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Sample records for cell survival

  1. Survival curves for irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of the lecture is the probability of survival of biological cells which have been subjected to ionising radiation. The basic mathematical theories of cell survival as a function of radiation dose are developed. A brief comparison with observed survival curves is made. (author)

  2. Computational Modeling of Cell Survival Using VHDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Jain1,

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The model for cell survival has been implemented using VeryHigh Speed Integrated Circuit Hardware DescriptionLanguage (VHDL (Xilinx Tool taking three input signals:Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF, Epidermal growth factor(EGF and Insulin. Cell survival has been regulated by theinteraction of five proteins viz P13K, TNFR1, EGFR, IRS andIKK in a network. In the absence of any one, in protein networkleads to cell death. For the EGF input signal the proteins likeMEK, ERK, AkT, Rac & JNK have been important forregulation of cell survival. Similarly for TNF and Insulin inputsignal proteins like NFκB, AkT, XIAP, JNK, MAP3K & MK2and MEK, ERK, AkT, Rac, mTOR & JNK respectively havebeen important for regulation of cell survival.

  3. Cell survival studies for moving targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 330 patients with static tumors have been treated at GSI with a scanned C-12 beam. For targets that are subject to respiratory motion, treatment is not yet possible because target motion and scanning motion interfere. GSI is developing a motion compensation system to compensate target motion by adaptation of each individual Bragg peak position. Within this project, the GSI treatment planning software TRiP was extended to calculate physical dose distributions in the presence of motion. These motion extensions were experimentally validated. Recently we included the calculation of cell survival for moving targets. To validate the software, a program of experimental studies with biological samples has been started. In a first set of experiments, living cell cultures were placed on a periodically moving table and irradiated with and without motion compensation. Results are compared to reference cell cultures that were static during standard irradiations. Furthermore, measured cell survival distributions are compared to calculated distributions for all irradiation schemes

  4. Erythropoietin signaling promotes transplanted progenitor cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Yi; Warin, Renaud; Yu, Xiaobing; Epstein, Reed; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2009-01-01

    We examine the potential for erythropoietin signaling to promote donor cell survival in a model of myoblast transplantation. Expression of a truncated erythropoietin receptor in hematopoietic stem cells has been shown to promote selective engraftment in mice. We previously demonstrated expression of endogenous erythropoietin receptor on murine myoblasts, and erythropoietin treatment can stimulate myoblast proliferation and delay differentiation. Here, we report that enhanced erythropoietin re...

  5. Cell survival studies using ultrasoft x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell survival was studied for V79 hamster, 10T1/2 mouse, and human skin fibroblast cell lines, using carbon K (0.28 keV), copper K (8.0 keV), and 250 kVp x rays. Because of the rapid attenuation of the carbon x rays, cellular dimensions at the time of exposure were measured using optical and electron microscopy, and frequency distributions of mean dose absorbed by the cell nucleus were obtained. The results indicate that the differences in cell killing between ultra-soft and hard x rays may depend on the nuclear thickness of the cells. Studies of the effects of hypoxia on V79 and 10T1/2 cells using carbon K, aluminum K (1.5 keV), and copper K x rays show decreasing OER values with decreasing x-ray energy and no difference between the two cell lines. Age response studies with V79 cells show similar cell-cycle variation of survival for carbon K and aluminum K x rays as for hard x rays

  6. TRAIL treatment provokes mutations in surviving cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lovric, M M; Hawkins, C J

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy and radiotherapy commonly damage DNA and trigger p53-dependent apoptosis through intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Two unfortunate consequences of this mechanism are resistance due to blockade of p53 or intrinsic apoptosis pathways, and mutagenesis of non-malignant surviving cells which can impair cellular function or provoke second malignancies. Death ligand-based drugs, such as tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), stimulate extrinsic apoptotic signaling,...

  7. AKT Inhibition Promotes Nonautonomous Cancer Cell Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salony; Solé, Xavier; Alves, Cleidson P; Dey-Guha, Ipsita; Ritsma, Laila; Boukhali, Myriam; Lee, Ju H; Chowdhury, Joeeta; Ross, Kenneth N; Haas, Wilhelm; Vasudevan, Shobha; Ramaswamy, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog) signaling are being evaluated in patients with various cancer types, but have so far proven therapeutically disappointing for reasons that remain unclear. Here, we treat cancer cells with subtherapeutic doses of Akti-1/2, an allosteric small molecule AKT inhibitor, in order to experimentally model pharmacologic inhibition of AKT signaling in vitro. We then apply a combined RNA, protein, and metabolite profiling approach to develop an integrated, multiscale, molecular snapshot of this "AKT(low)" cancer cell state. We find that AKT-inhibited cancer cells suppress thousands of mRNA transcripts, and proteins related to the cell cycle, ribosome, and protein translation. Surprisingly, however, these AKT-inhibited cells simultaneously upregulate a host of other proteins and metabolites posttranscriptionally, reflecting activation of their endo-vesiculo-membrane system, secretion of inflammatory proteins, and elaboration of extracellular microvesicles. Importantly, these microvesicles enable rapidly proliferating cancer cells of various types to better withstand different stress conditions, including serum deprivation, hypoxia, or cytotoxic chemotherapy in vitro and xenografting in vivo. These findings suggest a model whereby cancer cells experiencing a partial inhibition of AKT signaling may actually promote the survival of neighbors through non-cell autonomous communication. PMID:26637368

  8. The extracellular matrix as a cell survival factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Meredith, J E; Fazeli, B; Schwartz, M A

    1993-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) or apoptosis is a naturally occurring cell suicide pathway induced in a variety of cell types. In many cases, PCD is induced by the withdrawal of specific hormones or growth factors that function as survival factors. In this study, we have investigated the potential role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a cell survival factor. Our results indicate that in the absence of any ECM interactions, human endothelial cells rapidly undergo PCD, as determined by cell mor...

  9. Properties of Lewis Lung Carcinoma Cells Surviving Curcumin Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Dejun Yan, Michael E. Geusz, Roudabeh J. Jamasbi

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory agent curcumin can selectively eliminate malignant rather than normal cells. The present study examined the effects of curcumin on the Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell line and characterized a subpopulation surviving curcumin treatments. Cell density was measured after curcumin was applied at concentrations between 10 and 60 μM for 30 hours. Because of the high cell loss at 60 μM, this dose was chosen to select for surviving cells that were then used to establis...

  10. MiR-24 promotes the survival of hematopoietic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Nguyen

    Full Text Available The microRNA, miR-24, inhibits B cell development and promotes myeloid development of hematopoietic progenitors. Differential regulation of cell survival in myeloid and lymphoid cells by miR-24 may explain how miR-24's affects hematopoietic progenitors. MiR-24 is reported to regulate apoptosis, either positively or negatively depending on cell context. However, no role for miR-24 in regulating cell death has been previously described in blood cells. To examine miR-24's effect on survival, we expressed miR-24 via retrovirus in hematopoietic cells and induced cell death with cytokine or serum withdrawal. We observed that miR-24 enhanced survival of myeloid and B cell lines as well as primary hematopoietic cells. Additionally, antagonizing miR-24 with shRNA in hematopoietic cells made them more sensitive to apoptotic stimuli, suggesting miR-24 functions normally to promote blood cell survival. Since we did not observe preferential protection of myeloid over B cells, miR-24's pro-survival effect does not explain its promotion of myelopoiesis. Moreover, expression of pro-survival protein, Bcl-xL, did not mimic miR-24's impact on cellular differentiation, further supporting this conclusion. Our results indicate that miR-24 is a critical regulator of hematopoietic cell survival. This observation has implications for leukemogenesis. Several miRNAs that regulate apoptosis have been shown to function as either tumor suppressors or oncogenes during leukemogenesis. MiR-24 is expressed highly in primary acute myelogenous leukemia, suggesting that its pro-survival activity could contribute to the transformation of hematopoietic cells.

  11. A track-event theory of cell survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe [Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. of Physics; Radiotherapy Hirslanden, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-01

    When fractionation schemes for hypofractionation and stereotactic body radiotherapy are considered, a reliable cell survival model at high dose is needed for calculating doses of similar biological effectiveness. In this work a simple model for cell survival which is valid also at high dose is developed from Poisson statistics. An event is defined by two double strand breaks (DSB) on the same or different chromosomes. An event is always lethal due to direct lethal damage or lethal binary misrepair by the formation of chromosome aberrations. Two different mechanisms can produce events: one-track events (OTE) or two-track-events (TTE). The target for an OTE is always a lethal event, the target for an TTE is one DSB. At least two TTEs on the same or different chromosomes are necessary to produce an event. Both, the OTE and the TTE are statistically independent. From the stochastic nature of cell kill which is described by the Poisson distribution the cell survival probability was derived. It was shown that a solution based on Poisson statistics exists for cell survival. It exhibits exponential cell survival at high dose and a finite gradient of cell survival at vanishing dose, which is in agreement with experimental cell studies. The model fits the experimental data nearly as well as the three-parameter formula of Hug-Kellerer and is only based on two free parameters. It is shown that the LQ formalism is an approximation of the model derived in this work. It could be also shown that the derived model predicts a fractionated cell survival experiment better than the LQ-model. It was shown that cell survival can be described with a simple analytical formula on the basis of Poisson statistics. This solution represents in the limit of large dose the typical exponential behavior and predicts cell survival after fractionated dose application better than the LQ-model.

  12. Epithelial cell invasion and survival of Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    OpenAIRE

    SCHIPPER, H; Krohne, G F; R. Gross

    1994-01-01

    Wild-type Bordetella bronchiseptica and a bvg mutant strain were used for invasion and survival experiments in human Caco-2 and A549 epithelial cells. Both bacterial strains were able to enter and persist within the host cells for at least a week. A significant proportion of the bacteria from both B. bronchiseptica strains but not from Bordetella pertussis were found free in the cytoplasm, suggesting different invasion and survival strategies of the two species in epithelial cells.

  13. A statistical model for red blood cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korell, Julia; Coulter, Carolyn V; Duffull, Stephen B

    2011-01-01

    A statistical model for the survival time of red blood cells (RBCs) with a continuous distribution of cell lifespans is presented. The underlying distribution of RBC lifespans is derived from a probability density function with a bathtub-shaped hazard curve, and accounts for death of RBCs due to senescence (age-dependent increasing hazard rate) and random destruction (constant hazard), as well as for death due to initial or delayed failures and neocytolysis (equivalent to early red cell mortality). The model yields survival times similar to those of previously published studies of RBC survival and is easily amenable to inclusion of drug effects and haemolytic disorders. PMID:20950630

  14. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75NTR, a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75NTR. For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75NTR. This latter signaling through p75NTR promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75NTR mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer

  15. Assessment of pancreatic islet cell function and survival

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Function and survival of pancreatic islet insulin-producing beta-cells (β-cells) and glucagonproducing alpha-cells (α-cells) were studied, and methods for this purpose were developed or refined. Dynamic control of glucose metabolism is essential for β-cell stimulus-secretion coupling. ATP is an important metabolic parameter and therefore we set up a technique to monitor dynamic changes of ATP in insulin-producing cells using luciferase bioluminescence at the level of single...

  16. Properties of Lewis Lung Carcinoma Cells Surviving Curcumin Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Dejun; Geusz, Michael E; Jamasbi, Roudabeh J

    2011-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory agent curcumin can selectively eliminate malignant rather than normal cells. The present study examined the effects of curcumin on the Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell line and characterized a subpopulation surviving curcumin treatments. Cell density was measured after curcumin was applied at concentrations between 10 and 60 μM for 30 hours. Because of the high cell loss at 60 μM, this dose was chosen to select for surviving cells that were then used to establish a new ce...

  17. Cell survival in a simulated Mars environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Paul; Kurk, Michael Andy; Boland, Eugene; Thomas, David

    2016-07-01

    The most ancient life forms on earth date back comfortably to the time when liquid water was believed to be abundant on Mars. These ancient life forms include cyanobacteria, contemporary autotrophic earth organisms believed to have descended from ancestors present as long as 3.5 billion years ago. Contemporary cyanobacteria have adapted to the earth environment's harshest conditions (long-term drying, high and low temperature), and, being autotrophic, they are among the most likely life forms to withstand space travel and the Mars environment. However, it is unlikely that humans would unwittingly contaminate a planetary spacecraft with these microbes. One the other hand, heterotrophic microbes that co-habit with humans are more likely spacecraft contaminants, as history attests. Indeed, soil samples from the Atacama desert have yielded colony-forming organisms resembling enteric bacteria. There is a need to understand the survivability of cyanobacteria (likely survivors, unlikely contaminants) and heterotrophic eubacteria (unlikely survivors, likely contaminants) under simulated planetary conditions. A 35-day test was performed in a commercial planetary simulation system (Techshot, Inc., Greenville, IN) in which the minimum night-time temperature was -80 C, the maximum daytime temperature was +26 C, the simulated day-night light cycle in earth hours was 12-on and 12-off, and the total pressure of the pure CO _{2} atmosphere was maintained below 11 mbar. Any water present was allowed to equilibrate with the changing temperature and pressure. The gas phase was sampled into a CR1-A low-pressure hygrometer (Buck Technologies, Boulder, CO), and dew/frost point was measured once every hour and recorded on a data logger, along with the varying temperature in the chamber, from which the partial pressure of water was calculated. According to measurements there was no liquid water present throughout the test except during the initial pump-down period when aqueous specimens

  18. Properties of Lewis Lung Carcinoma Cells Surviving Curcumin Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejun Yan, Michael E. Geusz, Roudabeh J. Jamasbi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory agent curcumin can selectively eliminate malignant rather than normal cells. The present study examined the effects of curcumin on the Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC cell line and characterized a subpopulation surviving curcumin treatments. Cell density was measured after curcumin was applied at concentrations between 10 and 60 μM for 30 hours. Because of the high cell loss at 60 μM, this dose was chosen to select for surviving cells that were then used to establish a new cell line. The resulting line had approximately 20% slower growth than the original LLC cell line and based on ELISA contained less of two markers, NF-κB and ALDH1A, used to identify more aggressive cancer cells. We also injected cells from the original and surviving lines subcutaneously into syngeneic C57BL/6 mice and monitored tumor development over three weeks and found that the curcumin surviving-line remained tumorigenic. Because curcumin has been reported to kill cancer cells more effectively when administered with light, we examined this as a possible way of enhancing the efficacy of curcumin against LLC cells. When LLC cells were exposed to curcumin and light from a fluorescent lamp source, cell loss caused by 20 μM curcumin was enhanced by about 50%, supporting a therapeutic use of curcumin in combination with white light. This study is the first to characterize a curcumin-surviving subpopulation among lung cancer cells. It shows that curcumin at a high concentration either selects for an intrinsically less aggressive cell subpopulation or generates these cells. The findings further support a role for curcumin as an adjunct to traditional chemical or radiation therapy of lung and other cancers.

  19. Repair-misrepair model of cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last three years a new model, the repair-misrepair model (RMR) has been proposed, to interpret radiobiological experiments with heavy ions. In using the RMR model it became apparent that some of its features are suitable for handling the effects produced by a variety of environmental agents in addition to ionizing radiation. Two separate sequences of events are assumed to take place in an irradiated cell. The first sequence begins with an initial energy transfer consisting of ionizations and excitations, culminating via fast secondary physical and chemical processes in established macromolecular lesions in essential cell structures. The second sequence contains the responses of the cell to the lesions and consists of the processes of recognition and molecular repair. In normal cells there exists one repair process or at most a few enzymatic repair processes for each essential macromolecular lesion. The enzymatic repair processes may last for hours and minutes, and can be separated in time from the initial physicochemical and later genetic phases

  20. Influence of acute hypoxia and radiation quality on cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of acute oxygen depletion on cell survival for different types of radiation, experiments have been performed using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and R-3327-AT1 (RAT-1) rat prostate cancer cells. A special chamber has been developed to perform irradiations under different levels of oxygenation. The oxygen concentrations used were normoxia (air), hypoxia (94.5% N2, 5% CO2, 0.5% O2) and anoxia (95% N2, 5% CO2). Cells were exposed to X-rays and to C-, N- or O-ions with linear energy transfer (LET) values ranging from 100-160 keV/μm. The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values have been calculated from the measured clonogenic survival curves. For both cell lines, the X-ray OER depended on the survival level. For particle irradiation, OER was not dependent on the survival level but decreased with increasing LET. The RBE of CHO cells under oxic conditions reached a plateau for LET values above 100 keV/μm, while it was still increasing under anoxia. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that our chamber could be used to measure radiosensitivity under intermediate hypoxia. Measurements suggest that ions heavier than carbon could be of additional advantage in the irradiation, especially of radioresistant hypoxic tumor regions. (author)

  1. Influence of chronic hypoxia and radiation quality on cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chronic hypoxia and anoxia on cell survival after low- and high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells were kept for 24 h under chronic hypoxia (94.5% N2; 5% CO2; 0.5% O2) or chronic anoxia (95% N2; 5% CO2). Irradiation was performed using 250 kVp X-rays or carbon ions with a dose average LET of 100 keV/μm either directly under the chronic oxygenation states, or at different time points after reoxygenation. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution for cells irradiated under different chronic oxic states was measured over 24 h during reoxygenation. The measurements showed a fairly uniform cell cycle distribution under chronic hypoxia, similar to normoxic conditions. Chronic anoxia induced a block in G1 and a strong reduction of S-phase cells. A distribution similar to normoxic conditions was reached after 12 h of reoxygenation. CHO cells had a similar survival under both acute and chronic hypoxia. In contrast, survival after irradiation under chronic anoxia was slightly reduced compared to that under acute anoxia. We conclude that, in hamster cells, chronic anoxia is less effective than acute anoxia in inducing radioresistance for both X-rays and carbon ions, whereas in hypoxia, acute and chronic exposures have a similar impact on cell killing. (author)

  2. Radiation effects on membranes - 1. Cellular permeability and cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of various doses of γ radiation (5-60 krad) on the membrane permeability and cell survival of Candida albicans, a pathogenic yeast, was investigated. A reduction in the cell survival and in the accumulation of amino acids (proline, glycine, lysine, and glutamic acid) was observed following irradiation. The rate of oxygen uptake, which is often associated with transport, was also reduced. There was no damage to available sulfhydryl groups following the exposure of cells to various doses of γ radiation. The membrane lipid composition of C. albicans cells can be altered by growing them in alkanes of varying chain lengths. The effects of such altered lipid composition on radiosensitivity was examined. It was observed that C. albicans cells with altered lipid content acquire resistance to γ radiation

  3. Veratridine increases the survival of retinal ganglion cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P.F. Pereira

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cell death is an important phenomenon involving many biochemical pathways. This degenerative event has been studied to understand how the cells activate the mechanisms that lead to self-destruction. Target cells and afferent cells play a relevant role in the regulation of natural cell death. We studied the effect of veratridine (1.5, 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0 µM on the survival of neonatal rat retinal ganglion cells in vitro. Veratridine (3.0 µM, a well-known depolarizing agent that opens the Na+ channel, promoted a two-fold increase in the survival of retinal ganglion cells kept in culture for 48 h. This effect was dose-dependent and was blocked by 1.0 µM tetrodotoxin (a classical voltage-dependent Na+ channel blocker and 30.0 µM flunarizine (a Na+ and Ca2+ channel blocker. These results indicate that electrical activity is also important for the maintenance of retinal ganglion cell survival in vitro

  4. Cytokine signaling for proliferation, survival, and death in hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, A; Ito, Y; Kinoshita, T

    1999-04-01

    The survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic cells are regulated by cytokines. In the absence of cytokines, hematopoietic cells not only stop proliferation, but undergo apoptosis. This strict dependency of hematopoietic cells on cytokines is an important mechanism that maintains the homeostasis of blood cells. Cytokines induce various intracellular signaling pathways by activating the receptor-associated Janus kinases (Jaks), and distinct signals are responsible for cell cycle progression and cell survival. Induction of signals for cell cycle progression without suppressing apoptosis results in apoptotic cell death, indicating the essential role of anti-apoptotic signaling for cell growth. In hematopoietic cells, Ras, a cellular protooncogen product, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase are involved in the suppression of apoptosis. Cytokine depletion not only turns off anti-apoptotic signaling, but also actively induces cell death by activating caspases, a distinct family of cysteine proteases. Alterations in the mechanisms of cytokine signaling for cell cycle progression and anti-apoptotic function are implicated in hematological disorders. PMID:10222650

  5. Gene Expression Profiling Predicts Survival in Conventional Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conventional renal cell carcinoma (cRCC accounts for most of the deaths due to kidney cancer. Tumor stage, grade, and patient performance status are used currently to predict survival after surgery. Our goal was to identify gene expression features, using comprehensive gene expression profiling, that correlate with survival. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene expression profiles were determined in 177 primary cRCCs using DNA microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis segregated cRCC into five gene expression subgroups. Expression subgroup was correlated with survival in long-term follow-up and was independent of grade, stage, and performance status. The tumors were then divided evenly into training and test sets that were balanced for grade, stage, performance status, and length of follow-up. A semisupervised learning algorithm (supervised principal components analysis was applied to identify transcripts whose expression was associated with survival in the training set, and the performance of this gene expression-based survival predictor was assessed using the test set. With this method, we identified 259 genes that accurately predicted disease-specific survival among patients in the independent validation group (p < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, the gene expression predictor was a strong predictor of survival independent of tumor stage, grade, and performance status (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: cRCC displays molecular heterogeneity and can be separated into gene expression subgroups that correlate with survival after surgery. We have identified a set of 259 genes that predict survival after surgery independent of clinical prognostic factors.

  6. Effects of Triclosan on Neural Stem Cell Viability and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bo Kyung; Gonzales, Edson Luck T.; Yang, Sung Min; Bang, Minji; Choi, Chang Soon; Shin, Chan Young

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial or sanitizing agent used in personal care and household products such as toothpaste, soaps, mouthwashes and kitchen utensils. There are increasing evidence of the potentially harmful effects of triclosan in many systemic and cellular processes of the body. In this study, we investigated the effects of triclosan in the survivability of cultured rat neural stem cells (NSCs). Cortical cells from embryonic day 14 rat embryos were isolated and cultured in vitro. After stabilizing the culture, triclosan was introduced to the cells with concentrations ranging from 1 μM to 50 μM and in varied time periods. Thereafter, cell viability parameters were measured using MTT assay and PI staining. TCS decreased the cell viability of treated NSC in a concentration-dependent manner along with increased expressions of apoptotic markers, cleaved caspase-3 and Bax, while reduced expression of Bcl2. To explore the mechanisms underlying the effects of TCS in NSC, we measured the activation of MAPKs and intracellular ROS. TCS at 50 μM induced the activations of both p38 and JNK, which may adversely affect cell survival. In contrast, the activities of ERK, Akt and PI3K, which are positively correlated with cell survival, were inhibited. Moreover, TCS at this concentration augmented the ROS generation in treated NSC and depleted the glutathione activity. Taken together, these results suggest that TCS can induce neurodegenerative effects in developing rat brains through mechanisms involving ROS activation and apoptosis initiation. PMID:26759708

  7. p63 promotes cell survival through fatty acid synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Sabbisetti

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that p63, and specifically DeltaNp63, plays a central role in both development and tumorigenesis by promoting epithelial cell survival. However, few studies have addressed the molecular mechanisms through which such important function is exerted. Fatty acid synthase (FASN, a key enzyme that synthesizes long-chain fatty acids and is involved in both embryogenesis and cancer, has been recently proposed as a direct target of p53 family members, including p63 and p73. Here we show that knockdown of either total or DeltaN-specific p63 isoforms in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC9 or immortalized prostate epithelial (iPrEC cells caused a decrease in cell viability by inducing apoptosis without affecting the cell cycle. p63 silencing significantly reduced both the expression and the activity of FASN. Importantly, stable overexpression of either FASN or myristoylated AKT (myr-AKT was able to partially rescue cells from cell death induced by p63 silencing. FASN induced AKT phosphorylation and a significant reduction in cell viability was observed when FASN-overexpressing SCC9 cells were treated with an AKT inhibitor after p63 knockdown, indicating that AKT plays a major role in FASN-mediated survival. Activated AKT did not cause any alteration in the FASN protein levels but induced its activity, suggesting that the rescue from apoptosis documented in the p63-silenced cells expressing myr-AKT cells may be partially mediated by FASN. Finally, we demonstrated that p63 and FASN expression are positively associated in clinical squamous cell carcinoma samples as well as in the developing prostate. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that FASN is a functionally relevant target of p63 and is required for mediating its pro-survival effects.

  8. Recommended method for radioisotope red-cell survival studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an amendment to a tentative ICSH Standard published in 1971, three 51Cr (sodium chromate) selected methods are briefly discussed as methods for red-cell survival studies. The acid citrate dextrose (ACD) method is accepted as the reference method and the technique described in detail. (U.K.)

  9. SOLITARY CHEMORECEPTOR CELL SURVIVAL IS INDEPENDENT OF INTACT TRIGEMINAL INNERVATION

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbransen, Brian; Silver, Wayne; Finger, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) are a population of specialized chemosensory epithelial cells presumed to broaden trigeminal chemoreceptivity in mammals (Finger et al., 2003). SCCs are innervated by peptidergic trigeminal nerve fibers (Finger et al., 2003) but it is currently unknown if intact innervation is necessary for SCC development or survival. We tested the dependence of SCCs on innervation by eliminating trigeminal nerve fibers during development with neurogenin-1 knockout m...

  10. Influence of acute hypoxia and radiation quality on cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Tinganelli, Walter; Ma, Ning-Yi; von Neubeck, Cläre; Maier, Andreas; Schicker, Corinna; Kraft-Weyrather, Wilma; Durante, Marco

    2013-01-01

    To measure the effect of acute oxygen depletion on cell survival for different types of radiation, experiments have been performed using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and RAT-1 rat prostate cancer cells. A special chamber has been developed to perform irradiations under different levels of oxygenation. The oxygen concentrations used were normoxia (air), hypoxia (94.5% N2, 5% CO2, 0.5% O2) and anoxia (95% N2, 5% CO2). Cells were exposed to X-rays and to C-, N- or O-ions with linear energy ...

  11. Surviving protein quality control catastrophes--from cells to organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kim; Bertolotti, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Organisms have evolved mechanisms to cope with and adapt to unexpected challenges and harsh conditions. Unfolded or misfolded proteins represent a threat for cells and organisms, and the deposition of misfolded proteins is a defining feature of many age-related human diseases, including the increasingly prevalent neurodegenerative diseases. These protein misfolding diseases are devastating and currently cannot be cured, but are hopefully not incurable. In fact, the aggregation-prone and potentially harmful proteins at the origins of protein misfolding diseases are expressed throughout life, whereas the diseases are late onset. This reveals that cells and organisms are normally resilient to disease-causing proteins and survive the threat of misfolded proteins up to a point. This Commentary will outline the limits of the cellular resilience to protein misfolding, and discuss the possibility of pushing these limits to help cells and organisms to survive the threat of misfolding proteins and to avoid protein quality control catastrophes. PMID:26483388

  12. Coniferyl Aldehyde Ameliorates Radiation Intestine Injury via Endothelial Cell Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer treatments related gastrointestinal toxicity has also been recognized as a significant economic burden. Especially, extensive apoptosis of microvascular endothelial cell of the lamina propria is the primary lesion initiating intestinal radiation damage after abdominal radiation therapy. Coniferyl aldehyde (CA) is phenolic compounds isolated from cork stoppers, and one of the major pyrolysis products of lignin. Shi H. was support for the empirical use of CA as a medicinal food for cardiovascular diseases. CA has positive effect in broad way but there is no consequence in radiation induced intestine damage. Here, we investigate effect of CA on small intestine after abdominal IR to mice in this study. In this study, CA increased the survival rate in C3H mice against 13.5 Gy abdominal IR. We found CA protects small intestine via preventing endothelial cell apoptosis and enhancing their angiogenic activity. CA also showed protective effect on crypt cell survival. Endothelial cell survival may affect crypt cell protection against IR. From this data, we concluded that CA is effective for protection against abdominal radiation injury. CA could ameliorate side-effect of radiation therapy

  13. Coniferyl Aldehyde Ameliorates Radiation Intestine Injury via Endothelial Cell Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ye Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Lee, Yoonjin; Lee, Haejune [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yunsil [Ewha Woman' s Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Younggyu [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Cancer treatments related gastrointestinal toxicity has also been recognized as a significant economic burden. Especially, extensive apoptosis of microvascular endothelial cell of the lamina propria is the primary lesion initiating intestinal radiation damage after abdominal radiation therapy. Coniferyl aldehyde (CA) is phenolic compounds isolated from cork stoppers, and one of the major pyrolysis products of lignin. Shi H. was support for the empirical use of CA as a medicinal food for cardiovascular diseases. CA has positive effect in broad way but there is no consequence in radiation induced intestine damage. Here, we investigate effect of CA on small intestine after abdominal IR to mice in this study. In this study, CA increased the survival rate in C3H mice against 13.5 Gy abdominal IR. We found CA protects small intestine via preventing endothelial cell apoptosis and enhancing their angiogenic activity. CA also showed protective effect on crypt cell survival. Endothelial cell survival may affect crypt cell protection against IR. From this data, we concluded that CA is effective for protection against abdominal radiation injury. CA could ameliorate side-effect of radiation therapy.

  14. Novel genes underlying beta cell survival in metabolic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Himadri; Farouk, Mohammed; Bose, Barish Baran; Singh, Prabhakar

    2013-01-01

    Relative insulin deficiency, in response to increased metabolic demand (obesity, genetic insulin resistance, pregnancy and aging) lead to Type2 diabetes. Susceptibility of the type 2 diabetes has a genetic basis, as a subset of people with risk factors (obesity, Insulin Resistance, pregnancy), develop Type2 Diabetes. We aimed to identify ‘cluster’ of overexpressed genes, underlying increased beta cell survival in diabetes resistant C57BL/6J ob/ob mice (compared to diabetes susceptible BTBR ob...

  15. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  16. Dynamic observation of micronuclei and cell survival in human liver cancer cells irradiated by heavy ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reported dynamic changes of micronuclei and cell survival in human liver cancer cells SMMC-7721 irradiated by 25 MeV/u 40Ar14+. The results show: (1) Change rules of frequency of micronuclei induced by single irradiation and fractionation irradiation with culture time have not clear difference. (2) Irradiated (single, fractionation) liver cancer cells grow much slower than control and their survival number with culture time shows decay tendency. (3) Dynamic changes of the relationship between micronucleus frequency and cell survival number presents negative correlation. (4) For cells irradiated by dose of 0.68 Gy, 6.8 Gy and 68 Gy, frequency of micronuclei following culture 24 hours is lower than that following culture 96 hours. (5) Negative dependences of survival number of liver cancer cells for culture 24 hours and 48 hours on dose are demonstrated

  17. Cell survival and iso-effect contours in irradiated tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell population kinetic parameters derived from radiobiological experiments and analysis of clinical data can be used to compute cellular surviving fractions in irradiated tumours and normal tissues. A three-component model of cellular radiation lethality, capable of simulating irreparable lethal events, reversible or sublethal effects and tissue repopulation processes, has proved adequate for clinical purposes. On this basis, computer programs have been developed for generating iso-effect (iso-survival) functions for various fractionation intervals in several tissues and tumours; for determining surviving fractions, equivalent single doses, and probabilities of response with specified fractionation schemes; and for optimizing treatment by identifying the procedure giving the highest probability of uncomplicated cure for a given tumour type growing in a specified location. If the relevant parameters for each of the tissues traversed by the beam, the physical dose absorbed at each point of interest, and the size, number and sequence of fractional doses reaching that point are known, then a series of computations of cellular surviving fractions can be made and used to draw iso-effect contours as a supplement to the physical isodose distribution in the same region. Procedures for both physical and biological optimization of the whole treatment plan are suggested. (author)

  18. Cell survival in spheroids irradiated with heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological investigations with accelerated heavy ions have been carried out regularly at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac for the past four years. Most of the cellular investigations have been conducted on cell monolayer and suspension culture systems. The studies to date suggest that heavy charged particle beams may offer some radiotherapeutic advantages over conventional radiotherapy sources. The advantages are thought to lie primarily in an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), a decrease in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and better tissue distribution dose. Experiments reported here were conducted with 400 MeV/amu carbon ions and 425 MeV/amu neon ions, using a rat brain gliosarcoma cell line grown as multicellular spheroids. Studies have been carried out with x-rays and high-energy carbon and neon ion beams. These studies evaluate high-LET (linear energy transfer) cell survival in terms of RBE and the possible contributions of intercellular communication. Comparisons were made of the post-irradiation survival characteristics for cells irradiated as multicellular spheroids (approximately 100 μm and 300 μm diameters) and for cells irradiated in suspension. These comparisons were made between 225-kVp x-rays, 400 MeV/amu carbon ions, and 425 MeV/amu neon ions

  19. IGFBP2 promotes glioma tumor stem cell expansion and survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, David, E-mail: dhs.zfs@gmail.com [College of Medicine, The University of Arizona (United States); Hsieh, Antony [The McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Stea, Baldassarre [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Arizona (United States); Ellsworth, Ron [College of Medicine, The University of Arizona (United States)

    2010-06-25

    IGFBP2 is overexpressed in the most common brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM), and its expression is inversely correlated to GBM patient survival. Previous reports have demonstrated a role for IGFBP2 in glioma cell invasion and astrocytoma development. However, the function of IGFBP2 in the restricted, self-renewing, and tumorigenic GBM cell population comprised of tumor-initiating stem cells has yet to be determined. Herein we demonstrate that IGFBP2 is overexpressed within the stem cell compartment of GBMs and is integral for the clonal expansion and proliferative properties of glioma stem cells (GSCs). In addition, IGFBP2 inhibition reduced Akt-dependent GSC genotoxic and drug resistance. These results suggest that IGFBP2 is a selective malignant factor that may contribute significantly to GBM pathogenesis by enriching for GSCs and mediating their survival. Given the current dearth of selective molecular targets against GSCs, we anticipate our results to be of high therapeutic relevance in combating the rapid and lethal course of GBM.

  20. Red cell survival and sequestration in acute intermittent porphyria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life span and sequestration of red cells have been studied in twenty one proved cases of acute intermittent porphyria of different age and sex group from Bikaner District, Rajasthan State (India). Chromium-51 labelled red cells were used in the study and the excess count method of Bughe Jones and Szur was used to calculate the index of sequestration. The mean apparent half survival time of erythrocytes in the control subjects was 25.9 +- 2.9 (S.D.) days and the same in the prophyria patients was 27.0 +- 3.8 days. This shows that the life span of red cells is normal in both the patient and the control. Excess destruction of red blood cells was found to take place in either spleen or liver in the disease and no excess accumulation of erythrocytes occurred over spleen as compared to liver. (M.G.B.)

  1. A mathematical model describing survival of mammalian cells after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents a model for describing the dose/effect curve which also considers recent findings about molecular damage to DNA and its enzymatic repair by the cell. To understand this model better, the author describes a number of important molecular details of the effect of radiation. The SSR model (Survival with Saturable Repair) describes correctly most of the experimental results. The concept of 'saturable repair' is based on the basic assumption of enzymatic repair kinetics for DNA damage based on the Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics. The existence of potentially lethally damaged cells is postulated which may be turned into fully viable cells by successful DNA repair. In case of repair failure, the damaged cells will die. The model also includes the immediate production of lethal damage. (orig./MG)

  2. PERK Integrates Oncogenic Signaling and Cell Survival During Cancer Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Yiwen; Diehl, J Alan

    2016-10-01

    Unfolded protein responses (UPR), consisting of three major transducers PERK, IRE1, and ATF6, occur in the midst of a variety of intracellular and extracellular challenges that perturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER stress occurs and is thought to be a contributing factor to a number of human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and various metabolic syndromes. In the context of neoplastic growth, oncogenic stress resulting from dysregulation of oncogenes such as c-Myc, Braf(V600E) , and HRAS(G12V) trigger the UPR as an adaptive strategy for cancer cell survival. PERK is an ER resident type I protein kinase harboring both pro-apoptotic and pro-survival capabilities. PERK, as a coordinator through its downstream substrates, reprograms cancer gene expression to facilitate survival in response to oncogenes and microenvironmental challenges, such as hypoxia, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Herein, we discuss how PERK kinase engages in tumor initiation, transformation, adaption microenvironmental stress, chemoresistance and potential opportunities, and potential opportunities for PERK targeted therapy. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2088-2096, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864318

  3. Oral squamous cell carcinoma: survival, recurrence and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Camilo Souza Cruz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper was based in data survey from macro and microscopic oral lesions characteristics, personal data and medical history of patients diagnosed with oral squamous cell carcinoma in the Lab of Pathological Anatomy from the Federal University of Alfenas from January 2000 to December 2010, establishing comparative parameters among clinical data, type of treatment, recurrence, survival and anatomic pathological characteristics of the lesions. Were analyzed the histopathological reports, dental and hospital records. The highest incidence was in white men, age between 50 and 60 years, married, with low education and socioeconomic levels. The beginning of treatment occurred in average 67 days after the histopathological diagnosis. The estimated survival of patients at five years was 42%. The consumption of alcohol and tobacco and the occurrence of metastasis were statistically significant for the increase of recurrence and lethality.

  4. CXCR4 engagement promotes dendritic cell survival and maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been reported that human monocyte derived-dendritic cells (DCs) express CXCR4, responsible for chemotaxis to CXCL12. However, it remains unknown whether CXCR4 is involved in other functions of DCs. Initially, we found that CXCR4 was expressed on bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs). The addition of specific CXCR4 antagonist, 4-F-Benzoyl-TN14003, to the culture of mouse BMDCs decreased their number, especially the mature subset of them. The similar effect was found on the number of Langerhans cells (LCs) but not keratinocytes among epidermal cell suspensions. Since LCs are incapable of proliferating in vitro, these results indicate that CXCR4 engagement is important for not only maturation but also survival of DCs. Consistently, the dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced, antigen-specific in vitro proliferation of previously sensitized lymph node cells was enhanced by CXCL12, and suppressed by CXCR4 antagonist. These findings suggest that CXCL12-CXCR4 engagement enhances DC maturation and survival to initiate acquired immune response

  5. Heat shock genes – integrating cell survival and death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richa Arya; Moushami Mallik; Subhash C Lakhotia

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock induced gene expression and other cellular responses help limit the damage caused by stress and thus facilitate cellular recovery. Cellular damage also triggers apoptotic cell death through several pathways. This paper briefly reviews interactions of the major heat shock proteins with components of the apoptotic pathways. Hsp90, which acts as a chaperone for unstable signal transducers to keep them poised for activation, interacts with RIP and Akt and promotes NF-B mediated inhibition of apoptosis; in addition it also blocks some steps in the apoptotic pathways. Hsp70 is mostly anti-apoptotic and acts at several levels like inhibition of translocation of Bax into mitochondria, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, formation of apoptosome and inhibition of activation of initiator caspases. Hsp70 also modulates JNK, NF-B and Akt signaling pathways in the apoptotic cascade. In contrast, Hsp60 has both anti- and pro-apoptotic roles. Cytosolic Hsp60 prevents translocation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax into mitochondria and thus promotes cell survival but it also promotes maturation of procaspase-3, essential for caspase mediated cell death. Our recent in vivo studies show that RNAi for the Hsp60D in Drosophila melanogaster prevents induced apoptosis. Hsp27 exerts its anti-apoptotic influence by inhibiting cytochrome c and TNF-mediated cell death. crystallin suppresses caspase-8 and cytochrome c mediated activation of caspase-3. Studies in our laboratory also reveal that absence or reduced levels of the developmentally active as well as stress induced non-coding hsr transcripts, which are known to sequester diverse hnRNPs and related nuclear RNA-binding proteins, block induced apoptosis in Drosophila. Modulation of the apoptotic pathways by Hsps reflects their roles as ``weak links” between various ``hubs” in cellular networks. On the other hand, non-coding RNAs, by virtue of their potential to bind with multiple proteins, can act as ``hubs” in

  6. Single-cell hydrogel encapsulation for enhanced survival of human marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoubi, Golnaz; Ormiston, Mark L; Stewart, Duncan J; Courtman, David W

    2009-10-01

    Inadequate extracellular matrix cues and subsequent apoptotic cell death are among crucial factors currently limiting cell viability and organ retention in cell-based therapeutic strategies for vascular regeneration. Here we describe the use of a single-cell hydrogel capsule to provide enhanced cell survival of adherent cells in transient suspension culture. Human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) were singularly encapsulated in agarose capsules containing the immobilized matrix molecules, fibronectin and fibrinogen to ameliorate cell-matrix survival signals. MSCs in the enriched capsules demonstrated increased viability, greater metabolic activity and enhanced cell-cytoskeletal patterning. Increased cell viability resulted from the re-induction of cell-matrix interactions likely via integrin clustering and subsequent activation of the extracellular signal regulated MAPK (ERK)/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Proof of principle in-vivo studies, investigating autologous MSC delivery into Fisher 344 rat hindlimb, depicted a significant increase in the number of engrafted cells using the single-cell encapsulation system. Incorporation of immobilized adhesion molecules compensates, at least in part, for the missing cell-matrix cues, thereby attenuating the initial anoikis stimuli and providing protection from subsequent apoptosis. Thus, this single-cell encapsulation strategy may markedly enhance therapeutic cell survival in targeted tissues. PMID:19595454

  7. Regulation of cell survival and death during Flavivirus infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sounak; Ghosh; Roy; Beata; Sadigh; Emmanuel; Datan; Richard; A; Lockshin; Zahra; Zakeri

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses, ss(+) RNA viruses, include many of mankind’s most important pathogens. Their pathogenicity derives from their ability to infect many types of cells including neurons, to replicate, and eventually to kill the cells. Flaviviruses can activate tumor necrosis factor α and both intrinsic(Bax-mediated) and extrinsic pathways to apoptosis. Thus they can use many approaches for activating these pathways. Infection can lead to necrosis if viral load is extremely high or to other types of cell death if routes to apoptosis are blocked. Dengue and Japanese Encephalitis Virus can also activate autophagy. In this case the autophagy temporarily spares the infected cell, allowing a longer period of reproduction for the virus, and the autophagy further protects the cell against other stresses such as those caused by reactive oxygen species. Several of the viral proteins have been shown to induce apoptosis or autophagy on their own, independent of the presence of other viral proteins. Given the versatility of these viruses to adapt to and manipulate the metabolism, and thus to control the survival of, the infected cells, we need to understand much better how the specific viral proteins affect the pathways to apoptosis and autophagy. Only in this manner will we be able to minimize the pathology that they cause.

  8. Tumour-stromal interactions: Integrins and cell adhesions as modulators of mammary cell survival and transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromal–epithelial interactions modulate mammary epithelial cell (MEC) growth and apoptosis by influencing cell adhesion and tissue organization. Perturbations in the mammary stroma and cell adhesion characterize breast tumors and underlie the altered tissue organization, disrupted tissue homeostasis and enhanced survival phenotype of the disease. Apoptosis resistance likely arises during malignant transformation via genetic and epigenetic modification of cell adhesion pathways induced by a changing tissue microenvironment. Acquisition of adhesion-linked survival networks that enhance MEC viability in the absence of basement membrane interactions probably promote malignant transformation, and may render breast tumors sufficiently resistant to exogenous apoptotic stimuli to generate multidrug resistance

  9. Evaluation of motion tracking by cell survival measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At GSI patients with stationary tumors are treated with a rasterscanned carbon ion beam. For moving targets interplay possibly deteriorates the dose distribution because target motion and scanner motion interfere. Several motion mitigation techniques are proposed to solve this problem. We use a fully integrated 3D online motion compensation system to track target motion of phantoms which includes adaptation of the Bragg peak position. To validate motion tracking with biological systems we conducted a series of repetitive experiments with hamster cells grown in wellplates. The wellplates were placed on a sliding table to induce lateral as well as longitudinal motion. Irradiations were performed with stationary wellplates and by tracking moving wellplates. Multiple samples were irradiated to gain statistics. As a result, we observed no significant difference in cell survival between the motion compensated measurements in comparison to a stationary reference irradiation. We conclude that our motion compensation system allows correct delivery of the biologically effective dose to moving phantoms

  10. Clinical characteristics and survival of children with Langerhans cell hystiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstovski Nada

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease in children, initial presentation is variable, clinical course, prognosis and survival are mostly unpredictable. OBJECTIVE To summarise clinical characteristics and treatment results in children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis. METHOD Retrospectively there were analyzed patients with LCH diagnosed and treated at Hematology Department of University Children's Hospital in Belgrade from 1990 to 2006. Clinical presentation, therapy and survival according to Kaplan-Meier's statistical test was analysed. RESULTS 30 patients were treated, aged from 4 months to 14 years, mean 3.9 years, median 2.3 years, 18 (60% males, 12 (40% females. A single system disease was diagnosed in 16 (53% patients, of whom 6 patients with multifocal bone disease. All patients were in complete remission averagely following162 and 82 months respectively. Multisystem disease was found in 14 (47% patients. The lymph nodes and skin were more frequently involved organs than the central nervous system (diabetes insipidus, lung, liver and spleen. The number of involved organs ranged from 2 to 8, mean 4.2. Four patients died due to disease progression 3, 16, 36 and 66 months after diagnosis. Nine patents with multisystem disease were in remission with 117 months of follow-up. One patient was lost on follow-up. CONCLUSION The clinical course of patients with a single system disease is usually benign while a multisystem disease has to be aggressively treated with precise initial evaluation and staging before therapy.

  11. Platelets increase survival of adenocarcinoma cells challenged with anticancer drugs: mechanisms and implications for chemoresistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Radomski, Marek; MEDINA MARTIN, CARLOS; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    PUBLISHED BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cancer cells grow without the restraints of feedback control mechanisms, leading to increased cancer cell survival. The treatment of cancer is often complicated by the lack of response to chemotherapy leading to chemoresistance and persistent survival of tumour cells. In this work we studied the role of platelets in chemotherapy-induced cancer cell death and survival. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Human adenocarcinoma cells, colonic (Caco-2) and ovaria...

  12. Ras and Rheb Signaling in Survival and Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most obvious hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation of cells partly due to independence of growth factor supply. A major component of mitogenic signaling is Ras, a small GTPase. It was the first identified human protooncogene and is known since more than three decades to promote cellular proliferation and growth. Ras was shown to support growth factor-independent survival during development and to protect from chemical or mechanical lesion-induced neuronal degeneration in postmitotic neurons. In contrast, for specific patho-physiological cases and cellular systems it has been shown that Ras may also promote cell death. Proteins from the Ras association family (Rassf, especially Rassf1 and Rassf5) are tumor suppressors that are activated by Ras-GTP, triggering apoptosis via e.g., activation of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST1) kinase. In contrast to Ras, their expression is suppressed in many types of tumours, which makes Rassf proteins an exciting model for understanding the divergent effects of Ras activity. It seems likely that the outcome of Ras signaling depends on the balance between the activation of its various downstream effectors, thus determining cellular fate towards either proliferation or apoptosis. Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) is a protein from the Ras superfamily that is also known to promote proliferation, growth, and regeneration through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. However, recent evidences indicate that the Rheb-mTor pathway may switch its function from a pro-growth into a cell death pathway, depending on the cellular situation. In contrast to Ras signaling, for Rheb, the cellular context is likely to modulate the whole Rheb-mTor pathway towards cellular death or survival, respectively

  13. Culture conditions affecting the survival response of Chinese hamster ovary cells treated by hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using lethally irradiated feeder cells to control cell population densities, researchers investigated the survival of Chinese hamster ovary cells heated between 42.2 and 45.5 degrees C. Test cells were plated into T25 flasks with or without feeder cells, incubated 2 hours at 37 degrees C, and then given various heat treatments. Under all heating conditions, survival increased in those flasks containing feeder cells. Increased survival (by as much as a factor of 100 for cells heated at 42.4 degrees C for 6-10 hr) was most apparent when cells were heated to thermotolerance. By adjustment of test and feeder cell numbers, survival increased as density increased; however, maximum survival followed a transition period that occurred between the plating of 1 X 10(4) and 6 X 10(4) cells. Experimental artifacts due to improper control of cell density was demonstrated

  14. Survival and kinetics of Chinese hamster ovary cell subpopulations induced by Adriamycin and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitotic selection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, at 10 min intervals after the initiation of Adriamycin and/or x-ray treatment was used to measure the kinetics and survival of cells which progressed without delay, the ''refractory'' cells, the cells that reached mitosis only after recovery from the treatment-induced delay, the ''recovered'' cells, and the survival of the cells remaining attached to the flask 5 h after treatment. The cell kinetics were determined from the rate at which cells entered mitosis, and the reproductive integrity from the survival of the selected refractory, recovered and remaining (unselected) cells

  15. Identification of Progenitor Cell Survival in Peripheral Blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The myeloid progenitors can not survive properly under the usual conditions of blood banking.The aim of work is to assay the survival of myeloid progenitors during varying periods of blood storage, under the usual condition of blood banking. It is an attempt to detect whether or not ,these circulating myeloid progenitors could be stored under the blood banking condition to be used in clinical transplantation protocols to treat a wide variety of refractory diseases.Individual blood samples from forty healthy adults were examined clinically, laboratory and ultrasonography. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated using Ficoll-Paque gradients . Serial dilutions of human placental conditioned medium were made, and tested for optimal activity by In vitro cultured technique.This study estimated that the mean levels of absolute number of myeloid progenitors per c.mm. at zero time was 137.7±68.3 (Range 54-297),at day 3 was 71.0±40.2 (Range 54-297), at day 7 was 94.8±45.7 (Range 30 -232) and at day 14 was 45.5±22.7). There was statistically significant decrease in the number of colonies from zero time to day 14. There was statistically significant decrease in the number of myeloid progenitors from zero time to day 14

  16. Resistin is a survival factor for porcine ovarian follicular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Agnieszka; Drwal, Eliza; Wróbel, Anna; Gregoraszczuk, Ewa Łucja

    2015-10-01

    Previously, we demonstrated the expression of resistin in the porcine ovary, the regulation of its expression and its direct effect on ovarian steroidogenesis. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of resistin on cell proliferation and apoptosis in a co-culture model of porcine granulosa and theca cells. First, we analysed the effect of resistin at 1 and 10  ng/ml alone or in combination with FSH- and IGF1 on ovarian cell proliferation with an alamarBlue assay and protein expression of cyclins A and B using western blot. Next, the mRNA and protein expression of selected pro-apoptotic and pro-survival regulators of cell apoptosis, caspase-9, -8 and -3 activity and DNA fragmentation using real time PCR, western blot, fluorescent assay and an ELISA kit, respectively, were analysed after resistin treatment. Furthermore, we determined the effect of resistin on the protein expression of ERK1/2, Stat and Akt kinase. Using specific inhibitors of these kinases, we also checked caspase-3 activity and protein expression. We found that resistin, at both doses, has no effect on cell proliferation. The results showed that resistin decreased pro-apoptotic genes, which was confirmed on protein expression of selected factors. We demonstrate an inhibitory effect of resistin on caspase activity and DNA fragmentation. Finally, resistin stimulated phosphorylation of the ERK1/2, Stat and Akt and kinases inhibitors reversed resistin action on caspase-3 activity and protein expression to control. All of these results showed that resistin has an inhibitory effect on porcine ovarian cell apoptosis by activation of the MAPK/ERK, JAK/Stat and Akt/PI3 kinase signalling pathways. PMID:26159832

  17. Survival curves and cell restoration of gamma irradiated chlorella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of the living material used and the cultures developed are defined. The irradiation techniques and the dosimetry methods used are described. The clonal growth in a gelified nutrient solution was studied and the survival curves, which are very reproducible when anoxic conditions are eliminated, were established. It is shown that the radiosensitivity of Chlorella decreases with the age of the culture when the plateau of the growth curve is reached, and that for synchronous cells it varies slightly with the phase in the cycle at which the radiation is received. The restoration from sublethal damage occurs quickly and does not depend upon the continuation of the cell cycle when no multiplication occurs during the experiments and is not modified by anoxic conditions. The restoration rate is reduced at 0 deg. C. It explains the variations in the apparent radiosensitivity with the dose rate. In contrast with the results published for many cells, the restoration is incomplete. The problem of the elimination of sublethal damage during clonal development is posed. A model summarizing the experimental results and suggesting future work is given. (author)

  18. Cell survival of human tumor cells compared with normal fibroblasts following 60Co gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three tumor cell lines, two of which were shown to be HeLa cells, were irradiated with 60Co gamma irradiation, together with two cell cultures of normal human diploid fibroblasts. Cell survival was studied in three different experiments over a dose range of 2 to 14 gray. All the tumor cell lines showed a very wide shoulder in the dose response curves in contrast to the extremely narrow shoulder of the normal fibroblasts. In addition, the D/sub o/ values for the tumor cell lines were somewhat greater. These two characteristics of the dose response curves resulted in up to 2 orders of magnitude less sensitivity for cell inactivation of HeLa cells when compared with normal cells at high doses (10 gray). Because of these large differences, the extrapolation of results from the irradiation of HeLa cells concerning the mechanisms of normal cell killing should be interpreted with great caution

  19. Tumor cell survival and immune escape mechanisms in classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell survival and immune escape mechanisms in classical Hodgkin lymphoma The nature of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a minority of tumor cells in a reactive background and loss of B cell phenotype, decides its dependence on the microenvironment for signals to contribute to survival and prol

  20. High-density lipoprotein, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell survival mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C Roger; Giordano, Samantha; Anantharamaiah, G M

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic injury is associated with acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting and open heart surgery. The timely re-establishment of blood flow is critical in order to minimize cardiac complications. Reperfusion after a prolonged ischemic period, however, can induce severe cardiomyocyte dysfunction with mitochondria serving as a major target of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. An increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces damage to mitochondrial respiratory complexes leading to uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial membrane perturbations also contribute to calcium overload, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and the release of apoptotic mediators into the cytoplasm. Clinical and experimental studies show that ischemic preconditioning (ICPRE) and postconditioning (ICPOST) attenuate mitochondrial injury and improve cardiac function in the context of I/R injury. This is achieved by the activation of two principal cell survival cascades: 1) the Reperfusion Injury Salvage Kinase (RISK) pathway; and 2) the Survivor Activating Factor Enhancement (SAFE) pathway. Recent data suggest that high density lipoprotein (HDL) mimics the effects of conditioning protocols and attenuates myocardial I/R injury via activation of the RISK and SAFE signaling cascades. In this review, we discuss the roles of apolipoproteinA-I (apoA-I), the major protein constituent of HDL, and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a lysosphingolipid associated with small, dense HDL particles as mediators of cardiomyocyte survival. Both apoA-I and S1P exert an infarct-sparing effect by preventing ROS-dependent injury and inhibiting the opening of the mPTP. PMID:27150975

  1. Cell survival, cell death and cell cycle pathways are interconnected: Implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddika, S; Ande, SR; Panigrahi, S;

    2007-01-01

    The partial cross-utilization of molecules and pathways involved in opposing processes like cell survival, proliferation and cell death, assures that mutations within one signaling cascade will also affect the other opposite process at least to some extent, thus contributing to homeostatic...... regulatory circuits. This review highlights some of the connections between opposite-acting pathways. Thus, we discuss the role of cyclins in the apoptotic process, and in the regulation of cell proliferation. CDKs and their inhibitors like the INK4-family (p16(Ink4a), p15(Ink4b), p18(Ink4c), p19(Ink4d...... highlighted both for their apoptosis-regulating capacity and also for their effect on the cell cycle progression. The PI3-K/Akt cell survival pathway is shown as regulator of cell metabolism and cell survival, but examples are also provided where aberrant activity of the pathway may contribute to the...

  2. Germ Cell Cancer and Multiple Relapses: Toxicity and Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria G.G.; Mortensen, Mette S.;

    2015-01-01

    , compared with patients treated with only orchiectomy, had an increased risk for a second cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 3.2; 95% CI, 1.9 to 5.5), major cardiovascular disease (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.3), pulmonary disease (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.8), GI disease (HR, 7.3; 95% CI, 3.6 to 14.8), renal...... disease have a highly increased risk of late toxicity and death as a result of causes other than GCC. Therefore, they should be candidates for life-long follow-up. The IPFSG classification was confirmed in this unselected population.......Purpose: A small number of patients with germ cell cancer (GCC) receive more than one line of treatment for disseminated disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate late toxicity and survival in an unselected cohort of patients who experienced relapse after receiving first-line treatment...

  3. Role for protein geranylgeranylation in adult T-cell leukemia cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease that develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals. Despite the accumulating knowledge of the molecular biology of HTLV-I-infected cells, effective therapeutic strategies remain to be established. Recent reports showed that the hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor statins have anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on certain tumor cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. Here, we report that statins hinder the survival of ATL cells and induce apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation is responsible for these effects, since simultaneous treatment with isoprenoid precursors, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate or farnesyl pyrophosphate, but not a cholesterol precursor squalene, restored the viability of ATL cells. Simvastatin inhibited geranylgeranylation of small GTPases Rab5B and Rac1 in ATL cells, and a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor GGTI-298 reduced ATL cell viability more efficiently than a farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277. These results not only unveil an important role for protein geranylgeranylation in ATL cell survival, but also implicate therapeutic potentials of statins in the treatment of ATL

  4. Improvement of Cell Survival During Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Definitive Endoderm Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Luo, Xie; Yao, Li; Lehman, Donna M; Wang, Pei

    2015-11-01

    Definitive endoderm (DE) is a vital precursor for internal organs such as liver and pancreas. Efficient protocol to differentiate human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to DE is essential for regenerative medicine and for modeling diseases; yet, poor cell survival during DE differentiation remains unsolved. In this study, our use of B27 supplement in modified differentiation protocols has led to a substantial improvement. We used an SOX17-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) reporter hESC line to compare and modify established DE differentiation protocols. Both total live cell numbers and the percentages of eGFP-positive cells were used to assess differentiation efficiency. Among tested protocols, three modified protocols with serum-free B27 supplement were developed to generate a high number of DE cells. Massive cell death was avoided during DE differentiation and the percentage of DE cells remained high. When the resulting DE cells were further differentiated toward the pancreatic lineage, the expression of pancreatic-specific markers was significantly increased. Similar high DE differentiation efficiency was observed in H1 hESCs and iPSCs through the modified protocols. In B27 components, bovine serum albumin was found to facilitate DE differentiation and cell survival. Using our modified DE differentiation protocols, satisfactory quantities of quality DE can be produced as primary material for further endoderm lineage differentiation. PMID:26132288

  5. Stem cell factor enhances the survival of murine intestinal stem cells after photon irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant rat stem cell factor (SCF) has been shown to decrease lethality in mice exposed to total-body irradiation (TBI) in the lower range of lethality through radioprotection of hematopoietic stem cells and acceleration of bone marrow repopulation. This study evaluates the effect of SCF on the survival of the intestinal mucosal stem cell after TBI. This non-hematopoietic cell is clinically relevant. Gastrointestinal toxicity is common during and after abdominal and pelvic radiation therapy and limits the radiation dose in these regions. As observed with bone marrow, the administration of SCF to mice prior to TBI enhanced the survival of mouse duodenal crypt stem cells. The maximum enhancement of survival was seen when 100 μ/kg of SCF was given intraperitoneally 8 h before irradiation. This regimen increased the survival of duodenal crypt stem cells after 12.0 Gy TBI from 22.5 ± 0.7 per duodenal cross section for controls to 30.0 ± 1.7 after treatment with SCF (P=0.03). The TBI dose producing 50% mortality of 6 days (LD50/6) was increased from 14.9 Gy for control mice to 19.0 Gy for mice treated with SCF (dose modification factor = 1.28). These findings demonstrate that SCF (dose modification factor = 1.28). These findings demonstrate that SCF has radioprotective effects on a non-hematopoietic stem cell population and suggest that SCF may be of clinical value in preventing radiation injury to the intestine. 29 refs., 4 figs

  6. Association of ultraviolet-induced retrovirus expression with anchorage-independent survival in rat embryo cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have shown in the AI assay that the nontransforming retrovirus increases the differential in enhanced survival response in infected cultures. To more fully understand this aspect of the system, they examined the effect of UV irradiation on infected and uninfected FRE cells. In this communication the authors report that UV irradiation induces AI survival in infected and uninfected cells;in uninfected cells there is a concomitant induction of endogenous retrovirus expression. The AI survival of both cell lines was determined using a previously described procedure. Anchorage-dependent media control and solvent control cells, when suspended in medium above an agar base layer, showed a rapid decline in cell survival;however, cells that had been treated with carcinogen did not undergo the destructive process that took place in control cells, indicating specificity

  7. Curcumin affects cell survival and cell volume regulation in human renal and intestinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curcumin (1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione or diferuloyl methane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. This substance has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries for its anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer properties linked to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions. The underlying mechanisms of these diverse effects are complex, not fully elucidated and subject of intense scientific debate. Despite increasing evidence indicating that different cation channels can be a molecular target for curcumin, very little is known about the effect of curcumin on chloride channels. Since, (i) the molecular structure of curcumin indicates that the substance could potentially interact with chloride channels, (ii) chloride channels play a role during the apoptotic process and regulation of the cell volume, and (iii) apoptosis is a well known effect of curcumin, we set out to investigate whether or not curcumin could (i) exert a modulatory effect (direct or indirect) on the swelling activated chloride current IClswell in a human cell system, therefore (ii) affect cell volume regulation and (iii) ultimately modulate cell survival. The IClswell channels, which are essential for regulating the cell volume after swelling, are also known to be activated under isotonic conditions as an early event in the apoptotic process. Here we show that long-term exposure of a human kidney cell line to extracellular 0.1–10 μM curcumin modulates IClswell in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 μM curcumin is ineffective, 0.5–5.0 μM curcumin increase, while 10 μM curcumin decrease the current), and short-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of curcumin does not affect IClswell neither if applied from the extracellular nor from the intracellular side – therefore, a direct effect of curcumin on IClswell

  8. Lipoic acid enhances survival of transplanted neural stem cells by reducing transplantation-associated injury

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Junling Gao,1,* Jason R Thonhoff,1,2,* Tiffany J Dunn,1 Ping Wu1 1Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA; 2Department of Neurology, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The efficacy of stem cell-based therapy for neurological diseases depends highly on cell survival post-transplantation. One of the key factors affecting cell survival is the grafting procedure. The curren...

  9. ORP4L is essential for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wenbin; Yi, Qing; Xu, Bing; Li, Shiqian; Wang, Tong; Liu, Fupei; Zhu, Biying; Hoffmann, Peter R; Ji, Guangju; Lei, Pingsheng; Li, Guoping; Li, Jiwei; Li, Jian; Olkkonen, Vesa M; Yan, Daoguang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are reprogrammed in cancer to support cell survival. Here, we report that T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells are characterized by increased oxidative phosphorylation and robust ATP production. We demonstrate that ORP4L is expressed in T-ALL but not normal T-cells and its abundance is proportional to cellular ATP. ORP4L acts as an adaptor/scaffold assembling CD3ɛ, Gαq/11 and PLCβ3 into a complex that activates PLCβ3. PLCβ3 catalyzes IP3 production in T-ALL as opposed to PLCγ1 in normal T-cells. Up-regulation of ORP4L thus results in a switch in the enzyme responsible for IP3-induced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release and oxidative phosphorylation. ORP4L knockdown results in suboptimal bioenergetics, cell death and abrogation of T-ALL engraftment in vivo. In summary, we uncovered a signalling pathway operating specifically in T-ALL cells in which ORP4L mediates G protein-coupled ligand-induced PLCβ3 activation, resulting in an increase of mitochondrial respiration for cell survival. Targeting ORP4L might represent a promising approach for T-ALL treatment. PMID:27581363

  10. Atypical protein kinase C zeta: potential player in cell survival and cell migration of ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly K Y Seto

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is one of the most aggressive gynaecological cancers, thus understanding the different biological pathways involved in ovarian cancer progression is important in identifying potential therapeutic targets for the disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential roles of Protein Kinase C Zeta (PRKCZ in ovarian cancer. The atypical protein kinase C isoform, PRKCZ, is involved in the control of various signalling processes including cell proliferation, cell survival, and cell motility, all of which are important for cancer development and progression. Herein, we observe a significant increase in cell survival upon PRKCZ over-expression in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells; additionally, when the cells are treated with small interference RNA (siRNA targeting PRKCZ, the motility of SKOV3 cells decreased. Furthermore, we demonstrate that over-expression of PRKCZ results in gene and/or protein expression alterations of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R and integrin beta 3 (ITGB3 in SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells. Collectively, our study describes PRKCZ as a potential regulatory component of the IGF1R and ITGB3 pathways and suggests that it may play critical roles in ovarian tumourigenesis.

  11. Radiobiology goes 3D: How ECM and cell morphology impact on cell survival after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Translational research is essential to find new therapeutic approaches to improve cancer patient survival. Despite extensive efforts in preclinical studies, many novel therapies fail to turn out to be translational from bench to beside. Therefore, new models better reflecting the conditions in vivo are needed to generate results, which transfer reliably into the clinic. The use of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models has provided new emerging insights into the understanding of cellular behavior upon cancer therapies. Interestingly, cells cultured in a 3D extracellular matrix are more radio- and chemoresistant than cells grown under conventional 2D conditions. In this review, we summarize and discuss underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon including integrin-mediated cell-matrix interactions, cell shape, nuclear organization and chromatin structure. Identifying the molecular differences between 2D and 3D cultured cells will offer the opportunity to improve our research and widen our therapeutic possibilities against cancer.

  12. Social isolation increases cell proliferation in male and cell survival in female California mice (Peromyscus californicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscio, Michael G; Bradley King, S; Haun, Harold L

    2015-11-01

    Social environment has direct effects on an animal's behavior, physiology and neurobiology. In particular, adult neurogenesis is notably affected by a variety of social manipulations, including social isolation. We hypothesized that social isolation should have particularly acute effects on neurogenesis in a highly social (monogamous and bi-parental) species such as Peromyscus californicus, the California mouse. Adult male and female P. californicus mice were housed in isolation or in same-sex pairs for 4 or 24 days. At the end of each period, either cell proliferation or cell survival was quantified with BrdU label and neuronal markers (either TuJ1 or NeuN). After 4 days, isolated males had greater cellular proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus (DG) than pair housed males. After 24 days, isolate females demonstrated greater cell survival in the DG than paired females. Males demonstrated a similar, but non-significant pattern. No differences in cellular proliferation or cell survival were found in the subventricular zone (SVZ), or medial amygdala (MeA). These results add to the evidence which demonstrates that neurogenic responses to environmental conditions are not identical across species. These data may be critical in understanding the functional significance of neurogenesis as it relates to the interactions between social systems, social environment and the display of social behaviors. PMID:26342752

  13. Cell cycle arrest and cell survival induce reverse trends of cardiolipin remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Chao

    Full Text Available Cell survival from the arrested state can be a cause of the cancer recurrence. Transition from the arrest state to the growth state is highly regulated by mitochondrial activity, which is related to the lipid compositions of the mitochondrial membrane. Cardiolipin is a critical phospholipid for the mitochondrial integrity and functions. We examined the changes of cardiolipin species by LC-MS in the transition between cell cycle arrest and cell reviving in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. We have identified 41 cardiolipin species by MS/MS and semi-quantitated them to analyze the detailed changes of cardiolipin species. The mass spectra of cardiolipin with the same carbon number form an envelope, and the C64, C66, C68, C70 C72 and C74 envelopes in HT1080 cells show a normal distribution in the full scan mass spectrum. The cardiolipin quantity in a cell decreases while entering the cell cycle arrest, but maintains at a similar level through cell survival. While cells awakening from the arrested state and preparing itself for replication, the groups with short acyl chains, such as C64, C66 and C68 show a decrease of cardiolipin percentage, but the groups with long acyl chains, such as C70 and C72 display an increase of cardiolipin percentage. Interestingly, the trends of the cardiolipin species changes during the arresting state are completely opposite to cell growing state. Our results indicate that the cardiolipin species shift from the short chain to long chain cardiolipin during the transition from cell cycle arrest to cell progression.

  14. Radiation-induced autophagy promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell survival via the LKB1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chi; Xie, Conghua

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy is an important treatment modality for esophageal cancer; however, the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy is limited by tumor radioresistance. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that radiation induces tumor cell autophagy as a cytoprotective adaptive response, which depends on liver kinase B1 (LKB1) also known as serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11). Radiation-induced Eca-109 cell autophagy was found to be dependent on signaling through the LKB1 pathway, and autophagy inhibitors that disrupted radiation-induced Eca-109 cell autophagy increased cell cycle arrest and cell death in vitro. Inhibition of autophagy also reduced the clonogenic survival of the Eca-109 cells. When treated with radiation alone, human esophageal carcinoma xenografts showed increased LC3B and p-LKB1 expression, which was decreased by the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. In vivo inhibition of autophagy disrupted tumor growth and increased tumor apoptosis when combined with 6 Gy of ionizing radiation. In summary, our findings elucidate a novel mechanism of resistance to radiotherapy in which radiation-induced autophagy, via the LKB1 pathway, promotes tumor cell survival. This indicates that inhibition of autophagy can serve as an adjuvant treatment to improve the curative effect of radiotherapy. PMID:27109915

  15. The importance of actual tumor growth rate on disease free survival and overall survival in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Evaluation of the variation in tumor growth rate and the influence of tumor growth rate on disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). Material and methods: We delineated tumor volume on a diagnostic and planning CT scan in 131 patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and calculated the tumor growth rate. Primary endpoint was DFS. Follow up data were collected retrospectively. Results: A large variation in tumor growth rate was seen. When dichotomized with a cut-off point of −0.3 ln(cc/day), we found a significant association between high growth rate and worse DFS (p = 0.008) and OS (p = 0.013). After stepwise adjustment for potential confounders (age, differentiation and tumor volume) this significant association persisted. However, after adjustment of N-stage association disappeared. Exploratory analyses suggested a strong association between N-stage and tumor growth rate. Conclusions: In laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, there is a large variation in tumor growth rate. This tumor growth rate seems to be an important factor in disease free survival and OS. This tumor growth rate is independent of age, differentiation and tumor volume associated with DFS, but N-stage seems to be a more important risk factor

  16. Measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity by post-labeling surviving target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 51Cr release assay (CRA) is the commonly accepted technique for measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity. This assay shows some disadvantages when mononucleated cells of human peripheral blood (MNC) are used as effector and target cells. The uptake of 51Cr by PHA stimulated lymphocytes is low compared to the spontaneous release. In an attempt to develop a cytotoxicity assay suitable for human lymphocytes we used 14C-TdR to label target cells surviving after contact with effector cells. Cytotoxic lymphocytes were generated by incubation of MNC with irradiated allogeneic MNC for 6 days. On day 6 the effector cells are irradiated and cocultured with PHA stimulated target cells. Twenty-four hours later 14C-TdR is added. After an additional 24 h the cultures are harvested and 14C-TdR taken up by target cells is measured. It is shown that the effector cells are still cytotoxic after irradiation. These cells do not take up 14C-TdR. Cell-free supernatants do not influence the uptake of 14C-TdR by target cells. The results obtained with this assay correlate very well those obtained by the CRA, if the spontaneous release does not exceed 30%. (author)

  17. Enhanced endogenous type I interferon cell-driven survival and inhibition of spontaneous apoptosis by Riluzole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), although effective in improving the survival of HIV-1-infected individuals, has not been able to reconstitute the adaptive immune response. We have described the use of novel chemical agents to restore T-cell survival/proliferation by inducing cytokine production. Due to its cationic amphiphilic structure, these molecules appear to enhance immune restoration. In this study, we investigated the action of Riluzole (2-amino-6-trifuromethoxybenzothiazole) in HIV-1 infection. Riluzole is able to increase (effective dose from 1 to 1000 nM) the cell-survival of T cells from HIV-1-infected patients and inhibit spontaneous apoptosis. The immunomodulatory effect of riluzole-sensitized cells was ascribed to endogenous type I interferon (IFN) derived from monocytes. Riluzole might be used for restoring the cell survival of immunocompromised patients and eliminating latent infected cells upon HIV-1 reactivation

  18. Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) Regulates Retinal Ganglion Cell Number and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnstable, Colin J; Reddy, Rajini; Li, Hong; Horvath, Tamas L

    2016-04-01

    In the brain, mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) has emerged as a stress signal associated with neuronal survival. In the retina, UCP2 is expressed primarily by retinal ganglion cells. Here, we investigated the functional relevance of UCP2 in the mouse retina. Increased expression of UCP2 significantly reduced apoptosis during the critical developmental period resulting in elevated numbers of retinal ganglion cells in the adult. Elevated UCP2 levels also protected against excitotoxic cell death induced by intraocular injection of either NMDA or kainic acid. In monolayer cultures of retinal cells, elevated UCP2 levels increased cell survival and rendered the cells independent of the survival-promoting effects of the neurotrophic factors BDNF and CNTF. Taken together, these data implicate UCP2 as an important regulator of retinal neuron survival both during development and in adult animals. PMID:26846222

  19. Cell Survival and Apoptosis Signaling as Therapeutic Target for Cancer: Marine Bioactive Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Se-Kwon; Senthilkumar Kalimuthu

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of apoptosis leads to activation of cell survival factors (e.g., AKT) causes continuous cell proliferation in cancer. Apoptosis, the major form of cellular suicide, is central to various physiological processes and the maintenance of homeostasis in multicellular organisms. A number of discoveries have clarified the molecular mechanism of apoptosis, thus clarifying the link between apoptosis and cell survival factors, which has a therapeutic outcome. Induction of apoptosis and inhib...

  20. Conditioned medium from activated spleen cells supports the survival of rat retinal cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sholl-Franco

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are a heterogeneous group of molecules that have been associated with several functions in the nervous system, such as survival and differentiation of neuronal and glial cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that conditioned medium from spleen cells activated with concanavalin A increased neuritogenesis and survival of retinal cells, as measured by biochemical and morphological criteria. Our data showed that conditioned medium induced a five-fold increase in the amount of protein after 120 h in vitro. This effect was not inhibited by the blockade of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels with 5.0 µM nifedipine. However, the use of an intracellular calcium chelator (15.0 µM BAPTA-AM inhibited this effect. Our results support the idea that factors secreted by activated lymphocytes, such as cytokines, can modulate the maintenance and the differentiation of rat retinal cells in vitro, indicating a possible role of these molecules in the development of retinal cells, as well as in its protection against pathological conditions

  1. The role of autophagy in cell survival from heavy ion irradiation in the plateau region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study cytotoxic effect of heavy ion irradiation in the plateau region, and investigate whether autophagy induced by heavy ion irradiation is cytoprotective, HeLa cells were irradiated with 350 MeV/u carbon ions beams, and the clonogenic survival was analyzed. The results showed that cell survival decreased with increasing doses. It was also found that G2/M-phase cells increased, and the autophagy-related activity was significantly higher than the control. When autophagy was blocked by 3-methyladenine in carbon-ion irradiated cells, G2/M phase arrest and the percentage of apoptosis cells were further elevated, and cell survival decreased significantly, indicating the induction of cytoprotective autophagy by carbon-ion irradiation. Our results demonstrated that autophagy induced by carbon ion irradiation provided a self-protective mechanism in HeLa cells, short-time inhibition of autophagy before carbon-ion irradiation could enhance radiation cytotoxicity in HeLa cells. (authors)

  2. Cell Survival and DNA Damage in Normal Prostate Cells Irradiated Out-of-Field.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, L

    2014-10-31

    Interest in out-of-field radiation dose has been increasing with the introduction of new techniques, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These new techniques offer superior conformity of high-dose regions to the target compared to conventional techniques, however more normal tissue is exposed to low-dose radiation with VMAT. There is a potential increase in radiobiological effectiveness associated with lower energy photons delivered during VMAT as normal cells are exposed to a temporal change in incident photon energy spectrum. During VMAT deliveries, normal cells can be exposed to the primary radiation beam, as well as to transmission and scatter radiation. The impact of low-dose radiation, radiation-induced bystander effect and change in energy spectrum on normal cells are not well understood. The current study examined cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells after exposure to out-of-field radiation both with and without the transfer of bystander factors. The effect of a change in energy spectrum out-of-field compared to in-field was also investigated. Prostate cancer (LNCaP) and normal prostate (PNT1A) cells were placed in-field and out-of-field, respectively, with the PNT1A cells being located 1 cm from the field edge when in-field cells were being irradiated with 2 Gy. Clonogenic and γ-H2AX assays were performed postirradiation to examine cell survival and DNA damage. The assays were repeated when bystander factors from the LNCaP cells were transferred to the PNT1A cells and also when the PNT1A cells were irradiated in-field to a different energy spectrum. An average out-of-field dose of 10.8 ± 4.2 cGy produced a significant reduction in colony volume and increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci\\/cell in the PNT1A cells compared to the sham-irradiated control cells. An adaptive response was observed in the PNT1A cells having first received a low out-of-field dose and then the bystander factors. The PNT1A cells showed a significant

  3. Regulatory T cell expressed MyD88 is critical for prolongation of allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Christopher M; Reichenbach, Dawn K; Kim, Beom Seok; Misra, Aditya; Blazar, Bruce R; Turka, Laurence A

    2016-08-01

    MyD88 signaling directly promotes T-cell survival and is required for optimal T-cell responses to pathogens. To examine the role of T-cell-intrinsic MyD88 signals in transplantation, we studied mice with targeted T-cell-specific MyD88 deletion. Contrary to expectations, we found that these mice were relatively resistant to prolongation of graft survival with anti-CD154 plus rapamycin in a class II-mismatched system. To specifically examine the role of MyD88 in Tregs, we created a Treg-specific MyD88-deficient mouse. Transplant studies in these animals replicated the findings observed with a global T-cell MyD88 knockout. Surprisingly, given the role of MyD88 in conventional T-cell survival, we found no defect in the survival of MyD88-deficient Tregs in vitro or in the transplant recipients and also observed intact cell homing and expression of Treg effector molecules. MyD88-deficient Tregs also fail to protect allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipients from chronic graft-versus-host disease, confirming the observations of defective regulation seen in a solid organ transplant system. Together, our data define MyD88 as having a divergent requirement for cell survival in non-Tregs and Tregs, and a yet-to-be defined survival-independent requirement for Treg function during the response to alloantigen. PMID:27112509

  4. Non-small cell lung cancer cell survival crucially depends on functional insulin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Carolin Maria; Zimmermann, Katrin; Zilleßen, Pia; Pfeifer, Alexander; Racké, Kurt; Mayer, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Insulin plays an important role as a growth factor and its contribution to tumor proliferation is intensely discussed. It acts via the cognate insulin receptor (IR) but can also activate the IGF1 receptor (IGF1R). Apart from increasing proliferation, insulin might have additional effects in lung cancer. Therefore, we investigated insulin action and effects of IR knockdown (KD) in three (NCI-H292, NCI-H226 and NCI-H460) independent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. All lung cancer lines studied were found to express IR, albeit with marked differences in the ratio of the two variants IR-A and IR-B. Insulin activated the classical signaling pathway with IR autophosphorylation and Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, activation of MAPK was observed in H292 cells, accompanied by enhanced proliferation. Lentiviral shRNA IR KD caused strong decrease in survival of all three lines, indicating that the effects of insulin in lung cancer go beyond enhancing proliferation. Unspecific effects were ruled out by employing further shRNAs and different insulin-responsive cells (human pre-adipocytes) for comparison. Caspase assays demonstrated that IR KD strongly induced apoptosis in these lung cancer cells, providing the physiological basis of the rapid cell loss. In search for the underlying mechanism, we analyzed alterations in the gene expression profile in response to IR KD. A strong induction of certain cytokines (e.g. IL20 and tumour necrosis factor) became obvious and it turned out that these cytokines trigger apoptosis in the NSCLC cells tested. This indicates a novel role of IR in tumor cell survival via suppression of pro-apoptotic cytokines. PMID:26113601

  5. Erythrokinetics, ferrokinetics and red cell survival in sickle cell anaemia under subtropical climatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrokinetic parameters were evaluated with 59Fe and red-cell survival with 51Cr by classical techniques in a total of 17 patients with sickle-cell disease. The mean plasma 59Fe half-disappearance time in these patients was 29.5 min as compared with a normal value of 92 min, and the t1/2 51Cr 8.0 days as compared with a normal value of 26.0 days. The mean red-cell iron turnover rate was elevated to 9 times normal. The increased destruction of red cells appeared to take place predominantly, though not entirely, in the spleen. Eight of the 17 patients studied were identified as having intercurrent complications, but these did not significantly affect the results of the investigations. A group of 5 boys in whom the red-cell iron turnover rate was elevated to a lesser degree than in the other patients were subjected to more detailed studies of plasma 59Fe clearance with particular reference to ineffective erythropoiesis. In these patients, the plasma 59Fe clearance curves showed precocious humps characteristic of ineffective erythropoiesis. Detailed analysis of the results indicated ineffective erythropoiesis corresponding to 3.6, 16.0, 22.6, 32.0 and 50.0 % of the iron initially taken up by the bone marrow. It is concluded that while the anaemia in most patients with sickle-cell disease is mainly due to shortened survival of the circulating red cells, with increased destruction of red cells in the spleen, ineffective erythropoiesis may none the less be an important factor determining the actual degree of this anaemia

  6. Survival of the fittest?--survival of stored red blood cells after transfusion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luten, M.; Roerdinkholder-Stoelwinder, B.; Bost, H.J.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    During the last 90 years many developments have taken place in the world of blood transfusion. Several anticoagulants and storage solutions have been developed. Also the blood processing has undergone many changes. At the moment, in The Netherlands, red blood cell (RBC) concentrates (prepared from a

  7. Progression-free survival, post-progression survival, and tumor response as surrogate markers for overall survival in patients with extensive small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisao Imai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The effects of first-line chemotherapy on overall survival (OS might be confounded by subsequent therapies in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC. We examined whether progression-free survival (PFS, post-progression survival (PPS, and tumor response could be valid surrogate endpoints for OS after first-line chemotherapies for patients with extensive SCLC using individual-level data. Methods: Between September 2002 and November 2012, we analyzed 49 cases of patients with extensive SCLC who were treated with cisplatin and irinotecan as first-line chemotherapy. The relationships of PFS, PPS, and tumor response with OS were analyzed at the individual level. Results: Spearman rank correlation analysis and linear regression analysis showed that PPS was strongly correlated with OS (r = 0.97, p < 0.05, R 2 = 0.94, PFS was moderately correlated with OS (r = 0.58, p < 0.05, R 2 = 0.24, and tumor shrinkage was weakly correlated with OS (r = 0.37, p < 0.05, R 2 = 0.13. The best response to second-line treatment, and the number of regimens employed after progression beyond first-line chemotherapy were both significantly associated with PPS ( p ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: PPS is a potential surrogate for OS in patients with extensive SCLC. Our findings also suggest that subsequent treatment after disease progression following first-line chemotherapy may greatly influence OS.

  8. Autophagy in response to photodynamic therapy: cell survival vs. cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Nancy L.; Xue, Liang-yan; Chiu, Song-mao; Joseph, Sheeba

    2009-02-01

    Autophagy (or more properly, macroautophagy) is a pathway whereby damaged organelles or other cell components are encased in a double membrane, the autophagosome, which fuses with lysosomes for digestion by lysosomal hydrolases. This process can promote cell survival by removing damaged organelles, but when damage is extensive, it can also be a mechanism of cell death. Similar to the Kessel and Agostinis laboratories, we have reported the vigorous induction of autophagy by PDT; this was found in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells whether or not they were able to efficiently induce apoptosis. One way to evaluate the role of autophagy in PDT-treated cells is to silence one of the essential genes in the pathway. Kessel and Reiners silenced the Atg7 gene of murine leukemia L1210 cells using inhibitory RNA and found sensitization to PDT-induced cell death at a low dose of PDT, implying that autophagy is protective when PDT damage is modest. We have examined the role of autophagy in an epithelium-derived cancer cell by comparing parental and Atg7-silenced MCF-7 cells to varying doses of PDT with the phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4. In contrast to L1210 cells, autophagy-deficient MCF-7 cells were more resistant to the lethal effects of PDT, as judged by clonogenic assays. A possible explanation for the difference in outcome for L1210 vs. MCF-7 cells is the greatly reduced ability of the latter to undergo apoptosis, a deficiency that may convert autophagy into a cell-death process even at low PDT doses. Experiments to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible are in process.

  9. Lentivirus mediated HO-1 gene transfer enhances myogenic precursor cell survival after autologous transplantation in pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumonier, Thomas; Yang, Sheng; Konig, Stephane; Chauveau, Christine; Anegon, Ignacio; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Menetrey, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Cell therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other muscle diseases is limited by a massive early cell death following injections. In this study, we explored the potential benefit of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in the survival of porcine myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) transplanted in pig skeletal muscle. Increased HO-1 expression was assessed either by transient hyperthermia or by HO-1 lentiviral infection. One day after the thermic shock, we observed a fourfold and a threefold increase in HSP70/72 and HO-1 levels, respectively. This treatment protected 30% of cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis in vitro. When porcine MPC were heat-shocked prior to grafting, we improved cell survival by threefold at 5 days after autologous transplantation (26.3 +/- 5.5% surviving cells). After HO-1 lentiviral transduction, almost 60% of cells expressed the transgene and kept their myogenic properties to proliferate and fuse in vitro. Apoptosis of HO-1 transduced cells was reduced by 50% in vitro after staurosporine induction. Finally, a fivefold enhancement in cell survival was observed after transplantation of HO-1-group (47.5 +/- 9.1% surviving cells) as compared to the nls-LacZ-group or control group. These results identify HO-1 as a protective gene against early MPC death post-transplantation. PMID:18026170

  10. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C.; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian; Dittmer, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Scheffrahn, Inka; Beauchemin, Nicole; Göthert, Joachim R.; Singer, Bernhard B.; Lang, Philipp A.; Lang, Karl S.

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1−/− mice limits the survival of B cells. During systemic infection with cytopathic vesicular stomatitis virus, Ceacam1−/− mice can barely induce neutralizing antibody responses and die early after infection. We find, therefore, that CEACAM1 is a crucial regulator of B-cell survival, influencing B-cell numbers and protective antiviral antibody responses. PMID:25692415

  11. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten; Westendorf, Astrid M; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian; Dittmer, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Scheffrahn, Inka; Beauchemin, Nicole; Göthert, Joachim R; Singer, Bernhard B; Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1(-/-) mice limits the survival of B cells. During systemic infection with cytopathic vesicular stomatitis virus, Ceacam1(-/-) mice can barely induce neutralizing antibody responses and die early after infection. We find, therefore, that CEACAM1 is a crucial regulator of B-cell survival, influencing B-cell numbers and protective antiviral antibody responses. PMID:25692415

  12. Suofu Qin’s work on studies of cell survival signaling in cancer and epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) encompass a variety of diverse chemical species including superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals and peroxynitrite, which are mainly produced via mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, enzymatic reactions, and light-initiated lipid peroxidation. Over-production of ROS and/or decrease in the antioxidant capacity cause cells to undergo oxi- dative stress that damages cellular macromolecules such as proteins, lipids, and DNA. Oxidative stress is associated with ageing and the development of agerelated diseases such as cancer and age-related macular degeneration. ROS activate signaling pathways that promote cell survival or lead to cell death, depending on the source and site of ROS production, the specific ROS generated, the concentration and kinetics of ROS generation, and the cell types being challenged. However, how the nature and compartmentalization of ROS contribute to the pathogenesis of individual diseases is poorly understood. Consequently, it is crucial to gain a comprehensive understanding of the molecular bases of cell oxidative stress signaling, which will then provide novel therapeutic opportunities to interfere with disease progression via targeting specific signaling pathways.Currently, Dr. Qin’s work is focused on inflammatory and oxidative stress responses using the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells as a model. The study of RPE cell inflammatory and oxidative stress responses has successfully led to a better understanding of RPE cell biology and identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  13. IL-15 expression on RA synovial fibroblasts promotes B cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Benito-Miguel

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to examine the role of RA Synovial Fibroblast (RASFib IL-15 expression on B cell survival. METHODS: Magnetically sorted peripheral blood memory B cells from 15 healthy subjects were cocultured with RASFib. RESULTS: RASFib constitutively expressed membrane IL-15. Survival of isolated B cells cultured for 6 days, below 5%, was extended in coculture with RASFib to 52+/-8% (p<0.001. IL-15 neutralizing agents but not isotype controls, reduced this rate to 31+/-6% (p<0.05. Interestingly, rhIL-15 had no effect on isolated B cells but significantly increased their survival in coculture with RASFib. In parallel, B cell IL-15R chains were upregulated in cocultures. BAFF and VCAM-1, that are expressed on RASFib, were tested as potential candidates involved in upregulating B cell IL-15R. Culture of B cells in the presence of rhBAFF or rhVCAM-1 resulted in significantly increased survival, together with upregulation of all three IL-15R chains; in parallel, rhIL-15 potentiated the anti-apoptotic effect of BAFF and VCAM-1. Both BAFF and VCAM-1 neutralizing agents downmodulated the effect of RASFib on B cell survival and IL-15R expression. In parallel, rhIL-15 had a lower effect on the survival of B cells cocultured with RASFib in the presence of BAFF or VCAM-1 neutralizing agents. Peripheral blood B cells from 15 early RA patients demonstrated an upregulated IL-15R and increased survival in cocultures. CONCLUSION: IL-15 expression on RASFib significantly contributes to the anti-apoptotic effect of RASFib on B cells. IL-15 action is facilitated by BAFF and VCAM-1 expressed on RASFib, through an upregulation of IL-15R chains.

  14. Reducing macrophages to improve bone marrow stromal cell survival in the contused spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, G.J.; Nandoe Tewarie, R.D.S.; Rahiem, S.T.; Hurtado, A.; Roos, R.A.; Grotenhuis, A.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    We tested whether reducing macrophage infiltration would improve the survival of allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted in the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord. Treatment with cyclosporine, minocycline, or methylprednisolone all resulted in a significant decrease in macropha

  15. Endothelial cell-initiated signaling promotes the survival and self-renewal of cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Sudha; Dong, Zhihong; Vodopyanov, Dmitry; Imai, Atsushi; Helman, Joseph I.; Prince, Mark E.; Wicha, Max S.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cancer stem cells play an important role in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). However, little is known about functional interactions between head and neck cancer stem-like cells (CSC) and surrounding stromal cells. Here, we used Aldehyde Dehydrogenase activity and CD44 expression to sort putative stem cells from primary human HNSCC. Implantation of 1,000 CSC (ALDH+CD44+Lin−) led to tumors in 13 (out of 15) mice, while 10,000 non-cancer stem cells (NCSC; ALDH−CD44−Lin−) resulted in 2 tumors in 15 mice. These data demonstrated that ALDH and CD44 select a sub-population of cells that are highly tumorigenic. The ability to self-renew was confirmed by the observation that ALDH+CD44+Lin− cells sorted from human HNSCC formed more spheroids (orospheres) in 3-D agarose matrices or ultra-low attachment plates than controls and were serially passaged in vivo. We observed that approximately 80% of the CSC were located in close proximity (within 100-µm radius) of blood vessels in human tumors, suggesting the existence of perivascular niches in HNSCC. In vitro studies demonstrated that endothelial cell-secreted factors promoted self-renewal of CSC, as demonstrated by the upregulation of Bmi-1 expression and the increase in the number of orospheres as compared to controls. Notably, selective ablation of tumor-associated endothelial cells stably transduced with a caspase-based artificial death switch (iCaspase-9) caused a marked reduction in the fraction of CSC in xenograft tumors. Collectively, these findings indicate that endothelial cell-initiated signaling can enhance the survival and self-renewal of head and neck cancer stem cells. PMID:21098716

  16. Cell Survival and Apoptosis Signaling as Therapeutic Target for Cancer: Marine Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Se-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of apoptosis leads to activation of cell survival factors (e.g., AKT causes continuous cell proliferation in cancer. Apoptosis, the major form of cellular suicide, is central to various physiological processes and the maintenance of homeostasis in multicellular organisms. A number of discoveries have clarified the molecular mechanism of apoptosis, thus clarifying the link between apoptosis and cell survival factors, which has a therapeutic outcome. Induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell survival by anticancer agents has been shown to correlate with tumor response. Cellular damage induces growth arrest and tumor suppression by inducing apoptosis, necrosis and senescence; the mechanism of cell death depends on the magnitude of DNA damage following exposure to various anticancer agents. Apoptosis is mainly regulated by cell survival and proliferating signaling molecules. As a new therapeutic strategy, alternative types of cell death might be exploited to control and eradicate cancer cells. This review discusses the signaling of apoptosis and cell survival, as well as the potential contribution of marine bioactive compounds, suggesting that new therapeutic strategies might follow.

  17. Unbiased and automated identification of a circulating tumour cell definition that associates with overall survival.

    OpenAIRE

    Ligthart, Sjoerd T.; Frank A W Coumans; Gerhardt Attard; Amy Mulick Cassidy; de Bono, Johann S.; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTC) in patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. Classification of CTC however remains subjective, as they are morphologically heterogeneous. We acquired digital images, using the CellSearch™ system, from blood of 185 castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients and 68 healthy subjects to define CTC by computer algorithms. Patient survival data was used as the training parameter for the computer t...

  18. HSP70 mediates survival in apoptotic cells – Boolean network prediction and experimental validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas Vasaikar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal stress or injury results in the activation of proteins, which regulate the balance between survival and apoptosis. However, the complex mechanism of cell signalling involving cell death and survival, activated in response to cellular stress is not yet completely understood. To bring more clarity about these mechanisms, a Boolean network was constructed that represented the apoptotic pathway in neuronal cells. FasL and neurotrophic growth factor (NGF were considered as inputs in the absence and presence of heat shock proteins known to shift the balance towards survival by rescuing pro-apoptotic cells. The probabilities of survival, DNA repair and apoptosis as cellular fates, in the presence of either the growth factor or FasL, revealed a survival bias encoded in the network. Boolean predictions tested by measuring the mRNA expression level of caspase-3, caspase-8 and BAX in neuronal Neuro2a (N2a cell line with NGF and FasL as external input, showed positive correlation with the observed experimental results for survival and apoptotic states. It was observed that HSP70 contributed more towards rescuing cells from apoptosis in comparison to HSP27, HSP40 and HSP90. Overexpression of HSP70 in N2a transfected cells showed reversal of cellular fate from FasL-induced apoptosis to survival. Further, the pro-survival role of the proteins BCL2, IAP, cFLIP and NFκB determined by vertex perturbation analysis was experimentally validated through protein inhibition experiments using EM20-25, Embelin and Wedelolactone, which resulted in 1.27-fold, 1.26-fold and 1.46-fold increase in apoptosis of N2a cells. The existence of a one-to-one correspondence between cellular fates and attractor states shows that Boolean networks may be employed with confidence in qualitative analytical studies of biological networks.

  19. Determination of cell survival after irradiation via clonogenic assay versus multiple MTT Assay - A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Buch Karl; Peters Tanja; Nawroth Thomas; Sänger Markus; Schmidberger Heinz; Langguth Peter

    2012-01-01

    Abstract For studying proliferation and determination of survival of cancer cells after irradiation, the multiple MTT assay, based on the reduction of a yellow water soluble tetrazolium salt to a purple water insoluble formazan dye by living cells was modified from a single-point towards a proliferation assay. This assay can be performed with a large number of samples in short time using multi-well-plates, assays can be performed semi-automatically with a microplate reader. Survival, the calc...

  20. Cell survival and chromosomal aberrations in CHO-K1 cells irradiated by carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czub, J. [Institute of Physics, Swietokrzyska Academy, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Banas, D. [Institute of Physics, Swietokrzyska Academy, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Blaszczyk, A. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Braziewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Swietokrzyska Academy, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Buraczewska, I. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, ul. Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Choinski, J. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University, ul. Pasteura 5A, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Gorak, U. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, ul. Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Jaskola, M.; Korman, A. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Lankoff, A.; Lisowska, H. [Institute of Biology, Swietokrzyska Academy, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Lukaszek, A. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, ul. Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Main School of Fire Service, ul. Slowackiego 52/54, 01-629 Warsaw (Poland); Szeflinski, Z. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, ul. Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: szef@fuw.edu.pl; Wojcik, A. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, ul. Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Biology, Swietokrzyska Academy, ul. Swietokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland)

    2009-03-15

    Chinese hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells were exposed to high LET {sup 12}C-beam (LET: 830 keV/{mu}m) in the dose range of 0-6 Gy and to {sup 60}Co irradiation and the RBE value was obtained. Effects of {sup 12}C-beam exposure on cell survival and chromosomal aberrations were calculated. The chromosomal aberration data were fitted with linear equation. The distribution of aberration in cells was examined with a standard u-test and used to evaluate the data according to Poisson probabilities. The variance to the mean ratio {sigma}{sup 2}/Y and the dispersion index (u) were determined. Overdispersion was significant (p<0.05) when the value of u exceeded 1.96.

  1. A novel in vitro survival assay of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microcolony assay developed by Withers and Elkind has been a gold standard to assess the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to high (≥8 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation (IR), but is not applicable in cases of exposure to lower doses. Here, we developed a novel in vitro assay that enables assessment of the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower IR doses. The assay includes in vitro culture of small intestinal stem cells, which allows the stem cells to develop into epithelial organoids containing all four differentiated cell types of the small intestine. We used Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-CreERT2/ROSA26-tdTomato mice to identify Lgr5+ stem cells and their progeny. Enzymatically dissociated single crypt cells from the duodenum and jejunum of mice were irradiated with 7.25, 29, 101, 304, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mGy of X-rays immediately after plating, and the number of organoids was counted on Day 12. Organoid-forming efficiency of irradiated cells relative to that of unirradiated controls was defined as the surviving fraction of stem cells. We observed a significant decrease in the surviving fraction of stem cells at ≥1000 mGy. Moreover, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses and passage of the organoids revealed that proliferation of stem cells surviving IR is significantly potentiated. Together, the present study demonstrates that the in vitro assay is useful for quantitatively assessing the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower doses of IR as compared with previous examinations using the microcolony assay. (author)

  2. The radiosensitivity of a murine fibrosarcoma as measured by three cell survival assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, L; Urano, M; Suit, H D

    1980-04-01

    The radiation sensitivity of a weakly immunogenic spontaneous fibrosarcoma of the C3Hf/Sed mouse (designated FSa-II) was assessed by three in vivo cell survival methods: end-point dilution (TD50) assay, lung colony (LC) assay, and agar diffusion chamber (ADC) assay. The hypoxic fraction of this tumour was also determined by the ADC method. Although there was a good agreement of the cell survival data between the ADC and LC methods, the TD50 method yielded a considerably less steep cell survival curve. Beneficial aspects and limitations of each assay are discussed. In addition, the use of the ADC method for the growth of xenogeneic cell lines and a preliminary experiment with human tumour cells in non-immunosuppressed hosts suggest that this method may be a valuable adjunct for studying the growth and therapeutic responses of human tumour cells. PMID:6932931

  3. Relation of intracellular cyclic AMP to the shape of mammalian cell survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experiments with V79 cells growing in tissue culture indicate that the reproductive survival of cells following irradiation is influenced by the level of intracellular 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) at the time of irradiation. Cells containing high levels of cyclic AMP induced by treatments with drugs show a characteristic survival curve in which the extent of the shoulder is increased so that the survival after low doses is enhanced. The exponential slope or D0, however, is decreased so that at high doses the survival of cells containing high levels of cyclic AMP may be less than that of controls. Naturally occurring changes in radiosensitivity such as those observed as cells pass through the division cycle, may also be related to parallel changes in cyclic AMP concentration occurring during the cycle. Injection of mice with compounds producing elevated cyclic AMP prior to whole-body irradiation increases survival at seven days post-irradiation. The shape of the survival curve for intestinal stem cells in these mice differs from that of the control in having an increased extrapolation number; no change in D0 is observed in this in vivo situation. (author)

  4. Ensemble of cell survival experiments after ion irradiation for validation of RBE models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is persistent interest in understanding the systematics of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Models such as the Local Effect Model (LEM) or the Microdosimetric Kinetic Model have the goal to predict the RBE. For the validation of these models a collection of many in-vitro cell survival experiments is most appropriate. The set-up of an ensemble of in-vitro cell survival data comprising about 850 survival experiments after both ion and photon irradiation is reported. The survival curves have been taken out from publications. The experiments encompass survival curves obtained in different labs, using different ion species from protons to uranium, varying irradiation modalities (shaped or monoenergetic beam), various energies and linear energy transfers, and a whole variety of cell types (human or rodent; normal, mutagenic or tumor; radioresistant or -sensitive). Each cell survival curve has been parameterized by the linear-quadratic model. The photon parameters have been added to the data base to allow to calculate the experimental RBE to any survival level. We report on experimental trends found within the data ensemble. The data will serve as a testing ground for RBE models such as the LEM. Finally, a roadmap for further validation and first model results using the data base in combination with the LEM are presented.

  5. Collagen Promotes Higher Adhesion, Survival and Proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnapaka Somaiah

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC can differentiate into several cell types and are desirable candidates for cell therapy and tissue engineering. However, due to poor cell survival, proliferation and differentiation in the patient, the therapy outcomes have not been satisfactory. Although several studies have been done to understand the conditions that promote proliferation, differentiation and migration of MSC in vitro and in vivo, still there is no clear understanding on the effect of non-cellular bio molecules. Of the many factors that influence the cell behavior, the immediate cell microenvironment plays a major role. In this context, we studied the effect of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in controlling cell survival, proliferation, migration and directed MSC differentiation. We found that collagen promoted cell proliferation, cell survival under stress and promoted high cell adhesion to the cell culture surface. Increased osteogenic differentiation accompanied by high active RHOA (Ras homology gene family member A levels was exhibited by MSC cultured on collagen. In conclusion, our study shows that collagen will be a suitable matrix for large scale production of MSC with high survival rate and to obtain high osteogenic differentiation for therapy.

  6. Homotypic RANK signaling differentially regulates proliferation, motility and cell survival in osteosarcoma and mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beristain, Alexander G; Narala, Swami R; Di Grappa, Marco A; Khokha, Rama

    2012-02-15

    RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand) is a crucial cytokine for regulating diverse biological systems such as innate immunity, bone homeostasis and mammary gland differentiation, operating through activation of its cognate receptor RANK. In these normal physiological processes, RANKL signals through paracrine and/or heterotypic mechanisms where its expression and function is tightly controlled. Numerous pathologies involve RANKL deregulation, such as bone loss, inflammatory diseases and cancer, and aberrant RANK expression has been reported in bone cancer. Here, we investigated the significance of RANK in tumor cells with a particular emphasis on homotypic signaling. We selected RANK-positive mouse osteosarcoma and RANK-negative preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and subjected them to loss- and gain-of-RANK function analyses. By examining a spectrum of tumorigenic properties, we demonstrate that RANK homotypic signaling has a negligible effect on cell proliferation, but promotes cell motility and anchorage-independent growth of osteosarcoma cells and preosteoblasts. By contrast, establishment of RANK signaling in non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial NMuMG cells promotes their proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, but not motility. Furthermore, RANK activation initiates multiple signaling pathways beyond its canonical target, NF-κB. Among these, biochemical inhibition reveals that Erk1/2 is dominant and crucial for the promotion of anchorage-independent survival and invasion of osteoblastic cells, as well as the proliferation of mammary epithelial cells. Thus, RANK signaling functionally contributes to key tumorigenic properties through a cell-autonomous homotypic mechanism. These data also identify the likely inherent differences between epithelial and mesenchymal cell responsiveness to RANK activation. PMID:22421365

  7. Genetic Engineering of Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Induce Their Migration and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Adam; Walczak, Piotr; Lukomska, Barbara; Janowski, Miroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are very attractive for regenerative medicine due to their relatively easy derivation and broad range of differentiation capabilities, either naturally or induced through cell engineering. However, efficient methods of delivery to diseased tissues and the long-term survival of grafted cells still need improvement. Here, we review genetic engineering approaches designed to enhance the migratory capacities of MSCs, as well as extend their survival after transplantation by the modulation of prosurvival approaches, including prevention of senescence and apoptosis. We highlight some of the latest examples that explore these pivotal points, which have great relevance in cell-based therapies.

  8. Controlling Redox Status for Stem Cell Survival, Expansion, and Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Sébastien Sart; Liqing Song; Yan Li

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have long been considered as pathological agents inducing apoptosis under adverse culture conditions. However, recent findings have challenged this dogma and physiological levels of ROS are now considered as secondary messengers, mediating numerous cellular functions in stem cells. Stem cells represent important tools for tissue engineering, drug screening, and disease modeling. However, the safe use of stem cells for clinical applications still requires culture ...

  9. Impact of CD133 positive stem cell proportion on survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to assess the impact of CD133-positive (CD133+) cancer stem cell proportions on treatment results of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. Patients with GBM (n = 42) received postoperative radiotherapy (± chemotherapy). Surgically excised GBM tissue sections were immunohistochemically examined for CD133 expression. The proportions of CD133+ GBM cells were determined (%). The proportion of CD133+ GBM stem cells was established by 2 independent researchers whose results were in good accordance (R = 0.8, p < 0.01). Additionally, CD133 expression levels were correlated with patients overall survival. The proportion of CD133+ cells varied between patients, being from 0.5% to 82%. Mean and median proportions of CD133+ cells of the entire study group were 33% ± 24% (mean ± SD) and 28%, respectively. Clinical data do not support the association between higher proportion of stem cells and the aggressiveness of GBM. Median survival time of the study group was 10.0 months (95% CI 9.0–11.0). The survival time clearly depended on the proportion of CD133+ cells (log rank test, p = 0.02). Median survival times for patients with low (< median) and high (≥ median) proportion of CD133+ cells were 9.0 months (95% CI 7.6–10.5) and 12.0 months (95% CI 9.3–14.7), respectively. In multivariate analysis, the proportion of CD133+ cells emerged as a significant independent predictor for longer overall survival (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0–3.8, p = 0.04). In patients with higher stem cell proportion, significantly longer survival times after postoperative radiotherapy were achieved. Underlying reasons and possible higher sensitivity of GBM stem cells to fractionated radio-therapy should be clarified in further studies

  10. Conditioning the cochlea to facilitate survival and integration of exogenous cells into the auditory epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Ho; Wilson, Kevin F; Ueda, Yoshihisa; Tung Wong, Hiu; Beyer, Lisa A; Swiderski, Donald L; Dolan, David F; Raphael, Yehoash

    2014-04-01

    The mammalian auditory epithelium (AE) cannot replace supporting cells and hair cells once they are lost. Therefore, sensorineural hearing loss associated with missing cells is permanent. This inability to regenerate critical cell types makes the AE a potential target for cell replacement therapies such as stem cell transplantation. Inserting stem cells into the AE of deaf ears is a complicated task due to the hostile, high potassium environment of the scala media in the cochlea, and the robust junctional complexes between cells in the AE that resist stem cell integration. Here, we evaluate whether temporarily reducing potassium levels in the scala media and disrupting the junctions in the AE make the cochlear environment more receptive and facilitate survival and integration of transplanted cells. We used sodium caprate to transiently disrupt the AE junctions, replaced endolymph with perilymph, and blocked stria vascularis pumps with furosemide. We determined that these three steps facilitated survival of HeLa cells in the scala media for at least 7 days and that some of the implanted cells formed a junctional contact with native AE cells. The data suggest that manipulation of the cochlear environment facilitates survival and integration of exogenously transplanted HeLa cells in the scala media. PMID:24394296

  11. An unexpected caffeine-enhanced survival in x-ray-sensitive variant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of normal Chinese hamster cell lines, V79 and CHO, mouse cell lines, L5178Y and L, and human HeLa cells to the killing effect of x-ray is enhanced with addition of caffeine following x-ray irradiation in a dose-dependent fashion. However, the survival rate of variant cell (V79-AL162/S-10) increased with addition of low concentration of caffeine (caffeine-enhanced survival phenomenon). Therefore, the effects of protein synthesis-inhibiting agents, such as cycloheximide and puromycin, on caffeine-enhanced survival phenomenon were examined. This phenomenon was completely abolished by the inhibitory agents, but not abolished by DNA synthesis-damaging agents, such as excess thymidine and aphidicolin. DNA-damaging physiochemical factors, such as neutrons, U.V., methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C, were examined in relation to variant cells' sensitivity and caffeine-enhanced survival phenomenon. V79-AL162/S-10 cells showed high sensitivity to the killing effect of mitomycin C, but their survival rate returned to the rate of normal V79-B310H cells with addition of caffeine. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Urokinase mediates endothelial cell survival via induction of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prager, Gerald W; Mihaly, Judit; Brunner, Patrick M;

    2008-01-01

    factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) p52 activation. Indeed, blocking NF-kappaB activation by using specific NF-kappaB inhibitors abolished uPA-induced cell survival as it blocked uPA-induced XIAP up-regulation. Furthermore, down-regulating XIAP expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly reduced u......Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) additionally elicits a whole array of pro-angiogenic responses, such as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. In this study, we demonstrate that in endothelial cells uPA also protects against apoptosis by transcriptional up-regulation and......PA-dependent endothelial cell survival. This mechanism is also important for VEGF-induced antiapoptosis because VEGF-dependent up-regulation of XIAP was found defective in uPA(-/-) endothelial cells. This led us to conclude that uPA is part of a novel NF-kappaB-dependent cell survival pathway....

  13. Cell cycle variation in x-ray survival for cells from spheroids measured by volume cell sorting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable work has been done studying the variation in cell survival as a function of cell cycle position for monolayers or single cells exposed to radiation. Little is known about the effects of multicellular growth on the relative radiation sensitivity of cells in different cell cycle stages. The authors have developed a new technique for measuring the response of cells, using volume cell sorting, which is rapid, non-toxic, and does not require cell synchronization. By combining this technique with selective spheroid dissociation,they have measured the age response of cells located at various depths in EMT6 and Colon 26 spheroids. Although cells in the inner region had mostly G1-phase DNA contents, 15-20% had S- and G2-phase DNA contents. Analysis of these cells using BrdU labeling and flow cytometric analysis with a monoclonal antibody to BrdU indicated that the inner region cells were not synthesizing DNA. Thus, the authors were able to measure the radiation response of cells arrested in G1, S and G2 cell cycle phases. Comparison of inner and outer spheroid regions, and monolayer cultures, indicates that it is improper to extrapolate age response data in standard culture conditions to the situation in spheroids

  14. Mitochondrial peroxiredoxin 3 regulates sensory cell survival in the cochlea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Quan Chen

    Full Text Available This study delineates the role of peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3 in hair cell death induced by several etiologies of acquired hearing loss (noise trauma, aminoglycoside treatment, age. In vivo, Prx3 transiently increased in mouse cochlear hair cells after traumatic noise exposure, kanamycin treatment, or with progressing age before any cell loss occurred; when Prx3 declined, hair cell loss began. Maintenance of high Prx3 levels via treatment with the radical scavenger 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate prevented kanamycin-induced hair cell death. Conversely, reducing Prx3 levels with Prx3 siRNA increased the severity of noise-induced trauma. In mouse organ of Corti explants, reactive oxygen species and levels of Prx3 mRNA and protein increased concomitantly at early times of drug challenge. When Prx3 levels declined after prolonged treatment, hair cells began to die. The radical scavenger p-phenylenediamine maintained Prx3 levels and attenuated gentamicin-induced hair cell death. Our results suggest that Prx3 is up-regulated in response to oxidative stress and that maintenance of Prx3 levels in hair cells is a critical factor in their susceptibility to acquired hearing loss.

  15. In vivo studies of the long-term 51Cr red cell survival of serologically incompatible red cell units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term survival of serologically incompatible red cell units was measured in five patients with antibodies to high-frequency antigens. Initially, the survival of 1 ml of 51Cr-labeled incompatible red cells was measured over 1 hour. After demonstrating that the 1-hour survival times were successful (greater than 70%), each patient then received 5 ml of the same 51Cr-labeled red cells followed by the transfusion of the remainder of the red cell unit. The long-term T 1/2Cr survival for each case was patient 1 (anti-McCa), 15 days; patient 2 (anti-JMH), 12 days; patient 3 (anti-Kna), 31 days; patient 4 (anti-McCa), 12 days; and patient 5 (anti-Hya), 14 days. Each antibody tested in an in vitro homologous macrophage assay showed less than 5 percent phagocytosis. Anti-JMH was the only antibody to react with IgG subclass antisera and was determined to be IgG4. The macrophage assay, IgG subclass testing, and short-term (1 hour, 1 ml) 51Cr survival studies all indicated that the short-term survival was good. However, only the measurement of long-term survival with transfused units of serologically incompatible red cells was able to determine the actual survival, and clinical significance of the alloantibodies. Determining the actual long-term survival by the method described here can be of importance for patients requiring chronic red cell transfusion

  16. Influence of pro-angiogenic cytokines on proliferative activity and survival of endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solyanik G. I.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Tumor angiogenesis in contrast to physiological one is characterized by high level of malignant cell production of proangiogenic cytokines, which have different influence on functional activity of endothelial cells. The goal of the study – to carry out a comparative analysis of the influence of a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and an epidermal growth factor (EGF on proliferative activity and survival of endothelial cells upon their confluent and exponential growth. Methods. The proliferative activity of endothelial cells was determined by MTT-test and their viability was detected by the trypane blue exclusion test. Results. It was shown that EGF (irrespectively of the level of serum factors in concentrations higher than 10 ng/ml activated the proliferative activity of confluent endotheliocytes in a concentration-dependent manner by 18–36 % (ð < 0.05 as compared to the control, while this cytokine didn’t affect the endothelial cells in the exponential growth phase. VEGF in wide concentration range didn’t display the mitogenic effect on endotheliocytes in both confluent and exponential growth phases. Furthermore, VEGF in concentrations higher than 100 ng/ml inhibited proliferative activity of confluent endothelial cells by 12 % (ð < 0.05. In case of deficiency of nutrients, EGF and VEGF promoted the survival of endothelial cells, considerably decreasing their death. Conclusions. EGF, in contrast to VEGF, stimulates proliferation and survival of the endothelial cells, whereas VEGF has significant influence only on the survival of the cells

  17. A distinct subset of self-renewing human memory CD8+ T cells survives cytotoxic chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Swanson, Hillary M.; Fujii, Nobuharu; Estey, Elihu H.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms that maintain human T cell memory during normal and perturbed homeostasis are not fully understood. The repeated induction of profound lymphocytopenia in patients undergoing multiple cycles of cytotoxic chemotherapy infrequently results in severe infections with viruses controlled by memory T cells, suggesting that some memory T cells survive chemotherapy and restore immunity. Here we identify a distinct subpopulation of memory CD8+ T cells with the ability to rapidly efflux an...

  18. Dormancy of Cancer Cells with Suppression of AKT Activity Contributes to Survival in Chronic Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroko Endo; Hiroaki Okuyama; Masayuki Ohue; Masahiro Inoue

    2014-01-01

    A hypoxic microenvironment in tumors has been recognized as a cause of malignancy or resistance to various cancer therapies. In contrast to recent progress in understanding the acute response of cancer cells to hypoxia, the characteristics of tumor cells in chronic hypoxia remain elusive. We have identified a pancreatic cancer cell line, AsPC-1, that is exceptionally able to survive for weeks under 1% oxygen conditions while most tested cancer cell lines die after only some days under these c...

  19. PPAR-delta promotes survival of breast cancer cells in harsh metabolic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Wang, G; Shi, Y; Sun, L; Gorczynski, R; Li, Y-J; Xu, Z; Spaner, D E

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPARδ) in breast cancer cells is negatively associated with patient survival, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. High PPARδ protein levels in rat breast adenocarcinomas were found to be associated with increased growth in soft agar and mice. Transgenic expression of PPARδ increased the ability of human breast cancer cell lines to migrate in vitro and form lung metastases in mice. PPARδ also conferred the ability to grow in exhausted tissue culture media and survive in low-glucose and other endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions such as hypoxia. Upregulation of PPARδ by glucocorticoids or synthetic agonists also protected human breast cancer cells from low glucose. Survival in low glucose was related to increased antioxidant defenses mediated in part by catalase and also to late AKT phosphorylation, which is associated with the prolonged glucose-deprivation response. Synthetic antagonists reversed the survival benefits conferred by PPARδ in vitro. These findings suggest that PPARδ conditions breast cancer cells to survive in harsh microenvironmental conditions by reducing oxidative stress and enhancing survival signaling responses. Drugs that target PPARδ may have a role in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:27270614

  20. The shape of radiation survival curves of mammalian cells cultured in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various in vivo and in vitro techniques to study the survival of single mammalian cells are now well known. The potential applications of formal data obtained by these methods to problems of human exposure, radiotherapy, radiation protection and the like are extensive. Mammalian cell techniques, particularly in vitro, have also extended greatly the opportunity to study basic interactions between radiation and processes occurring in cells at the time of exposure. In survival curve analysis and interpretation and the dependence of survival upon different types of radiation, formerly confined chiefly to microorganisms, single mammalian cell studies open new avenues. These cells are large, sensitive to radiation, and cytologically relatively well known. Although it would be rash to suggest that more is known about them than some microorganisms, at least some details of structure, chromosome morphology, and the pattern and order of DNA synthesis are quite well established. The prospects of quantitatively relating changes in structure and behaviour to radiation exposure in the form of some coherent model therefore seem enhanced. This paper discusses survival data for mammalian cells cultured in vitro from three points of view: first, technical or experimental factors which can vary the shape of the survival curve; second, the effect of heterogeneity among individuals of the populations generally studied; third, mathematical expressions or models other than which may fit the observed data better

  1. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    OpenAIRE

    Razmik Mirzayans; Bonnie Andrais; Piyush Kumar; David Murray

    2016-01-01

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and t...

  2. Sox2 promotes survival of satellite glial cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sox2 is a transcriptional factor expressed in neural stem cells. It is known that Sox2 regulates cell differentiation, proliferation and survival of the neural stem cells. Our previous study showed that Sox2 is expressed in all satellite glial cells of the adult rat dorsal root ganglion. In this study, to examine the role of Sox2 in satellite glial cells, we establish a satellite glial cell-enriched culture system. Our culture method succeeded in harvesting satellite glial cells with the somata of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. Using this culture system, Sox2 was downregulated by siRNA against Sox2. The knockdown of Sox2 downregulated ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA at 2 and 4 days after siRNA treatment. MAPK phosphorylation, downstream of ErbB, was also inhibited by Sox2 knockdown. Because ErbB2 and ErbB3 are receptors that support the survival of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, apoptotic cells were also counted. TUNEL-positive cells increased at 5 days after siRNA treatment. These results suggest that Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through the MAPK pathway via ErbB receptors. - Highlights: • We established satellite glial cell culture system. • Function of Sox2 in satellite glial cell was examined using siRNA. • Sox2 knockdown downregulated expression level of ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA. • Sox2 knockdown increased apoptotic satellite glial cell. • Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through ErbB signaling

  3. Sox2 promotes survival of satellite glial cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Taro, E-mail: koiket@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Mori, Tetsuji; Hirahara, Yukie; Yamada, Hisao

    2015-08-14

    Sox2 is a transcriptional factor expressed in neural stem cells. It is known that Sox2 regulates cell differentiation, proliferation and survival of the neural stem cells. Our previous study showed that Sox2 is expressed in all satellite glial cells of the adult rat dorsal root ganglion. In this study, to examine the role of Sox2 in satellite glial cells, we establish a satellite glial cell-enriched culture system. Our culture method succeeded in harvesting satellite glial cells with the somata of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. Using this culture system, Sox2 was downregulated by siRNA against Sox2. The knockdown of Sox2 downregulated ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA at 2 and 4 days after siRNA treatment. MAPK phosphorylation, downstream of ErbB, was also inhibited by Sox2 knockdown. Because ErbB2 and ErbB3 are receptors that support the survival of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, apoptotic cells were also counted. TUNEL-positive cells increased at 5 days after siRNA treatment. These results suggest that Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through the MAPK pathway via ErbB receptors. - Highlights: • We established satellite glial cell culture system. • Function of Sox2 in satellite glial cell was examined using siRNA. • Sox2 knockdown downregulated expression level of ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA. • Sox2 knockdown increased apoptotic satellite glial cell. • Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through ErbB signaling.

  4. SV40 DNA amplification and reintegration in surviving hamster cells after 60Co γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cells were exposed to 60Co γ-irradiation and the fate of the integrated SV40 sequences was pursued over a period of 20 days following radiation exposure. As shown by colony hybridization, integrated SV40 sequences were amplified in surviving and non-surviving cells. At later times, however, clonal sublines of surviving cells grown for 20-30 cell generations after irradiation had lost most of their amplified SV40 copies but showed altered restriction fragment patterns indicating reintegration of SV40 sequences at new sites of the hamster genome. This suggest that 60Co γ-irradiation can generate mutations by inducing over-replication of chromosome segments that are then substrates of enzymatic rearrangements. (author)

  5. Determination of cell survival after irradiation via clonogenic assay versus multiple MTT Assay - A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For studying proliferation and determination of survival of cancer cells after irradiation, the multiple MTT assay, based on the reduction of a yellow water soluble tetrazolium salt to a purple water insoluble formazan dye by living cells was modified from a single-point towards a proliferation assay. This assay can be performed with a large number of samples in short time using multi-well-plates, assays can be performed semi-automatically with a microplate reader. Survival, the calculated parameter in this assay, is determined mathematically. Exponential growth in both control and irradiated groups was proven as the underlying basis of the applicability of the multiple MTT assay. The equivalence to a clonogenic survival assay with its disadvantages such as time consumption was proven in two setups including plating of cells before and after irradiation. Three cell lines (A 549, LN 229 and F 98) were included in the experiment to study its principal and general applicability

  6. Ceruloplasmin reduces DNA double strand breaks and improves cell survival in lymphoblastoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Ionizing radiation through oxidative free radical production causes dose-dependent oxidative damage to biological macromolecules. To reduce the oxidative stress from ionizing radiation, use of antioxidants has been suggested as a prophylactic and early remedy of pathogenic therapy. Ceruloplasmin (Cp), a plasma protein produced by the liver, belongs to a class of multi copper ferroxidases known for their role in iron metabolism in vertebrates, including humans. Functions of Cp include copper transport, ferroxidase and aminooxidase activities. Serum Cp concentration fluctuates during inflammation, infection, trauma and irradiation. The role of Cp as an antioxidant after irradiation is not fully understood. Our aim was to investigate the radioprotective efficacy of Cp. We studied the effect of ceruloplasmin on the in-vitro radiosensitivity of lymphoblastoid cells lines after gamma-ray irradiation. We used radiosensitive cell lines LB0003, LB0004 and LB 0005, established from individuals who developed late radiation necrosis following curative radiotherapy and non-sensitive cell lines Masci and LB0001 as controls. The cell lines were irradiated with doses from 0 - 60 Gy. Genomic DNA was extracted at 0 - 24h after irradiation and subjected to PFGE to analyse the initial quantity of DNA DSBs and the quantity of unrepaired DSBs to evaluate the kinetics of DSB rejoining. Human Cp (0.05 or 0.5mg/ml) was added to cell cultures 30 min before or 5 min after irradiation. In the presence of Cp cell survival was increased and the level of DBSs reduced demonstrating its radioprotective effect and the potential mechanism of its protection against radiation effects. Its radioprotective efficacy on dose and time of administration of Cp. The radiosensitive cell lines differ from controls by kinetics of DSBs repair. Importantly, in presence of ceruloplasmin the level of DNA DSB was reduced and the kinetics of DNA DSB repair became comparable to that in controls

  7. Astrocytes Upregulate Survival Genes in Tumor Cells and Induce Protection from Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Jin Kim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, more than 40% of cancer patients develop brain metastasis. The median survival for untreated patients is 1 to 2 months, which may be extended to 6 months with conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The growth and survival of metastasis depend on the interaction of tumor cells with host factors in the organ microenvironment. Brain metastases are surrounded and infiltrated by activated astrocytes and are highly resistant to chemotherapy. We report here that coculture of human breast cancer cells or lung cancer cells with murine astrocytes (but not murine fibroblasts led to the up-regulation of survival genes, including GSTA5, BCL2L1, and TWIST1, in the tumor cells. The degree of up-regulation directly correlated with increased resistance to all tested chemotherapeutic agents. We further show that the up-regulation of the survival genes and consequent resistance are dependent on the direct contact between the astrocytes and tumor cells through gap junctions and are therefore transient. Knocking down these genes with specific small interfering RNA rendered the tumor cells sensitive to chemotherapeutic agents. These data clearly demonstrate that host cells in the microenvironment influence the biologic behavior of tumor cells and reinforce the contention that the organ microenvironment must be taken into consideration during the design of therapy.

  8. The control of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenardo Michael J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg cells are believed to play an important role in suppressing autoimmunity and maintaining peripheral tolerance. How their survival is regulated in the periphery is less clear. Here we show that Treg cells express receptors for gamma chain cytokines and are dependent on an exogenous supply of these cytokines to overcome cytokine withdrawal apoptosis in vitro. This result was validated in vivo by the accumulation of Treg cells in Bim-/- and Bcl-2 tg mice which have arrested cytokine deprivation apoptosis. We also found that CD25 and Foxp3 expression were down-regulated in the absence of these cytokines. CD25+ cells from Scurfy mice do not depend on cytokines for survival demonstrating that Foxp3 increases their dependence on cytokines by suppressing cytokine production in Treg cells. Our study reveals that the survival of Treg cells is strictly dependent on cytokines and cytokine producing cells because they do not produce cytokines. Our study thus, demonstrates that different gamma chain cytokines regulate Treg homeostasis in the periphery by differentially regulating survival and proliferation. These findings may shed light on ways to manipulate Treg cells that could be utilized for their therapeutic applications. Reviewers This article was reviewed by: Avinash Bhandoola, Fred Ramsdell (nominated by Juan Carlos Zuniga-Pflucker and Anne Cooke.

  9. Imprinted survival genes preclude loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 7 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Arnoud; Oosting, Jan; de Miranda, Noel Fcc; Zhang, Yinghui; Corver, Willem E; van de Water, Bob; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The genomes of a wide range of cancers, including colon, breast, and thyroid cancers, frequently show copy number gains of chromosome 7 and rarely show loss of heterozygosity. The molecular basis for this phenomenon is unknown. Strikingly, oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinomas can display an extreme genomic profile, with homozygosity of all chromosomes except for chromosome 7. The observation that homozygosity of chromosome 7 is never observed suggests that retention of heterozygosity is essential for cells. We hypothesized that cell survival genes are genetically imprinted on either of two copies of chromosome 7, which thwarts loss of heterozygosity at this chromosome in cancer cells. By employing a DNA methylation screen and gene expression analysis, we identified six imprinted genes that force retention of heterozygosity on chromosome 7. Subsequent knockdown of gene expression showed that CALCR, COPG2, GRB10, KLF14, MEST, and PEG10 were essential for cancer cell survival, resulting in reduced cell proliferation, G1 -phase arrest, and increased apoptosis. We propose that imprinted cell survival genes provide a genetic basis for retention of chromosome 7 heterozygosity in cancer cells. The monoallelically expressed cell survival genes identified in this study, and the cellular pathways that they are involved in, offer new therapeutic targets for the treatment of tumours showing retention of heterozygosity on chromosome 7. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27265324

  10. N-methyl-D-aspartate promotes the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Jørgensen, Ole Steen; Hack, N

    1988-01-01

    Our previous studies on the survival-promoting influence of elevated concentrations of extracellular K+ ([K+]e) on cultured cerebellar granule cells led to the proposal that depolarization in vitro mimics the effect of the earliest afferent inputs received by the granule cells in vivo. This, in t...

  11. Persistence of disseminated tumor cells after neoadjuvant treatment for locally advanced breast cancer predicts poor survival

    OpenAIRE

    Mathiesen, Randi R.; Borgen, Elin; Renolen, Anne; Løkkevik, Erik; Nesland, Jahn M; Anker, Gun; Østenstad, Bjørn; Lundgren, Steinar; Risberg, Terje; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Lønning, Per E.; Naume, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Presence of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow (BM) and circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood (PB) predicts reduced survival in early breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of and alterations in DTC- and CTC-status in locally advanced breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and to evaluate their prognostic impact. Methods ...

  12. Survival of human osteosarcoma cells and normal human fibroblasts following alpha particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell survival of human osteosarcoma cells in culture following alpha particle irradiation is reported here for the first time. The osteosarcoma cell line (TE-85) is found to be less sensitive to inactivation by 5.6 MeV alpha particles (LET 86 keV/μm) than normal diploid human fibroblasts (NFS). Values for the mean lethal doses were estimated to be 103 rads for the TE-85 cells compared with 68 rads for the NFS cultures irradiated under identical conditions. It is postulated that the aneuploidy of the tumor cells with increased DNA chromosomal material may confer a selective advantage for the survival of tumor cells relative to normal cells with diploid chromosomes

  13. Ubiquitin at the crossroad of cell death and survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Shan Chen; Xiao-Bo Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitination is crucial for cellular processes, such as protein degradation, apoptosis, autophagy, and cell cycle progression. Dysregulation of the ubiquitination network accounts for the development of numerous diseases, including cancer. Thus, targeting ubiquitination is a promising strategy in cancer therapy. Both apoptosis and autophagy are involved in tumorigenesis and response to cancer therapy. Although both are categorized as types of celldeath, autophagy is general y considered to have protective functions, including protecting cells from apoptosis under certain cellular stress conditions. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy by ubiquitination.

  14. Cancer stem cells and chemoresistance: The smartest survives the raid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jihe

    2016-04-01

    Chemoresistant metastatic relapse of minimal residual disease plays a significant role for poor prognosis of cancer. Growing evidence supports a critical role of cancer stem cell (CSC) behind the mechanisms for this deadly disease. This review briefly introduces the basics of the conventional chemotherapies, updates the CSC theories, highlights the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which CSC smartly designs and utilizes multiple lines of self-defense to avoid being killed by chemotherapy, and concisely summarizes recent progress in studies on CSC-targeted therapies in the end, with the hope to help guide future research toward developing more effective therapeutic strategies to eradicate tumor cells in the patients. PMID:26899500

  15. The influence of tumour cell DNA content on survival in colorectal cancer: a detailed analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Armitage, N C; Ballantyne, K. C.; Evans, D F; Clarke, P; Sheffield, J.; Hardcastle, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of tumour cell DNA content (ploidy) on survival of 416 patients undergoing excisional surgery for colorectal cancer. Two hundred and eleven (51%) tumours had an abnormal DNA content (aneuploid or tetraploid). There was no correlation between ploidy status, sex, age and pathological stage, histological grade, tumour site, local tumour extension or assessment of curability. Patients with tumours with an abnormal DNA content had a poorer survival 68/211 (32%) t...

  16. EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells by potentiating IGF-1 secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Er-Wen [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China); Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xue, Sheng-Jiang [Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiao-Yan [Department of Pharmacy, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Suo-Wen [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Cheng, Jian-Ding; Zheng, Jin-Xiang [Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Shi, He; Lv, Guo-Li; Li, Zhi-Gang; Li, Yue; Liu, Chang-Hui; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Hong [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jie, E-mail: mdlijie@sina.com [Department of Anaesthesiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Chao, E-mail: liuchaogaj@21cn.com [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Levels of EEN expression paralleled with the rate of cell proliferation. • EEN was involved in the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. • EEN regulated the activity of IGF-1-Akt/mTOR pathway. • EEN regulated proliferation and survival of MM cells by enhancing IGF-1 secretion. - Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of multiple myeloma are not well defined. EEN is an endocytosis-regulating molecule. Here we report that EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, by regulating IGF-1 secretion. In the present study, we observed that EEN expression paralleled with cell proliferation, EEN accelerated cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) pathway, and delayed cell apoptosis via Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistically, we found that EEN was indispensable for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion and the activation of protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt-mTOR) pathway. Exogenous IGF-1 overcame the phenotype of EEN depletion, while IGF-1 neutralization overcame that of EEN over-expression. Collectively, these data suggest that EEN may play a pivotal role in excessive cell proliferation and insufficient cell apoptosis of bone marrow plasma cells in multiple myeloma. Therefore, EEN may represent a potential diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for multiple myeloma.

  17. EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells by potentiating IGF-1 secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Levels of EEN expression paralleled with the rate of cell proliferation. • EEN was involved in the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. • EEN regulated the activity of IGF-1-Akt/mTOR pathway. • EEN regulated proliferation and survival of MM cells by enhancing IGF-1 secretion. - Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of multiple myeloma are not well defined. EEN is an endocytosis-regulating molecule. Here we report that EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, by regulating IGF-1 secretion. In the present study, we observed that EEN expression paralleled with cell proliferation, EEN accelerated cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) pathway, and delayed cell apoptosis via Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistically, we found that EEN was indispensable for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion and the activation of protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt-mTOR) pathway. Exogenous IGF-1 overcame the phenotype of EEN depletion, while IGF-1 neutralization overcame that of EEN over-expression. Collectively, these data suggest that EEN may play a pivotal role in excessive cell proliferation and insufficient cell apoptosis of bone marrow plasma cells in multiple myeloma. Therefore, EEN may represent a potential diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for multiple myeloma

  18. Effect of Tc99m Labeling on The Survival Rate of Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabari F

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Human dental pulp stem cells have substantial proliferative and differentiation potential. The isolated stem cells or progenitor cells of the pulp can differentiate into odontoblasts or /and osteoblast-like cells and aid in repair as well as reconstruction of tooth structure. Several ways have been introduced for isolation and tracing of these cells. The aim of this study was to isolate mesenchymal stem cells from deciduous dental pulps as well as labeling them with Technetium (Tc99m to investigate the effect of Tc labeling on the survival rate of stem cells. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, exfoliated deciduous teeth of 6-11 year old children without any history of systemic disease were collected. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic methods were used to expedite cell isolation and isolated cells (10000 from dental pulp were mixed with 25 millicurie of Tc for tracing purposes. Individual cell activity as well as culture medium activation was evaluated separately afterwards. Data was analyzed using ANOVA statistical test. Results: Isolated dental pulp cells formed single cell derived colonies which showed fibroblast-like growth with solo cloning morphology. Specific staining of the cells indicated them to be stem cells and confirmed their differentiation into bone and fat. Moreover, Technetium significantly decreased the activity of cells. The survival rates of the cells in the period of 1,3,6,24,48 hours were reported to be 95.5%, 85.5%, 77.4%, 68.4%, and 57.3% respectively. Conclusion: The dental pulp stem cells have a significant capacity to differentiate into bone and fat. Tracing the cells with Tc M99 will reduce their survival rate over time.

  19. Lipoic acid enhances survival of transplanted neural stem cells by reducing transplantation-associated injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao J

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Junling Gao,1,* Jason R Thonhoff,1,2,* Tiffany J Dunn,1 Ping Wu1 1Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA; 2Department of Neurology, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The efficacy of stem cell-based therapy for neurological diseases depends highly on cell survival post-transplantation. One of the key factors affecting cell survival is the grafting procedure. The current study aims to determine whether needle insertion into intact rat spinal cords creates a hypoxic environment that is prone to lipid peroxidation damage upon reperfusion, and whether an antioxidant protects human neural stem cells (hNSCs both in vitro and post-transplantation into rat spinal cords. We show here that a single needle injection creates a hypoxic environment within the rat spinal cord that peaks at approximately 12 hours before reperfusion occurs. Lipid peroxidation damage at the transplantation site is evident by 48 hours post-needle insertion. In an in vitro model, hypoxia-reperfusion results in apoptotic death of hNSCs. Pretreatment with the antioxidant, α-lipoic acid, protects hNSCs against hypoxia-reperfusion injury and oxidative stress–mediated cell death. Increasing glutathione, but not Akt signaling, contributes to the protective effect of lipoic acid. Pretreating hNSCs with lipoic acid also increases the cell survival rate 1 month post-transplantation. Further investigation is warranted to develop improved techniques to maximize the survival of transplanted stem cells. Keywords: neural stem cell, transplantation, hypoxia-reperfusion, antioxidant, cell survival, lipoic acid

  20. Piezoelectric Drop-on-Demand Inkjet Printing of Rat Fibroblast Cells: Survivability Study and Pattern Printing

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur Tryggvi

    2013-01-01

    A novel piezoelectric, drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet system has been developed and used to print L929 rat fibroblast cells. We investigate the survivability of the cells subjected to the large stresses during the printing process. These stresses are varied by changing the diameter of the orifice (36 to 119 microns) through which the cells are dispensed, as well as changing the electrical pulse used to drive the piezoelectric element. It is shown that for the smallest 36 microns diameter orifice, cell survival rates fall from 95% to approximately 76% when the ejection velocity is increased from 2 to 16 m/s. This decrease in survival rates is less significant when the larger orifice diameters of 81 microns and 119 microns are used. Analysis shows that there is a clear inverse relationship between cell survival rates and the mean shear rates during drop formation. By using the same printing set-up, fibroblast cells are printed onto alginate and collagen into patterns. Printed cells are cultured over a period of da...

  1. Role of DNA deletion length in mutation and cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model is presented which is based on the assumption that malignant transformation, mutation, chromosome aberration, and reproductive death of cells are all manifestations of radiation induced deletions in the DNA of the cell, and that the size of the deletion in relation to the spacing of essential genes determines the consequences of that deletion. It is assumed that two independent types of potentially lethal lesions can result in DNA deletions, and that the relative numbers of these types of damage is dependent on radiation quality. The repair of the damage reduces the length of a deletion, but does not always eliminate it. The predictions of this model are in good agreement with a wide variety of experimental evidence. (author)

  2. Evaluation of recommended methods for radioisotope red cell survival studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mean red cell life-span in normal subjects and in patients with various hematological disorders was examined with 51Cr and diisopropylfluorophosphate (DF)32P. The results with 51Cr were corrected for 51Cr elution using correction factors. The results by the two methods agreed fairly well with each other. Elution rate in various hematological disorders was 2.3% per day or less except for the patients with extracorpuscular hemolytic agents such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia or congestive splenomegaly. It is concluded that estimates of mean red cell life-span by corrected 51Cr method are more useful and sufficient than uncorrected 51Cr or DF32P method in general hematological disorders. (auth.)

  3. Possible role of pineal allopregnanolone in Purkinje cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Haraguchi, Shogo; Hara, Sakurako; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Mita, Masatoshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    It is believed that neurosteroids are produced in the brain and other nervous systems. Here, we show that allopregnanolone (ALLO), a neurosteroid, is exceedingly produced in the pineal gland compared with the brain and that pineal ALLO acts on the Purkinje cell, a principal cerebellar neuron, to prevent apoptosis in the juvenile quail. We first demonstrated that the pineal gland is a major organ of neurosteroidogenesis. A series of experiments using molecular and biochemical techniques has fu...

  4. Mathematical analysis of /sup 51/Cr-labelled red cell survival curves in congenital haemolytic anaemias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasfiki, A.G.; Antipas, S.E.; Dimitriou, P.A.; Gritzali, F.A.; Melissinos, K.G.

    1982-04-01

    The parameters of /sup 51/Cr labelled red cell survival curves were calculated in 26 patients with homozygous ..beta..-thalassaemia, 8 with sickle-cell anaemia and 3 with s-..beta..-thalassaemia, using a non-linear weighted least squares analysis computer program. In thalassaemic children the calculated parameters denote that the shorting of the mean cell life is due to early senescence alone, while there is some evidence that in thalassaemic adults additional extracellular destruction mechanisms participate as well. Red cell survival curves from patients with sickle-cell anaemia and s-..beta..-thalassaemia resemble each other, while their parameters indicate an initial rapid loss of radioactivity, early senescence and the presence of extracellular red cell destruction factors.

  5. Mathematical analysis of 51Cr-labelled red cell survival curves in congenital haemolytic anaemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parameters of 51Cr labelled red cell survival curves were calculated in 26 patients with homozygous β-thalassaemia, 8 with sickle-cell anaemia and 3 with s-β-thalassaemia, using a non-linear weighted least squares analysis computer program. In thalassaemic children the calculated parameters denote that the shorting of the mean cell life is due to early senescence alone, while there is some evidence that in thalassaemic adults additional extracellular destruction mechanisms participate as well. Red cell survival curves from patients with sickle-cell anaemia and s-β-thalassaemia resemble each other, while their parameters indicate an initial rapid loss of radioactivity, early senescence and the presence of extracellular red cell destruction factors. (orig.)

  6. Endobronchial mucosa invasion predicts survival in patients with small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai-Chien Chou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current staging system for small cell lung cancer (SCLC categorizes patients into limited- or extensive-stage disease groups according to anatomical localizations. Even so, a wide-range of survival times has been observed among patients in the same staging system. This study aimed to identify whether endobronchial mucosa invasion is an independent predictor for poor survival in patients with SCLC, and to compare the survival time between patients with and without endobronchial mucosa invasion. METHODS: We studied 432 consecutive patients with SCLC based on histological examination of biopsy specimens or on fine-needle aspiration cytology, and received computed tomography and bone scan for staging. All the enrolled patients were assessed for endobronchial mucosa invasion by bronchoscopic and histological examination. Survival days were compared between patients with or without endobronchial mucosa invasion and the predictors of decreased survival days were investigated. RESULTS: 84% (364/432 of SCLC patients had endobronchial mucosal invasion by cancer cells at initial diagnosis. Endobronchial mucosal involvement (Hazard ratio [HR], 2.01; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.30-3.10, age (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.03-1.06, and extensive stage (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.06-1.84 were independent contributing factors for shorter survival time, while received chemotherapy (HR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.25-0.42 was an independent contributing factor better outcome. The survival days of SCLC patients with endobronchial involvement were markedly decreased compared with patients without (median 145 vs. 290, p<0.0001. Among SCLC patients of either limited (median 180 vs. 460, p<0.0001 or extensive (median 125 vs. 207, p<0.0001 stages, the median survival duration for patients with endobronchial mucosal invasion was shorter than those with intact endobronchial mucosa, respectively. CONCLUSION: Endobronchial mucosal involvement is an independent prognostic factor for SCLC

  7. The effect of encapsulation of cardiac stem cells within matrix-enriched hydrogel capsules on cell survival, post-ischemic cell retention and cardiac function

    OpenAIRE

    Mayfield, Audrey E.; Tilokee, Everad L.; Latham, Nicholas; McNeill, Brian; Lam, Bu-Khanh; Ruel, Marc; Suuronen, Erik J; Courtman, David W.; Stewart, Duncan J.; Davis, Darryl R.

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of ex vivo proliferated cardiac stem cells (CSCs) is an emerging therapy for ischemic cardiomyopathy but outcomes are limited by modest engraftment and poor long-term survival. As such, we explored the effect of single cell microencapsulation to increase CSC engraftment and survival after myocardial injection. Transcript and protein profiling of human atrial appendage sourced CSCs revealed strong expression the pro-survival integrin dimers αVβ3 and α5β1- thus rationalizing the...

  8. Autophagy mediates survival of pancreatic tumour-initiating cells in a hypoxic microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Vanessa; Liu, Li; Apel, Anja; Rettig, Theresa; Gladkich, Jury; Labsch, Sabrina; Kallifatidis, Georgios; Kaczorowski, Adam; Groth, Ariane; Gross, Wolfgang; Gebhard, Martha M; Schemmer, Peter; Werner, Jens; Salnikov, Alexei V; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Büchler, Markus W; Herr, Ingrid

    2012-07-01

    Involvement of dysregulated autophagy in cancer growth and progression has been shown in different tumour entities, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). PDA is an extremely aggressive tumour characterized by a small population of highly therapy-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) capable of self-renewal and migration. We examined whether autophagy might be involved in the survival of CSCs despite nutrition and oxygen deprivation typical for the hypoxic tumour microenvironment of PDA. Immunohistochemistry revealed that markers for hypoxia, CSCs and autophagy are co-expressed in patient-derived tissue of PDA. Hypoxia starvation (H/S) enhanced clonogenic survival and migration of established pancreatic cancer cells with stem-like properties (CSC(high)), while pancreatic tumour cells with fewer stem cell markers (CSC(low)) did not survive these conditions. Electron microscopy revealed more advanced autophagic vesicles in CSC(high) cells, which exhibited higher expression of autophagy-related genes under normoxic conditions and relative to CSC(low) cells, as found by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. LC3 was already fully converted to the active LC3-II form in both cell lines, as evaluated by western blot and detection of accumulated GFP-LC3 protein by fluorescence microscopy. H/S increased formation of autophagic and acid vesicles, as well as expression of autophagy-related genes, to a higher extent in CSC(high) cells. Modulation of autophagy by inhibitors and activators resensitized CSC(high) to apoptosis and diminished clonogenicity, spheroid formation, expression of CSC-related genes, migratory activity and tumourigenicity in mice. Our data suggest that enhanced autophagy levels may enable survival of CSC(high) cells under H/S. Interference with autophagy-activating or -inhibiting drugs disturbs the fine-tuned physiological balance of enhanced autophagy in CSC and switches survival signalling to suicide. PMID:22262369

  9. A comparison of methods of determining the 100 percent survival of preserved red cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were done to compare three methods to determine the 100 percent survival value from which to estimate the 24-hour posttransfusion survival of preserved red cells. The following methods using small aliquots of 51Cr-labeled autologous preserved red cells were evaluated: First, the 125I-albumin method, which is an indirect measurement of the recipient's red cell volume derived from the plasma volume measured using 125I-labeled albumin and the total body hematocrit. Second, the body surface area method (BSA) in which the recipient's red cell volume is derived from a body surface area nomogram. Third, an extrapolation method, which extrapolates to zero time the radioactivity associated with the red cells in the recipient's circulation from 10 to 20 or 15 to 30 minutes after transfusion. The three methods gave similar results in all studies in which less than 20 percent of the transfused red cells were nonviable (24-hour posttransfusion survival values of between 80-100%), but not when more than 20 percent of the red cells were nonviable. When 21 to 35 percent of the transfused red cells were nonviable (24-hour posttransfusion survivals of 65 to 79%), values with the 125I-albumin method and the body surface area method were about 5 percent lower (p less than 0.001) than values with the extrapolation method. When greater than 35 percent of the red cells were nonviable (24-hour posttransfusion survival values of less than 65%), values with the 125I-albumin method and the body surface area method were about 10 percent lower (p less than 0.001) than those obtained by the extrapolation method

  10. Effects of common germ-line genetic variation in cell cycle genes on ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, H.; Hogdall, E.; Ramus, S.J.;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Somatic alterations have been shown to correlate with ovarian cancer prognosis and survival, but less is known about the effects on survival of common inherited genetic variation. Of particular interest are genes involved in cell cycle pathways, which regulate cell division and could...... plausibly influence clinical characteristics of multiple tumors types. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We examined associations between common germ-line genetic variation in 14 genes involved in cell cycle pathway (CCND1, CCND2, CCND3, CCNE1, CDKN1A, CDKN1B, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, CDKN2C, CDKN2D, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, and RB1......) and survival among women with invasive ovarian cancer participating in a multicenter case-control study from United Kingdom, Denmark, and United States. DNAs from up to 1,499 women were genotyped for 97 single-nucleotide polymorphisms that tagged the known common variants (minor allele frequency > or = 0...

  11. The initial slope of cell survival curves. Its implications in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of the initial slope of the cell survival curves can be approached in 2 ways: a straightforward approach is the direct and acurate measurement of the cell survival at low dose. This method is practically restricted to experiments in vitro; an indirect approach is the determination of the initial slope of the single cell survival curves from the shape of the ''isoeffect curves'' for fractionated irradiations. This method can be applied to ''non-quantitative'' reactions. Implications in radiotherapy of the existence of a significant initial slope are presented with respect to the 3 following problems: importance of the fraction number N for fractionated irradiations with small doses per fraction and differential effect related to fraction number; variation of the total dose as a function of dose rate for low dose rate irradiation; RBE of high LET radiation and RBE/dose relationship

  12. A naringenin–tamoxifen combination impairs cell proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatkevich, Talia; Ramos, Joseph; Santos-Sanchez, Idalys; Patel, Yashomati M., E-mail: ympatel@uncg.edu

    2014-10-01

    Since over 60% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive (ER+), many therapies have targeted the ER. The ER is activated by both estrogen binding and phosphorylation. While anti-estrogen therapies, such as tamoxifen (Tam) have been successful they do not target the growth factor promoting phosphorylation of the ER. Other proliferation pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, (PI3K) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are activated in breast cancer cells and are associated with poor prognosis. Thus targeting multiple cellular proliferation and survival pathways at the onset of treatment is critical for the development of more effective therapies. The grapefruit flavanone naringenin (Nar) is an inhibitor of both the PI3K and MAPK pathways. Previous studies examining either Nar or Tam used charcoal-stripped serum which removed estrogen as well as other factors. We wanted to use serum containing medium in order to retain all the potential inducers of cell proliferation so as not to exclude any targets of Nar. Here we show that a Nar–Tam combination is more effective than either Tam alone or Nar alone in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We demonstrate that a Nar–Tam combination impaired cellular proliferation and viability to a greater extent than either component alone in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the use of a Nar–Tam combination requires lower concentrations of both compounds to achieve the same effects on proliferation and viability. Nar may function by inhibiting both PI3K and MAPK pathways as well as localizing ERα to the cytoplasm in MCF-7 cells. Our results demonstrate that a Nar–Tam combination induces apoptosis and impairs proliferation signaling to a greater extent than either compound alone. These studies provide critical information for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis in breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Nar–Tam impairs cell viability more effectively than

  13. A new scoring system for predicting survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis was performed to create a scoring system to estimate the survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Data from 1274 NSCLC patients were analyzed to create and validate a scoring system. Univariate (UV) and multivariate (MV) Cox models were used to evaluate the prognostic importance of each baseline factor. Prognostic factors that were significant on both UV and MV analyses were used to develop the score. These included quality of life, age, performance status, primary tumor diameter, nodal status, distant metastases, and smoking cessation. The score for each factor was determined by dividing the 5-year survival rate (%) by 10 and summing these scores to form a total score. MV models and the score were validated using bootstrapping with 1000 iterations from the original samples. The score for each prognostic factor ranged from 1 to 7 points with higher scores reflective of better survival. Total scores (sum of the scores from each independent prognostic factor) of 32–37 correlated with a 5-year survival of 8.3% (95% CI = 0–17.1%), 38–43 correlated with a 5-year survival of 20% (95% CI = 13–27%), 44–47 correlated with a 5-year survival of 48.3% (95% CI = 41.5–55.2%), 48–49 correlated to a 5-year survival of 72.1% (95% CI = 65.6–78.6%), and 50–52 correlated to a 5-year survival of 84.7% (95% CI = 79.6–89.8%). The bootstrap method confirmed the reliability of the score. Prognostic factors significantly associated with survival on both UV and MV analyses were used to construct a valid scoring system that can be used to predict survival of NSCLC patients. Optimally, this score could be used when counseling patients, and designing future trials

  14. Laser Phototherapy Enhances Mesenchymal Stem Cells Survival in Response to the Dental Adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana Márcia Alves Diniz; Adriana Bona Matos; Márcia Martins Marques

    2015-01-01

    Background. We investigated the influence of laser phototherapy (LPT) on the survival of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) submitted to substances leached from dental adhesives. Method. MSCs were isolated and characterized. Oral mucosa fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells were used as comparative controls. Cultured medium conditioned with two adhesive systems was applied to the cultures. Cell monolayers were exposed or not to LPT. Laser irradiations were performed using a red laser (GaAlAs...

  15. Correlation of Particle Traversals with Clonogenic Survival Using Cell-Fluorescent Ion Track Hybrid Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana eDokic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of novel approaches linking the physical characteristics of particles with biological responses are of high relevance for the field of particle therapy. In radiobiology, the clonogenic survival of cells is considered the gold standard assay for assessment of cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Towards further development of next generation biodosimeters in particle therapy, cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-FIT-HD was recently engineered by our group and successfully employed to study physical particle track information in correlation with irradiation- induced DNA damage in cell nuclei. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of Cell-FIT-HD as a tool to study the effects of clinical beams on cellular clonogenic survival. Tumor cells were grown on the FNTD as cell culture, mimicking the standard procedures for clonogenic assay. Cell-FIT-HD was used to detect the spatial distribution of particle tracks within colony-initiating cells. The physical data were associated to radiation induced foci as surrogates for DNA double strand breakages (DSB, the hallmark of radiation ‐induced cell lethality. Long‐term cell fate was monitored to determine the ability of cells to form colonies. We report the first successful detection of particle traversal within colony-initiating cells at subcellular resolution using Cell-FIT-HD.

  16. Exosomes Derived from Squamous Head and Neck Cancer Promote Cell Survival after Ionizing Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Mutschelknaus

    Full Text Available Exosomes are nanometer-sized extracellular vesicles that are believed to function as intercellular communicators. Here, we report that exosomes are able to modify the radiation response of the head and neck cancer cell lines BHY and FaDu. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned medium of irradiated as well as non-irradiated head and neck cancer cells by serial centrifugation. Quantification using NanoSight technology indicated an increased exosome release from irradiated compared to non-irradiated cells 24 hours after treatment. To test whether the released exosomes influence the radiation response of other cells the exosomes were transferred to non-irradiated and irradiated recipient cells. We found an enhanced uptake of exosomes isolated from both irradiated and non-irradiated cells by irradiated recipient cells compared to non-irradiated recipient cells. Functional analyses by exosome transfer indicated that all exosomes (from non-irradiated and irradiated donor cells increase the proliferation of non-irradiated recipient cells and the survival of irradiated recipient cells. The survival-promoting effects are more pronounced when exosomes isolated from irradiated compared to non-irradiated donor cells are transferred. A possible mechanism for the increased survival after irradiation could be the increase in DNA double-strand break repair monitored at 6, 8 and 10 h after the transfer of exosomes isolated from irradiated cells. This is abrogated by the destabilization of the exosomes. Our results demonstrate that radiation influences both the abundance and action of exosomes on recipient cells. Exosomes transmit prosurvival effects by promoting the proliferation and radioresistance of head and neck cancer cells. Taken together, this study indicates a functional role of exosomes in the response of tumor cells to radiation exposure within a therapeutic dose range and encourages that exosomes are useful objects of study for a better

  17. In vivo vascularization of cell sheets provided better long-term tissue survival than injection of cell suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ryohei; Kuruma, Yosuke; Sekine, Hidekazu; Dobashi, Izumi; Yamato, Masayuki; Umezu, Mitsuo; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    Cell sheets have shown a remarkable ability for repairing damaged myocardium in clinical and preclinical studies. Although they demonstrate a high degree of viability as engrafted cells in vivo, the reason behind their survivability is unclear. In this study, the survival and vascularization of rat cardiac cell sheets transplanted in the subcutaneous tissue of athymic rats were investigated temporally. The cell sheets showed significantly higher survival than cell suspensions for up to 12 months, using an in vivo bioluminescence imaging system to detect luciferase-positive transplanted cells. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay also showed a smaller number of apoptotic cells in the cell sheets than in the cell suspensions at 1 day. Rapid vascular formation and maturation were observed inside the cell sheets using an in vivo imaging system. Leaky vessels appeared at 6 h, red blood cells flowing through functional vessels appeared at 12 h, and morphologically matured vessels appeared at 7 days. In addition, immunostaining of cell sheets with nerve/glial antigen-2 (NG2) showed that vessel maturity increased over time. Interestingly, these results correlated with the dynamics of cell sheet mRNA expression. Genes related to endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation, migration and vessel sprouting were highly expressed within 1 day, and genes related to pericyte recruitment and vessel maturation were highly expressed at 3 days or later. This suggested that the cell sheets could secrete appropriate angiogenic factors in a timely way after transplantation, and this ability might be a key reason for their high survival. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24470393

  18. The survival of cryopreserved human bone marrow stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R S; Mackinder, C A; Postlewaight, B F; Blacklock, H A

    1979-07-01

    Two methods for cryopreservation of bone marrow stem cells were compared using bone marrow obtained from 36 patients. Included in this group were 21 persons with the diagnosis of leukaemia including 14 either with acute myeloid or lymphoblastic leukaemia in remission following intensive remission induction chemotherapy. After freeze-preservation and reconstitution, all marrow samples were tested for nucleated cell (NC) recovery and grown on agar to assess colony forming units (CFUC) and cluster forming units in culture (CluFUc). A slow dilution reconstitution method using freezing media containing AB negative plasma resulted in recovery of 85% of the CFUc activity of fresh marrow. This result was significantly better than the 47% CFUc recovery obtained when freezing media without plasma and a rapid dilution reconstitution technique were used. NC recoveries following slow dilution (51%) and rapid dilution (44%) were not significantly different. CluFUc were disproportionately reduced compared with CFUc although yielding similar results with both methods (26% and 32%). No correlation was found for either method between CFUc and NC recovery or between CFUc and CluFUc recovery in cryopreserved bone marrow. PMID:392422

  19. Role of adipose-derived stromal cells in pedicle skin flap survival in experimental animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroglou, Pericles; Karathanasis, Vasileios; Demiri, Efterpi; Koliakos, George; Papadakis, Marios

    2016-03-26

    The use of skin flaps in reconstructive surgery is the first-line surgical treatment for the reconstruction of skin defects and is essentially considered the starting point of plastic surgery. Despite their excellent usability, their application includes general surgical risks or possible complications, the primary and most common is necrosis of the flap. To improve flap survival, researchers have used different methods, including the use of adipose-derived stem cells, with significant positive results. In our research we will report the use of adipose-derived stem cells in pedicle skin flap survival based on current literature on various experimental models in animals. PMID:27022440

  20. The Hug-Kellerer equation as the universal cell survival curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekstrand, Kenneth E [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2010-05-21

    The Hug-Kellerer (H-K) equation is one of the earliest proposed radiation cell survival curves. We examine this equation in view of the recent perceived need for a universal cell survival curve which would be applicable to single radiation fractions at high doses. We derive relationships between the three parameters of the H-K equation and the parameters {alpha} and {beta} of the linear-quadratic equation. Using these relationships we show how the H-K equation can be used to determine single-fraction doses which are equivalent in theory to the dose in a conventional multi-fraction course of radiation therapy. (note)

  1. The Hug-Kellerer equation as the universal cell survival curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hug-Kellerer (H-K) equation is one of the earliest proposed radiation cell survival curves. We examine this equation in view of the recent perceived need for a universal cell survival curve which would be applicable to single radiation fractions at high doses. We derive relationships between the three parameters of the H-K equation and the parameters α and β of the linear-quadratic equation. Using these relationships we show how the H-K equation can be used to determine single-fraction doses which are equivalent in theory to the dose in a conventional multi-fraction course of radiation therapy. (note)

  2. How to Improve the Survival of Transplanted Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Ischemic Heart?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangpeng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC is an intensely studied stem cell type applied for cardiac repair. For decades, the preclinical researches on animal model and clinical trials have suggested that MSC transplantation exerts therapeutic effect on ischemic heart disease. However, there remain major limitations to be overcome, one of which is the very low survival rate after transplantation in heart tissue. Various strategies have been tried to improve the MSC survival, and many of them showed promising results. In this review, we analyzed the studies in recent years to summarize the methods, effects, and mechanisms of the new strategies to address this question.

  3. Bone-Marrow Stem-Cell Survival in the Non-Uniformly Exposed Mammal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For comparison of the effectiveness of non-uniform versus uniform irradiations in causing haematological death in mammals, a model of the irradiated haemopoietic system has been proposed. The essential features of this model are: (1) that different parts of the haemopoietic system have numbers of stem cells which are proportioned to the amounts of active marrow in those parts as measured by 59Fe uptake, (2) that stem cells in the different parts are subject to the, same dose-survival relationship, and (3) that survival of the animal depends on survival of a critical fraction of the total number of stem cells independent of their distribution among the parts of the total marrow mass. To apply this model one needs to know: (a) the relative 59Fe uptakes of the different parts of the haemopoietic system, (b) the doses delivered to those parts by each of the exposures to be compared, and (c) the dose-survival curve applicable to the stem cells. From these one can calculate the fraction of stem cells surviving each exposure. In a preliminary communication the applicability of the model was investigated using data obtained entirely from the literature. Additional data, particularly on bone-marrow distribution, have since been obtained and are included here. The primary object of the present paper is to test further the validity of the above 'stem-cell survival model'. Data on bilateral (essentially uniform) versus unilateral and non-uniform rotational exposures in mammals are examined with respect to the surviving fraction of stem cells at the LD50/30 day dose level. Although an adequate test is not possible at present for lack of a full set of data in any one species, a partial test indicates compatibility with data for dogs and rats. Other possible mortality determinants such as doses or exposures at entrance, midline or exit, or the gram-rads or average dose to the marrow, appear to be less useful than the critical stem-cell survival fraction

  4. Action of caffeine on the survival of x-irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-irradiation treatment of HeLa S3 cells with 1 mM caffeine results in a marked diminution of the surviving fraction as scored by colony formation. The decrease is dose-dependent; the effect of a 24-h post-irradiation treatment of a non-synchronous population with caffeine is to change the terminal slope of the survival curve and its intercept. Do is reduced from 130 to 60 rad; the extrapolation number is increased about twofold. The amount of post-irradiation killing is maximal if cells are exposed to caffeine at a concentration of at least 1 mM for 8 hours; less than 10% of unirradiated cells are killed under these conditions. Dose-response curves were also obtained for synchronous cells at various phases of the cell cycle. Similar results were obtained at all cell ages, but the magnitude of the effect is age-dependent. This age dependence was further explored in experiments in which mitotically collected cells were exposed to 300 or 500 rad doses at 2-hour intervals throughout the cell cycle. Treatment with caffeine for 24 hours after irradiation enhances the killing of cells late in the cycle more than in G1. The sensitivities of two other cell lines, CHO and EMT6, also were examined; both are substantially less sensitive to caffeine. The smaller cell-cycle dependence of CHO cells is qualitatively the same as that of HeLa cells

  5. Host cell cytotoxicity, cellular repopulation dynamics, and phase-specific cell survival in X-irradiated rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postirradiation tumor volume response, cellular repopulation dynamics, cell-cycle perturbations, and phase-specific cell survival were characterized in rat rhabdomyosarcoma R-1 tumors (the R2C5 subline) following an in situ 10-Gy dose of 225-kVp X rays. This X-ray dose produced a 7.5-day delay in tumor growth to twice the volume measured at the time of irradiation, and reduced the initial surviving fraction of R2C5 cells to 0.17 as measured by the excision assay procedure. The surviving fraction of R2C5 cells returned to unity by the 16th day after tumor irradiation. On the basis of flow cytometry measurements of DNA content in tumor cells stained with a noncytotoxic concentration of Hoechst 33342, a transient G2 block was observed 1 day after irradiation. Flow cytometry measurements also demonstrated that the tetraploid R2C5 cells constituted only 30% of the total tumor cell population, with the remainder being diploid host cells comprised of macrophages, monocytes, lymphocytes, and granulocytes. Large numbers of host cells infiltrated the irradiated tumors, leading to an increase in the percentage of diploid cells by Day 2 and reaching a level of more than 80% of the total tumor cell population by 4 to 8 days after irradiation. The influx of host cells into irradiated tumors was correlated temporally with a significant 12-fold decrease in the surviving fraction of R2C5 cells that occurred between Days 2 and 4 postirradiation. When the diploid host cell population was removed by cell sorting procedures, the surviving fraction of R2C5 cells at Day 4 substantially greater than that in the presence of the host cells. Experiments involving the mixing of 4/1 and 12/1 ratios of diploid host cells and tetraploid tumor cells isolated from irradiated and unirradiated tumors demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of the host cells was specific for the irradiated tumor cells

  6. Predicting the clonogenic survival of A549 cells after modulated x-ray irradiation using the linear quadratic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromley, Regina; Oliver, Lyn [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Davey, Ross; Harvie, Rozelle [Department of Medical Oncology, Bill Walsh Cancer Research Laboratories, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Baldock, Clive [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, Sydney University, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2009-01-21

    In this study we present two prediction methods, mean dose and summed dose, for predicting the number of A549 cells that will survive after modulated x-ray irradiation. The prediction methods incorporate the dose profile from the modulated x-ray fluence map applied across the cell sample and the linear quadratic (LQ) model. We investigated the clonogenic survival of A549 cells when irradiated using two different modulated x-ray fluence maps. Differences between the measured and predicted surviving fraction were observed for modulated x-ray irradiation. When the x-ray fluence map produced a steep dose gradient across the sample, fewer cells survived in the unirradiated region than expected. When the x-ray fluence map produced a less steep dose gradient across the sample, more cells survived in the unirradiated region than expected. Regardless of the steepness of the dose gradient, more cells survived in the irradiated region than expected for the reference dose range of 1-10 Gy. The change in the cell survival for the unirradiated regions of the two different dose gradients may be an important factor to consider when predicting the number of cells that will survive at the edge of modulated x-ray fields. This investigation provides an improved method of predicting cell survival for modulated x-ray radiation treatment. It highlights the limitations of the LQ model, particularly in its ability to describe the biological response of cells irradiated under these conditions.

  7. Predicting the clonogenic survival of A549 cells after modulated x-ray irradiation using the linear quadratic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Regina; Oliver, Lyn; Davey, Ross; Harvie, Rozelle; Baldock, Clive

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present two prediction methods, mean dose and summed dose, for predicting the number of A549 cells that will survive after modulated x-ray irradiation. The prediction methods incorporate the dose profile from the modulated x-ray fluence map applied across the cell sample and the linear quadratic (LQ) model. We investigated the clonogenic survival of A549 cells when irradiated using two different modulated x-ray fluence maps. Differences between the measured and predicted surviving fraction were observed for modulated x-ray irradiation. When the x-ray fluence map produced a steep dose gradient across the sample, fewer cells survived in the unirradiated region than expected. When the x-ray fluence map produced a less steep dose gradient across the sample, more cells survived in the unirradiated region than expected. Regardless of the steepness of the dose gradient, more cells survived in the irradiated region than expected for the reference dose range of 1-10 Gy. The change in the cell survival for the unirradiated regions of the two different dose gradients may be an important factor to consider when predicting the number of cells that will survive at the edge of modulated x-ray fields. This investigation provides an improved method of predicting cell survival for modulated x-ray radiation treatment. It highlights the limitations of the LQ model, particularly in its ability to describe the biological response of cells irradiated under these conditions.

  8. Musashi1 regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and is a prognostic indicator of poor survival

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xiao-Yang; Penalva Luiz OF; Yuan Hongyan; Linnoila R Ilona; Lu Jiachun; Okano Hideyuki; Glazer Robert I

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Musashi1 (Msi1) is a conserved RNA-binding protein that regulates the Notch and Wnt pathways, and serves as a stem cell marker in the breast and other tissues. It is unknown how Msi1 relates to other breast cancer markers, whether it denotes tumor initiating cells (TICs), and how it affects gene expression and tumor cell survival in breast cancer cells. Results Msi1 expression was analyzed in 20 breast cancer cell lines and in 140 primary breast tumors by western blotting ...

  9. The effect of vitamin E on cellular survival after X irradiation of lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asynchronous cultures of a lymphocytic mouse leukaemic cell line L5178Y were X-irradiated under oxic and hypoxic conditions. The survival curves had almost no shoulder when the cells were grown under normal conditions and then irradiated in the presence of vitamin E, whereas a clear shoulder appeared when the cells were grown and irradiated in a medium supplemented with vitamin E (100 μg/ml). There was no change in the final sensitivity to lethal events in the vitamin E enriched cells. The results suggest that the radioprotective effect of vitamin E depends on its incorporation into the cell membranes. (U.K.)

  10. Metallodrug induced apoptotic cell death and survival attempts are characterizable by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, K.; Prinsloo, L. C.; Meyer, D.

    2014-09-01

    Chrysotherapeutics are under investigation as new or additional treatments for different types of cancers. In this study, gold complexes were investigated for their anticancer potential using Raman spectroscopy. The aim of the study was to determine whether Raman spectroscopy could be used for the characterization of metallodrug-induced cell death. Symptoms of cell death such as decreased peak intensities of proteins bonds and phosphodiester bonds found in deoxyribose nucleic acids were evident in the principal component analysis of the spectra. Vibrational bands around 761 cm-1 and 1300 cm-1 (tryptophan, ethanolamine group, and phosphatidylethanolamine) and 1720 cm-1 (ester bonds associated with phospholipids) appeared in the Raman spectra of cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells after metallodrug treatment. The significantly (p treatment could be a molecular signature of induced apoptosis since both the co-regulated phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine are externalized during cell death. Treated cells had significantly higher levels of glucose and glycogen vibrational peaks, indicative of a survival mechanism of cancer cells under chemical stress. Cancer cells excrete chemotherapeutics to improve their chances of survival and utilize glucose to achieve this. Raman spectroscopy was able to monitor a survival strategy of cancer cells in the form of glucose uptake to alleviate chemical stress. Raman spectroscopy was invaluable in obtaining molecular information generated by biomolecules affected by anticancer metallodrug treatments and presents an alternative to less reproducible, conventional biochemical assays for cytotoxicity analyses.

  11. Oxygen cycling to improve survival of stem cells for myocardial repair: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall, Christopher; Khan, Mahmood; Chen, Chun-An; Angelos, Mark G

    2016-05-15

    Heart disease represents the leading cause of death among Americans. There is currently no clinical treatment to regenerate viable myocardium following myocardial infarction, and patients may suffer progressive deterioration and decreased myocardial function from the effects of remodeling of the necrotic myocardium. New therapeutic strategies hold promise for patients who suffer from ischemic heart disease by directly addressing the restoration of functional myocardium following death of cardiomyocytes. Therapeutic stem cell transplantation has shown modest benefit in clinical human trials with decreased fibrosis and increased functional myocardium. Moreover, autologous transplantation holds the potential to implement these therapies while avoiding the immunomodulation concerns of heart transplantation. Despite these benefits, stem cell therapy has been characterized by poor survival and low engraftment of injected stem cells. The hypoxic tissue environment of the ischemic/infracting myocardium impedes stem cell survival and engraftment in myocardial tissue. Hypoxic preconditioning has been suggested as a viable strategy to increase hypoxic tolerance of stem cells. A number of in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated improved stem cell viability by altering stem cell secretion of protein signals and up-regulation of numerous paracrine signaling pathways that affect inflammatory, survival, and angiogenic signaling pathways. This review will discuss both the mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning as well as the effects of hypoxic preconditioning in different cell and animal models, examining the pitfalls in current research and the next steps into potentially implementing this methodology in clinical research trials. PMID:27091653

  12. The epidemiology and survival of extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma in South East England, 1970–2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma (EPSCC) is a rare cancer and few studies describe its epidemiology. Our objectives were to compare the incidence and survival of EPSCC in South East England with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC), to determine the most common anatomical presenting sites for EPSCC and to compare survival in EPSCC by disease stage and site of diagnosis. We used data from the Thames Cancer Registry database for South East England between 1970 and 2004 to determine the incidence, most common anatomical sites, and survival by site, and stage of EPSCC. 1618 patients registered with EPSCC were identified. We calculated the age-standardised incidence rate for EPSCC using the European standard population and compared this to that for SCLC. We calculated survival using the Kaplan-Meier method for EPSCC and SCLC, and reported 3-year survival for different EPSCC anatomical sites and disease stages. The incidence of EPSCC was much lower than for SCLC, similar in males and females, and stable throughout the study period, with incidence rates of 0.45 per 100,000 in males and 0.37 in females during 2000–2004. In general, patients with EPSCC had a better 3-year survival (19%) than SCLC (5%). The most common anatomical sites for EPSCC were oesophagus (18%), other gastrointestinal (15%), genitourinary (20%), head and neck (11%), and breast (10%). Breast EPSCC had the best 3-year survival (60%) and gastrointestinal EPSCC the worst (7%). This study suggests that EPSCC has a stable incidence and confirms that it presents widely, but most commonly in the oesophagus and breast. Site and extent of disease influence survival, with breast EPSCC having the best prognosis. Further studies using standardised diagnosis, prospective case registers for uncommon diseases and European cancer registries are needed to understand this disease

  13. A Hyaluronan-Based Injectable Hydrogel Improves the Survival and Integration of Stem Cell Progeny following Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G. Ballios

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The utility of stem cells and their progeny in adult transplantation models has been limited by poor survival and integration. We designed an injectable and bioresorbable hydrogel blend of hyaluronan and methylcellulose (HAMC and tested it with two cell types in two animal models, thereby gaining an understanding of its general applicability for enhanced cell distribution, survival, integration, and functional repair relative to conventional cell delivery in saline. HAMC improves cell survival and integration of retinal stem cell (RSC-derived rods in the retina. The pro-survival mechanism of HAMC is ascribed to the interaction of the CD44 receptor with HA. Transient disruption of the retinal outer limiting membrane, combined with HAMC delivery, results in significantly improved rod survival and visual function. HAMC also improves the distribution, viability, and functional repair of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs. The HAMC delivery system improves cell transplantation efficacy in two CNS models, suggesting broad applicability.

  14. Enhanced survival and decreased mutation frequency after photoreactivation of UV damage in rat kangaroo cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of pyrimidine dimers on cytotoxicity, DNA repair and mutagenesis was studied in cells, derived from the rat kangaroo, which possess photoreactivating capabilities. A significant enhancement in colony-forming ability was achieved after UV irradiation in exponentially growing cells if photoreactivating light treatment followed the UV irradiation. If photoreactivation treatment was delayed 24h after UV irradiation, no significant increase in survival was observed. Assays of pyrimidine dimers, unscheduled DNA synthesis, and survival in contact-inhibited cells all confirmed a minor role of dark excision repair and a major role of photoreactivation. Photoreactivation decreased the frequency of mutations to 6-thioguanine resistance to a greater extent than the alteration seen in survival. Approximately 1.6 times the dose must be given to get equal killing in photoreactivated cells, whereas 4 times the dose must be given to obtain equal mutation frequencies in light-treated cells. This suggests that the removal of dimers is more effective in mutant reduction than enhancement of survival. (orig.)

  15. Enhanced survival and decreased mutation frequency after photoreactivation of UV damage in rat kangaroo cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, M.H.; Trosko, J.E. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA). Dept. of Pediatrics and Human Development)

    1983-08-01

    The effect of pyrimidine dimers on cytotoxicity, DNA repair and mutagenesis was studied in cells, derived from the rat kangaroo, which possess photoreactivating capabilities. A significant enhancement in colony-forming ability was achieved after UV irradiation in exponentially growing cells if photoreactivating light treatment followed the UV irradiation. If photoreactivation treatment was delayed 24h after UV irradiation, no significant increase in survival was observed. Assays of pyrimidine dimers, unscheduled DNA synthesis, and survival in contact-inhibited cells all confirmed a minor role of dark excision repair and a major role of photoreactivation. Photoreactivation decreased the frequency of mutations to 6-thioguanine resistance to a greater extent than the alteration seen in survival. Approximately 1.6 times the dose must be given to get equal killing in photoreactivated cells, whereas 4 times the dose must be given to obtain equal mutation frequencies in light-treated cells. This suggests that the removal of dimers is more effective in mutant reduction than enhancement of survival.

  16. Stochastic modeling and experimental analysis of phenotypic switching and survival of cancer cells under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani Dahaj, Seyed Alireza; Kumar, Niraj; Sundaram, Bala; Celli, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Rahul

    The phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells is critical to their survival under stress. A significant contribution to heterogeneity of cancer calls derives from the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a conserved cellular program that is crucial for embryonic development. Several studies have investigated the role of EMT in growth of early stage tumors into invasive malignancies. Also, EMT has been closely associated with the acquisition of chemoresistance properties in cancer cells. Motivated by these studies, we analyze multi-phenotype stochastic models of the evolution of cancers cell populations under stress. We derive analytical results for time-dependent probability distributions that provide insights into the competing rates underlying phenotypic switching (e.g. during EMT) and the corresponding survival of cancer cells. Experimentally, we evaluate these model-based predictions by imaging human pancreatic cancer cell lines grown with and without cytotoxic agents and measure growth kinetics, survival, morphological changes and (terminal evaluation of) biomarkers with associated epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes. The results derived suggest approaches for distinguishing between adaptation and selection scenarios for survival in the presence of external stresses.

  17. Correlation Between Fuhrman Nuclear Grade and Stage with Survival in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim KUŞ

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim was to find out the correlation between histopathological findings and survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma.Material and Method: We examined 114 cases diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma at the Pathology Department in 1997 - 2007. We explored the correlation of histological type, size, Fuhrman nuclear grade, renal capsule invasion, renal vein and lymphatic/vascular invasion, tumoral necrosis and stage with survival.Results: Histological subtypes were determined as clear cell in 101 cases (88,6% , papillary in 9 cases (7,9%, and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma in 4 cases (3,5%. Reliable follow-up data were available in 96 of 114 cases. 74 of them (77,1% were alive and 22 of them (22,9% had died related to renal cell carcinoma. The mean follow-up time was 21,5 months with a wide range between 2 days and 87 months. 5 year survival was 61,3 months, and its probability was 58,2%.Conclusion: We provide statistical results compatible with the recent literature in regard to high Fuhrman nuclear grade, advanced stage, necrosis, capsule invasion, microvascular invasion and lymph node invasion decreasing the survival time.

  18. EGFR overexpressing cells and tumors are dependent on autophagy for growth and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed, amplified or mutated in various human epithelial tumors, and is associated with tumor aggressiveness and therapy resistance. Autophagy activation provides a survival advantage for cells in the tumor microenvironment. In the current study, we assessed the potential of autophagy inhibition (using chloroquine (CQ)) in treatment of EGFR expressing tumors. Material and methods: Quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, clonogenic survival, proliferation assays and in vivo tumor growth were used to assess this potential. Results: We show that EGFR overexpressing xenografts are sensitive to CQ treatment and are sensitized to irradiation by autophagy inhibition. In HNSSC xenografts, a correlation between EGFR and expression of the autophagy marker LC3b is observed, suggesting a role for autophagy in EGFR expressing tumors. This observation was substantiated in cell lines, showing high EGFR expressing cells to be more sensitive to CQ addition as reflected by decreased proliferation and survival. Surprisingly high EGFR expressing cells display a lower autophagic flux. Conclusions: The EGFR high expressing cells and tumors investigated in this study are highly dependent on autophagy for growth and survival. Inhibition of autophagy may therefore provide a novel treatment opportunity for EGFR overexpressing tumors

  19. Nuclear trafficking of EGFR by Vps34 represses Arf expression to promote lung tumor cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayde, D; Guerard, M; Perron, P; Hatat, A-S; Barrial, C; Eymin, B; Gazzeri, S

    2016-07-28

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a cell surface receptor that has an essential role in cell proliferation and survival, and overexpression of EGFR is a common feature of human cancers. In Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), activating mutations of EGFR have also been described. We recently showed that mutant EGFR-L858R inhibits the expression of the p14ARF tumor-suppressor protein to promote cell survival. In this study, we defined the molecular bases by which EGFR controls Arf expression. Using various lung tumor models, we showed that EGF stimulation inhibits Arf transcription by a mechanism involving the nuclear transport and recruitment of EGFR to the Arf promoter. We unraveled the vesicular trafficking protein Vps34 as a mediator of EGFR nuclear trafficking and showed that its neutralization prevents the accumulation of EGFR to the Arf promoter in response to ligand activation. Finally, in lung tumor cells that carry mutant EGFR-L858R, we demonstrated that inhibition of Vps34 using small interfering RNA restrains nuclear EGFR location and restores Arf expression leading to apoptosis. These findings identify the Arf tumor suppressor as a new transcriptional target of nuclear EGFR and highlight Vps34 as an important regulator of the nuclear EGFR/Arf survival pathway. As a whole, they provide a mechanistic explanation to the inverse correlation between nuclear expression of EGFR and overall survival in NSCLC patients. PMID:26686095

  20. Microvesicles derived from mesenchymal stem cells enhance survival in a lethal model of acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bruno

    Full Text Available Several studies demonstrated that treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs reduces cisplatin mortality in mice. Microvesicles (MVs released from MSCs were previously shown to favor renal repair in non lethal toxic and ischemic acute renal injury (AKI. In the present study we investigated the effects of MSC-derived MVs in SCID mice survival in lethal cisplatin-induced AKI. Moreover, we evaluated in vitro the effect of MVs on cisplatin-induced apoptosis of human renal tubular epithelial cells and the molecular mechanisms involved. Two different regimens of MV injection were used. The single administration of MVs ameliorated renal function and morphology, and improved survival but did not prevent chronic tubular injury and persistent increase in BUN and creatinine. Multiple injections of MVs further decreased mortality and at day 21 surviving mice showed normal histology and renal function. The mechanism of protection was mainly ascribed to an anti-apoptotic effect of MVs. In vitro studies demonstrated that MVs up-regulated in cisplatin-treated human tubular epithelial cells anti-apoptotic genes, such as Bcl-xL, Bcl2 and BIRC8 and down-regulated genes that have a central role in the execution-phase of cell apoptosis such as Casp1, Casp8 and LTA. In conclusion, MVs released from MSCs were found to exert a pro-survival effect on renal cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that MVs may contribute to renal protection conferred by MSCs.

  1. Influence of preirradiational and postirradiational heating of lyophilized Micrococcus radioproteolyticus cells on their survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival curve of Micrococcus radioproteolyticus following gamma irradiation of lyophilized cells is characterized by a broad shoulder reaching as far as the dose range 10 - 20 kGy (1 - 2 Mrad). The course of the curve indicates that under these conditions most of the changes induced by irradiation have the character of sublethal damage, which the cell can repair. The course of the survival curve does not change if the lyophilized cells are heated prior to irradiation for 2 h at 60 0C. Certain changes do occur if the preirradiational temperature is 80 0C. If the cells are exposed to increased temperature after irradiation even a temperature of 60 0C brings about a marked decrease in survival. A temperature of 80 0C after irradiation leads to extensive changes in the shape of survival curves, which are characterized by a narrowing or even disappearing of the shoulders. It can be concluded from the results obtained that an increased temperature modifies the capability of irradiated lyophilized cells to repair radiation damage. (author)

  2. Differential survival of solitary and aggregated bacterial cells promotes aggregate formation on leaf surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, J.-M.; Lindow, S. E.

    2003-01-01

    The survival of individual Pseudomonas syringae cells was determined on bean leaf surfaces maintained under humid conditions or periodically exposed to desiccation stress. Cells of P. syringae strain B728a harboring a GFP marker gene were visualized by epifluorescence microscopy, either directly in situ or after recovery from leaves, and dead cells were identified as those that were stained with propidium iodide in such populations. Under moist, conducive conditions on plants, the proportion of total live cells was always high, irrespective of their aggregated state. In contrast, the proportion of the total cells that remained alive on leaves that were periodically exposed to desiccation stress decreased through time and was only ≈15% after 5 days. However, the fraction of cells in large aggregates that were alive on such plants in both condition was much higher than more solitary cells. Immediately after inoculation, cells were randomly distributed over the leaf surface and no aggregates were observed. However, a very aggregated pattern of colonization was apparent within 7 days, and >90% of the living cells were located in aggregates of 100 cells or more. Our results strongly suggest that, although conducive conditions favor aggregate formation, such cells are much more capable of tolerating environmental stresses, and the preferential survival of cells in aggregates promotes a highly clustered spatial distribution of bacteria on leaf surfaces. PMID:14665692

  3. Survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma in the pretargeted versus targeted therapy eras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengxiang; Wong, Yu-Ning; Armstrong, Katrina; Haas, Naomi; Subedi, Prasun; Davis-Cerone, Margaret; Doshi, Jalpa A

    2016-02-01

    Between December 2005 and October 2009, FDA approved six targeted therapies shown to significantly extend survival for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients in clinical trials. This study aimed to examine changes in survival between the pretargeted and targeted therapy periods in advanced RCC patients in a real-world setting. Utilizing the 2000-2010 SEER Research files, a pre-post study design with a contemporaneous comparison group was employed to examine differences in survival outcomes for patients diagnosed with advanced RCC (study group) or advanced prostate cancer (comparison group, for whom no significant treatment innovations happened during this period) across the pretargeted therapy era (2000-2005) and the targeted therapy era (2006-2010). RCC patients diagnosed in the targeted therapy era (N = 6439) showed improved survival compared to those diagnosed in the pretargeted therapy era (N = 7231, hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause death: 0.86, P < 0.01), while the change between the pre-post periods was not significant for advanced prostate cancer patients (HR: 0.97, P = 0.08). Advanced RCC patients had significantly larger improvements in overall survival compared to advanced prostate cancer patients (z = 4.31; P < 0.01). More detailed year-to-year analysis revealed greater survival improvements for RCC in the later years of the posttargeted period. Similar results were seen for cause-specific survival. Subgroup analyses by nephrectomy status, age, and gender showed consistent findings. Patients diagnosed with advanced RCC during the targeted therapy era had better survival outcomes than those diagnosed during the pretargeted therapy era. Future studies should examine the real-world survival improvements directly associated with targeted therapies. PMID:26645975

  4. The P2X7 receptor regulates cell survival, migration and invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannuzzo, Andrea; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Novak, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is presently one of the cancers with the worst survival rates and least effective treatments. Moreover, total deaths due to PDAC are predicted to increase in the next 15 years. Therefore, novel insights into basic mechanism of PDAC development and...... therapies are needed. PDAC is characterized by a complex microenvironment, in which cancer and stromal cells release different molecules, such as ATP. ATP can be transported and/or exocytosed from active cancer cells and released from dying cells in the necrotic core of the cancer. We hypothesized that one...... / propidium iodide assays). RESULTS: We found higher expression of P2X7R protein in PDAC compared to HPDE cells. P2X7R had notable disparate effects on PDAC survival. Firstly, high concentrations of ATP or the specific P2X7R agonist, BzATP, had cytotoxic effects in all cell lines, and cell death was mediated...

  5. Survival Analysis of 1,742 Patients with Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong PENG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective At present non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is still the leading cause of death induced by cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors of advanced NSCLC. Methods Total 1,742 cases of stage IV NSCLC data from Jan 4, 2000 to Dec 25, 2008 in Shanghai Chest Hospital were collected, confirmed by pathological examinations. Analysis was made to observe the impact of treatment on prognosis in gender, age, smoking history, pathology, classification, clinical TNM stage. Survival rate, survival difference were evaluated by Kaplan-Meire method and Logrank test respectively. The prognosis were analyzed by Cox multivariate regression. Results The median survival time of 1,742 patients was 10.0 months (9.5 months-10.5 months. One, two, three, four, and five-year survival rates were 44%, 22%, 13%, 9%, 6% respectively. The median survivals of single or multiple metastasis were 11 months vs 7 months (P < 0.001. Survival time were different in metastasic organs, with the median survival time as follows: lung for about 12 months (11.0 months-12.9 months, bone for 9 months (8.3 months-9.6 months, brain for 8 months (6.8 months-9.1 months, liver, adrenal gland, distannt lymph node metastasis for 5 months (3.8 months-6.1 months, and subcutaneous for 3 months (1.7 months-4.3 months. The median survival times of adenocarcinoma (n=1,086, 62% and squamous cell carcinoma cases (n=305, 17.5% were 12 months vs 8 months (P < 0.001. The median survival time of chemotherapy and best supportive care were 11 months vs 6 months (P < 0.001; the median survival times of with and without radiotherapy were 11 months vs 9 months (P=0.017. Conclusion Gender, age, gross type, pathological type, clinical T stage, N stage, numbers of metastatic organ, smoking history, treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer were independent prognostic factors.

  6. Effects of cell concentrations on the survival and repopulation of haemopoietic stem cells in irradiated bone marrow cell culture in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of cell concentrations on the survival and repopulation of haemopoietic stem cells after irradiation were studied in the long-term culture of mouse bone marrow cells in vitro. No difference was observed in the survival of the stem cells among cultures in which 0 - 107 cells were re-inoculated on the adherent cell colonies in the culture flask. Stem cells showed a significant proliferation within 1 week and the number of the stem cells exceeded the control in 3 weeks after irradiation in the cultures with less than 106 re-inoculated cells per flask. In contrast, there was a considerable delay in the onset of stem cell proliferation after irradiation in the culture with 107 cells per flask. Based on these results, a possibility that a stimulator of stem cell proliferation, released from irradiated stromal cells, is cancelled by an inhibitory factor produced by irradiated or unirradiated haemopoietic cells is postulated. (author)

  7. Tumor cells with low proteasome subunit expression predict overall survival in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and clinical data suggest that solid cancers contain treatment-resistant cancer stem cells that will impair treatment efficacy. The objective of this study was to investigate if head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) also contain cancer stem cells that can be identified by low 26S proteasome activity and if their presence correlates to clinical outcome. Human HNSCC cells, engineered to report lack of proteasome activity based on accumulation of a fluorescent fusion protein, were separated based on high (ZsGreen-cODCneg) or low (ZsGreen-cODCpos) proteasome activity. Self-renewal capacity, tumorigenicity and radioresistance were assessed. Proteasome subunit expression was analyzed in tissue microarrays and correlated to survival and locoregional cancer control of 174 patients with HNSCC. HNSCC cells with low proteasome activity showed a significantly higher self-renewal capacity and increased tumorigenicity. Irradiation enriched for ZsGreen-cODCpos cells. The survival probability of 82 patients treated with definitive radio- or chemo-radiotherapy exhibiting weak, intermediate, or strong proteasome subunit expression were 21.2, 28.8 and 43.8 months (p = 0.05), respectively. Locoregional cancer control was comparably affected. Subpopulations of HNSCC display stem cell features that affect patients’ tumor control and survival. Evaluating cancer tissue for expression of the proteasome subunit PSMD1 may help identify patients at risk for relapse

  8. Late radiation response of kidney assayed by tubule-cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assay for the survival of renal tubule cells was developed using mice, analogous to other in-situ clonogenic cell survival assays. One kidney was irradiated using a 137Cs irradiator and removed 60-68 weeks later for histological examination. In unirradiated animals there were about 370 tubules in contact with the capsule in a coronal cross section at the middle of the kidney. After irradiation, extensive tubular damage was the dominant lesion. The number of epithelialised tubules in contact with the capsule showed a dose-dependent logarithmic decline. The dose-survival relationship for the clonogenic cells responsible for the regeneration of tubule epithelium was described by a D0 value of 1.5 Gy over the dose range 11-16 Gy. This radiosensitivity resembles that of stem cells in acutely responding tissues. The lack of histological evidence of damage to the arterial vasculature at the time the tubules are initially denuded of epithelium, and the similarity of renal tubule cell radiosensitivity to that of other mammalian cells, support the hypothesis that ''late'' radiation injury results primarily from depletion of parenchymal cells, not indirectly from injury to blood vessels, as has been the prevailing belief. (author)

  9. ATG7 regulates energy metabolism, differentiation and survival of Philadelphia-chromosome-positive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvela, Maria; Baquero, Pablo; Kuntz, Elodie M; Mukhopadhyay, Arunima; Mitchell, Rebecca; Allan, Elaine K; Chan, Edmond; Kranc, Kamil R; Calabretta, Bruno; Salomoni, Paolo; Gottlieb, Eyal; Holyoake, Tessa L; Helgason, G Vignir

    2016-06-01

    A major drawback of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is that primitive CML cells are able to survive TKI-mediated BCR-ABL inhibition, leading to disease persistence in patients. Investigation of strategies aiming to inhibit alternative survival pathways in CML is therefore critical. We have previously shown that a nonspecific pharmacological inhibition of autophagy potentiates TKI-induced death in Philadelphia chromosome-positive cells. Here we provide further understanding of how specific and pharmacological autophagy inhibition affects nonmitochondrial and mitochondrial energy metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated differentiation of CML cells and highlight ATG7 (a critical component of the LC3 conjugation system) as a potential specific therapeutic target. By combining extra- and intracellular steady state metabolite measurements by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with metabolic flux assays using labeled glucose and functional assays, we demonstrate that knockdown of ATG7 results in decreased glycolysis and increased flux of labeled carbons through the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle. This leads to increased oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Furthermore, following ROS accumulation, CML cells, including primary CML CD34(+) progenitor cells, differentiate toward the erythroid lineage. Finally, ATG7 knockdown sensitizes CML progenitor cells to TKI-induced death, without affecting survival of normal cells, suggesting that specific inhibitors of ATG7 in combination with TKI would provide a novel therapeutic approach for CML patients exhibiting persistent disease. PMID:27168493

  10. Nifuroxazide inhibits survival of multiple myeloma cells by directly inhibiting STAT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik A; Walker, Sarah R; Kepich, Alicia; Gashin, Laurie B; Hideshima, Teru; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C; Frank, David A

    2008-12-15

    Constitutive activation of the transcription factor STAT3 contributes to the pathogenesis of many cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Since STAT3 is dispensable in most normal tissue, targeted inhibition of STAT3 is an attractive therapy for patients with these cancers. To identify STAT3 inhibitors, we developed a transcriptionally based assay and screened a library of compounds known to be safe in humans. We found the drug nifuroxazide to be an effective inhibitor of STAT3 function. Nifuroxazide inhibits the constitutive phosphorylation of STAT3 in MM cells by reducing Jak kinase autophosphorylation, and leads to down-regulation of the STAT3 target gene Mcl-1. Nifuroxazide causes a decrease in viability of primary myeloma cells and myeloma cell lines containing STAT3 activation, but not normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Although bone marrow stromal cells provide survival signals to myeloma cells, nifuroxazide can overcome this survival advantage. Reflecting the interaction of STAT3 with other cellular pathways, nifuroxazide shows enhanced cytotoxicity when combined with either the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide or the MEK inhibitor UO126. Therefore, using a mechanistic-based screen, we identified the clinically relevant drug nifuroxazide as a potent inhibitor of STAT signaling that shows cytotoxicity against myeloma cells that depend on STAT3 for survival. PMID:18824601

  11. Encapsulated Whole Bone Marrow Cells Improve Survival in Wistar Rats after 90% Partial Hepatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Uribe-Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. The use of bone marrow cells has been suggested as an alternative treatment for acute liver failure. In this study, we investigate the effect of encapsulated whole bone marrow cells in a liver failure model. Methods. Encapsulated cells or empty capsules were implanted in rats submitted to 90% partial hepatectomy. The survival rate was assessed. Another group was euthanized at 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after hepatectomy to study expression of cytokines and growth factors. Results. Whole bone marrow group showed a higher than 10 days survival rate compared to empty capsules group. Gene expression related to early phase of liver regeneration at 6 hours after hepatectomy was decreased in encapsulated cells group, whereas genes related to regeneration were increased at 12, 24, and 48 hours. Whole bone marrow group showed lower regeneration rate at 72 hours and higher expression and activity of caspase 3. In contrast, lysosomal-β-glucuronidase activity was elevated in empty capsules group. Conclusions. The results show that encapsulated whole bone marrow cells reduce the expression of genes involved in liver regeneration and increase those responsible for ending hepatocyte division. In addition, these cells favor apoptotic cell death and decrease necrosis, thus increasing survival.

  12. The effect of caffeine and adenine on radiation induced suppression of DNA synthesis, and cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of cultured mammalian cells to ionizing radiation or UV light results in a transient decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis. This depression in synthetic rate may be attenuated or deferred via a post-irradiation treatment with caffeine or adenine. It has been suggested that this attenuation may increase the fixation of damage and, therefore, increase radiation sensitivity. However, it has been previously reported that, for V79 cells treated with caffeine or adenine, no correlation exists between the extent of depression and cell survival. The present investigation expands upon these findings by examining the effect of caffeine or adenine post-irradiation treatment on two cell lines with normal UV sensitivity, mouse 3T3 and CHO AA8 cells, and one UV sensitive cell line, CHO UV5 cells. Both caffeine and adenine have been found to reduce, or delay, the suppression in DNA synthesis in all three cell lines. Surprisingly, caffeine appeared to induced even the UV5 cells to recover DNA synthetic ability. The amount of reduction in suppression of DNA synthesis, however, varies between the different cell lines and no consistent relationship with cell survival has emerged

  13. Dormancy of cancer cells with suppression of AKT activity contributes to survival in chronic hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Endo

    Full Text Available A hypoxic microenvironment in tumors has been recognized as a cause of malignancy or resistance to various cancer therapies. In contrast to recent progress in understanding the acute response of cancer cells to hypoxia, the characteristics of tumor cells in chronic hypoxia remain elusive. We have identified a pancreatic cancer cell line, AsPC-1, that is exceptionally able to survive for weeks under 1% oxygen conditions while most tested cancer cell lines die after only some days under these conditions. In chronic hypoxia, AsPC-1 cells entered a state of dormancy characterized by no proliferation, no death, and metabolic suppression. They reversibly switched to active status after being placed again in optimal culture conditions. ATP turnover, an indicator of energy demand, was markedly decreased and accompanied by reduced AKT phosphorylation. Forced activation of AKT resulted in increased ATP turnover and massive cell death in vitro and a decreased number of dormant cells in vivo. In contrast to most cancer cell lines, primary-cultured colorectal cancer cells easily entered the dormant status with AKT suppression under hypoxia combined with growth factor-depleted conditions. Primary colorectal cancer cells in dormancy were resistant to chemotherapy. Thus, the ability to survive in a deteriorated microenvironment by entering into dormancy under chronic hypoxia might be a common property among cancer cells. Targeting the regulatory mechanism inducing this dormant status could provide a new strategy for treating cancer.

  14. Aberrant Expression of Functional BAFF-System Receptors by Malignant B-Cell Precursors Impacts Leukemia Cell Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Maia, Sara; Pelletier, Marc; Ding, Jixin; Hsu, Yen-Ming; Rao, Sambasiva P.; Cardoso, Angelo A.; Sallan, Stephen Earl; Nadler, Lee Marshall

    2011-01-01

    Despite exhibiting oncogenic events, patient's leukemia cells are responsive and dependent on signals from their malignant bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, which modulate their survival, cell cycle progression, trafficking and resistance to chemotherapy. Identification of the signaling pathways mediating this leukemia/microenvironment interplay is critical for the development of novel molecular targeted therapies. We observed that primary leukemia B-cell precursors aberrantly express recept...

  15. Radiation survival of two human cervical carcinoma cell lines after multifraction irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Multifraction irradiation may contribute to radiation therapy treatment failure if selection of radiation resistant subpopulations occurs. We sought to determine whether surviving cells following daily fraction irradiation of two human cervical squamous cell carcinoma lines would express different radiation survival characteristics compared to the unirradiated parent. Methods and Materials: A late-passage line (HTB35) and an early-passage line (RECA) received daily 2 Gy x-irradiation. Two new stable HTB35 cell lines were established after 40 and 60 Gy (HTB35-40 and HTB35-60). A single line was established from RECA after 30 Gy (RECA-30). High dose rate (74 cGy/min) acute radiation survival curves were prepared from the three new lines and the unirradiated parents. Potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and sublethal damage repair (SLDR) responses were detailed for HTB35, HTB35-40 and HTB35-60. Low dose rate (1.27 cGy/min) survival was measured for HTB35 and HTB35-60. Clones were derived from HTB35 and from HTB35-60 and the surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) values were determined. Results: The two parent lines (HTB35 and RECA) differed in acute radiation survival. The surviving lines following multifraction irradiation (HTB35-40, HTB35-60, and RECA-30) showed no change in acute radiation response compared to the appropriate parent. HTB35-40 and HTB35-60 were repair proficient, demonstrating similar PLDR and SLDR recovery ratios as the parent. Likewise, acute, low dose rate survival of HTB35 and HTB35-60 was similar. Nine clones derived from HTB35 lacked a consistent difference in SF2 compared to the original culture. A single clone of seven derived from HTB35-60 was consistently radiation resistant (SF2 = 0.81 ± 0.06) compared to the original culture (SF2 = 0.50 ± 0.09). Conclusion: No evidence was obtained that cell lines generated following multiple daily fractions of x-irradiation in vitro possessed acute radiation survival or repair characteristics

  16. Musashi1 regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and is a prognostic indicator of poor survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiao-Yang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musashi1 (Msi1 is a conserved RNA-binding protein that regulates the Notch and Wnt pathways, and serves as a stem cell marker in the breast and other tissues. It is unknown how Msi1 relates to other breast cancer markers, whether it denotes tumor initiating cells (TICs, and how it affects gene expression and tumor cell survival in breast cancer cells. Results Msi1 expression was analyzed in 20 breast cancer cell lines and in 140 primary breast tumors by western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Lentivirus RNA interference was used to reduce Msi1 expression in breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and T47D grown as spheroid cultures and to assess stem cell gene expression and the growth of these cell lines as xenografts. In normal human breast tissue, Msi1 was expressed in 10.6% of myoepithelum and 1.2% of ductal epithelium in the terminal ductal lobular unit (TDLU, whereas, less than 0.05% of ductal epithelium and myoepithelium in large ducts outside the TDLU expressed Msi1. Msi1 was expressed in 55% of the breast cancer cell lines and correlated with ErbB2 expression in 50% of the cell lines. Msi1 was expressed in 68% of primary tumors and in 100% of lymph node metastases, and correlated with 5 year survival. Msi1 was enriched in CD133+ MCF-7 and T47D cells and in spheroid cultures of these cells, and Msi1 'knockdown' (KD with a lentivirus-expressed shRNA decreased the number and size of spheroid colonies. Msi1 KD reduced Notch1, c-Myc, ErbB2 and pERK1/2 expression, and increased p21CIP1 expression, which is consistent with known Msi1 target mRNAs. Msi1 KD also reduced the expression of the somatic and embryonic stem cell markers, CD133, Bmi1, Sox2, Nanog and Oct4. Xenografts of MCF-7 and T47D Msi1 KD cells resulted in a marked reduction of tumor growth, reduced Msi1 and Notch1 expression and increased p21CIP1 expression. Conclusion Msi1 is a negative prognostic indicator of breast cancer patient survival, and is

  17. Lung cancer survival in England: trends in non-small-cell lung cancer survival over the duration of the National Lung Cancer Audit

    OpenAIRE

    Khakwani, A; Rich, A L; Powell, H A; Tata, L J; Stanley, R A; Baldwin, D R; Duffy, J P; Hubbard , R B

    2013-01-01

    Background: In comparison with other European and North American countries, England has poor survival figures for lung cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the changes in survival since the introduction of the National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA). Methods: We used data from the NLCA to identify people with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and stratified people according to their performance status (PS) and clinical stage. Using Cox regression, we calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for death according t...

  18. N-methyl-D-aspartate promotes the survival of cerebellar granule cells: pharmacological characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen;

    1989-01-01

    The survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture is promoted by chronic exposure to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The effect is due to the stimulation of 'conventional' NMDA receptor-ionophore complex: it is concentration dependent, voltage dependent and blocked by the selective antagonists D-2...

  19. Effects of cell-bound microcystins on survival and feeding of Daphnia spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrlack, T; Dittmann, E; Börner, T;

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cell-bound microcystins on the survival time and feeding rates of six Daphnia clones belonging to five common species was studied. To do this, the effects of the microcystin-producing Microcystis strain PCC7806 and its mutant, which has been genetically engineered to knock out mi...

  20. A biophysical model applied to survival of tumor cells and chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations on survival of tumor cells E.M.T.6 and chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes irradiated in vitro and microdosimetric studies were made using a helion beam. The results obtained were compared in order to see if the Dual Radiation Action Theory of ROSSI and KELLERER can explain these radiobiological phenomena

  1. Nicotine-mediated signals modulate cell death and survival of T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capacity of nicotine to affect the behavior of non-neuronal cells through neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has been the subject of considerable recent attention. Previously, we showed that exposure to nicotine activates the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor in lymphocytes and endothelial cells, leading to alterations in cellular growth and vascular endothelial growth factor production. Here, we extend these studies to document effects of nicotine on lymphocyte survival. The data show that nicotine induces paradoxical effects that might alternatively enforce survival or trigger apoptosis, suggesting that depending on timing and context, nicotine might act both as a survival factor or as an inducer of apoptosis in normal or transformed lymphocytes, and possibly other non-neuronal cells. In addition, our results show that, while having overlapping functions, low and high affinity nAChRs also transmit signals that promote distinct outcomes in lymphocytes. The sum of our data suggests that selective modulation of nAChRs might be useful to regulate lymphocyte activation and survival in health and disease.

  2. Prolonged survival of virulent Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) in cell-free and tissue culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieldsteel, A H; Becker, F A; Stout, J G

    1977-10-01

    Survival of Treponema pallidum was found to be prolonged in the presence of tissue culture. Of the 12 cultures studied, cottontail rabbit epithelium (Sf1Ep) supported T. pallidum for the longest time. In horizontal Leighton tubes with reduced medium and an atmosphere of 5% CO2 in N2, the 50% survival time (ST50) was 5 to 6 days for treponemes associated with monolayers of Sf1Ep cells. Comparable cell-free tubes had ST50 values of less than 4 days. In vertical Leighton tubes containing 6 ml of prereduced medium incubated aerobically, gradients of O2 tension and redox potential were established. Attachment and survival of T. pallidum were greatest at a depth of about 10 to 20 mm. Motility was between 70 and 95% in this area throughout the first 14 days of incubation. Occasionally, greater than 50% motility was observed for as long as 21 days. The redox potential and O2 tension in the optimal area of gradient cultures were reproduced by adjusting the medium depth in a shell vial culture system containing cells on a horizontal cover slip. Treponemes associated with the cell monolayer in both gradient and shell vial cultures were still virulent after 21 days in vitro. The dilution of testis extract and the concentration of T. pallidum were found to be important factors in survival of T. pallidum. PMID:332639

  3. Overall survival after immunotherapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and surgery in treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Hermann, Gregers G.; Rorth, Mikael;

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate overall survival (OS) after treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) following the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. Material and methods. One-hundred and fort...

  4. TNF-α promotes cell survival through stimulation of K+ channel and NFκB activity in corneal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in various cell types induces either cell death or mitogenesis through different signaling pathways. In the present study, we determined in human corneal epithelial cells how TNF-α also promotes cell survival. Human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells were cultured in DMEM/F-12 medium containing 10% FBS. TNF-α stimulation induced activation of a voltage-gated K+ channel detected by measuring single channel activity using patch clamp techniques. The effect of TNF-α on downstream events included NFκB nuclear translocation and increases in DNA binding activities, but did not elicit ERK, JNK, or p38 limb signaling activation. TNF-α induced increases in p21 expression resulting in partial cell cycle attenuation in the G1 phase. Cell cycle progression was also mapped by flow cytometer analysis. Blockade of TNF-α-induced K+ channel activity effectively prevented NFκB nuclear translocation and binding to DNA, diminishing the cell-survival protective effect of TNF-α. In conclusion, TNF-α promotes survival of HCE cells through sequential stimulation of K+ channel and NFκB activities. This response to TNF-α is dependent on stimulating K+ channel activity because following suppression of K+ channel activity TNF-α failed to activate NFκB nuclear translocation and binding to nuclear DNA

  5. Pax8 has a critical role in epithelial cell survival and proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Di Palma, T; Filippone, M G; Pierantoni, G. M.; Fusco, A; S. Soddu; Zannini, M

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor Pax8, a member of the Paired-box gene family, is a critical regulator required for proper development and differentiation of thyroid follicular cells. Despite being Pax8 well characterized with respect to its role in regulating genes responsible for thyroid differentiation, its involvement in cell survival and proliferation has been hypothesized but remains unclear. Here, we show that Pax8 overexpression significantly increases proliferation and colony-forming efficie...

  6. Gender-Dependent Survival of Allogeneic Trophoblast Stem Cells in Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Epple-Farmer, Jessica; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Smithies, Oliver; Binas, Bert

    2009-01-01

    In view of the well-known phenomenon of trophoblast immune privilege, trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) might be expected to be immune privileged, which could be of interest for cell or gene therapies. Yet in the ectopic sites tested so far, TSC transplants fail to show noticeable immune privilege and seem to lack physiological support. However, we show here that after portal venous injection, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled TSCs survive for several months in the livers of allogeneic fema...

  7. Ascorbic acid improves embryonic cardiomyoblast cell survival and promotes vascularization in potential myocardial grafts in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, E. C.; Wang, J; Gan, S U; Singh, R.; Lee, C. N.; Kofidis, T

    2010-01-01

    Organ restoration via cell therapy and tissue transplantation is limited by impaired graft survival. We tested the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA) reduces cell death in myocardial grafts both in vitro and in vivo and introduced a new model of autologous graft vascularization for later transplantation. Luciferase (Fluc)- and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing H9C2 cardiomyoblasts were seeded in gelatin scaffolds to form myocardial artificial grafts (MAGs). MAGs were supplemented wit...

  8. Survival and DNA repair in ultraviolet-irradiated haploid and diploid cultured frog cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survival and repair of DNA following ultraviolet (254-nm) radiation have been investigated in ICR 2A, a cultured cell line from haploid embryos of the grassfrog, Rana pipiens. Survival curves from cells recovering in the dark gave mean lethal dose value (D0) in the range 1.5-1.7 Jm-2 for both haploid and diploid cell stocks. The only significant difference observed between haploids and diploids was in the extent of the shoulder at low fluence (Dsub(q)), the value for exponentially multiplying diploid cells (3.0 Jm-2) being higher than that found for haploids (1.2 Jm-2). Irradiation of cultures reversibly blocked in the G1 phase of the cell cycle gave survival-curve coefficients indistinguishable between haploids and diploids. Post-irradiation exposure to visible light restored colony-forming capacity and removed chromatographically estimated pyrimidine dimers from DNA at the same rates. After fluences killing 90% of the cells, complete restoration of survival was obtained after 60-min exposure to 500 foot-candles, indicating that in this range lethality is entirely photoreversible and therefore attributable to pyrimidine dimers in DNA. Dimer removal required illumination following ultraviolet exposure, intact cells and physiological temperature, implying that the photoreversal involved DNA photolyase activity. Excision-repair capacity was slight, since no loss of dimers could be detected chromoatographically during up to 48 h incubation in the dark and since autoradiographically detected 'unscheduled DNA synthesis' was limited to a 2-fold increase saturated at 10 Jm-2. These properties make ICR 2A frog cells useful to explore how DNA-repair pathways influence mutant yield. (Auth.)

  9. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Zaugg, K; Yao, Y.; Reilly, P T; K. Kannan; Kiarash, R; Mason, J.; Huang, P.; Sawyer, S K; Fuerth, B.; Faubert, B; Kalliomäki, T; Elia, A J; Luo, X.; Nadeem, V; Bungard, D

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in met...

  10. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells that survive combination chemotherapy in vivo remain sensitive to allogeneic immune effects

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Johan; Hsu, Yu-Chiao; Kuzin, Igor I.; Campbell, Andrew; Mullen, Craig A.

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is often performed for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) whose disease has relapsed after chemotherapy treatment. However, graft versus leukemia (GVL) effects in ALL are generally weak and the mechanisms of this weakness are unknown. These studies tested the hypothesis that ALL cells that have survived conventional chemotherapy in vivo acquire relative resistance to the allogeneic GVL effect. C57BL/6 mice were injected with mur...

  11. UBIAD1-mediated vitamin K2 synthesis is required for vascular endothelial cell survival and development

    OpenAIRE

    Hegarty, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Hongbo; Chi, Neil C.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-organ animals, such as vertebrates, require the development of a closed vascular system to ensure the delivery of nutrients to, and the transport of waste from, their organs. As a result, an organized vascular network that is optimal for tissue perfusion is created through not only the generation of new blood vessels but also the remodeling and maintenance of endothelial cells via apoptotic and cell survival pathways. Here, we show that UBIAD1, a vitamin K2/menaquinone-4 biosynthetic en...

  12. Genomic instability induced by 137Cs γ-ray irradiation in CHL surviving cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study in parallel several possible manifestations of instability of surviving CHL cells after irradiation, namely the frequencies of mutation at locus, micronuclei and apoptosis. Methods: The frequencies of mutation at HGPRT locus, micronuclei and apoptosis were assayed at various times in surviving cells irradiated with γ-rays. Results: The surviving cells showed a persistently increased frequency of mutation at the HGPRT locus after irradiation until 53 days. Mutant fraction as high as 10-4 was scored, tens of times higher than those assayed in control cells studied in parallel. The frequency of bi nucleated cells with micronuclei determined within 24 hours after irradiation increased with dose and reached a peak value of (26.58 +- 2.48)% at 3 Gy, decreasing at higher doses to a plateau around 20%. The micronucleus frequency decreased steeply to about (14.47 +- 2.39)% within the first 3 days post-irradiation, and fluctuated at around 10% up to 56 days post-irradiation. The delayed efficiency of irradiated cells was significantly decreased. The frequency of apoptosis peaked about (24.90 +- 4.72)% at 10 Gy 48 h post-irradiation (γ-ray dose between 3-10 Gy) and then decreased to about 12% within 3 days. It was significantly higher than in control cells until 14 days. Conclusions: It shows that genomic instability induced by radiation can be transmitted to the progeny of surviving cells and may take many forms of expression such as lethal mutation, chromosome aberrations, gene mutation, etc

  13. Radiation survival of cells from spheroids grown in different oxygen concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The position of the internal, chronically hypoxic cells in spheroids was varied by alterations in the oxygen concentration in the growth medium. Such alterations were expected to cause large changes in the size of the radiobiologically hypoxic fraction. This was tested by growing and irradiating spheroids in oxygen concentrations between 5 and 20.3%, ensuring that the irradiation and growth conditions were as similar as possible. The survival curves appeared to be linear below a surviving fraction of 3 x 10-2, and the slopes were intermediate between the slopes of control curves for cells from spheroids irradiated in nitrogen or when fully oxygenated. Thus direct estimates of the hypoxic fractions could not be made. Two models of oxygen diffusion might explain the data. One model assumes that a large fraction of cells was fully hypoxic (radiobiologically) and that these internal, G1-confined, chronically hypoxic cells had a lower inherent radioresistance than the outer proliferating cells. Evidence was presented which indicated that this model was unlikely to be correct. The other model assumes that the inherent radioresistance was equal throughout the spheroid, and that the innermost cells died before the oxygen concentration was reduced sufficiently to cause full hypoxic protection. Theoretical survival curves based on this model were generated using the measured geometries ofthe spheroids and multitarget single-hit survival theory. Acceptable agreement with the postulate that the innermost cells of spheroids die at between 0.2 and 0.4% oxygen was obtained. These data may have implications regarding the relative contributions of chronic and acute hypoxia to the fraction of hypoxic cells in tumors

  14. Stem Cell Derived Extracellular Matrix Enables Survival and Multi Lineage Differentiation within Superporous Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Köllmer, Melanie; Keskar, Vandana; Hauk, Thomas G.; Collins, John M.; Russell, Brenda; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel surfaces resist protein adsorption and are generally thought to be unsuitable for anchorage dependent cells to adhere. Intriguingly, our previous findings revealed that PEGDA superporous hydrogel scaffolds (SPHs) allow anchorage of bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and support their long term survival. Therefore, we hypothesized that the physicochemical characteristics of the scaffold impart properties that c...

  15. Pancreatic β-cells activate a JunB/ATF3-dependent survival pathway during inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurzov, E N; Barthson, J; Marhfour, I;

    2012-01-01

    Destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells by local autoimmune inflammation is a hallmark of type 1 diabetes. Histochemical analysis of pancreases from non-obese diabetic mice indicated activation of the transcription factor JunB/AP-1 (activator protein-1) after autoimmune infiltration of...... primary β-cells and human islet cells against pro-inflammatory mediators. These results were confirmed in genetically modified islets derived from Ubi-JunB transgenic mice. Our findings identify ATF3 as a novel downstream target of JunB in the survival mechanism of β-cells under inflammatory stress....

  16. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C.; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1 −/− mice limits...

  17. PIAS1-FAK Interaction Promotes the Survival and Progression of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerfiz D. Constanzo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The sequence of genomic alterations acquired by cancer cells during tumor progression and metastasis is poorly understood. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that integrates cytoskeleton remodeling, mitogenic signaling and cell survival. FAK has previously been reported to undergo nuclear localization during cell migration, cell differentiation and apoptosis. However, the mechanism behind FAK nuclear accumulation and its contribution to tumor progression has remained elusive. We report that amplification of FAK and the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS1 gene loci frequently co-occur in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells, and that both gene products are enriched in a subset of primary NSCLCs. We demonstrate that endogenous FAK and PIAS1 proteins interact in the cytoplasm and the cell nucleus of NSCLC cells. Ectopic expression of PIAS1 promotes proteolytic cleavage of the FAK C-terminus, focal adhesion maturation and FAK nuclear localization. Silencing of PIAS1 deregulates focal adhesion turnover, increases susceptibility to apoptosis in vitro and impairs tumor xenograft formation in vivo. Nuclear FAK in turn stimulates gene transcription favoring DNA repair, cell metabolism and cytoskeleton regulation. Consistently, ablation of FAK by CRISPR/Cas9 editing, results in basal DNA damage, susceptibility to ionizing radiation and impaired oxidative phosphorylation. Our findings provide insight into a mechanism regulating FAK cytoplasm-nuclear distribution and demonstrate that FAK activity in the nucleus promotes NSCLC survival and progression by increasing cell-ECM interaction and DNA repair regulation.

  18. Mga is essential for the survival of pluripotent cells during peri-implantation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washkowitz, Andrew J; Schall, Caroline; Zhang, Kun; Wurst, Wolfgang; Floss, Thomas; Mager, Jesse; Papaioannou, Virginia E

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance and control of pluripotency is of great interest in stem cell biology. The dual specificity T-box/basic-helix-loop-helix-zipper transcription factor Mga is expressed in the pluripotent cells of the inner cell mass (ICM) and epiblast of the peri-implantation mouse embryo, but its function has not been investigated previously. Here, we use a loss-of-function allele and RNA knockdown to demonstrate that Mga depletion leads to the death of proliferating pluripotent ICM cells in vivo and in vitro, and the death of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro. Additionally, quiescent pluripotent cells lacking Mga are lost during embryonic diapause. Expression of Odc1, the rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of ornithine into putrescine in the synthesis of polyamines, is reduced in Mga mutant cells, and the survival of mutant ICM cells as well as ESCs is rescued in culture by the addition of exogenous putrescine. These results suggest a mechanism whereby Mga influences pluripotent cell survival through regulation of the polyamine pool in pluripotent cells of the embryo, whether they are in a proliferative or quiescent state. PMID:25516968

  19. Laser Phototherapy Enhances Mesenchymal Stem Cells Survival in Response to the Dental Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Márcia Alves Diniz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the influence of laser phototherapy (LPT on the survival of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs submitted to substances leached from dental adhesives. Method. MSCs were isolated and characterized. Oral mucosa fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells were used as comparative controls. Cultured medium conditioned with two adhesive systems was applied to the cultures. Cell monolayers were exposed or not to LPT. Laser irradiations were performed using a red laser (GaAlAs, 780 nm, 0.04 cm2, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2, 0.4 J, 10 seconds, 1 point, 10 J/cm2. After 24 h, cell viability was assessed by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide reduction assay. Data were statistically compared by ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test (P<0.05. Results. Different cell types showed different viabilities in response to the same materials. Substances leached from adhesives were less cytotoxic to MSCs than to other cell types. Substances leached from Clearfil SE Bond were highly cytotoxic to all cell types tested, except to the MSCs when applied polymerized and in association with LPT. LPT was unable to significantly increase the cell viability of fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells submitted to the dental adhesives. Conclusion. LPT enhances mesenchymal stem cells survival in response to substances leached from dental adhesives.

  20. Human ribosomal protein L9 is a Bax suppressor that promotes cell survival in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Rawan; Sheibani, Sara; Gharib, Nada; Lapointe, Jason F; Horowitz, Avital; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    The identification of a human ribosomal protein L9 (hRPL9) cDNA as a sequence capable of suppressing the lethal effects of heterologously expressed murine Bax in yeast led us to investigate its antiapoptotic potential. Using growth and viability assays, we show that yeast cells heterologously expressing hRPL9 are resistant to the growth inhibitory and lethal effects of exogenously supplied copper, indicating that it has pro-survival properties. To explore potential mechanisms, we used yeast mutants defective in all three types of programmed cell death (apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy). The ability to retain pro-survival function in all the mutants suggests that hRPL9 may regulate a common pro-death process. In contrast, the yeast RPL9 orthologues, RPL9A and RPL9B, have opposite effects when overexpressed in yeast. In effect, instead of showing resistance to stress, RPL9A and RPL9B overexpressing cells show reduced cell growth. Further analysis indicates that the effects of overexpressed RPL9A and RPL9B are not in themselves lethal, instead, they serve to increase cell doubling time. Thus, yeast RPL9s are more representative of RPs whose extra-ribosomal function is similar to that of tumor suppressors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that RPL9 represents a species- and sequence-specific regulator of cell growth and survival. PMID:24305165

  1. Dendritic cell maturation and survival are differentially regulated by TNF receptors 1 and 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maney, Nicola J.; Reynolds, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of dendritic cells (DC) to regulate adaptive immunity is controlled by their maturation state and lifespan. Although TNF is a well-known maturation and survival factor for DC, the role of the two TNF receptors (TNFR), TNFR1 and TNFR2, in mediating these effects is poorly understood. By using unique TNF variants that selectively signal through TNFR1 and/or TNFR2, we demonstrate differential functions of TNFR in human monocyte-derived and blood CD1c+ DC. Activation of TNFR1, but not TNFR2, efficiently induced DC maturation, as defined by enhanced expression of cell surface maturation markers (CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR) as well as enhanced T-cell stimulatory capacity. In contrast, both TNFR1 and TNFR2 significantly protected DC against cell death indicating that innate signals can promote DC survival in the absence of DC maturation. We further show differential activation of NFκB signaling pathways by the TNFR: TNFR1 activated both the p65 and p52 pathways, whereas TNFR2 triggered p52, but not p65 activation. Accordingly, the p65 NFκB pathway only played a role in the pro-survival effect of TNFR1. However, cell death protection through both TNFR was mediated through the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL pathway. Together, our data show that TNFR1-, but not TNFR2-signaling induces DC maturation, whereas DC survival can be mediated independently through both TNFR. These data indicate differential but partly overlapping responses through TNFR1 and TNFR2 in both inflammatory and conventional DC, and demonstrate that DC maturation and DC survival can be regulated through independent signaling pathways. PMID:25288570

  2. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2016-01-01

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence) in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress) DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E2, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional “repair and survive, or die” hypothesis. PMID:27187358

  3. Hypoxic preconditioning of mesenchymal stromal cells induces metabolic changes, enhances survival, and promotes cell retention in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Julie; Lakatos, Kinga; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Stewart, Heather; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Nolta, Jan A; Fierro, Fernando A

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells/multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) are promising therapeutics for a variety of conditions. However, after transplantation, cell retention remains extremely challenging. Given that many hypoxic signals are transitory and that the therapeutic administration of MSCs is typically into tissues that are normally hypoxic, we studied the effect of hypoxic preconditioning (HP) prior to new exposure to hypoxia. We show that preincubation for 2 days or more in 1% oxygen reduces serum deprivation-mediated cell death, as observed by higher cell numbers and lower incorporation of EthD-III and Annexin V. Consistently, HP-MSCs expressed significantly lower levels of cytochrome c and heme oxygenase 1 as compared to controls. Most importantly, HP-MSCs showed enhanced survival in vivo after intramuscular injection into immune deficient NOD/SCID-IL2Rgamma(-/-) mice. Interestingly, HP-MSCs consume glucose and secrete lactate at a slower rate than controls, possibly promoting cell survival, as glucose remains available to the cells for longer periods of time. In addition, we compared the metabolome of HP-MSCs to controls, before and after hypoxia and serum deprivation, and identified several possible mediators for HP-mediated cell survival. Overall, our findings suggest that preincubation of MSCs for 2 days or more in hypoxia induces metabolic changes that yield higher retention after transplantation. PMID:25702874

  4. Dendritic cell derived IL-2 inhibits survival of terminally mature cells via an autocrine signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachander, Akhila; Nabti, Sabrina; Sobota, Radoslaw M; Foo, Shihui; Zolezzi, Francesca; Lee, Bernett T K; Poidinger, Michael; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2015-05-01

    DCs are crucial for sensing pathogens and triggering immune response. Upon activation by pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) ligands, GM-CSF myeloid DCs (GM-DCs) secrete several cytokines, including IL-2. DC IL-2 has been shown to be important for innate and adaptive immune responses; however, IL-2 importance in DC physiology has never been demonstrated. Here, we show that autocrine IL-2 signaling is functional in murine GM-DCs in an early time window after PAMPs stimulation. IL-2 signaling selectively activates the JAK/STAT5 pathway by assembling holo-receptor complexes at the cell surface. Using the sensitivity of targeted mass spectrometry, we show conclusively that GM-DCs express CD122, the IL-2 receptor β-chain, at steady state. In myeloid DCs, this cytokine pathway inhibits survival of PAMP-matured GM-DCs which is crucial for maintaining immune tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. Our findings suggest that immune regulation by this novel autocrine signaling pathway can potentially be used in DC immunotherapy. PMID:25652593

  5. Molecular Imaging of Stem Cells: Tracking Survival, Biodistribution, Tumorigenicity, and Immunogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Gu, Wen-Yi Chen, Jay Gu, Paul Burridge, Joseph C. Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Being able to self-renew and differentiate into virtually all cell types, both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have exciting therapeutic implications for myocardial infarction, neurodegenerative disease, diabetes, and other disorders involving irreversible cell loss. However, stem cell biology remains incompletely understood despite significant advances in the field. Inefficient stem cell differentiation, difficulty in verifying successful delivery to the target organ, and problems with engraftment all hamper the transition from laboratory animal studies to human clinical trials. Although traditional histopathological techniques have been the primary approach for ex vivo analysis of stem cell behavior, these postmortem examinations are unable to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms in real time and in vivo. Fortunately, the advent of molecular imaging has led to unprecedented progress in understanding the fundamental behavior of stem cells, including their survival, biodistribution, immunogenicity, and tumorigenicity in the targeted tissues of interest. This review summarizes various molecular imaging technologies and how they have advanced the current understanding of stem cell survival, biodistribution, immunogenicity, and tumorigenicity.

  6. QHREDGS enhances tube formation, metabolism and survival of endothelial cells in collagen-chitosan hydrogels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W Miklas

    Full Text Available Cell survival in complex, vascularized tissues, has been implicated as a major bottleneck in advancement of therapies based on cardiac tissue engineering. This limitation motivates the search for small, inexpensive molecules that would simultaneously be cardio-protective and vasculogenic. Here, we present peptide sequence QHREDGS, based upon the fibrinogen-like domain of angiopoietin-1, as a prime candidate molecule. We demonstrated previously that QHREDGS improved cardiomyocyte metabolism and mitigated serum starved apoptosis. In this paper we further demonstrate the potency of QHREDGS in its ability to enhance endothelial cell survival, metabolism and tube formation. When endothelial cells were exposed to the soluble form of QHREDGS, improvements in endothelial cell barrier functionality, nitric oxide production and cell metabolism (ATP levels in serum starved conditions were found. The functionality of the peptide was then examined when conjugated to collagen-chitosan hydrogel, a potential carrier for in vivo application. The presence of the peptide in the hydrogel mitigated paclitaxel induced apoptosis of endothelial cells in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the peptide modified hydrogels stimulated tube-like structure formation of encapsulated endothelial cells. When integrin αvβ3 or α5β1 were antibody blocked during cell encapsulation in peptide modified hydrogels, tube formation was abolished. Therefore, the dual protective nature of the novel peptide QHREDGS may position this peptide as an appealing augmentation for collagen-chitosan hydrogels that could be used for biomaterial delivered cell therapies in the settings of myocardial infarction.

  7. QHREDGS enhances tube formation, metabolism and survival of endothelial cells in collagen-chitosan hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklas, Jason W; Dallabrida, Susan M; Reis, Lewis A; Ismail, Nesreen; Rupnick, Maria; Radisic, Milica

    2013-01-01

    Cell survival in complex, vascularized tissues, has been implicated as a major bottleneck in advancement of therapies based on cardiac tissue engineering. This limitation motivates the search for small, inexpensive molecules that would simultaneously be cardio-protective and vasculogenic. Here, we present peptide sequence QHREDGS, based upon the fibrinogen-like domain of angiopoietin-1, as a prime candidate molecule. We demonstrated previously that QHREDGS improved cardiomyocyte metabolism and mitigated serum starved apoptosis. In this paper we further demonstrate the potency of QHREDGS in its ability to enhance endothelial cell survival, metabolism and tube formation. When endothelial cells were exposed to the soluble form of QHREDGS, improvements in endothelial cell barrier functionality, nitric oxide production and cell metabolism (ATP levels) in serum starved conditions were found. The functionality of the peptide was then examined when conjugated to collagen-chitosan hydrogel, a potential carrier for in vivo application. The presence of the peptide in the hydrogel mitigated paclitaxel induced apoptosis of endothelial cells in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the peptide modified hydrogels stimulated tube-like structure formation of encapsulated endothelial cells. When integrin αvβ3 or α5β1 were antibody blocked during cell encapsulation in peptide modified hydrogels, tube formation was abolished. Therefore, the dual protective nature of the novel peptide QHREDGS may position this peptide as an appealing augmentation for collagen-chitosan hydrogels that could be used for biomaterial delivered cell therapies in the settings of myocardial infarction. PMID:24013716

  8. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kover, Karen, E-mail: kkover@cmh.edu [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa [Kansas City University Medical Biosciences, Kansas City, MO (United States); Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V. [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States)

    2015-06-19

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose

  9. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H2O2 assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H2O2 levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced TXNIP expression

  10. Cell survival and growth delay in rat R-1 tumours after radiation and vinblastine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rat R-1 rhabdomyosarcoma with a capacity for colony growth in vitro after excision of the tumour and dissociation by a trypsin method was used to investigate the effectiveness of radio-chemotherapy. Growth delay data were compared with data on survival of cells derived from tumours treated in situ. An excess in growth delay was observed when vinblastine (1.5 mg/kg) was given at intervals of 0.3 to 2 d after or 4 d before a dose of 20 Gy of X-rays. Cell survival data indicated that the maximum effectiveness of the drug treatment and the combined treatment (vinblastine and a dose of 10 Gy) can be assessed 2 to 3 d after treatment. The fractions of surviving cells determined after combined therapy at 0,1 and 2 d intervals were not significantly different from the fractions expected on the basis of simple multiplication of the fractions surviving individual treatments. The data suggested that the excess in tumour growth delay observed cannot be accounted for by co-operative interaction of the doses of radiation and drug. (author)

  11. DNA damage and repair in relation to mammalian cell survival implications for microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number and dose dependence of DSBs, measured with greatly improved precision in mammalian cells, are in accord with the Chadwick-Leenhouts model and suggest that approximately one DSB per cell causes reproductive death. The rate and activation energy for SSB repair agree with those measured for the critical sublesion by studies of survival at low dose rate. The data indicate that SSBs may interact in the cell to yield a DSB at up to approximately 250 base pairs separation. These findings may provide a basis for bringing the theory of dual radiation action, the Chadwick-Leenhouts molecular model, and survival and stand break measurements into mutual agreement, a development which may greatly benefit the study of radiobiology, and particularly of microdosimetry

  12. Evidence for the involvement of NOD2 in regulating colonic epithelial cell growth and survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheena M Cruickshank; Louise Wakenshaw; John Cardone; Peter D Howdle; Peter J Murray; Simon R Carding

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the function of NOD2 in colonic epithelial cells (CEC).METHODS: A combination of in vivo and in vitro analyses of epithelial cell turnover in the presence and absence of a functional NOD2 protein and, in response to enteric Salmonella typhimurium infection, were used. shRNA interference was also used to investigate the consequences of knocking down NOD2 gene expression on the growth and survival of colorectal carcinoma cell lines.RESULTS: In the colonic mucosa the highest levels of NOD2 expression were in proliferating crypt epithelial cells. Muramyl dipeptide (MDP), that is recognized by NOD2, promoted CEC growth in vitro. By contrast, the growth of NOD2-deficient CECs was impaired. In vivo CEC proliferation was also reduced and apoptosis increased in Nod2-/- mice, which were also evident following enteric Salmonella infection. Furthermore, neutralization of NOD2 mRNA expression in human colonic carcinoma cells by shRNA interference resulted in decreased survival due to increased levels of apoptosis.CONCLUSION: These findings are consistent with the involvement of NOD2 protein in promoting CEC growth and survival. Defects in proliferation by CECs in cases of CD may contribute to the underlying pathology of disrupted intestinal homeostasis and excessive inflammation.

  13. Activated H-Ras regulates hematopoietic cell survival by modulating Survivin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survivin expression and Ras activation are regulated by hematopoietic growth factors. We investigated whether activated Ras could circumvent growth factor-regulated Survivin expression and if a Ras/Survivin axis mediates growth factor independent survival and proliferation in hematopoietic cells. Survivin expression is up-regulated by IL-3 in Ba/F3 and CD34+ cells and inhibited by the Ras inhibitor, farnesylthiosalicylic acid. Over-expression of constitutively activated H-Ras (CA-Ras) in Ba/F3 cells blocked down-modulation of Survivin expression, G0/G1 arrest, and apoptosis induced by IL-3 withdrawal, while dominant-negative (DN) H-Ras down-regulated Survivin. Survivin disruption by DN T34A Survivin blocked CA-Ras-induced IL-3-independent cell survival and proliferation; however, it did not affect CA-Ras-mediated enhancement of S-phase, indicating that the anti-apoptotic activity of CA-Ras is Survivin dependent while its S-phase enhancing effect is not. These results indicate that CA-Ras modulates Survivin expression independent of hematopoietic growth factors and that a CA-Ras/Survivin axis regulates survival and proliferation of transformed hematopoietic cells

  14. Stem cell factor expression after renal ischemia promotes tubular epithelial survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geurt Stokman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal ischemia leads to apoptosis of tubular epithelial cells and results in decreased renal function. Tissue repair involves re-epithelialization of the tubular basement membrane. Survival of the tubular epithelium following ischemia is therefore important in the successful regeneration of renal tissue. The cytokine stem cell factor (SCF has been shown to protect the tubular epithelium against apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a mouse model for renal ischemia/reperfusion injury, we studied how expression of c-KIT on tubular epithelium and its ligand SCF protect cells against apoptosis. Administration of SCF specific antisense oligonucleotides significantly decreased specific staining of SCF following ischemia. Reduced SCF expression resulted in impaired renal function, increased tubular damage and increased tubular epithelial apoptosis, independent of inflammation. In an in vitro hypoxia model, stimulation of tubular epithelial cells with SCF activated survival signaling and decreased apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate an important role for c-KIT and SCF in mediating tubular epithelial cell survival via an autocrine pathway.

  15. The effect of comorbidity on stage-specific survival in resected non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Jakobsen, Erik; Krasnik, Mark; Linklater, Karen M; Mellemgaard, Anders; Møller, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the effect of comorbidity on stage-specific survival in resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.......To quantify the effect of comorbidity on stage-specific survival in resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients....

  16. Staying in Shape: the Impact of Cell Shape on Bacterial Survival in Diverse Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Desirée C; Blair, Kris M; Salama, Nina R

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria display an abundance of cellular forms and can change shape during their life cycle. Many plausible models regarding the functional significance of cell morphology have emerged. A greater understanding of the genetic programs underpinning morphological variation in diverse bacterial groups, combined with assays of bacteria under conditions that mimic their varied natural environments, from flowing freshwater streams to diverse human body sites, provides new opportunities to probe the functional significance of cell shape. Here we explore shape diversity among bacteria, at the levels of cell geometry, size, and surface appendages (both placement and number), as it relates to survival in diverse environments. Cell shape in most bacteria is determined by the cell wall. A major challenge in this field has been deconvoluting the effects of differences in the chemical properties of the cell wall and the resulting cell shape perturbations on observed fitness changes. Still, such studies have begun to reveal the selective pressures that drive the diverse forms (or cell wall compositions) observed in mammalian pathogens and bacteria more generally, including efficient adherence to biotic and abiotic surfaces, survival under low-nutrient or stressful conditions, evasion of mammalian complement deposition, efficient dispersal through mucous barriers and tissues, and efficient nutrient acquisition. PMID:26864431

  17. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT29 and SW620 express higher levels of a splice variant of

  18. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paquet Éric R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Methods Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Results Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT

  19. Corticosteroids reverse cytokine-induced block of survival and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Romy

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL is a frequent complication of preterm delivery. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α released from astrocytes and microglia activated by infection or ischemia have previously been shown to impair survival and maturation of oligodendrocyte progenitors and could thus be considered as potential factors contributing to the generation of this disease. The first goal of the present study was to investigate whether exposure of oligodendrocyte precursors to these cytokines arrests the maturation of ion currents in parallel to its effects on myelin proteins and morphological maturation. Secondly, in the search for agents, that can protect differentiating oligodendrocyte precursor cells from cytokine-induced damage we investigated effects of coapplications of corticosteroids with proinflammatory cytokines on the subsequent survival and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Methods To exclude influences from factors released from other cell types purified cultures of oligodendrocyte precursors were exposed to cytokines and/or steroids and allowed to differentiate for further 6 days in culture. Changes in membrane surface were investigated with capacitance recordings and Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy. Na+- and K+- currents were investigated using whole cell patch clamp recordings. The expression of myelin specific proteins was investigated using western blots and the precursor cells were identified using immunostaining with A2B5 antibodies. Results Surviving IFN-γ and TNF-α treated cells continued to maintain voltage-activated Na+- and K+ currents characteristic for the immature cells after 6 days in differentiation medium. Corticosterone, dihydrocorticosterone and, most prominently dexamethasone, counteracted the deleterious effects of IFN-γ and TNF-α on cell survival, A2B5-immunostaining and expression of myelin basic

  20. Associations of ATM Polymorphisms With Survival in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are associated with survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy or surgery only. Methods and Materials: Four tagSNPs of ATM were genotyped in 412 individuals with clinical stage III or IV ESCC receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy, and in 388 individuals with stage I, II, or III ESCC treated with surgery only. Overall survival time of ESCC among different genotypes was estimated by Kaplan-Meier plot, and the significance was examined by log-rank test. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC among different genotypes were computed by a Cox proportional regression model. Results: We found 2 SNPs, rs664143 and rs664677, associated with survival time of ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy. Individuals with the rs664143A allele had poorer median survival time compared with the rs664143G allele (14.0 vs 20.0 months), with the HR for death being 1.45 (95% CI 1.12-1.89). Individuals with the rs664677C allele also had worse median survival time than those with the rs664677T allele (14.0 vs 23.5 months), with the HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.18-2.08). Stratified analysis showed that these associations were present in both stage III and IV cancer and different radiation therapy techniques. Significant associations were also found between the SNPs and locosregional progression or progression-free survival. No association between these SNPs and survival time was detected in ESCC patients treated with surgery only. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ATM polymorphisms might serve as independent biomarkers for predicting prognosis in ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy

  1. The influence of social support on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation survival: a systematic review of literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Beattie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hematopoietic Stem cell Transplantation (HSCT can negatively impact the psychosocial well-being of the patient. Social support is a complex term that has been variably used to encompass perceived and objective support, including caregiver presence. Social support has been associated with superior psychosocial outcomes; however the influence of social support on HSCT survival remains unclear. We sought to summarize the literature on the influence of social support on HSCT survival. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, COCHRANE, CINAHL, AND PSYCINFO WERE SEARCHED USING THE FOLLOWING SEARCH CATEGORIES/CONCEPTS: 1 HSCT, 2 Social support, 3 Caregiver, 4 Survival, and 5 Treatment outcomes. RESULTS: We identified 6 relevant studies: 4 publications, 1 dissertation, and 1 abstract. Three studies were retrospective and 3, prospective. Sample size ranged between 92-272 with a mean/median patient age between 30-55 yrs. The duration of follow-up ranged between 13.3-48 months. Social support was measured inconsistently: 2 by retrospective investigator assessment, 2 as patients' perceived support, 1 as caregiver presence, and 1 included caregiver presence and retrospective investigator assessment. The 4 published studies and 1 abstract demonstrate an association between better social support and survival. However, the unpublished dissertation, with the largest sample size found no association. CONCLUSIONS: There is a paucity of evidence examining social support with HSCT survival. Available studies are older, with the most recent publication in 2005. A heterogeneous group of HSCT patients were studied with variable follow-up times. Further, covariates were variably considered in HSCT survival analyses and we suggest that there may be publication bias, given the negative unpublished study with the largest sample size. Prospective studies using validated scales are necessary to better assess the influence of social support on HSCT mortality. Given the potential

  2. Associations of ATM Polymorphisms With Survival in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Zhongli [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhang, Wencheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhou, Yuling; Yu, Dianke; Chen, Xiabin; Chang, Jiang; Qiao, Yan; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Ying; Wu, Chen [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Xiao, Zefen, E-mail: xiaozefen@sina.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Tan, Wen, E-mail: tanwen@cicams.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); and others

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are associated with survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy or surgery only. Methods and Materials: Four tagSNPs of ATM were genotyped in 412 individuals with clinical stage III or IV ESCC receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy, and in 388 individuals with stage I, II, or III ESCC treated with surgery only. Overall survival time of ESCC among different genotypes was estimated by Kaplan-Meier plot, and the significance was examined by log-rank test. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC among different genotypes were computed by a Cox proportional regression model. Results: We found 2 SNPs, rs664143 and rs664677, associated with survival time of ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy. Individuals with the rs664143A allele had poorer median survival time compared with the rs664143G allele (14.0 vs 20.0 months), with the HR for death being 1.45 (95% CI 1.12-1.89). Individuals with the rs664677C allele also had worse median survival time than those with the rs664677T allele (14.0 vs 23.5 months), with the HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.18-2.08). Stratified analysis showed that these associations were present in both stage III and IV cancer and different radiation therapy techniques. Significant associations were also found between the SNPs and locosregional progression or progression-free survival. No association between these SNPs and survival time was detected in ESCC patients treated with surgery only. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ATM polymorphisms might serve as independent biomarkers for predicting prognosis in ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy.

  3. Survival-related DNA repair phenomena in cultured rat-kangaroo cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cultured cells (line PtK-2) from the marsupial mammal rat-kangaroo, or potoroo (Potorous tridactylis), which photoreactivate (PR) both UV-induced dimers and lethality, excise few dimers, and are only slightly sensitized by post-UV exposure to caffeine, were subjected to caffeine and hydroxyurea (HU) treatments during the 30-min PR period. It was found that neither caffeine nor HU inhibited PR of lethality as measured by colony-forming ability. Further, the cells exhibited no photoprotective properties and 3 mM caffeine potentiated the same slight survival decrease in both photoreactivated and unphotoreactivated cells

  4. Sphingosine Kinase Expression Increases Intracellular Sphingosine-1-Phosphate and Promotes Cell Growth and Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Olivera, Ana; Kohama, Takafumi; Edsall, Lisa; Nava, Victor; Cuvillier, Olivier; Poulton, Samantha; Spiegel, Sarah

    1999-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (SPP) is a bioactive lipid that has recently been identified as the ligand for the EDG family of G protein–coupled cell surface receptors. However, the mitogenic and survival effects of exogenous SPP may not correlate with binding to cell-surface receptors (Van Brocklyn, J.R., M.J. Lee, R. Menzeleev, A. Olivera, L. Edsall, O. Cuvillier, D.M. Thomas, P.J.P. Coopman, S. Thangada, T. Hla, and S. Spiegel. 1998. J. Cell Biol. 142:229–240). The recent cloning of sphingosine ...

  5. Adult neural precursor cells form connexin-dependent networks that improve their survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravella, Ajaya; Ringstedt, Thomas; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Pandolfo, Massimo; Herlenius, Eric

    2015-10-21

    Establishment of cellular networks and calcium homeostasis are essential for embryonic stem cell proliferation and differentiation. We also hypothesized that adult neural progenitor cells form functional cellular networks relevant for their development. We isolated neuronal progenitor cells from the subventricular zone of 5-week-old mice to investigate the role of gap junctions, calcium homeostasis, and cellular networks in cell differentiation and survival. Western blotting and reverse transcription-PCR showed that the cells expressed the gap junction components connexin 26, 36, 43, and 45, and that expression of connexin 43 increased in early (8 days) differentiated cells. Transmission electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry also indicated that gap junctions were present. Scrape-loading experiments showed dye transfer between cells that could be prevented by gapjunction blockers; thus, functional intercellular gap junctions had been established. However, dye transfer was four times stronger in differentiated cultures, correlating with the increased connexin 43 expression. During time-lapse calcium imaging, both differentiated and undifferentiated cultures showed spontaneous calcium activity that was reduced by gap junction blockers. Cross-correlation analysis of the calcium recordings showed that the cells were interconnected through gap junctions and that the early-differentiated cells were organized in small-world networks. Gap junction blockers did not affect proliferation and differentiation, but resulted in twice as many apoptotic cells. mRNAi knockdown of connexin 43 also doubled the number of apoptotic cells. We conclude that adult neural progenitor cells form networks in vitro that are strengthened during early differentiation by increased expression of connexin 43. The networks are functional and improve cell survival. PMID:26351758

  6. A H2S-Nampt Dependent Energetic Circuit Is Critical to Survival and Cytoprotection from Damage in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reiko Sanokawa-Akakura; Ostrakhovitch, Elena A.; Shin Akakura; Scott Goodwin; Siamak Tabibzadeh

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that cancer cells that recover from damage exhibit increased aerobic glycolysis, however, the molecular mechanism by which cancer cells survive the damage and show increased aerobic glycolysis remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that diverse cancer cells that survive hypoxic or oxidative damage show rapid cell proliferation, and develop tolerance to damage associated with increased production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) which drives up-regulation of nicotinamide phosp...

  7. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kai [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Shandong Province (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Song, Yong [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Department of Stomatology, Liu Zhou People' s Hospital, Guangxi (China); Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Liu, Ke, E-mail: liuke.1999@aliyun.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck oncology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Shang, Zheng-jun, E-mail: shangzhengjun@hotmail.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck oncology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China)

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  8. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo

  9. The B-cell receptor orchestrates environment-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance in B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, K H; Tao, J

    2014-08-01

    Specific niches within the lymphoma tumor microenvironment (TME) provide sanctuary for subpopulations of tumor cells through stromal cell-tumor cell interactions. These interactions notably dictate growth, response to therapy and resistance of residual malignant B cells to therapeutic agents. This minimal residual disease (MRD) remains a major challenge in the treatment of B-cell malignancies and contributes to subsequent disease relapse. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling has emerged as essential mediator of B-cell homing, survival and environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR). Central to EMDR are chemokine- and integrin-mediated interactions between lymphoma and the TME. Further, stromal cell-B cell adhesion confers a sustained BCR signaling leading to chemokine and integrin activation. Recently, the inhibitors of BCR signaling have garnered a substantial clinical interest because of their effectiveness in B-cell disorders. The efficacy of these agents is, at least in part, attributed to attenuation of BCR-dependent lymphoma-TME interactions. In this review, we discuss the pivotal role of BCR signaling in the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of TME-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance. PMID:24037527

  10. Bmi1 overexpression in the cerebellar granule cell lineage of mice affects cell proliferation and survival without initiating medulloblastoma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourinaz Behesti

    2013-01-01

    BMI1 is a potent inducer of neural stem cell self-renewal and neural progenitor cell proliferation during development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It is overexpressed in numerous human cancers – including medulloblastomas, in which its functional role is unclear. We generated transgenic mouse lines with targeted overexpression of Bmi1 in the cerebellar granule cell lineage, a cell type that has been shown to act as a cell of origin for medulloblastomas. Overexpression of Bmi1 in granule cell progenitors (GCPs led to a decrease in cerebellar size due to decreased GCP proliferation and repression of the expression of cyclin genes, whereas Bmi1 overexpression in postmitotic granule cells improved cell survival in response to stress by altering the expression of genes in the mitochondrial cell death pathway and of Myc and Lef-1. Although no medulloblastomas developed in ageing cohorts of transgenic mice, crosses with Trp53−/− mice resulted in a low incidence of medulloblastoma formation. Furthermore, analysis of a large collection of primary human medulloblastomas revealed that tumours with a BMI1high TP53low molecular profile are significantly enriched in Group 4 human medulloblastomas. Our data suggest that different levels and timing of Bmi1 overexpression yield distinct cellular outcomes within the same cellular lineage. Importantly, Bmi1 overexpression at the GCP stage does not induce tumour formation, suggesting that BMI1 overexpression in GCP-derived human medulloblastomas probably occurs during later stages of oncogenesis and might serve to enhance tumour cell survival.

  11. Aiolos collaborates with Blimp-1 to regulate the survival of multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, K-H; Su, S-T; Chen, C-Y; Hsu, P-H; Huang, S-Y; Wu, W-J; Chen, M-J M; Chen, H-Y; Wu, P-C; Lin, F-R; Tsai, M-D; Lin, K-I

    2016-07-01

    The transcriptional repressor B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1) has crucial roles in the control of plasma cell differentiation and in maintaining survival of plasma cells. However, how Blimp-1 ensures the survival of plasma cell malignancy, multiple myeloma (MM), has remained elusive. Here we identified Aiolos, an anti-apoptotic transcription factor of MM cells, as a Blimp-1-interacting protein by mass spectrometry. ChIP coupled with DNA microarray was used to profile the global binding of Aiolos and Blimp-1 to endogenous targets in MM cells, which revealed their co-binding to a large number of genes, including apoptosis-related genes. Accordingly, Blimp-1 and Aiolos regulate similar transcriptomes in MM cells. Analysis of the binding motifs for Blimp-1 and Aiolos uncovered a partial motif that was similar across sites for both proteins. Aiolos promotes the binding of Blimp-1 to target genes and thereby enhances Blimp-1-dependent transcriptional repression. Furthermore, treatment with an anti-MM agent, lenalidomide, caused ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of Blimp-1, leading to the de-repression of a new Blimp-1 direct target, CULLIN 4A (CUL4A), and reduced Aiolos levels. Accordingly, lenalidomide-induced cell death was partially rescued by reintroduction of Blimp-1 or knockdown of CUL4A. Thus, we demonstrated the functional impacts and underlying mechanisms of the interaction between Aiolos and Blimp-1 in maintaining MM cell survival. We also showed that interruption of Blimp-1/Aiolos regulatory pathways contributes to lenalidomide-mediated anti-MM activity. PMID:26823144

  12. Estimation of the initial slope of the cell survival curve after irradiation from micronucleus frequency in cytokinesis-blocked cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have already reported that the α/β ratio of the cell survival curve could be estimated from the micronucleus frequency in cytokinesis-blocked cells treated with cytochalasin-B after irradiation. In this paper, we investigate the direct relationship between the α value and the appearance of micronuclei. Cells of the SCCVII, RIF-1, EMT6, V-79, CHO, HeLa and human esophageal cancer cell lines were used for the study. Low-dose-rate irradiation was used to determine the α component of the relationship between dose and micronucleus frequency according to the linear-quadratic (LQ) model. A reduction of the dose rate from 3.09 to 0.0142 Gy/min correspondingly decreased the micronucleus frequency; however, the fraction of binucleate cells without micronuclei was not affected in SCCVII and RIF-1 cells. When this fraction was defined as the normal nuclear division fraction, it decreased exponentially as a function of radiation dose. Then dose vs normal nuclear division fraction (NNDF) was fitted as follows: -In NNDF = aD + C, where D is radiation dose in grays and C is constant. The slope of the dose vs normal nuclear division fraction was not affected by dose rate. The correlation was also explored between the slope (a) and the α value of the cell survival curve determined by the colony formation assay in cells of eight cell lines. These two values showed extremely high agreement: α = 1.01a + 0.00795 (r = 0.99, P < 0.01). This assay was applied to estimate the α value of the cell survival curve of human esophageal cancer cell lines established from surgical specimens. 13 refs., 5 figs

  13. A nanodosimetry-based linear-quadratic model of cell survival for mixed-LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new nanodosimetry-based linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell survival for mixed-LET radiations has been developed. The new model employs three physical quantities and three biological quantities. The three physical quantities are related to energy depositions at two nanometre scales, 5 nm and 25 nm. The three biological quantities are related to the lesion production and interaction probabilities and the lesion repair rate. The coefficients α and β of the LQ formula (αD + βD2) are explicitly expressed in terms of the three physical quantities and the three biological quantities. The new model is shown to be consistent with the previously published cell survival curves of V-79 cells. The advantage of this new model is that it can be conveniently adopted to estimate the iso-effect for radiotherapies that involve ionizing radiation of mixed LET. An example is given to estimate the cell survival fractions for a high-dose-rate mixed neutron and gamma-ray field from a 252Cf source

  14. A nanodosimetry-based linear-quadratic model of cell survival for mixed-LET radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.-K. Chris; Zhang, Xin

    2006-12-01

    A new nanodosimetry-based linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell survival for mixed-LET radiations has been developed. The new model employs three physical quantities and three biological quantities. The three physical quantities are related to energy depositions at two nanometre scales, 5 nm and 25 nm. The three biological quantities are related to the lesion production and interaction probabilities and the lesion repair rate. The coefficients α and β of the LQ formula (αD + βD2) are explicitly expressed in terms of the three physical quantities and the three biological quantities. The new model is shown to be consistent with the previously published cell survival curves of V-79 cells. The advantage of this new model is that it can be conveniently adopted to estimate the iso-effect for radiotherapies that involve ionizing radiation of mixed LET. An example is given to estimate the cell survival fractions for a high-dose-rate mixed neutron and gamma-ray field from a 252Cf source.

  15. A nanodosimetry-based linear-quadratic model of cell survival for mixed-LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C-K Chris; Zhang, Xin [Nuclear/Radiological Engineering/Medical Physics Program, Neely Research Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 900 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0425 (United States)

    2006-12-07

    A new nanodosimetry-based linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell survival for mixed-LET radiations has been developed. The new model employs three physical quantities and three biological quantities. The three physical quantities are related to energy depositions at two nanometre scales, 5 nm and 25 nm. The three biological quantities are related to the lesion production and interaction probabilities and the lesion repair rate. The coefficients {alpha} and {beta} of the LQ formula ({alpha}D + {beta}D{sup 2}) are explicitly expressed in terms of the three physical quantities and the three biological quantities. The new model is shown to be consistent with the previously published cell survival curves of V-79 cells. The advantage of this new model is that it can be conveniently adopted to estimate the iso-effect for radiotherapies that involve ionizing radiation of mixed LET. An example is given to estimate the cell survival fractions for a high-dose-rate mixed neutron and gamma-ray field from a {sup 252}Cf source.

  16. Notch1 regulated autophagy controls survival and suppressor activity of activated murine T-regulatory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, Nimi; Sarin, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Cell survival is one of several processes regulated by the Notch pathway in mammalian cells. Here we report functional outcomes of non-nuclear Notch signaling to activate autophagy, a conserved cellular response to nutrient stress, regulating survival in murine natural T-regulatory cells (Tregs), an immune subset controlling tolerance and inflammation. Induction of autophagy required ligand-dependent, Notch intracellular domain (NIC) activity, which controlled mitochondrial organization and survival of activated Tregs. Consistently, NIC immune-precipitated Beclin and Atg14, constituents of the autophagy initiation complex. Further, ectopic expression of an effector of autophagy (Atg3) or recombinant NIC tagged to a nuclear export signal (NIC-NES), restored autophagy and suppressor function in Notch1-/- Tregs. Furthermore, Notch1 deficiency in the Treg lineage resulted in immune hyperactivity, implicating Notch activity in Treg homeostasis. Notch1 integration with autophagy, revealed in these experiments, holds implications for Notch regulated cell-fate decisions governing differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14023.001 PMID:27267497

  17. Inhibition of Bcl-2 or IAP proteins does not provoke mutations in surviving cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mutagenicities of anti-cancer drugs were tested using HPRT, γH2AX and comet assays. • TRAIL, doxorubicin and etoposide were more mutagenic than BH3- or Smac-mimetics. • Physiologically achievable levels of the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 were not mutagenic. • High concentrations of ABT-737 provoked mutations via an off-target mechanism. • Even very high concentrations of IAP antagonists were not mutagenic. - Abstract: Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can cause permanent damage to the genomes of surviving cells, provoking severe side effects such as second malignancies in some cancer survivors. Drugs that mimic the activity of death ligands, or antagonise pro-survival proteins of the Bcl-2 or IAP families have yielded encouraging results in animal experiments and early phase clinical trials. Because these agents directly engage apoptosis pathways, rather than damaging DNA to indirectly provoke tumour cell death, we reasoned that they may offer another important advantage over conventional therapies: minimisation or elimination of side effects such as second cancers that result from mutation of surviving normal cells. Disappointingly, however, we previously found that concentrations of death receptor agonists like TRAIL that would be present in vivo in clinical settings provoked DNA damage in surviving cells. In this study, we used cell line model systems to investigate the mutagenic capacity of drugs from two other classes of direct apoptosis-inducing agents: the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 and the IAP antagonists LCL161 and AT-406. Encouragingly, our data suggest that IAP antagonists possess negligible genotoxic activity. Doses of ABT-737 that were required to damage DNA stimulated Bax/Bak-independent signalling and exceeded concentrations detected in the plasma of animals treated with this drug. These findings provide hope that cancer patients treated by BH3-mimetics or IAP antagonists may avoid mutation-related illnesses that afflict

  18. Inhibition of Bcl-2 or IAP proteins does not provoke mutations in surviving cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekhar, Tanmay M. [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia); Green, Maja M. [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia); Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Rayner, David M.; Miles, Mark A.; Cutts, Suzanne M. [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia); Hawkins, Christine J., E-mail: c.hawkins@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mutagenicities of anti-cancer drugs were tested using HPRT, γH2AX and comet assays. • TRAIL, doxorubicin and etoposide were more mutagenic than BH3- or Smac-mimetics. • Physiologically achievable levels of the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 were not mutagenic. • High concentrations of ABT-737 provoked mutations via an off-target mechanism. • Even very high concentrations of IAP antagonists were not mutagenic. - Abstract: Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can cause permanent damage to the genomes of surviving cells, provoking severe side effects such as second malignancies in some cancer survivors. Drugs that mimic the activity of death ligands, or antagonise pro-survival proteins of the Bcl-2 or IAP families have yielded encouraging results in animal experiments and early phase clinical trials. Because these agents directly engage apoptosis pathways, rather than damaging DNA to indirectly provoke tumour cell death, we reasoned that they may offer another important advantage over conventional therapies: minimisation or elimination of side effects such as second cancers that result from mutation of surviving normal cells. Disappointingly, however, we previously found that concentrations of death receptor agonists like TRAIL that would be present in vivo in clinical settings provoked DNA damage in surviving cells. In this study, we used cell line model systems to investigate the mutagenic capacity of drugs from two other classes of direct apoptosis-inducing agents: the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 and the IAP antagonists LCL161 and AT-406. Encouragingly, our data suggest that IAP antagonists possess negligible genotoxic activity. Doses of ABT-737 that were required to damage DNA stimulated Bax/Bak-independent signalling and exceeded concentrations detected in the plasma of animals treated with this drug. These findings provide hope that cancer patients treated by BH3-mimetics or IAP antagonists may avoid mutation-related illnesses that afflict

  19. A phospholipase A₂ isolated from Lachesis muta snake venom increases the survival of retinal ganglion cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Cunha, Karinne Cristinne; Fuly, André Lopes; de Araujo, Elizabeth Giestal

    2011-03-15

    We have previously showed that a phospholipase A₂ isolated from Lachesis muta snake venom and named LM-PLA₂-I displayed particular biological activities, as hemolysis, inhibition on platelet aggregation, edema induction and myotoxicity. In the present work, we evaluated the effect of LM-PLA₂-I on the survival of axotomized rat retinal ganglion cells kept in vitro, as well as its mechanism of action. Our results clearly showed that treatment with LM-PLA₂-I increased the survival of ganglion cells (100% when compared to control cultures) and the treatment of LM-PLA₂-I with p-bromophenacyl bromide abolished this effect. This result indicates that the effect of LM-PLA₂-I on ganglion cell survival is entirely dependent on its enzymatic activity and the generation of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) may be a prerequisite to the observed survival. In fact, commercial LPC mimicked the effect of LM-PLA₂-I upon ganglion cell survival. To investigate the mechanism of action of LM-PLA₂-I, cultures were treated with chelerythrine chloride, BAPTA-AM, rottlerin and also with an inhibitor of c-junc kinase (JNKi). Our results showed that rottlerin and JNK inhibitor abolished the LM-PLA₂-I on ganglion cell survival. Taken together, our results showed that LM-PLA₂-I and its enzymatic product, LPC promoted survival of retinal ganglion cells through the protein kinase C pathway and strongly suggest a possible role of the PLA₂ enzyme and LPC in controlling the survival of axotomized neuronal cells. PMID:21223976

  20. Propentofylline inhibits glioblastoma cell invasion and survival by targeting the TROY signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhruv, Harshil D; Roos, Alison; Tomboc, Patrick J; Tuncali, Serdar; Chavez, Ashley; Mathews, Ian; Berens, Michael E; Loftus, Joseph C; Tran, Nhan L

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary tumor of the CNS and carries a dismal prognosis. The aggressive invasion of GBM cells into the surrounding normal brain makes complete resection impossible, significantly increases resistance to the standard therapy regimen, and virtually assures tumor recurrence. Median survival for newly diagnosed GBM is 14.6 months and declines to 8 months for patients with recurrent GBM. New therapeutic strategies that target the molecular drivers of invasion are required for improved clinical outcome. We have demonstrated that TROY (TNFRSF19), a member of the TNFR super-family, plays an important role in GBM invasion and resistance. Knockdown of TROY expression inhibits GBM cell invasion, increases sensitivity to temozolomide, and prolongs survival in an intracranial xenograft model. Propentofylline (PPF), an atypical synthetic methylxanthine compound, has been extensively studied in Phase II and Phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia where it has demonstrated blood-brain permeability and minimal adverse side effects. Here we showed that PPF decreased GBM cell expression of TROY, inhibited glioma cell invasion, and sensitized GBM cells to TMZ. Mechanistically, PPF decreased glioma cell invasion by modulating TROY expression and downstream signaling, including AKT, NF-κB, and Rac1 activation. Thus, PPF may provide a pharmacologic approach to target TROY, inhibit cell invasion, and reduce therapeutic resistance in GBM. PMID:26559543

  1. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  2. Transcription factor KLF2 regulates homeostatic NK cell proliferation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabacal, Whitney; Pabbisetty, Sudheer K; Hoek, Kristen L; Cendron, Delphine; Guo, Yin; Maseda, Damian; Sebzda, Eric

    2016-05-10

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that recognize and lyse virally infected or transformed cells. This latter property is being pursued in clinics to treat leukemia with the hope that further breakthroughs in NK cell biology can extend treatments to other cancers. At issue is the ability to expand transferred NK cells and prolong their functionality within the context of a tumor. In terms of NK cell expansion and survival, we now report that Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) is a key transcription factor that underpins both of these events. Excision of Klf2 using gene-targeted mouse models promotes spontaneous proliferation of immature NK cells in peripheral tissues, a phenotype that is replicated under ex vivo conditions. Moreover, KLF2 imprints a homeostatic migration pattern on mature NK cells that allows these cells to access IL-15-rich microenvironments. KLF2 accomplishes this feat within the mature NK cell lineage via regulation of a subset of homing receptors that respond to homeostatic ligands while leaving constitutively expressed receptors that recognize inflammatory cytokines unperturbed. Under steady-state conditions, KLF2-deficient NK cells alter their expression of homeostatic homing receptors and subsequently undergo apoptosis due to IL-15 starvation. This novel mechanism has implications regarding NK cell contraction following the termination of immune responses including the possibility that retention of an IL-15 transpresenting support system is key to extending NK cell activity in a tumor environment. PMID:27114551

  3. Cooperation of B cells and T cells is required for survival of mice infected with vesicular stomatitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Nansen, A; Andersen, C; Johansen, J; Marker, O; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    1997-01-01

    some antiviral activity, but CD4+ T cells sufficed for survival and were required for optimal resistance. Consistent with this it was found that in nude mice a lethal outcome could be prevented by transfer of CD8-depleted cells from B cell-deficient mice. Thus our results clearly demonstrate that while......To define the role of T cells and B cells in resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection, knockout mice with different specific immune defects on an identical background were infected i.v. and the outcome of infection was compared; in this way a more complete picture of the relative...... importance of various host defence mechanisms could be obtained. Compared to T and B cell-deficient SCID mice which all succumbed from encephalitis within 5-9 days of infection, T cell-deficient nude mice generally lived longer, but within a period of approximately 1 month after challenge all died. In...

  4. Argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region in MIB-1 positive cells in non-small cell lung cancer: clinicopathological significance and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the relation between argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (AgNOR)-associated proteins and clinicopathological parameters and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 207 surgical specimens diagnosed as NSCLC were included in this study. Double-staining procedures were performed using antigen Ki-67 (clone MIB-1) and silver nitrate by immunohistochemical and AgNOR-staining methods. The AgNOR area in MIB-1-positive cells of NSCLC is related to clinicopathological parameters under the TNM (tumor, node, and metastasis) system. The survival of patients with small AgNOR area in MIB-1-positive cells is better than that of patients with large AgNOR area. Molecular, biological (AgNOR area in MIB-1-positive cells), and clinicopathological (greatest tumor dimension, metastases to regional lymph nodes, histology, and differentiation) parameters are independent prognostic factors of NSCLC. The AgNOR area in MIB-1-positive cells is related to clinicopathological parameters and survival in NSCLC

  5. All colonies of CHO-K1 cells surviving γ-irradiation contain non-viable cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses production of defective cells within clones arising from irradiated progenitor cells. It aims at answering the question whether lethal mutation result from a generalised effect which lowers the ability of all the progeny to divide successfully or whether it represents a late expressed but unique lethal defect induced by radiation which occurs in some cells only and which causes those cells only to cease dividing. Results obtained from autoradiographic analysis of cells within individual surviving colonies (i.e. containing more than 150 cells) suggests that some cells in all clones are not synthesizing DNA over a 9-h period and that the properties of non-synthesizing cells rises with increasing dose of radiation from less than 3% in controls to 80-85% after a progenitor dose of 12.5 Gy. because of the possibility that cells had longer division times post irradiation, these results were repeated using Ki67 antibody labelling, a technique that identifies cells which are in cycle. Results were similar. This suggests the non-labelled cells were not reproducing. Both techniques were also used to look at the % labelling of morphologically abnormal cells in colonies. Results suggested that up to 35% of these abnormal cells were actively cycling and about 20% were synthesizing DNA. Abnormal cells did not appear in subcultures of survivor progeny suggesting that they may have failed to replate successfully and may contribute to the lethally mutated population. The results are discussed in the context of their significance for survival curve analysis and for radiotherapy and radiation protection results. (author). 32 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  6. Rac1 selective activation improves retina ganglion cell survival and regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Lorenzetto

    Full Text Available In adult mammals, after optic nerve injury, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs do not regenerate their axons and most of them die by apoptosis within a few days. Recently, several strategies that activate neuronal intracellular pathways were proposed to prevent such degenerative processes. The rho-related small GTPase Rac1 is part of a complex, still not fully understood, intracellular signaling network, mediating in neurons many effects, including axon growth and cell survival. However, its role in neuronal survival and regeneration in vivo has not yet been properly investigated. To address this point we intravitreally injected selective cell-penetrating Rac1 mutants after optic nerve crush and studied the effect on RGC survival and axonal regeneration. We injected two well-characterized L61 constitutively active Tat-Rac1 fusion protein mutants, in which a second F37A or Y40C mutation confers selectivity in downstream signaling pathways. Results showed that, 15 days after crush, both mutants were able to improve survival and to prevent dendrite degeneration, while the one harboring the F37A mutation also improved axonal regeneration. The treatment with F37A mutant for one month did not improve the axonal elongation respect to 15 days. Furthermore, we found an increase of Pak1 T212 phosphorylation and ERK1/2 expression in RGCs after F37A treatment, whereas ERK1/2 was more activated in glial cells after Y40C administration. Our data suggest that the selective activation of distinct Rac1-dependent pathways could represent a therapeutic strategy to counteract neuronal degenerative processes in the retina.

  7. Influenza A virus survival in water is influenced by the origin species of the host cell

    OpenAIRE

    Shigematsu, Sayuri; Dublineau, Amélie; Sawoo, Olivier; Batéjat, Christophe; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Leclercq, India; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Background Influenza A viruses have an envelope made of a lipid bilayer and two surface glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin and the neuraminidase. The structure of the virus is directly dependent on the genetic makeup of the viral genome except the glycosylation moieties and the composition of the lipid bilayer. They both depend on the host cell and are in direct contact with the environment, such as air or water. Virus survival is important for virus transmission from contaminated waters in the...

  8. Influenza A virus survival in water is influenced by the origin species of the host cell

    OpenAIRE

    Shigematsu, Sayuri; Dublineau, Amélie; Sawoo, Olivier; Batéjat, Christophe; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Leclercq, India; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Background: Influenza A viruses have an envelope made of a lipid bilayer and two surface glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin and the neuraminidase. The structure of the virus is directly dependent on the genetic makeup of the viral genome except the glycosylation moieties and the composition of the lipid bilayer. They both depend on the host cell and are in direct contact with the environment, such as air or water. Virus survival is important for virus transmission from contaminated waters in th...

  9. 8-year survival in a patient with several recurrences of renal cell carcinoma after radical nephrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Shivam; Eldefrawy, Ahmed; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with a large renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who underwent cytoreductive nephrectomy utilizing liver mobilization techniques similar to those used in transplantation. Despite recurrent metastases, our patient continues to survive eight years later with several metastasectomies and adjuvant chemotherapy. We report the case of a 48-year-old Hispanic American man who presented with a 4-month history of an enlarging right upper quadrant abdominal mass and hematuria. C...

  10. QHREDGS Enhances Tube Formation, Metabolism and Survival of Endothelial Cells in Collagen-Chitosan Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Miklas, Jason W.; Dallabrida, Susan M.; Reis, Lewis A.; Nesreen Ismail; Maria Rupnick; Milica Radisic

    2013-01-01

    Cell survival in complex, vascularized tissues, has been implicated as a major bottleneck in advancement of therapies based on cardiac tissue engineering. This limitation motivates the search for small, inexpensive molecules that would simultaneously be cardio-protective and vasculogenic. Here, we present peptide sequence QHREDGS, based upon the fibrinogen-like domain of angiopoietin-1, as a prime candidate molecule. We demonstrated previously that QHREDGS improved cardiomyocyte metabolism an...

  11. Theranostic Imaging of the Kinases and Proteases that Modulate Cell Death and Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Howard H.; Yuan, Hushan; Josephson, Lee; Sosnovik, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Several signaling cascades are involved in cell death, with a significant amount of crosstalk between them. Despite the complexity of these cascades several key pro-survival and pro-death players have been identified. These include PI3-kinase, AKT and caspase-3. Here we review the approaches used to date to perform molecular imaging of these important targets. We focus in particular on approaches that include the possibility of modulating the activity of these kinases and proteases in a thera...

  12. Survival outcomes of First Nations patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (Poliquin 2014)

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Bree; Biron, Vincent L; Zhang, Han; Seikaly, Hadi; Côté, David WJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) is the most common head and neck cancer, affecting approximately 2000 Canadians yearly. Analysis of Canadian Cancer Registry data has shown that the incidence of oral cavity cancer is decreasing and survival outcomes are improving. There are significant health disparities in First Nations (FN) people in Canada. The incidence of cancer in FN groups is significantly lower when compared to the general population, but the cancer-related morbi...

  13. The effects of polyamines on the cell survival against γ-irradiation in polyamine deficient Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the possibility that the polyamine was involved in the survival of cells against γ-irradiation in E. coli at low doses using polyamine-deficient mutant strain, KL527. In 40 Gy, 80 Gy and 200 Gy irradiated group, Survival of cells increased by 62%, 44% and 30% respectively by addition of polyamine putrescine (1 mM). When the dose of irradiation was 400 Gy, the survival of cells was 7% in the polyamine supplement condition and the survival colonies were not detected in the polyamine absent condition. Wild type strain MG1655 showed that the survivals of cells were 3.6% and 6.6% in both conditions at a dose of 400 Gy, respectively. (author)

  14. Metallodrug induced apoptotic cell death and survival attempts are characterizable by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, K.; Prinsloo, L. C.; Meyer, D.

    2014-09-01

    Chrysotherapeutics are under investigation as new or additional treatments for different types of cancers. In this study, gold complexes were investigated for their anticancer potential using Raman spectroscopy. The aim of the study was to determine whether Raman spectroscopy could be used for the characterization of metallodrug-induced cell death. Symptoms of cell death such as decreased peak intensities of proteins bonds and phosphodiester bonds found in deoxyribose nucleic acids were evident in the principal component analysis of the spectra. Vibrational bands around 761 cm-1 and 1300 cm-1 (tryptophan, ethanolamine group, and phosphatidylethanolamine) and 1720 cm-1 (ester bonds associated with phospholipids) appeared in the Raman spectra of cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells after metallodrug treatment. The significantly (p cancer cells under chemical stress. Cancer cells excrete chemotherapeutics to improve their chances of survival and utilize glucose to achieve this. Raman spectroscopy was able to monitor a survival strategy of cancer cells in the form of glucose uptake to alleviate chemical stress. Raman spectroscopy was invaluable in obtaining molecular information generated by biomolecules affected by anticancer metallodrug treatments and presents an alternative to less reproducible, conventional biochemical assays for cytotoxicity analyses.

  15. Isolation of mammalian cell variants with enhanced endogenous thiol content at low survival levels following irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately half of a group of Chinese hamster V79 cell clones isolated from radiation survivors at low surviving fractions had significantly higher endogenous levels of non-protein and protein thiols than unirradiated cells. A similar group of cell lines cloned from unirradiated cells had thiol levels in the same range as the original unirradiated population. In some cases, clones isolated following irradiation are also more resistant to misonidazole toxicity and to radiation. This phenotype can persist through many cell generations for weeks or months of continuous growth; however, in many clones with altered phenotypes isolated following irradiation, reversion to the same phenotype as that of unirradiated populations has been observed. Induction of elevated thiol levels in tumours by radiotherapy could reduce both efficacy of the radiation itself and of radiation-modifying or chemotherapeutic drugs given in combination with radiation. (author)

  16. The regulation of function, growth and survival of GLP-1-producing L-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Holst, Jens Juul; Kappe, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    absorption and disposal, as well as cell proliferation and survival. In Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) reduced plasma levels of GLP-1 have been observed, and plasma levels of GLP-1, as well as reduced numbers of GLP-1 producing cells, have been correlated to obesity and insulin resistance. Increasing endogenous...... secretion of GLP-1 by selective targeting of the molecular mechanisms regulating secretion from the L-cell has been the focus of much recent research. An additional and promising strategy for enhancing endogenous secretion may be to increase the L-cell mass in the intestinal epithelium, but the mechanisms......Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a peptide hormone, released from intestinal L-cells in response to hormonal, neural and nutrient stimuli. In addition to potentiation of meal-stimulated insulin secretion, GLP-1 signalling exerts numerous pleiotropic effects on various tissues, regulating energy...

  17. REDD1 Is Essential for Optimal T Cell Proliferation and Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L Reuschel

    Full Text Available REDD1 is a highly conserved stress response protein that is upregulated following many types of cellular stress, including hypoxia, DNA damage, energy stress, ER stress, and nutrient deprivation. Recently, REDD1 was shown to be involved in dexamethasone induced autophagy in murine thymocytes. However, we know little of REDD1's function in mature T cells. Here we show for the first time that REDD1 is upregulated following T cell stimulation with PHA or CD3/CD28 beads. REDD1 knockout T cells exhibit a defect in proliferation and cell survival, although markers of activation appear normal. These findings demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for REDD1 in T cell function.

  18. YAP enhances autophagic flux to promote breast cancer cell survival in response to nutrient deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghe Song

    Full Text Available The Yes-associated protein (YAP, a transcriptional coactivator inactivated by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, functions as an oncoprotein in a variety of cancers. However, its contribution to breast cancer remains controversial. This study investigated the role of YAP in breast cancer cells under nutrient deprivation (ND. Here, we show that YAP knockdown sensitized MCF7 breast cancer cells to nutrient deprivation-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, in response to ND, YAP increased the autolysosome degradation, thereby enhancing the cellular autophagic flux in breast cancer cells. Of note, autophagy is crucial for YAP to protect MCF7 cells from apoptosis under ND conditions. In addition, the TEA domain (TEAD family of growth-promoting transcription factors was indispensable for YAP-mediated regulation of autophagy. Collectively, our data reveal a role for YAP in promoting breast cancer cell survival upon ND stress and uncover an unappreciated function of YAP/TEAD in the regulation of autophagy.

  19. Automated low dose assay system for survival measurements of mammalian cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that at low doses of radiation both surviving cells (S) and inactivated cells (K) should be identified to obtain accurate data. One way to achieve this is to microscopically examine individual cells attached to a culture vessel, record their positions and observe and classify subsequent cell growth. In this way most systematic errors (counting, pipetting, diluting, etc.) are eliminated and since both S and K cells are scored, statistical accuracy (binomial) is also improved. For this purpose the authors have developed a semi automatic low dose assay system (ALDAS) whereby a microscope state was modified and equipped with two stepping motors under computer control. The computer automatically scans tissue culture flasks in which cells were plated after irradiation. When a cell is observed, the operator assumes command of the stage monitor, centres the cell in the field of view using a ''joystick'' control and signals the computer to record the cell's X-Y coordinates. After one week of incubation each cell location is revisited automatically and the operator scores the cells as S or K

  20. Hypercoagulability as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somonova Oksana V

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In experimental systems, interference with coagulation can affect tumor biology. We suggested that abnormal coagulation could be a negative predictor for response to immunotherapy and survival among patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC. Methods To address this issue, retrospective analysis of 289 previously untreated MRCC patients entering on institutional review board-approved clinical trials was conducted between 2003 and 2006. In addition, two groups of MRCC patients with (n = 28 or without (n = 28 hypercoagulability were compared in a case-control study. Baseline and treatment characteristics were well balanced. Results Hypercoagulability was present at treatment start in 40% of patients. Median baseline fibrinogen was 6.2 mg/dl. Serious disorders were found in 68% of patients. Abnormal coagulation was strongly associated with a number of metastatic sites (2 and more metastatic sites vs. 0–1 (P = .001. Patients with high extent of hypercoagulability had significantly higher number of metastatic sites (P = .02. On univariate analysis, patients with hypercoagulability had significantly shorter overall survival than patients with normal coagulation; median survivals of 8.9 and 16.3, respectively (P = .001. Short survival and low response rate also were significantly associated with hypercoagulability in a case-control study. Median survival was 8.2 months and 14.6 months, respectively (P = .0011. Disease control rate (overall response + stable disease was significantly higher in patients with normal coagulation: 71.4 versus 42.9% (P = .003. Conclusion Hypercoagulability disorders were found to be prognostic factor for response rate to systemic therapy and survival in patients with MRCC.

  1. Survival Outcome of Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising from Sinonasal Inverted Papilloma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Zhuang Liang; De-Zhi Li; Xiao-Lei Wang; Hui Huang; Zhen-Gang Xu; Yue-Huang Wu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Sinonasal inverted papilloma (IP) is a rare benign tumor of the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses.It is destructive or bone-remodeling,tends to recur after surgical resection,and has a significant malignant potential.The present study aimed to perform a retrospective analysis of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from IP,including characteristics,survival outcome,and predictors of associated malignancy.Methods:The medical records of 213 patients diagnosed with IP from January 1970 to January 2014 were retrospectively reviewed.Eighty-seven patients were diagnosed with SCC/IP; their clinical characteristics,treatments,and survival outcomes were analyzed.Results:Of the 87 patients with SCC/IP,the 5-and 10-year overall survival outcomes were 39.6% and 31.8%,respectively.Twenty-nine of these patients received surgery and 58 received combined surgery and radiation.Of the patients with stages Ⅲ-Ⅳ,the 5-year survival rate was 30.7% for those treated with surgery only and 39.9% for those given the combination treatment (P =0.849).Factors associated with significantly poor prognosis were advanced-stage,metachronous tumors,or with cranial base and orbit invasion.Age,synchronous or metachronous tumors,and pathological stage were independent risk factors for mortality,shown by multivariate analysis.Conclusion:Patients with SCC/IP had low overall survival outcomes.Advanced age,stage,and metachronous tumors are the main factors affecting prognosis.Treatment planning should consider high-risk factors to improve survival outcome.

  2. Impact of Pancreatic Rat Islet Density on Cell Survival during Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodriguez-Brotons

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In bioartificial pancreases (BP, the number of islets needed to restore normoglycaemia in the diabetic patient is critical. However, the confinement of a high quantity of islets in a limited space may impact islet survival, particularly in regard to the low oxygen partial pressure (PO2 in such environments. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of islet number in a confined space under hypoxia on cell survival. Rat islets were seeded at three different concentrations (150, 300, and 600 Islet Equivalents (IEQ/cm2 and cultured in normal atmospheric pressure (160 mmHg as well as hypoxic conditions (15 mmHg for 24 hours. Cell viability, function, hypoxia-induced changes in gene expression, and cytokine secretion were then assessed. Notably, hypoxia appeared to induce a decrease in viability and increasing islet density exacerbated the observed increase in cellular apoptosis as well as the loss of function. These changes were also associated with an increase in inflammatory gene transcription. Taken together, these data indicate that when a high number of islets are confined to a small space under hypoxia, cell viability and function are significantly impacted. Thus, in order to improve islet survival in this environment during transplantation, oxygenation is of critical importance.

  3. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 is involved in cell growth and survival of human rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qualman Stephen J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stat3 has been classified as a proto-oncogene and constitutive Stat3 signaling appears to be involved in oncogenesis of human cancers. However, whether constitutive Stat3 signaling plays a role in the survival and growth of osteosarcomas, rhabdomyosarcomas, and soft-tissue sarcomas is still unclear. Methods To examine whether Stat3 is activated in osteosarcomas, rhabdomyosarcomas and other soft-tissue sarcomas we analyzed sarcoma tissue microarray slides and sarcoma cell lines using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, respectively, with a phospho-specific Stat3 antibody. To examine whether the activated Stat3 pathway is important for sarcoma cell growth and survival, adenovirus-mediated expression of a dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F and a small molecule inhibitor (termed STA-21 were used to inhibit constitutive Stat3 signaling in human sarcoma cell lines expressing elevated levels of Stat3 phosphorylation. Cell viability was determined by MTT assays and induction of apoptosis was analyzed by western blotting using antibodies that specifically recognize cleaved caspases-3, 8, and 9. Results Stat3 phosphorylation is elevated in 19% (21/113 of osteosarcoma, 27% (17/64 of rhabdomyosarcoma, and 15% (22/151 of other soft-tissue sarcoma tissues as well as in sarcoma cell lines. Expression of the dominant-negative Stat3 and treatment of STA-21 inhibited cell viability and growth and induced apoptosis through caspases 3, 8 and 9 pathways in human sarcoma cell lines expressing elevated levels of phosphorylated Stat3. Conclusion This study demonstrates that Stat3 phosphorylation is elevated in human rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcomas and soft-tissue sarcomas. Furthermore, the activated Stat3 pathway is important for cell growth and survival of human sarcoma cells.

  4. Prognostic factors for long term survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumtzi, Despoina; Lampaki, Sofia; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Lagoudi, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Pataka, Athanasia; Tsiouda, Theodora; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Lazaridis, George; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Timotheadou, Helen; Barbetakis, Nikolaos; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Kontakiotis, Theodoros; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents 85% of all lung cancers. It is estimated that 60% of patients with NSCLC at time of diagnosis have advanced disease. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical and demographic prognostic factors of long term survival in patients with unresectable NSCLC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed data of 1,156 patients with NSCLC stage IIIB or IV who survived more than 60 days from the time of diagnosis and treated from August 1987 until March 2013 in the Oncology Department of Pulmonary Clinic of the General Hospital Papanikolaou. Initially univariate analysis using the log-rank test was conducted and then multivariate analysis using the proportional hazards model of Cox. Also Kaplan Meier curves were used to describe the distribution of survival times of patients. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results The mean age at diagnosis was 62 years. About 11.9% of patients were women and 88.1% were male. The majority of cases were adenocarcinomas (42.2%), followed squamous (33%) and finally the large cell (6%). Unlike men, most common histological type among women was adenocarcinoma rather than squamous (63% vs. 10.9%). In univariate analysis statistically significant factors in the progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were: weight loss ≥5%, histological type, line 1 drugs, line 1 combination, line 1 cycles and radio lung. Specifically radio lung gives clear survival benefit in the PFS and OS in stage IIIB (P=0.002) and IV (Pcell carcinoma recorded the shortest OS and PFS compared with adenocarcinoma (P=0.043 and P=0.016 respectively) and squamous cell carcinoma (P=0.021 and P=0.004 respectively). In multivariate analysis the same predictors were statistically significant except for line 1 drugs. Conclusions This study confirms the increased incidence of adenocarcinoma in women than in men and the aggressiveness of large cell carcinoma. It also underlines the vitality of factors

  5. Genetic variants in ABCG1 are associated with survival of nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanru; Liu, Hongliang; Ready, Neal E; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Christiani, David C; Wei, Qingyi

    2016-06-01

    Cell membrane transporters and metabolic enzymes play a crucial role in the transportation of a wide variety of substrates that maintain homeostasis in biological processes. We explored associations between genetic variants in these genes and survival of nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by reanalyzing two datasets from published genome-wide association studies (GWASs). In the discovery by using the GWAS dataset of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, we evaluated associations of 1,245 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of four transporter families and two metabolic enzyme families with survival of 1,185 NSCLC patients. We then performed a replication analysis in the Harvard University Lung Cancer study (LCS) with 984 NSCLC patients. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression and false discovery rate (FDR) corrections were performed to evaluate the associations. We identified that 21 genotyped SNPs in eight gene regions were significantly associated with survival with FDR ≤0.1 in the discovery dataset. Subsequently, we confirmed six SNPs, which were putative functional, in ABCG1 of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family in the replication dataset. In the pooled analysis, two tagging (at r(2)  > 0.8 for linkage disequilibrium with other replicated SNPs)/functional SNPs were independently associated with survival: rs225388 G > A [adjusted hazards ratio (HR) = 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-1.20, Ptrend  = 4.6 × 10(-3) ] and rs225390 A > G (adjusted HR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, Ptrend  = 3.8 × 10(-4) ). Our results indicated that genetic variants of ABCG1 may be predictors of survival of NSCLC patients. PMID:26757251

  6. Hormesis and adaptive response of survival in Hela cells induced by low dose X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival fraction in HeLa cells irradiated by low dose X-rays was observed using clone method. The results showed that the survival fraction in the cells irradiated by less than 0.5 Gy X-rays was higher than control, 'hormesis' of HeLa cell survival was obtained and was significant at doses near 0.25 Gy; also, the damage degree of cells induced by the following irradiation was reduced because of pre-treating the cells with low dose D1 of 0.05, 0.75 Gy; it was found from above that 'adaptive response' of cell survival was induced by the low dose irradiation

  7. Mometasone and desloratadine additive effect on eosinophil survival and cytokine secretion from epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valero Antonio

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although antihistamines and topical corticosteroids are used in combination to treat allergic rhinitis, their additive effect has not been yet demonstrated. The aim was investigate the antiinflammatory additive effect of mometasone and desloratadine on cytokine and sICAM-1 secretion by epithelial cells, and on eosinophil survival stimulated by human epithelial cells secretions from nasal mucosa and polyps. Methods Epithelial cells obtained from nasal mucosa or polyps were stimulated with 10% fetal bovine serum in presence of mometasone (10-11M-10-5M with/without desloratadine (10-5M. Cytokine and sICAM-1 concentrations in supernatants were measured by ELISA. Peripheral blood eosinophils were incubated during 4 days with epithelial cell secretions with (10-11M-10-5M and/or desloratadine (10-5M and survival assessed by Trypan blue. Results are expressed as percentage (mean ± SEM compared to control. Results Fetal bovine serum stimulated IL-6, IL-8, GM-CSF and sICAM-1 secretion. In mucosa and polyp epithelial cells, mometasone inhibited this induced secretion while desloratadine inhibited IL-6 and IL-8. The combination of 10-5M desloratadine and 10-9M mometasone reduced IL-6 secretion (48 ± 11%, p -11M and desloratadine (10-5M provoked an increased inhibition of eosinophil survival induced by cell secretions (27 ± 5%, p Conclusions These results suggest that the combination of desloratadine and mometasone furoate have a greater antinflammatory effect in an in vitro model of eosinophil inflammation than those drugs administered alone.

  8. CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells are undifferentiated, radioresistant and survive radioiodide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Chien-Chih [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Ren-Shyan [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); NRPGM, Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Yang, An-Hang [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Ching-Sheng [National Yang-Ming University Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Chi, Chin-Wen [National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei (China); Tseng, Ling-Ming [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Tsai, Yi-Fan [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Ho, Jennifer H. [Taipei Medical University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Medical Center, Center for Stem Cell Research, Taipei (China); Lee, Chen-Hsen [NRPGM, Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Lee, Oscar K. [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Stem Cell Research Center, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei (China)

    2013-01-15

    {sup 131}I therapy is regularly used following surgery as a part of thyroid cancer management. Despite an overall relatively good prognosis, recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer is not rare. CD133-expressing cells have been shown to mark thyroid cancer stem cells that possess the characteristics of stem cells and have the ability to initiate tumours. However, no studies have addressed the influence of CD133-expressing cells on radioiodide therapy of the thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CD133{sup +} cells contribute to the radioresistance of thyroid cancer and thus potentiate future recurrence and metastasis. Thyroid cancer cell lines were analysed for CD133 expression, radiosensitivity and gene expression. The anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line ARO showed a higher percentage of CD133{sup +} cells and higher radioresistance. After {gamma}-irradiation of the cells, the CD133{sup +} population was enriched due to the higher apoptotic rate of CD133{sup -} cells. In vivo {sup 131}I treatment of ARO tumour resulted in an elevated expression of CD133, Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Glut1 genes. After isolation, CD133{sup +} cells exhibited higher radioresistance and higher expression of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Lin28 and Glut1 in the cell line or primarily cultured papillary thyroid cancer cells, and lower expression of various thyroid-specific genes, namely NIS, Tg, TPO, TSHR, TTF1 and Pax8. This study demonstrates the existence of CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells which show a higher radioresistance and are in an undifferentiated status. These cells possess a greater potential to survive radiotherapy and may contribute to the recurrence of thyroid cancer. A future therapeutic approach for radioresistant thyroid cancer may focus on the selective eradication of CD133{sup +} cells. (orig.)

  9. CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells are undifferentiated, radioresistant and survive radioiodide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    131I therapy is regularly used following surgery as a part of thyroid cancer management. Despite an overall relatively good prognosis, recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer is not rare. CD133-expressing cells have been shown to mark thyroid cancer stem cells that possess the characteristics of stem cells and have the ability to initiate tumours. However, no studies have addressed the influence of CD133-expressing cells on radioiodide therapy of the thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CD133+ cells contribute to the radioresistance of thyroid cancer and thus potentiate future recurrence and metastasis. Thyroid cancer cell lines were analysed for CD133 expression, radiosensitivity and gene expression. The anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line ARO showed a higher percentage of CD133+ cells and higher radioresistance. After γ-irradiation of the cells, the CD133+ population was enriched due to the higher apoptotic rate of CD133- cells. In vivo 131I treatment of ARO tumour resulted in an elevated expression of CD133, Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Glut1 genes. After isolation, CD133+ cells exhibited higher radioresistance and higher expression of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Lin28 and Glut1 in the cell line or primarily cultured papillary thyroid cancer cells, and lower expression of various thyroid-specific genes, namely NIS, Tg, TPO, TSHR, TTF1 and Pax8. This study demonstrates the existence of CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells which show a higher radioresistance and are in an undifferentiated status. These cells possess a greater potential to survive radiotherapy and may contribute to the recurrence of thyroid cancer. A future therapeutic approach for radioresistant thyroid cancer may focus on the selective eradication of CD133+ cells. (orig.)

  10. Sphingosine kinase expression increases intracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate and promotes cell growth and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, A; Kohama, T; Edsall, L; Nava, V; Cuvillier, O; Poulton, S; Spiegel, S

    1999-11-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (SPP) is a bioactive lipid that has recently been identified as the ligand for the EDG family of G protein-coupled cell surface receptors. However, the mitogenic and survival effects of exogenous SPP may not correlate with binding to cell-surface receptors (Van Brocklyn, J.R., M.J. Lee, R. Menzeleev, A. Olivera, L. Edsall, O. Cuvillier, D.M. Thomas, P.J.P. Coopman, S. Thangada, T. Hla, and S. Spiegel. 1998. J. Cell Biol. 142:229-240). The recent cloning of sphingosine kinase, a unique lipid kinase responsible for the formation of SPP, has provided a new tool to investigate the role of intracellular SPP. Expression of sphingosine kinase markedly increased SPP levels in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and HEK293 cells, but no detectable secretion of SPP into the medium was observed. The increased sphingosine kinase activity in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts was sufficient to promote growth in low- serum media, expedite the G(1)/S transition, and increase DNA synthesis and the proportion of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle with a concomitant increase in cell numbers. Transient or stable overexpression of sphingosine kinase in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts or HEK293 cells protected against apoptosis induced by serum deprivation or ceramide elevation. N,N-Dimethylsphingosine, a competitive inhibitor of sphingosine kinase, blocked the effects of sphingosine kinase overexpression on cell proliferation and suppression of apoptosis. In contrast, pertussis toxin did not abrogate these biological responses. In Jurkat T cells, overexpression of sphingosine kinase also suppressed serum deprivation- and ceramide-induced apoptosis and, to a lesser extent, Fas-induced apoptosis, which correlated with inhibition of DEVDase activity, as well as inhibition of the executionary caspase-3. Taken together with ample evidence showing that growth and survival factors activate sphingosine kinase, our results indicate that SPP functions as a second messenger important for growth and survival of

  11. Different Effects of BORIS/CTCFL on Stemness Gene Expression, Sphere Formation and Cell Survival in Epithelial Cancer Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Alberti

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells are cancer cells characterized by stem cell properties and represent a small population of tumor cells that drives tumor development, progression, metastasis and drug resistance. To date, the molecular mechanisms that generate and regulate cancer stem cells are not well defined. BORIS (Brother of Regulator of Imprinted Sites or CTCFL (CTCF-like is a DNA-binding protein that is expressed in normal tissues only in germ cells and is re-activated in tumors. Recent evidences have highlighted the correlation of BORIS/CTCFL expression with poor overall survival of different cancer patients. We have previously shown an association of BORIS-expressing cells with stemness gene expression in embryonic cancer cells. Here, we studied the role of BORIS in epithelial tumor cells. Using BORIS-molecular beacon that was already validated, we were able to show the presence of BORIS mRNA in cancer stem cell-enriched populations (side population and spheres of cervical, colon and breast tumor cells. BORIS silencing studies showed a decrease of sphere formation capacity in breast and colon tumor cells. Importantly, BORIS-silencing led to down-regulation of hTERT, stem cell (NANOG, OCT4, SOX2 and BMI1 and cancer stem cell markers (ABCG2, CD44 and ALDH1 genes. Conversely, BORIS-induction led to up-regulation of the same genes. These phenotypes were observed in cervical, colon and invasive breast tumor cells. However, a completely different behavior was observed in the non-invasive breast tumor cells (MCF7. Indeed, these cells acquired an epithelial mesenchymal transition phenotype after BORIS silencing. Our results demonstrate that BORIS is associated with cancer stem cell-enriched populations of several epithelial tumor cells and the different phenotypes depend on the origin of tumor cells.

  12. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Sureban, Sripathi M.; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stan A.; Ding, Kai; Umar, Shahid; Schlosser, Michael J.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC) marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI) can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on i...

  13. Survival of intestinal crypt cells after exposure to high Z, high energy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the experiments described is to evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high energy charged particles for cell killing in the mouse crypt-cell survival assay. The reference radiation, 225 kVp x rays, is slightly more effective than plateau helium ions. For carbon, neon and argon ions there is a suggestion of a saturation effect with increasing LET. Furthermore, it should be emphasized that there is a large difference associated with particles of different atomic number or mass at the same average LET

  14. Mitochondrial Variations in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaoxi Wang; Sojung Choi; Jinseon Lee; Yen-Tsung Huang; Feng Chen; Yang Zhao; Xihong Lin; Donna Neuberg; Jhingook Kim; Christiani, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the mtDNA genome have long been suspected to play an important role in cancer. Although most cancer cells harbor mtDNA mutations, the question of whether such mutations are associated with clinical prognosis of lung cancer remains unclear. We resequenced the entire mitochondrial genomes of tumor tissue from a population of 250 Korean patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our analysis revealed that the haplogroup (D/D4) was associated with worse overall survival (OS) o...

  15. Enhancing stem cell survival in an ischemic heart by CRISPR-dCas9-based gene regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Alexander; Weintraub, Neal L.; Tang, Yaoliang

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease has remained the number one killer around the world for over the past twenty years. While stem cell therapy has become a promising new frontier to repair the damaged heart, limited stem cell survivability post-transplantation has precluded widespread use of this therapy. Strategies to genetically modify stem cells to activate pro-survival and anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory pathways, such as Akt and heme oxygenase-1, have been shown to improve the lifespan of trans...

  16. The pro-adhesive and pro-survival effects of glucocorticoid in human ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lijuan; Fang, Fang; Song, Xinglei; Wang, Yan; Huang, Gaoxiang; Su, Jie; Hui, Ning; Lu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) is controlled by multiple signaling molecules and intracellular pathways, and is pivotal for survival and growth of cells from most solid tumors. Our previous works demonstrated that dexamethasone (DEX) significantly enhances cell adhesion and cell resistance to chemotherapeutics by increasing the levels of integrin β1, α4, and α5 in human ovarian cancer cells. However, it is unclear whether the components of ECM or other membrane molecules are also involved in the pro-adhesive effect of DEX in ovarian cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the treatment of cells with DEX did not change the expression of collagens (I, III, and IV), laminin, CD44, and its principal ligand hyaluronan (HA), but significantly increased the levels of intracellular and secreted fibronectin (FN). Inhibiting the expression of FN with FN1 siRNA or blocking CD44, another FN receptor, with CD44 blocking antibody significantly attenuated the pro-adhesion of DEX, indicating that upregulation of FN mediates the pro-adhesive effect of DEX by its interaction with CD44 besides integrin β1. Moreover, DEX significantly enhanced cell resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel (PTX) by activating PI-3K-Akt pathway. Finally, we found that DEX also significantly upregulated the expression of MUC1, a transmembrane glycoprotein. Inhibiting the expression of MUC1 with MUC1 siRNA significantly attenuated the DEX-induced effects of pro-adhesion, Akt-activation, and pro-survival. In conclusion, these results provide new data that upregulation of FN and MUC1 by DEX contributes to DEX-induced pro-adhesion and protects ovarian cancer cells from chemotherapy. PMID:27151574

  17. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. ► Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. ► Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. ► Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  18. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarzija, Ivana [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Beard, Peter, E-mail: peter.beard@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  19. Sphingosine kinase-2 maintains viral latency and survival for KSHV-infected endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Dai

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation of sphingosine by sphingosine kinases (SphK1 and SphK2 generates sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a bioactive sphingolipid which promotes cancer cell survival and tumor progression in vivo. We have recently reported that targeting SphK2 induces apoptosis for human primary effusion lymphoma (PEL cell lines infected by the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, and this occurs in part through inhibition of canonical NF-κB activation. In contrast, pharmacologic inhibition of SphK2 has minimal impact for uninfected B-cell lines or circulating human B cells from healthy donors. Therefore, we designed additional studies employing primary human endothelial cells to explore mechanisms responsible for the selective death observed for KSHV-infected cells during SphK2 targeting. Using RNA interference and a clinically relevant pharmacologic approach, we have found that targeting SphK2 induces apoptosis selectively for KSHV-infected endothelial cells through induction of viral lytic gene expression. Moreover, this effect occurs through repression of KSHV-microRNAs regulating viral latency and signal transduction, including miR-K12-1 which targets IκBα to facilitate activation of NF-κB, and ectopic expression of miR-K12-1 restores NF-κB activation and viability for KSHV-infected endothelial cells during SphK2 inhibition. These data illuminate a novel survival mechanism and potential therapeutic target for KSHV-infected endothelial cells: SphK2-associated maintenance of viral latency.

  20. Lipocalin-2-induced cytokine production enhances endometrial carcinoma cell survival and migration

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    Hsiu-Hsia Lin, Chi-Jr Liao, Ying-Chu Lee, Keng-Hsun Hu, Hsien-Wei Meng, Sin-Tak Chu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin-2 (Lcn-2 is an acute-phase protein that has been implicated in diverse physiological processes in mice, including: apoptosis, ion transport, inflammation, cell survival, and tumorigenesis. This study characterized the biological activity of Lcn-2 in human endometrial carcinoma cells (RL95-2. Exposure of RL95-2 cells to Lcn-2 for >24 h reduced Lcn-2-induced cell apoptosis, changed the cell proliferation and up-regulated cytokine secretions, including: interleukin-8 (IL-8, inteleukin-6 (IL-6, monocyte chemotatic protein-1 (MCP-1 and growth-related oncogene (GRO. However, IL-8 mRNA and protein levels were dramatically increased in Lcn-2-treated RL95-2 cells. To determine the IL-8 effect on Lcn-2-treated RL95-2 cells was our major focus. Adding recombinant IL-8 (rIL-8 resulted in decreased caspase-3 activity in Lcn-2-treated cells, whereas the addition of IL-8 antibodies resulted in significantly increased caspase-3 activity and decreased cell migration. Data indicate that IL-8 plays a crucial role in the induction of cell migration. Interestingly, Lcn-2-induced cytokines, secretion from RL95-2 cells, could not show the potent cell migration ability with the exception of IL-8. We conclude that Lcn-2 triggered cytokine secretions to prevent RL95-2 cells from undergoing apoptosis and subsequently increased cell migration. We hypothesize that Lcn-2 increased cytokine secretion by RL95-2 cells, which in turn activated a cellular defense system. This study suggests that Lcn-2 may play a role in the human female reproductive system or in endometrial cancer.

  1. Bim and Mcl-1 exert key roles in regulating JAK2V617F cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guthy Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The JAK2V617F mutation plays a major role in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms and is found in the vast majority of patients suffering from polycythemia vera and in roughly every second patient suffering from essential thrombocythemia or from primary myelofibrosis. The V617F mutation is thought to provide hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid progenitors with a survival and proliferation advantage. It has previously been shown that activated JAK2 promotes cell survival by upregulating the anti-apoptotic STAT5 target gene Bcl-xL. In this study, we have investigated the role of additional apoptotic players, the pro-apoptotic protein Bim as well as the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Methods Pharmacological inhibition of JAK2/STAT5 signaling in JAK2V617F mutant SET-2 and MB-02 cells was used to study effects on signaling, cell proliferation and apoptosis by Western blot analysis, WST-1 proliferation assays and flow cytometry. Cells were transfected with siRNA oligos to deplete candidate pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were performed to assess the impact of JAK2 inhibition on complexes of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Results Treatment of JAK2V617F mutant cell lines with a JAK2 inhibitor was found to trigger Bim activation. Furthermore, Bim depletion by RNAi suppressed JAK2 inhibitor-induced cell death. Bim activation following JAK2 inhibition led to enhanced sequestration of Mcl-1, besides Bcl-xL. Importantly, Mcl-1 depletion by RNAi was sufficient to compromise JAK2V617F mutant cell viability and sensitized the cells to JAK2 inhibition. Conclusions We conclude that Bim and Mcl-1 have key opposing roles in regulating JAK2V617F cell survival and propose that inactivation of aberrant JAK2 signaling leads to changes in Bim complexes that trigger cell death. Thus, further preclinical evaluation of combinations of JAK2 inhibitors with Bcl-2 family antagonists that also tackle Mcl-1

  2. Bim and Mcl-1 exert key roles in regulating JAK2V617F cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JAK2V617F mutation plays a major role in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms and is found in the vast majority of patients suffering from polycythemia vera and in roughly every second patient suffering from essential thrombocythemia or from primary myelofibrosis. The V617F mutation is thought to provide hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid progenitors with a survival and proliferation advantage. It has previously been shown that activated JAK2 promotes cell survival by upregulating the anti-apoptotic STAT5 target gene Bcl-xL. In this study, we have investigated the role of additional apoptotic players, the pro-apoptotic protein Bim as well as the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Pharmacological inhibition of JAK2/STAT5 signaling in JAK2V617F mutant SET-2 and MB-02 cells was used to study effects on signaling, cell proliferation and apoptosis by Western blot analysis, WST-1 proliferation assays and flow cytometry. Cells were transfected with siRNA oligos to deplete candidate pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were performed to assess the impact of JAK2 inhibition on complexes of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Treatment of JAK2V617F mutant cell lines with a JAK2 inhibitor was found to trigger Bim activation. Furthermore, Bim depletion by RNAi suppressed JAK2 inhibitor-induced cell death. Bim activation following JAK2 inhibition led to enhanced sequestration of Mcl-1, besides Bcl-xL. Importantly, Mcl-1 depletion by RNAi was sufficient to compromise JAK2V617F mutant cell viability and sensitized the cells to JAK2 inhibition. We conclude that Bim and Mcl-1 have key opposing roles in regulating JAK2V617F cell survival and propose that inactivation of aberrant JAK2 signaling leads to changes in Bim complexes that trigger cell death. Thus, further preclinical evaluation of combinations of JAK2 inhibitors with Bcl-2 family antagonists that also tackle Mcl-1, besides Bcl-xL, is warranted to assess the therapeutic potential for

  3. Aggregative adherent strains of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum enter and survive within HEp-2 epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Cristina de Souza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum is a well-known human pathogen that mainly causes respiratory disease and is associated with high mortality in compromised hosts. Little is known about the virulence factors and pathogenesis of C. pseudodiphtheriticum. In this study, cultured human epithelial (HEp-2 cells were used to analyse the adherence pattern, internalisation and intracellular survival of the ATCC 10700 type strain and two additional clinical isolates. These microorganisms exhibited an aggregative adherence-like pattern to HEp-2 cells characterised by clumps of bacteria with a "stacked-brick" appearance. The differences in the ability of these microorganisms to invade and survive within HEp-2 cells and replicate in the extracellular environment up to 24 h post infection were evaluated. The fluorescent actin staining test demonstrated that actin polymerisation is involved in the internalisation of the C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains. The depolymerisation of microfilaments by cytochalasin E significantly reduced the internalisation of C. pseudodiphtheriticum by HEp-2 cells. Bacterial internalisation and cytoskeletal rearrangement seemed to be partially triggered by the activation of tyrosine kinase activity. Although C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains did not demonstrate an ability to replicate intracellularly, HEp-2 cells were unable to fully clear the pathogen within 24 h. These characteristics may explain how some C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains cause severe infection in human patients.

  4. Irradiation shortens the survival time of red cells deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenasee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerman, M.P. (Rush Medical College, Chicago, IL); Wald, N.; Diloy-Puray, M.

    1980-03-01

    X radiation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient red cells causes distinct shortening of their survival time. This is accompanied by significant lowering of reduced glutathione content and is not observed in similarly prepared and treated normal cells. The damage is most likely related to irradiation-induced formation of activated oxygen products and to their subsequent effects on the cells. Neither methemoglobin increases nor Heinz body formation were observed, suggesting that hemolysis occurred prior to these changes. The study provides a model for examining the effects of irradiation and activated oxygen on red cells and suggests that patients with G6PD deficiency who receive irradiation could develop severe hemolysis in certain clinical settings.

  5. Irradiation shortens the survival time of red cells deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenasee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X radiation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient red cells causes distinct shortening of their survival time. This is accompanied by significant lowering of reduced glutathione content and is not observed in similarly prepared and treated normal cells. The damage is most likely related to irradiation-induced formation of activated oxygen products and to their subsequent effects on the cells. Neither methemoglobin increases nor Heinz body formation were observed, suggesting that hemolysis occurred prior to these changes. The study provides a model for examining the effects of irradiation and activated oxygen on red cells and suggests that patients with G6PD deficiency who receive irradiation could develop severe hemolysis in certain clinical settings

  6. Promoting Cell Survival and Proliferation in Degradable Poly(vinyl alcohol)-Tyramine Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Khoon S; Ramaswamy, Yogambha; Roberts, Justine J; Alves, Marie-Helene; Poole-Warren, Laura A; Martens, Penny J

    2015-10-01

    A photopolymerizable-tyraminated poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA-Tyr) system that has the ability to covalently bind proteins in their native state was evaluated as a platform for cell encapsulation. However, a key hurdle to this system is the radicals generated during the cross-linking that can cause oxidative stress to the cells. This research hypothesized that incorporation of anti-oxidative proteins (sericin and gelatin) into PVA-Tyr gels would mitigate any toxicity caused by the radicals. The results showed that although incorporation of 1 wt% sericin promoted survival of the fibroblasts, both sericin and gelatin acted synergistically to facilitate long-term 3D cell function. The encapsulated cells formed clusters with deposition of laminin and collagen, as well as remaining metabolically active after 21 d. PMID:26097045

  7. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...

  8. Improved Survival and Hematopoietic Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells on Electrospun Polycaprolactone Nanofiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Dehdilani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Three-dimensional (3D biomimetic nanofiber scaffolds have widespread applications in biomedical tissue engineering. They provide a suitable environment for cellular adhesion, survival, proliferation and differentiation, guide new tissue formation and development, and are one of the outstanding goals of tissue engineering. Electrospinning has recently emerged as a leading technique for producing biomimetic scaffolds with micro to nanoscale topography and a high porosity similar to the natural extracellular matrix (ECM. These scaffolds are comprised of synthetic and natural polymers for tissue engineering applications. Several kinds of cells such as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and mouse ESCs (mESCs have been cultured and differentiated on nanofiber scaffolds. mESCs can be induced to differentiate into a particular cell lineage when cultured as embryoid bodies (EBs on nano-sized scaffolds. Materials and Methods: We cultured mESCs (2500 cells/100 μl in 96-well plates with knockout Dulbecco’s modified eagle medium (DMEM-KO and Roswell Park Memorial Institute-1640 (RPMI-1640, both supplemented with 20% ESC grade fetal bovine serum (FBS and essential factors in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF. mESCs were seeded at a density of 2500 cells/100 μl onto electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL nanofibers in 96-well plates. The control group comprised mESCs grown on tissue culture plates (TCP at a density of 2500 cells/100 μl. Differentiation of mESCs into mouse hematopoietic stem cells (mHSCs was performed by stem cell factor (SCF, interleukin-3 (IL-3, IL-6 and Fms-related tyrosine kinase ligand (Flt3-L cytokines for both the PCL and TCP groups. We performed an experimental study of mESCs differentiation. Results: PCL was compared to conventional TCP for survival and differentiation of mESCs to mHSCs. There were significantly more mESCs in the PCL group. Flowcytometric analysis revealed differences in hematopoietic

  9. Detection of Critical Genes Associated with Overall Survival (OS) and Progression-Free Survival (PFS) in Reconstructed Canine B-Cell Lymphoma Gene Regulatory Network (GRN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad; Najafi, Ali; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Canine B-cell lymphoma GRN was reconstructed from gene expression data in the STRING and MiMI databases. Critical genes of networks were identified and correlations of critical genes with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated. Significant changes were detected in the expressions of GLUL, CD44, CD79A, ARF3, FOS, BLOC1S1, FYN, GZMB, GALNT3, IFI44, CD3G, GNG2, ESRP1, and CCND1 in the STRING network and of PECAM1, GLUL, CD44, GDI1, E2F4, TLE1, CD79A, UCP2, CCND1, FYN, RHOQ, BIN1, and A2M in the MiMI network. Final survival analysis highlighted CCND1 and FOS as genes with significant correlations with OS and PFS. PMID:26818715

  10. Elucidation of tonic and activated B-cell receptor signaling in Burkitt's lymphoma provides insights into regulation of cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Jasmin; Pan, Kuan-Ting; Walter, Roland; Doebele, Carmen; Mohr, Sebastian; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Ströbel, Philipp; Lenz, Christof; Slabicki, Mikolaj; Hüllein, Jennifer; Comoglio, Federico; Rieger, Michael A; Zenz, Thorsten; Wienands, Jürgen; Engelke, Michael; Serve, Hubert; Urlaub, Henning; Oellerich, Thomas

    2016-05-17

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is a highly proliferative B-cell neoplasm and is treated with intensive chemotherapy that, because of its toxicity, is often not suitable for the elderly or for patients with endemic BL in developing countries. BL cell survival relies on signals transduced by B-cell antigen receptors (BCRs). However, tonic as well as activated BCR signaling networks and their relevance for targeted therapies in BL remain elusive. We have systematically characterized and compared tonic and activated BCR signaling in BL by quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify novel BCR effectors and potential drug targets. We identified and quantified ∼16,000 phospho-sites in BL cells. Among these sites, 909 were related to tonic BCR signaling, whereas 984 phospho-sites were regulated upon BCR engagement. The majority of the identified BCR signaling effectors have not been described in the context of B cells or lymphomas yet. Most of these newly identified BCR effectors are predicted to be involved in the regulation of kinases, transcription, and cytoskeleton dynamics. Although tonic and activated BCR signaling shared a considerable number of effector proteins, we identified distinct phosphorylation events in tonic BCR signaling. We investigated the functional relevance of some newly identified BCR effectors and show that ACTN4 and ARFGEF2, which have been described as regulators of membrane-trafficking and cytoskeleton-related processes, respectively, are crucial for BL cell survival. Thus, this study provides a comprehensive dataset for tonic and activated BCR signaling and identifies effector proteins that may be relevant for BL cell survival and thus may help to develop new BL treatments. PMID:27155012

  11. The Fricke dosimeter as a physicochemical model of single-dose cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of ferrous ion survival and ferric ion production have been experimentally studied for classic versions of the Fricke system irradiated with continuous, low-let radiation. High performance ion chromatography permitted improved sensitivity (<0.5Gy) and spatial resolution (<0.05cc) of the simultaneous detection of ferrous/ferric ion complexes when compared to conventional μv spectophotometry. Air-saturated solutions of 0.001-1000 mM ferous ammonium sulfate and 1mM NaCl in 0.05-0.40 M sulfuric acid were used. The primary focus has been to examine the dose-response curves in the 0-2000 rad range for 0.1mM ferrous and in the 0-20000 rad range for 0.1mM ferrous. Ferrous survival curves virtually identical to average mammalian cell survival curves result when using 0.01 mM ferrous in 0.05 M sulfuric acid - similar initial slope, similar shoulder, similar final slope. The existence of localized regions of order, as unit, chemical equilibrium ''cells'' containing clusters of 4-10 ferrous ions are postulated. Modifications of the DRA theory to include predicted effects of spur, blob, and short track expansion and overlap in this aqueous system are required. The new model is discussed

  12. Long-term Survival, Organ Function, and Malignancy after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Fanconi Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfim, Carmem; Ribeiro, Lisandro; Nichele, Samantha; Bitencourt, Marco; Loth, Gisele; Koliski, Adriana; Funke, Vaneuza A M; Pilonetto, Daniela V; Pereira, Noemi F; Flowers, Mary E D; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Fasth, Anders; Torres-Pereira, Cassius C; Pedruzzi, Paola; Eapen, Mary; Pasquini, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    We report on long-term survival in 157 patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) who survived 2 years or longer after their first transplantation with a median follow-up of 9 years. Marrow failure (80%) was the most common indication for transplantation. There were 20 deaths beyond 2 years after transplantation, with 12 of the deaths occurring beyond 5 years after transplantation. Donor chimerism was available for 149 patients: 112 (76%) reported > 95% chimerism, 27 (18%) reported 90% to 95% chimerism, and 8 (5%) reported 20% to 89% donor chimerism. Two patients have donor chimerism. The 10- and 15-year probabilities of survival were 90% and 79%, respectively. Results of multivariate analysis showed higher mortality risks for transplantations before 2003 (hazard ratio [HR], 7.87; P = .001), chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (HR, 3.80; P = .004) and squamous cell carcinoma after transplantation (HR, 38.17; P < .0001). The predominant cause of late mortality was squamous cell carcinoma, with an incidence of 8% and 14% at 10 and 15 years after transplantation, respectively, and was more likely to occur in those with chronic GVHD. Other causes of late mortality included chronic GVHD, infection, graft failure, other cancers, and hemorrhage. Although most patients are disease free and functional long term, our data support aggressive surveillance for long periods to identify those at risk for late mortality. PMID:26976241

  13. Anti-apoptotic BFL-1 is the major effector in activation-induced human mast cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ekoff

    Full Text Available Mast cells are best known for their role in allergic reactions, where aggregation of FcεRI leads to the release of mast cell mediators causing allergic symptoms. The activation also induces a survival program in the cells, i.e., activation-induced mast cell survival. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the activation-induced survival is mediated. Cord blood-derived mast cells and the mast cell line LAD-2 were activated through FcεRI crosslinking, with or without addition of chemicals that inhibit the activity or expression of selected Bcl-2 family members (ABT-737; roscovitine. Cell viability was assessed using staining and flow cytometry. The expression and function of Bcl-2 family members BFL-1 and MCL-1 were investigated using real-time quantitative PCR and siRNA treatment. The mast cell expression of Bfl-1 was investigated in skin biopsies. FcεRI crosslinking promotes activation-induced survival of human mast cells and this is associated with an upregulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bfl-1. ABT-737 alone or in combination with roscovitine decreases viability of human mast cells although activation-induced survival is sustained, indicating a minor role for Bcl-X(L, Bcl-2, Bcl-w and Mcl-1. Reducing BFL-1 but not MCL-1 levels by siRNA inhibited activation-induced mast cell survival. We also demonstrate that mast cell expression of Bfl-1 is elevated in birch-pollen-provocated skin and in lesions of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients. Taken together, our results highlight Bfl-1 as a major effector in activation-induced human mast cell survival.

  14. IGFBP7 induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia cells and synergizes with chemotherapy in suppression of leukemia cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen, H JMP; de Leeuw, D C; Roemer, M GM; Denkers, F; Pouwels, W; Rutten, A; Celie, P H; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Schuurhuis, G. J.; Smit, L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite high remission rates after chemotherapy, only 30–40% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients survive 5 years after diagnosis. This extremely poor prognosis of AML is mainly caused by treatment failure due to chemotherapy resistance. Chemotherapy resistance can be caused by various features including activation of alternative signaling pathways, evasion of cell death or activation of receptor tyrosine kinases such as the insulin growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R). Here we have studied ...

  15. Effects of physical exercise on survival after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskemann, Joachim; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Kuehl, Rea; Dreger, Peter; Schwerdtfeger, Rainer; Bohus, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Observational studies have suggested that physical activity may be associated with improved survival after cancer treatment. However, data from controlled clinical trials are required. We analyzed survival data of 103 patients from a previously published randomized controlled trial in allogeneic stem cell transplant patients who were randomized to either an exercise intervention (EX) or to a social contact control group. EX patients trained prior to hospital admission, during inpatient treatment, and for 6-8 weeks after discharge. Survival analyses were used to compare both total mortality (TM) and non-relapse mortality (NRM) after discharge and transplantation during an observation period of 2 years after transplantation. Analyses were corroborated with Cox and Fine & Gray regression models adjusting for potential confounders. After discharge, EX patients had a significantly lower TM rate than controls (12.0 vs. 28.3%, p = 0.030) and a numerically lower NRM rate (4.0 vs. 13.5%, p = 0.086). When the inpatient period was included, absolute risk reductions were similar but not significantly different (TM: 34.0 vs. 50.9%, p = 0.112; NRM: 26.0 vs. 36.5%, p = 0.293). The number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one death with EX was about 6. Furthermore, regression analyses revealed that baseline fitness was protective against mortality. The data suggest that exercise might improve survival in patients undergoing allo-HCT. However, the results should be interpreted with caution as the study was not designed to detect differences in survival rates, and as no stratification on relevant prognostic factors was carried out. PMID:26061092

  16. Impact of Neoadjuvant Radiation on Survival in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The role of surgery in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial. This study was undertaken to assess the impact of neoadjuvant radiation therapy for Stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database that included patients who were 18 years and older with NSCLC classified as Stage III and who underwent definitive therapy from 1988 to 2004. Patients were characterized by type of treatment received. Survival functions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression model was used to analyze trends in overall (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 48,131 patients were selected, with a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 0-203 months). By type of treatment, the 3-year OS was 10% with radiation therapy (RT), 37% with surgery (S), 34% with surgery and postoperative radiation (S-RT), and 45% with neoadjuvant radiation followed by surgery (Neo-RT) (p = 0.0001). Multivariable Cox model identified sex, race, laterality, T stage, N stage, and type of treatment as factors affecting survival. Estimated hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for other variables in regression model showed the types of treatment: S (HR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.4), S-RT (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3), and RT (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 2.15-2.53) were associated with significantly worse overall survival when compared with Neo-RT (p = 0.0001). Conclusion: This population based study demonstrates that patients with Stage III NSCLC receiving Neo-RT had significantly improved overall survival when compared with other treatment groups.

  17. Functional characterization of Trip10 in cancer cell growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Pearlly S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cdc42-interacting protein-4, Trip10 (also known as CIP4, is a multi-domain adaptor protein involved in diverse cellular processes, which functions in a tissue-specific and cell lineage-specific manner. We previously found that Trip10 is highly expressed in estrogen receptor-expressing (ER+ breast cancer cells. Estrogen receptor depletion reduced Trip10 expression by progressively increasing DNA methylation. We hypothesized that Trip10 functions as a tumor suppressor and may be involved in the malignancy of ER-negative (ER- breast cancer. To test this hypothesis and evaluate whether Trip10 is epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation in other cancers, we evaluated DNA methylation of Trip10 in liver cancer, brain tumor, ovarian cancer, and breast cancer. Methods We applied methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and bisulfite sequencing to determine the DNA methylation of Trip10 in various cancer cell lines and tumor specimens. We also overexpressed Trip10 to observe its effect on colony formation and in vivo tumorigenesis. Results We found that Trip10 is hypermethylated in brain tumor and breast cancer, but hypomethylated in liver cancer. Overexpressed Trip10 was associated with endogenous Cdc42 and huntingtin in IMR-32 brain tumor cells and CP70 ovarian cancer cells. However, overexpression of Trip10 promoted colony formation in IMR-32 cells and tumorigenesis in mice inoculated with IMR-32 cells, whereas overexpressed Trip10 substantially suppressed colony formation in CP70 cells and tumorigenesis in mice inoculated with CP70 cells. Conclusions Trip10 regulates cancer cell growth and death in a cancer type-specific manner. Differential DNA methylation of Trip10 can either promote cell survival or cell death in a cell type-dependent manner.

  18. Mechanisms of Sensorineural Cell Damage, Death and Survival in the Cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Frederic Ryan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of acquired hearing loss, including presbycusis, is caused by irreversible damage to the sensorineural tissues of the cochlea. This article reviews the intracellular mechanisms that contribute to sensorineural damage in the cochlea, as well as the survival signaling pathways that can provide endogenous protection and tissue rescue. These data have primarily been generated in hearing loss not directly related to age. However, there is evidence that similar mechanisms operate in presbycusis. Moreover, accumulation of damage from other causes can contribute to age-related hearing loss. Potential therapeutic interventions to balance opposing but interconnected cell damage and survival pathways, such as antioxidants, anti-apoptotics, and pro-inflammatory cytokine inhibitors, are also discussed.

  19. Cell survival in carbon beams - comparison of amorphous track model predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, L.; Greilich, S.; Korcyl, M.;

    Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under i....... Amorphous track modelling of luminescence detector efficiency in proton and carbon beams. 4.Tsuruoka C, Suzuki M, Kanai T, et al. LET and ion species dependence for cell killing in normal human skin fibroblasts. Radiat Res. 2005;163:494-500.......Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under ion...... factors is the normalization of the energy distribution around the particle tracks to the actual LET value. Later on we check what is the effect of radial dose distribution choice on kappa parameter for different types and energy of ions. Outline References 1.Katz R, Sharma SC.Response of cells to fast...

  20. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell Survival and Function Are Regulated by the Transcription Factor Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beury, Daniel W; Carter, Kayla A; Nelson, Cassandra; Sinha, Pratima; Hanson, Erica; Nyandjo, Maeva; Fitzgerald, Phillip J; Majeed, Amry; Wali, Neha; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2016-04-15

    Tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) contribute to immune suppression in tumor-bearing individuals and are a major obstacle to effective immunotherapy. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the mechanisms used by MDSC to suppress T cell activation. Although ROS are toxic to most cells, MDSC survive despite their elevated content and release of ROS. NF erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that regulates a battery of genes that attenuate oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that MDSC resistance to ROS may be regulated by Nrf2. To test this hypothesis, we used Nrf2(+/+)and Nrf2(-/-)BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice bearing 4T1 mammary carcinoma and MC38 colon carcinoma, respectively. Nrf2 enhanced MDSC suppressive activity by increasing MDSC production of H2O2, and it increased the quantity of tumor-infiltrating MDSC by reducing their oxidative stress and rate of apoptosis. Nrf2 did not affect circulating levels of MDSC in tumor-bearing mice because the decreased apoptotic rate of tumor-infiltrating MDSC was balanced by a decreased rate of differentiation from bone marrow progenitor cells. These results demonstrate that Nrf2 regulates the generation, survival, and suppressive potency of MDSC, and that a feedback homeostatic mechanism maintains a steady-state level of circulating MDSC in tumor-bearing individuals. PMID:26936880

  1. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1-1% O2), physioxia or physoxia (∼1-13%), and normoxia (∼20%) are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia) or excess oxygen (hyperoxia) could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude) and pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation, solid tumor formation, lung disease, or myocardial infarction). Hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of heart disease, cancers, stroke, and other causes of mortality. Hypoxia inducible factor(s) (HIFs) are key oxygen sensors that mediate the ability of the cell to cope with decreased oxygen tension. These transcription factors regulate cellular adaptation to hypoxia and protect cells by responding acutely and inducing production of endogenous metabolites and proteins to promptly regulate metabolic pathways. Here, we review the role of the HIF pathway as a metabolic adaptation pathway and how this pathway plays a role in cell survival. We emphasize the roles of the HIF pathway in physiological adaptation, cell death, pH regulation, and adaptation during exercise. PMID:26491231

  2. P2X7 receptor predicts postoperative cancer-specific survival of patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Liu, Yidong; Xu, Le; An, Huimin; Chang, Yuan; Yang, Yuanfeng; Zhang, Weijuan; Xu, Jiejie

    2015-09-01

    The P2X7 receptor, an ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channel, is involved in inflammation, apoptosis and cell proliferation, and thereby plays a crucial role during oncogenic transformation in various malignancies. This study aims to evaluate the impact of P2X7 receptor expression on postoperative cancer-specific survival of patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). A total of 273 patients with ccRCC undergoing nephrectomy at a single institution were retrospectively enrolled in this study, among which 86 patients died of this disease and six patients died of other causes. Clinicopathologic features and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were recorded. P2X7 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in clinical specimens. Kaplan-Meier method with log rank test was performed to compare survival curves. Cox regression models were used to evaluate the prognostic values of variables on CSS. Concordance index was calculated to assess prognostic accuracy of prognostic models. Median follow-up period was 90 months (range, 11-120 months). Intratumoral P2X7 expression was significantly lower than peritumoral tissues (P independent prognostic factor for CSS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.693; P = 0.034). The prognostic accuracy of TNM stage, UISS and SSIGN scoring models was improved when intratumoral P2X7 expression was added. Intratumoral P2X7 expression is a potential independent adverse prognostic indicator for postoperative CSS of patients with ccRCC. PMID:26179886

  3. Ciprofloxacin Derivatives Affect Parasite Cell Division and Increase the Survival of Mice Infected with Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica S Martins-Duarte

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis, caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, is a worldwide disease whose clinical manifestations include encephalitis and congenital malformations in newborns. Previously, we described the synthesis of new ethyl-ester derivatives of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin with ~40-fold increased activity against T. gondii in vitro, compared with the original compound. Cipro derivatives are expected to target the parasite's DNA gyrase complex in the apicoplast. The activity of these compounds in vivo, as well as their mode of action, remained thus far uncharacterized. Here, we examined the activity of the Cipro derivatives in vivo, in a model of acute murine toxoplasmosis. In addition, we investigated the cellular effects T. gondii tachyzoites in vitro, by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. When compared with Cipro treatment, 7-day treatments with Cipro derivatives increased mouse survival significantly, with 13-25% of mice surviving for up to 60 days post-infection (vs. complete lethality 10 days post-infection, with Cipro treatment. Light microscopy examination early (6 and 24h post-infection revealed that 6-h treatments with Cipro derivatives inhibited the initial event of parasite cell division inside host cells, in an irreversible manner. By TEM and immunofluorescence, the main cellular effects observed after treatment with Cipro derivatives and Cipro were cell scission inhibition--with the appearance of 'tethered' parasites--malformation of the inner membrane complex, and apicoplast enlargement and missegregation. Interestingly, tethered daughter cells resulting from Cipro derivatives, and also Cipro, treatment did not show MORN1 cap or centrocone localization. The biological activity of Cipro derivatives against C. parvum, an apicomplexan species that lacks the apicoplast, is, approximately, 50 fold lower than that in T. gondii tachyzoites, supporting that these compounds targets the apicoplast. Our results

  4. Role of ATG10 expression quantitative trait loci in non-small cell lung cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kaipeng; Liang, Cheng; Li, Qin; Yan, Caiwang; Wang, Cheng; Gu, Yayun; Zhu, Meng; Du, Fangzhi; Wang, Hui; Dai, Juncheng; Liu, Xiao'an; Jin, Guangfu; Shen, Hongbing; Ma, Hongxia; Hu, Zhibin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this article was to evaluate whether genetic variants in autophagy-related genes affect the overall survival (OS) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. We analyzed 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in core autophagy-related genes for OS in 1,001 NSCLC patients. Three promising SNPs in ATG10 were subsequently annotated by the expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) and methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTL) analyses based on Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets. We observed that the variants of rs10514231, rs1864182 and rs1864183 were associated with poor lung cancer survival (HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.07-1.65; HR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.13-1.81; HR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.14-1.68, respectively) and positively correlated with ATG10 expression (all p lung cancer patients in TCGA dataset (HR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.33-3.29). Moreover, the variants of rs10514231 and rs1864182 were associated with the increased methylation levels of cg17942617 (meQTL), which in turn contributed to the elevated ATG10 expression and decreased survival time. Further functional assays revealed that ATG10 facilitated lung cancer cell proliferation and migration. Our findings suggest that eQTL/meQTL variations of ATG10 could influence lung cancer survival through regulating ATG10 expression. PMID:27225307

  5. SU-E-T-352: Why Is the Survival Rate Low in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z; Feng, Y; Rasmussen, K; Rice, J; Stephenson, S; Ferreira, Maria C [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Liu, T [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Yuh, K [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Wang, R; Grecula, J [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lo, S [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Mayr, N; Yuh, W [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumors are composed of a large number of clonogens that have the capability of indefinite reproduction. Even when there is complete clinical or radiographic regression of the gross tumor mass after treatment, tumor recurrence can occur if the clonogens are not completely eradicated by radiotherapy. This study was to investigate the colonogen number and its association with the tumor control probability (TCP) in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCCA). Methods: A literature search was conducted to collect clinical information of patients with OSCCA, including the prescription dose, tumor volume and survival rate. The linear-quadratic (LQ) model was incorporated into TCP model for clinical data analysis. The total dose ranged from 60 to 70 Gy and tumor volume ranged from 10 to 50 cc. The TCP was calculated for each group according to tumor size and dose. The least χ{sup 2} method was used to fit the TCP calculation to clinical data while other LQ model parameters (α, β) were adopted from the literature, due to the limited patient data. Results: A total of 190 patients with T2–T4 OSCCA were included. The association with HPV was not available for all the patients. The 3-year survival rate was about 82% for T2 squamous cell carcinoma and 40% for advanced tumors. Fitting the TCP model to the survival data, the average clonogen number was 1.56×10{sup 12}. For the prescription dose of 70 Gy, the calculated TCP ranged from 40% to 90% when the tumor volume varied from 10 to 50 cc. Conclusion: Our data suggests variation between the clonogen number and TCP in OSCCA. Tumors with larger colonogen number tend to have lower TCP and therefore dose escalation above 70 Gy may be indicated in order to improve the TCP and survival rate. Our result will require future confirmation with a large number of patients.

  6. Calcium-independent phospholipase A₂, group VIA, is critical for RPE cell survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; Vohra, Rupali; Westlund, Barbro S.;

    2014-01-01

    of iPLA₂-VIA after SI exposure. Inhibitors of iPLA₂-VIA were used to explore a potential protective role in cells exposed to SI. Primary RPE cell cultures were grown from iPLA₂-VIA knockout mice and wild-type mice. The cultures were exposed to SI to investigate a possible increased protection against......PURPOSE: To investigate the significance of calcium-independent phospholipase A₂, group VIA (iPLA2-VIA), in RPE cell survival following responses to sodium iodate (SI) in cell cultures. METHODS: The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line (ARPE-19) cells and primary mouse-RPE cultures were...... treated with SI to induce cell death. Cells were transfected with an iPLA₂-VIA promoter-luciferase construct to evaluate the regulation of iPLA-VIA after exposure to SI. PCR analysis, western blot analysis, and activity assays were performed to evaluate the mRNA level, protein level, and activity levels...

  7. Effect of dihydroxyanthraquinone (DHAQ) and radiation on the survival of cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihydroxyanthraquinone (DHAQ) is currently being tested as a cancer chemotherapeutic agent because of its structural similarity to Adriamycin (ADR) and other DNA-intercalating antibiotics. The interaction of DHAQ and ionizing radiation on the induction of cell lethality was investigated in Chinese hamster ovary cells in culture. In asynchronous populations of cells, DHAQ produced a slight enhancement of radiation-induced cell lethality as evidenced by changes in both shoulder and slope of the radiation dose-survival curves. However, DHAQ had no effect on either the extent or time course of recovery from sublethal radiation damage. In synchronous populations of cells treated at various times before or after selection in mitosis, the combination of DHAQ and radiation produced greater cell killing than that predicted based on simple additivity of effect, with a decided enhancement for cells treated during S phase. These results indicate that DHAQ is similar to other DNA-intercalating antibiotics in regard to the interaction with ionizing radiation to produce cell lethality

  8. PIAS3 expression in squamous cell lung cancer is low and predicts overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlike lung adenocarcinoma, little progress has been made in the treatment of squamous cell lung carcinoma (SCC). The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has recently reported that receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways are altered in 26% of SCC tumors, validating the importance of downstream Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) activity as a prime therapeutic target in this cancer. In the present report we examine the status of an endogenous inhibitor of STAT3, called Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT3 (PIAS3), in SCC and its potential role in this disease. We examine PIAS3 expression in SCC tumors and cell lines by immunohistochemistry of a tissue microarray and western blotting. PIAS3 mRNA expression and survival data are analyzed in the TCGA data set. SCC cell lines are treated with curcumin to regulate PIAS3 expression and cell growth. PIAS3 protein expression is decreased in a majority of lung SCC tumors and cell lines. Analysis of PIAS3 mRNA transcript levels demonstrated that low PIAS3 levels predicted poor survival; Cox regression analysis revealed a hazard ratio of 0.57 (95% CI: 0.37–0.87), indicating a decrease in the risk of death by 43% for every unit elevation in PIAS3 gene expression. Curcumin treatment increased endogenous PIAS3 expression and decreased cell growth and viability in Calu-1 cells, a model of SCC. Our results implicate PIAS3 loss in the pathology of lung SCC and raise the therapeutic possibility of upregulating PIAS3 expression as a single target that can suppress signaling from the multiple receptor tyrosine kinase receptors found to be amplified in SCC

  9. Mitochondrial respiratory modifiers confer survival advantage by facilitating DNA repair in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High rate of aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), one of the primary hallmarks of cancer cells, acquired during the multistep development of tumors is also responsible for therapeutic resistance. Underlying this hallmark is the compromised respiratory metabolism that contributes to the acquisition of the glycolytic phenotype for sustained ATP production and cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms underlying the glycolysis-linked radio-resistance in cancer cells remain elusive. In this study, we transiently elevated glycolysis by treating human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1) with mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs) viz. 2,4-dinitrophenol, Photosan-3, and Methylene blue to examine if transient stimulation of glycolysis before irradiation using MRMs is sufficient to confer radioresistance. Treatment with MRMs led to a significant (two-fold) increase in glucose consumption and lactate production together with a robust increase in the protein levels of two key regulators of glucose metabolism, i.e. GLUT-1 and HK-II. MRMs also enhanced the clonogenic survival and facilitated DNA repair by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. Inhibition of glucose uptake by inhibitors like 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), 3-bromo pyruvate (3-BP) and fasentin under conditions of stimulated glycolysis not only reversed the effect but also sensitized the cells to radiation more profoundly. The inhibition of glycolysis using 2-DG also reduced the levels of Ku 70 (NHEJ) and Rad-51 (HR) proteins. Thus, our results suggest that enhanced glycolysis in cancer cells may confer radio-resistance and offers survival advantage partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage. (author)

  10. MicroRNA-22 promotes cell survival upon UV radiation by repressing PTEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Guangyun [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Center for Adult Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Jilin Province Key Laboratory of Animal Embryo Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Shi, Yuling [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Center for Adult Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Wu, Zhao-Hui, E-mail: zwu6@uthsc.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Center for Adult Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-22 is induced in cells treated with UV radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATM is required for miR-22 induction in response to UV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-22 targets 3 Prime -UTR of PTEN to repress its expression in UV-treated cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulated miR-22 inhibits apoptosis in cells exposed to UV. -- Abstract: DNA damage response upon UV radiation involves a complex network of cellular events required for maintaining the homeostasis and restoring genomic stability of the cells. As a new class of players involved in DNA damage response, the regulation and function of microRNAs in response to UV remain poorly understood. Here we show that UV radiation induces a significant increase of miR-22 expression, which appears to be dependent on the activation of DNA damage responding kinase ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated). Increased miR-22 expression may result from enhanced miR-22 maturation in cells exposed to UV. We further found that tumor suppressor gene phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression was inversely correlated with miR-22 induction and UV-induced PTEN repression was attenuated by overexpression of a miR-22 inhibitor. Moreover, increased miR-22 expression significantly inhibited the activation of caspase signaling cascade, leading to enhanced cell survival upon UV radiation. Collectively, these results indicate that miR-22 is an important player in the cellular stress response upon UV radiation, which may promote cell survival via the repression of PTEN expression.

  11. Resident bacteria on leaves enhance survival of immigrant cells of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poza-Carrion, Cesar; Suslow, Trevor; Lindow, Steven

    2013-04-01

    Although Salmonella enterica apparently has comparatively low epiphytic fitness on plants, external factors that would influence its ability to survive on plants after contamination would be of significance in the epidemiology of human diseases caused by this human pathogen. Viable population sizes of S. enterica applied to plants preinoculated with Pseudomonas syringae or either of two Erwinia herbicola strains was ≥10-fold higher than that on control plants that were not precolonized by such indigenous bacteria when assessed 24 to 72 h after the imposition of desiccation stress. The protective effect of P. fluorescens, which exhibited antibiosis toward S. enterica in vitro, was only ≈50% that conferred by other bacterial strains. Although S. enterica could produce small cellular aggregates after incubation on wet leaves for several days, and the cells in such aggregates were less susceptible to death upon acute dehydration than solitary cells (as determined by propidium iodide staining), most Salmonella cells were found as isolated cells when it was applied to leaves previously colonized by other bacterial species. The proportion of solitary cells of S. enterica coincident with aggregates of cells of preexisting epiphytic species that subsequently were judged as nonviable by viability staining on dry leaves was as much as 10-fold less than those that had landed on uncolonized portions of the leaf. Thus, survival of immigrant cells of S. enterica on plants appears to be strongly context dependent, and the presence of common epiphytic bacteria on plants can protect such immigrants from at least one key stress (i.e., desiccation) encountered on leaf surfaces. PMID:23506362

  12. Monitoring cell survival after extraction of a single subcellular organelle using optical trapping and pulsed-nitrogen laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, J Patrick; Edgar, J Scott; Chiu, Daniel T

    2005-01-01

    This paper characterizes cell viability in three different cell lines--Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO), neuroblastoma cells fused with glialoma cells (NG108-15) and murine embryonic stem cells (ES-D3)--after N2 laser disruption of the cell membrane and removal, via optical trapping, of a single subcellular organelle. Morphological changes and viability (as determined by live/dead fluorescent stains) of the cell were monitored every half hour over a 4-h period postsurgery. The ability of the cell to survive organelle extraction was found to depend both on the conditions under which surgery was performed and on the cell type. The average viability after surgery for CHO cells was approximately 80%, for NG 108 cells it was approximately 30% and for ES-D3 cells postsurgery viability was approximately 10%. From over 600 surgeries we found the survival of the cell is determined almost exclusively within the first hour postsurgery regardless of cell line. The optimal pulse energy for N2 laser ablation was approximately 0.7 microJ. The N2 pulse produced an approximately 1-3 microm hole in the cell membrane and proved to be the primary source of cell death in those cells that did not survive the procedure. PMID:15850426

  13. The number and microlocalization of tumor-associated immune cells are associated with patient's survival time in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Shangfu; Ma Junliang; Pu Qiang; Yu Nanbin; Che Guowei; Liu Lunxu; Dai Fuqiang; Ma Lin; You Zongbing

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Tumor microenvironment is composed of tumor cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-associated immune cells may inhibit or promote tumor growth and progression. This study was conducted to determine whether the number and microlocalization of macrophages, mature dendritic cells and cytotoxic T cells in non-small cell lung cancer are associated with patient's survival time. Methods Ninety-nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSC...

  14. Role of Ku80-dependent end-joining in delayed genomic instability in mammalian cells surviving ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keiji, E-mail: kzsuzuki@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kodama, Seiji [Research Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-machi, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan); Watanabe, Masami [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori-cho Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2010-01-05

    Ionizing radiation induces delayed destabilization of the genome in the progenies of surviving cells. This phenomenon, which is called radiation-induced genomic instability, is manifested by delayed induction of radiation effects, such as cell death, chromosome aberration, and mutation in the progeny of cells surviving radiation exposure. Previously, there was a report showing that delayed cell death was absent in Ku80-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, however, the mechanism of their defect has not been determined. We found that delayed induction of DNA double strand breaks and chromosomal breaks were intact in Ku80-deficient cells surviving X-irradiation, whereas there was no sign for the production of chromosome bridges between divided daughter cells. Moreover, delayed induction of dicentric chromosomes was significantly compromised in those cells compared to the wild-type CHO cells. Reintroduction of the human Ku86 gene complimented the defective DNA repair and recovered delayed induction of dicentric chromosomes and delayed cell death, indicating that defective Ku80-dependent dicentric induction was the cause of the absence of delayed cell death. Since DNA-PKcs-defective cells showed delayed phenotypes, Ku80-dependent illegitimate rejoining is involved in delayed impairment of the integrity of the genome in radiation-survived cells.

  15. The effect of heat on Na+/H+ antiport function and survival in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Because intracellular pH (pHi) is a determinant of thermosensitivity, it is important to understand the relationship between heat cytotoxicity and the mechanisms responsible for pHi regulation, such as the Na+/H+ antiport. The objective of this study is to elucidate the relationship between heat damage and Na+/H+ antiport activity. Methods and Materials: Various cell lines, EMT6, RIF-1, and its thermoresistant variant TR-4, and CCL39, and its variant that lacks the Na+/H+ antiport (PS120), were all heated using a water bath. Parallel assessments of antiport function and pHi were made using the fluorescent dye 2,7-biscarboxyethyl-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). Results: Exposure of EMT6 cells to 43-46 deg. C for 30-60 min caused progressive decline in antiport activity, in parallel with cytotoxicity. When the same degree of cytotoxicity was induced by ionizing radiation, no alteration in Na+/H+ antiport function was observed. Despite a 10-fold lower survival in RIF-1 compared to TR-4 cells after heating, there was no difference in the thermosensitivity of their antiports. Antiport activity in the TR-4 cells, however, was higher than that of RIF-1 cells both before and during heating. Intracellular pH for TR-4 cells decreased minimally during heating, in contrast to a decline of 1 pH unit in RIF-1 cells despite similar relative levels of antiport activity, suggesting that in this pair of cell lines, antiport activity does not play a major pHi regulatory role. PS120 and CCL39 cells had similar survival levels when heated at pHe 7.2 in the presence of NaHCO3, which allows function of the other major regulator of pHi, the Na+-dependent HCO3-/Cl- exchanger. This occurred despite a drop in pHi in the PS120 cells during heating. A reduced survival was observed, however, in PS120 cells after 43 deg. C for 30-60 min at either pHe 6.5 or pHe 7.2 in the absence of NaHCO3. Intracellular pH for both lines decreased with increasing duration of heating under the various

  16. Evidence that high-migration drug-surviving MOLT4 leukemia cells exhibit cancer stem cell-like properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoxing; Xiong, Meng; Jin, Yujie; Deng, Chaohua; Xu, Hui; An, Changqing; Hao, Ling; Yang, Xiangyong; Deng, Xinzhou; Tu, Zhenbo; Li, Xinran; Xiao, Ruijing; Zhang, Qiuping

    2016-07-01

    Leukemia represents a spectrum of hematological malignancies threatening human health. Resistance to treatments and metastasis of leukemia are the main causes of death in patients. Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are the initiating cells of leukemia as well as the main source of drug resistance, invasion and metastasis. Consequently, eliminating LSCs is a prerequisite to eradicate leukemia. Preliminary studies in our laboratory have shown that chemokines and their related receptors play an important role in the drug resistance and metastasis of leukemic cells. In this study, we obtained high migration drug-surviving (short term) MOLT4 cells (hMDSCs-MOLT4) with treatment of doxorubicin (DOX) after Transwell assay. Then we detected stem cell-associated molecular markers on hMDSCs-MOLT4 cells and the parental MOLT4 cells by FCM, QPCR, western blotting, H&E staining and immunohisto-chemistry experimental techniques in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we explored its impact on drug resistance and tumor formation. Then we found that compared with the parental MOLT4 cells, the mRNA expression levels of stem cell-related factors Sox2, Oct4, C-myc, Klf4, Nanog, Bmi-1, CXCR4 are increased in hMDSCs-MOLT4 cells, together with the protein expression levels of Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, Nanog, CXCR4 and CD34. Our results indicated that hMDSCs-MOLT4 cells exhibited strong drug resistance and certain cancer stem cell-like characteristics. It is the first indication that the targeting stemness factors such as Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, Nanog and CXCR4 may represent plausible options for eliminating T-ALL stem-like cells. The present findings shed light on the relationship between drug-tolerant leukemic cells and cancer stem cells. PMID:27210806

  17. Bicaudal is a conserved substrate for Drosophila and mammalian caspases and is essential for cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M Creagh

    Full Text Available Members of the caspase family of cysteine proteases coordinate cell death through restricted proteolysis of diverse protein substrates and play a conserved role in apoptosis from nematodes to man. However, while numerous substrates for the mammalian cell death-associated caspases have now been described, few caspase substrates have been identified in other organisms. Here, we have utilized a proteomics-based approach to identify proteins that are cleaved by caspases during apoptosis in Drosophila D-Mel2 cells, a subline of the Schneider S2 cell line. This approach identified multiple novel substrates for the fly caspases and revealed that bicaudal/betaNAC is a conserved substrate for Drosophila and mammalian caspases. RNAi-mediated silencing of bicaudal expression in Drosophila D-Mel2 cells resulted in a block to proliferation, followed by spontaneous apoptosis. Similarly, silencing of expression of the mammalian bicaudal homologue, betaNAC, in HeLa, HEK293T, MCF-7 and MRC5 cells also resulted in spontaneous apoptosis. These data suggest that bicaudal/betaNAC is essential for cell survival and is a conserved target of caspases from flies to man.

  18. N-acetylcysteine impairs survival of luteal cells through mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhrke, Berthold; Xu, Jinxian; Weitzel, Joachim M; Krüger, Burkhard; Goldammer, Tom; Viergutz, Torsten

    2010-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is known as an antioxidant and used for mucus viscosity reduction. However, this drug prevents or induces cell death depending on the cell type. The response of steroidogenic luteal cells to NAC is unknown. Our data shows that NAC can behave as an antioxidant or prooxidant in dependency on the concentration and mitochondrial energization. NAC elevated the flowcytometric-measured portion of hypodiploid (dying) cells. This rise was completely abolished by aurintricarboxylic acid, an inhibitor of topoisomerase II. NAC increased the secretion of nitric oxide and cellular nitrotyrosine. An image analysis indicated that cells pretreated with NAC and loaded with DHR showed a fluorescent structure probably elicited by the oxidative product of DHR, rhodamine 123 that sequesters mitochondrially. Pretreating luteal cells with NAC or adding NAC directly to mitochondrial fractions followed by assessing the mitochondrial transmembrane potential difference (Deltapsi) by the JC-1 technique demonstrated a marked decrease in Deltapsi. A protonophore restored Deltapsi and rotenone (an inhibitor of respiratory chain complex I) inhibited mitochondrial recovering. Thus, in steroidogenic luteal cells from healthy mature corpus luteum, NAC impairs cellular survival by interfering with mitochondrial metabolism. The protonophore-induced recovering of NAC-provoked decrease in Deltapsi indicates that an ATP synthase-favored route of H(+) re-entry to the matrix is essentially switched off by NAC while other respiratory chain complexes remain intact. These data may be important for therapeutic timing of treatments with NAC. (c) 2010 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:20151456

  19. Bicaudal is a conserved substrate for Drosophila and mammalian caspases and is essential for cell survival.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Creagh, Emma M

    2009-01-01

    Members of the caspase family of cysteine proteases coordinate cell death through restricted proteolysis of diverse protein substrates and play a conserved role in apoptosis from nematodes to man. However, while numerous substrates for the mammalian cell death-associated caspases have now been described, few caspase substrates have been identified in other organisms. Here, we have utilized a proteomics-based approach to identify proteins that are cleaved by caspases during apoptosis in Drosophila D-Mel2 cells, a subline of the Schneider S2 cell line. This approach identified multiple novel substrates for the fly caspases and revealed that bicaudal\\/betaNAC is a conserved substrate for Drosophila and mammalian caspases. RNAi-mediated silencing of bicaudal expression in Drosophila D-Mel2 cells resulted in a block to proliferation, followed by spontaneous apoptosis. Similarly, silencing of expression of the mammalian bicaudal homologue, betaNAC, in HeLa, HEK293T, MCF-7 and MRC5 cells also resulted in spontaneous apoptosis. These data suggest that bicaudal\\/betaNAC is essential for cell survival and is a conserved target of caspases from flies to man.

  20. Identification of cytoskeleton-associated proteins essential for lysosomal stability and survival of human cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth-Pedersen, Line; Aits, Sonja; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth;

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-disturbing drugs inhibit lysosomal trafficking and induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization followed by cathepsin-dependent cell death. To identify specific trafficking-related proteins that control cell survival and lysosomal stability, we screened a molecular motor siRNA library in...... human MCF7 breast cancer cells. SiRNAs targeting four kinesins (KIF11/Eg5, KIF20A, KIF21A, KIF25), myosin 1G (MYO1G), myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) were identified as effective inducers of non-apoptotic cell death. The cell death induced by KIF11, KIF21A, KIF25, MYH1 or TPM2 si......, MYH1, TPM2), increased dextran accumulation (KIF20A), or reduced autophagic flux (MYO1G, MYH1). Importantly, all seven siRNAs also killed human cervix cancer (HeLa) and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells and sensitized cancer cells to other lysosome-destabilizing treatments, i.e. photo-oxidation, siramesine...

  1. MANF Is Indispensable for the Proliferation and Survival of Pancreatic β Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lindahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available All forms of diabetes mellitus (DM are characterized by the loss of functional pancreatic β cell mass, leading to insufficient insulin secretion. Thus, identification of novel approaches to protect and restore β cells is essential for the development of DM therapies. Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER-stress-inducible protein, but its physiological role in mammals has remained obscure. We generated MANF-deficient mice that strikingly develop severe diabetes due to progressive postnatal reduction of β cell mass, caused by decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Additionally, we show that lack of MANF in vivo in mouse leads to chronic unfolded protein response (UPR activation in pancreatic islets. Importantly, MANF protein enhanced β cell proliferation in vitro and overexpression of MANF in the pancreas of diabetic mice enhanced β cell regeneration. We demonstrate that MANF specifically promotes β cell proliferation and survival, thereby constituting a therapeutic candidate for β cell protection and regeneration.

  2. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: Roles for distinct TIN2-containing complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sahn-ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Zou, Ying; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Yannone, Steven M.; Campisi, Judith

    2007-10-02

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA binding proteins (TRF1, TRF2 and POT1), and several associated factors. One factor, TIN2, binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. Along with two other proteins, TPP1 and hRap1, these form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere maintenance complex. It is not clear whether sub-complexes also exist in vivo. We provide evidence for two TIN2 sub-complexes with distinct functions in human cells. We isolated these two TIN2 sub-complexes from nuclear lysates of unperturbed cells and cells expressing TIN2 mutants TIN2-13, TIN2-15C, which cannot bind TRF2 or TRF1, respectively. In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere dysfunction and cell death. Our findings suggest that distinct TIN2 complexes exist, and that TIN2-15C-sensitive subcomplexes are particularly important for cell survival in the absence of functional p53.

  3. Radiation Survival in Synchronous and Asynchronous Chinese Hamster Cells In Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchronized mammalian cells enable radiation responses to be examined as a function of the position of the cell within its generation cycle. However, synchrony techniques are limited by the random distribution of generation rates in cell populations and, because of the techniques employed, stages such as G2 and mitosis are difficult to examine. Superposing on the mitotic selection technique high-specific- activity tritiated thymidine to inactivate resistant S cells enables the average sensitivity of G2 and mitotic cells to be established. The changes in sensitivity during the cell cycle for Chinese hamster cells are considerable, at least as great as the effect of the presence or absence of oxygen. G2 and mitosis are the most sensitive cells, followed by G1, early S and finally late S cells as the most resistant. With this data the response of an asynchronous population can be estimated and compared with experimental data. Calculation and experiment agree well. The selection + tritiated thymidine technique is still limited in resolution to a one-hour period. Experiments varying the interval between irradiation and selection indicate that there is, very probably, a brief phase more sensitive than the average in the selected mitotic population which should be examined further. Experiments with Janus (fission) neutrons indicate that the changes in response during the cell cycle are smaller than for X-rays and the shapes of the survival curves are different. The RBE of these neutrons is shown to vary with both dose level and position in the cell cycle. (author)

  4. Survival of priceless cells: active and passive protection of embryonic stem cells against immune destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utermöhlen, Olaf; Krönke, Martin

    2007-06-15

    This review focuses on our current knowledge of the mechanisms employed by embryonic stem (ES) cells to avoid destruction by cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, ES cells have been found to shield themselves against cytotoxic effector cells by expressing CD95L and serine protease inhibitor SPI-6 mediating apoptosis of the cytotoxic cells and inactivation of granzyme B, respectively. These findings are discussed in view of their implications for using ES cell-derived transplants in regenerative medicine as well as for our understanding of early embryonic stages during invasion and implantation. PMID:17459325

  5. Irradiation effects of ultraviolet rays on Leptospira cells. Loss of motility, survive ability, and damages of cell structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hidezo (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-12-01

    The irradiation effects of ultraviolets rays (UV) on leptospira cells were investigated. Four serovar strains of Genus Leptospira ; L. copenhageni, L. canicola, L. biflexa and L. illini were used. A sterilization lamp (Toshiba-GL-15) was lighted at intervals of 90mm on the sample fluid for several minutes. Loss of motility, survival growth and morphological damages were recognized under several conditions. The medium conditions were important, that is, the Korthof's medium was less effective than phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The irradiation time was also important, that is, L. canicola cells in PBS lost their motility and survive ability within 300sec. of irradiation, however, much more time, such as 1.200sec. was necessary in Korthof's medium. This phenomenon may be depended upon defensibility of albumin in the latter. Among the strains, L. biflexa cells showed the highest resistance in loss of motility and survive ability, and other three strains were inferior. The remarkable efects of cellular structures were also seen in the materials with 30 min. of irradiation, in both immediate time or after 24h incubation. The damages observed after 24th of irradiation were much more drastic than those of immediate time. No effect could be seen on the cells suspended in the Korthof's medium irradiated for 24h. Regarding morphological effect, there appeared relaxation of helical body, spherical body and semighost as the immediate changes. Structural damages were recognized as the collapse of cell body, such as scattering of capsule, release of axial flagella, loss or change of cytoplasmic density and break down of wall membrane complex. These phenomena were regarded as the indirect effects of UV-irradiation and autolysis in a post-mortem change.

  6. Late Release of Circulating Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells after Chemotherapy Predicts Response and Survival in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine M. Roodhart

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We and others have previously demonstrated that the acute release of progenitor cells in response to chemotherapy actually reduces the efficacy of the chemotherapy. Here, we take these data further and investigate the clinical relevance of circulating endothelial (progenitor cells (CE(PCs and modulatory cytokines in patients after chemotherapy with relation to progression-free and overall survival (PFS/OS. Patients treated with various chemotherapeutics were included. Blood sampling was performed at baseline, 4 hours, and 7 and 21 days after chemotherapy. The mononuclear cell fraction was analyzed for CE(PC by FACS analysis. Plasma was analyzed for cytokines by ELISA or Luminex technique. CE(PCs were correlated with response and PFS/OS using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. We measured CE(PCs and cytokines in 71 patients. Only patients treated with paclitaxel showed an immediate increase in endothelial progenitor cell 4 hours after start of treatment. These immediate changes did not correlate with response or survival. After 7 and 21 days of chemotherapy, a large and consistent increase in CE(PC was found (P < .01, independent of the type of chemotherapy. Changes in CE(PC levels at day 7 correlated with an increase in tumor volume after three cycles of chemotherapy and predicted PFS/OS, regardless of the tumor type or chemotherapy. These findings indicate that the late release of CE(PC is a common phenomenon after chemotherapeutic treatment. The correlation with a clinical response and survival provides further support for the biologic relevance of these cells in patients' prognosis and stresses their possible use as a therapeutic target.

  7. Enhancing the survival of grafted cardiac stem cells for long-term imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Uyenchi N.; Tae, Seong Ho; Bom, Hee Seung; Min, Jung Joon [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Heat shock treatment is known to induce the protection for cells from various environmental insults. Akt (protein kinase B) - with anti-apoptotic activity - has presently been reemerged as a critical enzyme in several signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation and programmed cell death. We hypothesized that thermotic treatment and Akt activity in genetically modified cardiomyoblasts would improve their survival after transplantation. Embryonic rat H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were simultaneously transfected with adenovirus containing luciferase reporter gene (MOl 50) and another containing Akt gene [MOl (0 100) ]. 5x106 harvested cells were i.m. implanted into murine skeletal muscles. Bioluminescence imaging was acquired for everyday and luciferase assay was performed to validate the imaging data. For thermotic challenge, adenovirus-mediated flue expressing H9c2 cells were subjected to great heat of 42 .deg. C for 1 hr and re-cultured at 37 .deg. C for 18 hours. Expression of heat shock protein in cells was detected in vitro by Western-blotting. 5x106 normal and shocked cells were implanted into mouse thigh (n = 5) and the animals were imaged with bioluminescence imaging system. In vitro evidences showed a high level expression of Akt and HSP in transfected H9c2 cells. Animals carrying Akt expressed bioluminescence signals until day 34 of post-implantation. The Flue activity was significantly higher in the shocked H9c2 cell-implanted rats and detected over 10 days as compared with the control group. The graft cell death was reduced by 73% at day 2 (1.46+ 10-7 p/s/cm{sup 2}/sr), 51% at day 3 (1.02+10-7 p/s/cm{sup 2}/sr), and 8% at day 10 (1.62+ 10-6 p/s/cm{sup 2}/sr). We revealed here improvement of donor cell's survival induced by the anti-apoptotic means of Akt genetic therapy or heat shock. Utility of bioluminescence imaging resulted in a potential to noninvasively and repetitively monitor implanted cardiac myoblasts over time.

  8. Determination of the survival curve of the cell irradiated with low dose rate neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the radiation in tissue and cells are a theme of extreme importance and that is receiving large attention more and more now. This work purposes to evaluate the deleterious effects of the neutrons radiation at low dose rate in lineages of human cancerous cells through the analysis of survival curves. Deleterious effects due to radiation of low dose rate (3.8 mSv/hr) were observed in cells of the lineage HeLa S3. Previous studies, in lineage HN5 of tongue carcinoma, showed survive level to 0.2Sv of 80%, compatible to the value of 88,57% 0.4 Sv obtained for HeLa S3. In a close future, with the molecular biology characterization of a great number or possibly all cancer types (that will be accelerated largely with the conclusion of the human genome project), studies like this, can be much more specific, and could determine the efficiency of the neutrons or any other radiation type for each one of those types. Those data would have of great value for the medicine and they would help to plan the treatments better. (author)

  9. EMR2 Receptor Ligation Modulates Cytokine Secretion Profiles and Cell Survival of Lipopolysaccharide-treated Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Ying Chenee

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidermal growth factor (EGF-like module-containing mucin-like hormonereceptor-like 2 (EMR2 is an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor previouslyshown to potentiate neutrophil responses to a number of inflammatory stimuli. EMR2 activation promotes neutrophil adhesion and migration, and augments production of reactive oxygen species and degranulation. In this study,we examined the effect of EMR2 ligation by its specific antibody on thecytokine expression profile and cell survival of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-treated neutrophils.Methods: Neutrophils were treated with LPS in the absence or presence of the antiEMR2 mAb, 2A1. Cell apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry analysisusing annexin-V and propidium iodide staining. Cell supernatants were collected for the detection of cytokine secretion by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: We confirmed the specific priming effect of EMR2 on the response of neutrophils to formyl-Met-Leu-Phe by measuring the production of reactiveoxygen species. Furthermore, we showed that EMR2 ligation suppressesLPS-induced neutrophil survival. In addition, we demonstrated that ligationof EMR2 changes the secretion profiles of multiple cytokines, includinginterleukin (IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Finally, higherlevels of EMR2 were detected on neutrophils of liver cirrhosis patients andwere correlated to a pro-apoptotic phenotype.Conclusion: Collectively, the present data indicate a functional role for EMR2 in themodulation of neutrophil activation during inflammation.

  10. Survival of V79 cells after low doses of X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doses of X-rays of the order 1-3 Gy are used in clinical multifraction regimes. Reduction in oxygen enhancement ratios (OER) and sensitizer enhancement ratios have been reported for CHO cells. The errors in determining low levels of cell kill are largely influenced by sampling and dilution errors. The authors have aimed to reduce these errors by increasing the sample size and reducing dilutions. To further assess the uncertainties involved in these experiments the data were pooled from three independent series of experiments. Asynchronous log phase Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells have been irradiated attached to glass Petri dishes in Eagle's MEM + 10% fcs at a dose rate of 0.61 Gy min/sup -1/ under air + 5% CO/sub 2/ or nitrogen + 5% CO/sub 2/ at 180C. Survival in the range 10/sup -1/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ surviving fraction (SF) was identical at 0.61 Gy min/sup -1/ and 3.93 Gy min/sup -1/. Many previous experiments have given an OER = 3.1 at 10/sup -2/-10/sup -3/ survival. Least squares fit to the linear quadratic function log S = -(αD + βD/sup 2/) gave an OER≅3.2 at SF = 10/sup -2/. Below 6 Gy air dose (>0.2 SF) OER was reduced, but was still ≅ 2.4 at 2 Gy. The linear quadratic function gave an OER for a ≅ 1.5 (the limiting low-dose OER) and √β≅3.2

  11. Measurement of DNA strand break repair and survival rate after X-irradiation of synchronized CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author investigated the induction and repair of DNA strand breaks and the survival rate of CHO cells after X-radiation at different stages of the cell cycle. His particular concern was the interdependence between cell inactivation and double strand break repair. (orig./AJ)

  12. Proving tumour cells by acute nutritional/energy deprivation as a survival threat: a task for microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janečková, H.; Veselý, Pavel; Chmelík, R.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 6 (2009), s. 2339-2345. ISSN 0250-7005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : tumour cell * nutritional deprivation * energy deprivation * cell survival * cell death * digital holographic microscopy * dynamic phase difference Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.428, year: 2009

  13. Effects of protein kinase C activators and staurosporine on protein kinase activity, cell survival, and proliferation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straarup, EM; Schousboe, P; Hansen, HQ;

    1997-01-01

    Autocrine factors prevent cell death in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, a unicellular eukaryote, in a chemically defined medium. At certain growth conditions these factors are released at a sufficient concentration by > 500 cells ml-1 to support cell survival and proliferation. The protein...... kinase C activators phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or 1-oleyl 2-acetate glycerol (OAG) when added to 250 cells ml-1 supported cell survival and proliferation. In the presence of the serine and threonine kinase inhibitor staurosporine the cells died both at 250 cells ml-1 in cultures supplemented...... with either PMA or OAG, or at 2,500 cells ml-1. At 500 cells ml-1 PMA induced the in vivo phosphorylation of at least six proteins. The myelin basic protein fragment 4-14 was phosphorylated in vitro in crude extracts of a culture of 250,000 cells ml-1. Both the in vivo and the in vitro phosphorylation...

  14. Protein Kinase G1 α Overexpression Increases Stem Cell Survival and Cardiac Function after Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Linlin Wang; Zeeshan Pasha; Shuyun Wang; Ning Li; Yuliang Feng; Gang Lu; Millard, Ronald W.; Muhammad Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that overexpression of cGMP-dependent protein kinase type 1α (PKG1α) could mimic the effect of tadalafil on the survival of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contributing to regeneration of the ischemic heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: MSCs from male rats were transduced with adenoviral vector encoding for PKG1α ((PKG1α)MSCs).Controls included native MSCs ((Nat)MSCs) and MSCs transduced with an empty vector ((Null)MSCs). PKG1α activity was increased appr...

  15. Theranostic Imaging of the Kinases and Proteases that Modulate Cell Death and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard H. Chen, Hushan Yuan, Lee Josephson, David E. Sosnovik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several signaling cascades are involved in cell death, with a significant amount of crosstalk between them. Despite the complexity of these cascades several key pro-survival and pro-death players have been identified. These include PI3-kinase, AKT and caspase-3. Here we review the approaches used to date to perform molecular imaging of these important targets. We focus in particular on approaches that include the possibility of modulating the activity of these kinases and proteases in a theranostic approach.

  16. p70S6 kinase signals cell survival as well as growth, inactivating the pro-apoptotic molecule BAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harada, H; Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M;

    2001-01-01

    Cytokines often deliver simultaneous, yet distinct, cell growth and cell survival signals. The 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) is known to regulate cell growth by inducing protein synthesis components. We purified membrane-based p70S6K as a kinase responsible for site......-specific phosphorylation of BAD, which inactivates this proapoptotic molecule. Rapamycin inhibited mitochondrial-based p70S6K, which prevented phosphorylation of Ser-136 on BAD and blocked cell survival induced by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Moreover, IGF-1-induced phosphorylation of BAD Ser-136 was abolished in...... p70S6K-deficient cells. Thus, p70S6K is itself a dual pathway kinase, signaling cell survival as well as growth through differential substrates which include mitochondrial BAD and the ribosomal subunit S6, respectively....

  17. Early palliative care and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: potential mechanisms of prolonged survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Kelly E; Greer, Joseph A; Khatib, Jude; Temel, Jennifer S; Pirl, William F

    2013-02-01

    Patients with advanced cancer experience a significant burden of physical symptoms and psychological distress at the end of life, and many elect to receive aggressive cancer-directed therapy. The goal of palliative care is to relieve suffering and promote quality of life (QOL) for patients and families. Traditionally, both the public and medical community have conceptualized the need for patients to make a choice between pursuing curative therapy or receiving palliative care. However, practice guidelines from the World Health Organization and leadership from the oncology and palliative care communities advocate a different model of palliative care that is introduced from the point of diagnosis of life-threatening illness. Early palliative care has been shown to provide benefits in QOL, mood, and health care utilization. Additionally, preliminary research has suggested that in contrast to fears about palliative care hastening death, referral to palliative care earlier in the course of illness may have the potential to lengthen survival, particularly in patients with advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer. This review summarizes the literature on potential survival benefits of palliative care and presents a model of how early integrated palliative care could potentially influence survival in patients with advanced cancer. PMID:23355404

  18. Tumour thrombus consistency has no impact on survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołąbek, T; Przydacz, M; Okoń, K; Kopczyński, J; Bukowczan, J; Sobczyński, R; Curyło, Ł; Gołąbek, K; Curyło, Ł; Chłosta, P

    2016-06-01

    The prognosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with venous tumour thrombus (VTT) is variable and not always possible to predict. The prognostic impact and independence of tumour thrombus-related factors including the recently introduced tumour thrombus consistency (TTC) on overall survival remain controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic role of TTC in patients' survival. We determined the tumour thrombus consistency (solid vs. friable) in a cohort of 84 patients with RCC and VTT who underwent nephrectomy with thrombectomy, and performed a retrospective evaluation of the patients' data from the prospectively maintained database. A total of 45% of patients had solid thrombus (sTT) and 55% had friable thrombus (fTT). The venous tumour thrombus consistency was not predictive of overall survival. Further studies, preferably prospective and with a larger number of patients, are needed to validate the obtained results, as well as to evaluate the usefulness of tumour thrombus consistency in clinical practice for stratifying the risk of recurrence and planning further follow-up. PMID:27543869

  19. Leishmania Donovani Cell Surface Sialoglycans Regulate Susceptibility for Siglec Mediated Macrophage Invasion and Parasite Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti De

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glycoconjugates play a pivotal role in the survival of Leishmania parasites in destructive surroundings. An important constituent present on many glycoconjugates is sialic acid. By virtue of their peripheral position on oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates, sialic acids are well suited as molecular determinants of specific biological processes, including the interaction of pathogenic microorganisms with sialylated cellular receptors. Differences in a2,3- and a2,6-sialoglycan patterns detected in clonal virulent Leishmania donovani promastigotes, correlated with the level of a2,3- and a2,6-sialyltransferase activity present in these parasites. The role of macrophage sialic acid-receptors in uptake and survival of L.donovani was studied in the murine macrophage cell line raw 264.7. Macrophage invasion was dependent on the binding to Siglec-1, while suppression of MAPK signaling was mediated through Siglec-5. Sialic acid removal by neuraminidase treatment reduced parasite infectivity. The presence of trypsin resistant sialic acid residues in the neuraminidase treated parasites grown in a serum free medium in presence of sialoglycoconjugates indicated that the parasites could salvage sialic acid from exogenous sialoglycans and reutilize it for de novo glycoprotein sialylation in L.donovani parasites. Thus, our results demonstrate the involvement of sialoglycans in the invasion as well as the survival process of L.donovani parasites.

  20. Enhanced survival in vitro of human corneal endothelial cells using mouse embryonic stem cell conditioned medium

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Dong; Liu, Zhiping; Li, Chaoyang; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Jin; Wan, Pengxia; Mou, Yong-Gao; Wang, Zhichong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether mouse embryonic stem cell conditioned medium (ESC-CM) increases the proliferative capacity of human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) in vitro. Methods Primary cultures of HCECs were established from explants of the endothelial cell layer, including the Descemet’s membrane. Cells were cultured in human corneal endothelium medium (CEM) containing 25% ESC-CM for the experimental group and CEM alone for the control group. Phase-contrast microscopy and reverse-transcr...

  1. Factors associated with improved survival following surgery for renal cell carcinoma spinal metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petteys, Rory J; Spitz, Steven M; Goodwin, C Rory; Abu-Bonsrah, Nancy; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy F; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) frequently metastasizes to the spine, causing pain or neurological dysfunction, and is often resistant to standard therapies. Spinal surgery is frequently required, but may result in high morbidity rates. The authors sought to identify prognostic factors and determine clinical outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for RCC spinal metastases. METHODS The authors searched the records of patients who had undergone spinal surgery for metastatic disease at a single institution during a 12-year period and retrieved data for 30 patients with metastatic RCC. The records were retrospectively reviewed for data on preoperative conditions, treatment, and survival. Statistical analyses (i.e., Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank test in univariate analysis) were performed with R version 2.15.2. RESULTS The 30 patients (23 men and 7 women with a mean age of 57.6 years [range 29-79 years]) had in total 40 spinal surgeries for metastatic RCC. The indications for surgery included pain (70%) and weakness (30%). Fourteen patients (47%) had a Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) indicating indeterminate or impending instability, and 6 patients (20%) had a SINS denoting instability. The median length of postoperative survival estimated with Kaplan-Meier analysis was 11.4 months. Younger age (p = 0.001) and disease control at the primary site (p = 0.005), were both significantly associated with improved survival. In contrast, visceral (p = 0.002) and osseous (p = 0.009) metastases, nonambulatory status (p = 0.001), and major comorbidities (p = 0.015) were all significantly associated with decreased survival. Postoperative Frankel grades were the same or had improved in 78% of patients. Major complications occurred in 9 patients, and there were 3 deaths (10%) during the 30-day in-hospital period. Three en bloc resections were performed. CONCLUSIONS Resection and fixation may provide pain relief and neurological stabilization in patients

  2. Survival rate of homster cells followed by X-radiation: analysis in terms of Chadwick-Leenhouts model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental data on the survival of well-synchronized hamster cells are compared with theoretical values, calculated according to the formula based on..the Chadwick-Leenhouts model. When introducing corrections for DNA replication the experimental data model well for cells at any stage of the cycle. The data on survival of asynchronous population obtained by synthesizing the data on cell survival at separate cycle stages are merely by chance well described by the same equation as the results of experimental determination. The data on the induction of DNA breaks and results of studying repair prove a direct-connection of these processes with survival supposed in the model. The use of the above equation to determine the shape of the survival curve in the initial portion is quite advisable. The analysis shows that the survival curve has a slope at the initial portion almost always. The exception is made by cells in mitosis or late interphase, the survival of which is approximated by a curve with a zero slope

  3. Propolis augments apoptosis induced by butyrate via targeting cell survival pathways.

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    Eric Drago

    Full Text Available Diet is one of the major lifestyle factors affecting incidence of colorectal cancer (CC, and despite accumulating evidence that numerous diet-derived compounds modulate CC incidence, definitive dietary recommendations are not available. We propose a strategy that could facilitate the design of dietary supplements with CC-preventive properties. Thus, nutrient combinations that are a source of apoptosis-inducers and inhibitors of compensatory cell proliferation pathways (e.g., AKT signaling may produce high levels of programmed death in CC cells. Here we report the combined effect of butyrate, an apoptosis inducer that is produced through fermentation of fiber in the colon, and propolis, a honeybee product, on CC cells. We established that propolis increases the apoptosis of CC cells exposed to butyrate through suppression of cell survival pathways such as the AKT signaling. The programmed death of CC cells by combined exposure to butyrate and propolis is further augmented by inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway. Analyses on the contribution of the downstream targets of JNK signaling, c-JUN and JAK/STAT, to the apoptosis of butyrate/propolis-treated CC cells ascertained that JAK/STAT signaling has an anti-apoptotic role; whereas, the role of cJUN might be dependent upon regulatory cell factors. Thus, our studies ascertained that propolis augments apoptosis of butyrate-sensitive CC cells and re-sensitizes butyrate-resistant CC cells to apoptosis by suppressing AKT signaling and downregulating the JAK/STAT pathway. Future in vivo studies should evaluate the CC-preventive potential of a dietary supplement that produces high levels of colonic butyrate, propolis, and diet-derived JAK/STAT inhibitors.

  4. Latent KSHV Infected Endothelial Cells Are Glutamine Addicted and Require Glutaminolysis for Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Sanchez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS. KSHV establishes a predominantly latent infection in the main KS tumor cell type, the spindle cell, which is of endothelial cell origin. KSHV requires the induction of multiple metabolic pathways, including glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis, for the survival of latently infected endothelial cells. Here we demonstrate that latent KSHV infection leads to increased levels of intracellular glutamine and enhanced glutamine uptake. Depletion of glutamine from the culture media leads to a significant increase in apoptotic cell death in latently infected endothelial cells, but not in their mock-infected counterparts. In cancer cells, glutamine is often required for glutaminolysis to provide intermediates for the tri-carboxylic acid (TCA cycle and support for the production of biosynthetic and bioenergetic precursors. In the absence of glutamine, the TCA cycle intermediates alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG and pyruvate prevent the death of latently infected cells. Targeted drug inhibition of glutaminolysis also induces increased cell death in latently infected cells. KSHV infection of endothelial cells induces protein expression of the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5. Chemical inhibition of SLC1A5, or knockdown by siRNA, leads to similar cell death rates as glutamine deprivation and, similarly, can be rescued by αKG. KSHV also induces expression of the heterodimeric transcription factors c-Myc-Max and related heterodimer MondoA-Mlx. Knockdown of MondoA inhibits expression of both Mlx and SLC1A5 and induces a significant increase in cell death of only cells latently infected with KSHV, again, fully rescued by the supplementation of αKG. Therefore, during latent infection of endothelial cells, KSHV activates and requires the Myc/MondoA-network to upregulate the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5, leading to increased glutamine uptake for glutaminolysis. These findings

  5. Metagenes Associated with Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgard, Egon; Vooder, Tõnu; Võsa, Urmo; Välk, Kristjan; Liu, Mingming; Luo, Cheng; Hoti, Fabian; Roosipuu, Retlav; Annilo, Tarmo; Laine, Jukka; Frenz, Christopher M.; Zhang, Liqing; Metspalu, Andres

    2011-01-01

    NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) comprises about 80% of all lung cancer cases worldwide. Surgery is most effective treatment for patients with early-stage disease. However, 30%–55% of these patients develop recurrence within 5 years. Therefore, markers that can be used to accurately classify early-stage NSCLC patients into different prognostic groups may be helpful in selecting patients who should receive specific therapies. A previously published dataset was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of different NSCLC subtypes. A moderated two-sample t-test was used to identify differentially expressed genes between all tumor samples and cancer-free control tissue, between SCC samples and AC/BC samples and between stage I tumor samples and all other tumor samples. Gene expression microarray measurements were validated using qRT-PCR. Bayesian regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were performed to determine metagenes associated with survival. We identified 599 genes which were down-regulated and 402 genes which were up-regulated in NSCLC compared to the normal lung tissue and 112 genes which were up-regulated and 101 genes which were down-regulated in AC/BC compared to the SCC. Further, for stage Ib patients the metagenes potentially associated with survival were identified. Genes that expressed differently between normal lung tissue and cancer showed enrichment in gene ontology terms which were associated with mitosis and proliferation. Bayesian regression and Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that gene-expression patterns and metagene profiles can be applied to predict the probability of different survival outcomes in NSCLC patients. PMID:21695068

  6. Endothelial cell-initiated signaling promotes the survival and self-renewal of cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, Sudha; Dong, Zhihong; Vodopyanov, Dmitry; Imai, Atsushi; Helman, Joseph I.; Prince, Mark E.; Wicha, Max S.; Jacques E Nör

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cancer stem cells play an important role in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). However, little is known about functional interactions between head and neck cancer stem-like cells (CSC) and surrounding stromal cells. Here, we used Aldehyde Dehydrogenase activity and CD44 expression to sort putative stem cells from primary human HNSCC. Implantation of 1,000 CSC (ALDH+CD44+Lin−) led to tumors in 13 (out of 15) mice, while 10,...

  7. Specific silencing of the REST target genes in insulin-secreting cells uncovers their participation in beta cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David; Allagnat, Florent; Gesina, Emilie; Caille, Dorothee; Gjinovci, Asllan; Waeber, Gerard; Meda, Paolo; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine

    2012-01-01

    The absence of the transcriptional repressor RE-1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST) in insulin-secreting beta cells is a major cue for the specific expression of a large number of genes. These REST target genes were largely ascribed to a function of neurotransmission in a neuronal context, whereas their role in pancreatic beta cells has been poorly explored. To identify their functional significance, we have generated transgenic mice expressing REST in beta cells (RIP-REST mice), and previously discovered that REST target genes are essential to insulin exocytosis. Herein we characterized a novel line of RIP-REST mice featuring diabetes. In diabetic RIP-REST mice, high levels of REST were associated with postnatal beta cell apoptosis, which resulted in gradual beta cell loss and sustained hyperglycemia in adults. Moreover, adenoviral REST transduction in INS-1E cells led to increased cell death under control conditions, and sensitized cells to death induced by cytokines. Screening for REST target genes identified several anti-apoptotic genes bearing the binding motif RE-1 that were downregulated upon REST expression in INS-1E cells, including Gjd2, Mapk8ip1, Irs2, Ptprn, and Cdk5r2. Decreased levels of Cdk5r2 in beta cells of RIP-REST mice further confirmed that it is controlled by REST, in vivo. Using siRNA-mediated knock-down in INS-1E cells, we showed that Cdk5r2 protects beta cells against cytokines and palmitate-induced apoptosis. Together, these data document that a set of REST target genes, including Cdk5r2, is important for beta cell survival. PMID:23029270

  8. Specific silencing of the REST target genes in insulin-secreting cells uncovers their participation in beta cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Martin

    Full Text Available The absence of the transcriptional repressor RE-1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST in insulin-secreting beta cells is a major cue for the specific expression of a large number of genes. These REST target genes were largely ascribed to a function of neurotransmission in a neuronal context, whereas their role in pancreatic beta cells has been poorly explored. To identify their functional significance, we have generated transgenic mice expressing REST in beta cells (RIP-REST mice, and previously discovered that REST target genes are essential to insulin exocytosis. Herein we characterized a novel line of RIP-REST mice featuring diabetes. In diabetic RIP-REST mice, high levels of REST were associated with postnatal beta cell apoptosis, which resulted in gradual beta cell loss and sustained hyperglycemia in adults. Moreover, adenoviral REST transduction in INS-1E cells led to increased cell death under control conditions, and sensitized cells to death induced by cytokines. Screening for REST target genes identified several anti-apoptotic genes bearing the binding motif RE-1 that were downregulated upon REST expression in INS-1E cells, including Gjd2, Mapk8ip1, Irs2, Ptprn, and Cdk5r2. Decreased levels of Cdk5r2 in beta cells of RIP-REST mice further confirmed that it is controlled by REST, in vivo. Using siRNA-mediated knock-down in INS-1E cells, we showed that Cdk5r2 protects beta cells against cytokines and palmitate-induced apoptosis. Together, these data document that a set of REST target genes, including Cdk5r2, is important for beta cell survival.

  9. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Kathrin; Yao, Yi; Reilly, Patrick T; Kannan, Karuppiah; Kiarash, Reza; Mason, Jacqueline; Huang, Ping; Sawyer, Suzanne K; Fuerth, Benjamin; Faubert, Brandon; Kalliomäki, Tuula; Elia, Andrew; Luo, Xunyi; Nadeem, Vincent; Bungard, David; Yalavarthi, Sireesha; Growney, Joseph D; Wakeham, Andrew; Moolani, Yasmin; Silvester, Jennifer; Ten, Annick You; Bakker, Walbert; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Berger, Shelley L; Hill, Richard P; Jones, Russell G; Tsao, Ming; Robinson, Murray O; Thompson, Craig B; Pan, Guohua; Mak, Tak W

    2011-05-15

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in metabolic transformation. CPT1C expression correlates inversely with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation, contributes to rapamycin resistance in murine primary tumors, and is frequently up-regulated in human lung tumors. Tumor cells constitutively expressing CPT1C show increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation, ATP production, and resistance to glucose deprivation or hypoxia. Conversely, cancer cells lacking CPT1C produce less ATP and are more sensitive to metabolic stress. CPT1C depletion via siRNA suppresses xenograft tumor growth and metformin responsiveness in vivo. CPT1C can be induced by hypoxia or glucose deprivation and is regulated by AMPKα. Cpt1c-deficient murine embryonic stem (ES) cells show sensitivity to hypoxia and glucose deprivation and altered FA homeostasis. Our results indicate that cells can use a novel mechanism involving CPT1C and FA metabolism to protect against metabolic stress. CPT1C may thus be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:21576264

  10. High VRK1 expression contributes to cell proliferation and survival in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Cui, Xiaopeng; Chen, Yuyan; Shao, Mengting; Shao, Xian; Shen, Yifen; Liu, Qingqing; Wu, Miaomiao; Liu, Jinxia; Ni, Wenkai; Lu, Cuihua; Wan, Chunhua

    2016-03-01

    VRK1 is a member of the vaccinia-related kinase (VRK) family of serine/threonine protein kinases, which is known to play multiple roles in cellular proliferation, cell cycle regulation and carcinogenesis. However, the expression and physiological significance of VRK1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential role of VRK1 in the development and progression of HCC. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that VRK1 was highly expressed in HCC tissues and cell lines, compared with adjacent nontumorous tissues and LO2 normal hepatocytes. Meanwhile, clinicopathological analysis showed that VRK1 was significantly associated with AJCC stage, Ki-67 and a poor prognosis in HCC specimens. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that VRK1 could serve as an independent prognostic indicator of HCC patients' survival. Furthermore, we found that VRK1 was lowly expressed in serum-starved Huh7 cells, and was progressively increased after serum-refeeding. Finally, flow cytometry, CCK-8 and colony formation assay indicated that the depletion of VRK1 could retard cell cycle progression and reduce cells proliferation in HCC cells. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that VRK1 may be a candidate prognostic biomarker as well as a potential therapeutical target of HCC. PMID:26706601

  11. Interaction between the Alzheimer's survival peptide humanin and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 regulates cell survival and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ikonen, Maaria; LIU, BINGRONG; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Ma, Liqun; Lee, Kuk-Wha; Niikura, Takako; Nishimoto, Ikuo; Cohen, Pinchas

    2003-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) regulates IGF bioactivity and also independently modulates cell growth and survival. By using a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify IGFBP-3-interacting proteins, we cloned humanin (HN) as an IGFBP-3-binding partner. HN is a 24-aa peptide that has been shown to specifically inhibit neuronal cell death induced by familial Alzheimer's disease mutant genes and amyloid-β (Aβ). The physical interaction of HN with IGFBP-3 was determined to be of...

  12. Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells and their possible effects on cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to prepare high-molecular, pure DNA with the aid of enzymes, detergents, and heat treatment is presented. A sedimentation technique with neutral density gradients has been introduced which permits mass separation and molecular mass analysis of high-molecular DNA (msub(r) 10). Using this method, the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) in the dose range between 10 Gy <= D <= 100 Gy has been measured. Further, the induction of DSB in dependence of the radiation quality has been studied. A correlation between DSB induction and cell survival was not found for any type of radiation investigated. DNA repair was measured in a multitude of repair conditions. The repair kinetics shows that the ''apparent'' DNA fraction is negligible. A large number of DSB was found to be repaired. The effects of some repair inhibitors have been investigated. DSB repair after cell plating on agar was proved. This factor has been underestimated in all former estimates of DSB influence on cell survival. It has been shown that DSB in living cells cannot be tolerated. There was no indication of biologically irrelevant DSB. (orig./AJ)

  13. Enhanced CLIP uncovers IMP protein-RNA targets in human pluripotent stem cells important for cell adhesion and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Anne E.; Van Nostrand, Eric L.; Pratt, Gabriel A.; Aigner, Stefan; Wilbert, Melissa L.; Sundararaman, Balaji; Freese, Peter; Lambert, Nicole J.; Sathe, Shashank; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Essex, Anthony; Landais, Severine; Burge, Christopher B.; Jones, D. Leanne; Yeo, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) require precise control of post-transcriptional RNA networks to maintain proliferation and survival. Using enhanced UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (eCLIP), we identify RNA targets of the IMP/IGF2BP family of RNA-binding proteins in hPSCs. At the broad region- and binding site-level IMP1 and IMP2 show reproducible binding to a large and overlapping set of 3′UTR-enriched targets. RNA Bind-N-Seq applied to recombinant full-length IMP1 and IMP2 reveals CA-rich motifs that are enriched in eCLIP-defined binding sites. We observe that IMP1 loss in hPSCs recapitulates IMP1 phenotypes, including a reduction in cell adhesion and an increase in cell death. For cell adhesion, in hPSCs we find IMP1 maintains levels of integrin mRNA, specifically regulating RNA stability of ITGB5. Additionally, we show IMP1 can be linked to hPSC survival via direct target BCL2. Thus, transcriptome-wide binding profiles identify hPSC targets modulating well-characterized IMP1 roles. PMID:27068461

  14. Effect of Sub-Lethal Environmental Stresses on the Cell Survival and Antibacterial Susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes PTCC1297

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faezi-Ghasemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Listeria monocytogenes is slowly becoming drug resistant, study on resistance of this pathogen is important to ensure effective treatment of human listeriosis. The aim of this work was evaluating the changes in susceptibility to antibiotics and cell survival of L. monocytogenes PTCC1297 (serotype 4a after exposure to some stresses. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytic study L. monocytogenes PTCC1297 subjected to sub-lethal environmental stresses including ethanol (5% v/v, sodium chloride (7% w/v, acid (HCl, pH=5.0, hydrogen peroxide (600 ppm and heat (45ºC. After the stress treatments, antibacterial susceptibility and cell survival were determined. Results: Exposing to hydrogen peroxide (600 ppm and heat (45ºC significantly (p<0.05 increased resistance to all selective antibiotics. But treating to stresses such as hydrochloric acid (pH=5.0, sodium chloride (7% w/v and ethanol (5% v/v decreased resistance (p<0.05 to antibiotics. L. monocytogenes PTCC1297 cell survival was decreased at 60ºC which is considered as lethal condition. Exposing to sub-lethal acid stress increased survival to high acidic conditions (pH=3.0. But upon increasing hydrogen peroxide the viability of cell decreased. Treating the cells with ethanol (14% v/v and NaCl (20% w/v increased cell survival. Conclusion: Adaptation to some stresses including hydrogen peroxide and heat increase resistance to antibiotics. Stresses such as ethanol, hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride act in adverse. Exposing to some sub-lethal stresses increased cell survival when lethal doses of the same stress such as acid, ethanol and sodium chloride were used. But, when we treating the cells to sublethal doses of H2O2 and heat the cell survival decreased.

  15. Effects of Ionizing Radiation and Glutathione Precursor on Antioxidant Enzyme and Cell Survival in Yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells react to such an induced oxidative stress through scavenging the generated reactive oxygen species to reduce oxidative damage. Antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase are immediately triggered for reactive oxygen species. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione, is one of the antioxidants. The effect of NAC as an antioxidant and/or a cell rescue agent was investigated in the present study. Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant intracellular thiol, which involves in antioxidant defense via direct interaction with ROS or via activities of detoxication enzymes like glutathione peroxidases (GPx). NAC flowed in the cell is converted to cysteine by deacetylation, that is supplied to the depleted GSH by oxidative stress. NAC prevents the depletion of GSH by radiation, increases the production of GSH, and improves enzymes activity such as GPx and alkaline phosphatase. Cell growth and survivorship and transcriptional level of glutathione gene are analyzed in two yeast strains exposed to combined treatment of NAC with gamma-rays. The effect of NAC on cell growth was measured during 72 hours. The cell growth was hampered by higher concentrations of NAC at stationary phase. NAC, however, didn't affect the cell division at the exponential phase. The survival of the cells decreased with radiation dose. The cell viability of the strain W303-1A was reduced significantly at the low dose (10 and 30 Gy). By comparison, the strain W303-1A was more sensitive to radiation with having a half lethal dose (LD50) of about 20 Gy. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the transcriptional expression of antioxidant enzyme gene GPX1 increased after irradiation while the expression of the gene decreased by the combined treatment of NAC with 100 Gy radiation. The present study shows that NAC can directly scavenge ROS against oxidative stress in vivo. In conclusion, NAC can prevent radiation-induced oxidative stress by

  16. Effects of Ionizing Radiation and Glutathione Precursor on Antioxidant Enzyme and Cell Survival in Yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinkyu; Roh, Changhyun; Ryu, Taeho; Park, Jiyoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Michael A. [Oxiage Cosmeceutical Research Institute, Virginia (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Cells react to such an induced oxidative stress through scavenging the generated reactive oxygen species to reduce oxidative damage. Antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase are immediately triggered for reactive oxygen species. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione, is one of the antioxidants. The effect of NAC as an antioxidant and/or a cell rescue agent was investigated in the present study. Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant intracellular thiol, which involves in antioxidant defense via direct interaction with ROS or via activities of detoxication enzymes like glutathione peroxidases (GPx). NAC flowed in the cell is converted to cysteine by deacetylation, that is supplied to the depleted GSH by oxidative stress. NAC prevents the depletion of GSH by radiation, increases the production of GSH, and improves enzymes activity such as GPx and alkaline phosphatase. Cell growth and survivorship and transcriptional level of glutathione gene are analyzed in two yeast strains exposed to combined treatment of NAC with gamma-rays. The effect of NAC on cell growth was measured during 72 hours. The cell growth was hampered by higher concentrations of NAC at stationary phase. NAC, however, didn't affect the cell division at the exponential phase. The survival of the cells decreased with radiation dose. The cell viability of the strain W303-1A was reduced significantly at the low dose (10 and 30 Gy). By comparison, the strain W303-1A was more sensitive to radiation with having a half lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) of about 20 Gy. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the transcriptional expression of antioxidant enzyme gene GPX1 increased after irradiation while the expression of the gene decreased by the combined treatment of NAC with 100 Gy radiation. The present study shows that NAC can directly scavenge ROS against oxidative stress in vivo. In conclusion, NAC can prevent radiation-induced oxidative

  17. Nicotinamide augments the survival and incidence of apoptosis in glioma cells following photodynamic therapy in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Stuart K.; Modi, Nayan; Wilson, Brian C.

    2004-10-01

    The ability to customize photodynamic therapy (PDT) parameters with regards to timing and dosing of administered drug and light can be beneficial in determining target specificity and mode of cell death. Sustained, low level PDT or metronomic PDT (mPDT) may afford enhanced apoptotic cell death. This is of particular importance when considering PDT for the treatment of brain tumors as unlike apoptosis, necrotic cell death often leads to inflammation with increased intracranial pressure. The ability, therefore, to 'fine tune' PDT in favour of apoptosis is paramount. We have studied both acute (one time treatment) PDT (aPDT) and mPDT delivery strategies in combination with nicotinamide (NA) in an attempt to maximize the number of tumor cells dieing by apoptosis. Using several different glioma cell lines (9L, U87-MG and CNS-1) we now confirm that NA provides a dose-dependent (0.1-0.5 mM) increase in apoptotic cells following d-aminolevulinic acid-mediated aPDT or mPDT. Furthermore, using the 9L cell line stably transfected with the luciferase gene, NA was shown to delay the depletion of bioluminscence signal in aPDT and mPDT treated cells, inferring that adenosine triphosphate levels are maintained for longer following NA treatment. NA has previously been reported as promoting neuronal and vascular cell survival in normal brain following a number of neurological insults in which reactive oxygen species are implicated including, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and toxin-induced lesions. It is likely that the effects of NA reflect its capacity as an antioxidant as well as its ability to inhibit poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-mediated depletion of ATP. Our results indicate that NA may prove therapeutically advantageous when used in combination with PDT treatment of brain tumors.

  18. Association of cancer stem cell markers genetic variants with gallbladder cancer susceptibility, prognosis, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Anu; Gupta, Annapurna; Rastogi, Neeraj; Agrawal, Sushma; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Vijay; Mittal, Balraj

    2016-02-01

    Genes important to stem cell progression have been involved in the genetics and clinical outcome of cancers. We investigated germ line variants in cancer stem cell (CSC) genes to predict susceptibility and efficacy of chemoradiotherapy treatment in gallbladder cancer (GBC) patients. In this study, we assessed the effect of SNPs in CSC genes (surface markers CD44, ALCAM, EpCAM, CD133) and (molecular markers NANOG, SOX-2, LIN-28A, ALDH1A1, OCT-4) with GBC susceptibility and prognosis. Total 610 GBC patients and 250 controls were genotyped by using PCR-RFLP, ARMS-PCR, and TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. Chemotoxicity graded 2-4 in 200 patients and tumor response was recorded in 140 patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Differences in genotype and haplotype frequency distributions were calculated by binary logistic regression. Gene-gene interaction model was analyzed by generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR). Overall survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier survival curve and multivariate Cox-proportional methods. ALCAM Ars1157Crs10511244 (P = 0.0035) haplotype was significantly associated with GBC susceptibility. In GMDR analysis, ALCAM rs1157G>A, EpCAM rs1126497T>C emerged as best significant interaction model with GBC susceptibility and ALDH1A1 rs13959T>G with increased risk of grade 3-4 hematological toxicity. SOX-2 rs11915160A>C, OCT-4 rs3130932T>G, and NANOG rs11055786T>C were found best gene-gene interaction model for predicting response to NACT. In both Cox-proportional and recursive partitioning ALCAM rs1157GA+AA genotype showed higher mortality and hazard ratio. ALCAM gene polymorphisms associated with GBC susceptibility and survival while OCT-4, SOX-2, and NANOG variants showed an interactive role with treatment response. PMID:26318430

  19. Regulation of the survival and differentiation of hepatic stem/progenitor cells by acyclic retinoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    During embryonic liver development, hepatic stem/progenitor cells (HpSCs) have a high proliferative ability and bipotency to differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Retinoic acid is a derivative of vitamin A and is involved in the proliferation and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells in several tissues. However, whether retinoic acid regulates the characteristics of HpSCs in the normal liver is still unknown. A recent study has shown that acyclic retinoid regulates the survival and proliferation of HpSCs derived from mouse foetal liver. Acyclic retinoid suppressed the expansion of CD29(+)CD49f(+) HpSCs through the induction of hepatocytic differentiation and progression of apoptosis. PMID:26021438

  20. Assessment of the Radioprotection Efficacy of Antioxidant Substances in Foods in regard to Clonogenic Cell Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation is perceived as a hazard in spite of its diverse uses. The public are more sensitive than ever to the activities from the nuclear power plant industry since Fukushima accident and the consequential environment contamination. The never-dissolved fear from the public of the nuclear energy costs the nuclear industry too much for safety measures not to mention brings the public uneasy life. Beta carotene, oltipraz and luteolin, which are easily taken from various foods, are substances that may protect cells from damage caused by unstable molecules known as free radicals. The purpose of this study is to inform people of accessible radiation protection measures in everyday lives. Three antioxidant substances were investigated regarding their radioprotection effects counted in terms of clonogenic cell surviving fraction in vitro. The radioprotection efficacy was observed with those substances at concentrations below certain levels. At concentrations beyond those levels, the efficacy was canceled out by their inherent cytotoxicity

  1. Twelve-year survival after multiple recurrences and repeated metastasectomies for renal cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jue

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC presents a therapeutic challenge for clinicians because of the unpredictable clinical course, resistance to chemotherapy or radiotherapy and the limited response to immunotherapy. Patients and Methods We report a case of a 62-year-old woman who underwent nephrectomy for T4N0 RCC, clear cell type, Fuhrman grade 3/4 in 1999. The patinet subsequently had multiple tumor recurrences. Results The patient underwent eight metastasectomies, including multiple partial left nephrectomies, right adrenalectomy, a complete left nephrectomy, and distal pancreatectomy. She remains well and tumor free 12 years after initial diagnosis. Conclusion Repeated resections after initial metastasectomy can be carried out safely and provide long-term survival in selected patients with recurrent metastasis from RCC. The findings from our case indicate that close follow-up for the early detection of recurrence and complete resection of metastases can improve the results after repeated resection.

  2. Assessment of the Radioprotection Efficacy of Antioxidant Substances in Foods in regard to Clonogenic Cell Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyosung; Lee, Minho; Kim, Eunhee [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Radiation is perceived as a hazard in spite of its diverse uses. The public are more sensitive than ever to the activities from the nuclear power plant industry since Fukushima accident and the consequential environment contamination. The never-dissolved fear from the public of the nuclear energy costs the nuclear industry too much for safety measures not to mention brings the public uneasy life. Beta carotene, oltipraz and luteolin, which are easily taken from various foods, are substances that may protect cells from damage caused by unstable molecules known as free radicals. The purpose of this study is to inform people of accessible radiation protection measures in everyday lives. Three antioxidant substances were investigated regarding their radioprotection effects counted in terms of clonogenic cell surviving fraction in vitro. The radioprotection efficacy was observed with those substances at concentrations below certain levels. At concentrations beyond those levels, the efficacy was canceled out by their inherent cytotoxicity.

  3. Autophagy/Xenophagy as a survival strategy of cancer cells. The role of Cathepsins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macroautophagy, often referred as to autophagy (self-cannibalism), designates the genetically determined process by which portions of the cytoplasm, organelles and long-lived proteins are engulfed in double-membraned vacuoles (autophagosomes) and sent for lysosomal degradation. Basal levels of autophagy contribute to the maintenance of intracellular homoeostasis by ensuring the turnover of supernumerary, aged and/or damaged components. Under conditions of starvation, the autophagic pathway operates to supply cells with metabolic substrates, and thus represents an important pro-survival mechanism. In cultured cells, the withdrawal of growth factors, known to represent an experimental condition triggering autophagy, can also enhance xeno-cannibalism (xenophagy; xeno is from ancient greek=foreign)

  4. Tumour growth delay and cell survival in rat R-1 tumours after radiation and methotrexate treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rat R-1 rhabdomyosarcoma which forms colonies in vitro has been used to investigate the effectiveness of radiochemotherapy. Tumour growth delay data were compared with those on survival of cells derived from tumours treated in situ. Methotrexate (MTX) was administered i.p. in three doses of 10 mg per kg body weight at intervals of 4 h. A dose of 10 Gy of 300 kV X rays was given at different time intervals before or after the MTX treatment. The observed tumour growth delays for the combined treatment for intervals of up to 4 d were less than the sum of those following separate treatments. An excess in growth delay was observed when MTX was given 6 to 8 days after or 5 days before a dose of 10 Gy. The radiation treatment resulted in fractions of surviving cells which remained constant for up to 6 days after treatment. The effectiveness of the MTX treatment could be assessed at 3d after administration of the drug, that of the combined treatments as at least 3 days after the MTX treatment. (Auth.)

  5. Heat shock proteins in the retina: Focus on HSP70 and alpha crystallins in ganglion cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piri, Natik; Kwong, Jacky M K; Gu, Lei; Caprioli, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to a superfamily of stress proteins that are critical constituents of a complex defense mechanism that enhances cell survival under adverse environmental conditions. Cell protective roles of HSPs are related to their chaperone functions, antiapoptotic and antinecrotic effects. HSPs' anti-apoptotic and cytoprotective characteristics, their ability to protect cells from a variety of stressful stimuli, and the possibility of their pharmacological induction in cells under pathological stress make these proteins an attractive therapeutic target for various neurodegenerative diseases; these include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, prion disease, and others. This review discusses the possible roles of HSPs, particularly HSP70 and small HSPs (alpha A and alpha B crystallins) in enhancing the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in optic neuropathies such as glaucoma, which is characterized by progressive loss of vision caused by degeneration of RGCs and their axons in the optic nerve. Studies in animal models of RGC degeneration induced by ocular hypertension, optic nerve crush and axotomy show that upregulation of HSP70 expression by hyperthermia, zinc, geranyl-geranyl acetone, 17-AAG (a HSP90 inhibitor), or through transfection of retinal cells with AAV2-HSP70 effectively supports the survival of injured RGCs. RGCs survival was also stimulated by overexpression of alpha A and alpha B crystallins. These findings provide support for translating the HSP70- and alpha crystallin-based cell survival strategy into therapy to protect and rescue injured RGCs from degeneration associated with glaucomatous and other optic neuropathies. PMID:27017896

  6. Functional microarray analysis suggests repressed cell-cell signaling and cell survival-related modules inhibit progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Fernando A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer shows a great diversity in its clinical behavior which cannot be easily predicted using the currently available clinical or pathological markers. The identification of pathways associated with lymph node metastasis (N+ and recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC may increase our understanding of the complex biology of this disease. Methods Tumor samples were obtained from untreated HNSCC patients undergoing surgery. Patients were classified according to pathologic lymph node status (positive or negative or tumor recurrence (recurrent or non-recurrent tumor after treatment (surgery with neck dissection followed by radiotherapy. Using microarray gene expression, we screened tumor samples according to modules comprised by genes in the same pathway or functional category. Results The most frequent alterations were the repression of modules in negative lymph node (N0 and in non-recurrent tumors rather than induction of modules in N+ or in recurrent tumors. N0 tumors showed repression of modules that contain cell survival genes and in non-recurrent tumors cell-cell signaling and extracellular region modules were repressed. Conclusions The repression of modules that contain cell survival genes in N0 tumors reinforces the important role that apoptosis plays in the regulation of metastasis. In addition, because tumor samples used here were not microdissected, tumor gene expression data are represented together with the stroma, which may reveal signaling between the microenvironment and tumor cells. For instance, in non-recurrent tumors, extracellular region module was repressed, indicating that the stroma and tumor cells may have fewer interactions, which disable metastasis development. Finally, the genes highlighted in our analysis can be implicated in more than one pathway or characteristic, suggesting that therapeutic approaches to prevent tumor progression should target more than one gene or pathway

  7. Cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance (CAM-RR). Extracellular matrix-dependent improvement of cell survival in human tumor and normal cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, N.; Meineke, V. [Inst. of Radiobiology, Medical Academy of the German Armed Forces, Munich (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Background: Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) contact is thought to have great impact on cellular mechanisms resulting in increased cell survival upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Several human tumor cell lines and normal human fibroblastic cell strains of different origin, all of them expressing the wide-spread and important integrin subunit {beta}1, were irradiated, and clonogenic cell survival, {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression, and adhesive functionality were investigated. Material and Methods: Human tumor cell lines A172 (glioblastoma), PATU8902 (pancreas carcinoma), SKMES1 (lung carcinoma), A549 (lung carcinoma), and IPC298 (melanoma) as well as normal human skin (HSF1) and lung fibroblasts (CCD32) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were irradiated with 0-8 Gy. Besides colony formation assays, {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression by flow cytometry and adhesive functionality by adhesion assays were analyzed. Results: All cell lines showed improved clonogenic survival after irradiation in the presence of fibronectin as compared to plastic. Irradiated cells exhibited a significant, dose-dependent increase in {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression following irradiation. As a parameter of the adhesive functionality of the {beta}1-integrin, a radiation-dependent elevation of cell adhesion to fibronectin in comparison with adhesion to plastic was demonstrated. Conclusion: The in vitro cellular radiosensitivity is highly influenced by fibronectin according to the phenomenon of cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance. Additionally, our emerging data question the results of former and current in vitro cytotoxicity studies performed in the absence of an ECM. These findings might also be important for the understanding of malignant transformation, anchorage-independent cell growth, optimization of radiotherapeutic regimes and the prevention of normal tissue side effects on the basis of experimental radiobiological data. (orig.)

  8. Impact of exogenous lactate on survival and radiosensitivity of carcinoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many solid tumors are characterized by spatiotemporal heterologous supply conditions due to a histomorphological and functional disaster of their vascular network. Hypoxia as a pathophysiologic consequence is a well-established, yet still not entirely understood direct radioresistance factor while other milieu conditions such as tissue acidosis and lactate accumulation are considered only as indirect modulators of tumor radioresponse. An enhanced level of local and overall lactate in tumor tissues may result from the pathologic vascular supply as oxygen deficiency leads to an increased cellular glycolytic flux but disposal of waste products is impeded. In addition, genetic alterations as a consequence of malignant transformation are known to contribute to lactate accumulation under aerobic conditions in tumors. This may be true for genes (i) which control the expression or activity of glycolytic enzymes and related transporters and/or (ii) which lead to a truncated citric acid cycle and which support glutaminolysis. In various tumor entities including squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck and adenocarcinomas of the rectum high lactate concentrations (> 8-10 mM as compared to normal tissues with ∼ 2 mM) were shown to correlate with risk of metastases and/or reduced recurrence-free as well as overall survival. Several in vitro studies show adverse effects of high lactate concentrations on various tumor stromal cell types that may contribute to this phenomenon. Also, most recently, a hypoxia-independent correlation of lactate level with radioresistance was documented in a subcutanous xenograft mouse model of human squamous cell carcinomas indicating that lactate could causally and/or directly relate to radioresponse. The present study was performed to evaluate the impact of pathophysiological, high extracellular lactate levels and reduced pH on the survival and radioresponse of various established cancer cell lines in a classical in vitro assay

  9. Bioluminescence imaging to monitor the prolongation of stem cell survival by pharmaceutical intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rapid donor cell death and rejection owing to humoral and cellular immune reactions are a basic limitation encountered in stem cell therapy for treatment of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the potential for longitudinal bioluminescence imaging to monitor the survival of transplanted stem cells prolonged by immunosuppressive agents. Embryonic rat H9c2 cardio myoblasts were transfected with adenovirus containing luciferase reporter gene (Ad-CMV-Fluc) in different MOI (1,10,100) and various cell doses (1x105 - 5x106)followed by injection in the thigh muscle of nude mice (n=6 per group), Other mice (n = 18) were undergone transient immunosuppression provided by either Cyclosporine (5mg/kg) or Tacrolimus (1mg/kg) or Dexamethasone (4mg/kg) beginning 3 days prior to and continuing to 2 weeks after transplantation. Optical bioluminescent imaging was then daily carried out using cooled CCD camera (Xenogen) Viral transfection at MOI 100 and the 5x106 cell dose implantation resulted in optimal transgene efficiency. Mice received immunosuppressive agents displayed long-term in vivo reporter gene expression for a time course of 14 days. Tacrolimus (Prograf) and Cyclosporine successfully suppressed the transplanted cell loss in animals, that obviously observed until day 8 as compared to Dexamethasone-treated and non-treated mice (day 1: 1.00E+08 (Prograf), 9.47E+07 (Cys), 5.25E+07 (Dex), and 1.25E+07 p/s/cm2/sr (control); day 8: 3.27E+05 (Prograf), 1.02E+05 (Cys), 6.17E+04 (Dex) and 2.73E+04 p/s/cm2/sr (control)) and continued expressing bioluminescence until day 13 ( 6.42E+05 (Prograf), 4.99E+05 (Cys), and 4.10E+04 p/s/cm2/sr. Induction of immune tolerance using pharmaceutical agents during cardio myoblast transplantation improved long-term donor cell survival in murine muscles. Optical imaging technique is capable of being used for tracking implanted stem cells in myocardium of living subjects over time

  10. Bioluminescence imaging to monitor the prolongation of stem cell survival by pharmaceutical intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Uyenchi N.; Min, Jung Joon; Moon, Sung Min; Ahn, Young Keun; Kim, Yong Sook; Joo, Soo Yeon; Hong, Moon Hwa; Jeong, Myung Ho; Song, Ho Cheon; Bom, Hee Seung [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The rapid donor cell death and rejection owing to humoral and cellular immune reactions are a basic limitation encountered in stem cell therapy for treatment of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the potential for longitudinal bioluminescence imaging to monitor the survival of transplanted stem cells prolonged by immunosuppressive agents. Embryonic rat H9c2 cardio myoblasts were transfected with adenovirus containing luciferase reporter gene (Ad-CMV-Fluc) in different MOI (1,10,100) and various cell doses (1x10{sup 5} - 5x10{sup 6})followed by injection in the thigh muscle of nude mice (n=6 per group), Other mice (n = 18) were undergone transient immunosuppression provided by either Cyclosporine (5mg/kg) or Tacrolimus (1mg/kg) or Dexamethasone (4mg/kg) beginning 3 days prior to and continuing to 2 weeks after transplantation. Optical bioluminescent imaging was then daily carried out using cooled CCD camera (Xenogen) Viral transfection at MOI 100 and the 5x10{sup 6} cell dose implantation resulted in optimal transgene efficiency. Mice received immunosuppressive agents displayed long-term in vivo reporter gene expression for a time course of 14 days. Tacrolimus (Prograf) and Cyclosporine successfully suppressed the transplanted cell loss in animals, that obviously observed until day 8 as compared to Dexamethasone-treated and non-treated mice (day 1: 1.00E+08 (Prograf), 9.47E+07 (Cys), 5.25E+07 (Dex), and 1.25E+07 p/s/cm{sup 2}/sr (control); day 8: 3.27E+05 (Prograf), 1.02E+05 (Cys), 6.17E+04 (Dex) and 2.73E+04 p/s/cm{sup 2}/sr (control)) and continued expressing bioluminescence until day 13 ( 6.42E+05 (Prograf), 4.99E+05 (Cys), and 4.10E+04 p/s/cm{sup 2}/sr. Induction of immune tolerance using pharmaceutical agents during cardio myoblast transplantation improved long-term donor cell survival in murine muscles. Optical imaging technique is capable of being used for tracking implanted stem cells in myocardium of living subjects over time.

  11. Survival of cord blood haematopoietic stem cells in a hyaluronan hydrogel for ex vivo biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Elise; Kassim, Yusra; Petit, Cyrille; Buquet, Catherine; Dulong, Virginie; Cerf, Didier Le; Buchonnet, Gérard; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) grow in a specified niche in close association with the microenvironment, the so-called 'haematopoietic niche'. Scaffolds have been introduced to overcome the liquid culture limitations, mimicking the presence of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present study the hyaluronic acid scaffold, already developed in the laboratory, has been used for the first time to maintain long-term cultures of CD34⁺ haematopoietic cells obtained from human cord blood. One parameter investigated was the impact on ex vivo survival of CD34⁺ cord blood cells (CBCs) on the hyaluronic acid surface, immobilized with peptides containing the RGD motif. This peptide was conjugated by coating the hyaluronan hydrogel and cultured in serum-free liquid phase complemented with stem cell factor (SCF), a commonly indispensable cytokine for haematopoiesis. Our work demonstrated that these hyaluronan hydrogels were superior to traditional liquid cultures by maintaining and expanding the HPCs without the need for additional cytokines, and a colonization of 280-fold increment in the hydrogel compared with liquid culture after 28 days of ex vivo expansion. PMID:22473677

  12. c-Myb regulates NOX1/p38 to control survival of colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarčíková, Lucie; Knopfová, Lucia; Beneš, Petr; Šmarda, Jan

    2016-08-01

    The c-Myb transcription factor is important for maintenance of immature cells of many tissues including colon epithelium. Overexpression of c-Myb occurring in colorectal carcinomas (CRC) as well as in other cancers often marks poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism explaining how c-Myb contributes to progression of CRC has not been fully elucidated. To address this point, we investigated the way how c-Myb affects sensitivity of CRC cells to anticancer drugs. Using CRC cell lines expressing exogenous c-myb we show that c-Myb protects CRC cells from the cisplatin-, oxaliplatin-, and doxorubicin-induced apoptosis, elevates reactive oxygen species via up-regulation of NOX1, and sustains the pro-survival p38 MAPK pathway. Using pharmacological inhibitors and gene silencing of p38 and NOX1 we found that these proteins are essential for the protective effect of c-Myb and that NOX1 acts upstream of p38 activation. In addition, our result suggests that transcription of NOX1 is directly controlled by c-Myb and these genes are strongly co-expressed in human tumor tissue of CRC patients. The novel c-Myb/NOX1/p38 signaling axis that protects CRC cells from chemotherapy described in this study could provide a new base for design of future therapies of CRC. PMID:27107996

  13. Sema3C Promotes the Survival and Tumorigenicity of Glioma Stem Cells through Rac1 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Man

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Different cancer cell compartments often communicate through soluble factors to facilitate tumor growth. Glioma stem cells (GSCs are a subset of tumor cells that resist standard therapy to contribute to disease progression. How GSCs employ a distinct secretory program to communicate with and nurture each other over the nonstem tumor cell (NSTC population is not well defined. Here, we show that GSCs preferentially secrete Sema3C and coordinately express PlexinA2/D1 receptors to activate Rac1/nuclear factor (NF-κB signaling in an autocrine/paracrine loop to promote their own survival. Importantly, Sema3C is not expressed in neural progenitor cells (NPCs or NSTCs. Disruption of Sema3C induced apoptosis of GSCs, but not NPCs or NSTCs, and suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic models of glioblastoma. Introduction of activated Rac1 rescued the Sema3C knockdown phenotype in vivo. Our study supports the targeting of Sema3C to break this GSC-specific autocrine/paracrine loop in order to improve glioblastoma treatment, potentially with a high therapeutic index.

  14. DNA synthesis and cell survival after X-irradiation of mammalian cells treated with caffeine or adenine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression of the transient depression in the rate of DNA synthesis normally observed after exposure of randomly-dividing Chinese hamster V-79 or Chinese hamster CHO cells to ionizing radiation could be postponed by a post-irradiation treatment with 1.0 to 2.0 mM adenine or 1.5 mM caffeine. Caffeine may exert its effect by creating additional sites for replication in irradiated cells. Cells treated with caffeine or adenine for 2 or 4 hours after exposure to 3000 rad of 300 kVp X-rays exhibited depressed synthesis only after the removal of caffeine or adenine. These alterations in the timing of the X-ray-induced depression of the rate of DNA synthesis had no effect on X-ray-induced cell killing. Although a 4 hour post-irradiation treatment of randomly-dividing Chinese hamster V-79 cells with 1.0 or 2.0 mM caffeine potentiated X-ray-induced cell killing, this reduction in survival was due primarily to effects on cells not in S-phase. (author)

  15. Identification of cytoskeleton-associated proteins essential for lysosomal stability and survival of human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth-Pedersen, Line; Aits, Sonja; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Nylandsted, Jesper; Jäättelä, Marja

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-disturbing drugs inhibit lysosomal trafficking and induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization followed by cathepsin-dependent cell death. To identify specific trafficking-related proteins that control cell survival and lysosomal stability, we screened a molecular motor siRNA library in human MCF7 breast cancer cells. SiRNAs targeting four kinesins (KIF11/Eg5, KIF20A, KIF21A, KIF25), myosin 1G (MYO1G), myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) were identified as effective inducers of non-apoptotic cell death. The cell death induced by KIF11, KIF21A, KIF25, MYH1 or TPM2 siRNAs was preceded by lysosomal membrane permeabilization, and all identified siRNAs induced several changes in the endo-lysosomal compartment, i.e. increased lysosomal volume (KIF11, KIF20A, KIF25, MYO1G, MYH1), increased cysteine cathepsin activity (KIF20A, KIF25), altered lysosomal localization (KIF25, MYH1, TPM2), increased dextran accumulation (KIF20A), or reduced autophagic flux (MYO1G, MYH1). Importantly, all seven siRNAs also killed human cervix cancer (HeLa) and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells and sensitized cancer cells to other lysosome-destabilizing treatments, i.e. photo-oxidation, siramesine, etoposide or cisplatin. Similarly to KIF11 siRNA, the KIF11 inhibitor monastrol induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and sensitized several cancer cell lines to siramesine. While KIF11 inhibitors are under clinical development as mitotic blockers, our data reveal a new function for KIF11 in controlling lysosomal stability and introduce six other molecular motors as putative cancer drug targets. PMID:23071517

  16. Smad2 and Smad6 as predictors of overall survival in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snitcovsky Igor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To test if the expression of Smad1-8 mRNAs were predictive of survival in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Patients and Methods We analyzed, prospectively, the expression of Smad1-8, by means of Ribonuclease Protection Assay in 48 primary, operable, oral SCC. In addition, 21 larynx, 10 oropharynx and 4 hypopharynx SCC and 65 matched adjacent mucosa, available for study, were also included. For survival analysis, patients were categorized as positive or negative for each Smad, according to median mRNA expression. We also performed real-time quantitative PCR (QRTPCR to asses the pattern of TGFβ1, TGFβ2, TGFβ3 in oral SCC. Results Our results showed that Smad2 and Smad6 mRNA expression were both associated with survival in Oral SCC patients. Cox Multivariate analysis revealed that Smad6 positivity and Smad2 negativity were both predictive of good prognosis for oral SCC patients, independent of lymph nodal status (P = 0.003 and P = 0.029, respectively. In addition, simultaneously Smad2- and Smad6+ oral SCC group of patients did not reach median overall survival (mOS whereas the mOS of Smad2+/Smad6- subgroup was 11.6 months (P = 0.004, univariate analysis. Regarding to TGFβ isoforms, we found that Smad2 mRNA and TGFβ1 mRNA were inversely correlated (p = 0.05, R = -0.33, and that seven of the eight TGFβ1+ patients were Smad2-. In larynx SCC, Smad7- patients did not reach mOS whereas mOS of Smad7+ patients were only 7.0 months (P = 0.04. No other correlations were found among Smad expression, clinico-pathological characteristics and survival in oral, larynx, hypopharynx, oropharynx or the entire head and neck SCC population. Conclusion Smad6 together with Smad2 may be prognostic factors, independent of nodal status in oral SCC after curative resection. The underlying mechanism which involves aberrant TGFβ signaling should be better clarified in the future.

  17. Systemic treatment with CAR-engineered T cells against PSCA delays subcutaneous tumor growth and prolongs survival of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically engineered with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has successfully been used to treat both chronic and acute lymphocytic leukemia as well as other hematological cancers. Experimental therapy with CAR-engineered T cells has also shown promising results on solid tumors. The prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a protein expressed on the surface of prostate epithelial cells as well as in primary and metastatic prostate cancer cells and therefore a promising target for immunotherapy of prostate cancer. We developed a third-generation CAR against PSCA including the CD28, OX-40 and CD3 ζ signaling domains. T cells were transduced with a lentivirus encoding the PSCA-CAR and evaluated for cytokine production (paired Student’s t-test), proliferation (paired Student’s t-test), CD107a expression (paired Student’s t-test) and target cell killing in vitro and tumor growth and survival in vivo (Log-rank test comparing Kaplan-Meier survival curves). PSCA-CAR T cells exhibit specific interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 secretion and specific proliferation in response to PSCA-expressing target cells. Furthermore, the PSCA-CAR-engineered T cells efficiently kill PSCA-expressing tumor cells in vitro and systemic treatment with PSCA-CAR-engineered T cells significantly delays subcutaneous tumor growth and prolongs survival of mice. Our data confirms that PSCA-CAR T cells may be developed for treatment of prostate cancer

  18. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the anti-survival effect of sulforaphane on human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gasotransmitter that regulates cell proliferation and other cellular functions. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a sulfur-containing compound that exhibits anticancer properties, and young sprouts of broccoli are particularly rich in SFN. There is consistent epidemiological evidence that the consumption of sulfur-containing vegetables, such as garlic and cruciferous vegetables, may help reduce the occurrence of prostate cancer. Here we found that a large amount of H2S is released when SFN is added into cell culture medium or mixed with mouse liver homogenates, respectively. Both SFN and NaHS (a H2S donor) decreased the viability of PC-3 cells (a human prostate cancer cell line) in a dose-dependent manner, and supplement of methemoglobin or oxidized glutathione (two H2S scavengers) reversed SFN-reduced cell viability. We further found both cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta-synthase are expressed in PC-3 cells and mouse prostate tissues. H2S production in prostate tissues from CSE knockout mice was only 20% of that from wild-type mice, suggesting CSE is a major H2S-producing enzyme in prostate. CSE overexpression enhanced H2S production and inhibited cell viability in PC-3 cells. In addition, both SFN and NaHS activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Pre-treatment of PC-3 cells with methemoglobin decreased SFN-stimulated MAPK activities. Suppression of both p38 MAPK and JNK reversed H2S- or SFN-reduced viability of PC-3 cells. Our results demonstrated that H2S mediates the inhibitory effect of SFN on the proliferation of PC-3 cells, which suggests that H2S-releasing diet or drug might be beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. Highlights: ► A large amount of H2S is released from sulforaphane. ► H2S mediates the anti-survival effect of sulforaphane on human prostate cancer cells. ► Cystathionine gamma-lyase is a major H2S-producing enzyme in prostate tissues.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the anti-survival effect of sulforaphane on human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Yanxi [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); College of Life Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan (China); Wu, Bo [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Cao, Qiuhui [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); Wu, Lingyun [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Department of Pharmacology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Yang, Guangdong, E-mail: gyang@lakeheadu.ca [The School of Kinesiology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a novel gasotransmitter that regulates cell proliferation and other cellular functions. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a sulfur-containing compound that exhibits anticancer properties, and young sprouts of broccoli are particularly rich in SFN. There is consistent epidemiological evidence that the consumption of sulfur-containing vegetables, such as garlic and cruciferous vegetables, may help reduce the occurrence of prostate cancer. Here we found that a large amount of H{sub 2}S is released when SFN is added into cell culture medium or mixed with mouse liver homogenates, respectively. Both SFN and NaHS (a H{sub 2}S donor) decreased the viability of PC-3 cells (a human prostate cancer cell line) in a dose-dependent manner, and supplement of methemoglobin or oxidized glutathione (two H{sub 2}S scavengers) reversed SFN-reduced cell viability. We further found both cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta-synthase are expressed in PC-3 cells and mouse prostate tissues. H{sub 2}S production in prostate tissues from CSE knockout mice was only 20% of that from wild-type mice, suggesting CSE is a major H{sub 2}S-producing enzyme in prostate. CSE overexpression enhanced H{sub 2}S production and inhibited cell viability in PC-3 cells. In addition, both SFN and NaHS activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Pre-treatment of PC-3 cells with methemoglobin decreased SFN-stimulated MAPK activities. Suppression of both p38 MAPK and JNK reversed H{sub 2}S- or SFN-reduced viability of PC-3 cells. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}S mediates the inhibitory effect of SFN on the proliferation of PC-3 cells, which suggests that H{sub 2}S-releasing diet or drug might be beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large amount of H{sub 2}S is released from sulforaphane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}S mediates the anti-survival effect of

  20. The number and microlocalization of tumor-associated immune cells are associated with patient's survival time in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor microenvironment is composed of tumor cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-associated immune cells may inhibit or promote tumor growth and progression. This study was conducted to determine whether the number and microlocalization of macrophages, mature dendritic cells and cytotoxic T cells in non-small cell lung cancer are associated with patient's survival time. Ninety-nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were included in this retrospective study. Paraffin-embedded NSCLC specimens and their clinicopathological data including up to 8-year follow-up information were used. Immunohistochemical staining for CD68 (marker for macrophages), CD83 (marker for mature dendritic cells), and CD8 (marker for cytotoxic T cells) was performed and evaluated in a blinded fashion. The numbers of immune cells in tumor islets and stroma, tumor islets, or tumor stroma were counted under a microscope. Correlation of the cell numbers and patient's survival time was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (version 13.0). The numbers of macrophages, mature dendritic cells and cytotoxic T cells were significantly more in the tumor stroma than in the tumor islets. The number of macrophages in the tumor islets was positively associated with patient's survival time, whereas the number of macrophages in the tumor stroma was negatively associated with patient's survival time in both univariate and multivariate analyses. The number of mature dendritic cells in the tumor islets and stroma, tumor islets only, or tumor stroma only was positively associated with patient's survival time in a univariate analysis but not in a multivariate analysis. The number of cytotoxic T cells in the tumor islets and stroma was positively associated with patient's survival time in a univariate analysis but not in a multivariate analysis. The number of cytotoxic T cells in the tumor islets only or stroma

  1. Enhanced survival in vitro of human corneal endothelial cells using mouse embryonic stem cell conditioned medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Dong; Liu, Zhiping; Li, Chaoyang; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Jin; Wan, Pengxia; Mou, Yong-gao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether mouse embryonic stem cell conditioned medium (ESC-CM) increases the proliferative capacity of human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) in vitro. Methods Primary cultures of HCECs were established from explants of the endothelial cell layer, including the Descemet’s membrane. Cells were cultured in human corneal endothelium medium (CEM) containing 25% ESC-CM for the experimental group and CEM alone for the control group. Phase-contrast microscopy and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) were used to identify HCECs. The eruption time and HCEC morphology were observed under phase-contrast microscopy. We detected the protein expression of zona occludens protein-1 (ZO-1; a tight junction protein) and the Na+-K+-ATPase by western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. The mRNA expression of the Na+-K+-ATPase, voltage-dependent anion channel 3 (VDAC3), solute carrier family 4, sodium bicarbonate cotransporter member 4 (SLC4A4), and chloride channel protein 3 (CLCN3) were detected by RT–PCR. To explore the proliferation capacity of HCECs, the colony forming efficiency (CFE) was determined by Giemsa staining and the cellular proliferation marker of Ki-67 protein (Ki-67) positive cells were detected by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. Progression of the cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Negative regulation of the cell cycle, as measured by cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (p21) levels, was detected by western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Results In primary culture, HCECs in the 25%ESC-CM group erupted with polygonal appearance on day 2, while those in the CEM group erupted with slightly larger cells on day 3–4. HCECs in the 25%ESC-CM group could be subcultured until passage 6 without enlargement of cell volume, while those in the CEM group were enlarged and lost their polygonal appearance by passage 2. HCECs in both the 25%ESC-CM and CEM groups expressed ZO-1, Na

  2. Protein kinase G1 α overexpression increases stem cell survival and cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that overexpression of cGMP-dependent protein kinase type 1α (PKG1α could mimic the effect of tadalafil on the survival of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs contributing to regeneration of the ischemic heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: MSCs from male rats were transduced with adenoviral vector encoding for PKG1α ((PKG1αMSCs.Controls included native MSCs ((NatMSCs and MSCs transduced with an empty vector ((NullMSCs. PKG1α activity was increased approximately 20, 5 and 16 fold respectively in (PKG1αMSCs. (PKG1αMSCs showed improved survival under oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD which was evidenced by lower LDH release, caspase-3/7 activity and number of positive TUNEL cells. Anti-apoptotic proteins pAkt, pGSK3β, and Bcl-2 were significantly increased in (PKG1αMSCs compared to (NatMSCs and (NullMSCs. Higher release of multiple prosurvival and angiogenic factors such as HGF, bFGF, SDF-1 and Ang-1 was observed in (PKG1αMSCs before and after OGD. In a female rat model of acute myocardial infarction, (PKG1αMSCs group showed higher survival compared with (NullMSCs group at 3 and 7 days after transplantation as determined by TUNEL staining and sry-gene quantitation by real-time PCR. Increased anti-apoptotic proteins and paracrine factors in vitro were also identified. Immunostaining for cardiac troponin I combined with GFP showed increased myogenic differentiation of (PKG1αMSCs. At 4 weeks after transplantation, compared to DMEM group and (NullMSCs group, (PKG1αMSCs group showed increased blood vessel density in infarct and peri-infarct areas (62.5±7.7; 68.8±7.3 per microscopic view, p<0.05 and attenuated infarct size (27.2±2.5%, p<0.01. Heart function indices including ejection fraction (52.1±2.2%, p<0.01 and fractional shortening (24.8%±1.3%, p<0.01 were improved significantly in (PKG1αMSCs group. CONCLUSION: Overexpression of PKG1α transgene could be a powerful approach to improve MSCs

  3. Inflammatory cytokines regulate endothelial cell survival and tissue repair functions via NF-κB signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaji N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nobuhiro Kanaji1, Tadashi Sato2, Amy Nelson3, Xingqi Wang3, YingJi Li4, Miok Kim5, Masanori Nakanishi6, Hesham Basma3, Joel Michalski3, Maha Farid3, Michael Chandler3, William Pease3, Amol Patil3, Stephen I Rennard3, Xiangde Liu31Division of Hematology, Rheumatology and Respiratory Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Japan; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 3Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska; 4Department of Hygiene and Public Health, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan; 5Third Department of Internal Medicine, Wakayama Medical University School of Medicine, Wakayama, Japan; 6Department of Internal Medicine, Jeju Medical College, Jeju, Republic of KoreaAbstract: Inflammation contributes to the development of fibrotic and malignant diseases. We assessed the ability of inflammatory cytokines to modulate endothelial cell survival and functions related to tissue repair/remodeling. Treatment with interleukin (IL-1ß or tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α (2 ng/mL led to human pulmonary artery endothelial cells becoming spindle-shaped fibroblast-like cells. However, immunoblot and DNA microarray showed no change in most endothelial and mesenchymal markers. In the presence of IL-1ß or TNF-α, cells were resistant to apoptosis induced by deprivation of serum and growth factor, and were more migratory. In addition, cells treated with IL-1ß or TNF-α contracted collagen gels more robustly. In contrast, transforming growth factor-ß1 did not induce these responses. RNA interference targeting nuclear factor (NF- κB p65 blocked the effects of IL-1ß or TNF-α on cell morphologic change, survival, migration, and collagen gel contraction. These results suggest that endothelial cells may contribute to tissue repair/remodeling via the NF-κB signaling in a milieu of airway inflammation.Keywords: NF-κB, IL-1ß, TNF-α, apoptosis, tissue repair

  4. Survival of Partially Differentiated Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells in the Scala Media of the Guinea Pig Cochlea

    OpenAIRE

    Hildebrand, Michael S.; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; Hardman, Jennifer; Coleman, Bryony; Shepherd, Robert K.; de Silva, Michelle G.

    2005-01-01

    The low regenerative capacity of the hair cells of the mammalian inner ear is a major obstacle for functional recovery following sensorineural hearing loss. A potential treatment is to replace damaged tissue by transplantation of stem cells. To test this approach, undifferentiated and partially differentiated mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were delivered into the scala media of the deafened guinea pig cochlea. Transplanted cells survived in the scala media for a postoperative period of at le...

  5. Quantification of early adipose-derived stem cell survival: comparison between sodium iodide symporter and enhanced green fluorescence protein imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Strategies to overcome the problem of extensive early stem cell loss following transplantation requires a method to quantitatively assess their efficacy. This study compared the ability of sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) imaging to monitor the effectiveness of treatments to enhance early stem cell survival. Methods: Human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) transduced with an adenoviral vector to express both NIS and EGFP were mixed with culture media (control), matrigel (matrigel group) or pro-survival cocktail (PSC group), and 5 × 106 cells were injected into thigh muscles of C57BL/6 mice. Animals underwent serial optical imaging and 99mTcO4- scintigraphy. Image-based EGFP fluorescence and 99mTcO4- uptake was measured by region-of-interest analysis, and extracted tissues were measured for 99mTc activity. Fluorescent intensity measured from homogenized muscle tissue was used as reference for actual amount of viable ADSCs. Results: ADSCs were efficiently transduced to express EGFP and NIS without affecting proliferative capacity. The absence of significant apoptosis was confirmed by annexin V FACS analysis and Western blots for activated caspase-3. Both fluorescence optical imaging and 99mTcO4- scintigraphy visualized implanted cells in living mice for up to 5 days. However, optical imaging displayed large variations in fluorescence intensity, and thus failed to detect difference in cell survival between groups or its change over time. In comparison, 99mTcO4- scintigraphy provided more reliable assessment of within-in group donor cell content as well as its temporal change. As a result, NIS imaging was able to discern beneficial effects of matrigel and pro-survival cocktail treatment on early ADSC survival, and provided quantitative measurements that correlated to actual donor cell content within implanted tissue. Conclusion: NIS reporter imaging may be useful for noninvasively assessing the efficacies of

  6. Midkine is a NF-κB-inducible gene that supports prostate cancer cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Zongbing

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Midkine is a heparin-binding growth factor that is over-expressed in various human cancers and plays important roles in cell transformation, growth, survival, migration, and angiogenesis. However, little is known about the upstream factors and signaling mechanisms that regulate midkine gene expression. Methods Two prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC3 were studied for their expression of midkine. Induction of midkine expression in LNCaP cells by serum, growth factors and cytokines was determined by Western blot analysis and/or real-time quantitative reverse-transcription – polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The cell viability was determined by the trypan blue exclusion assay when the LNCaP cells were treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα and/or recombinant midkine. When the LNCaP cells were treated with recombinant midkine, activation of intracellular signalling pathways was determined by Western blot analysis. Prostate tissue microarray slides containing 129 cases (18 normal prostate tissues, 40 early stage cancers, and 71 late stage cancers were assessed for midkine expression by immunohistochemical staining. Results We identified that fetal bovine serum, some growth factors (epidermal growth factor, androgen, insulin-like growth factor-I, and hepatocyte growth factor and cytokines (TNFα and interleukin-1beta induced midkine expression in a human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP cells. TNFα also induced midkine expression in PC3 cells. TNFα was the strongest inducer of midkine expression via nuclear factor-kappa B pathway. Midkine partially inhibited TNFα-induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells. Knockdown of endogenous midkine expression by small interfering RNA enhanced TNFα-induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells. Midkine activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in LNCaP cells. Furthermore, midkine expression was significantly increased in late stage

  7. Elevation of soluble guanylate cyclase suppresses proliferation and survival of human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Chin Wen

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an essential signaling molecule in biological systems. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC, composing of α1 and β1 subunit, is the receptor for NO. Using radioimmunoassay, we discovered that activation of sGC by treatment with bradykinin or sodium nitroprusside (SNP is impaired in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells as compared to normal breast epithelial 184A1 cells. The 184A1 cells expressed both sGC α1 and sGCβ1 mRNAs. However, levels of sGCβ1 mRNAs were relatively lower in MCF-7 cells while both mRNA of sGC subunits were absent in MDA-MB-231 cells. Treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC increased mRNA levels of both sGCα1 and sGCβ1 in MDA-MB-231 cells but only sGCβ1 mRNAs in MCF-7 cells. The 5-aza-dC treatment increased the SNP-induced cGMP production in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, but not in 184A1 cells. Bisulfite sequencing revealed that the promoter of sGCα1 in MDA-MB-231 cells and promoter of sGCβ1 in MCF-7 cells were methylated. Promoter hypermethylation of sGCα1 and sGCβ1 was found in 1 out of 10 breast cancer patients. Over-expression of both sGC subunits in MDA-MB-231 cells induced apoptosis and growth inhibition in vitro as well as reduced tumor incidence and tumor growth rate of MDA-MB-231 xenografts in nude mice. Elevation of sGC reduced protein abundance of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Cdc2, Cdc25A, Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1, Cdk6, c-Myc, and Skp2 while increased protein expression of p53. Our study demonstrated that down-regulation of sGC, partially due to promoter methylation, provides growth and survival advantage in human breast cancer cells.

  8. DNA-damage response gene GADD45A induces differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells without inhibiting cell cycle or survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Susanne; Thalheimer, Frederic B; Haetscher, Nadine; Rehage, Maike; Schroeder, Timm; Rieger, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood cell production life-long by their unique abilities of self-renewal and differentiation into all blood cell lineages. Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is induced by genotoxic stress in HSCs. GADD45A has been implicated in cell cycle control, cell death and senescence, as well as in DNA-damage repair. In general, GADD45A provides cellular stability by either arresting the cell cycle progression until DNA damage is repaired or, in cases of fatal damage, by inducing apoptosis. However, the function of GADD45A in hematopoiesis remains controversial. We revealed the changes in murine HSC fate control orchestrated by the expression of GADD45A at single cell resolution. In contrast to other cellular systems, GADD45A expression did not cause a cell cycle arrest or an alteration in the decision between cell survival and apoptosis in HSCs. Strikingly, GADD45A strongly induced and accelerated the differentiation program in HSCs. Continuous tracking of individual HSCs and their progeny via time-lapse microscopy elucidated that once GADD45A was expressed, HSCs differentiate into committed progenitors within 29 hours. GADD45A-expressing HSCs failed to long-term reconstitute the blood of recipients by inducing multilineage differentiation in vivo. Importantly, γ-irradiation of HSCs induced their differentiation by upregulating endogenous GADD45A. The differentiation induction by GADD45A was transmitted by activating p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and allowed the generation of megakaryocytic-erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages. These data indicate that genotoxic stress-induced GADD45A expression in HSCs prevents their fatal transformation by directing them into differentiation and thereby clearing them from the system. Stem Cells 2016;34:699-710. PMID:26731607

  9. Sphingomyelinase D/Ceramide 1-Phosphate in Cell Survival and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Io-Guané Rivera

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are major constituents of biological membranes of eukaryotic cells. Many studies have shown that sphingomyelin (SM is a major phospholipid in cell bilayers and is mainly localized to the plasma membrane of cells, where it serves both as a building block for cell architecture and as a precursor of bioactive sphingolipids. In particular, upregulation of (C-type sphingomyelinases will produce ceramide, which regulates many physiological functions including apoptosis, senescence, or cell differentiation. Interestingly, the venom of some arthropodes including spiders of the genus Loxosceles, or the toxins of some bacteria such as Corynebacterium tuberculosis, or Vibrio damsela possess high levels of D-type sphingomyelinase (SMase D. This enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of SM to yield ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P, which promotes cell growth and survival and is a potent pro-inflammatory agent in different cell types. In particular, C1P stimulates cytosolic phospholipase A2 leading to arachidonic acid release and the subsequent formation of eicosanoids, actions that are all associated to the promotion of inflammation. In addition, C1P potently stimulates macrophage migration, which has also been associated to inflammatory responses. Interestingly, this action required the interaction of C1P with a specific plasma membrane receptor, whereas accumulation of intracellular C1P failed to stimulate chemotaxis. The C1P receptor is coupled to Gi proteins and activates of the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK1-2 pathways upon ligation with C1P. The proposed review will address novel aspects on the control of inflammatory responses by C1P and will highlight the molecular mechanisms whereby C1P exerts these actions.

  10. Nano-textured fluidic biochip as biological filter for selective survival of neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hsieh-Cheng; Lo, Hung-Chun; Wu, Chia-Yu; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong; Ou, Keng-Liang; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2015-06-01

    This is an innovative study to engineer biological filter to evaluate the effect of template surface structure and physiochemical properties that can be used for wide variety of applications in biological, health care as well as environmental protection. Specifically, planar silicon (Si) wafer and arrayed Si nano-tips (SiNT) templates were fabricated and coated with gold for various lengths of time to study the effect of surface charge, surface roughness, and hydrophilicity on biological activity of rat pheochromocytoma cell lines PC12. The initial growth and proliferation of PC12 cells on Si and SiNT templates showed an antipathy for the ultra-sharp SiNTs templates. In contrast, the same cells demonstrated a preferable adherence to and proliferation on planar Si templates, resulting in higher cell densities by three orders of magnitude than those on SiNT templates. It is hypothesized that SiNTs array does generate nano-fluidic effect such that the effective contact region for aqueous solution on SiNTs is lower than that on planar Si templates, thus decreasing adsorbable area for cell viability and survival. Moreover, the effect of the gold coating on cell number density was analyzed in terms of the surface roughness, zeta potential and wetting properties of the templates. It was determined that surface charge, as measured by the zeta potential, strongly correlated with the trend observed in the surface cell density, whereas no such correlation was observed for surface roughness or wetting properties in the ranges of our experiment conditions. PMID:25256631

  11. Necdin modulates proliferative cell survival of human cells in response to radiation-induced genotoxic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The finite replicative lifespan of cells, termed cellular senescence, has been proposed as a protective mechanism against the proliferation of oncogenically damaged cells, that fuel cancer. This concept is further supported by the induction of premature senescence, a process which is activated when an oncogene is expressed in normal primary cells as well as following intense genotoxic stresses. Thus, deregulation of genes that control this process, like the tumor suppressor p53, may contribute to promoting cancer by allowing cells to bypass senescence. A better understanding of the genes that contribute to the establishment of senescence is therefore warranted. Necdin interacts with p53 and is also a p53 target gene, although the importance of Necdin in the p53 response is not clearly understood. In this study, we first investigated Necdin protein expression during replicative senescence and premature senescence induced by gamma irradiation and by the overexpression of oncogenic RasV12. Gain and loss of function experiments were used to evaluate the contribution of Necdin during the senescence process. Necdin expression declined during replicative aging of IMR90 primary human fibroblasts or following induction of premature senescence. Decrease in Necdin expression seemed to be a consequence of the establishment of senescence since the depletion of Necdin in human cells did not induce a senescence-like growth arrest nor a flat morphology or SA-β-galactosidase activity normally associated with senescence. Similarly, overexpression of Necdin did not affect the life span of IMR90 cells. However, we demonstrate that in normal human cells, Necdin expression mimicked the effect of p53 inactivation by increasing radioresistance. This result suggests that Necdin potentially attenuate p53 signaling in response to genotoxic stress in human cells and supports similar results describing an inhibitory function of Necdin over p53-dependent growth arrest in mice

  12. Effective Oocyte Vitrification and Survival Techniques for Bovine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Jee; Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Jun Beom; Jeong, Chang Jin; Park, Se Pill

    2015-06-01

    Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using vitrified-thawed (VT) oocytes has been studied; however, the cloning efficiency of these oocytes is not comparable with that of nonvitrified (non-V) fresh oocytes. This study sought to optimize the survival and cryopreservation of VT oocytes for SCNT. Co-culture with feeder cells that had been preincubated for 15 h significantly improved the survival of VT oocytes and their in vitro developmental potential following SCNT in comparison to co-culture with feeder cells that had been preincubated for 2, 5, or 24 h (pEVT) group, 13.7%; VT group, 15.0%; p<0.05] and was comparable with that of the non-V group (25.9%). The reactive oxygen species level was significantly lower in the EAVT group than in the other vitrification groups (p<0.05). mRNA levels of maternal genes (ZAR1, BMP15, and NLRP5) and a stress gene (HSF1) were lower in the vitrification groups than in the non-V group (p<0.05), whereas the level of phospho-p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase did not differ among the groups. Among the vitrification groups, blastocysts in the EAVT group had the best developmental potential, as judged by their high mRNA expression of developmental potential-related genes (POU5f1, Interferon-tau, and SLC2A5) and their low expression of proapoptotic (CASP3) and stress (Hsp70) genes. This study demonstrates that SCNT using bovine frozen-thawed oocytes can be successfully achieved using optimized vitrification and co-culture techniques. PMID:25984830

  13. A physiologic three-dimensional cell culture system to investigate the role of decorin in matrix organisation and cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo cells exist in a three-dimensional environment generated and maintained by multiple cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Proteoglycans, like decorin, affect these complex interactions. Thus, we sought to investigate the role of decorin in a three-dimensional environment where the matrix was generated over time by decorin-deficient fibroblasts in the presence of L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate. The cells were viable and proliferated in response to FGF2. Decorin was incorporated in the matrix and caused a ∼2 nm shift in the average diameter of the collagen fibrils, and the range and distribution of the fibrils became narrower and more uniform. Although there were no appreciable changes in collagen composition, we found that exogenous decorin induced the de novo synthesis of collagen I and V and cross-linked β (I). In the early phases of the three-dimensional culture, decorin reduced apoptosis. However, following the establishment of a three-dimensional matrix, the cells did not require decorin for their survival

  14. Long term survival following the detection of circulating tumour cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques for detecting circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of patients with head and neck cancers may identify individuals likely to benefit from early systemic treatment. Reconstruction experiments were used to optimise immunomagnetic enrichment and RT-PCR detection of circulating tumor cells using four markers (ELF3, CK19, EGFR and EphB4). This method was then tested in a pilot study using samples from 16 patients with advanced head and neck carcinomas. Seven patients were positive for circulating tumour cells both prior to and after surgery, 4 patients were positive prior to but not after surgery, 3 patients were positive after but not prior to surgery and 2 patients were negative. Two patients tested positive for circulating cells but there was no other evidence of tumor spread. Given this patient cohort had mostly advanced disease, as expected the detection of circulating tumour cells was not associated with significant differences in overall or disease free survival. For the first time, we show that almost all patients with advanced head and neck cancers have circulating cells at the time of surgery. The clinical application of techniques for detection of spreading disease, such as the immunomagnetic enrichment RT-PCR analysis used in this study, should be explored further

  15. Germ cells may survive clipping and division of the spermatic vessels in surgery for intra-abdominal testes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, J M; Cortes, Dina; Visfeldt, J

    1999-01-01

    Laparoscopy is a well described modality that provides an accurate visual diagnosis upon which further management of intra-abdominal testes may be based. Laparoscopic ligation of spermatic vessels as stage 1 of the procedure is a natural extension of laparoscopy. A staged approach provides adequate...... viability of the intra-abdominal testis. However, it is uncertain whether the more sensitive germ cells survive this procedure in addition to the Sertoli and interstitial cells of the human testis. Survival of germ cells is a prerequisite of later fertility potential....

  16. The survival of cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells is not dependent on elevated potassium-ion concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Hack, N; Balázs, R;

    1994-01-01

    The effects of K(+)-induced membrane depolarization were studied on the survival and biochemical parameters in mouse and rat cerebellar granule cells grown in micro-well cultures. Cell numbers were determined by estimating DNA content using the Hoechst 33258 fluorochrome binding assay. DNA from d...

  17. Id1 expression promotes peripheral CD4+ T cell proliferation and survival upon TCR activation without co-stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Id1 expression enables naïve T cell proliferation without anti-CD28 co-stimulation. •Id1 expression facilitates T cells survival when stimulated with anti-CD3. •Elevation of IL-2 production by Id1 contributes increased proliferation and survival. •Id1 potentiates NF-κB activation by anti-CD3 stimulation. -- Abstract: Although the role of E proteins in the thymocyte development is well documented, much less is known about their function in peripheral T cells. Here we demonstrated that CD4 promoter-driven transgenic expression of Id1, a naturally occurring dominant-negative inhibitor of E proteins, can substitute for the co-stimulatory signal delivered by CD28 to facilitate the proliferation and survival of naïve CD4+ cells upon anti-CD3 stimulation. We next discovered that IL-2 production and NF-κB activity after anti-CD3 stimulation were significantly elevated in Id1-expressing cells, which may be, at least in part, responsible for the augmentation of their proliferation and survival. Taken together, results from this study suggest an important role of E and Id proteins in peripheral T cell activation. The ability of Id proteins to by-pass co-stimulatory signals to enable T cell activation has significant implications in regulating T cell immunity

  18. Effect of four serum components on survival of Treponema pallidum and its attachment to rabbit cells in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, G H; Steiner, B.; Graves, S

    1986-01-01

    Transferrin and, to a lesser extent, insulin were two components of serum that enhanced the survival of Treponema pallidum in microaerophilic, acellular medium. These two components also enhanced the attachment of T pallidum to baby rabbit genital organ (BRGO) cells in both aerobic and microaerophilic tissue culture systems. Growth hormone and epidermal growth factor marginally enhanced the attachment of T pallidum to BRGO cells.

  19. Survival of women with clear cell and papillary serous endometrial cancer after adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type II (papillary serous and clear cell) endometrial carcinoma (EC) is a rare subgroup and is considered to have an unfavorable prognosis. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to elucidate the meaning of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for clinical outcome and to define prognostic factors in these patients (pts). From 2004-2012 forty-two pts with type II EC underwent surgery followed by adjuvant RT at our department. Median age was 72 years. The majority were early stage carcinomas (FIGO I n = 27 [64.3%], FIGO II n = 4 [9.5%], FIGO III n = 11 [26.2%]. Seven pts (16.7%) received adjuvant chemotherapy (ChT). Pts were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (IVB) boost. Five-year local recurrence free survival (LRFS), distant metastases free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were 85.4%, 78%, and 64.5% respectively. LRFS was better with lower pT stage, without lymphangiosis (L0), without haemangiosis (V0) and negative resection margins (R0). DMFS was prolonged in lymph node negatives (N0), L0, V0 and R0. OS was improved in younger pts, N0, L0, V0 and after lymphadenectomy (LNE). Multivariate analysis revealed haemangiosis (V1) as the only independent prognostic factor for OS (p = .014) and DMFS (p = .008). For LRFS pT stage remained as an independent prognostic factor (p = .028). Adjuvant RT with EBRT/IVB ensures adequate local control in type II EC, but control rates remain lower than in type I EC. A benefit of additional adjuvant ChT could not be demonstrated and a general omission of EBRT cannot be recommended at this point. Lymphovascular infiltration and pT stage might be the best predictive factors for a benefit from combined local and systemic treatment

  20. Predictive role of vascular endothelial growth factor polymorphisms in the survival of renal cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y-Q; Chen, J

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a study to investigate the possible role of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms -2578C/A, -1154G/A and -634C/G and clinical factors in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) prognosis in a cohort of 336 RCC cases. A total of 336 patients with RCC were recruited from PLA General Hospital between January 2004 and December 2005. All patients were followed up until December 2010, and no patient was lost to follow-up. The follow-up time of this study was 60 months. At the time of analysis, a total of 210 died during the follow-up. The median overall survival for patients was 29.1 months (95%CI = 17.1 to 41.3 months), and the 5-year survival rate for the patients was 37.5%. Our study showed that Karnofsky performance status ≥60 could delay death from RCC, with HR (95%CI) of 0.57 (0.39-0.84). Patients with anemia, platelet count >400 x 10(9)/L, neutrophilia and lymphocytes >160 g/L had increased risk of death from RCC, with HR (95%CI) of 1.84 (1.18-2.96), 2.01 (1.27-3.25), 1.65 (1.03-2.56) and 1.49 (0.99-2.71), respectively. The VEGF -2578AA and -1154AA genotypes were significantly associated with a poor overall survival of RCC patients, with HR (95%CI) of 2.41 (1.32-5.13) and 3.77 (1.42-15.67), respectively. In conclusion, our study presented the factors regarding the prognosis of RCC patients, and high platelet and neutrophil counts, low lymphocytes, and VEGF -2578C/A and -1154G/A polymorphisms were shown to be independent factors for a lower prognosis of RCC patients. PMID:25062489

  1. Efficacy of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitors with diverse isoform selectivity profiles for inhibiting the survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göckeritz, Elisa; Kerwien, Susan; Baumann, Michael; Wigger, Marion; Vondey, Verena; Neumann, Lars; Landwehr, Thomas; Wendtner, Clemens M; Klein, Christian; Liu, Ningshu; Hallek, Michael; Frenzel, Lukas P; Krause, Günter

    2015-11-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatiylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated signaling holds great promise for treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Therefore we assessed three structurally related PI3K inhibitors targeting the PI3K-δ isoform for their ability to inhibit the survival of freshly isolated CLL cells. The purely PI3K-δ-selective inhibitor idelalisib was compared to copanlisib (BAY 80-6946) and duvelisib (IPI-145), with isoform target profiles that additionally include PI3K-α or PI3K-γ, respectively. The concentrations leading to half-maximal reduction of the survival of CLL cells were more than ten-fold lower for copanlisib than for idelalisib and duvelisib. At concentrations reflecting the biological availability of the different inhibitors, high levels of apoptotic response among CLL samples were attained more consistently with copanlisib than with idelalisib. Copanlisib selectively reduced the survival of CLL cells compared to T cells and to B cells from healthy donors. In addition copanlisib and duvelisib impaired the migration of CLL cells towards CXCL12 to a greater extent than equimolar idelalisib. Similarly copanlisib and duvelisib reduced the survival of CLL cells in co-cultures with the bone marrow stroma cell line HS-5 more strongly than idelalisib. Survival inhibition by copanlisib and idelalisib was enhanced by the monoclonal CD20 antibodies rituximab and obinutuzumab (GA101), while antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by alemtuzumab and peripheral blood mononuclear cells was not substantially impaired by both PI3K inhibitors for the CLL-derived JVM-3 cell line as target cells. Taken together, targeting the α- and δ- p110 isoforms with copanlisib may be a useful strategy for the treatment of CLL and warrants further clinical investigation. PMID:25912635

  2. Regulation of normal B-cell differentiation and malignant B-cell survival by OCT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Daniel J; Shaffer, Arthur L; Xiao, Wenming; Wright, George W; Schmitz, Roland; Phelan, James D; Yang, Yandan; Webster, Daniel E; Rui, Lixin; Kohlhammer, Holger; Nakagawa, Masao; Waldmann, Thomas A; Staudt, Louis M

    2016-04-01

    The requirement for the B-cell transcription factor OCT2 (octamer-binding protein 2, encoded by Pou2f2) in germinal center B cells has proved controversial. Here, we report that germinal center B cells are formed normally after depletion of OCT2 in a conditional knockout mouse, but their proliferation is reduced and in vivo differentiation to antibody-secreting plasma cells is blocked. This finding led us to examine the role of OCT2 in germinal center-derived lymphomas. shRNA knockdown showed that almost all diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell lines are addicted to the expression of OCT2 and its coactivator OCA-B. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis and gene-expression profiling revealed the broad transcriptional program regulated by OCT2 that includes the expression of STAT3, IL-10, ELL2, XBP1, MYC, TERT, and ADA. Importantly, genetic alteration of OCT2 is not a requirement for cellular addiction in DLBCL. However, we detected amplifications of the POU2F2 locus in DLBCL tumor biopsies and a recurrent mutation of threonine 223 in the DNA-binding domain of OCT2. This neomorphic mutation subtly alters the DNA-binding preference of OCT2, leading to the transactivation of noncanonical target genes including HIF1a and FCRL3 Finally, by introducing mutations designed to disrupt the OCT2-OCA-B interface, we reveal a requirement for this protein-protein interface that ultimately might be exploited therapeutically. Our findings, combined with the predominantly B-cell-restricted expression of OCT2 and the absence of a systemic phenotype in our knockout mice, suggest that an OCT2-targeted therapeutic strategy would be efficacious in both major subtypes of DLBCL while avoiding systemic toxicity. PMID:26993806

  3. An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay for estimating red cell survival of transfused red cells-validation using CR-51 labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival time of transfused red cells antigenically distinct from the recipient's red cells was determined using an indirect enzyme linked antiglobulin test. These results were then compared to those determined by Cr-51 labeling. Three patients with hypoproliferative anemias and one patient (2 studies) with traumatic hemolytic anemia caused by a prosthetic heart valve were studied. Survival times were performed by transfusing a 5cc aliquot of Cr-51 labeled cells along with the remaining unit. One hour post transfusion, a blood sample was drawn and used as the 100% value. Subsequent samples drawn over a 2-3 week period were then compared to the initial sample to determine percent survival for both methods. The ELISA method for measuring red cell survival in antigenically distinct cells is in close agreement with the Cr-51 method. Although CR-51 labeling is the accepted method for red cell survival determination the ELISA method can be used when radioisotopes are unavailable or contraindicated or when the decision to estimate red cell survival is made after transfusion

  4. Induction of cell proliferation and survival genes by estradiol-repressed microRNAs in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In estrogen responsive MCF-7 cells, estradiol (E2) binding to ERα leads to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in the control of cell proliferation and survival. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. The aim of this study was to explore whether miRNAs were involved in hormonally regulated expression of estrogen responsive genes. Western blot and QPCR were used to determine the expression of estrogen responsive genes and miRNAs respectively. Target gene expression regulated by miRNAs was validated by luciferase reporter assays and transfection of miRNA mimics or inhibitors. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTS assay. E2 significantly induced bcl-2, cyclin D1 and survivin expression by suppressing the levels of a panel of miRNAs (miR-16, miR-143, miR-203) in MCF-7 cells. MiRNA transfection and luciferase assay confirmed that bcl-2 was regulated by miR-16 and miR-143, cyclinD1 was modulated by miR-16. Importantly, survivin was found to be targeted by miR-16, miR-143, miR-203. The regulatory effect of E2 can be either abrogated by anti-estrogen ICI 182, 780 and raloxifene pretreatment, or impaired by ERα siRNA, indicating the regulation is dependent on ERα. In order to investigate the functional significance of these miRNAs in estrogen responsive cells, miRNAs mimics were transfected into MCF-7 cells. It revealed that overexpression of these miRNAs significantly inhibited E2-induced cell proliferation. Further study of the expression of the miRNAs indicated that miR-16, miR-143 and miR-203 were highly expressed in triple positive breast cancer tissues, suggesting a potential tumor suppressing effect of these miRNAs in ER positive breast cancer. These results demonstrate that E2 induces bcl-2, cyclin D1 and survivin by orchestrating the coordinate downregulation of a panel of miRNAs. In turn, the miRNAs manifest growth suppressive effects and control cell proliferation in response to E2. This sheds a

  5. Induction of cell proliferation and survival genes by estradiol-repressed microRNAs in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In estrogen responsive MCF-7 cells, estradiol (E2 binding to ERα leads to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in the control of cell proliferation and survival. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have emerged as key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. The aim of this study was to explore whether miRNAs were involved in hormonally regulated expression of estrogen responsive genes. Methods Western blot and QPCR were used to determine the expression of estrogen responsive genes and miRNAs respectively. Target gene expression regulated by miRNAs was validated by luciferase reporter assays and transfection of miRNA mimics or inhibitors. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTS assay. Results E2 significantly induced bcl-2, cyclin D1 and survivin expression by suppressing the levels of a panel of miRNAs (miR-16, miR-143, miR-203 in MCF-7 cells. MiRNA transfection and luciferase assay confirmed that bcl-2 was regulated by miR-16 and miR-143, cyclinD1 was modulated by miR-16. Importantly, survivin was found to be targeted by miR-16, miR-143, miR-203. The regulatory effect of E2 can be either abrogated by anti-estrogen ICI 182, 780 and raloxifene pretreatment, or impaired by ERα siRNA, indicating the regulation is dependent on ERα. In order to investigate the functional significance of these miRNAs in estrogen responsive cells, miRNAs mimics were transfected into MCF-7 cells. It revealed that overexpression of these miRNAs significantly inhibited E2-induced cell proliferation. Further study of the expression of the miRNAs indicated that miR-16, miR-143 and miR-203 were highly expressed in triple positive breast cancer tissues, suggesting a potential tumor suppressing effect of these miRNAs in ER positive breast cancer. Conclusions These results demonstrate that E2 induces bcl-2, cyclin D1 and survivin by orchestrating the coordinate downregulation of a panel of miRNAs. In turn, the miRNAs manifest growth suppressive effects

  6. Distribution of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Effects on Neuronal Survival and Axon Regeneration after Optic Nerve Crush and Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise Alessandra; Zaverucha-do-Valle, Camila; da Silva-Junior, Almir Jordão; Nascimento-dos-Santos, Gabriel; Gubert, Fernanda; de Figueirêdo, Ana Beatriz Padilha; Torres, Ana Luiza; Paredes, Bruno D.; Teixeira, Camila; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F.

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells have been used in different animal models of neurological diseases. We investigated the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) injected into the vitreous body in a model of optic nerve injury. Adult (3–5 months old) Lister Hooded rats underwent unilateral optic nerve crush followed by injection of MSC or the vehicle into the vitreous body. Before they were injected, MSC were labeled with a fluorescent dye or with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which allowed us to track the cells in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Sixteen and 28 days after injury, the survival of retinal ganglion cells was evaluated by assessing the number of Tuj1- or Brn3a-positive cells in flat-mounted retinas, and optic nerve regeneration was investigated after anterograde labeling of the optic axons with cholera toxin B conjugated to Alexa 488. Transplanted MSC remained in the vitreous body and were found in the eye for several weeks. Cell therapy significantly increased the number of Tuj1- and Brn3a-positive cells in the retina and the number of axons distal to the crush site at 16 and 28 days after optic nerve crush, although the RGC number decreased over time. MSC therapy was associated with an increase in the FGF-2 expression in the retinal ganglion cells layer, suggesting a beneficial outcome mediated by trophic factors. Interleukin-1β expression was also increased by MSC transplantation. In summary, MSC protected RGC and stimulated axon regeneration after optic nerve crush. The long period when the transplanted cells remained in the eye may account for the effect observed. However, further studies are needed to overcome eventually undesirable consequences of MSC transplantation and to potentiate the beneficial ones in order to sustain the neuroprotective effect overtime. PMID:25347773

  7. Piperlongumine inhibits the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines irrespective of glucocorticoid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seong-Su; Han, Sangwoo; Kamberos, Natalie L

    2014-09-26

    Piperlongumine (PL), a pepper plant alkaloid from Piper longum, has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. PL selectively kills both solid and hematologic cancer cells, but not normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the effect of PL on the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), including glucocorticoid (GC)-resistant B-ALL. Regardless of GC-resistance, PL inhibited the proliferation of all B-ALL cell lines, but not normal B cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis via elevation of ROS. Interestingly, PL did not sensitize most of B-ALL cell lines to dexamethasone (DEX). Only UoC-B1 exhibited a weak synergistic effect between PL and DEX. All B-ALL cell lines tested exhibited constitutive activation of multiple transcription factors (TFs), including AP-1, MYC, NF-κB, SP1, STAT1, STAT3, STAT6 and YY1. Treatment of the B-ALL cells with PL significantly downregulated these TFs and modulated their target genes. While activation of AURKB, BIRC5, E2F1, and MYB mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by PL, but SOX4 and XBP levels were increased by PL. Intriguingly, PL also increased the expression of p21 in B-ALL cells through a p53-independent mechanism. Given that these TFs and their target genes play critical roles in a variety of hematological malignancies, our findings provide a strong preclinical rationale for considering PL as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including B-ALL and GC-resistant B-ALL. PMID:25193702

  8. Urothelial atypia and survival rate of 500 unselected patients with primary transitional-cell tumour of the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde Olsen, P; Wolf, H; Schroeder, T; Fischer, A; Højgaard, K

    1988-01-01

    In a consecutive series of 500 unselected patients with primary urinary bladder tumours the influence of urothelial atypia on the 5 years survival-rate was examined. All tumours were transitional-cell tumours categorized according to the T-classification. Mucosal biopsies from 7 pre-selected sites...... were taken at the initial cystoscopy in 391 patients (78%) to identify urothelial atypia. The over-all cumulative 5 years survival-rate was 48%. Submucosal and muscle invasion had major influence on survival, whereas tumour grade was less important. Patients with urothelial atypia fared significantly...

  9. Survival after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant in Patients with Dyskeratosis Congenita: Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Pasquale; Vedi, Aditi

    2016-07-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a multisystem disorder, with a disruption in telomere biology leading to very short telomeres underpinning its pathophysiology. Bone marrow failure is a key feature in DC and is the leading cause of mortality. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative option for bone marrow failure in DC; however, small case reports and series have suggested a poor outcome after HSCT. We undertook a systematic review of all reported patients with DC who underwent HSCT to better characterize outcome and to identify factors associated with improved survival. The outcome of 109 patients found in the literature was poor, with 5- and 10-year survival estimates of only 57% and 23%, respectively. Patients transplanted after 2000 had improved early survival, with 5-year survival estimates of 70%; however, longer term survival was similar (28%). Pulmonary disease, infection, and graft failure were the leading causes of death. Prognosis after development of pulmonary disease post-HSCT was poor, with only 4 of 15 patients surviving at last follow-up. Multivariate analysis identified age >20 years at HSCT, HSCT before 2000, and alternate donor source to be poor prognostic markers. Reduced-intensity conditioning was not significantly found to be associated with improved survival. This review shows the poor outcome after HSCT in patients with DC and highlights the need for future collaborative clinical trials and extended follow-up of this rare patient population to define whether changes in therapy will lead to improved survival. PMID:26968789

  10. Uterine papillary serous and clear cell carcinomas predict for poorer survival compared to grade 3 endometrioid corpus cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, C. A.; Cheung, M K; Osann, K; Chen, L.; Teng, N N; Longacre, T A; Powell, M A; Hendrickson, M R; Kapp, D S; Chan, J. K.

    2006-01-01

    To compare the survival of women with uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) and clear cell carcinoma (CC) to those with grade 3 endometrioid uterine carcinoma (G3EC). Demographic, pathologic, treatment, and survival information were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program from 1988 to 2001. Data were analysed using Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression methods. Of 4180 women, 1473 had UPSC, 391 had CC, and 2316 had G3EC cancers. Uterine papilla...

  11. The recurrence and survival of oral squamous cell carcinoma: a report of 275 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yue

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is a common malignant tumor of the head and neck, and recurrence is an important prognostic factor in patients with OSCC. We explored the factors associated with recurrence of OSCC and analyzed the survival of patients after recurrence. Clinicopathologic and follow-up data of 275 patients with OSCC treated by surgery in the Cancer Institute and Hospital of Tianjin Medical University between 2002 and 2006 were analyzed. Recurrence factors were analyzed with Chi-square or Fisher's exact test and multivariate analysis. The prognosis of patients after recurrence was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. The recurrence rate was 32.7%. The recurrence time ranged from 2 to 96 months, with a median of 14 months. Univariate analysis showed that T stage, degree of differentiation, pN stage, flap application, resection margin, and lymphovascular invasion were factors of recurrence (P 0.05. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests showed that the 2- and 5-year survival rates were significantly lower in the recurrence group than in non-recurrence group (67.6% vs. 88.0%, 31.8% vs. 79.9%, P < 0.001. Therefore, to improve prognosis, we recommend extended local excision, flap, radical neck dissection, and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for patients more likely to undergo recurrence.

  12. Survival of mice and hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow after intermittent total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a preparative procedure for bone marrow transplantation, intermittent total body irradiation (TBI) has been used in our hospital. The biological significance of this method, in which the instantaneous dose rate is high but the average dose rate is low, has not been evaluated to date. The hematopoietic responses caused by both intermittent and continuous TBI were compared. In the intermittent irradiation, mice in a moving irradiation chamber were exposed under a small field (2 x 35 cm2), and the instantaneous and average dose rates were 1 Gy/min and 0.25 - 0.12 Gy/min, respectively. The average dose rate was adjusted to the same level in both irradiation methods. LD50/30 and survival of colony-forming units (CFU) in culture and survival of endogenuous CFU in the spleen from female BDF1 mice were the same with the two methods. These results show that the response of hematopoietic stem cells depends on the average dose rate, not on the instantaneous dose rate. Our findings suggest that intermittent irradiation, as well as the continuous method, would be useful for preparing patients before bone marrow transplantation. (author)

  13. Microsomal PGE2 synthase-1 regulates melanoma cell survival and associates with melanoma disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Cho, Sung-Nam; Roszik, Jason; Milton, Denái R; Dal, Fulya; Kim, Sangwon F; Menter, David G; Yang, Peiying; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Grimm, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    COX-2 and its product PGE2 enhance carcinogenesis and tumor progression, which has been previously reported in melanoma. As most COX inhibitors cause much toxicity, the downstream microsomal PGE2 synthase-1 (mPGES1) is a consideration for targeting. Human melanoma TMAs were employed for testing mPGES1 protein staining intensity and percentage levels, and both increased with clinical stage; employing a different Stage III TMA, mPGES1 intensity (not percentage) associated with reduced patient survival. Our results further show that iNOS was also highly expressed in melanoma tissues with high mPGES1 levels, and iNOS-mediated NO promoted mPGES1 expression and PGE2 production. An mPGES1-specific inhibitor (CAY10526) as well as siRNA attenuated cell survival and increased apoptosis. CAY10526 significantly suppressed tumor growth and increased apoptosis in melanoma xenografts. Our findings support the value of a prognostic and predictive role for mPGES1, and suggest targeting this molecule in the PGE2 pathway as another avenue toward improving melanoma therapy. PMID:26801201

  14. Peroxidation due to cryoprotectant treatment is a vital factor for cell survival in Arabidopsis cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Li; Zhang, Di; Jiang, Xiang-Ning; Gai, Ying; Wang, Wei-Ming; Reed, Barbara M; Shen, Xiao-Hui

    2013-11-01

    Cryopreservation can be a safe and cost-effective tool for the long-term storage of plant germplasm. In Arabidopsis, the ability to recover from cryogenic treatment was lost as growth progressed. Growth could be restored in 48-h seedlings, whereas 72-h seedlings died after cryogenic treatment. Why seedling age and survival are negatively correlated is an interesting issue. A comparative transcriptomics was performed to screen differentially expressed genes between 48- and 72-h seedlings after exposure to cryoprotectant. Among differentially expressed genes, oxidative stress response genes played important roles in cryoprotectant treatment, and peroxidation was a key factor related to cell survival. Seedlings underwent more peroxidation at 72-h than at 48-h. A comprehensive analysis indicated that peroxidation injured membrane systems leading to photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation damage. Furthermore, the apoptosis-like events were found in cryogenic treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings. 48- and 72-h seedlings underwent different degrees of membrane lipid peroxidation during cryoprotectant treatment, and reducing the injury of oxidative stress was an important factor to successful cryopreservation. This study provided a novel insight of genetic regulatory mechanisms in cryopreservation, and established an excellent model to test and evaluate the effect of exogenous antioxidants and conventional cryoprotectants in plant cryopreservation. PMID:24094052

  15. Entrance and survival of Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages and epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett K Larsen

    Full Text Available Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis and cetaceans (B. ceti from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17 by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1, two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1, and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3 were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72-96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3, suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary.

  16. Long-term survival in uterine clear cell carcinoma and uterine papillary serous carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Bengt; Persson, Jan; Ranstam, Jonas; Willén, Roger

    2010-09-01

    Uterine clear cell carcinoma (UCC) and uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) are rare entities that differ in clinical behavior from endometrial adenocarcinoma. Compared with endometrioid adenocarcinoma, they more often metastasize early and more commonly in the upper abdomen including the omentum. Treatment programs of UCC and UPSC at different stages vary and range from no adjuvant therapy in stage Ia to a wide variety of chemotherapies and radiotherapies in more advanced stages. This study presents the outcome of 109 patients with UCC or UPSC treated according to essentially the same treatment program from May 1993 to December 2004. Most patients were treated with a simple hysterectomy with no further adjuvant treatment. In stage Ia, 2/46 patients died of their disease and amongst all the stages, 30/109 patients died of their disease. These survival outcomes are comparable to or better than those presented previously. PMID:20944161

  17. Prolonged Survival in a Patient with a Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploquin, Anne; Baldini, Capucine; Vuagnat, Perrine; Makhloufi, Samira; Desauw, Christophe; Hebbar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare entity. Herein we present the case of a 50-year-old male patient with an unlimited mass on the pancreatic corpus and tail with peripancreatic effusion and multiple metastases in the liver and spleen. A liver biopsy showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received 9 cycles of gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which had to be stopped because of a persistent grade 2 neuropathy. A CT scan showed complete response after 14 years. At the age of 61 years, a localized prostatic cancer was diagnosed, treated by prostatectomy. The patient carried a BRCA2 mutation. None of the precedent case reports describe a chemosensibility to the GEMOX regimen. In spite of the lack of study in these patients, chemotherapy with oxaliplatin seems to be the most effective. Long survival can be expected. PMID:26600777

  18. Incidence of and survival after glottic squamous cell carcinoma in Denmark from 1971 to 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Nina Munk; Johansen, Jørgen; Kristensen, Claus Andrup;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the incidence, disease-specific mortality (DSM), and overall survival (OS) of patients with glottic squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in Denmark from 1971-2011 in a national population-based cohort of consecutive patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients diagnosed with glottic SCC...... stage I-IV between 1971 and 2011 in Denmark were included. Patients were identified from the Danish Head and Neck Cancer database, which has a coverage of approximately 100% of registered glottic cancer in Denmark. Information on vital status and cause of death were updated using patient charts and...... the earlier decades. Longer waiting-time for treatment (>25 d) significantly increased DSM and reduced OS. CONCLUSION: Despite being highly avoidable with smoking cessation, the incidence of glottic SCC increased in Denmark from 1971-2011. The adjusted hazard rate of DSM and overall death after...

  19. Survival and signaling changes in antigen presenting cell subsets after radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer Janell

    examine co-stimulatory receptor activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine release, and T cell proliferation with and without radiation and inhibition of the NFkappaB pathway, demonstrated that NEMO is necessary for the activation, maturation, and enhanced responsiveness of human subsets of antigen presenting cells that occur after radiation. These findings provided insight into the mechanism of action of radiation-enhanced promotion of the antigen presenting cell responses. The methods of analysis employed can be used for monitoring immune changes that impact immune modulation in transplantation and tumor vaccines studies. Furthermore, NFkappaB pathway proteins have the potential to serve as biomarkers for optimal antitumor responses. The NBD peptide may also have usefulness as a therapeutic agent for inhibition of graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients who have undergone transplantation. While the first set of experiments focused on antigen presenting cell responsiveness, the second set of experiments were designed to enhance our understanding of why antigen presenting cells, specifically monocytes and dendritic cells, are more radioresistant than conventional T cells. Flow cytometric analysis of various surface markers and intracellular signaling markers were used to examine the mechanisms behind the radioresistance of antigen presenting cells. The experiments described here showed a hierarchy of radiosensitivity among T cells, with naive CD8 T cells being the most radiosensitive and CD4 memory T cells being the most radioresistant. Antigen presenting cells were found to be significantly more radioresistant than T cell subsets (survival may have importance for the generation of anti-tumor immunity and post-transplantation immune sequelae such as GVHD. In addition, elucidation of the mechanism of death of APC and T cell subsets, as described in chapter 3, provides potential markers of cell death that can be correlated to good graft versus tumor (GVT) effects versus bad

  20. Mutant p53 - heat shock response oncogenic cooperation: a new mechanism of cancer cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evguenia eAlexandrova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main tumor suppressor function of p53 as a ‘guardian of the genome’ is to respond to cellular stress by transcriptional activation of apoptosis, growth arrest or senescence in damaged cells. Not surprisingly, mutations in the p53 gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in human cancers. Importantly, mutant p53 (mutp53 proteins not only lose their wild-type tumor suppressor activity, but also can actively promote tumor development. Two main mechanisms accounting for mutp53 proto-oncogenic activity are inhibition of the wild-type p53 in a dominant-negative fashion and gain of additional oncogenic activities known as gain-of-function (GOF. Here we discuss a novel mechanism of mutp53 GOF, which relies on its oncogenic cooperation with the heat shock machinery. This coordinated adaptive mechanism renders cancer cells more resistant to proteotoxic stress and provides both, a strong survival advantage to cancer cells and a promising means for therapeutic intervention.

  1. Hypoxic stress, tumor cell survival and /sup 31/P-NMR spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have studied the /sup 31/P-NMR spectral characteristics of a variety of transplantable tumors in situ. These tumors demonstrate the presence of phosphorylocholine, phosphorylethanolamine; inorganic phosphate; glycerolphosphorylcholine, glycerolphosphorylethanolamine; phosphocreatine; and, nucleoside di- and triphosphates. Sensitivity has been improved by use of a 15 mm id solenoidal coil which allows spectrometry of tumors of -- 300 mg. Two tumor models were used to assess the influence of N/sub 2/ asphyxiation and tumor cell survival. Mice bearing s.c. 16/C mammary adenocarcinoma were N/sub 2/ asphyxiated within the NMR spectrometer and tumors excised after various durations of hypoxia for endpoint dilution analysis. Similar protocols using the RIF-1 tumor and clonogenic assay were also employed. The TD/sub 50/ assay using the 16/C mammary tumor indicated that the tumorigenic cells were most vulnerable during the initial adaptation to anoxia (0-13 min). Further delay in tumor excision following N/sub 2/ asphyxiation or simple tumor excision and incubation at 370C was without effect (2 hrs). Cell yield from either tumor was not influenced by hypoxic stress. Trypan blue dye exclusion was suspect due to a detectable decline of intracellular high energy phosphates

  2. Nubp1 is required for lung branching morphogenesis and distal progenitor cell survival in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Schnatwinkel

    Full Text Available The lung is a complex system in biology and medicine alike. Whereas there is a good understanding of the anatomy and histology of the embryonic and adult lung, less is known about the molecular details and the cellular pathways that ultimately orchestrate lung formation and affect its health. From a forward genetic approach to identify novel genes involved in lung formation, we identified a mutated Nubp1 gene, which leads to syndactyly, eye cataract and lung hypoplasia. In the lung, Nubp1 is expressed in progenitor cells of the distal epithelium. Nubp1(m1Nisw mutants show increased apoptosis accompanied by a loss of the distal progenitor markers Sftpc, Sox9 and Foxp2. In addition, Nubp1 mutation disrupts localization of the polarity protein Par3 and the mitosis relevant protein Numb. Using knock-down studies in lung epithelial cells, we also demonstrate a function of Nubp1 in regulating centrosome dynamics and microtubule organization. Together, Nubp1 represents an essential protein for lung progenitor survival by coordinating vital cellular processes including cell polarity and centrosomal dynamics.

  3. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials: Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results: The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient's survival probability ( (www.predictcancer.org)). The data set can be downloaded at (https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048). Conclusions: The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system

  4. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberije, Cary, E-mail: cary.oberije@maastro.nl [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven, KU Leuven (Belgium); Houben, Ruud [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Heuvel, Michel van de; Uyterlinde, Wilma [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Deasy, Joseph O. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Maastricht, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Lambin, Philippe [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials: Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results: The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient's survival probability ( (www.predictcancer.org)). The data set can be downloaded at (https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048). Conclusions: The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system.

  5. Regulation of proliferation-survival decisions is controlled by FGF1 secretion in retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryckaert, M; Guillonneau, X; Hecquet, C; Perani, P; Courtois, Y; Mascarelli, F

    2000-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) induces proliferation and differentiation in a wide variety of cells of mesodermal and neuroectodermal origin. FGF1 has no 'classical' signal sequence to direct its secretion, and there has been considerable debate concerning FGF1 secretion and its role in the biological activities of FGF1. We investigated the effects of FGF1 secretion and the signalling induced by signal peptide (SP)-containing FGFI and SP-less FGF1, on the proliferation and the apoptosis in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. Primary RPE cell cultures were transfected with FGF1 (FGF1 cells) and SP-FGF1 (SP-FGF1 cells) cDNAs. SP-FGF1 cells secreted large amount of FGF1 and actively proliferated, whereas FGF1 and control cells did not. Secreted FGF1 induced short-term activation of both FGFR1 and ERK2, which were required for cell proliferation. In contrast, SP-FGF1 cells stopped secreting FGF1 and died rapidly, if cultured in the absence of serum. Surprisingly, FGF1 cells, but not control cells, secreted FGF1 and were resistant to apoptosis induced by serum depletion. Secreted FGF1 induced long-term activation of FGFR1 and ERK2, which was necessary to induce a constant and high level of Bcl-x production, and to induce cell survival in FGFI cells. Downregulation of ERK2 and Bcl-x increased apoptosis. Thus, the proliferation and survival activities of FGF1 depend on the secretion of FGF1 which is determined by the cell culture conditions. Cell proliferation was SP-dependent, whereas cell survival was not. The signal peptide controls the level and duration, 'whispering or shouting', of ERK2 activation cells which determines FGF1 biological function and may have important implications for anti-degenerative and anti-proliferative treatments. PMID:11039909

  6. SIRT1 is a critical regulator of K562 cell growth, survival, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Mark T; DeLuca, Teresa A; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Yi, Minchang; Mrksich, Milan; Miller, William M

    2016-05-15

    Inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACi) has emerged as a promising approach in the treatment of many types of cancer, including leukemias. Among the HDACs, Class III HDACs, also known as sirtuins (SIRTs), are unique in that their function is directly related to the cell's metabolic state through their dependency on the co-factor NAD(+). In this study, we examined the relation between SIRTs and the growth, survival, and differentiation of K562 erythroleukemia cells. Using a mass spectrometry approach we previously developed, we show that SIRT expression and deacetylase activity in these cells changes greatly with differentiation state (undifferentiated vs. megakaryocytic differentiation vs. erythroid differentiation). Moreover, SIRT1 is crucially involved in regulating the differentiation state. Overexpression of wildtype (but not deacetylase mutant) SIRT1 resulted in upregulation of glycophorin A, ~2-fold increase in the mRNA levels of α, γ, ε, and ζ-globins, and spontaneous hemoglobinization. Hemin-induced differentiation was also enhanced by (and depended on) higher SIRT1 levels. Since K562 cells are bipotent, we also investigated whether SIRT1 modulation affected their ability to undergo megakaryocytic (MK) differentiation. SIRT1 was required for commitment to the MK lineage and subsequent maturation, but was not directly involved in polyploidization of either K562 cells or an already-MK-committed cell line, CHRF-288-11. The observed blockage in commitment to the MK lineage was associated with a dramatic decrease in the formation of autophagic vacuoles, which was previously shown to be required for K562 cell MK commitment. Autophagy-associated conversion of the protein LC3-I to LC3-II was greatly enhanced by overexpression of wildtype SIRT1, further suggesting a functional connection between SIRT1, autophagy, and MK differentiation. Based on its clear effects on autophagy, we also examined the effect of SIRT1 modulation on stress responses. Consistent

  7. Hemolin triggers cell survival on fibroblasts in response to serum deprivation by inhibition of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Rosemary Viola; Alvarez-Flores, Miryam Paola; Maria, Durvanei Augusto; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblasts are the main cellular component of connective tissues and play important roles in health and disease through the production of collagen, fibronectin and growth factors. Under certain conditions, such as wound healing, fibroblasts intensify their metabolic demand, while the restriction of nutrients affect matrix composition, cell metabolism and behavior. In lepidopterans, wound healing is regulated by ecdysteroid hormones, which upregulate multifunctional proteins such as hemolin. However, the role of hemolin in cell proliferation and wound healing is not clear. rLosac is a recombinant hemolin from the caterpillar Lonomia obliqua whose proliferative and cytoprotective effects on endothelial cells have been described. Here, we show that rLosac induces a marked cell survival effect on fibroblast submitted to serum deprivation, which is observable as early as 24h, as demonstrated through the MTT assay, as well as an increase in migration of human dermal fibroblasts (HDF). No effects on cell proliferation or cell cycle distribution of fibroblasts in normal conditions were observed, suggesting that rLosac induces an effect in stressful conditions such serum deprivation but not when nutrient are sufficient. By flow cytometry, rLosac caused an apparent dose-dependent increase in cells in the S phase of the cell cycle and a significant reduction of cells with fragmented DNA. Furthermore, treatment with rLosac results in a significant decrease in the production of reactive oxygen species and in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating that a reduction in oxidative stress is involved in rLosac-mediated cytoprotection. Our results also show an up-regulation of Bcl-2 and a down-regulation of Bax protein levels, inhibition of cytochrome c release and a reduction in caspase-3 levels, all considered critical factors for apoptosis. Moreover, rLosac treatment reduces the morphological changes induced by prolonged serum deprivation including the emergence

  8. beta1-integrin-mediated signaling essentially contributes to cell survival after radiation-induced genotoxic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordes, N; Seidler, J; Durzok, R; Geinitz, H; Brakebusch, C

    2006-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins confers resistance to radiation- or drug-induced genotoxic injury. To analyse the underlying mechanisms specific for beta1-integrins, wild-type beta1A-integrin-expressing GD25beta1A cells were compared to GD25beta1B cells, which express...... findings in tumor cells, human A-172 glioma cells were examined under the same conditions after siRNA-mediated silencing of beta1-integrins. We found that beta1A-integrin-mediated adhesion to fibronectin, collagen-III or beta1-IgG was essential for cell survival after radiation-induced genotoxic injury...... central role of beta1-integrins in Akt- and p130Cas/paxillin-mediated prosurvival signaling. These findings suggest beta1-integrins as critical regulators of cell survival after radiation-induced genotoxic injury. Elucidation of the molecular circuitry of prosurvival beta1-integrin-mediated signaling in...

  9. Pancreatic Satellite Cells Derived Galectin-1 Increase the Progression and Less Survival of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Wang, Sen; Ye, Nianyuan; Li, Ping; Gao, Sujun; Miao, Yi; Wang, Daorong; Jiang, Kuirong

    2014-01-01

    Background Galectin-1, a member of carbohydrate-binding proteins with a polyvalent function on tumor progression, was found strongly expressed in pancreatic satellite cells (PSCs), which partner in crime with cancer cells and promote the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We evaluated the effects of PSCs derived Galectin-1 on the progression of PDAC, as well as the tumor establishment and development in mouse xenografts. Methods The relationship between immunohistochemistry staining intensity of Galectin-1 and clinicopathologic variables were assessed in 66 PDAC tissues, 18 chronic pancreatitis tissues and 10 normal controls. The roles of PSCs isolated from PDAC and normal pancreas on the proliferative activity, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and the invasion of CFPAC-1 in the co-cultured system, as well as on the tumor establishment and development in mouse xenografts by mixed implanting with CFPAC-1 subcutaneously were evaluated. Results Galectin-1 expression was gradually increased from normal pancreas (negative), chronic pancreatitis (weak) to PDAC (strong), in which Galectin-1 expression was also increased from well, moderately to poorly differentiated PDAC. Galectin-1 staining intensity of pancreatic cancer tissue was associated with increase in tumor size, lymph node metastasis, perineural invasion and differentiation and UICC stage, and served as the independent prognostic indicator of poor survival of pancreatic cancer. In vitro and in vivo experiments indicated that TGF-β1 upregulated Galectin-1 expression in PSCs, which could further promotes the proliferative activity, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, as well as the tumor establishment and growth. Conclusion Galectin-1 expression in stromal cells of pancreatic cancer suggests that this protein plays a role in the promotion of cancer cells invasion and metastasis and provides a therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24595374

  10. The effect of encapsulation of cardiac stem cells within matrix-enriched hydrogel capsules on cell survival, post-ischemic cell retention and cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Audrey E; Tilokee, Everad L; Latham, Nicholas; McNeill, Brian; Lam, Bu-Khanh; Ruel, Marc; Suuronen, Erik J; Courtman, David W; Stewart, Duncan J; Davis, Darryl R

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of ex vivo proliferated cardiac stem cells (CSCs) is an emerging therapy for ischemic cardiomyopathy but outcomes are limited by modest engraftment and poor long-term survival. As such, we explored the effect of single cell microencapsulation to increase CSC engraftment and survival after myocardial injection. Transcript and protein profiling of human atrial appendage sourced CSCs revealed strong expression the pro-survival integrin dimers αVβ3 and α5β1- thus rationalizing the integration of fibronectin and fibrinogen into a supportive intra-capsular matrix. Encapsulation maintained CSC viability under hypoxic stress conditions and, when compared to standard suspended CSC, media conditioned by encapsulated CSCs demonstrated superior production of pro-angiogenic/cardioprotective cytokines, angiogenesis and recruitment of circulating angiogenic cells. Intra-myocardial injection of encapsulated CSCs after experimental myocardial infarction favorably affected long-term retention of CSCs, cardiac structure and function. Single cell encapsulation prevents detachment induced cell death while boosting the mechanical retention of CSCs to enhance repair of damaged myocardium. PMID:24099706

  11. The Bmi-1 polycomb protein antagonizes the (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate-dependent suppression of skin cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Adhikary, Gautam; Eckert, Richard L

    2010-03-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators of gene expression that enhance cell survival. This regulation is achieved via action of two multiprotein PcG complexes--PRC2 (EED) and PRC1 [B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi-1)]. These complexes modulate gene expression by increasing histone methylation and reducing acetylation--leading to a closed chromatin conformation. Activity of these proteins is associated with increased cell proliferation and survival. We show increased expression of key PcG proteins in immortalized keratinocytes and skin cancer cell lines. We examine the role of two key PcG proteins, Bmi-1 and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), and the impact of the active agent in green tea, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), on the function of these regulators. EGCG treatment of SCC-13 cells reduces Bmi-1 and Ezh2 level and this is associated with reduced cell survival. The reduction in survival is associated with a global reduction in histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, a hallmark of PRC2 complex action. This change in PcG protein expression is associated with reduced expression of key proteins that enhance progression through the cell cycle [cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin A and cyclin B1] and increased expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression (p21 and p27). Apoptosis is also enhanced, as evidenced by increased caspase 9, 8 and 3 cleavage and increased poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase cleavage. EGCG treatment also increases Bax and suppresses Bcl-xL expression. Vector-mediated enhanced Bmi-1 expression reverses these EGCG-dependent changes. These findings suggest that green tea polyphenols reduce skin tumor cell survival by influencing PcG-mediated epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. PMID:20015867

  12. Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James CK Lai

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available James CK Lai1, Gayathri Ananthakrishnan1,2, Sirisha Jandhyam1, Vikas V Dukhande1, Alok Bhushan1, Mugdha Gokhale1, Christopher K Daniels1, Solomon W Leung31Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy and Biomedical Research Institute, 2Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences, Kasiska College of Health Professions, 3Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering and Biomedical Research Institute, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID, USAAbstract: Recent evidence suggests silicon dioxide micro- and nanoparticles induce cytotoxic effects on lung cells. Thus, there is an increasing concern regarding their potential health hazard. Nevertheless, the putative toxicity of nanoparticles in mammalian cells has not yet been systematically investigated. We previously noted that several metallic oxide nanoparticles exert differential cytotoxic effects on human neural and nonneural cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that silicon dioxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in U87 cells by lowering their survival by decreasing cell survival signaling and disturbing mitochondrial function. To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the activities of the key mitochondrial enzymes, citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase, in astrocytoma U87 cells treated with silicon dioxide nanoparticles. In addition, we studied the expression of the mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins, cytochrome C oxidase II and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH dehydrogenase subunit 6, and cell signaling pathway protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphorylated ERK in treated U87 cells. The activated form of ERK controls cell growth, differentiation, and proliferation. In parallel, we determined survival of U87 cells after treating them with various concentrations of silicon dioxide nanoparticles. Our results indicated that treatment with silicon dioxide nanoparticles induced decreases in U87 cell survival

  13. Role of CDK5/cyclin complexes in ischemia-induced death and survival of renal tubular cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Tatiana; Sancho, Mónica; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Orzáez, Mar

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion processes induce damage in renal tubules and compromise the viability of kidney transplants. Understanding the molecular events responsible for tubule damage and recovery would help to develop new strategies for organ preservation. CDK5 has been traditionally considered a neuronal kinase with dual roles in cell death and survival. Here, we demonstrate that CDK5 and their regulators p35/p25 and cyclin I are also expressed in renal tubular cells. We show that treatment with CDK inhibitors promotes the formation of pro-survival CDK5/cyclin I complexes and enhances cell survival upon an ischemia reperfusion pro-apoptotic insult. These findings support the benefit of treating with CDK inhibitors for renal preservation, assisting renal tubule protection. PMID:24675881

  14. Response to combined modality therapy correlates with survival in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Although concurrent chemoradiotherapy can now achieve demonstrated long-term survival in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LANSCLC), it is difficult to predict which patients will benefit most from this therapeutic approach. Studies have suggested that local control, and the response to therapy, may be linked to improved survival; however, detailed analysis of the impact of tumor response to chemoradiotherapy on survival has not been thoroughly reported. Therefore, we sought to determine the impact of the response rate on survival for patients who were treated with combined modality therapy for LANSCLC. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the data from 116 patients enrolled between 1994 and 1997 in three trials investigating paclitaxel-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy for LANSCLC. Tumor size measurements were assessed immediately before and 2 months after completion of combined modality therapy to determine the response and to calculate the percentage of decrease in tumor size. Results: Patients with a response (complete or partial) had an improved 4-year overall survival rate compared with patients with no response (stable or progressive disease; 21.1% vs. 3.3%, p <0.0001) in the 109 assessable patients. Progression-free survival also improved significantly with response. An analysis of the percentage of decrease in tumor size vs. survival was performed (n = 74) using Cox proportion model analysis. After combined modality therapy, a 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% decrease in tumor size conferred a 39%, 63%, 78%, 86%, and 92% reduction in risk of death compared with a 0% decrease in tumor size (p <0.0001). Conclusion: The response by conventional response criteria correlated strongly with improved overall survival and progression-free survival and an increasing percentage of decrease in tumor size resulted in a reduction in the risk of death. Additional investigation of the degree of response as a factor predictive of improved

  15. Exploitation of the complement system by oncogenic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus for cell survival and persistent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Shin Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During evolution, herpesviruses have developed numerous, and often very ingenious, strategies to counteract efficient host immunity. Specifically, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV eludes host immunity by undergoing a dormant stage, called latency wherein it expresses a minimal number of viral proteins to evade host immune activation. Here, we show that during latency, KSHV hijacks the complement pathway to promote cell survival. We detected strong deposition of complement membrane attack complex C5b-9 and the complement component C3 activated product C3b on Kaposi's sarcoma spindle tumor cells, and on human endothelial cells latently infected by KSHV, TIME-KSHV and TIVE-LTC, but not on their respective uninfected control cells, TIME and TIVE. We further showed that complement activation in latently KSHV-infected cells was mediated by the alternative complement pathway through down-regulation of cell surface complement regulatory proteins CD55 and CD59. Interestingly, complement activation caused minimal cell death but promoted the survival of latently KSHV-infected cells grown in medium depleted of growth factors. We found that complement activation increased STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation (Y705 of KSHV-infected cells, which was required for the enhanced cell survival. Furthermore, overexpression of either CD55 or CD59 in latently KSHV-infected cells was sufficient to inhibit complement activation, prevent STAT3 Y705 phosphorylation and abolish the enhanced survival of cells cultured in growth factor-depleted condition. Together, these results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which an oncogenic virus subverts and exploits the host innate immune system to promote viral persistent infection.

  16. The Bmi-1 polycomb protein antagonizes the (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate-dependent suppression of skin cancer cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Adhikary, Gautam; Eckert, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators of gene expression that enhance cell survival. This regulation is achieved via action of two multiprotein PcG complexes—PRC2 (EED) and PRC1 [B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi-1)]. These complexes modulate gene expression by increasing histone methylation and reducing acetylation—leading to a closed chromatin conformation. Activity of these proteins is associated with increased cell proliferation an...

  17. Phacoemulsification versus extracapsular cataract extraction: a comparative study of cell survival and growth on the human capsular bag in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Quinlan, M; Wormstone, I; Duncan, G.; DAVIES, P

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Phacoemulsification is rapidly replacing conventional extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) as the method of choice for cataract surgery in the Western world. However, posterior capsule opacification (PCO) still remains the major postoperative complication, affecting 20-50% of patients, and results from persistent cell growth of epithelial cells remaining after surgery. This study aimed to compare cell survival and growth on capsular bags following ECCE and phacoemulsificat...

  18. Piperlongumine inhibits the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines irrespective of glucocorticoid resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seong-Su, E-mail: seong-su-han@uiowa.edu [Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Han, Sangwoo [Health and Human Physiology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kamberos, Natalie L. [Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • PL inhibits the proliferation of B-ALL cell lines irrespective of GC-resistance. • PL selectively kills B-ALL cells by increasing ROS, but not normal counterpart. • PL does not sensitize majority of B-ALL cells to DEX. • PL represses the network of constitutively activated TFs and modulates their target genes. • PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for GC-resistant B-ALL. - Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), a pepper plant alkaloid from Piper longum, has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. PL selectively kills both solid and hematologic cancer cells, but not normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the effect of PL on the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), including glucocorticoid (GC)-resistant B-ALL. Regardless of GC-resistance, PL inhibited the proliferation of all B-ALL cell lines, but not normal B cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis via elevation of ROS. Interestingly, PL did not sensitize most of B-ALL cell lines to dexamethasone (DEX). Only UoC-B1 exhibited a weak synergistic effect between PL and DEX. All B-ALL cell lines tested exhibited constitutive activation of multiple transcription factors (TFs), including AP-1, MYC, NF-κB, SP1, STAT1, STAT3, STAT6 and YY1. Treatment of the B-ALL cells with PL significantly downregulated these TFs and modulated their target genes. While activation of AURKB, BIRC5, E2F1, and MYB mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by PL, but SOX4 and XBP levels were increased by PL. Intriguingly, PL also increased the expression of p21 in B-ALL cells through a p53-independent mechanism. Given that these TFs and their target genes play critical roles in a variety of hematological malignancies, our findings provide a strong preclinical rationale for considering PL as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including B-ALL and GC-resistant B-ALL.

  19. Piperlongumine inhibits the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines irrespective of glucocorticoid resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PL inhibits the proliferation of B-ALL cell lines irrespective of GC-resistance. • PL selectively kills B-ALL cells by increasing ROS, but not normal counterpart. • PL does not sensitize majority of B-ALL cells to DEX. • PL represses the network of constitutively activated TFs and modulates their target genes. • PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for GC-resistant B-ALL. - Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), a pepper plant alkaloid from Piper longum, has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. PL selectively kills both solid and hematologic cancer cells, but not normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the effect of PL on the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), including glucocorticoid (GC)-resistant B-ALL. Regardless of GC-resistance, PL inhibited the proliferation of all B-ALL cell lines, but not normal B cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis via elevation of ROS. Interestingly, PL did not sensitize most of B-ALL cell lines to dexamethasone (DEX). Only UoC-B1 exhibited a weak synergistic effect between PL and DEX. All B-ALL cell lines tested exhibited constitutive activation of multiple transcription factors (TFs), including AP-1, MYC, NF-κB, SP1, STAT1, STAT3, STAT6 and YY1. Treatment of the B-ALL cells with PL significantly downregulated these TFs and modulated their target genes. While activation of AURKB, BIRC5, E2F1, and MYB mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by PL, but SOX4 and XBP levels were increased by PL. Intriguingly, PL also increased the expression of p21 in B-ALL cells through a p53-independent mechanism. Given that these TFs and their target genes play critical roles in a variety of hematological malignancies, our findings provide a strong preclinical rationale for considering PL as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including B-ALL and GC-resistant B-ALL

  20. Survival Outcome of Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising from Sinonasal Inverted Papilloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Zhuang Liang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Patients with SCC/IP had low overall survival outcomes. Advanced age, stage, and metachronous tumors are the main factors affecting prognosis. Treatment planning should consider high-risk factors to improve survival outcome.

  1. Hydrostatic pressure does not cause detectable changes in survival of human retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Osborne

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is a major risk factor for glaucoma. One consequence of raised IOP is that ocular tissues are subjected to increased hydrostatic pressure (HP. The effect of raised HP on stress pathway signaling and retinal ganglion cell (RGC survival in the human retina was investigated. METHODS: A chamber was designed to expose cells to increased HP (constant and fluctuating. Accurate pressure control (10-100 mmHg was achieved using mass flow controllers. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs from donor eyes (<24 h post mortem were cultured in serum-free DMEM/HamF12. Increased HP was compared to simulated ischemia (oxygen glucose deprivation, OGD. Cell death and apoptosis were measured by LDH and TUNEL assays, RGC marker expression by qRT-PCR (THY-1 and RGC number by immunohistochemistry (NeuN. Activated p38 and JNK were detected by Western blot. RESULTS: Exposure of HORCs to constant (60 mmHg or fluctuating (10-100 mmHg; 1 cycle/min pressure for 24 or 48 h caused no loss of structural integrity, LDH release, decrease in RGC marker expression (THY-1 or loss of RGCs compared with controls. In addition, there was no increase in TUNEL-positive NeuN-labelled cells at either time-point indicating no increase in apoptosis of RGCs. OGD increased apoptosis, reduced RGC marker expression and RGC number and caused elevated LDH release at 24 h. p38 and JNK phosphorylation remained unchanged in HORCs exposed to fluctuating pressure (10-100 mmHg; 1 cycle/min for 15, 30, 60 and 90 min durations, whereas OGD (3 h increased activation of p38 and JNK, remaining elevated for 90 min post-OGD. CONCLUSIONS: Directly applied HP had no detectable impact on RGC survival and stress-signalling in HORCs. Simulated ischemia, however, activated stress pathways and caused RGC death. These results show that direct HP does not cause degeneration of RGCs in the ex vivo human retina.

  2. microRNA-10b Is Overexpressed and Critical for Cell Survival and Proliferation in Medulloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Pal

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the effects of miRNA-10b on medulloblastoma proliferation through transcriptional induction of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2. Using a cancer specific miRNA-array, high expression of miRNA-10b in medulloblastoma cell lines compared to a normal cerebellar control was shown, and this was confirmed with real time PCR (RT-PCR. Two medulloblastoma cell lines (DAOY and UW228 were transiently transfected with control miRNA, miRNA-10b inhibitor or miRNA-10b mimic and subjected to RT-PCR, MTT, apoptosis, clonogenic assay and western blot analysis. Transfection of miRNA-10b inhibitor induced a significant down-regulation of miRNA-10b expression, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis, while miRNA-10b mimic exerted an opposite effect. Inhibition of miRNA-10b abrogated the colony-forming capability of medulloblastoma cells, and markedly down-regulated the expression of BCL2. Down-regulation of BCL2 by antisense oligonucleotides or siRNA also significantly down-regulated miRNA-10b, suggesting that BCL2 is a major mediator of the effects of miRNA-10b. ABT-737 and ABT-199, potent inhibitors of BCL2, downregulated the expression of miRNA-10b and increased apoptosis. Analysis of miRNA-10b levels in 13 primary medulloblastoma samples revealed that the 2 patients with the highest levels of miRNA-10b had multiple recurrences (4.5 and died within 8 years of diagnosis, compared with the 11 patients with low levels of miRNA-10b who had a mean of 1.2 recurrences and nearly 40% long-term survival. The data presented here indicate that miRNA-10b may act as an oncomir in medulloblastoma tumorigenesis, and reveal a previously unreported mechanism with Bcl-2 as a mediator of the effects of miRNA-10b upon medulloblastoma cell survival.

  3. EphA2 Mutation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Promotes Increased Cell Survival, Cell Invasion, Focal Adhesions, and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faoro, Leonardo; Singleton, Patrick A.; Cervantes, Gustavo M.; Lennon, Frances E.; Choong, Nicholas W.; Kanteti, Rajani; Ferguson, Benjamin D.; Husain, Aliya N.; Tretiakova, Maria S.; Ramnath, Nithya; Vokes, Everett E.; Salgia, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has a poor prognosis and improved therapies are needed. Expression of EphA2 is increased in NSCLC metastases. In this study, we investigated EphA2 mutations in NSCLC and examined molecular pathways involved in NSCLC. Tumor and cell line DNA was sequenced. One EphA2 mutation was modeled by expression in BEAS2B cells, and functional and biochemical studies were conducted. A G391R mutation was detected in H2170 and 2/28 squamous cell carcinoma patient samples. EphA2 G391R caused constitutive activation of EphA2 with increased phosphorylation of Src, cortactin, and p130Cas. Wild-type (WT) and G391R cells had 20 and 40% increased invasiveness; this was attenuated with knockdown of Src, cortactin, or p130Cas. WT and G391R cells demonstrated a 70% increase in focal adhesion area. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) phosphorylation was increased in G391R cells with increased survival (55%) compared with WT (30%) and had increased sensitivity to rapamycin. A recurrent EphA2 mutation is present in lung squamous cell carcinoma and increases tumor invasion and survival through activation of focal adhesions and actin cytoskeletal regulatory proteins as well as mTOR. Further study of EphA2 as a therapeutic target is warranted. PMID:20360610

  4. EphA2 mutation in lung squamous cell carcinoma promotes increased cell survival, cell invasion, focal adhesions, and mammalian target of rapamycin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faoro, Leonardo; Singleton, Patrick A; Cervantes, Gustavo M; Lennon, Frances E; Choong, Nicholas W; Kanteti, Rajani; Ferguson, Benjamin D; Husain, Aliya N; Tretiakova, Maria S; Ramnath, Nithya; Vokes, Everett E; Salgia, Ravi

    2010-06-11

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has a poor prognosis and improved therapies are needed. Expression of EphA2 is increased in NSCLC metastases. In this study, we investigated EphA2 mutations in NSCLC and examined molecular pathways involved in NSCLC. Tumor and cell line DNA was sequenced. One EphA2 mutation was modeled by expression in BEAS2B cells, and functional and biochemical studies were conducted. A G391R mutation was detected in H2170 and 2/28 squamous cell carcinoma patient samples. EphA2 G391R caused constitutive activation of EphA2 with increased phosphorylation of Src, cortactin, and p130(Cas). Wild-type (WT) and G391R cells had 20 and 40% increased invasiveness; this was attenuated with knockdown of Src, cortactin, or p130(Cas). WT and G391R cells demonstrated a 70% increase in focal adhesion area. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) phosphorylation was increased in G391R cells with increased survival (55%) compared with WT (30%) and had increased sensitivity to rapamycin. A recurrent EphA2 mutation is present in lung squamous cell carcinoma and increases tumor invasion and survival through activation of focal adhesions an