG-CoA reductase and squalene-2,3-epoxide cyclase were inhibited, the latter more strongly than the former. GLC analysis of gross sterol and hydrocarbon fractions confirmed previous indications that incorporation of radioactivity into individual sterols was inhibited by Amo 1618. Finally, incorporation of MVA-[ 14 C] into sterols and sterol precursors of Digitalis was significantly altered by the retardant, thus expanding the generality of the relationship between sterol (particularly 4-desmethylsterol) biosynthesis inhibition and retardant effect. (author)

  6. Proceedings of the DAE-BRNS fifth interdisciplinary symposium on materials chemistry

    Jafar, Mohsin; Tyagi, Adish; Tyagi, Deepak

    2014-12-01

    The focus of the present symposium on materials chemistry was on research areas in materials chemistry like: nuclear materials; high purity materials; nanomaterials and clusters; carbon based materials; fuel cell materials and other electro-ceramics; biomaterials; polymers and soft condensed matter; materials for energy conversion; thin films and surface chemistry; magnetic materials; catalysis; chemical sensors; organic and organometallic compounds; computational material chemistry etc. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  7. Book Symposium: Duncan Pritchard, Epistemic Angst (Princeton University Press, 2015, xiii + 236 pages

    Duncan Pritchard

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This book symposium features three critical pieces dealing with Duncan Pritchard's book, 'Epistemic Angst'; the symposium also contains Pritchard's replies to his critics.

  8. Conference Report: 6th Annual International Symposium on Regenerative Rehabilitation.

    Loghmani, M Terry; Roche, Joseph A

    2018-04-03

    The 6th International Symposium on Regenerative Rehabilitation, hosted by the Alliance for Regenerative Rehabilitation Research and Training (AR 3 T), included a preconference meeting of institutional representatives of the International Consortium of Regenerative Rehabilitation, keynote talks from distinguished scientists, platform and poster presentations from experts and trainees, panel discussions and postconference workshops. The following priorities were identified: increasing rigor in basic, preclinical and clinical studies, especially the use of better controls; developing better outcome measures for preclinical and clinical trials; focusing on developing more tissue-based interventions versus cell-based interventions; including regenerative rehabilitation in curricula of professional programs like occupational and physical therapy; and developing better instruments to quantify rehabilitative interventions.

  9. 3rd International Symposium on Innovative Management, Information and Production

    Xu, Bing; Wu, Berlin

    2014-01-01

    Innovative Management in Information and Production is based on the proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Innovative Managemet, Information and Production. This symposium is held by International Society of Management Engineers. The symposium took place on October 8-10, in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. This book examines recent innovative management of information and productions such as digital collection management and operations planning, scheduling and control.

  10. 1st Jagiellonian Symposium on Fundamental and Applied Subatomic Physics

    2016-01-01

    Following the success of two meetings "II Symposium on applied nuclear physics and innovative technologies" and "II Symposium on Positron Emission Tomography" organized in 2014, this event will start a new series of conferences which will bring together scientists from the physics, nuclear medicine and healthcare. One of the main purposes of the symposium is to exchange experience and and expertise gained by various institutions in the field of applied and fundamental nuclear as well as particle physics, medical imaging, radiotherapy and healthcare.

  11. Proceedings of the international nuclear power plant aging symposium

    Beranek, A.

    1989-03-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the International Nuclear Power Plant Aging Symposium that was held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, on August 30-31 and September 1, 1988. The Symposium was presented in cooperation with the American Nuclear Society, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. There were approximately 550 participants from 16 countries at the Symposium

  12. NIFS symposium: toward the research of fusion burning plasmas

    Itoh, Sanae

    1993-07-01

    NIFS symposium, entitled 'Toward the research of Fusion Burning Plasmas - Present status and Future Strategy' was held at NIFS on July 15th 1992. This NIFS symposium covers various topics related to burning plasma, e.g., JET DT experiment, Plan for DT experiment on TFTR as well as the future trends among researchers. To study the critical issues and trends of future research, a questionnaire was sent to about 100 researchers. This report presents such activities in the NIFS symposium. (author)

  13. CONFERENCE NOTE: Sixth Symposium on Temperature Scheduled for March 1982

    1981-07-01

    The call for papers for the 6th Symposium on Temperature, Its Measurement and Control in Science and Industry has been issued. The Symposium is scheduled to take place in Washington, DC, USA during the week of March 14 18, 1982. Like its predecessors held in the years 1919, 1939, 1954, 1961, and 1971, the 6th Symposium will stress advances in the measurement of thermodynamic values of temperature, in temperature reference points, in temperature sensors and instruments for the control of temperature, and in the development and use of temperature scales. For the first time, an exhibit of thermometry will be a part of the Symposium. Manuscripts to be submitted for inclusion in the Symposium should be sent to the 6th Temperature Symposium Program Chairman, National Bureau of Standards, by September 15, 1981. Those papers accepted for the Symposium will be due in camera-ready form by February 15, 1982. Original papers on all of the topics listed above, as well as reviews of the past decade's progress in thermometry and temperature control, are solicited by the Symposium organizers. The Symposium arrangements and registration are in the care of the Instrument Society of America (represented on the Symposium General Committee by Mr C T Glazer, 67 Alexander Drive, PO Box 12277, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27709, USA). Questions regarding the instrument exhibits should also be addressed to the ISA. The technical program for the Symposium is the responsibility of a committee headed by Dr J F Schooley, Room B-128 Physics Building, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC, 20234, USA. The Symposium proceedings will be published by the American Institute of Physics.

  14. Changes in the rat lung after exposure to radon and its progeny: Effects on incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine in epithelial cells and on the incidence of nuclear aberrations in Alveolar macrophages

    Taya, A.; Morgan, A.; Baker, S.T.; Humphreys, J.A.H.; Collier, C.G.; Bisson, M.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate some responses of cells in the rat respiratory tract as a function of time after inhalation exposure to various levels of radon and its progeny. Rats were exposed to a constant concentration of radon and its progeny to give cumulative exposure levels of 120, 225, 440 and 990 working level months (WLM). An additional unexposed group of rats served as controls. The end points selected for investigation were (a) the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) in epithelial cells of the conducting airways and of the alveolar region of the respiratory tract and (b) the incidence of alveolar macrophages with nuclear aberrations. After exposure, the incidence of epithelial cells incorporating BrdU-the labeling index-increased in all regions of the respiratory tract examined, but the increase occurred later in alveolar than in airway epithelial cells. The highest labeling index was found in bronchial epithelial cells, which probably received the highest radiation dose. After an initial induction period, the incidence of alveolar macrophages with nuclear aberrations also increased. The possibility of using the labeling index of alveolar and airway epithelial cells, and/or the incidence of nuclear aberrations in alveolar macrophages, to estimate the radiation dose to various regions of the respiratory tract after exposure of rats to radon and its progeny is discussed. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. Proceedings of the seventh symposium on laser spectroscopy

    1999-01-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the 7th symposium on laser spectroscopy and this symposium is held on Nov. 5-6, 1999 by KAERI. Both the laser and laser beams are critically used in many most precise measurements in science and technology. We discussed about the recently developed subjects in detail during the this symposium. This proceedings is composed of two major parts. One is the invitational lectures and the other is the research papers. And we have a number of invited speakers from several advanced countries. Their talks are the highlights of this symposium. (Cho, G. S.)

  16. Proceedings of the eighth symposium on laser spectroscopy

    2000-01-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the 8th symposium on laser spectroscopy and this symposium is held on Nov. 3-4, 2000 by KAERI. Both the laser and laser beams are critically used in many most precise measurements in science and technology. We discussed about the recently developed subjects in detail during the this symposium. This proceedings is composed of two major parts. One is the invitational lectures and the other is the research papers. And we have a number of invited speakers from several advanced countries. Their talks are the highlights of this symposium. (Yi, J. H.)

  17. Effect of D-valine and cytosine arabinoside on [3H]thymidine incorporation in rat and rabbit epididymal epithelial cell cultures

    Orgebin-Crist, M.C.; Jonas-Davies, J.; Storey, P.; Olson, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Epithelial cell enriched primary cultures were established from the rat and the rabbit epididymis. Epithelial cell aggregates, obtained after pronase digestion of minced epididymis, attached to the culture dish and after 72 h in vitro spread out to form discrete patches of cells. These cells have an epithelioid morphology and form a monolayer of closely apposed polygonal cells where DNA synthesis, as judged by [ 3 H]thymidine uptake, is very low. In L-valine medium the nonepithelial cell contamination was no more than 10% in rat and rabbit epididymal primary cultures. The labeling index of rat epididymal cells cultured in D-valine medium was significantly lower than that of cells cultured in L-valine medium. In contrast, the labeling index of rabbit epididymal cells cultured in D-valine medium was significantly higher than that of cells cultured in L-valine medium. Cytosine arabinoside decreased the number of labeled cells in both L-valine and D-valine cultures. From these results, it appears that D-valine is a selective agent for rat epididymal epithelial cells, but not for rabbit epithelial cells, and that cytosine arabinoside is a simple and effective means to control the proliferation of fibroblast-like cells in both rat and rabbit epididymal cell cultures

  18. Making microenvironments: A look into incorporating macromolecular crowding into in vitro experiments, to generate biomimetic microenvironments which are capable of directing cell function for tissue engineering applications.

    Benny, Paula; Raghunath, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Biomimetic microenvironments are key components to successful cell culture and tissue engineering in vitro. One of the most accurate biomimetic microenvironments is that made by the cells themselves. Cell-made microenvironments are most similar to the in vivo state as they are cell-specific and produced by the actual cells which reside in that specific microenvironment. However, cell-made microenvironments have been challenging to re-create in vitro due to the lack of extracellular matrix composition, volume and complexity which are required. By applying macromolecular crowding to current cell culture protocols, cell-made microenvironments, or cell-derived matrices, can be generated at significant rates in vitro. In this review, we will examine the causes and effects of macromolecular crowding and how it has been applied in several in vitro systems including tissue engineering.

  19. Supplementation with a fish oil-enriched, high-protein medical food leads to rapid incorporation of EPA into white blood cells and modulates immune responses within one week in healthy men and women.

    Faber, Joyce; Berkhout, Marloes; Vos, Arjan P; Sijben, John W C; Calder, Philip C; Garssen, Johan; van Helvoort, Ardy

    2011-05-01

    Immune modulatory effects of EPA and DHA are well described. However, these fatty acids must be effectively incorporated into cell membrane phospholipids to modify cell function. To address the absence of human data regarding short-term incorporation, the present study investigated the incorporation of EPA and DHA into white blood cells (WBC) at different time points during 1 wk of supplementation with a medical food, which is high in protein and leucine and enriched with fish oil and specific oligosaccharides. Additionally, the effects on ex vivo immune function were determined. In a single-arm, open label study, 12 healthy men and women consumed 2 × 200 mL of medical food providing 2.4 g EPA, 1.2 g DHA, 39.7 g protein (including 4.4 g L-leucine), and 5.6 g oligosaccharides daily. Blood samples were taken at d 0 (baseline), 1, 2, 4, and 7. Within 1 d of nutritional intervention, the percentage of EPA in phospholipids of WBC increased from 0.5% at baseline to 1.3% (P blood cultures was significantly increased within 1 wk. Nutritional supplementation with a fish oil-enriched medical food significantly increased the percentage of EPA in phospholipids of WBC within 1 wk. Simultaneously, ex vivo immune responsiveness to LPS increased significantly. These results hold promise for novel applications such as fast-acting nutritional interventions in cancer patients, which should be investigated in future studies.

  20. 4th international interdisciplinary chaos symposium

    Banerjee, Santo; Caglar, Suleyman; Ozer, Mehmet; Chaos and complex systems

    2013-01-01

    Complexity Science and Chaos Theory are fascinating areas of scientific research with wide-ranging applications.  The interdisciplinary nature and ubiquity of complexity and chaos are features that provides scientists with a motivation to pursue general theoretical tools and frameworks. Complex systems give rise to emergent behaviors, which in turn produce novel and interesting phenomena in science, engineering, as well as in the socio-economic sciences. The aim of all Symposia on Chaos and Complex Systems (CCS) is to bring together scientists, engineers, economists and social scientists, and to discuss the latest insights and results obtained in the area of corresponding nonlinear-system complex (chaotic) behavior. Especially for the “4th International Interdisciplinary Chaos Symposium on Chaos and Complex Systems,” which took place April 29th to May 2nd, 2012 in Antalya, Turkey, the scope of the symposium had been further enlarged so as to encompass the presentation of work from circuits to econophysic...

  1. Quality assurance and demolition: 2008 symposium

    Schartmann, F.; Thierfeldt, S.

    2008-01-01

    The 'Quality Assurance and Demolition Symposium, which has become a tradition established jointly by Applus RTD Deutschland GmbH (formerly compra GmbH) and Brenk Systemplanung GmbH, Aachen, was held also in 2008 with the focus on quality assurance and the demolition of nuclear facilities. The conference began with a series of lectures on knowledge and document management in general, and the use of document management systems in the nuclear field in particular. The evening lecture was presented by Axel Weis (Karlsruhe Research Center) on 'Competence Preservation in Nuclear Technology'. The 24 technical papers presented on the next 2 days of the symposium dealt with non-destructive materials testing and with special problems of radiation protection, demolition, and waste management. In 2009, the meeting will cover similar main topics and will again be held in an interesting environment, perhaps in combination with a tour of a demolition project. (orig.)

  2. Proceedings of the symposium on leukemia clustering

    Elaguppillai, V [Atomic Energy Control Board, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Goyette, J P [Atomic Energy Control Board, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Advisory Committee on Radiological Protection; Hill, G; Krewski, D [Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Osborne, R V [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1992-07-01

    Clusters of leukemia in populations living in specific locations in various countries have been examined by scientific and medical experts for many years. In general, the reason for the existence of these clusters is unknown. The recent discovery of a small cluster of leukemias among children who were born in the vicinity of a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility in England has stimulated wide interest in the possible occurrence of clusters of leukemia around nuclear facilities. The purpose of this symposium was to present scientific evidence concerning the existence of leukemia clusters in the population, to discuss possible causes for these clusters and to suggest directions for future research. Distinguished speakers from Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy and the U.S.A. participated in this symposium. (author).

  3. 15th International Symposium of Robotic Research

    Khatib, Oussama

    2017-01-01

    This volume presents a collection of papers presented at the 15th International Symposium of Robotic Research (ISRR). ISRR is the biennial meeting of the International Foundation of Robotic Research (IFRR) and its 15th edition took place in Flagstaff, Arizona on December 9 to December 12, 2011. As for the previous symposia, ISRR 2011 followed up on the successful concept of a mixture of invited contributions and open submissions. Therefore approximately half of the 37 contributions were invited contributions from outstanding researchers selected by the IFRR officers and the program committee, and the other half were chosen among the open submissions after peer review. This selection process resulted in a truly excellent technical program which featured some of the very best of robotic research. The program was organized around oral presentation in a single-track format and included for the first time a small number of interactive presentations. The symposium contributions contained in this volume report on a ...

  4. 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings present the results of the 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW29) which was held in Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A., from July 14 to July 19, 2013. It was organized by the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory, which is part of the College of Engineering of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The ISSW29 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reactive Flows, Detonation and Combustion,  Facilities, Flow Visualization, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Industrial Applications, Magnetohydrodynamics, Medical and Biological Applications, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Plasmas, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter, Shock Waves in Multiphase Flow, as well as Shock Waves in Rarefield Flow. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 29 and individuals interes...

  5. Tenth international symposium on environmental biogeochemistry

    Ehrlich, H.L.

    1992-01-01

    The primary task of this Symposium on Environmental Biogeochemistry was to examine our current understanding of GLOBAL CHANGE AND THE BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF RADIATIVE TRACE GASES. The symposium was divided into 12 non-overlapping sessions: Paleoatmospheres and paleoclimates; Global distributions and atmospheric reactions; Poster presentations on the topics of sessions 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7; Terrestrial systems and land use change - 1; Terrestrial and land use change - 11; Fluxes and cycling in aquatic systems; Metals, organics, and depositional environments; Poster presentations on the topics of sessions 6, 9, 10 and 12; Biological Mechanisms of formation and destruction - 1; Biological mechanisms of formation and destruction - 11; High latitude systems; and Global sources, sinks, and feedbacks.

  6. International symposium on marine pollution. Extended synopses

    1998-01-01

    The marine environment - understanding and protecting for the future were at the forefront of the International Symposium on Marine Pollution convened in Monaco from 5 to 9 October 1998, as one of the major events of the UN International Year of the Oceans. New achievements were reported in identifying the sources of pollution, on the behaviour and fate of contaminants in seawater, biota and sediments, on the use of radioactive and non-radioactive tracers for studies of transport and circulation processes in the world's oceans and seas, on studies of radioactive waste dumping sites and nuclear weapons test sites, on local, regional and global computer modelling of the transport of contaminants and on many other topics in marine pollution. New developments in high sensitivity analytical measurements of contaminants with emphasis on nuclear and isotopic methods were also presented. This document contains extended synopses of 390 oral and poster presentations made at the symposium. Each synopsis was indexed separately

  7. 2016 International Symposium on Experimental Robotics

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Khatib, Oussama; Venture, Gentiane

    2017-01-01

    Experimental Robotics XV is the collection of papers presented at the International Symposium on Experimental Robotics, Roppongi, Tokyo, Japan on October 3-6, 2016. 73 scientific papers were selected and presented after peer review. The papers span a broad range of sub-fields in robotics including aerial robots, mobile robots, actuation, grasping, manipulation, planning and control and human-robot interaction, but shared cutting-edge approaches and paradigms to experimental robotics. The readers will find a breadth of new directions of experimental robotics. The International Symposium on Experimental Robotics is a series of bi-annual symposia sponsored by the International Foundation of Robotics Research, whose goal is to provide a forum dedicated to experimental robotics research. Robotics has been widening its scientific scope, deepening its methodologies and expanding its applications. However, the significance of experiments remains and will remain at the center of the discipline. The ISER gatherings are...

  8. John B. Little Center Annual Symposium

    Demple, Bruce F.

    2007-01-01

    The Annual Symposium of the John B. Little Center for Radiation Sciences and Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health seeks to educate radiobiologists and biomedical scientists in related areas on the leading research related to the effects of ionizing radiation and related environmental agents in biological systems. This effort seeks to further the training of individuals in this field, and to foment productive interactions and collaborations among scientists at Harvard and with other institutions. The Symposium attracts world-class scientists as speakers, and a broad cross-section of attendees from academic, government, and industrial research centers, as well as editorial staff from leading scientific publications. In order to maintain this quality, funding to support the travel and local expenses of invited speakers is sought, along with funds to allow use of appropriate conference facilities.

  9. PREFACE: XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    Padilla-Rodal, E.; Bijker, R.

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo The XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 3-6 2012. Conceived in 1978 as a small meeting, over the years and thanks to the efforts of various organizing committees, the symposium has become a well known international conference on nuclear physics. To the best of our knowledge, the Mexican Symposium on Nuclear Physics represents the conference series with longest tradition in Latin America and one of the longest-running annual nuclear physics conferences in the world. The Symposium brings together leading scientists from all around the world, working in the fields of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. Its main goal is to provide a relaxed environment where the exchange of ideas, discussion of new results and consolidation of scientific collaboration are encouraged. To celebrate the 35th edition of the symposium 53 colleagues attended from diverse countries including: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Japan, Saudi Arabia and USA. We were happy to have the active participation of Eli F Aguilera, Eduardo Andrade, Octavio Castaños, Alfonso Mondragón, Stuart Pittel and Andrés Sandoval who also participated in the first edition of the Symposium back in 1978. We were joined by old friends of Cocoyoc (Stuart Pittel, Osvaldo Civitarese, Piet Van Isacker, Jerry Draayer and Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri) as well as several first time visitors that we hope will come back to this scientific meeting in the forthcoming years. The scientific program consisted of 33 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee, which nicely covered the topics of the Symposium giving a balanced perspective between the experimental and the theoretical work that is currently underway in each line of research. Fifteen posters complemented the scientific sessions giving the opportunity

  10. Proceedings of the 2008 marine biodiesel symposium

    2008-01-01

    In addition to producing lower hydrocarbon emissions, marine biodiesel is biodegradable and does not harm fish. This symposium was held to discuss current marine biodiesel applications and examine methods of increasing the use of biodiesel in marine environments in British Columbia (BC). Biofuel policies and mandates in the province were reviewed, and methods of expanding the biodiesel market were explored. Updates on the use of biodiesel in ferries, tugboats, and smaller marine diesel engine applications were provided. Biodiesel projects in the United States were discussed. The environmental impacts of marine biodiesel were evaluated, and federal policies and standards for biodiesel were also outlined. The symposium was divided into the following 5 main sessions: (1) policy, (2) overviews, (3) using biodiesel in marine engines, (4) biodiesel in larger marine vessels, and (5) biodiesel quality and environmental considerations. The conference featured 13 presentations, of which 4 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs

  11. John B. Little Center Annual Symposium

    Demple, Bruce F.

    2007-11-02

    The Annual Symposium of the John B. Little Center for Radiation Sciences and Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health seeks to educate radiobiologists and biomedical scientists in related areas on the leading research related to the effects of ionizing radiation and related environmental agents in biological systems. This effort seeks to further the training of individuals in this field, and to foment productive interactions and collaborations among scientists at Harvard and with other institutions. The Symposium attracts world-class scientists as speakers, and a broad cross-section of attendees from academic, government, and industrial research centers, as well as editorial staff from leading scientific publications. In order to maintain this quality, funding to support the travel and local expenses of invited speakers is sought, along with funds to allow use of appropriate conference facilities.

  12. 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    Sadot, Oren; Igra, Ozer

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings collect the papers presented at the 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW30), which was held in Tel-Aviv Israel from July 19 to July 24, 2015. The Symposium was organized by Ortra Ltd. The ISSW30 focused on the state of knowledge of the following areas: Nozzle Flow, Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows with Shocks, Supersonic Jets, Chemical Kinetics, Chemical Reacting Flows, Detonation, Combustion, Ignition, Shock Wave Reflection and Interaction, Shock Wave Interaction with Obstacles, Shock Wave Interaction with Porous Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Granular Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Dusty Media, Plasma, Magnetohyrdrodynamics, Re-entry to Earth Atmosphere, Shock Waves in Rarefied Gases, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter (Solids and Liquids), Shock Waves in Dense Gases, Shock Wave Focusing, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock Boundary Layer Interaction, Multiphase Flow, Blast Waves, Facilities, Flow Visualization, and Numerical Methods. The two volumes serve as a reference ...

  13. Proceedings of the symposium on leukemia clustering

    Elaguppillai, V.; Goyette, J.P.; Osborne, R.V.

    1992-07-01

    Clusters of leukemia in populations living in specific locations in various countries have been examined by scientific and medical experts for many years. In general, the reason for the existence of these clusters is unknown. The recent discovery of a small cluster of leukemias among children who were born in the vicinity of a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility in England has stimulated wide interest in the possible occurrence of clusters of leukemia around nuclear facilities. The purpose of this symposium was to present scientific evidence concerning the existence of leukemia clusters in the population, to discuss possible causes for these clusters and to suggest directions for future research. Distinguished speakers from Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy and the U.S.A. participated in this symposium. (author)

  14. Grid Scale Energy Storage (Symposium EE8)

    2016-06-01

    any one of the areas 5 touched upon by speakers participated in symposium EE8, which could potentially change the energy storage landscape in an...Solid-State Supercapacitors Based on RuO2/PEDOT Hybrid Ultrathin Films Chuanfang (John) Zhang1, Thomas Higgins1, Jonathan Coleman1, Valeria...or capacitance) at the expense of electrodes transmittance. Therefore it’s very necessary to develop ultrathin films with highly pseudocapacitive

  15. Assessing a Science Graduate School Recruitment Symposium.

    González-Espada, Wilson; Díaz-Muñoz, Greetchen; Feliú-Mójer, Mónica; Flores-Otero, Jacqueline; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Guerrero-Medina, Giovanna; López-Casillas, Marcos; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Fernández-Repollet, Emma

    2015-12-01

    Ciencia Puerto Rico, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting science, research and scientific education among Latinos, organized an educational symposium to provide college science majors the tools, opportunities and advice to pursue graduate degrees and succeed in the STEM disciplines. In this article we share our experiences and lessons learned, for others interested in developing large-scale events to recruit underrepresented minorities to STEM and in evaluating the effectiveness of these efforts.

  16. Sixth underground coal-conversion symposium

    1980-01-01

    The sixth annual underground coal conversion symposium was held at Shangri-la near Afton, Oklahoma, July 13 to 17, 1980. Sessions were developed to: Doe Field Programs, Major Industry Activity, Mathematical Modeling, Laboratory Studies, Environmental Studies, Economics, Instruments and Controls, and General Topics. Fifty-two papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Thirteen papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  17. IAEA symposium on international safeguards. Extended synopses

    1997-10-01

    The most important subjects treated in 188 papers presented by the participants from member state and IAEA Safeguards Inspectors at the Symposium were as follows: implementation of IAEA safeguards; national support programs to the IAEA safeguards; experiences in application of safeguard monitoring devices; improved methods for verification of plutonium; highly enriched uranium; surveillance of spent fuel storage facilities, reprocessing plants, fuel fabrication plants; excess weapon grade plutonium and other fissile materials

  18. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  19. IAEA symposium on international safeguards. Extended synopses

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The most important subjects treated in 188 papers presented by the participants from member state and IAEA Safeguards Inspectors at the Symposium were as follows: implementation of IAEA safeguards; national support programs to the IAEA safeguards; experiences in application of safeguard monitoring devices; improved methods for verification of plutonium; highly enriched uranium; surveillance of spent fuel storage facilities, reprocessing plants, fuel fabrication plants; excess weapon grade plutonium and other fissile materials Refs, figs, tabs

  20. Proceedings of the DMS medical ethics symposium.

    O'Reilly, D J

    2011-12-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium on medical ethics held at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine in October 2010. The nature of current operations continually generates challenging ethical problems, many of which are unique to the military environment. This article is intended to generate a debate on these difficult issues and readers are encouraged to contribute to this debate by emailing the Editor.