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Sample records for cell surface protein

  1. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  2. Metabolic behavior of cell surface biotinylated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The turnover of proteins on the surface of cultured mammalian cells was measured by a new approach. Reactive free amino or sulfhydryl groups on surface-accessible proteins were derivatized with biotinyl reagents and the proteins solubilized from culture dishes with detergent. Solubilized, biotinylated proteins were then adsorbed onto streptavidin-agarose, released with sodium dodecyl sulfate and mercaptoethanol, and separated on polyacrylamide gels. Biotin-epsilon-aminocaproic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (BNHS) or N-biotinoyl-N'-(maleimidohexanoyl)hydrazine (BM) were the derivatizing agents. Only 10-12 bands were adsorbed onto streptavidin-agarose from undervatized cells or from derivatized cells treated with free avidin at 4 degrees C. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis resolved greater than 100 BNHS-derivatized proteins and greater than 40 BM-derivatized proteins. There appeared to be little overlap between the two groups of derivatized proteins. Short-term pulse-chase studies showed an accumulation of label into both groups of biotinylated proteins up until 1-2 h of chase and a rapid decrease over the next 1-5 h. Delayed appearance of labeled protein at the cell surface was attributed to transit time from site of synthesis. The unexpected and unexplained rapid disappearance of pulse-labeled proteins from the cell surface was invariant for all two-dimensionally resolved proteins and was sensitive to temperature reduction to 18 degrees C. Long-term pulse-chase experiments beginning 4-8 h after the initiation of chase showed the disappearance of derivatized proteins to be a simple first-order process having a half-life of 115 h in the case of BNHS-derivatized proteins and 30 h in the case of BM-derivatized proteins

  3. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Jiang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins.

  4. Surface Functionalization for Protein and Cell Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpo, Pascal; Ruiz, Ana; Ceriotti, Laura; Rossi, François

    The interaction of biological systems with synthetic material surfaces is an important issue for many biological applications such as implanted devices, tissue engineering, cell-based sensors and assays, and more generally biologic studies performed ex vivo. To ensure reliable outcomes, the main challenge resides in the ability to design and develop surfaces or artificial micro-environment that mimic 'natural environment' in interacting with biomolecules and cells without altering their function and phenotype. At this effect, microfabrication, surface chemistry and material science play a pivotal role in the design of advanced in-vitro systems for cell culture applications. In this chapter, we discuss and describe different techniques enabling the control of cell-surface interactions, including the description of some techniques for immobilization of ligands for controlling cell-surface interactions and some methodologies for the creation of well confined cell rich areas.

  5. Surface immobilized protein multilayers for cell seeding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brynda, Eduard; Pacherník, J.; Houska, Milan; Pientka, Zbyněk; Dvořák, P.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 17 (2005), s. 7877. ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/1326; GA ČR GA102/03/0633; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A065 Keywords : surface modification * layer-by-layer deposition * protein multilayers Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.705, year: 2005

  6. RPE cell surface proteins in normal and dystrophic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane-bound proteins in plasma membrane enriched fractions from cultured rat RPE were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Membrane proteins were characterized on three increasingly specific levels. Total protein was visualized by silver staining. A maximum of 102 separate proteins were counted in silver-stained gels. Glycoproteins were labeled with 3H-glucosamine or 3H-fucose and detected by autoradiography. Thirty-eight fucose-labeled and 61-71 glucosamine-labeled proteins were identified. All of the fucose-labeled proteins were labeled with glucosamine-derived radioactivity. Proteins exposed at the cell surface were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination prior to preparation of membranes for two-dimensional analysis. Forty separate 125I-labeled surface proteins were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis/autoradiography. Comparison with the glycoprotein map showed that a number of these surface labeled proteins were glycoproteins. Two-dimensional maps of total protein, fucose-labeled, and glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins, and 125I-labeled surface proteins of membranes from dystrophic (RCS rdy-p+) and normal (Long Evans or RCS rdy+p+) RPE were compared. No differences in the total protein or surface-labeled proteins were observed. However, the results suggest that a 183K glycoprotein is more heavily glycosylated with glucosamine and fucose in normal RPE membranes as compared to membranes from dystrophic RPE

  7. Cdon, a cell surface protein, mediates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chun; Almazan, Guillermina

    2016-06-01

    During central nervous system development, oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) establish multiple branched processes and axonal contacts to initiate myelination. A complete understanding of the molecular signals implicated in cell surface interaction to initiate myelination/remyelination is currently lacking. The objective of our study was to assess whether Cdon, a cell surface protein that was shown to participate in muscle and neuron cell development, is involved in oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous Cdon protein is expressed in OLPs, increasing in the early differentiation stages and decreasing in mature OLGs. Immunocytochemistry of endogenous Cdon showed localization on both OLG cell membranes and cellular processes exhibiting puncta- or varicosity-like structures. Cdon knockdown with siRNA decreased protein levels by 62% as well as two myelin-specific proteins, MBP and MAG. Conversely, overexpression of full-length rat Cdon increased myelin proteins in OLGs. The complexity of OLGs branching and contact point numbers with axons were also increased in Cdon overexpressing cells growing alone or in coculture with dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Furthermore, myelination of DRGNs was decreased when OLPs were transfected with Cdon siRNA. Altogether, our results suggest that Cdon participates in OLG differentiation and myelination, most likely in the initial stages of development. GLIA 2016;64:1021-1033. PMID:26988125

  8. Proteomics and glycoproteomics of pluripotent stem-cell surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-03-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are a unique cell type with promising potential in regenerative and personalized medicine. Yet the difficulty to understand and coax their seemingly stochastic differentiation and spontaneous self-renewal have largely limited their clinical applications. A call has been made by numerous researchers for a better characterization of surface proteins on these cells, in search of biomarkers that can dictate developmental stages and lineage specifications, and can help formulate mechanistic insight of stem-cell fate choices. In the past two decades, proteomics has gained significant recognition in profiling surface proteins at high throughput. This review will summarize the impact of these studies on stem-cell biology, and discuss the used proteomic techniques. A systematic comparison of all the techniques and their results is also attempted here to help reveal pros, cons, and the complementarity of the existing methods. This awareness should assist in selecting suitable strategies for stem-cell related research, and shed light on technical improvements that can be explored in the future. PMID:25211708

  9. Surface Analyses and Immune Reactivities of Major Cell Wall-Associated Proteins of Group A Streptococcus

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Jason N; Ramirez, Ruben D.; Currie, Bart J.; Cordwell, Stuart J.; Djordjevic, Steven P.; Mark J Walker

    2005-01-01

    A proteomic analysis was undertaken to identify cell wall-associated proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes. Seventy-four distinct cell wall-associated proteins were identified, 66 of which were novel. Thirty-three proteins were immunoreactive with pooled S. pyogenes-reactive human antisera. Biotinylation of the GAS cell surface identified 23 cell wall-associated proteins that are surface exposed.

  10. Biointerface: protein enhanced stem cells binding to implant surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowski, W; Kondyurin, A; Lee, Jae Ho; Lord, Megan S; Bilek, M M M; Kim, Hae-Won

    2012-09-01

    The number of metallic implantable devices placed every year is estimated at 3.7 million. This number has been steadily increasing over last decades at a rate of around 8 %. In spite of the many successes of the devices the implantation of biomaterial into tissues almost universally leads to the development of an avascular sac, which consists of fibrous tissue around the device and walls off the implant from the body. This reaction can be detrimental to the function of implant, reduces its lifetime, and necessitates repeated surgery. Clearly, to reduce the number of revision surgeries and improve long-term implant function it is necessary to enhance device integration by modulating cell adhesion and function. In this paper we have demonstrated that it is possible to enhance stem cell attachment using engineered biointerfaces. To create this functional interface, samples were coated with polymer (as a precursor) and then ion implanted to create a reactive interface that aids the binding of biomolecules--fibronectin. Both AFM and XPS analyses confirmed the presence of protein layers on the samples. The amount of protein was significant greater for the ion implanted surfaces and was not disrupted upon washing with detergent, hence the formation of strong bonds with the interface was confirmed. While, for non ion implanted surfaces, a decrease of protein was observed after washing with detergent. Finally, the number of stem cells attached to the surface was enhanced for ion implanted surfaces. The studies presented confirm that the developed bionterface with immobilised fibronectin is an effective means to modulate stem cell attachment. PMID:22714559

  11. Multidimensional profiling of cell surface proteins and nuclear markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Andarawewa, Kumari; Yaswen, Paul; Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Mary; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-01-30

    Cell membrane proteins play an important role in tissue architecture and cell-cell communication. We hypothesize that segmentation and multidimensional characterization of the distribution of cell membrane proteins, on a cell-by-cell basis, enable improved classification of treatment groups and identify important characteristics that can otherwise be hidden. We have developed a series of computational steps to (i) delineate cell membrane protein signals and associate them with a specific nucleus; (ii) compute a coupled representation of the multiplexed DNA content with membrane proteins; (iii) rank computed features associated with such a multidimensional representation; (iv) visualize selected features for comparative evaluation through heatmaps; and (v) discriminate between treatment groups in an optimal fashion. The novelty of our method is in the segmentation of the membrane signal and the multidimensional representation of phenotypic signature on a cell-by-cell basis. To test the utility of this method, the proposed computational steps were applied to images of cells that have been irradiated with different radiation qualities in the presence and absence of other small molecules. These samples are labeled for their DNA content and E-cadherin membrane proteins. We demonstrate that multidimensional representations of cell-by-cell phenotypes improve predictive and visualization capabilities among different treatment groups, and identify hidden variables.

  12. Regulation of ADAM12 cell-surface expression by protein kinase C epsilon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundberg, Christina; Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Kveiborg, Marie;

    2004-01-01

    constitutively active protein. However, little is known about the regulation of ADAM12 cell-surface translocation. Here, we used human RD rhabdomyosarcoma cells, which express ADAM12 at the cell surface, in a temporal pattern. We report that protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon induces ADAM12 translocation to the cell......The ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family consists of multidomain cell-surface proteins that have a major impact on cell behavior. These transmembrane-anchored proteins are synthesized as proforms that have (from the N terminus): a prodomain; a metalloprotease-, disintegrin......-immunoprecipitated from membrane-enriched fractions of PMA-treated cells, 3) RD cells transfected with EGFP-tagged, myristoylated PKCepsilon expressed more ADAM12 at the cell surface than did non-transfected cells, and 4) RD cells transfected with a kinase-inactive PKCepsilon mutant did not exhibit ADAM12 cell...

  13. Cell surface molecules and fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion: effect of proteolytic digestion of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Proteases have been used as a tool to investigate the role of surface molecules in fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Proteolytic digestion of membrane-proteins by pronase (1 mg/ml for 20 min at 37 degrees C) completely inhibited adhesion of baby hamster kidney (BHK) fibroblasts on fibronectin-coated plastic dishes. Various degrees of inhibition were also obtained after treatment with proteinase K, chymotrypsin, papain, subtilopeptidase A, and thermolysin. Protein synthesis was required to r...

  14. Proteomic analysis and identification of cell surface-associated proteins of Clostridium chauvoei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaramaiah, Usharani; Singh, Neetu; Thankappan, Sabarinath; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara

    2016-06-01

    Blackleg is a highly fatal disease of cattle and sheep, caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a Gram positive, anaerobic, spore forming bacteria. Cell surface-associated proteins play a major role in inducing the protective immunity. However, the identity of a majority of cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei is not known. In the present investigation, we have used SDS-PAGE, 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blotting followed by mass spectrometry to identify cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei. Among the identified proteins, which have shown to offer protective antigencity in other bacteria, Enolase, Chaperonin, Ribosomal protein L10, Glycosyl Hydrolase and Flavoprotein were characterized by sequencing and their overexpression in Escherichia coli. In conclusion, cell surface-associated proteins were identified using proteomic approach and the genes for the immunoreactive proteins were expressed, which may prove to be potential diagnostic or vaccine candidates. PMID:26971466

  15. Cell wall sorting signals in surface proteins of gram-positive bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Schneewind, O; Mihaylova-Petkov, D; Model, P

    1993-01-01

    Staphylococcal protein A is anchored to the cell wall, a unique cellular compartment of Gram-positive bacteria. The sorting signal sufficient for cell wall anchoring consists of an LPXTG motif, a C-terminal hydrophobic domain and a charged tail. Homologous sequences are found in many surface proteins of Gram-positive bacteria and we explored the universality of these sequences to serve as cell wall sorting signals. We show that several signals are able to anchor fusion proteins to the staphyl...

  16. Integration of plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein surface activation for single-cell patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Q.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2010-07-01

    Surface patterning for single-cell culture was accomplished by combining plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein-induced surface activation. Hydrophilic patterns were produced on Parylene C films deposited on glass substrates by oxygen plasma treatment through the windows of polydimethylsiloxane shadow masks. After incubation first with Pluronic F108 solution and then serum medium overnight, surface seeding with mesenchymal stem cells in serum medium resulted in single-cell patterning. The present method provides a means of surface patterning with direct implications in single-cell culture.

  17. Identification of polymer surface adsorbed proteins implicated in pluripotent human embryonic stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Moamen; Rao, Wei; Smith, James G W; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Young, Lorraine E; Barrett, David A; Davies, Martyn C; Denning, Chris; Alexander, Morgan R

    2016-08-16

    Improved biomaterials are required for application in regenerative medicine, biosensing, and as medical devices. The response of cells to the chemistry of polymers cultured in media is generally regarded as being dominated by proteins adsorbed to the surface. Here we use mass spectrometry to identify proteins adsorbed from a complex mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) conditioned medium found to support pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) expansion on a plasma etched tissue culture polystyrene surface. A total of 71 proteins were identified, of which 14 uniquely correlated with the surface on which pluripotent stem cell expansion was achieved. We have developed a microarray combinatorial protein spotting approach to test the potential of these 14 proteins to support expansion of a hESC cell line (HUES-7) and a human induced pluripotent stem cell line (ReBl-PAT) on a novel polymer (N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl) methacrylamide). These proteins were spotted to form a primary array yielding several protein mixture 'hits' that enhanced cell attachment to the polymer. A second array was generated to test the function of a refined set of protein mixtures. We found that a combination of heat shock protein 90 and heat shock protein-1 encourage elevated adherence of pluripotent stem cells at a level comparable to fibronectin pre-treatment. PMID:27466628

  18. Survey of surface proteins from the pathogenic Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain 7448 using a biotin cell surface labeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reolon, Luciano Antonio; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Schrank, Irene Silveira; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of the repertoire of proteins exposed on the cell surface by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae), the etiological agent of enzootic pneumonia in pigs, is critical to understand physiological processes associated with bacterial infection capacity, survival and pathogenesis. Previous in silico studies predicted that about a third of the genes in the M. hyopneumoniae genome code for surface proteins, but so far, just a few of them have experimental confirmation of their expression and surface localization. In this work, M. hyopneumoniae surface proteins were labeled in intact cells with biotin, and affinity-captured biotin-labeled proteins were identified by a gel-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach. A total of 20 gel slices were separately analyzed by mass spectrometry, resulting in 165 protein identifications corresponding to 59 different protein species. The identified surface exposed proteins better defined the set of M. hyopneumoniae proteins exposed to the host and added confidence to in silico predictions. Several proteins potentially related to pathogenesis, were identified, including known adhesins and also hypothetical proteins with adhesin-like topologies, consisting of a transmembrane helix and a large tail exposed at the cell surface. The results provided a better picture of the M. hyopneumoniae cell surface that will help in the understanding of processes important for bacterial pathogenesis. Considering the experimental demonstration of surface exposure, adhesion-like topology predictions and absence of orthologs in the closely related, non-pathogenic species Mycoplasma flocculare, several proteins could be proposed as potential targets for the development of drugs, vaccines and/or immunodiagnostic tests for enzootic pneumonia. PMID:25386928

  19. Survey of surface proteins from the pathogenic Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain 7448 using a biotin cell surface labeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Antonio Reolon

    Full Text Available The characterization of the repertoire of proteins exposed on the cell surface by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae, the etiological agent of enzootic pneumonia in pigs, is critical to understand physiological processes associated with bacterial infection capacity, survival and pathogenesis. Previous in silico studies predicted that about a third of the genes in the M. hyopneumoniae genome code for surface proteins, but so far, just a few of them have experimental confirmation of their expression and surface localization. In this work, M. hyopneumoniae surface proteins were labeled in intact cells with biotin, and affinity-captured biotin-labeled proteins were identified by a gel-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach. A total of 20 gel slices were separately analyzed by mass spectrometry, resulting in 165 protein identifications corresponding to 59 different protein species. The identified surface exposed proteins better defined the set of M. hyopneumoniae proteins exposed to the host and added confidence to in silico predictions. Several proteins potentially related to pathogenesis, were identified, including known adhesins and also hypothetical proteins with adhesin-like topologies, consisting of a transmembrane helix and a large tail exposed at the cell surface. The results provided a better picture of the M. hyopneumoniae cell surface that will help in the understanding of processes important for bacterial pathogenesis. Considering the experimental demonstration of surface exposure, adhesion-like topology predictions and absence of orthologs in the closely related, non-pathogenic species Mycoplasma flocculare, several proteins could be proposed as potential targets for the development of drugs, vaccines and/or immunodiagnostic tests for enzootic pneumonia.

  20. Characterization of cell surface adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-binding proteins in Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrenal cortical cells are known to export cAMP and have binding proteins and cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity associated with their plasma membranes. Because these properties suggest a function for extracellular cAMP, we have undertaken a search for specific cell surface receptors for this cyclic nucleotide. Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cells actively export cAMP by an energy-dependent process. Analysis of Scatchard plots of the equilibrium binding of [3H]cAMP to these cells indicate the existence of two classes of cAMP binders: one with high affinity (K/sub a/ . 2.9 X 10(9) M-1) and another with low affinity (K/sub a/ . 7.0 X 10(7) M-1). The cell surface localization of these binders was established by the sensitivity of both the [3H]cAMP-binding proteins and the [32P]8-N3-cAMP photoaffinity labeled proteins of intact cells to mild trypsin digestion and by the surface distribution of a BSA-O2-monosuccinyl cAMP-gold complex revealed by electron microscopy. Analysis of radioautograms of cell surface cAMP-binding proteins from confluent monolayer tumor cells, photoaffinity labeled with [32P]8-N3-cAMP and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed two major 32P-labeled protein bands which were indistinguishable from the 49,000 and 55,000 mol wt regulatory subunits of the cytosolic protein kinase isoenzymes of this cell. These observations along with the demonstration of cell surface, cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity in the mouse adrenal tumor cell strongly suggest that these cAMP-binding proteins function as regulatory proteins for cell surface protein kinases

  1. Two cell surface proteins bind the sponge Microciona prolifera aggregation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, J A; Burger, M M; Kaufman, J F

    1988-06-15

    Two extracellular matrix cell surface proteins which bind the proteoglycan-like aggregation factor from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera (MAF) and which may function as physiological receptors for MAF were identified and characterized for the first time. By probing nitrocellulose blots of nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate gels containing whole sponge cell protein with iodinated MAF, a 210- and a 68-kDa protein, which have native molecular masses of approximately 200-400 and 70 kDa, were identified. MAF binding to blots is species-specific. It is also sensitive to reduction and is completely abolished by pretreatment of live cells with proteases, as was cellular aggregation, indicating that the 210- and 68-kDa proteins may be located on the cell surface. The additional observations that the 68 kDa is an endoglycosidase F-sensitive glycoprotein and that antisera against whole sponge cells or membranes can immunoprecipitate the 210 kDa when prebound to intact cells are consistent with a cell surface location. Both proteins can be isolated from sponge cell membranes and from the sponge skeleton (insoluble extracellular matrix), but the 210-kDa MAF-binding protein can also be found in the soluble extracellular matrix (buffer washes of cells and skeleton) as well. A third MAF-binding protein of molecular mass 95 kDa was also found in the sponge extracellular matrix but rarely on cells. Both of the cell-associated 210- and 68-kDa proteins are nonintegral membrane proteins, based on Triton X-114 phase separation, flotation of liposomes containing sponge membrane lysates, and their extraction from membranes by buffer washes. Both proteins bind MAF affinity resins, indicating that they each exhibit a moderate affinity for MAF under native conditions. They can also be separated from each other and from the bulk of the protein in an octylpolyoxyethylene extract of membranes by fast protein liquid chromatography Mono Q anion exchange chromatography, as assessed by native

  2. Quantitative determination of islet cell surface antibodies using 125I-protein A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantitative method to measure islet cell surface antibodies in human patients has been developed using 125I-protein A. Isolated, dispersed, viable rat islet cells prepared by collagenase digestion were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde to allow storage for up to 7 wk at 4 degrees C. Human sera, heat inactivated and adsorbed with rat liver and kidney powder (100 mg/ml), were incubated with the fixed cells (50 x 10(3)) for 60 min at 37 degrees C. Thereafter the cells were washed and exposed to 5 x 10(5) cpm 125I-protein A, which binds to IgG attached to the cell surface. Assay precision (14%) and reproducibility (16%) were established by repeated analysis of pooled sera from healthy individuals and IDDM patients using pooled batches of islet cells. Using this method, islet cell surface antibodies were detected in 35% of insulin-dependent diabetic patients

  3. Antibody-protein A conjugated quantum dots for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Takashi; Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Tanaka, Shin-Ichi; Inouye, Yasushi; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Tomonobu M

    2010-11-01

    To use quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescent probes for receptor imaging, QD surface should be modified with biomolecules such as antibodies, peptides, carbohydrates, and small-molecule ligands for receptors. Among these QDs, antibody conjugated QDs are the most promising fluorescent probes. There are many kinds of coupling reactions that can be used for preparing antibody conjugated QDs. Most of the antibody coupling reactions, however, are non-selective and time-consuming. In this paper, we report a facile method for preparing antibody conjugated QDs for surface receptor imaging. We used ProteinA as an adaptor protein for binding of antibody to QDs. By using ProteinA conjugated QDs, various types of antibodies are easily attached to the surface of the QDs via non-covalent binding between the F(c) (fragment crystallization) region of antibody and ProteinA. To show the utility of ProteinA conjugated QDs, HER2 (anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) in KPL-4 human breast cancer cells were stained by using anti-HER2 antibody conjugated ProteinA-QDs. In addition, multiplexed imaging of HER2 and CXCR4 (chemokine receptor) in the KPL-4 cells was performed. The result showed that CXCR4 receptors coexist with HER2 receptors in the membrane surface of KPL-4 cells. ProteinA mediated antibody conjugation to QDs is very useful to prepare fluorescent probes for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells. PMID:20835432

  4. Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a directs cell surface display of tick BM95 immunogenic peptides on Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Mario; Almazán, Consuelo; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; de la Fuente, José

    2008-07-31

    The surface display of heterologous proteins on live Escherichia coli using anchoring motifs from outer membranes proteins has impacted on many areas of biochemistry, molecular biology and biotechnology. The Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a (MSP1a) contains N-terminal surface-exposed repeated peptides (28-289 amino acids) that are involved in pathogen interaction with host cell receptors and is surface-displayed when the recombinant protein is expressed in E. coli. Therefore, it was predicted that MSP1a would surface display on E. coli peptides inserted in the N-terminal repeats region of the protein. The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus BM86 and BM95 glycoproteins are homologous proteins that protect cattle against tick infestations. In this study, we demonstrated that a recombinant protein comprising tick BM95 immunogenic peptides fused to the A. marginale MSP1a N-terminal region is displayed on the E. coli surface and is recognized by anti-BM86 and anti-MSP1a antibodies. This system provides a novel approach to the surface display of heterologous antigenic proteins on live E. coli and suggests the possibility to use the recombinant bacteria for immunization studies against cattle tick infestations. PMID:18582976

  5. Proteomic analysis of cell surface-associated proteins from probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Madsen, Søren M; Glenting, Jacob;

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to identify surface-associated proteins from the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. Proteins were extracted from the cell surface using a mild wash in phosphate buffer and analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel...... probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The results provide the basis for future studies on the molecular mechanisms of probiotics....

  6. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamgain Hitesh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM and atomic force microscope (AFM can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. Methods We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7 and mouse melanoma (B16F1 cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Results Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Conclusion Tumor suppressor

  7. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7) and mouse melanoma (B16F1) cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 might be used as a phenotypic differentiation

  8. SurfaceomeDB: a cancer-orientated database for genes encoding cell surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Jorge Estefano Santana; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; de Almeida, Renan Valieris Bueno; da Cunha, Julia Pinheiro Chagas; Ohara, Daniel Takatori; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Old, Lloyd J; de Souza, Sandro José

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface proteins (CSPs) are excellent targets for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic reagents, and it is estimated that 10-20% of all genes in the human genome encode CSPs. In an effort to integrate all data publicly available for genes encoding cell surface proteins, a database (SurfaceomeDB) was developed. SurfaceomeDB is a gene-centered portal containing different types of information, including annotation for gene expression, protein domains, somatic mutations in cancer, and protein-protein interactions for all human genes encoding CSPs. SurfaceomeDB was implemented as an integrative and relational database in a user-friendly web interface, where users can search for gene name, gene annotation, or keywords. There is also a streamlined graphical representation of all data provided and links to the most important data repositories and databases, such as NCBI, UCSC Genome Browser, and EBI. PMID:23390370

  9. Comparison of cell wall proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as anchors for cell surface expression of heterologous proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    van der Vaart, J. M.; te Biesebeke, R; Chapman, J.W.; Toschka, H Y; Klis, F M; Verrips, C. T.

    1997-01-01

    The carboxyl-terminal regions of five cell wall proteins (Cwp1p, Cwp2p, Ag alpha 1p, Tip1p, and Flo1p) and three potential cell wall proteins (Sed1p, YCR89w, and Tir1p) all proved capable of immobilizing alpha-galactosidase in the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The fraction of the total amount of fusion protein that was localized to the cell wall varied depending on the anchor domain used. The highest proportion of cell wall incorporation was achieved with Cwp2p, Ag alpha 1p, or Sed1p...

  10. Heterologous protein display on the cell surface of lactic acid bacteria mediated by the s-layer protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Lanlan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have revealed that the C-terminal region of the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus is responsible for the cell wall anchoring, which provide an approach for targeting heterologous proteins to the cell wall of lactic acid bacteria (LAB. In this study, we developed a new surface display system in lactic acid bacteria with the C-terminal region of S-layer protein SlpB of Lactobacillus crispatus K2-4-3 isolated from chicken intestine. Results Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the C-terminal region (LcsB of Lb. crispatus K2-4-3 SlpB had a high similarity with the cell wall binding domains SA and CbsA of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lb. crispatus. To evaluate the potential application as an anchoring protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP or beta-galactosidase (Gal was fused to the N-terminus of the LcsB region, and the fused proteins were successfully produced in Escherichia coli, respectively. After mixing them with the non-genetically modified lactic acid bacteria cells, the fused GFP-LcsB and Gal-LcsB were functionally associated with the cell surface of various lactic acid bacteria tested. In addition, the binding capacity could be improved by SDS pretreatment. Moreover, both of the fused proteins could simultaneously bind to the surface of a single cell. Furthermore, when the fused DNA fragment of gfp:lcsB was inserted into the Lactococcus lactis expression vector pSec:Leiss:Nuc, the GFP could not be secreted into the medium under the control of the nisA promoter. Western blot, in-gel fluorescence assay, immunofluorescence microscopy and SDS sensitivity analysis confirmed that the GFP was successfully expressed onto the cell surface of L. lactis with the aid of the LcsB anchor. Conclusion The LcsB region can be used as a functional scaffold to target the heterologous proteins to the cell surfaces of lactic acid bacteria in vitro and in vivo, and has also the potential for biotechnological

  11. Identification of a cell surface protein, p97, in human melanomas and certain other neoplasms.

    OpenAIRE

    Woodbury, R G; Brown, J. P.; Yeh, M Y; Hellström, I; Hellström, K E

    1980-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with a human melanoma cell line, SK-MEL 28, and their spleen cells were fused with mouse NS-1 myeloma cells. Hybrid cells were tested in an indirect 125I-labeled protein A assay for production of antibodies that bound to surface antigens of SK-MEL 28 melanoma cells but not to autologous skin fibroblasts. One hybridoma, designated 4.1, had the required specificity. It was cloned and grown in mice as an ascites tumor. The monoclonal IgG1 antibody produced by the hybri...

  12. Isolation of two biologically active cell surface proteins from Brucella abortus by chromatofocusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucella abortus contains a group of immunogenic cell surface proteins which have potential value as a vaccine or as a diagnostic reagent for the prevention and diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. Under nondenaturing conditions, these proteins range in molecular weight from 10,000-124,000, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on TSK 3000sw. By analytical isoelectrofocusing, 6 major protein bands could be distinguished with pI's ranging from 4.0 to 6.0 and 3 additional major proteins with pI's of 7.5, 9.5, and 10. By chromatofocusing on Polybuffer Exchanger 94 with a pH gradient from 6-4, two of the six proteins from pI 4-6 were separated, a pI 4.9 and a pI 4.7 protein; a third fraction contained the high pI proteins. The former two proteins were homogeneous by analytical isoelectrofocusing, and a molecular weight of 54,000 daltons was found for both protein species by HPLC on TSK 3000sw. The pI 4-6 and not the pI 9.5 and 10 proteins, could be radiolabeled when intact cells were radioiodinated with diazotized (125I)-iodosulfanilic acid. Biological activity of the proteins as assessed in lemmings indicated that immunization with the pI 4.7 and 4.9 proteins afforded better protection against experimental brucellosis than immunization with the high pI proteins. These results support our view that a single surface protein may be sufficient for the prevention of experimental brucellosis

  13. Isolation of two biologically active cell surface proteins from Brucella abortus by chromatofocusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabatabai, L.B.; Deyoe, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Brucella abortus contains a group of immunogenic cell surface proteins which have potential value as a vaccine or as a diagnostic reagent for the prevention and diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. Under nondenaturing conditions, these proteins range in molecular weight from 10,000-124,000, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on TSK 3000sw. By analytical isoelectrofocusing, 6 major protein bands could be distinguished with pI's ranging from 4.0 to 6.0 and 3 additional major proteins with pI's of 7.5, 9.5, and 10. By chromatofocusing on Polybuffer Exchanger 94 with a pH gradient from 6-4, two of the six proteins from pI 4-6 were separated, a pI 4.9 and a pI 4.7 protein; a third fraction contained the high pI proteins. The former two proteins were homogeneous by analytical isoelectrofocusing, and a molecular weight of 54,000 daltons was found for both protein species by HPLC on TSK 3000sw. The pI 4-6 and not the pI 9.5 and 10 proteins, could be radiolabeled when intact cells were radioiodinated with diazotized (/sup 125/I)-iodosulfanilic acid. Biological activity of the proteins as assessed in lemmings indicated that immunization with the pI 4.7 and 4.9 proteins afforded better protection against experimental brucellosis than immunization with the high pI proteins. These results support our view that a single surface protein may be sufficient for the prevention of experimental brucellosis.

  14. Gradation of proteins and cells attached to the surface of bio-inert zwitterionic polymer brush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lifu; Nakaji-Hirabayashi, Tadashi; Kitano, Hiromi; Ohno, Kohji; Kishioka, Takahiro; Usui, Yuki

    2016-08-01

    A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of a 2-bromoisobutyryl end group-carrying initiator for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was constructed on the surface of silicon wafer or glass substrates via a silane-coupling reaction. When the initiator SAM was irradiated with UV light at 254nm, the surface density of bromine atoms was reduced by the scission of CBr bonds as observed by XPS. With the surface-initiated ATRP of the zwitterionic vinyl monomer, carboxymethyl betaine (CMB), the surface density of PCMB brushes could be easily varied by changing the irradiation period of UV light prior to the polymerization. Furthermore, by using a UV-cut shutter sliding above the initiator SAM-modified substrate at a constant speed, the degree of bromine atom removal could be linearly varied along the direction of movement of the shutter. Consequently, the amount of both proteins adsorbed and cells adhered to the PCMB brush-covered substrate could easily be controlled by the gradation of the surface density of PCMB brushes, which suppressed protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Such a technique is very simple and useful for the regulation of the surface density of adsorbed proteins and adhered cells on an originally bio-inert surface. PMID:27085477

  15. Studies on cell adhesion and recognition. II. The kinetics of cell adhesion and cell spreading on surfaces coated with carbohydrate- reactive proteins (glycosidases and lectins) and fibronectin

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    The kinetics of cell attachment and cell spreading on the coated surfaces of two classes of carbohydrate-reactive proteins, enzymes and lectins, have been compared with those on fibronectin-coated surfaces with the following results: (a) A remarkable similarity between the kinetics of cell attachment to fibronectin-coated and glycosidase- coated surfaces was found. In contrast, cell attachment kinetics induced by lectin- and galactose oxidase-coated surfaces, in general, were strikingly diffe...

  16. Erratum: Colorectal Cancer Cell Surface Protein Profiling Using an Antibody Microarray and Fluorescence Multiplexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The author's email has been corrected in the publication of Colorectal Cancer Cell Surface Protein Profiling Using an Antibody Microarray and Fluorescence Multiplexing. There was an error with the author, Jerry Zhou's, email. The author's email has been updated to: j.zhou@uws.edu.au from: jzho7551@mail.usyd.edu.au. PMID:26167960

  17. Enhanced cell attachment using a novel cell culture surface presenting functional domains from extracellular matrix proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, M. J.; Phillips, S R; Shah, D. S. H.; Athey, D.; Lakey, J H; Przyborski, S A

    2008-01-01

    Many factors contribute to the creation and maintenance of a realistic environment for cell growth in vitro, e.g. the consistency of the growth medium, the addition of supplements, and the surface on which the cells grow. The nature of the surface on which cells are cultured plays an important role in their ability to attach, proliferate, migrate and function. Components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are often used to coat glass or plastic surfaces to enhance cell attachment in vitro. Fra...

  18. Predicting Cell Association of Surface-Modified Nanoparticles Using Protein Corona Structure - Activity Relationships (PCSAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Padmaja; Fernandez, Alberto; Giralt, Francesc; Rallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are likely to interact in real-case application scenarios with mixtures of proteins and biomolecules that will absorb onto their surface forming the so-called protein corona. Information related to the composition of the protein corona and net cell association was collected from literature for a library of surface-modified gold and silver nanoparticles. For each protein in the corona, sequence information was extracted and used to calculate physicochemical properties and statistical descriptors. Data cleaning and preprocessing techniques including statistical analysis and feature selection methods were applied to remove highly correlated, redundant and non-significant features. A weighting technique was applied to construct specific signatures that represent the corona composition for each nanoparticle. Using this basic set of protein descriptors, a new Protein Corona Structure-Activity Relationship (PCSAR) that relates net cell association with the physicochemical descriptors of the proteins that form the corona was developed and validated. The features that resulted from the feature selection were in line with already published literature, and the computational model constructed on these features had a good accuracy (R(2)LOO=0.76 and R(2)LMO(25%)=0.72) and stability, with the advantage that the fingerprints based on physicochemical descriptors were independent of the specific proteins that form the corona. PMID:25961528

  19. Protein Kinase C Regulates the Cell Surface Activity of Endothelin-Converting Enzyme-1

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, A Ian; Lew, Rebecca A.; Thomas, Walter G; Tochon-Danguy, Nathalie

    2006-01-01

    The potent vasoconstrictor endothelin is a 21 amino acid peptide whose principal physiological function is to regulate vascular tone. The generation of endothelin is crucially dependent on the local presence and activity of endothelin converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) expressed on the surface of vascular endothelial cells. In this study, we have shown in endothelial cells that the enzyme is phosphorylated, and that phosphorylation is increased by phorbol ester stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC)....

  20. Selective amine labeling of cell surface proteins guided by coiled-coil assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yoshiaki; Furukawa, Nami; Ono, Satoshi; Takeda, Yuki; Matsuzaki, Katsumi

    2016-11-01

    Covalent labeling of target proteins in living cells is useful for both fluorescence live-cell imaging and the subsequent biochemical analyses of the proteins. Here, we report an efficient method for the amine labeling of membrane proteins on the cell surface, guided by a noncovalent coiled-coil interaction. A carboxyl sulfosuccinimidyl ester introduced at the C-terminus of the coiled-coil probe reacted with target proteins under mild labeling conditions ([probe] = 150 nM, pH 7.4, 25°C) for 20 min. Various fluorescent moieties with different hydrophobicities are available for covalent labeling with high signal/background labeling ratios. Using this method, oligomeric states of glycophorin A (GpA) were compared in mammalian CHO-K1 cells and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. In the cell membranes, no significant self-association of GpA was detected, whereas SDS-PAGE suggested partial dimerization of the proteins. Membrane cholesterol was found to be an important factor that suppressed the dimerization of GpA. Thus, the covalent functionality enables direct comparison of the oligomeric state of membrane proteins under various conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 484-490, 2016. PMID:26285787

  1. Cell surface display of carbonic anhydrase on Escherichia coli using ice nucleation protein for CO₂ sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Li-Hai; Liu, Ning; Yu, Ming-Rui; Yang, Shang-Tian; Chen, Huan-Lin

    2011-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) has recently gained renewed interests for its potential as a mass-transfer facilitator for CO(2) sequestration. However, the low stability and high price severely limit its applications. In this work, the expression of α-CA from Helicobacter pylori on the outer membrane of Escherichia coli using a surface-anchoring system derived from ice nucleation protein (INP) from Pseudomonas syringae was developed. To find the best surface anchoring motif, full-length INP (114 kDa), truncated INP (INP-NC, 33 kDa), and INP's N-domain with first two subunits (INP-N, 22 kDa) were evaluated. Two vectors, pKK223-3 and pET22b(+), with different promoters (T7 and Tac) were used to construct the fusion genes, and for each vector, three recombinant strains, each expressing a different length of the fusion protein, were obtained. SDS-PAGE, Western blot, immunofluorescence microscopy, FACS, and whole-cell ELISA confirmed the expression of fusion proteins on the surface of E. coli. The smallest fusion protein with INP-N as the anchoring motif had the highest expression level and CA activity, suggesting that INP-N is the best carrying protein due to its smaller size. Also, the T7 promoter in pET22b(+) induced with 0.2 mM IPTG gave high protein expression levels, whereas the Tac promoter in pKK223-3 gave low expression levels. The surface displayed CA was at least twofold more stable than that of the free form, and did not show any adverse effect on cell growth and outer membrane integrity. Cells with surface displayed CA were successfully used to facilitate CO(2) sequestration in contained liquid membrane (CLM). PMID:21732326

  2. Role of the retinoblastoma protein in cell cycle arrest mediated by a novel cell surface proliferation inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enebo, D. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Moos, P. J.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A novel cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS-18), purified from the cell surface of bovine cerebral cortex cells has been shown to be a potent and reversible inhibitor of proliferation of a wide array of fibroblasts as well as epithelial-like cells and nontransformed and transformed cells. To investigate the possible mechanisms by which CeReS-18 exerts its inhibitory action, the effect of the inhibitor on the posttranslational regulation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (RB), a tumor suppressor gene, has been examined. It is shown that CeReS-18 mediated cell cycle arrest of both human diploid fibroblasts (HSBP) and mouse fibroblasts (Swiss 3T3) results in the maintenance of the RB protein in the hypophosphorylated state, consistent with a late G1 arrest site. Although their normal nontransformed counterparts are sensitive to cell cycle arrest mediated by CeReS-18, cell lines lacking a functional RB protein, through either genetic mutation or DNA tumor virus oncoprotein interaction, are less sensitive. The refractory nature of these cells is shown to be independent of specific surface receptors for the inhibitor, and another tumor suppressor gene (p53) does not appear to be involved in the CeReS-18 inhibition of cell proliferation. The requirement for a functional RB protein product, in order for CeReS-18 to mediate cell cycle arrest, is discussed in light of regulatory events associated with density-dependent growth inhibition.

  3. Role of a cell surface-associated protein in adherence and dental caries.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowen, W. H.; Schilling, K.; Giertsen, E; Pearson, S.; Lee, S. F.; Bleiweis, A; Beeman, D

    1991-01-01

    Insertional inactivation of the Streptococcus mutans spaP gene was used to construct an isogenic mutant (834) of strain NG8 (serotype c) which lacked the major cell surface-associated protein referred to as P1 (15). Results of several studies suggest that P1 is involved in the adherence of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatite surfaces. With an in vitro model system of hydroxyapatite (HA) beads coated with parotid saliva (PS) and additional HA surfaces coated with PS and in situ-formed glucan, i...

  4. Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cell Envelope Proteome by Capture of Surface-Exposed Proteins on Activated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Davide Vecchietti; Dario Di Silvestre; Matteo Miriani; Francesco Bonomi; Mauro Marengo; Alessandra Bragonzi; Lara Cova; Eleonora Franceschi; Pierluigi Mauri; Giovanni Bertoni

    2012-01-01

    We report on specific magneto-capturing followed by Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) for the analysis of surface-exposed proteins of intact cells of the bacterial opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The magneto-separation of cell envelope fragments from the soluble cytoplasmic fraction allowed the MudPIT identification of the captured and neighboring proteins. Remarkably, we identified 63 proteins captured directly by nanoparticles and 67 proteins embedde...

  5. Adhesion of MRC-5 and A549 cells on poly(dimethylsiloxane) surface modified by proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchowska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowski, Piotr; Jastrzebska, Elzbieta; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew

    2016-02-01

    PDMS is a very popular material used for fabrication of Lab-on-a-Chip systems for biological applications. Although PDMS has numerous advantages, it is a highly hydrophobic material, which inhibits adhesion and proliferation of the cells. PDMS surface modifications are used to enrich growth of the cells. However, due to the fact that each cell type has specific adhesion, it is necessary to optimize the parameters of these modifications. In this paper, we present an investigation of normal (MRC-5) and carcinoma (A549) human lung cell adhesion and proliferation on modified PDMS surfaces. We have chosen these cell types because often they are used as models for basic cancer research. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first presentation of this type of investigation. The combination of a gas-phase processing (oxygen plasma or ultraviolet irradiation) and wet chemical methods based on proteins' adsorption was used in our experiments. Different proteins such as poly-l-lysine, fibronectin, laminin, gelatin, and collagen were incubated with the activated PDMS samples. To compare with other works, here, we also examined how ratio of prepolymer to curing agent (5:1, 10:1, and 20:1) influences PDMS hydrophilicity during further modifications. The highest adhesion of the tested cells was observed for the usage of collagen, regardless of PDMS ratio. However, the MRC-5 cell line demonstrated better adhesion than A549 cells. This is probably due to the difference in their morphology and type (normal/cancer). PMID:26311334

  6. Developmental expression of a cell surface protein involved in sea urchin skeleton formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have previously used a monoclonal antibody (1223) to identify a 130 Kd cell surface protein involved in skeleton formation is sea urchin embryos. In the current study the authors have examined the expression of the 1223 antigen over the course of development of embryos of two species, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus pictus. The 130 Kd protein is detected in S. purp eggs on immunoblots. Labeling with [3H] leucine and immunoaffinity chromatography show that it also is synthesized shortly after fertilization. Immunofluroescence reveals that at this early stage the 1223 antigen is uniformly distributed on all of the cells. Synthesis decreases to a minimum by the time of hatching (18 h), as does the total amount of antigen present in the embryo. A second period of synthesis commences at the mesenchyme blastula stage, when the spicule-forming primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) have appeared. During this later stage, synthesis and cell surface expression are restricted to the PMCs. In contrast to S. purp., in L. pictus the 130 Kd protein does not appear until the PMCs are formed. Hybrid embryos demonstrate a pattern of expression of the maternal species. These results suggest that early expression of 1223 antigen in S. purp. is due to utilization of maternal transcripts present in the egg. In both species later expression in PMCs appears to be the result of cell-type specific synthesis, perhaps encoded by embryonic transcripts

  7. Comparison of cell wall proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as anchors for cell surface expression of heterologous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Vaart, J M; te Biesebeke, R; Chapman, J W; Toschka, H Y; Klis, F M; Verrips, C T

    1997-01-01

    The carboxyl-terminal regions of five cell wall proteins (Cwp1p, Cwp2p, Ag alpha 1p, Tip1p, and Flo1p) and three potential cell wall proteins (Sed1p, YCR89w, and Tir1p) all proved capable of immobilizing alpha-galactosidase in the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The fraction of the total amount of fusion protein that was localized to the cell wall varied depending on the anchor domain used. The highest proportion of cell wall incorporation was achieved with Cwp2p, Ag alpha 1p, or Sed1p as an anchor. Although 80% of these fusion proteins were incorporated in the cell wall, the total production of alpha-galactosidase-Ag alpha 1p was sixfold lower than that of alpha-galactosidase-Cwp2p and eightfold lower than that of alpha-galactosidase-Sed1p. Differences in mRNA levels were not responsible for this discrepancy, nor was an intracellular accumulation of alpha-galactosidase-Ag alpha 1p detectable. A lower translation efficiency of the alpha-galactosidase-AG alpha 1 fusion construct is most likely to be responsible for the low level of protein production. alpha-Galactosidase immobilized by the carboxyl-terminal 67 amino acids of Cwp2p was most effective in the hydrolysis of the high-molecular-weight substrate guar gum from Cyamopsis tetragonoloba. This indicates that the use of a large anchoring domain does not necessarily result in a better exposure of the immobilized enzyme to the exterior of the yeast cell. PMID:9023939

  8. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote cell surface proteins by two complementary methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queiroz, Rayner M L; Charneau, Sébastien; Motta, Flávia N; Santana, Jaime M; Roepstorff, Peter; Ricart, Carlos A O

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan that causes Chagas' disease, a neglected infectious illness that affects millions of people, mostly in Latin America. Here, the cell surface subproteome of the T. cruzi epimastigote life form was characterized. In order to prepare samples enriched in epimastigote...... of the labeled proteins. Both T. cruzi subproteomes were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The results showed that the methodologies offered comprehensive and complementary information about the parasite's plasma membrane subproteome....

  9. A 125I-protein A-binding assay detecting antibodies to cell surface antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 125I-protein A-binding assay detecting antibodies to cell surface antigens on human blood cells was developed and evaluated using sera from multitransfused nonleukemic patients sensitized against HLA antigens. The binding assay was found to be reproducible and more sensitive than conventional HLA testing. Seven patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and two patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia successfully treated by chemotherapy were than investigated. Sera from seven of the patients studied in partial or complete remission demonstrated significant binding to autochthonous leukemic cells obtained from bone marrow or peripheral blood. In two cases sera taken during the leukemic stage demonstrated the most pronounced binding to the patients' own leukemic cells. Sera from four patients with demonstrable significant binding to autochthonous leukemic cells failed to bind to autochthonous remission cells when both types of target cells were tested in parallel. Differences in serum concentrations of IgG, IgA, and IgM were not the cause of the demonstrated increased binding of leukemic sera to autochthonous target cells. We propose that the 125I-protein A-binding assay presented in this paper detects antibodies reacting selectively with acute leukemia cells. (orig.)

  10. Bee venom phospholipase A2 as a membrane-binding vector for cell surface display or internalization of soluble proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babon, Aurélie; Wurceldorf, Thibault; Almunia, Christine; Pichard, Sylvain; Chenal, Alexandre; Buhot, Cécile; Beaumelle, Bruno; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-06-15

    We showed that bee venom phospholipase A2 can be used as a membrane-binding vector to anchor to the surface of cells a soluble protein fused to its C-terminus. ZZ, a two-domain derivative of staphylococcal protein A capable of binding constant regions of antibodies was fused to the C-terminus of the phospholipase or to a mutant devoid of enzymatic activity. The fusion proteins bound to the surface of cells and could themselves bind IgGs. Their fate depended on the cell type to which they bound. On the A431 carcinoma cell line the proteins remained exposed on the cell surface. In contrast, on human dendritic cells the proteins were internalized into early endosomes. PMID:26253725

  11. Indirect 125I-labeled protein A assay for monoclonal antibodies to cell surface antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assay for detection of monoclonal hybridoma antibodies against cell surface antigens is described. Samples of spent medium from the hybridoma cultures are incubated in microtest wells with cells, either as adherent monolayers or in suspension. Antibodies bound to surface antigens are detected by successive incubations with rabbit anti-immunoglobulin serum and 125I-labeled protein A from Staphylococcus aureus, followed by autoradiography of the microtest plate or scintillation counting of the individual wells. Particular advantages of this assay for screening hybridomas are: (1) commercially available reagents are used, (2) antibodies of any species and of any immunoglobulin class or subclass can be detected, and (3) large numbers of samples can be screened rapidly and inexpensively. The assay has been used to select hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies to surface antigens of human melanomas and mouse sarcomas. (Auth.)

  12. Cell wall trapping of autocrine peptides for human G-protein-coupled receptors on the yeast cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ishii

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs regulate a wide variety of physiological processes and are important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery. Here, we describe a unique concept based on yeast cell-surface display technology to selectively track eligible peptides with agonistic activity for human GPCRs (Cell Wall Trapping of Autocrine Peptides (CWTrAP strategy. In our strategy, individual recombinant yeast cells are able to report autocrine-positive activity for human GPCRs by expressing a candidate peptide fused to an anchoring motif. Following expression and activation, yeast cells trap autocrine peptides onto their cell walls. Because captured peptides are incapable of diffusion, they have no impact on surrounding yeast cells that express the target human GPCR and non-signaling peptides. Therefore, individual yeast cells can assemble the autonomous signaling complex and allow single-cell screening of a yeast population. Our strategy may be applied to identify eligible peptides with agonistic activity for target human GPCRs.

  13. Association of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans of Schwann cells with extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, D J; Crumbling, D M; Stahl, R C; Evans, D M

    1990-11-25

    The terminal differentiation of Schwann cells is dependent on contact with basement membrane. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) in mediating Schwann cell responses to extracellular matrix contact. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C-releasable cell surface HSPGs purified from cultures of neonatal rat Schwann cells were subjected to affinity chromatography on immobilized laminin and fibronectin. Binding of the HSPG to both affinity matrices was observed. The strength of the association, however, was sensitive to the ionic strength of the buffer. In 0.1 M Tris-HCl, HSPG binding was essentially irreversible whereas in physiological ionic strength buffer (e.g. 0.142 M NaCl, 10 mM Tris), weaker binding was detected as a delay in elution of the HSPG from the affinity columns. Further studies of HSPG-laminin binding suggested that the binding was mediated by the glycosaminoglycan chains of the proteoglycans. Results of equilibrium gel filtration chromatography provided additional evidence for a reversible association of the HSPG and laminin with a Kd of approximately 1 x 10(-6) M. When Schwann cells were plated on plastic dishes coated with laminin, the cells attached and extended long slender processes. Inclusion of heparin, but not chondroitin sulfate, in the assay medium resulted in partial inhibition of process extension, but at concentrations of heparin which were higher than that needed to disrupt laminin-HSPG association in vitro. Addition of anti-integrin receptor antibodies resulted in more extensive inhibition of laminin-dependent process extension. Anti-integrin antibodies plus heparin essentially totally inhibited laminin-dependent process extension. These results demonstrate that cell surface HSPGs are capable of reversible association with extracellular matrix molecules and suggest that HSPG-laminin interactions play a role in laminin-dependent Schwann cell spreading. PMID

  14. What the cell surface does not see: The gene vector under the protein corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Simona; Rondelli, Valeria; Cantu, Laura; Del Favero, Elena; Aureli, Massimo; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio; Brocca, Paola

    2016-05-01

    The fate of lipid-based nanovectors, used in genetic targeting inside cells, depends on their behavior in biological media. In fact, during both in vitro and in vivo transfection, nanovectors come in contact with proteins that compete for their surface and build the protein corona, their true biological identity while engaging the cell membrane. Nonetheless, after cell internalization, the efficacy of transfection may depend also on structural modifications that occurred under the protein cover, following interaction with biological fluids. Here, based on previous in vivo experiments, two widely used lipid mixtures, namely DOTAP/DOPC and DC-Chol/DOPE, were identified as paradigms to investigate the impact of the inner structure of nanovectors on the transfection efficiency, all being proficiently internalized. The evolution of the inner structure of cationic lipoplexes and nanoparticles based on such lipid mixtures, following interaction with human plasma, could be unraveled. Particles were investigated in high dilution, approaching the biosimilar conditions. Data have demonstrated that the modulation of their inner structure depends on their lipid composition and the plasma concentration, still preserving the genetic payload. Interestingly, protein contact induces a variety of inner structures with different perviousness, including reshaping into cubic phases of different porosity, sometimes observed upon interaction between carrier-lipids and cell-lipids. Cubic reshaping is of biological relevance, as lipid cubic phases have been recently associated to both fusogenicity and to the readiness in releasing the payload to the final target via endosomal escape. PMID:26852100

  15. Protein Kinase C Regulates the Cell Surface Activity of Endothelin-Converting Enzyme-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A Ian; Lew, Rebecca A; Thomas, Walter G; Tochon-Danguy, Nathalie

    2006-09-01

    The potent vasoconstrictor endothelin is a 21 amino acid peptide whose principal physiological function is to regulate vascular tone. The generation of endothelin is crucially dependent on the local presence and activity of endothelin converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) expressed on the surface of vascular endothelial cells. In this study, we have shown in endothelial cells that the enzyme is phosphorylated, and that phosphorylation is increased by phorbol ester stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC). Furthermore, by monitoring specific ECE-1 activity on the surface of live cells, we also show that following PKC activation, enzyme activity is significantly increased at the cell surface, where it is positioned to catalyse the generation of active endothelin. We believe this novel finding is unprecedented for a peptide processing enzyme. Indeed, this new knowledge regarding the control of endothelin production by regulating ECE-1 activity at the cell surface opens up a new area of endothelin biology and will provide novel insights into the physiology and pathophysiology of endothelin and endothelin-associated diseases. In addition, the information generated in these studies may provide valuable new insights into potential extra- and intracellular targets for the pharmacological and perhaps even therapeutic regulation of endothelin production and thus vascular tone. PMID:19617920

  16. Merozoite surface proteins in red blood cell invasion, immunity and vaccines against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, James G; Drew, Damien R; Boyle, Michelle J; Feng, Gaoqian; Fowkes, Freya J I; Richards, Jack S

    2016-05-01

    Malaria accounts for an enormous burden of disease globally, with Plasmodium falciparum accounting for the majority of malaria, and P. vivax being a second important cause, especially in Asia, the Americas and the Pacific. During infection with Plasmodium spp., the merozoite form of the parasite invades red blood cells and replicates inside them. It is during the blood-stage of infection that malaria disease occurs and, therefore, understanding merozoite invasion, host immune responses to merozoite surface antigens, and targeting merozoite surface proteins and invasion ligands by novel vaccines and therapeutics have been important areas of research. Merozoite invasion involves multiple interactions and events, and substantial processing of merozoite surface proteins occurs before, during and after invasion. The merozoite surface is highly complex, presenting a multitude of antigens to the immune system. This complexity has proved challenging to our efforts to understand merozoite invasion and malaria immunity, and to developing merozoite antigens as malaria vaccines. In recent years, there has been major progress in this field, and several merozoite surface proteins show strong potential as malaria vaccines. Our current knowledge on this topic is reviewed, highlighting recent advances and research priorities. PMID:26833236

  17. Newly synthesized G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus is not transported to the cell surface during mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence, immunoelectron microscopy, and digestion by protease were used to study intracellular transport of the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus in mitotic and interphase cells. Quantitation showed that the appearance of G protein on the surface of mitotic cells was inhibited at least 10-fold when compared with that on interphase cells, even though similar amounts of viral protein were being synthesized. This dramatic inhibition, taken together with the simultaneous...

  18. Microassay using radioiodinated protein A from Staphylococcus aureus for antibodies bound to cell surface antigens of adherent tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new microassay which utilizes radioiodinated staphylococcal protein A (SpA) to detect antibodies bound to cell surface antigens (CSA) was developed for monolayers of viable cultured tumor cells. Optimal detection of bound antibodies occurred at 37degC with incubation periods of one hour each for antiserum and 131I-SpA. Labelling target cells with 125I-iododeoxyuridine facilitated expression of results relative to tumor cell number or protein concentration. Quantitation of antibody depended on CSA (tumor cells) and 131I-SpA being in excess of antibody; under these conditions, 0.25 ng of cell surface bound antibody could be detected readily. Initial studies utilized cultured human neuroblastoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells and human and rabbit antisera. Some antibodies in human serum which bound to CSA were removed by absorption with glutaraldehyde-insolubilized fetal calf serum (FSC) suggesting that FCS or FCS-like determinants can be CSA. Rabbit antisera, after extensive absorption, bound to cultured neuroblastoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells in a cell type specific pattern. These experiments demonstrated the value of this assay in quantitating anti-CSA antibodies and in serological analysis of tumor CSA

  19. Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell envelope proteome by capture of surface-exposed proteins on activated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Vecchietti

    Full Text Available We report on specific magneto-capturing followed by Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT for the analysis of surface-exposed proteins of intact cells of the bacterial opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The magneto-separation of cell envelope fragments from the soluble cytoplasmic fraction allowed the MudPIT identification of the captured and neighboring proteins. Remarkably, we identified 63 proteins captured directly by nanoparticles and 67 proteins embedded in the cell envelope fragments. For a high number of proteins, our analysis strongly indicates either surface exposure or localization in an envelope district. The localization of most identified proteins was only predicted or totally unknown. This novel approach greatly improves the sensitivity and specificity of the previous methods, such as surface shaving with proteases that was also tested on P. aeruginosa. The magneto-capture procedure is simple, safe, and rapid, and appears to be well-suited for envelope studies in highly pathogenic bacteria.

  20. Cell Surface Proteins in S. Pneumoniae, S. Mitis and S. Oralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Hakenbeck

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, is closely related to the commensal species S. mitis and S. oralis. S. pneumoniae surface proteins are implicated in virulence and host interaction of this species, but many of them have recently been detected in S. mitis B6 in silico. We tested for the presence of such genes usinga set of eight S. mitis and eleven S. oralis strains from different geographic locations.Materials and Methods: An oligonucleotide microarray was designed based on the genomes of S. pneumoniae R6 and TIGR4 as well as S. mitis B6 to include 63 cell surface proteins. The S. pneumoniae genes encoding neuraminidases, hyaluronidase and pneumolysin were also included. In addition to comparative genomic hybridization experiments, homologues were identified in silico in the genome of S. oralis Uo5.Results and Conclusions: The results document that many S. pneumoniae related surface proteins are ubiquitously present among the Mitis group of streptococci. All 19 samples hybridized with the pavA probe representing a gene important for adherence and invasion of S. pneumoniae. Only eight genes were not recognized in any strain, including the S. pneumoniae PcpC gene as the only virulence gene of the S. pneumoniae core genome.The fact that only 12 out of 26 genes present in the S. oralis Uo5 genome could be detected by microarray analysis confirms the sequence variation of surface components.

  1. Engineering nanoparticles surface for biosensing: "Chemical noses" to detect and identify proteins, bacteria and cancerous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Sanchez, Oscar Ramon

    Rapid and sensitive detection of biomolecules is an important issue in nanomedicine. Many disorders are manifested by changes in protein levels of serum and other biofluids. Rapid and effective differentiation between normal and cancerous cells is an important challenge for the diagnosis and treatment of tumor. Likewise, rapid and effective identification of pathogens is a key target in both biomedical and environmental monitoring. Most biological recognition processes occur via specific interactions. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP s) feature sizes commensurate with biomacromolecules, coupled with useful physical and optical properties. A key issue in the use of nanomaterials is controlling the interfacial interactions of these complex systems. Modulation of these physicochemical properties can be readily achieved by engineering nanoparticles surface. Inspired by the idea of mimicking nature, a convenient, precise and rapid method for sensing proteins, cancerous cells and bacteria has been developed by overtaking the superb performance of biological olfactory systems in odor detection, identification, tracking, and location. On the fundamental side, an array-based/'chemical nose' sensor composed of cationic functionalized AuNPs as receptors and anionic fluorescent conjugated polymers or green fluorescent proteins or enzyme/substrates as transducers that can properly detect and identify proteins, bacteria, and cancerous cells has been successfully fabricated.

  2. Phospholipase D specific for the phosphatidylinositol anchor of cell-surface proteins is abundant in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An enzyme activity capable of degrading the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol membrane anchor of cell-surface proteins has previously been reported in a number of mammalian tissues. The experiments reported here demonstrate that this anchor-degrading activity is also abundant in mammalian plasma. The activity was inhibited by EGTA or 1,10-phenanthroline. It was capable of removing the anchor from alkaline phosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase, and variant surface glycoprotein but had little or no activity toward phosphatidylinositol or phosphatidylcholine. Phosphatidic acid was the only 3H-labeled product when this enzyme hydrolyzed [3H]myristate-labeled variant surface glycoprotein. It could be distinguished from the Ca2=-dependent inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C activity in several rat tissues on the basis of its molecular size and its sensitivity to 1,10-phenanthroline. The data therefore suggest that this activity is due to a phospholipase D with specificity for glycosylphosphatidylinositol structures. Although the precise physiological function of this anchor-specific phospholipase D remains to be determined, these findings indicate that it could play an important role in regulating the expression and release of cell-surface proteins in vivo

  3. Selective cell-surface labeling of the molecular motor protein prestin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, Ryan M. [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Silberg, Jonathan J., E-mail: joff@rice.edu [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Pereira, Fred A. [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Huffington Center on Aging, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Raphael, Robert M., E-mail: rraphael@rice.edu [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States)

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Trafficking to the plasma membrane is required for prestin function. {yields} Biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) was fused to prestin through a transmembrane domain. {yields} BAP-prestin can be metabolically labeled with biotin in HEK293 cells. {yields} Biotin-BAP-prestin allows for selective imaging of fully trafficked prestin. {yields} The biotin-BAP-prestin displays voltage-sensitive activity. -- Abstract: Prestin, a multipass transmembrane protein whose N- and C-termini are localized to the cytoplasm, must be trafficked to the plasma membrane to fulfill its cellular function as a molecular motor. One challenge in studying prestin sequence-function relationships within living cells is separating the effects of amino acid substitutions on prestin trafficking, plasma membrane localization and function. To develop an approach for directly assessing prestin levels at the plasma membrane, we have investigated whether fusion of prestin to a single pass transmembrane protein results in a functional fusion protein with a surface-exposed N-terminal tag that can be detected in living cells. We find that fusion of the biotin-acceptor peptide (BAP) and transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) to the N-terminus of prestin-GFP yields a membrane protein that can be metabolically-labeled with biotin, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and selectively detected at the plasma membrane using fluorescently-tagged streptavidin. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a surface detectable tag and a single-pass transmembrane domain to prestin does not disrupt its voltage-sensitive activity.

  4. Tritium (3H) radiolabeling of protein A and antibody to high specific activity: Application to cell surface antigen radioimmunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staphylococcal protein A and several different immunoglobulins have been radiolabeled to high specific activities (> 106 cpm/μg) by reductive methylation with tritiated (3H) sodium borohydride. The proteins retain excellent functional and antigenic properties. The utility of these reagents in a variety of assays for cell surface antigens is illustrated. The results indicate that this radiolabeling procedure may become the method of choice for many cell surface and solution immunoassays. (Auth.)

  5. Soluble CD44 interacts with intermediate filament protein vimentin on endothelial cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päll, Taavi; Pink, Anne; Kasak, Lagle; Turkina, Marina; Anderson, Wally; Valkna, Andres; Kogerman, Priit

    2011-01-01

    CD44 is a cell surface glycoprotein that functions as hyaluronan receptor. Mouse and human serum contain substantial amounts of soluble CD44, generated either by shedding or alternative splicing. During inflammation and in cancer patients serum levels of soluble CD44 are significantly increased. Experimentally, soluble CD44 overexpression blocks cancer cell adhesion to HA. We have previously found that recombinant CD44 hyaluronan binding domain (CD44HABD) and its non-HA-binding mutant inhibited tumor xenograft growth, angiogenesis, and endothelial cell proliferation. These data suggested an additional target other than HA for CD44HABD. By using non-HA-binding CD44HABD Arg41Ala, Arg78Ser, and Tyr79Ser-triple mutant (CD443MUT) we have identified intermediate filament protein vimentin as a novel interaction partner of CD44. We found that vimentin is expressed on the cell surface of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Endogenous CD44 and vimentin coprecipitate from HUVECs, and when overexpressed in vimentin-negative MCF-7 cells. By using deletion mutants, we found that CD44HABD and CD443MUT bind vimentin N-terminal head domain. CD443MUT binds vimentin in solution with a Kd in range of 12-37 nM, and immobilised vimentin with Kd of 74 nM. CD443MUT binds to HUVEC and recombinant vimentin displaces CD443MUT from its binding sites. CD44HABD and CD443MUT were internalized by wild-type endothelial cells, but not by lung endothelial cells isolated from vimentin knock-out mice. Together, these data suggest that vimentin provides a specific binding site for soluble CD44 on endothelial cells. PMID:22216242

  6. Fimbrin, a new microfilament-associated protein present in microvilli and other cell surface structures

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    A 68,000 mol wt polypeptide has been identified as one of the few major proteins in the microfilament bundles of the microvilli present on intestinal epithelial cells. Antibodies against the purified protein have been used in indirect immunofluorescence microscopy on several cultured cells. The protein have been used in indirect immunofluorescence microscopy on several cultured cells. The protein is found particularly prominent in membrane ruffles, microspikes, and microvilli.

  7. Scanning the cell surface proteome of cancer cells and identification of metastasis-associated proteins using a subtractive immunization strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Nicolaj; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2009-01-01

    and technologically challenging, and no ideal method is currently available. Here, we describe a strategy that allows scanning of the entire cell surface and identification of molecules that exhibit altered expression between two cell types. Concurrently, this method gives rise to valuable reagents...... for further characterization of the identified proteins. The strategy is based on subtractive immunization of mice, and we used the two isogenic cell lines, NM-2C5 and M-4A4, derived from the MDA-MB-435 cancer cell line, as a model system. Although the two cell lines are equally tumorigenic, only M-4A...... neuroendocrine tumors while exhibiting no or very weak reactivity with normal tissues. mAb 15C7 stained a variety of cancers as well as some normal lymphoid organs and was subsequently identified to react with HLA-DR-beta. A third mAb, 31D7, that also specifically recognized HLA-DR-beta was capable of inhibiting...

  8. Protein phosphatase 2A isotypes regulate cell surface expression of the T cell receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Menné, C; Kastrup, J;

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying T cell receptor (TCR) down-regulation have been extensively studied during the last decade. Whereas the importance of phosphorylation in this process has been established, it is less certain whether dephosphorylation plays a role in TCR down-regulation. In this study, we...... show that inhibition of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP2A family had a biphasic effect on TCR expression. Thus, low concentrations of PP2A inhibitors induced TCR down-regulation, whereas higher concentrations of PP2A inhibitors induced TCR up-regulation. The effect of PP2A inhibition was...... independent of phosphorylation of the CD3gamma endocytosis motif. Whereas TCR down-regulation was caused by a partial inhibition of exocytosis, TCR up-regulation was caused by an inhibition of endocytosis. The effects on exocytosis and endocytosis were not restricted to the TCR, indicating a more general...

  9. Surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane with photo-grafted poly(ethylene glycol) for micropatterned protein adsorption and cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Edahiro, Jun-ichi; Sumaru, Kimio; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we applied photo-induced graft polymerization to micropatterned surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with poly(ethylene glycol). Two types of monomers, polyethylene glycol monoacrylate (PEGMA) and polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), were tested for surface modification of PDMS. Changes in the surface hydrophilicity and surface element composition were characterized by contact angle measurement and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. The PEGMA-grafted PDMS surfaces gradually lost their hydrophilicity within two weeks. In contrast, the PEGDA-grafted PDMS surface maintained stable hydrophilic characteristics for more than two months. Micropatterned protein adsorption and micropatterned cell adhesion were successfully demonstrated using PEGDA-micropatterned PDMS surfaces, which were prepared by photo-induced graft polymerization using photomasks. The PEGDA-grafted PDMS exhibited useful characteristics for microfluidic devices (e.g. hydrophilicity, low protein adsorption, and low cell attachment). The technique presented in this study will be useful for surface modification of various research tools and devices. PMID:18242961

  10. The role of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall surface anchor protein LapB in virulence, adherence, and intracellular replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lmof2365_2117 is a Listeria monocytogenes putative cell wall surface anchor protein with a conserved domain found in collagen binding proteins. We constructed a deletion mutation in lmof2365_2117 in serotype 4b strain F2365, evaluated its virulence, and determined its ability to adhere and invade co...

  11. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  12. Serine proteinase of Renibacterium salmoninarum digests a major autologous extracellular and cell-surface protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockey, D D; Turaga, P S; Wiens, G D; Cook, B A; Kaattari, S L

    1991-10-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a pathogen of salmonid fish that produces large amounts of extracellular protein (ECP) during growth. A proteolytic activity present in ECP at elevated temperatures digested the majority of the proteins in ECP. This digestion was also associated with the loss of ECP immunosuppressive function. In vitro activity of the proteinase in ECP was temperature dependent: it was not detected in an 18-h digest at 4 and 17 degrees C but became readily apparent at 37 degrees C. Proteinase activity was detected at bacterial physiological temperatures (17 degrees C) in reactions incubated for several days. Under these conditions, digestion of partially purified p57, a major constituent of ECP and a major cell-surface protein, yielded a spectrum of breakdown products similar in molecular weight and antigenicity to those in ECP. This pattern of digestion suggests that most of the immunologically related constituents of ECP are p57 and its breakdown products. The proteolytic activity was sensitive to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, methanol, and ethanol and to 10-min incubation at temperatures above 65 degrees C. Electrophoretic analysis of the proteinase on polyacrylamide gels containing proteinase substrates indicated the native form to be 100 kDa or greater. The enzyme was active against selected unrelated substrates only when coincubated with a denaturant (0.1% lauryl sulfate) and (or) a reducing agent (20 mM dithiothreitol). PMID:1777853

  13. Cutaneous T cell lymphoma expresses immunosuppressive CD80 (B7-1) cell surface protein in a STAT5-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Hong Yi; Wei, Fang;

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report that cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) cells and tissues ubiquitously express the immunosuppressive cell surface protein CD80 (B7-1). CD80 expression in CTCL cells is strictly dependent on the expression of both members of the STAT5 family, STAT5a and STAT5b, as well as...

  14. Transfer of Fas (CD95 protein from the cell surface to the surface of polystyrene beads coated with anti-Fas antibody clone CH-11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sawai

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Mouse monoclonal anti-Fas (CD95 antibody clone CH-11 has been widely used in research on apoptosis. CH-11 has the ability to bind to Fas protein on cell surface and induce apoptosis. Here, we used polystyrene beads coated with CH-11 to investigate the role of lipid rafts in Fas-mediated apoptosis in SKW6.4 cells. Unexpectedly, by treatment of the cells with CH-11-coated beads Fas protein was detached from cell surface and transferred to the surface of CH-11-coated beads. Western blot analysis showed that Fas protein containing both extracellular and intracellular domains was attached to the beads. Fas protein was not transferred from the cells to the surface of the beads coated with other anti-Fas antibodies or Fas ligand. Similar phenomenon was observed in Jurkat T cells. Furthermore, CH-11-induced apoptosis was suppressed by pretreatment with CH-11-coated beads in Jurkat cells. These results suggest that CH-11 might possess distinct properties on Fas protein compared with other anti-Fas antibodies or Fas ligand, and also suggest that caution should be needed to use polystyrene beads coated with antibodies such as CH-11.

  15. Identification of cell surface proteins as potential immunotherapy targets in twelve pediatric cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RimasJOrentas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances now allow us to rapidly produce CARs and other antibody-derived therapeutics targeting cell surface receptors. To maximize the potential of these new technologies, relevant extracellular targets must be identified. The Pediatric Oncology Branch of the NCI curates a freely accessible database of gene expression data for both pediatric cancers and normal tissues, through which we have defined discrete sets of over-expressed transcripts in twelve pediatric cancer subtypes as compared to normal tissues. We coupled gene expression profiles to current annotation databases (i.e., Affymetrix, Gene Ontology, Entrez Gene, in order to categorize transcripts by their subcellular location. In this manner we generated a list of potential immune targets expressed on the cell surface, ranked by their difference from normal tissue. Global differences from normal between each of the pediatric tumor types studied varied, indicating that some malignancies expressed transcript sets that were more highly diverged from normal tissues than others. The validity of our approach is seen by our findings for pre-B cell ALL, where targets currently in clinical trials were top-ranked hits (CD19, CD22. For some cancers, reagents already in development could potentially be applied to a new disease class, as exemplified by CD30 expression on sarcomas. Moreover, several potential new targets shared among several pediatric solid tumors are herein identified, such as MCAM (MUC18, MTDH (metadherin, and GPC2 (glypican-2. These targets have been identified at the mRNA level and are yet to be validated at the protein level. The safety of targeting these antigens has yet to be demonstrated and therefore the identified transcripts should be considered preliminary candidates for new CAR and therapeutic antibody targets. Prospective candidate targets will be evaluated by proteomic analysis including Westerns and immunohistochemistry of normal and tumor tissues.

  16. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-01-01

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level 16O and 18O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in ΔgspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-cype cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with previously investigation demonstrating that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system. PMID:20380418

  17. Surface characterization, protein adsorption, and initial cell-surface reactions on glutathione and 3-mercapto-1,2,-propanediol immobilized to gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagaraja, S; Alaeddine, S; Eriksson, C; Lausmaa, J; Tengvall, P; Wennerberg, A; Nygren, H

    1999-09-15

    Monolayers of glutathione (GSH) and 3-mercapto-1,2-propanediol (MG) on gold were tested for their bioreactivity by assessing the degree of inflammatory reaction as manifested by the adherence and activation of platelets and white blood cells (wbc) after exposure to blood ex vivo. Surface composition was characterized by XPS, and noncontact optical profilometry was used to determine surface roughness. The thickness and composition of the adsorbed protein layers were measured by ellipsometry/antibody techniques in vitro. Cell adhesion and activation were quantified by acridine orange staining, fluorescein-diacetate staining, and by specific antibodies against cell membrane antigens. Distinct differences among the surfaces were observed relative to the amounts and composition of adsorbed plasma proteins and the adhesion and activation of platelets (CD62P-exposure) and wbc (CD11b/CD18-exposure). GSH surfaces, which adsorbed the least amount of plasma protein, caused the least adherence and activation of platelets (CD62P), followed by the highest activation of wbc (CD11b/18). The MG surfaces caused a rapid recruitment and activation of platelets (CD62P), followed by a lower activation of wbc (CD11b/18). Thus it appears that measurements of the initial adsorption of plasma protein from anticoagulated plasma and of the adhesion and activation of platelets after 8 min of exposure to whole blood cannot be used to predict accurately the adhesion and activation behavior of inflammatory cells after longer periods (2 h) of exposure on different surfaces. PMID:10398020

  18. Lactobacillus plantarum gene clusters encoding putative cell-surface protein complexes for carbohydrate utilization are conserved in specific gram-positive bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Muscariello Lidia; Boekhorst Jos; Siezen Roland; Molenaar Douwe; Renckens Bernadet; Kleerebezem Michiel

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Genomes of gram-positive bacteria encode many putative cell-surface proteins, of which the majority has no known function. From the rapidly increasing number of available genome sequences it has become apparent that many cell-surface proteins are conserved, and frequently encoded in gene clusters or operons, suggesting common functions, and interactions of multiple components. Results A novel gene cluster encoding exclusively cell-surface proteins was identified, which is ...

  19. A bioactive elastin-like recombinamer reduces unspecific protein adsorption and enhances cell response on titanium surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Salvagni, Emiliano; Berguig, Geoffrey; Engel, Elisabeth; Rodriguez-Cabello, J. Carlos; Coullerez, Geraldine; Textor, Marcus; Planell, Josep A; Gil, F. Javier; Aparicio, Conrado

    2014-01-01

    We present the immobilization on synthetic substrates of elastin-like recombinamers (ELR) that combine a bioactive motif for cell adhesion with protein antifouling properties. Physical adsorption of the recombinamers and covalent-grafting through organosilane chemistry were investigated. The biochemically-modified surfaces were thoroughly characterized and tested for protein absorption in serum by fluorescence-labelling, XPS, Ellipsometry, and OWLS. The ELR were successfully grafted and stabl...

  20. Histophilus somni Surface Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, Lynette B

    2016-01-01

    The pathogen surface is usually the first site of interaction with the host. Histophilus somni was earlier thought to only have an outer membrane on its surface. Now it is known that the surface is composed of many virulence factors, including outer membrane proteins, lipooligosaccharide or endotoxin, a fibrillar network, and an exopolysaccharide. Outer membrane blebs, endotoxin, the fibrillar network, and the exopolysaccharide are also shed from the surface. This review will focus on the surface proteins of this pathogen that may colonize the mucosal surface of ruminants as a commensal or may cause pneumonia, septicemia, myocarditis, thrombotic meningoencephalitis, arthritis, and/or abortion. The major outer membrane protein has been well studied. Since its size and epitopes vary from strain to strain, it may be useful for typing strains. Iron-regulated OMPs have also received much attention because of their role in iron uptake for in vivo growth of H. somni. Other OMPs may be protective, based on passive immunization with monospecific antibodies and active immunization experiments. The surface and shed fibrillar network has been shown to be an immunoglobulin-binding protein in that it binds bovine IgG2 by the Fc portion. Two repeat domains (DR1 and DR2) have cytotoxic Fic motifs. Vaccine studies with recombinant DR2 are promising. Studies of the bacterial genome as well as comparison of surface proteins of different strains from the various H. somni syndromes and carrier states will be discussed and have provided much insight into pathogenesis and protection. PMID:26728061

  1. Cloning, protein expression and display of synthetic multi-epitope mycobacterial antigens on Salmonella typhi Ty21a cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhan, Mohammed A A; Musa, Mustaffa; Zainuddin, Zainul F

    2011-09-01

    Expressing proteins of interest as fusion to proteins of bacterial envelope is a powerful technique for biotechnological and medical applications. The synthetic gene (VacII) encoding for T-cell epitopes of selected genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis namely, ESAT6, MTP40, 38 kDa, and MPT64 was fused with N- terminus of Pseudomonas syringae ice nucleation protein (INP) outer membrane protein. The fused genes were cloned into a bacterial expression vector pKK223-3. The recombinant protein was purified by Ni-NAT column. VacII gene was displayed on the cell surface of Salmonella typhi Ty21a using N-terminal region of ice nucleation proteins (INP) as an anchoring motif. Glycine method confirmed that VacII was anchored on the cell surface. Western blot analysis further identified the synthesis of INP derivatives containing the N-terminal domain INP- VacII fusion protein of the expected size (52 kDa). PMID:21941936

  2. Control of Synaptic Connectivity by a Network of Drosophila IgSF Cell Surface Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Robert A; Özkan, Engin; Menon, Kaushiki P; Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Jeon, Mili; Birnbaum, Michael E; Bellen, Hugo J; Garcia, K Christopher; Zinn, Kai

    2015-12-17

    We have defined a network of interacting Drosophila cell surface proteins in which a 21-member IgSF subfamily, the Dprs, binds to a nine-member subfamily, the DIPs. The structural basis of the Dpr-DIP interaction code appears to be dictated by shape complementarity within the Dpr-DIP binding interface. Each of the six dpr and DIP genes examined here is expressed by a unique subset of larval and pupal neurons. In the neuromuscular system, interactions between Dpr11 and DIP-γ affect presynaptic terminal development, trophic factor responses, and neurotransmission. In the visual system, dpr11 is selectively expressed by R7 photoreceptors that use Rh4 opsin (yR7s). Their primary synaptic targets, Dm8 amacrine neurons, express DIP-γ. In dpr11 or DIP-γ mutants, yR7 terminals extend beyond their normal termination zones in layer M6 of the medulla. DIP-γ is also required for Dm8 survival or differentiation. Our findings suggest that Dpr-DIP interactions are important determinants of synaptic connectivity. PMID:26687361

  3. Origin of cell surface proteins released from Micrococcus radiodurans by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exposure of Micrococcus radiodurans to sublethal doses of ionizing radiation causes the release of certain proteins into the surrounding medium. As estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, these proteins range from approximately 20,000 to 125,000 daltons. At least some of the proteins, including an exonuclease, have a surface location and appear to originate from the lipid-rich midwall layer. The exonuclease has two functionally distinct locations, one with its active site available to external substrate and a second with the active site masked from the exterior. Ionizing radiation releases both the masked and unmasked activity into the surrounding medium

  4. Characterization of Four Outer Membrane Proteins Involved in Binding Starch to the Cell Surface of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    OpenAIRE

    Shipman, Joseph A.; Berleman, James E.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a gram-negative obligate anaerobe, utilizes polysaccharides by binding them to its cell surface and allowing cell-associated enzymes to hydrolyze them into digestible fragments. We use the starch utilization system as a model to analyze the initial steps involved in polysaccharide binding and breakdown. In a recent paper, we reported that one of the outer membrane proteins involved, SusG, had starch-degrading activity but was not sufficient for growth on starch. ...

  5. Extensive surface protein profiles of extracellular vesicles from cancer cells may provide diagnostic signatures from blood samples

    OpenAIRE

    Belov, Larissa; Matic, Kieran J.; Hallal, Susannah; Mulligan, Stephen P.; Best, O. Giles; Christopherson, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are membranous particles (30–1,000 nm in diameter) secreted by cells. Important biological functions have been attributed to 2 subsets of EV, the exosomes (bud from endosomal membranes) and the microvesicles (MV; bud from plasma membranes). Since both types of particles contain surface proteins derived from their cell of origin, their detection in blood may enable diagnosis and prognosis of disease. We have used an antibody microarray (DotScan) to compare the surfa...

  6. The Membrane Receptor for Plasma Retinol Binding Protein, a New Type of Cell-Surface Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hui; KAWAGUCHI, RIKI

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin A is essential for diverse aspects of life ranging from embryogenesis to the proper functioning of most adult organs. Its derivatives (retinoid) have potent biological activities such as regulating cell growth and differentiation. Plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is the specific vitamin A carrier protein in the blood that binds to vitamin A with high affinity and delivers it to target organs. A large amount of evidence has accumulated over the past decades supporting the existence...

  7. Protein rib: a novel group B streptococcal cell surface protein that confers protective immunity and is expressed by most strains causing invasive infections

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The group B Streptococcus, an important cause of invasive infections in the neonate, is classified into four major serotypes (Ia, Ib, II, and III) based on the structure of the polysaccharide capsule. Since the capsule is a known virulence factor, it has been extensively studied, in particular in type III strains, which cause the majority of invasive infections. Two cell surface proteins, alpha and beta, have also been studied in detail since they confer protective immunity, but these protein...

  8. Intentional formation of a protein corona on nanoparticles: Serum concentration affects protein corona mass, surface charge, and nanoparticle-cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, Christine; Weidner, Andreas; Lühe, Moritz V D; Bergemann, Christian; Schacher, Felix H; Clement, Joachim H; Dutz, Silvio

    2016-06-01

    The protein corona, which immediately is formed after contact of nanoparticles and biological systems, plays a crucial role for the biological fate of nanoparticles. In the here presented study we describe a strategy to control the amount of corona proteins which bind on particle surface and the impact of such a protein corona on particle-cell interactions. For corona formation, polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) were incubated in a medium consisting of fetal calf serum (FCS) and cell culture medium. To modulate the amount of proteins bind to particles, the composition of the incubation medium was varied with regard to the FCS content. The protein corona mass was estimated and the size distribution of the participating proteins was determined by means of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Additionally, the zeta potential of incubated particles was measured. Human blood-brain barrier-representing cell line HBMEC was used for in vitro incubation experiments. To investigate the consequences of the FCS dependent protein corona formation on the interaction of MNP and cells flow cytometry and laser scanning microscopy were used. Zeta potential as well as SDS-PAGE clearly reveal an increase in the amount of corona proteins on MNP with increasing amount of FCS in incubation medium. For MNP incubated with lower FCS concentrations especially medium-sized proteins of molecular weights between 30kDa and 100kDa could be found within the protein corona, whereas for MNP incubated within higher FCS concentrations the fraction of corona proteins of 30kDa and less increased. The presence of the protein corona reduces the interaction of PEI-coated MNP with HBMEC cells within a 30min-incubation. PMID:26556312

  9. Heme Transfer from Streptococcal Cell Surface Protein Shp to HtsA of Transporter HtsABC

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Mengyao; Lei, Benfang

    2005-01-01

    Human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS) can take up heme from host heme-containing proteins as a source of iron. Little is known about the heme acquisition mechanism in GAS. We recently identified a streptococcal cell surface protein (designated Shp) and the lipoprotein component (designated HtsA) of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter made by GAS as heme-binding proteins. In an effort to delineate the molecular mechanism involved in heme acquisition by GAS, heme-free Shp (apo-Shp) a...

  10. Structural properties of fibrillar proteins isolated from the cell surface and cytoplasm of Streptococcus salivarius (K+) cells and nonadhesive mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerkamp, A H; van der Mei, H C; Liem, R S

    1986-01-01

    Most Streptococcus salivarius (K+) cells contain two protein antigens with different adhesive functions. The subcellular distribution and some structural properties of purified proteins were studied. Antigen B (AgB), a protein involved in interbacterial coaggregation with gram-negative bacteria, was present in the cell wall fraction only of the wild-type strain and was absent from the cells of a nonadhesive mutant. Antigen C (AgC), a glycoprotein involved in host-associated adhesive functions, was predominantly associated with the cell wall of the wild-type strain (AgCw), but accumulated in high amounts in the cytoplasmic fraction (AgCin) of mutants lacking the wall-associated form. AgB, AgCw, and AgCin had molecular weights of 380,000, 250,000 to 320,000, and 488,000, respectively, upon gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions. In the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and beta-mercaptoethanol the molecular weights were only slightly lower, suggesting that the free, isolated molecules exist as monomers under native conditions. AgCin readily stained with periodate-Schiff reagent, indicating a significant content of carbohydrate, similar to AgCw. Circular dichroism spectra showed that about 45% of the amino acids of AgCw were involved in alpha-helical coiled structures. AgB had a significantly lower proportion of ordered coiled structure. Electron microscopic observations of low-angle-shadowed preparations of purified antigens showed that they were flexible, thin rods with thickened or globular ends. Measurements corrected for shadow thickness showed lengths of 184 nm (AgB), 112 nm (AgCin), and 87 nm (AgCw). Treatment of AgCw with protease destroyed the fibrillar core, but seemed not to affect the globular ends. Comparison of the results with the localization of the antigens in wild-type and specific mutant strains suggested that each antigen molecule may represent a single, characteristic surface fibril with a specific adhesive capacity. Images PMID

  11. Protein adsorption onto Fe3O4 nanoparticles with opposite surface charge and its impact on cell uptake

    CERN Document Server

    Catalayud, M P; Raffa, V; Riggio, C; Ibarra, M R; Goya, G F

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) engineered for biomedical applications are meant to be in contact with protein-rich physiological fluids. These proteins are usually adsorbed onto the NP surface, forming a swaddling layer called protein corona that influences cell internalization. We present a study on protein adsorption onto different magnetic NPs (MNPs) when immersed in cell culture medium, and how these changes affect the cellular uptake. Two colloids with magnetite cores of 25 nm, same hydrodynamic size and opposite surface charge were in situ coated with (a) positive polyethyleneimine (PEI-MNPs) and (b) negative poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-MNPs). After few minutes of incubation in cell culture medium the wrapping of the MNPs by protein adsorption resulted in a 5-fold size increase. After 24 h of incubation large MNP-protein aggregates with hydrodynamic sizes 1500 to 3000 nm (PAA-MNPs and PEI-MNPs respectively) were observed. Each cluster contained an estimated number of magnetic cores between 450 and 1000, indicating the...

  12. Single-cell characterization of autotransporter-mediated Escherichia coli surface display of disulfide bond-containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Sendra, Victor G; Cirino, Patrick C; Varadarajan, Navin

    2012-11-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are a family of bacterial proteins containing a C-terminal β-barrel-forming domain that facilitates the translocation of N-terminal passenger domain whose functions range from adhesion to proteolysis. Genetic replacement of the native passenger domain with heterologous proteins is an attractive strategy not only for applications such as biocatalysis, live-cell vaccines, and protein engineering but also for gaining mechanistic insights toward understanding AT translocation. The ability of ATs to efficiently display functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides has remained largely controversial. By employing high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry, we have systematically investigated the ability of the Escherichia coli AT Antigen 43 (Ag43) to display two different recombinant reporter proteins, a single-chain antibody (M18 scFv) that contains two disulfides and chymotrypsin that contains four disulfides, by varying the signal peptide and deleting the different domains of the native protein. Our results indicate that only the C-terminal β-barrel and the threaded α-helix are essential for efficient surface display of functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides. These results imply that there are no inherent constraints for functional translocation and display of disulfide bond-containing proteins mediated by the AT system and should open new avenues for protein display and engineering. PMID:23019324

  13. The structure and function of the urokinase receptor, a membrane protein governing plasminogen activation on the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Danø, K

    1995-01-01

    PA receptor, uPAR, is a cell-surface protein which plays an important role in the localization and regulation of these processes. In the present article a number of established conclusions concerning the structure and function of uPAR are presented, and in addition various models are discussed which might...... domain is directly involved in the molecular contact with uPA. The receptor binds uPA as well as its proenzyme, pro-uPA, in such a manner that the activation cascade can occur directly on the cell surface. Furthermore, the activation rates are enhanced relative to the situation in solution, probably due...

  14. Integrin-mediated adhesion of human mesenchymal stem cells to extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed to polymer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro, degradable aliphatic polyesters are widely used as cell carriers for bone tissue engineering, despite their lack of biological cues. Their biological active surface is rather determined by an adsorbed layer of proteins from the surrounding media. Initial cell fate, including adhesion and proliferation, which are key properties for efficient cell carriers, is determined by the adsorbed layer of proteins. Herein we have investigated the ability of human bone marrow derived stem cells (hBMSC) to adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including fibronectin and vitronectin which are present in plasma and serum. hBMSC expressed integrins for collagens, laminins, fibronectin and vitronectin. Accordingly, hBMSC strongly adhered to these purified ECM proteins by using the corresponding integrins. Although purified fibronectin and vitronectin adsorbed to aliphatic polyesters to a lower extent than to cell culture polystyrene, these low levels were sufficient to mediate adhesion of hBMSC. It was found that plasma- and serum-coated polystyrene adsorbed significant levels of both fibronectin and vitronectin, and fibronectin was identified as the major adhesive component of plasma for hBMSC; however, aliphatic polyesters adsorbed minimal levels of fibronectin under similar conditions resulting in impaired cell adhesion. Altogether, the results suggest that the efficiency of aliphatic polyesters cell carriers could be improved by increasing their ability to adsorb fibronectin. (paper)

  15. Efficient Isolation and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Cancer Cell Plasma Membrane Proteins for Identification of Metastasis-Associated Cell Surface Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Jensen, Ole N; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2009-01-01

    proteins that could be quantified from 40 to 93%. Repeated LC-MS/MS analyses (3-4 times) of each sample increased the number of identified proteins by 60%. The use of Percoll/sucrose density separation allowed subfractionation of membranes leading to enrichment of membrane proteins (66%) and reduction from...... 33% to only 16% of protein from other membranous organelles such as endoplasmatic reticulum, Golgi, and mitochondria. In total, our optimized methods resulted in 1919 protein identifications (corresponding to 826 at similarity level 80% (SL80); 1145 (509 at SL80) were identified by two or more...... peptides of which 622 (300 at SL80) were membrane proteins. The quantitative proteomic analysis identified 16 cell surface proteins as potential markers of the ability of breast cancer cells to form distant metastases....

  16. Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein-1 Polymorphisms among Asymptomatic Sickle Cell Anemia Patients in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamidele Abiodun, Iwalokun; Oluwadun, Afolabi; Olugbenga Ayoola, Aina; Senapon Olusola, Iwalokun

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic malaria (ASM) has been implicated in the development of hemolytic crisis in infected sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients worldwide. This study surveyed steady state SCA Nigerian patients for ASM to investigate the influence of malaria prevention behaviors and age on parasitaemia and multiplicity of infection (MOI). A total of 78 steady SCA patients aged 5 - 27 years on routine care at three health facilities in Lagos were investigated for ASM by light microscopy and PCR with a multiplicity of infection determined by genotyping block 2 of merozoite surface protein 1 (msp1) gene of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum). Use of malaria prevention measures was captured using a semi-structured questionnaire. The prevalence rates of ASM (due to Pf only) by microscopy and PCR were found to be 27.3% and 47.4% respectively (P < 0.05) with a Mean + SEM parasite density of 2238.4 + 464.3 parasites/uL. Five distinct msp1 genotypes [K1 (2), MAD20 (2), RO33 (1)] were detected and significant (P<0.05) disparity in allele frequencies (K1, 91.8%, MAD20, 32.4%; RO33, 18.9%) was found. The overall MOI was 1.43 and 37.8% of infections were polyclonal (P<0.05). ASM was associated with non-use of preventive measures and occurred in 62.1% of SCA patients aged < 10y with lower MOI of 1.3 compared to 38.1% in older patients with a higher MOI of 1.5 (P<0.05). We conclude that PCR improved the diagnosis of ASM among Nigerian SCA patients with infections being of low complexity and associated with non-use of preventive interventions and R033 msp1 allele selection. PMID:26853290

  17. Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein-1 Polymorphisms among Asymptomatic Sickle Cell Anemia Patients in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwalokun Bamidele Abiodun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic malaria (ASM has been implicated in the development of hemolytic crisis in infected sickle cell anemia (SCA patients worldwide. This study surveyed steady state SCA Nigerian patients for ASM to investigate the influence of malaria prevention behaviors and age on parasitaemia and multiplicity of infection (MOI. A total of 78 steady SCA patients aged 5 – 27 years on routine care at three health facilities in Lagos were investigated for ASM by light microscopy and PCR with a multiplicity of infection determined by genotyping block 2 of merozoite surface protein 1 (msp1 gene of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum. Use of malaria prevention measures was captured using a semi-structured questionnaire. The prevalence rates of ASM (due to Pf only by microscopy and PCR were found to be 27.3% and 47.4% respectively (P < 0.05 with a Mean + SEM parasite density of 2238.4 + 464.3 parasites/uL. Five distinct msp1 genotypes [K1 (2, MAD20 (2, RO33 (1] were detected and significant (P<0.05 disparity in allele frequencies (K1, 91.8%, MAD20, 32.4%; RO33, 18.9% was found. The overall MOI was 1.43 and 37.8% of infections were polyclonal (P<0.05. ASM was associated with non-use of preventive measures and occurred in 62.1% of SCA patients aged < 10y with lower MOI of 1.3 compared to 38.1% in older patients with a higher MOI of 1.5 (P<0.05. We conclude that PCR improved the diagnosis of ASM among Nigerian SCA patients with infections being of low complexity and associated with non-use of preventive interventions and R033 msp1 allele selection.

  18. Multiexcitation Fluorogenic Labeling of Surface, Intracellular, and Total Protein Pools in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganbabu, Matharishwan; Perkins, Lydia A; Wang, Yi; Kurish, Jeffery; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2016-06-15

    Malachite green (MG) is a fluorogenic dye that shows fluorescence enhancement upon binding to its engineered cognate protein, a fluorogen activating protein (FAP). Energy transfer donors such as cyanine and rhodamine dyes have been conjugated with MG to modify the spectral properties of the fluorescent complexes, where the donor dyes transfer energy through Förster resonance energy transfer to the MG complex resulting in binding-conditional fluorescence emission in the far-red region. In this article, we use a violet-excitable dye as a donor to sensitize the far-red emission of the MG-FAP complex. Two blue emitting fluorescent coumarin dyes were coupled to MG and evaluated for energy transfer to the MG-FAP complex via its secondary excitation band. 6,8-Difluoro-7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid (Pacific blue, PB) showed the most efficient energy transfer and maximum brightness in the far-red region upon violet (405 nm) excitation. These blue-red (BluR) tandem dyes are spectrally varied from other tandem dyes and are able to produce fluorescence images of the MG-FAP complex with a large Stokes shift (>250 nm). These dyes are cell-permeable and are used to label intracellular proteins. Used together with a cell-impermeable hexa-Cy3-MG (HCM) dye that labels extracellular proteins, we are able to visualize extracellular, intracellular, and total pools of cellular protein using one fluorogenic tag that combines with distinct dyes to effect different spectral characteristics. PMID:27159569

  19. EFFECTS OF SYSTEMIC FLUCONAZOLE THERAPY ON IN VITRO ADHESION OF CANDIDA ALBICANS TO BUCCAL EPITHELIAL CELLS AND CHANGES OF THE CELL SURFACE PROTEINS OF THE EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴绍熙; 郭宁如; 侯幼红

    1996-01-01

    This paper presented the effects of systemic fluconazole therapy via intravenous (IV) and oral (PO) administrations on the adhesion of Candida albicans (C. albicans) to the huccal epithelial ceils (BEC) from five treated patients with three candidosis, one mucornlycosis and one sporotrichosis and at the same time,an analysis of the cell surface proteins involving candidal adherent receptor in the BEC of the patients in the course of 7 days were exposed to 3H-leucine radiolabaled C. atbicans for in vitro eandidal adherent assay,and the BEC from first intake day and the last intake day of the patients were extracted by dithiothreitol(DTT)-iodoacetamide treatment for SDS-PAGE. These results indicate that the systemic iluconazole therapy resuks in the inhibitory effect of candldal adhesion to BEC of treated patients to prevent them from oral candidosis for a prolonged time, which is based on the absent surface protein (35KDa) of the BEC.

  20. Neural progenitor differentiation patterns of surface and secreted proteins for cell-replacement therapies of neuronal disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tylečková, Jiřina; Valeková, Ivona; Žižková, Martina; Rákocyová, Michaela; Maršala, S.; Maršala, M.; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    Split : Mediterranean Institute for life Sciences, 2015. s. 1-1. [OMICs in Biomedical Research. 08.06.2015-12.06.2015, Split] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : neuronal differentiation * surface N-glycoproteome * cell adhesion proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  1. Improved mucoadhesion and cell uptake of chitosan and chitosan oligosaccharide surface-modified polymer nanoparticles for mucosal delivery of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyawanapelly, Sathish; Koli, Uday; Dharamdasani, Vimisha; Jain, Ratnesh; Dandekar, Prajakta

    2016-08-01

    The main aim of the present study was to compare mucoadhesion and cellular uptake efficiency of chitosan (CS) and chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) surface-modified polymer nanoparticles (NPs) for mucosal delivery of proteins. We have developed poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NPs, surface-modified COS-PLGA NPs and CS-PLGA NPs, by using double emulsion solvent evaporation method, for encapsulating bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein. Surface modification of NPs was confirmed using physicochemical characterization methods such as particle size and zeta potential, SEM, TEM and FTIR analysis. Both surface-modified PLGA NPs displayed a slow release of protein compared to PLGA NPs. Furthermore, we have explored the mucoadhesive property of COS as a material for modifying the surface of polymeric NPs. During in vitro mucoadhesion test, positively charged COS-PLGA NPs and CS-PLGA NPs exhibited enhanced mucoadhesion, compared to negatively charged PLGA NPs. This interaction was anticipated to improve the cell interaction and uptake of NPs, which is an important requirement for mucosal delivery of proteins. All nanoformulations were found to be safe for cellular delivery when evaluated in A549 cells. Moreover, intracellular uptake behaviour of FITC-BSA loaded NPs was extensively investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. As we hypothesized, positively charged COS-PLGA NPs and CS-PLGA NPs displayed enhanced intracellular uptake compared to negatively charged PLGA NPs. Our results demonstrated that CS- and COS-modified polymer NPs could be promising carriers for proteins, drugs and nucleic acids via nasal, oral, buccal, ocular and vaginal mucosal routes. PMID:27106502

  2. Ice nucleation protein as a bacterial surface display protein

    OpenAIRE

    Sarhan Mohammed A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Surface display technology can be defined as that phenotype (protein or peptide) which is linked to a genotype (DNA or RNA) through an appropriate anchoring motif. A bacterial surface display system is based on expressing recombinant proteins fused to sorting signals (anchoring motifs) that direct their incorporation on the cell surface.

  3. Signal peptide cleavage is essential for surface expression of a regulatory T cell surface protein, leucine rich repeat containing 32 (LRRC32

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiyama Hideaki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs have been implicated in certain cancers. Depletion of Tregs has been shown to increase anti-tumor immunity. Tregs also play a critical role in the suppression of autoimmune responses. The study of Tregs has been hampered by a lack of adequate surface markers. Leucine Rich Repeat Containing 32 (LRRC32, also known as Glycoprotein A Repetitions Predominant (GARP, has been postulated as a novel surface marker of activated Tregs. However, there is limited information regarding the processing of LRRC32 or the regulatory phenotype and functional activity of Tregs expressing LRRC32. Results Using naturally-occurring freshly isolated Tregs, we demonstrate that low levels of LRRC32 are present intracellularly prior to activation and that freshly isolated LRRC32+ Tregs are distinct from LRRC32- Tregs with respect to the expression of surface CD62L. Using LRRC32 transfectants of HEK cells, we demonstrate that the N-terminus of LRRC32 is cleaved prior to expression of the protein at the cell surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate using a construct containing a deleted putative signal peptide region that the presence of a signal peptide region is critical to cell surface expression of LRRC32. Finally, mixed lymphocyte assays demonstrate that LRRC32+ Tregs are more potent suppressors than LRRC32- Tregs. Conclusions A cleaved signal peptide site in LRRC32 is necessary for surface localization of native LRRC32 following activation of naturally-occurring freshly-isolated regulatory T cells. LRRC32 expression appears to alter the surface expression of activation markers of T cells such as CD62L. LRRC32 surface expression may be useful as a marker that selects for more potent Treg populations. In summary, understanding the processing and expression of LRRC32 may provide insight into the mechanism of action of Tregs and the refinement of immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at targeting these cells.

  4. Modulation of cell surface protein free thiols: a potential novel mechanism of action of the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Skalska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been much interest in targeting intracellular redox pathways as a therapeutic approach for cancer. Given recent data to suggest that the redox status of extracellular protein thiol groups (i.e. exofacial thiols effects cell behavior, we hypothesized that redox active anti-cancer agents would modulate exofacial protein thiols. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, we used the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide, a known anti-cancer agent. Using flow cytometry, and western blotting to label free thiols with Alexa Fluor 633 C(5 maleimide dye and N-(biotinoyl-N-(iodoacetyl ethylendiamine (BIAM, respectively, we show that parthenolide decreases the level of free exofacial thiols on Granta mantle lymphoma cells. In addition, we used immuno-precipitation techniques to identify the central redox regulator thioredoxin, as one of the surface protein thiol targets modified by parthenolide. To examine the functional role of parthenolide induced surface protein thiol modification, we pretreated Granta cells with cell impermeable glutathione (GSH, prior to exposure to parthenolide, and showed that GSH pretreatment; (a inhibited the interaction of parthenolide with exofacial thiols; (b inhibited parthenolide mediated activation of JNK and inhibition of NFkappaB, two well established mechanisms of parthenolide activity and; (c blocked the cytotoxic activity of parthenolide. That GSH had no effect on the parthenolide induced generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species supports the fact that GSH had no effect on intracellular redox. Together these data support the likelihood that GSH inhibits the effect of parthenolide on JNK, NFkappaB and cell death through its direct inhibition of parthenolide's modulation of exofacial thiols. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these data, we postulate that one component of parthenolide's anti-lymphoma activity derives from its ability to modify the redox state of critical

  5. Membrane labeling of coral gastrodermal cells by biotinylation: the proteomic identification of surface proteins involving cnidaria-dinoflagellate endosymbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Hui Li

    Full Text Available The cellular and molecular-scale processes underlying the stability of coral-Symbiodinium endosymbioses remain unclear despite decades of investigation. As the coral gastroderm is the only tissue layer characterized by this unique symbiotic association, the membranes of these symbiotic gastrodermal cells (SGCs may play important roles in the initiation and maintenance of the endosymbiosis. In order to elucidate the interactions between the endosymbiotic dinoflagellates and their coral hosts, a thorough characterization of SGC membranes is therefore required. Cell surface proteins of isolated SGCs were biotinylated herein by a cell impermeant agent, biotin-XX sulfosuccinimidyl ester. The in situ distribution of these biotinylated proteins was uncovered by both fluorescence and transmission electron microscopic imaging of proteins bound to Alexa Fluor® 488-conjugated streptavidin. The identity of these proteins was then determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Nineteen (19 proteins were identified, and they are known to be involved in the molecular chaperone/stress response, cytoskeletal remodeling, and energy metabolism. These results not only reveal the molecular characters of the host SGC membrane, but also provide critical insight into understanding the possible role of host membranes in this ecologically important endosymbiotic association.

  6. Cell adhesion and growth enabled by biomimetic oligopeptide modification of a polydopamine-poly(ethylene oxide) protein repulsive surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musílková, Jana; Kotelnikov, Ilya; Novotná, Katarína; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Rypáček, František; Bačáková, Lucie; Proks, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 11 (2015), s. 253. ISSN 0957-4530 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1857; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1168; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : protein repulsive surface * cell adhesion * RGD * endothelial cells Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 2.587, year: 2014

  7. A c-di-GMP effector system controls cell adhesion by inside-out signaling and surface protein cleavage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Newell

    Full Text Available In Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 the availability of inorganic phosphate (Pi is an environmental signal that controls biofilm formation through a cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In low Pi conditions, a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE RapA is expressed, depleting cellular c-di-GMP and causing the loss of a critical outer-membrane adhesin LapA from the cell surface. This response involves an inner membrane protein LapD, which binds c-di-GMP in the cytoplasm and exerts a periplasmic output promoting LapA maintenance on the cell surface. Here we report how LapD differentially controls maintenance and release of LapA: c-di-GMP binding to LapD promotes interaction with and inhibition of the periplasmic protease LapG, which targets the N-terminus of LapA. We identify conserved amino acids in LapA required for cleavage by LapG. Mutating these residues in chromosomal lapA inhibits LapG activity in vivo, leading to retention of the adhesin on the cell surface. Mutations with defined effects on LapD's ability to control LapA localization in vivo show concomitant effects on c-di-GMP-dependent LapG inhibition in vitro. To establish the physiological importance of the LapD-LapG effector system, we track cell attachment and LapA protein localization during Pi starvation. Under this condition, the LapA adhesin is released from the surface of cells and biofilms detach from the substratum. This response requires c-di-GMP depletion by RapA, signaling through LapD, and proteolytic cleavage of LapA by LapG. These data, in combination with the companion study by Navarro et al. presenting a structural analysis of LapD's signaling mechanism, give a detailed description of a complete c-di-GMP control circuit--from environmental signal to molecular output. They describe a novel paradigm in bacterial signal transduction: regulation of a periplasmic enzyme by an inner membrane signaling protein that binds a cytoplasmic second messenger.

  8. Plet1 is an epigenetically regulated cell surface protein that provides essential cues to direct trophoblast stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Alexander; Sienerth, Arnold R.; Hemberger, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Gene loci that are hypermethylated and repressed in embryonic (ESCs) but hypomethylated and expressed in trophoblast (TSCs) stem cells are very rare and may have particularly important roles in early developmental cell fate decisions, as previously shown for Elf5. Here, we assessed another member of this small group of genes, Placenta Expressed Transcript 1 (Plet1), for its function in establishing trophoblast lineage identity and modulating trophoblast differentiation. We find that Plet1 is tightly repressed by DNA methylation in ESCs but expressed on the cell surface of TSCs and trophoblast giant cells. In hypomethylated ESCs that are prone to acquire some trophoblast characteristics, Plet1 is required to confer a trophoblast-specific gene expression pattern, including up-regulation of Elf5. Plet1 displays an unusual biphasic expression profile during TSC differentiation and thus may be pivotal in balancing trophoblast self-renewal and differentiation. Furthermore, overexpression and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout in TSCs showed that high Plet1 levels favour differentiation towards the trophoblast giant cell lineage, whereas lack of Plet1 preferentially induces syncytiotrophoblast formation. Thus, the endogenous dynamics of Plet1 expression establish important patterning cues within the trophoblast compartment by promoting differentiation towards the syncytiotrophoblast or giant cell pathway in Plet1-low and Plet1-high cells, respectively. PMID:27121762

  9. Plet1 is an epigenetically regulated cell surface protein that provides essential cues to direct trophoblast stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Alexander; Sienerth, Arnold R; Hemberger, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Gene loci that are hypermethylated and repressed in embryonic (ESCs) but hypomethylated and expressed in trophoblast (TSCs) stem cells are very rare and may have particularly important roles in early developmental cell fate decisions, as previously shown for Elf5. Here, we assessed another member of this small group of genes, Placenta Expressed Transcript 1 (Plet1), for its function in establishing trophoblast lineage identity and modulating trophoblast differentiation. We find that Plet1 is tightly repressed by DNA methylation in ESCs but expressed on the cell surface of TSCs and trophoblast giant cells. In hypomethylated ESCs that are prone to acquire some trophoblast characteristics, Plet1 is required to confer a trophoblast-specific gene expression pattern, including up-regulation of Elf5. Plet1 displays an unusual biphasic expression profile during TSC differentiation and thus may be pivotal in balancing trophoblast self-renewal and differentiation. Furthermore, overexpression and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout in TSCs showed that high Plet1 levels favour differentiation towards the trophoblast giant cell lineage, whereas lack of Plet1 preferentially induces syncytiotrophoblast formation. Thus, the endogenous dynamics of Plet1 expression establish important patterning cues within the trophoblast compartment by promoting differentiation towards the syncytiotrophoblast or giant cell pathway in Plet1-low and Plet1-high cells, respectively. PMID:27121762

  10. Identification and characterization of the surface proteins of Clostridium difficile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several clostridial proteins were detected on the clostridial cell surface by sensitive radioiodination techniques. Two major proteins and six minor proteins comprised the radioiodinated proteins on the clostridial cell surface. Cellular fractionation of surface radiolabeled C. difficile determined that the radioiodinated proteins were found in the cell wall fraction of C. difficile and surprisingly were also present in the clostridial membrane. Furthermore, an interesting phenomenon of disulfide-crosslinking of the cell surface proteins of C. difficile was observed. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were found in both the membrane and cell wall fractions. In addition, the cell surface proteins of C. difficile were found to be released into the culture medium. In attempts to further characterize the clostridial proteins recombinant DNA techniques were employed. In addition, the role of the clostridial cell surface proteins in the interactions of C. difficile with human PMNs was also investigated

  11. Identification and characterization of the surface proteins of Clostridium difficile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dailey, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Several clostridial proteins were detected on the clostridial cell surface by sensitive radioiodination techniques. Two major proteins and six minor proteins comprised the radioiodinated proteins on the clostridial cell surface. Cellular fractionation of surface radiolabeled C. difficile determined that the radioiodinated proteins were found in the cell wall fraction of C. difficile and surprisingly were also present in the clostridial membrane. Furthermore, an interesting phenomenon of disulfide-crosslinking of the cell surface proteins of C. difficile was observed. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were found in both the membrane and cell wall fractions. In addition, the cell surface proteins of C. difficile were found to be released into the culture medium. In attempts to further characterize the clostridial proteins recombinant DNA techniques were employed. In addition, the role of the clostridial cell surface proteins in the interactions of C. difficile with human PMNs was also investigated.

  12. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor regulates cell surface plasminogen activator activity on human trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J C; Sakthivel, R; Kniss, D; Graham, C H; Strickland, D K; McCrae, K R

    1998-11-27

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor (LRP/alpha2MR) mediates the internalization of numerous ligands, including prourokinase (pro-UK) and complexes between two-chain urokinase (tc-u-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1). It has been suggested that through its ability to internalize these ligands, LRP/alpha2MR may regulate the expression of plasminogen activator activity on cell surfaces; this hypothesis, however, has not been experimentally confirmed. To address this issue, we assessed the ability of LRP/alpha2MR to regulate plasminogen activator activity on human trophoblast cells, which express both LRP/alpha2MR and the urokinase receptor (uPAR). Trophoblasts internalized and degraded exogenous 125I-pro-UK (primarily following its conversion to tc-u-PA and incorporation into tc-u-PA.PAI complexes) in an LRP/alpha2MR-dependent manner, which was inhibited by the LRP/alpha2MR receptor-associated protein. Receptor-associated protein also caused a approximately 50% reduction in cell surface plasminogen activator activity and delayed the regeneration of unoccupied uPAR by cells on which uPAR were initially saturated with pro-UK. Identical effects were caused by anti-LRP/alpha2MR antibodies. These results demonstrate that LRP/alpha2MR promotes the expression of cell surface plasminogen activator activity on trophoblasts by facilitating the clearance of tc-u-PA.PAI complexes and regeneration of unoccupied cell surface uPAR. PMID:9822706

  13. Adherence of cell surface mutants of Candida albicans to buccal epithelial cells and analyses of the cell surface proteins of the mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Fukayama, M; Calderone, R A

    1991-01-01

    Strains of Candida albicans, selected on the basis of their reduced agglutination with a polyclonal anti-Candida antiserum, were tested for their adherence to human buccal epithelial cells (BEC). Of four strains, one (A9V2) had reduced binding to BEC in vitro. Adherence of wild type (wt) yeast cells (A9), as measured by the percentage of BEC with adhering Candida cells, was 73.4% +/- 3.8% compared with 49.3% +/- 3.1% for A9V2 (P less than 0.01). From yeast cells of A9 and A9V2, whole-cell ext...

  14. Surface functionalization of nanoporous alumina with bone morphogenetic protein 2 for inducing osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yuanhui; Ju, Yang; Morita, Yasuyuki; Xu, Baiyao [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Song, Guanbin [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the possibility to regulate cellular behavior by manipulating the specific characteristics of biomaterials including the physical features and chemical properties. To investigate the synergistic effect of chemical factors and surface topography on the growth behavior of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), bone morphorgenic protein 2 (BMP2) was immobilized onto porous alumina substrates with different pore sizes. The BMP2-immobilized alumina substrates were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Growth behavior and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs cultured on the different substrates were investigated. Cell adhesion and morphological changes were observed with SEM, and the results showed that the BMP2-immobilized alumina substrate was able to promote adhesion and spreading of MSCs. MTT assay and immunofluorescence staining of integrin β1 revealed that the BMP2-immobilized alumina substrates were favorable for cell growth. To evaluate the differentiation of MSCs, osteoblastic differentiation markers, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization, were investigated. Compared with those of untreated alumina substrates, significantly higher ALP activities and mineralization were detected in cells cultured on BMP2-immobilized alumina substrates. The results suggested that surface functionalization of nanoporous alumina substrates with BMP2 was beneficial for cell growth and osteogenic differentiation. With the approach of immobilizing growth factors onto material substrates, it provided a new insight to exploit novel biofunctional materials for tissue engineering. - Highlights: • BMP2 was immobilized onto nanoporous alumina substrates with different pore sizes. • BMP2-immobilized substrates were able to promote adhesion and spreading of MSCs. • BMP2-immobilized substrates were favorable for cell growth of MSCs. • BMP2-immobilized substrates promoted osteogenic

  15. Surface functionalization of nanoporous alumina with bone morphogenetic protein 2 for inducing osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies have demonstrated the possibility to regulate cellular behavior by manipulating the specific characteristics of biomaterials including the physical features and chemical properties. To investigate the synergistic effect of chemical factors and surface topography on the growth behavior of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), bone morphorgenic protein 2 (BMP2) was immobilized onto porous alumina substrates with different pore sizes. The BMP2-immobilized alumina substrates were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Growth behavior and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs cultured on the different substrates were investigated. Cell adhesion and morphological changes were observed with SEM, and the results showed that the BMP2-immobilized alumina substrate was able to promote adhesion and spreading of MSCs. MTT assay and immunofluorescence staining of integrin β1 revealed that the BMP2-immobilized alumina substrates were favorable for cell growth. To evaluate the differentiation of MSCs, osteoblastic differentiation markers, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization, were investigated. Compared with those of untreated alumina substrates, significantly higher ALP activities and mineralization were detected in cells cultured on BMP2-immobilized alumina substrates. The results suggested that surface functionalization of nanoporous alumina substrates with BMP2 was beneficial for cell growth and osteogenic differentiation. With the approach of immobilizing growth factors onto material substrates, it provided a new insight to exploit novel biofunctional materials for tissue engineering. - Highlights: • BMP2 was immobilized onto nanoporous alumina substrates with different pore sizes. • BMP2-immobilized substrates were able to promote adhesion and spreading of MSCs. • BMP2-immobilized substrates were favorable for cell growth of MSCs. • BMP2-immobilized substrates promoted osteogenic

  16. Nucleolin: acharan sulfate-binding protein on the surface of cancer cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joo, E.J.; Dam, G.B. ten; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Toida, T.; Linhardt, R.J.; Kim, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are complex polysaccharides that participate in the regulation of physiological processes through the interactions with a wide variety of proteins. Acharan sulfate (AS), isolated from the giant African snail Achatina fulica, primarily consists of the repeating disaccharide

  17. Enterococcal surface protein Esp is not essential for cell adhesion and intestinal colonization of Enterococcus faecium in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Luit-Asbroek Miranda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterococcus faecium has globally emerged as a cause of hospital-acquired infections with high colonization rates in hospitalized patients. The enterococcal surface protein Esp, identified as a potential virulence factor, is specifically linked to nosocomial clonal lineages that are genetically distinct from indigenous E. faecium strains. To investigate whether Esp facilitates bacterial adherence and intestinal colonization of E. faecium, we used human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2 cells and an experimental colonization model in mice. Results No differences in adherence to Caco-2 cells were found between an Esp expressing strain of E. faecium (E1162 and its isogenic Esp-deficient mutant (E1162Δesp. Mice, kept under ceftriaxone treatment, were inoculated orally with either E1162, E1162Δesp or both strains simultaneously. Both E1162 and E1162Δesp were able to colonize the murine intestines with high and comparable numbers. No differences were found in the contents of cecum and colon. Both E1162 and E1162Δesp were able to translocate to the mesenteric lymph nodes. Conclusion These results suggest that Esp is not essential for Caco-2 cell adherence and intestinal colonization or translocation of E. faecium in mice.

  18. Surface protein composition of Aeromonas hydrophila strains virulent for fish: identification of a surface array protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface protein composition of members of a serogroup of Aeromonas hydrophila was examined. Immunoblotting with antiserum raised against formalinized whole cells of A. hydrophila TF7 showed a 52K S-layer protein to be the major surface protein antigen, and impermeant Sulfo-NHS-Biotin cell surface labeling showed that the 52K S-layer protein was the only protein accessible to the Sulfo-NHS-Biotin label and effectively masked underlying outer membrane (OM) proteins. In its native surface conformation the 52K S-layer protein was only weakly reactive with a lactoperoxidase 125I surface iodination procedure. A UV-induced rough lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant of TF7 was found to produce an intact S layer, but a deep rough LPS mutant was unable to maintain an array on the cell surface and excreted the S-layer protein into the growth medium, indicating that a minimum LPS oligosaccharide size required for A. hydrophila S-layer anchoring. The native S layer was permeable to 125I in the lactoperoxidase radiolabeling procedure, and two major OM proteins of molecular weights 30,000 and 48,000 were iodinated. The 48K species was a peptidoglycan-associated, transmembrane protein which exhibited heat-modifiable SDS solubilization behavior characteristic of a porin protein. A 50K major peptidoglycan-associated OM protein which was not radiolabeled exhibited similar SDS heat modification characteristics and possibly represents a second porin protein

  19. Depletion of the surface CD4 molecule by the envelope protein of human immunodeficiency virus expressed in a human CD4+ monocytoid cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A CD4+ human monocytoid cell line, U937, was transfected with a constructed plasmid which has the envelope gene of human immunodeficiency virus under the transcriptional control of the human metallothionein IIA promoter and was cloned thereafter. These cloned cell lines (EH and EL cells) expressed the viral gp160 in the cytoplasm. The expression of surface CD4 antigen examined by Leu3a and OKT4 monoclonal antibodies, however, disappeared completely in EH cells, which produce a larger amount of gp160, while diminishing only partly in EL cells, which produce a smaller amount of gp160. These results indicate that the level of expression of surface CD4 antigen correlates inversely with the amount of intracellular gp160. Moreover, immunoprecipitation studies using lysate from EH cells showed that OKT4 monoclonal antibody precipitated a significant number of CD4 molecules even after surface CD4 disappeared. However, Leu3a monoclonal antibody, which recognizes the binding site for envelope protein, could not precipitate any CD4 molecules in the same cell lysate. Taken together, these results suggested that CD4 molecules are still synthesized normally after the augmented production of gp160 in the cells but form a complex with the envelope protein in the cytoplasm and become unable to be transported to the cell surface, resulting in the observed depletion of surface CD4 antigen. This mechanism may explain the decrease or absence of surface CD4 antigens in human lymphocytes infected with human immunodeficiency virus

  20. A comparative pan-genome perspective of niche-adaptable cell-surface protein phenotypes in Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kant

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a ubiquitously adaptable Gram-positive bacterium and as a typical commensal can be recovered from various microbe-accessible bodily orifices and cavities. Then again, other isolates are food-borne, with some of these having been long associated with naturally fermented cheeses and yogurts. Additionally, because of perceived health benefits to humans and animals, numerous L. rhamnosus strains have been selected for use as so-called probiotics and are often taken in the form of dietary supplements and functional foods. At the genome level, it is anticipated that certain genetic variances will have provided the niche-related phenotypes that augment the flexible adaptiveness of this species, thus enabling its strains to grow and survive in their respective host environments. For this present study, we considered it functionally informative to examine and catalogue the genotype-phenotype variation existing at the cell surface between different L. rhamnosus strains, with the presumption that this might be relatable to habitat preferences and ecological adaptability. Here, we conducted a pan-genomic study involving 13 genomes from L. rhamnosus isolates with various origins. In using a benchmark strain (gut-adapted L. rhamnosus GG for our pan-genome comparison, we had focused our efforts on a detailed examination and description of gene products for certain functionally relevant surface-exposed proteins, each of which in effect might also play a part in niche adaptability among the other strains. Perhaps most significantly of the surface protein loci we had analyzed, it would appear that the spaCBA operon (known to encode SpaCBA-called pili having a mucoadhesive phenotype is a genomic rarity and an uncommon occurrence in L. rhamnosus. However, for any of the so-piliated L. rhamnosus strains, they will likely possess an increased niche-specific fitness, which functionally might presumably be manifested by a protracted transient

  1. A Comparative Pan-Genome Perspective of Niche-Adaptable Cell-Surface Protein Phenotypes in Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Sigvart-Mattila, Pia; Paulin, Lars; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Saarela, Maria; Palva, Airi; von Ossowski, Ingemar

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a ubiquitously adaptable Gram-positive bacterium and as a typical commensal can be recovered from various microbe-accessible bodily orifices and cavities. Then again, other isolates are food-borne, with some of these having been long associated with naturally fermented cheeses and yogurts. Additionally, because of perceived health benefits to humans and animals, numerous L. rhamnosus strains have been selected for use as so-called probiotics and are often taken in the form of dietary supplements and functional foods. At the genome level, it is anticipated that certain genetic variances will have provided the niche-related phenotypes that augment the flexible adaptiveness of this species, thus enabling its strains to grow and survive in their respective host environments. For this present study, we considered it functionally informative to examine and catalogue the genotype-phenotype variation existing at the cell surface between different L. rhamnosus strains, with the presumption that this might be relatable to habitat preferences and ecological adaptability. Here, we conducted a pan-genomic study involving 13 genomes from L. rhamnosus isolates with various origins. In using a benchmark strain (gut-adapted L. rhamnosus GG) for our pan-genome comparison, we had focused our efforts on a detailed examination and description of gene products for certain functionally relevant surface-exposed proteins, each of which in effect might also play a part in niche adaptability among the other strains. Perhaps most significantly of the surface protein loci we had analyzed, it would appear that the spaCBA operon (known to encode SpaCBA-called pili having a mucoadhesive phenotype) is a genomic rarity and an uncommon occurrence in L. rhamnosus. However, for any of the so-piliated L. rhamnosus strains, they will likely possess an increased niche-specific fitness, which functionally might presumably be manifested by a protracted transient colonization of

  2. AMP-activated protein kinase downregulates Kv7.1 cell surface expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin N; Krzystanek, Katarzyna; Jespersen, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    downstream effector of AMPK is the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2. Additionally, we show that AMPK activation results in a downregulation of Kv7.1 currents in Xenopus oocytes through a Nedd4-2-dependent mechanism. In summary, surface-expressed Kv7.1 channels are endocytosed and sent for degradation in lysosomes...

  3. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images. PMID:23085529

  4. Engineered hepatitis B virus surface antigen L protein particles for in vivo active targeting of splenic dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuo H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hidenori Matsuo,1 Nobuo Yoshimoto,1 Masumi Iijima,1 Tomoaki Niimi,1 Joohee Jung,2,3 Seong-Yun Jeong,3 Eun Kyung Choi,3,4 Tomomitsu Sewaki,5 Takeshi Arakawa,6,7 Shun’ichi Kuroda11Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan; 2College of Pharmacy, Duksung Women’s University, Seoul, South Korea; 3Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; 5GenoLac BL Corporation, Okinawa, Japan; 6COMB, Tropical Biosphere Research Center, 7Graduate School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, JapanAbstract: Dendritic cells (DCs are key regulators of adaptive T-cell responses. By capturing exogenous antigens and presenting antigen-derived peptides via major histocompatibility complex molecules to naïve T cells, DCs induce antigen-specific immune responses in vivo. In order to induce effective host immune responses, active delivery of exogenous antigens to DCs is considered important for future vaccine development. We recently generated bionanocapsules (BNCs consisting of hepatitis B virus surface antigens that mediate stringent in vivo cell targeting and efficient endosomal escape, and after the fusion with liposomes (LP containing therapeutic materials, the BNC-LP complexes deliver them to human liver-derived tissues in vivo. BNCs were further modified to present the immunoglobulin G (IgG Fc-interacting domain (Z domain derived from Staphylococcus aureus protein A in tandem. When mixed with IgGs, modified BNCs (ZZ-BNCs displayed the IgG Fv regions outwardly for efficient binding to antigens in an oriented-immobilization manner. Due to the affinity of the displayed IgGs, the IgG-ZZ-BNC complexes accumulated in specific cells and tissues in vitro and in vivo. After mixing ZZ-BNCs with antibodies against DCs, we used immunocytochemistry to examine which antibodies delivered ZZ-BNCs to

  5. Display of active enzymes on the cell surface of Escherichia coli using PgsA anchor protein and their application to bioconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Junya; Okano, Kenji; Tateno, Toshihiro; Tanino, Takanori; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Sung, Moon-Hee; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a novel Escherichia coli cell surface display system by employing PgsA as an anchoring motif. In our display system, C-terminal fusion to PgsA anchor protein from Bacillus subtilis was used. The enzymes selected for display were alpha-amylase (AmyA) from Streptococcus bovis 148 and lipase B (CALB) from Candida antarctica. The molecular mass values of AmyA and CALB are approximately 77 and 34 kDa, respectively. The enzymes were displayed on the surface as a fusion protein with a FLAG peptide tag at the C terminus. Both the PgsA-AmyA-FLAG and PgsA-CALB-FLAG fusion proteins were shown to be displayed by immunofluorescence labeling using anti-FLAG antibody. The displayed enzymes were active forms, and AmyA and CALB activities reached 990 U/g (dry cell weight) and 4.6 U/g (dry cell weight), respectively. AmyA-displaying E. coli cells grew utilizing cornstarch as the sole carbon source, while CALB-displaying E. coli cells catalyzed enantioselective transesterification, indicating that they are effective whole-cell biocatalysts. Since a target enzyme with a size of 77 kDa and an industrially useful lipase have been successfully displayed on the cell surface of E. coli for the first time, PgsA protein is probably a useful anchoring motif to display various enzymes. PMID:16133338

  6. Display of alpha-amylase on the surface of Lactobacillus casei cells by use of the PgsA anchor protein, and production of lactic acid from starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Junya; Okano, Kenji; Kitao, Tomoe; Ishida, Saori; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Sung, Moon-Hee; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2006-01-01

    We developed a new cell surface engineering system based on the PgsA anchor protein from Bacillus subtilis. In this system, the N terminus of the target protein was fused to the PgsA protein and the resulting fusion protein was expressed on the cell surface. Using this new system, we constructed a novel starch-degrading strain of Lactobacillus casei by genetically displaying alpha-amylase from the Streptococcus bovis strain 148 with a FLAG peptide tag (AmyAF). Localization of the PgsA-AmyA-FLAG fusion protein on the cell surface was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometric analysis. The lactic acid bacteria which displayed AmyAF showed significantly elevated hydrolytic activity toward soluble starch. By fermentation using AmyAF-displaying L. casei cells, 50 g/liter of soluble starch was reduced to 13.7 g/liter, and 21.8 g/liter of lactic acid was produced within about 24 h. The yield in terms of grams of lactic acid produced per gram of carbohydrate utilized was 0.60 g per g of carbohydrate consumed at 24 h. Since AmyA was immobilized on the cells, cells were recovered after fermentation and used repeatedly. During repeated utilization of cells, the lactic acid yield was improved to 0.81 g per g of carbohydrate consumed at 72 h. These results indicate that efficient simultaneous saccharification and fermentation from soluble starch to lactic acid were carried out by recombinant L. casei cells with cell surface display of AmyA. PMID:16391053

  7. The presence of INA proteins on the surface of single cells of Pseudomonas syringae R10.79 isolated from rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Ling, Meilee; Holm, Stine; Finster, Kai; Boesen, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    One of the important open questions in atmospheric ice nucleation is the impact of bioaerosols on the ice content of mix phase clouds (DeMott and Prenni 2010). Biogenic ice nuclei have a unique capacity of facilitating ice formation at temperatures between -1 and -10 °C. The model biogenic ice nuclei are produced by a few species of plant-surface bacteria, such as Pseudomonas syringae, that are commonly transported through the atmosphere. These bacterial species have highly specialized proteins, the so-called ice nucleation active (INA) proteins, which are exposed at the outer membrane surface of the cell where they promote ice particle formation. The mechanisms behind the onset of INA protein synthesis in single bacterial cells are not well understood. We performed a laboratory study in order to (i) investigate the presence of INA proteins on single bacterial cells and (ii) understand the conditions that induce INA protein production. We previously isolated an INA-positive strain of Pseudomonas syringae from rain samples collected in Denmark. Bacterial cells initiated ice nucleation activity at temperatures ≤-2°C and the cell fragments at temperatures ≤-8°C (Šantl-Temkiv et al 2015). We determined the amino-acid sequence of the INA protein and used the sequence to produce custom-made antibodies (GenScript, Germany). These antibodies were used to specifically stain and visualize the INA protein on the surfaces of single cells, which can then be quantified by a technique called flow cytometry. The synthesis of INA proteins by individual cells was followed during a batch growth experiment. An unusually high proportion of cells that were adapting to the new conditions prior to growth produced INA proteins (~4.4% of all cells). A smaller fraction of actively growing cells was carrying INA proteins (~1.2 % of all cells). The cells that stopped growing due to unfavorable conditions had the lowest fraction of cells carrying INA proteins (~0.5 % of all cells). To

  8. Dendritic Cell-Secreted Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein-4 Regulates the T-cell Response by Downmodulating Bystander Surface B7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, Matthew M; Konduri, Vanaja; Liang, Dan; Chen, Yunyu; Wing, James B; Paust, Silke; Levitt, Jonathan M; Decker, William K

    2016-05-15

    The remarkable functional plasticity of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) allows the adaptive immune system to respond specifically to an incredibly diverse array of potential pathogenic insults; nonetheless, the specific molecular effectors and mechanisms that underpin this plasticity remain poorly characterized. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4 (CTLA-4), the target of the blockbuster cancer immunotherapeutic ipilimumab, is one of the most well-known and well-studied members of the B7 superfamily and negatively regulates T cell responses by a variety of known mechanisms. Although CTLA-4 is thought to be expressed almost exclusively among lymphoid lineage hematopoietic cells, a few reports have indicated that nonlymphoid APCs can also express the CTLA-4 mRNA transcript and that transcript levels can be regulated by external stimuli. In this study, we substantially build upon these critical observations, definitively demonstrating that mature myeloid lineage dendritic cells (DC) express significant levels of intracellular CTLA-4 that they constitutively secrete in microvesicular structures. CTLA-4(+) microvesicles can competitively bind B7 costimulatory molecules on bystander DC, resulting in downregulation of B7 surface expression with significant functional consequences for downstream CD8(+) T-cell responses. Hence, the data indicate a previously unknown role for DC-derived CTLA-4 in immune cell functional plasticity and have significant implication for the design and implementation of immunomodulatory strategies intended to treat cancer and infectious disease. PMID:26979751

  9. Immobilization of cross linked Col-I-OPN bone matrix protein on aminolysed PCL surfaces enhances initial biocompatibility of human adipogenic mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hee; Jyoti, Md. Anirban; Song, Ho-Yeon

    2014-06-01

    In bone tissue engineering surface modification is considered as one of the important ways of fabricating successful biocompatible material. Addition of biologically active functionality on the surfaces has been tried for improving the overall biocompatibility of the system. In this study poly-ɛ-caprolactone film surfaces have been modified through aminolysis and immobilization process. Collagen type I (COL-I) and osteopontin (OPN), which play an important role in osteogenesis, was immobilized onto PCL films followed by aminolysis treatment using 1,6-hexanediamine. Characterization of animolysed and immobilized surfaces were done by a number techniques using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), FT-IR, XPS, ninhydrin staining, SDS-PAGE and confocal microscopy and compared between the modified and un-modified surfaces. Results of the successive experiments showed that aminolysis treatment was homogeneously achieved which helped to entrap or immobilize Col-I-OPN proteins on surfaces of PCL film. In vitro studies with human adipogenic mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSC) also confirmed the attachment and proliferation of cells was better in modified PCL surfaces than the unmodified surfaces. SEM, confocal microscopy and MTT assay showed a significant increase in cell spreading, attachment and proliferations on the biofunctionalized surfaces compared to the unmodified PCL surfaces at all-time points indicating the success of surface biofunctionalization.

  10. Immobilization of cross linked Col-I–OPN bone matrix protein on aminolysed PCL surfaces enhances initial biocompatibility of human adipogenic mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In bone tissue engineering surface modification is considered as one of the important ways of fabricating successful biocompatible material. Addition of biologically active functionality on the surfaces has been tried for improving the overall biocompatibility of the system. In this study poly-ε-caprolactone film surfaces have been modified through aminolysis and immobilization process. Collagen type I (COL-I) and osteopontin (OPN), which play an important role in osteogenesis, was immobilized onto PCL films followed by aminolysis treatment using 1,6-hexanediamine. Characterization of animolysed and immobilized surfaces were done by a number techniques using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), FT-IR, XPS, ninhydrin staining, SDS-PAGE and confocal microscopy and compared between the modified and un-modified surfaces. Results of the successive experiments showed that aminolysis treatment was homogeneously achieved which helped to entrap or immobilize Col-I–OPN proteins on surfaces of PCL film. In vitro studies with human adipogenic mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSC) also confirmed the attachment and proliferation of cells was better in modified PCL surfaces than the unmodified surfaces. SEM, confocal microscopy and MTT assay showed a significant increase in cell spreading, attachment and proliferations on the biofunctionalized surfaces compared to the unmodified PCL surfaces at all-time points indicating the success of surface biofunctionalization.

  11. Immobilization of cross linked Col-I–OPN bone matrix protein on aminolysed PCL surfaces enhances initial biocompatibility of human adipogenic mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Hee; Jyoti, Md. Anirban; Song, Ho-Yeon, E-mail: songmic@sch.ac.kr

    2014-06-01

    In bone tissue engineering surface modification is considered as one of the important ways of fabricating successful biocompatible material. Addition of biologically active functionality on the surfaces has been tried for improving the overall biocompatibility of the system. In this study poly-ε-caprolactone film surfaces have been modified through aminolysis and immobilization process. Collagen type I (COL-I) and osteopontin (OPN), which play an important role in osteogenesis, was immobilized onto PCL films followed by aminolysis treatment using 1,6-hexanediamine. Characterization of animolysed and immobilized surfaces were done by a number techniques using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), FT-IR, XPS, ninhydrin staining, SDS-PAGE and confocal microscopy and compared between the modified and un-modified surfaces. Results of the successive experiments showed that aminolysis treatment was homogeneously achieved which helped to entrap or immobilize Col-I–OPN proteins on surfaces of PCL film. In vitro studies with human adipogenic mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSC) also confirmed the attachment and proliferation of cells was better in modified PCL surfaces than the unmodified surfaces. SEM, confocal microscopy and MTT assay showed a significant increase in cell spreading, attachment and proliferations on the biofunctionalized surfaces compared to the unmodified PCL surfaces at all-time points indicating the success of surface biofunctionalization.

  12. Interaction between Simian Virus 40 Major Capsid Protein VP1 and Cell Surface Ganglioside GM1 Triggers Vacuole Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Motamedi, Nasim; Magaldi, Thomas G.; Gee, Gretchen V.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus that has served as an important model to understand many aspects of biology, induces dramatic cytoplasmic vacuolization late during productive infection of monkey host cells. Although this activity led to the discovery of the virus in 1960, the mechanism of vacuolization is still not known. Pentamers of the major SV40 capsid protein VP1 bind to the ganglioside GM1, which serves as the cellular receptor for the virus. In this report, we show that binding of VP1 to cell surface GM1 plays a key role in SV40 infection-induced vacuolization. We previously showed that SV40 VP1 mutants defective for GM1 binding fail to induce vacuolization, even though they replicate efficiently. Here, we show that interfering with GM1-VP1 binding by knockdown of GM1 after infection is established abrogates vacuolization by wild-type SV40. Vacuole formation during permissive infection requires efficient virus release, and conditioned medium harvested late during SV40 infection rapidly induces vacuoles in a VP1- and GM1-dependent fashion. Furthermore, vacuolization can also be induced by a nonreplicating SV40 pseudovirus in a GM1-dependent manner, and a mutation in BK pseudovirus VP1 that generates GM1 binding confers vacuole-inducing activity. Vacuolization can also be triggered by purified pentamers of wild-type SV40 VP1, but not by GM1 binding-defective pentamers or by intracellular expression of VP1. These results demonstrate that SV40 infection-induced vacuolization is caused by the binding of released progeny viruses to GM1, thereby identifying the molecular trigger for the activity that led to the discovery of SV40. PMID:27006465

  13. Lactobacillus plantarum gene clusters encoding putative cell-surface protein complexes for carbohydrate utilization are conserved in specific gram-positive bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muscariello Lidia

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes of gram-positive bacteria encode many putative cell-surface proteins, of which the majority has no known function. From the rapidly increasing number of available genome sequences it has become apparent that many cell-surface proteins are conserved, and frequently encoded in gene clusters or operons, suggesting common functions, and interactions of multiple components. Results A novel gene cluster encoding exclusively cell-surface proteins was identified, which is conserved in a subgroup of gram-positive bacteria. Each gene cluster generally has one copy of four new gene families called cscA, cscB, cscC and cscD. Clusters encoding these cell-surface proteins were found only in complete genomes of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei, Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria innocua, Listeria monocytogenes, Lactococcus lactis ssp lactis and Bacillus cereus and in incomplete genomes of L. lactis ssp cremoris, Lactobacillus casei, Enterococcus faecium, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillius brevis, Oenococcus oeni, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Bacillus thuringiensis. These genes are neither present in the genomes of streptococci, staphylococci and clostridia, nor in the Lactobacillus acidophilus group, suggesting a niche-specific distribution, possibly relating to association with plants. All encoded proteins have a signal peptide for secretion by the Sec-dependent pathway, while some have cell-surface anchors, novel WxL domains, and putative domains for sugar binding and degradation. Transcriptome analysis in L. plantarum shows that the cscA-D genes are co-expressed, supporting their operon organization. Many gene clusters are significantly up-regulated in a glucose-grown, ccpA-mutant derivative of L. plantarum, suggesting catabolite control. This is supported by the presence of predicted CRE-sites upstream or inside the up-regulated cscA-D gene clusters. Conclusion We propose that the CscA, CscB, CscC and Csc

  14. Nanoscale organization of β2-adrenergic receptor-Venus fusion protein domains on the surface of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrenergic receptors are a key component of nanoscale multiprotein complexes that are responsible for controlling the beat rate in a mammalian heart. We demonstrate the ability of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to visualize β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) fused to the GFP analogue Venus at the nanoscale on HEK293 cells. The expression of the β2AR-Venus fusion protein was tightly controlled using a tetracycline-induced promoter. Both the size and density of the observed nanoscale domains are dependent on the level of induction and thus the level of protein expression. At concentrations between 100 and 700 ng/ml of inducer doxycycline, the size of domains containing the β2AR-Venus fusion protein appears to remain roughly constant, but the number of domains per cell increase. At 700 ng/ml doxycycline the functional receptors are organized into domains with an average diameter of 150 nm with a density similar to that observed for the native protein on primary murine cells. By contrast, larger micron-sized domains of β2AR are observed in the membrane of the HEK293 cells that stably overexpress β2AR-GFP and β2AR-eYFP. We conclude that precise chemical control of gene expression is highly advantageous for the use β2AR-Venus fusion proteins as models for β2AR function. These observations are critical for designing future cell models and assays based on β2AR, since the receptor biology is consistent with a relatively low density of nanoscale receptor domains.

  15. Nanoscale organization of {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor-Venus fusion protein domains on the surface of mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vobornik, Dusan; Rouleau, Yanouchka; Haley, Jennifer [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Bani-Yaghoub, Mahmud [Institute for Biological Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Taylor, Rod [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Johnston, Linda J., E-mail: Linda.Johnston@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Pezacki, John Paul, E-mail: John.Pezacki@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2009-04-24

    Adrenergic receptors are a key component of nanoscale multiprotein complexes that are responsible for controlling the beat rate in a mammalian heart. We demonstrate the ability of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to visualize {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors ({beta}{sub 2}AR) fused to the GFP analogue Venus at the nanoscale on HEK293 cells. The expression of the {beta}{sub 2}AR-Venus fusion protein was tightly controlled using a tetracycline-induced promoter. Both the size and density of the observed nanoscale domains are dependent on the level of induction and thus the level of protein expression. At concentrations between 100 and 700 ng/ml of inducer doxycycline, the size of domains containing the {beta}{sub 2}AR-Venus fusion protein appears to remain roughly constant, but the number of domains per cell increase. At 700 ng/ml doxycycline the functional receptors are organized into domains with an average diameter of 150 nm with a density similar to that observed for the native protein on primary murine cells. By contrast, larger micron-sized domains of {beta}{sub 2}AR are observed in the membrane of the HEK293 cells that stably overexpress {beta}{sub 2}AR-GFP and {beta}{sub 2}AR-eYFP. We conclude that precise chemical control of gene expression is highly advantageous for the use {beta}{sub 2}AR-Venus fusion proteins as models for {beta}{sub 2}AR function. These observations are critical for designing future cell models and assays based on {beta}{sub 2}AR, since the receptor biology is consistent with a relatively low density of nanoscale receptor domains.

  16. Surface heat shock protein 90 serves as a potential receptor for calcium oxalate crystal on apical membrane of renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong-Ngern, Kedsarin; Sueksakit, Kanyarat; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-07-01

    Adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals on renal tubular epithelial cells is a crucial step in kidney stone formation. Finding potential crystal receptors on the apical membrane of the cells may lead to a novel approach to prevent kidney stone disease. Our previous study identified a large number of crystal-binding proteins on the apical membrane of MDCK cells. However, their functional role as potential crystal receptors had not been validated. The present study aimed to address the potential role of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) as a COM crystal receptor. The apical membrane was isolated from polarized MDCK cells by the peeling method and recovered proteins were incubated with COM crystals. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of HSP90 in the apical membrane and the crystal-bound fraction. Immunofluorescence staining without permeabilization and laser-scanning confocal microscopy confirmed the surface HSP90 expression on the apical membrane of the intact cells. Crystal adhesion assay showed that blocking surface HSP90 by specific anti-HSP90 antibody and knockdown of HSP90 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) dramatically reduced crystal binding on the apical surface of MDCK cells (by approximately 1/2 and 2/3, respectively). Additionally, crystal internalization assay revealed the presence of HSP90 on the membrane of endocytic vesicle containing the internalized COM crystal. Moreover, pretreatment of MDCK cells with anti-HSP90 antibody significantly reduced crystal internalization (by approximately 1/3). Taken together, our data indicate that HSP90 serves as a potential receptor for COM crystals on the apical membrane of renal tubular epithelial cells and is involved in endocytosis/internalization of the crystals into the cells. PMID:27115409

  17. SURFACE: a database of protein surface regions for functional annotation

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrè, Fabrizio; Ausiello, Gabriele; Zanzoni, Andreas; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2004-01-01

    The SURFACE (SUrface Residues and Functions Annotated, Compared and Evaluated, URL http://cbm.bio.uniroma2.it/surface/) database is a repository of annotated and compared protein surface regions. SURFACE contains the results of a large-scale protein annotation and local structural comparison project. A non-redundant set of protein chains is used to build a database of protein surface patches, defined as putative surface functional sites. Each patch is annotated with sequence and structure-der...

  18. Cell Surface Sensors: Lightning the Cellular Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Md Monsur; Kang, Dong-Ku; Tsang, Kyle; Fu, Moyu; Karp, Jeffrey M; Zhao, Weian

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface sensors are powerful tools to elucidate cell functions including cell signaling, metabolism and cell-to-cell communication. These sensors not only facilitate our understanding in basic biology but also advance the development of effective therapeutics and diagnostics. While genetically encoded fluorescent protein/peptide sensors have been most popular, emerging cell surface sensor systems including polymer-, nanoparticle-, and nucleic acid aptamer-based sensors have largely expan...

  19. Impact of Concanavalin-A-Mediated Cytoskeleton Disruption on Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 Internalization and Cell Surface Expression in Glioblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Samuel Burke; Pratt, Jonathan; Beauchemin, David; Haidara, Khadidja; Annabi, Borhane

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) is a multiligand endocytic receptor, which plays a pivotal role in controlling cytoskeleton dynamics during cancer cell migration. Its rapid endocytosis further allows efficient clearance of extracellular ligands. Concanavalin-A (ConA) is a lectin used to trigger in vitro physiological cellular processes, including cytokines secretion, nitric oxide production, and T-lymphocytes activation. Given that ConA exerts part of its effects through cytoskeleton remodeling, we questioned whether it affected LRP-1 expression, intracellular trafficking, and cell surface function in grade IV U87 glioblastoma cells. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we found that loss of the cell surface 600-kDa mature form of LRP-1 occurs upon ConA treatment. Consequently, internalization of the physiological α2-macroglobulin and the synthetic angiopep-2 ligands of LRP-1 was also decreased. Silencing of known mediators of ConA, such as the membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase, and the Toll-like receptors (TLR)-2 and TLR-6 was unable to rescue ConA-mediated LRP-1 expression decrease, implying that the loss of LRP-1 was independent of cell surface relayed signaling. The ConA-mediated reduction in LRP-1 expression was emulated by the actin cytoskeleton-disrupting agent cytochalasin-D, but not by the microtubule inhibitor nocodazole, and required both lysosomal- and ubiquitin-proteasome system-mediated degradation. Our study implies that actin cytoskeleton integrity is required for proper LRP-1 cell surface functions and that impaired trafficking leads to specialized compartmentation and degradation. Our data also strengthen the biomarker role of cell surface LRP-1 functions in the vectorized transport of therapeutic angiopep bioconjugates into brain cancer cells.

  20. CD4 T-Cell Suppression by Cells from Toxoplasma gondii-Infected Retinas Is Mediated by Surface Protein PD-L1▿

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Elizabeth; Joshi, Sunil; Ash, John D.; Fox, Barbara A.; Farris, A. Darise; Bzik, David J.; Lang, Mark L.; Blader, Ira J.

    2010-01-01

    In the inflamed retina, CD4+ T cells can cause retinal damage when they are not properly regulated. Since tissue expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and costimulatory molecules is a key mechanism for regulating effector T cells, we tested the hypothesis that upregulation of these proteins in the retina contributes to the regulation of CD4 T cells. Here we report that in retinas infected with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, MHC class II is upregulated on inf...

  1. Mapping the laminin-binding and adhesive domain of the cell surface-associated Hlp/LBP protein from Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares de Lima, Cristiana; Zulianello, Laurence; Marques, Maria Angela de Melo; Kim, Heejin; Portugal, Michelle Iespa; Antunes, Sérgio Luiz; Menozzi, Franco Dante; Ottenhoff, Tom Henricus Maria; Brennan, Patrick Joseph; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2005-07-01

    Binding of Mycobacterium leprae to and invasion of Schwann cells (SC) represent a crucial step that initiates nerve damage in leprosy. We and others have described that M. leprae colonization of the peripheral nerve system may be mediated in part by a surface-exposed histone-like protein (Hlp), characterized as a laminin-binding protein (LBP). Hlp/LBP has also been shown to play a role in the binding of mycobacteria to alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages. In the present study we report that M. leprae expresses Hlp/LBP protein during the course of human infection. Additionally, we analyzed the interaction of Hlp/LBP with the extracellular matrix and host cell surface. We show that Hlp/LBP, besides laminin, also binds heparin and heparan sulfate. Testing truncated recombinant Hlp molecules corresponding to the N-terminal (rHlp-N) and the C-terminal (rHlp-C) domains of the protein, we established that interaction of Hlp/LBP with laminin-2 and heparin is mainly mediated by the C-terminal domain of the protein. Moreover, the same domain was found to be involved in Hlp/LBP-mediating bacterial binding to human SC. Finally, evidence is shown suggesting that M. leprae produces a post-translationally modified Hlp/LBP containing methyllysine residues. Methylation of the lysine residues, however, seems not to affect the adhesive properties of Hlp/LBP. Taken together, our observations reinforce the involvement of Hlp/LBP as an adhesin in mycobacterial infections and define its highly positive C-terminal region as the major adhesive domain of this protein. PMID:15919224

  2. Identification of surface proteins in Enterococcus faecalis V583

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijsink Vincent GH

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surface proteins are a key to a deeper understanding of the behaviour of Gram-positive bacteria interacting with the human gastro-intestinal tract. Such proteins contribute to cell wall synthesis and maintenance and are important for interactions between the bacterial cell and the human host. Since they are exposed and may play roles in pathogenicity, surface proteins are interesting targets for drug design. Results Using methods based on proteolytic "shaving" of bacterial cells and subsequent mass spectrometry-based protein identification, we have identified surface-located proteins in Enterococcus faecalis V583. In total 69 unique proteins were identified, few of which have been identified and characterized previously. 33 of these proteins are predicted to be cytoplasmic, whereas the other 36 are predicted to have surface locations (31 or to be secreted (5. Lipid-anchored proteins were the most dominant among the identified surface proteins. The seemingly most abundant surface proteins included a membrane protein with a potentially shedded extracellular sulfatase domain that could act on the sulfate groups in mucin and a lipid-anchored fumarate reductase that could contribute to generation of reactive oxygen species. Conclusions The present proteome analysis gives an experimental impression of the protein landscape on the cell surface of the pathogenic bacterium E. faecalis. The 36 identified secreted (5 and surface (31 proteins included several proteins involved in cell wall synthesis, pheromone-regulated processes, and transport of solutes, as well as proteins with unknown function. These proteins stand out as interesting targets for further investigation of the interaction between E. faecalis and its environment.

  3. Generation of human scFvs antibodies recognizing a prion protein epitope expressed on the surface of human lymphoblastoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imperiale Valentina

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A hallmark of prion disease is the transformation of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc into an infectious disease-associated isoform, (PrPsc. Anti-prion protein monoclonal antibodies are invaluable for structure-function studies of PrP molecules. Furthermore recent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies can prevent the incorporation of PrPc into propagating prions. In the present article, we show two new human phage antibodies, isolated on recombinant hamster prion protein (rHaPrP. Results We adopted an antibody phage display strategy to isolate specific human antibodies directed towards rHaPrP which has been used as a bait for panning the synthetic ETH-2 antibody phage library. Two phage antibodies clones named MA3.B4 and MA3.G3 were isolated and characterized under genetic biochemical and immunocytochemical aspects. The clones were found to recognize the prion protein in ELISA studies. In flow-cytometry studies, these human single chain Fragment variable (scFv phage-antibodies show a well defined pattern of reactivity on human lymphoblastoid and myeloid cells. Conclusion Sequence analysis of the gene encoding for the antibody fragments and antigen recognition patterns determined by flow-cytometry analysis indicate that the isolated scFvs recognize novel epitopes in the PrPc molecule. These new anti PrPc human antibodies are unique reagents for prion protein detection and may represent a biologic platform to develop new reagents to treat PrPsc associated disease.

  4. Presence of antibodies against a cell-surface protein, cross-reactive with DNA, in systemic lupus erythrematosus: a marker of the disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antibodies against a cell-surface protein, cross-reactive with double-stranded DNA, were detected in the serum of 25 patients with active human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), defined on the basis of the revised American Rheumatism Association classification. Among these sera, two did not display anti-DNA antibodies, as shown by Farr assay, solid-phase radioimmunoassay, and Crithidia luciliae test. Five other SLE patients were consecutively studied in active and remission states. Antibodies against the protein were detected in the serum of the 5 SLE patients when they were in active phase but not in the serum of the same patients in inactive phase of the disease. The anti-protein antibodies were not found in the serum of 10 inactive SLE patients or in the sera of 10 normal human controls, 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 5 patients with scleroderma, and 4 patients with primary sicca syndrome. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that antibodies against this cell-surface protein could provide a better diagnosis marker and activity index than anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

  5. Inactivation of the srtA Gene in Streptococcus gordonii Inhibits Cell Wall Anchoring of Surface Proteins and Decreases In Vitro and In Vivo Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolken, Tové C.; Franke, Christine A.; Jones, Kevin F.; Zeller, Gloria O.; Jones, C. Hal; Dutton, Emma K.; Hruby, Dennis E.

    2001-01-01

    The srtA gene product, SrtA, has been shown to be required for cell wall anchoring of protein A as well as virulence in the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. There are five major mechanisms for displaying proteins at the surface of gram-positive bacteria (P. Cossart and R. Jonquieres, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97:5013–5015, 2000). However, since many of the known surface proteins of gram-positive bacteria are believed to be exported and anchored via the sortase pathway, it was of interest to determine if srtA plays a similar role in other gram-positive bacteria. To that end, the srtA gene in the human oral commensal organism Streptococcus gordonii was insertionally inactivated. The srtA mutant S. gordonii exhibited a marked reduction in quantity of a specific anchored surface protein. Furthermore, the srtA mutant had reduced binding to immobilized human fibronectin and had a decreased ability to colonize the oral mucosa of mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the activity of SrtA plays an important role in the biology of nonpathogenic as well as pathogenic gram-positive cocci. PMID:11119491

  6. Negative staining and immunoelectron microscopy of adhesion-deficient mutants of Streptococcus salivarius reveal that the adhesive protein antigens are separate classes of cell surface fibril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerkamp, A H; Handley, P S; Baars, A; Slot, J W

    1986-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of the cell wall-associated protein antigens of Streptococcus salivarius HB, which are involved in specific adhesive properties of the cells, was studied. Mutants which had lost the adhesive properties and lacked the antigens at the cell surface were compared with the parent strain. Immunoelectron microscopy of cryosections of cells labeled with affinity-purified, specific antisera and colloidal gold-protein A complexes was used to locate the antigens. Antigen C (AgC), a glycoprotein involved in attachment to host surfaces, was mainly located in the fibrillar layer outside the cell wall. A smaller amount of label was also found throughout the cytoplasmic area in the form of small clusters of gold particles, which suggests a macromolecular association. Mutant HB-7, which lacks the wall-associated AgC, accumulated AgC reactivity intracellularly. Intracellular AgC was often found associated with isolated areas of increased electron density, but sometimes seemed to fill the entire interior of the cell. Antigen B (AgB), a protein responsible for interbacterial coaggregation, was also located in the fibrillar layer, although its distribution differed from that of the wall-associated AgC since AgB was found predominantly in the peripheral areas. A very small amount of label was also found in the cytoplasmic area as discrete gold particles. Mutant HB-V5, which lacks wall-associated AgB, was not labeled in the fibrillar coat, but showed the same weak intracellular label as the parent strain. Immunolabeling with serum against AgD, another wall-associated protein but of unknown function, demonstrated its presence in the fibrillar layer of strain HB. Negatively stained preparations of whole cells of wild-type S. salivarius and mutants that had lost wall-associated AgB or AgC revealed that two classes of short fibrils are carried on the cell surface at the same time. AgB and AgC are probably located on separate classes of short, protease

  7. Dynamic Morphological Changes Induced By GM1 and Protein Interactions on the Surface of Cell-Sized Liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Takagi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the physicochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the morphological changes in the cell membrane in the presence of various stimuli such as osmotic pressure. Lipid rafts are believed to play a crucial role in various cellular processes. It is well established that Ctb (Cholera toxin B subunit recognizes and binds to GM1 (monosialotetrahexosylganglioside on the cell surface with high specificity and affinity. Taking advantage of Ctb-GM1 interaction, we examined how Ctb and GM1 molecules affect the dynamic movement of liposomes. GM1 a natural ligand for cholera toxin, was incorporated into liposome and the interaction between fluorescent Ctb and the liposome was analyzed. The interaction plays an important role in determining the various surface interaction phenomena. Incorporation of GM1 into membrane leads to an increase of the line tension leading to either rupture of liposome membrane or change in the morphology of the membrane. This change in morphology was found to be GM1 concentration specific. The interaction between Ctb-GM1 leads to fast and easy rupture or to morphological changes of the liposome. The interactions of Ctb and the glycosyl chain are believed to affect the surface and the curvature of the membrane. Thus, the results are highly beneficial in the study of signal transduction processes.

  8. The cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderley de Souza

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell surface of trypanosomatids is formed by the plasma membrane and a layer of sub-pellicular microtubules which are connected to the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is composed by proteins, lipids and carbohydrates which form the glycocalix. In this paper we will review briefly aspects related to the organization of the cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi.

  9. The cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Wanderley de Souza; Thais Souto-Padrón

    1984-01-01

    The cell surface of trypanosomatids is formed by the plasma membrane and a layer of sub-pellicular microtubules which are connected to the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is composed by proteins, lipids and carbohydrates which form the glycocalix. In this paper we will review briefly aspects related to the organization of the cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi.

  10. The pancreatic beta cell surface proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Stützer, I.; Esterházy, D.; Stoffel, M.

    2012-01-01

    The pancreatic beta cell is responsible for maintaining normoglycaemia by secreting an appropriate amount of insulin according to blood glucose levels. The accurate sensing of the beta cell extracellular environment is therefore crucial to this endocrine function and is transmitted via its cell surface proteome. Various surface proteins that mediate or affect beta cell endocrine function have been identified, including growth factor and cytokine receptors, transporters, ion channels and prote...

  11. Cells behaviors and genotoxicity on topological surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, N.; Yang, M.K.; Bi, S.X. [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Fiber Modification and Functional Fiber, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin, 300387 (China); Chen, L., E-mail: chenlis@tjpu.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Fiber Modification and Functional Fiber, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin, 300387 (China); Zhu, Z.Y.; Gao, Y.T.; Du, Z. [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Artificial Cell, Tianjin Third Central Hospital, Tianjin, 300170 (China)

    2013-08-01

    To investigate different cells behaviors and genotoxicity, which were driven by specific microenvironments, three patterned surfaces (pillars, wide grooves and narrow grooves) and one smooth surface were prepared by template-based technique. Vinculin is a membrane-cytoskeletal protein in focal adhesion plaques and associates with cell–cell and cell–matrix junctions, which can promote cell adhesion and spreading. The immunofluorescence staining of vinculin revealed that the narrow grooves patterned substrate was favorable for L929 cell adhesion. For cell multiplication, the narrow grooves surface was fitted for the proliferation of L929, L02 and MSC cells, the pillars surface was only in favor of L929 cells to proliferate during 7 days of cell cultivation. Cell genetic toxicity was evaluated by cellular micronuclei test (MNT). The results indicated that topological surfaces were more suitable for L929 cells to proliferate and maintain the stability of genome. On the contrary, the narrow grooves surface induced higher micronuclei ratio of L02 and MSC cells than other surfaces. With the comprehensive results of cell multiplication and MNT, it was concluded that the wide grooves surface was best fitted for L02 cells to proliferate and have less DNA damages, and the smooth surface was optimum for the research of MSC cells in vitro. - Highlights: • Different cells behaviors on microstructure surfaces were discussed in this paper. • The expression of cell protein of Vinculin was studied in this research. • Cellular micronuclei test was applied to evaluate cells' genotoxicity. • Cell genotoxicity was first studied in the research field of topological surfaces.

  12. Cells behaviors and genotoxicity on topological surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate different cells behaviors and genotoxicity, which were driven by specific microenvironments, three patterned surfaces (pillars, wide grooves and narrow grooves) and one smooth surface were prepared by template-based technique. Vinculin is a membrane-cytoskeletal protein in focal adhesion plaques and associates with cell–cell and cell–matrix junctions, which can promote cell adhesion and spreading. The immunofluorescence staining of vinculin revealed that the narrow grooves patterned substrate was favorable for L929 cell adhesion. For cell multiplication, the narrow grooves surface was fitted for the proliferation of L929, L02 and MSC cells, the pillars surface was only in favor of L929 cells to proliferate during 7 days of cell cultivation. Cell genetic toxicity was evaluated by cellular micronuclei test (MNT). The results indicated that topological surfaces were more suitable for L929 cells to proliferate and maintain the stability of genome. On the contrary, the narrow grooves surface induced higher micronuclei ratio of L02 and MSC cells than other surfaces. With the comprehensive results of cell multiplication and MNT, it was concluded that the wide grooves surface was best fitted for L02 cells to proliferate and have less DNA damages, and the smooth surface was optimum for the research of MSC cells in vitro. - Highlights: • Different cells behaviors on microstructure surfaces were discussed in this paper. • The expression of cell protein of Vinculin was studied in this research. • Cellular micronuclei test was applied to evaluate cells' genotoxicity. • Cell genotoxicity was first studied in the research field of topological surfaces

  13. Two-dimensional analysis of metabolically and cell surface radiolabeled proteins of some human lymphoid and myeloid leukemia cell lines. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell surface glycoproteins, radiolabelled by the sodium metaperiodate/tritiated borohydride technique, and cell phosphoproteins, metabolically radiolabelled with 32P-orthophosphate were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis in some myeloid and lymphoid leukemia cell lines. Some markedly expressed major glycoproteins were predominant in some of the cell lines (such as 95k and 100k glycoproteins with marked charge heterogeneity in non-T, non-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines NALM 6 and NALM 16), but markedly quantitatively reduced in other examined cell lines, such as lymphoblastoid cell line UHKT 34/2. 32P-orthophosphate radiolabelled phosphoprotein two-dimensional patterns of the examined lymphoid leukemia cell lines were essentially similar, with some minor differences, in examined lymphoid and myeloid leukemia cell lines, such as marked expression of a series of large phosphoproteins in the molecular weight range 80-100k in lymphoid cell lines and almost complete absence of these phosphoproteins on the examined myeloid leukemia cell lines. Another configuration of acidic phosphoproteins (30-35k) exhibited individual cell line variability and differences between both individual myeloid leukemia cell lines and between the lymphoid and myeloid cell lines examined. (author) 2 figs., 15 refs

  14. Identification and characterization of Vibrio cholerae surface proteins by radioiodination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole cells and isolated outer membrane from Vibrio cholerae (Classical, Inaba) were radiolabeled with Iodogen or Iodo-beads as catalyst. Radiolabeling of whole cells was shown to be surface specific by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of whole cells and cell fractions. Surface-labeled whole cells regularly showed 16 distinguishable protein species, of which nine were found in radiolabeled outer membrane preparations obtained by a lithium chloride- lithium acetate procedure. Eight of these proteins were found in outer membranes prepared by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and Triton X-100 extraction of radiolabeled whole cells. The mobility of several proteins was shown to be affected by temperature, and the major protein species exposed on the cell surface was shown to consist of at least two different peptides

  15. CD4 T-cell suppression by cells from Toxoplasma gondii-infected retinas is mediated by surface protein PD-L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Elizabeth; Joshi, Sunil; Ash, John D; Fox, Barbara A; Farris, A Darise; Bzik, David J; Lang, Mark L; Blader, Ira J

    2010-08-01

    In the inflamed retina, CD4(+) T cells can cause retinal damage when they are not properly regulated. Since tissue expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and costimulatory molecules is a key mechanism for regulating effector T cells, we tested the hypothesis that upregulation of these proteins in the retina contributes to the regulation of CD4 T cells. Here we report that in retinas infected with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, MHC class II is upregulated on infiltrating leukocytes as well as on resident retinal cells, including photoreceptors. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that B7 costimulatory family members (CD80, CD86, ICOS-L, and programmed death ligand 2 [PD-L2]) were not expressed on class II(+) cells. In contrast, PD-L1 (also named B7-H1 or CD274) was expressed on the majority of both hematopoietic and resident retinal MHC class II-expressing cells. Retinal cells from Toxoplasma-infected animals were able to suppress T-cell activation in a PD-L1-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that the expression of MHC class II and PD-L1 was critically dependent on gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) expression. These data suggest that retinal MHC class II and PD-L1 expression is a novel mechanism by which the retina protects itself from CD4 T-cell-mediated immune damage in ocular toxoplasmosis and other types of retinal immune responses. PMID:20498261

  16. CD4 T-Cell Suppression by Cells from Toxoplasma gondii-Infected Retinas Is Mediated by Surface Protein PD-L1▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Elizabeth; Joshi, Sunil; Ash, John D.; Fox, Barbara A.; Farris, A. Darise; Bzik, David J.; Lang, Mark L.; Blader, Ira J.

    2010-01-01

    In the inflamed retina, CD4+ T cells can cause retinal damage when they are not properly regulated. Since tissue expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and costimulatory molecules is a key mechanism for regulating effector T cells, we tested the hypothesis that upregulation of these proteins in the retina contributes to the regulation of CD4 T cells. Here we report that in retinas infected with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, MHC class II is upregulated on infiltrating leukocytes as well as on resident retinal cells, including photoreceptors. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that B7 costimulatory family members (CD80, CD86, ICOS-L, and programmed death ligand 2 [PD-L2]) were not expressed on class II+ cells. In contrast, PD-L1 (also named B7-H1 or CD274) was expressed on the majority of both hematopoietic and resident retinal MHC class II-expressing cells. Retinal cells from Toxoplasma-infected animals were able to suppress T-cell activation in a PD-L1-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that the expression of MHC class II and PD-L1 was critically dependent on gamma interferon (IFN-γ) expression. These data suggest that retinal MHC class II and PD-L1 expression is a novel mechanism by which the retina protects itself from CD4 T-cell-mediated immune damage in ocular toxoplasmosis and other types of retinal immune responses. PMID:20498261

  17. Generation, modulation and maintenance of the plasma membrane asymmetric phospholipid composition in yeast cells during growth: their relation to surface potential and membrane protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbón, J; Calderón, V

    1995-04-12

    During growth a cyclic exposure of anionic phospholipids to the external surface of the plasma membrane was found. The surface charge density (sigma) increased gradually reaching a maximum in the first 5 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial value at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth (10-12 h). Phosphatidylinositol, that determines to a large extent the magnitude of the sigma, increased 83% in the yeast cells during the first 4 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial level at 10-12 h. During the stationary phase (12-24 h), both sigma and the anionic/zwitterionic phospholipid ratio, remained without any significant variation. The high-affinity H-linked glutamate transport system that behaves as a sensor of the changes in the membrane surface potential (phi) increased its activity in the first 5 h and then decreased it, following with great accuracy the sigma variations and remained without changes during the stationary phase of growth. The phosphatidylserine (PS) relative concentration in the cells (9.0%) did not significantly change during the whole growth curve, but their asymmetric distribution varied, contributing to the changes in sigma. PS facing the outer membrane surface increased 2.45-times during the first 5 h of growth and then returned to their original value at the end of the log phase (12 h). Phosphatidylcholine (PC) remained constant during the whole growth curve (50%), while phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) decreased 3-fold in the first 4 h and then increased to its original value at 10 h. Interestingly, PE at the outer membrane surface remained constant (3% of the total phospholipids) during the whole growth curve. During growth yeast cells change their phospholipid composition originating altered patterns of the plasma membrane phospholipid composition and IN-OUT distribution. This dynamic asymmetry is involved in the regulation of the surface potential and membrane protein activity. PMID:7718598

  18. Radioimmunotherapy of solid tumors targeting a cell-surface protein, FZD10. Therapeutic efficacy largely depends on radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frizzled homolog 10 (FZD10) is expressed at high levels on the cell surface of almost all synovial sarcoma tissues, but is absent in most normal organs. In a previous study, yttrium-90 (90Y)-labeled anti-FZD10 antibody (MAb 92-13) showed considerable therapeutic efficacy in synovial sarcoma cell-bearing mice. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the factors associated with this therapeutic efficacy of 90Y-MAb 92-13. FZD10 expression levels of SYO-1 (FZD10-overexpressing synovial sarcoma cell line) and DLD-1/FZD10 (FZD10-transfected DLD-1 cell) were determined by the cell binding assay, and their radiosensitivity was evaluated by incubation with 90Y-MAb 92-13 in vitro. Biodistribution study of indium-111 (111In)-MAb 92-13 was performed in SYO-1 and DLD-1/FZD10 tumor-bearing mice. For therapeutic studies, SYO-1 and DLD-1/FZD10 tumor-bearing mice were treated with 90Y-MAb 92-13 (100, 150, and 200 μCi), after which the change in tumor volume was measured. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on the excised tumor. Expression level of FZD10 on DLD-1/FZD10 was much greater than that on SYO-1. The accumulation of 111In-MAb 92-13 was much higher in DLD-1/FZD10 tumor-bearing mice than in SYO-1 tumor-bearing mice (49.0±4.2 and 22.0±4.5% ID/g, respectively, at 48 h after administration). In SYO-1 tumor, substantial tumor size reduction was observed in all mice treated with 90Y-MAb 92-13 (tumor volume decreased to less than 0.1 cm3 at 11 days after treatment) and tumor regrowth was not observed in most of them. In contrast, only slow progression was observed in DLD-1/FZD10 tumor. When incubated with 90Y-MAb 92-13, high radioactivity was needed to damage DLD-1/FZD10. Immunohistochemical study indicated apoptosis of SYO-1 tumor. The therapeutic efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) seems to largely depend on the tumor radiosensitivity. (author)

  19. Effects of prebiotic oligosaccharides consumption on the growth and expression profile of cell surface-associated proteins of a potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus FSMM15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtini, Devi; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Urashima, Tadasu; Fukuda, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    To investigate carbohydrate preference of a potential probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus FSMM15, six prebiotics, including two milk-derived prebiotics, galactooligosaccharides and lacto-N-biose I, and four plant-origin prebiotics, beet oligosaccharide syrup, difructose anhydride III, fructooligosaccharides, and raffinose, were examined. The strain utilized the milk-derived prebiotics at similar levels to glucose but did not utilize the plant-origin ones in the same manner, reflecting their genetic background, which allows them to adapt to dairy ecological niches. These prebiotics had little influence on the expression pattern of cell surface-associated proteins in the strain; however, an ATP-binding cassette transporter substrate-binding protein and a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were suggested to be upregulated in response to carbon starvation stress. PMID:26858929

  20. Expression of surface hydrophobic proteins by Candida albicans in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Glee, P M; Sundstrom, P; Hazen, K C

    1995-01-01

    Candida albicans modulates cell surface hydrophobicity during growth and morphogenesis in vitro. To determine if surface hydrophobicity is expressed during pathogenesis, we generated a polyclonal antiserum against yeast hydrophobic proteins. The antiserum was then used for indirect immunofluorescence analysis of tissues from mice colonized and chronically infected with C. albicans. Results demonstrated that yeast hydrophobic proteins are exposed on fungal cells present in host tissues. The po...

  1. The Cell Surface Estrogen Receptor, G Protein- Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30, is Markedly Down Regulated During Breast Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Poola

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: GPR30 is a cell surface estrogen receptor that has been shown to mediate a number of non-genomic rapid effects of estrogen and appear to balance the signaling of estrogen and growth factors. In addition, progestins appear to use GPR30 for their actions. Therefore, GPR30 could play a critical role in hormonal regulation of breast epithelial cell integrity. Deregulation of the events mediated by GPR30 could contribute to tumorigenesis.Methods: To understand the role of GPR30 in the deregulation of estrogen signaling processes during breast carcinogenesis, we have undertaken this study to investigate its expression at mRNA levels in tumor tissues and their matched normal tissues. We compared its expression at mRNA levels by RT quantitative real-time PCR relative to GAPDH in ERα”—positive (n = 54 and ERα”—negative (n = 45 breast cancer tissues to their matched normal tissues.Results: We report here, for the first time, that GPR30 mRNA levels were significantly down-regulated in cancer tissues in comparison with their matched normal tissues (p 0.0001 by two sided paired t-test. The GPR30 expression levels were significantly lower in tumor tissues from patients (n = 29 who had lymph node metastasis in comparison with tumors from patients (n = 53 who were negative for lymph node metastasis (two sample t-test, p 0.02, but no association was found with ERα, PR and other tumor characteristics.Conclusions: Down-regulation of GPR30 could contribute to breast tumorigenesis and lymph node metastasis.

  2. Cell-surface expression of a mutated Epstein–Barr virus glycoprotein B allows fusion independent of other viral proteins

    OpenAIRE

    McShane, Marisa P.; Longnecker, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infects human B lymphocytes and epithelial cells. We have compared the requirements for EBV glycoprotein-induced cell fusion between Chinese hamster ovary effecter cells and human B lymphoblasts or epithelial cells by using a virus-free cell fusion assay. EBV-encoded gB, gH, gL, and gp42 glycoproteins were required for efficient B cell fusion, whereas EBV gB, gH, and gL glycoproteins were required for Chinese hamster ovary effecter cell fusion with epithelial cell lin...

  3. Competitive Protein Adsorption - Multilayer Adsorption and Surface Induced Protein Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    high concentration with investigation of single protein adsorption and interdependent adsorption between two specific proteins enables us to map protein adsorption sequences during competitive protein adsorption. Our study shows that proteins can adsorb in a multilayer fashion onto the polymer surfaces......In this study, competitive adsorption of albumin and IgG (immunoglobulin G) from human serum solutions and protein mixtures onto polymer surfaces is studied by means of radioactive labeling. By using two different radiolabels (125I and 131I), albumin and IgG adsorption to polymer surfaces is...... and that the outcome of IgG adsorption is much more sensitive to surface characteristics than the outcome of albumin adsorption. Using high concentrations of protein solution and hydrophobic polymer surfaces during adsorption can induce IgG aggregation, which is observed as extremely high Ig...

  4. A PDZ-Like Motif in the Biliary Transporter ABCB4 Interacts with the Scaffold Protein EBP50 and Regulates ABCB4 Cell Surface Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quitterie Venot

    Full Text Available ABCB4/MDR3, a member of the ABC superfamily, is an ATP-dependent phosphatidylcholine translocator expressed at the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Defects in the ABCB4 gene are associated with rare biliary diseases. It is essential to understand the mechanisms of its canalicular membrane expression in particular for the development of new therapies. The stability of several ABC transporters is regulated through their binding to PDZ (PSD95/DglA/ZO-1 domain-containing proteins. ABCB4 protein ends by the sequence glutamine-asparagine-leucine (QNL, which shows some similarity to PDZ-binding motifs. The aim of our study was to assess the potential role of the QNL motif on the surface expression of ABCB4 and to determine if PDZ domain-containing proteins are involved. We found that truncation of the QNL motif decreased the stability of ABCB4 in HepG2-transfected cells. The deleted mutant ABCB4-ΔQNL also displayed accelerated endocytosis. EBP50, a PDZ protein highly expressed in the liver, strongly colocalized and coimmunoprecipitated with ABCB4, and this interaction required the QNL motif. Down-regulation of EBP50 by siRNA or by expression of an EBP50 dominant-negative mutant caused a significant decrease in the level of ABCB4 protein expression, and in the amount of ABCB4 localized at the canalicular membrane. Interaction of ABCB4 with EBP50 through its PDZ-like motif plays a critical role in the regulation of ABCB4 expression and stability at the canalicular plasma membrane.

  5. Effects of NKG2D haplotypes on the cell-surface expression of NKG2D protein on natural killer and CD8 T cells of peripheral blood among atomic-bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kazue; Hayashi, Tomonori; Yamaoka, Mika; Kajimura, Junko; Yoshida, Kengo; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Nakachi, Kei

    2012-06-01

    NKG2D is a primary activating receptor that triggers cell-mediated cytotoxicity in NK cells against tumor and virus-infected cells. We previously identified the NKG2D haplotypes in the natural killer gene complex region on chromosome 12p. Two major haplotype alleles, LNK1 and HNK1, were closely related to low and high natural cytotoxic activity phenotypes, respectively. Furthermore, the haplotype of HNK1/HNK1 has revealed a decreased risk of cancer compared with LNK1/LNK1. In the present study, using flow cytometry, we evaluated the functional effects of NKG2D haplotypes and five htSNPs in terms of the cell-surface expression of NKG2D protein on NK and CD8 T cells of peripheral blood among 732 atomic-bomb survivors. NKG2D expression on NK cells showed significant increases, in the order of LNK1/LNK1, LNK1/HNK1 and HNK1/HNK1 haplotypes (p for trend=0.003), or with major homozygous, heterozygous, and minor homozygous genotypes for individual htSNPs (p for trend=0.02-0.003). The same trend was observed for NKG2D expression on CD8 T cells. Our findings indicate that the NKG2D haplotypes are associated with the expression levels of NKG2D protein on NK and CD8 T cells, resulting in inter-individual variations in human cytotoxic response. PMID:22507622

  6. Cell wall proteins: a new insight through proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2006-01-01

    Cell wall proteins are essential constituents of plant cell walls; they are involved in modifications of cell wall components, wall structure, signaling and interactions with plasma membrane proteins at the cell surface. The application of proteomic approaches to the cell wall compartment raises important questions: are there technical problems specific to cell wall proteomics? What kinds of proteins can be found in Arabidopsis walls? Are some of them unexpected? What sort of post-translation...

  7. The structure and function of the urokinase receptor, a membrane protein governing plasminogen activation on the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Danø, K

    1995-01-01

    explain additional observations for which the mechanisms involved have not yet been clarified experimentally. uPAR is a highly glycosylated, 3-domain protein, anchored in the plasma membrane by a glycolipid moiety. The domain organization is important for efficient ligand-binding, and the NH2-terminal...... interaction between uPAR and uPA. The growing knowledge on the structure and function of uPAR which is a result of protein chemical analyses, functional studies and analyses of other, interacting components, should help to obtain a better understanding of the regulation of extracellular proteolysis. In...

  8. In silico Identification and Validation of a Linear and Naturally Immunogenic B-Cell Epitope of the Plasmodium vivax Malaria Vaccine Candidate Merozoite Surface Protein-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-da-Silva, Rodrigo Nunes; Martins da Silva, João Hermínio; Singh, Balwan; Jiang, Jianlin; Meyer, Esmeralda V S; Santos, Fátima; Banic, Dalma Maria; Moreno, Alberto; Galinski, Mary R; Oliveira-Ferreira, Joseli; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic peptide vaccines provide the advantages of safety, stability and low cost. The success of this approach is highly dependent on efficient epitope identification and synthetic strategies for efficacious delivery. In malaria, the Merozoite Surface Protein-9 of Plasmodium vivax (PvMSP9) has been considered a vaccine candidate based on the evidence that specific antibodies were able to inhibit merozoite invasion and recombinant proteins were highly immunogenic in mice and humans. However the identities of linear B-cell epitopes within PvMSP9 as targets of functional antibodies remain undefined. We used several publicly-available algorithms for in silico analyses and prediction of relevant B cell epitopes within PMSP9. We show that the tandem repeat sequence EAAPENAEPVHENA (PvMSP9E795-A808) present at the C-terminal region is a promising target for antibodies, given its high combined score to be a linear epitope and located in a putative intrinsically unstructured region of the native protein. To confirm the predictive value of the computational approach, plasma samples from 545 naturally exposed individuals were screened for IgG reactivity against the recombinant PvMSP9-RIRII729-972 and a synthetic peptide representing the predicted B cell epitope PvMSP9E795-A808. 316 individuals (58%) were responders to the full repetitive region PvMSP9-RIRII, of which 177 (56%) also presented total IgG reactivity against the synthetic peptide, confirming it validity as a B cell epitope. The reactivity indexes of anti-PvMSP9-RIRII and anti-PvMSP9E795-A808 antibodies were correlated. Interestingly, a potential role in the acquisition of protective immunity was associated with the linear epitope, since the IgG1 subclass against PvMSP9E795-A808 was the prevalent subclass and this directly correlated with time elapsed since the last malaria episode; however this was not observed in the antibody responses against the full PvMSP9-RIRII. In conclusion, our findings identified and

  9. Surface (S)-layer proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans and their utility as vehicles for surface localization of functional proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Basu, Bhakti; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The radiation resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans contains two major surface (S)-layer proteins, Hpi and SlpA. The Hpi protein was shown to (a) undergo specific in vivo cleavage, and (b) closely associate with the SlpA protein. Using a non-specific acid phosphatase from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, PhoN as a reporter, the Surface Layer Homology (SLH) domain of SlpA was shown to bind deinococcal peptidoglycan-containing cell wall sacculi. The association of SlpA with Hpi on one side and peptidoglycan on the other, localizes this protein in the 'interstitial' layer of the deinoccocal cell wall. Gene chimeras of hpi-phoN and slh-phoN were constructed to test efficacy of S-layer proteins, as vehicles for cell surface localization in D. radiodurans. The Hpi-PhoN protein localized exclusively in the membrane fraction, and displayed cell-based phosphatase activity in vivo. The SLH-PhoN, which localized to both cytosolic and membrane fractions, displayed in vitro activity but no cell-based in vivo activity. Hpi, therefore, emerged as an efficient surface localizing protein and can be exploited for suitable applications of this superbug. PMID:26450150

  10. Cell adhesion and growth enabled by biomimetic oligopeptide modification of a polydopamine-poly(ethylene oxide) protein repulsive surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotelnikov, Ilya; Musílková, Jana; Novotná, Katarína; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Rypáček, František; Bačáková, Lucie; Proks, Vladimír

    Prague : Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry AS CR, 2015. s. 79. ISBN 978-80-85009-82-8. [Functional Polymers at Bio-Material Interfaces - 79th Prague Meeting on Macromolecules. 28.06.2015-02.07.2015, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : polymer * surface characterization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  11. Conformational variation of surface class II MHC proteins during myeloid dendritic cell differentiation accompanies structural changes in lysosomal MIIC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Potolicchio, I.; Chitta, S.; Xu, X.; Fonseca, D.; Crisi, G.; Hořejší, Václav; Strominger, J. L.; Stern, L. J.; Raposo, G.; Santambrogio, L.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 175, č. 8 (2005), s. 4935-4947. ISSN 0022-1767 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : MHC II * HLA-DR * dendritic cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 6.387, year: 2005

  12. Improved adhesion and differentiation of endothelial cells on surface-attached fibrin structures containing extracellular matrix proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filová, Elena; Brynda, Eduard; Riedel, Tomáš; Chlupáč, Jaroslav; Vandrovcová, Marta; Švindrych, Zdeněk; Lisá, Věra; Houska, Milan; Pirk, J.; Bačáková, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 3 (2014), s. 698-712. ISSN 1549-3296 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11270 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : two-dimensional assembly * fibrin * endothelial cells Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 3.369, year: 2014

  13. Hybrid gold nanocube@silica@graphene-quantum-dot superstructures: synthesis and specific cell surface protein imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liu; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Chengzhou; Li, Dan; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-03-28

    Hybrid AuNCs@SiO2@GQDs nanocomposites were synthesized via a multistep procedure; GQDs located near AuNCs showed enhanced fluorescent intensities and improved photostabilities. AuNCs@SiO2@GQDs nanocomposites allowed specific visualization of EGFR on cancer cells. PMID:23423349

  14. Function and Redundancy of the Chaplin Cell Surface Proteins in Aerial Hypha Formation, Rodlet Assembly, and Viability in Streptomyces coelicolor▿

    OpenAIRE

    Di Berardo, Christina; Capstick, David S.; Bibb, Maureen J.; Findlay, Kim C.; Buttner, Mark J.; Elliot, Marie A.

    2008-01-01

    The chaplins are a family of eight secreted proteins that are critical for raising aerial hyphae in Streptomyces coelicolor. These eight chaplins can be separated into two main groups: the long chaplins (ChpA to -C) and the short chaplins (ChpD to -H). The short chaplins can be further subdivided on the basis of their abilities to form intramolecular disulfide bonds: ChpD, -F, -G, and -H contain two Cys residues, while ChpE has none. A “minimal chaplin strain” containing only chpC, chpE, and ...

  15. VASCo: computation and visualization of annotated protein surface contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thallinger Gerhard G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural data from crystallographic analyses contain a vast amount of information on protein-protein contacts. Knowledge on protein-protein interactions is essential for understanding many processes in living cells. The methods to investigate these interactions range from genetics to biophysics, crystallography, bioinformatics and computer modeling. Also crystal contact information can be useful to understand biologically relevant protein oligomerisation as they rely in principle on the same physico-chemical interaction forces. Visualization of crystal and biological contact data including different surface properties can help to analyse protein-protein interactions. Results VASCo is a program package for the calculation of protein surface properties and the visualization of annotated surfaces. Special emphasis is laid on protein-protein interactions, which are calculated based on surface point distances. The same approach is used to compare surfaces of two aligned molecules. Molecular properties such as electrostatic potential or hydrophobicity are mapped onto these surface points. Molecular surfaces and the corresponding properties are calculated using well established programs integrated into the package, as well as using custom developed programs. The modular package can easily be extended to include new properties for annotation. The output of the program is most conveniently displayed in PyMOL using a custom-made plug-in. Conclusion VASCo supplements other available protein contact visualisation tools and provides additional information on biological interactions as well as on crystal contacts. The tool provides a unique feature to compare surfaces of two aligned molecules based on point distances and thereby facilitates the visualization and analysis of surface differences.

  16. Identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum surface proteins by radioiodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksen, A; Bakken, V

    1994-09-01

    Surface exposed proteins of Renibacterium salmoninarum were identified by radiolabelling whole bacterial cells with 125I, followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. The most prominent bands had molecular masses of approximately 57 kDa and 22 kDa; in addition, some less intensively labelled bands were detected. Polyclonal sera raised against the 22 kDa protein did not react with the 57 kDa protein. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of the purified 22 kDa protein showed no similarity with the sequence of the 57 kDa protein. PMID:7926685

  17. Pneumococal Surface Protein A (PspA Regulates Programmed Death Ligand 1 Expression on Dendritic Cells in a Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Calcium Dependent Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Vashishta

    Full Text Available Pneumonia leads to high mortality in children under the age of five years worldwide, resulting in close to 20 percent of all deaths in this age group. Therefore, investigations into host-pathogen interactions during Streptococcus pneumoniae infection are key in devising strategies towards the development of better vaccines and drugs. To that end, in this study we investigated the role of S. pneumoniae and its surface antigen Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA in modulating the expression of co-stimulatory molecule Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1 expression on dendritic cells (DCs and the subsequent effects of increased PD-L1 on key defence responses. Our data indicate that stimulation of DCs with PspA increases the surface expression of PD-L1 in a time and dose dependent manner. Characterization of mechanisms involved in PspA induced expression of PD-L1 indicate the involvement of Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2 and calcium homeostasis. While calcium release from intracellular stores positively regulated PD-L1 expression, calcium influx from external milieu negatively regulated PD-L1 expression. Increase in PD-L1 expression, when costimulated with PspA and through TLR2 was higher than when stimulated with PspA or through TLR2. Further, knockdown of TLR2 and the intermediates in the TLR signaling machinery pointed towards the involvement of a MyD88 dependent pathway in PspA induced PD-L1 expression. Incubation of DCs with S. pneumoniae resulted in the up-regulation of PD-L1 expression, while infection with a strain lacking surface PspA failed to do so. Our data also suggests the role of PspA in ROS generation. These results suggest a novel and specific role for PspA in modulating immune responses against S. pneumoniae by regulating PD-L1 expression.

  18. Interactions between whey proteins and kaolinite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of the interactions between whey proteins and kaolinite surfaces was investigated by adsorption-desorption experiments at room temperature, performed at the isoelectric point (IEP) of the proteins and at pH 7. It was found that kaolinite is a strong adsorbent for proteins, reaching the maximum adsorption capacity at the IEP of each protein. At pH 7.0, the retention capacity decreased considerably. The adsorption isotherms showed typical Langmuir characteristics. X-ray diffraction data for the protein-kaolinite complexes showed that protein molecules were not intercalated in the mineral structure, but immobilized at the external surfaces and the edges of the kaolinite. Fourier transform IR results indicate the absence of hydrogen bonding between kaolinite surfaces and the polypeptide chain. The adsorption patterns appear to be related to electrostatic interactions, although steric effects should be also considered

  19. A transferrin-like GPI-linked iron-binding protein in detergent-insoluble noncaveolar microdomains at the apical surface of fetal intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; van Deurs, B

    1995-01-01

    ultracryosections of mucosal tissue, the protein was localized to the apical surface of the enterocytes, whereas it was absent from the basolateral plasma membrane. Interestingly, it was mainly found in patches of flat or invaginated apical membrane domains rather than at the surface of microvilli. Caveolae were...

  20. Antibody sensed protein surface conformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R. Schricker

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An antibody-modified atomic force microscope (AFM tip was used to detect conformational changes of fibronectin deposited on a poly(methyl methacrylate/poly(acrylic acid block copolymer compared to PMMA and a random poly(methyl methacrylate/poly(acrylic acid copolymer with an identical chemical composition. Based on the antibody-protein adhesive force maps and phase imaging, it was found that the nanomorphology of the triblock copolymer induces the desired conformation of fibronectin. This finding demonstrates that block copolymer nanomorphology can be used to regulate protein conformation and potentially cellular response.

  1. Adhesion and growth of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells on artificial vascular prostheses and protein-coated surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlupáč, Jaroslav; Filová, Elena; Brynda, Eduard; Remy-Zolghadri, M.; Bačáková, Lucie

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. S1 (2005), S8-S9. ISSN 1214-021X. [Cells /6./ - Biological days /18./. 24.10.2005-26.10.2005, České Budějovice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011301; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4050202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : tissue engineering * bioartificial vessel * dynamic culture system * hemodynamic bench * fibronectin * collagen * endothelialization * sex -related differences Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  2. Interaction of Protein and Cell with Different Chitosan Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between proteins, cells and biomaterial surfaces is commonly observed and often used to measure biocompatibility of biomaterials.In this investigation, three kinds of biomaterials derived from chitosan were prepared.The surface wettability of these polymers, interaction of protein with material surface, and their effects on cell adhesion and growth were studied.The results show that the surface contact angle and surface charge of biomaterials have a close bearing on protein adsorption as well as cell adhesion and growth, indicating that through different chemical modifications, chitosan can be made into different kinds of biomedical materials to satisfy various needs.

  3. Effect of Biofilm Growth on Expression of Surface Proteins of Actinomyces naeslundii Genospecies 2

    OpenAIRE

    Paddick, James S.; Brailsford, Susan R; Rao, Susmitha; Soares, Renata F.; Kidd, Edwina A. M.; Beighton, David; Homer, Karen A.

    2006-01-01

    The predominant surface proteins of biofilm and planktonic Actinomyces naeslundii, a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, were examined. Seventy-nine proteins (the products of 52 genes) were identified in biofilm cells, and 30 of these, including adhesins, chaperones, and stress-response proteins, were significantly up-regulated relative to planktonic cells.

  4. AFCo1, a meningococcal B-derived cochleate adjuvant, strongly enhances antibody and T-cell immunity against Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 4 and 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst a large number of malaria antigens are being tested as candidate malaria vaccines, a major barrier to the development of an effective vaccine is the lack of a suitable human adjuvant capable of inducing a strong and long lasting immune response. In this study, the ability of AFCo1, a potent T and B cell adjuvant based on cochleate structures derived from meningococcal B outer membrane proteoliposomes (MBOMP, to boost the immune response against two Plasmodium falciparum antigens, merozoite surface protein 4 (MSP4 and 5 (MSP5, was evaluated. Methods Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, which is able to confer protection against malaria in animal MSP4/5 vaccine challenge models, was used as positive control adjuvant. MSP4 and 5-specific IgG, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH, T-cell proliferation, and cytokine production were evaluated in parallel in mice immunized three times intramuscularly with MSP4 or MSP5 incorporated into AFCo1, synthetic cochleate structures, CFA or phosphate buffered saline. Results AFCo1 significantly enhanced the IgG and T-cell response against MSP4 and MSP5, with a potency equivalent to CFA, with the response being characterized by both IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, increased interferon gamma production and a strong DTH response, consistent with the ability of AFCo1 to induce Th1-like immune responses. Conclusion Given the proven safety of MBOMP, which is already in use in a licensed human vaccine, AFCo1 could assist the development of human malaria vaccines that require a potent and safe adjuvant.

  5. Proteins in solution: Fractal surfaces in solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tscheliessnig

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the surface of a protein in solution, as well of the interface between protein and 'bulk solution', is introduced. The experimental technique of small angle X-ray and neutron scattering is introduced and described briefly. Molecular dynamics simulation, as an appropriate computational tool for studying the hydration shell of proteins, is also discussed. The concept of protein surfaces with fractal dimensions is elaborated. We finish by exposing an experimental (using small angle X-ray scattering and a computer simulation case study, which are meant as demonstrations of the possibilities we have at hand for investigating the delicate interfaces that connect (and divide protein molecules and the neighboring electrolyte solution.

  6. Two Domains of Vimentin Are Expressed on the Surface of Lymph Node, Bone and Brain Metastatic Prostate Cancer Lines along with the Putative Stem Cell Marker Proteins CD44 and CD133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vimentin was originally identified as an intermediate filament protein present only as an intracellular component in many cell types. However, this protein has now been detected on the surface of a number of different cancer cell types in a punctate distribution pattern. Increased vimentin expression has been indicated as an important step in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) required for the metastasis of prostate cancer. Here, using two vimentin-specific monoclonal antibodies (SC5 and V9 directed against the coil one rod domain and the C-terminus of the vimentin protein, respectively), we examined whether either of these domains would be displayed on the surface of three commonly studied prostate cancer cell lines isolated from different sites of metastases. Confocal analysis of LNCaP, PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines (derived from lymph node, bone or brain prostate metastases, respectively) demonstrated that both domains of vimentin are present on the surface of these metastatic cancer cell types. In addition, flow cytometric analysis revealed that vimentin expression was readily detected along with CD44 expression but only a small subpopulation of prostate cancer cells expressed vimentin and the putative stem cell marker CD133 along with CD44. Finally, Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) nanoparticles that target vimentin could bind and internalize into tested prostate cancer cell lines. These results demonstrate that at least two domains of vimentin are present on the surface of metastatic prostate cancer cells and suggest that vimentin could provide a useful target for nanoparticle- or antibody- cancer therapeutic agents directed against highly invasive cancer and/or stem cells

  7. Simple high-cell density fed-batch technique for high-level recombinant protein production with Pichia pastoris: Application to intracellular production of Hepatitis B surface antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Anton

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B is a serious global public health concern. Though a safe and efficacious recombinant vaccine is available, its use in several resource-poor countries is limited by cost. We have investigated the production of Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg using the yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 by inserting the HBsAg gene into the alcohol oxidase 1 locus. Results Large-scale production was optimized by developing a simple fed-batch process leading to enhanced product titers. Cells were first grown rapidly to high-cell density in a batch process using a simple defined medium with low salt and high glycerol concentrations. Induction of recombinant product synthesis was carried out using rather drastic conditions, namely through the addition of methanol to a final concentration of 6 g L-1. This methanol concentration was kept constant for the remainder of the cultivation through continuous methanol feeding based on the on-line signal of a flame ionization detector employed as methanol analyzer in the off-gas stream. Using this robust feeding protocol, maximum concentrations of ~7 grams HBsAg per liter culture broth were obtained. The amount of soluble HBsAg, competent for assembly into characteristic virus-like particles (VLPs, an attribute critical to its immunogenicity and efficacy as a hepatitis B vaccine, reached 2.3 grams per liter of culture broth. Conclusion In comparison to the highest yields reported so far, our simple cultivation process resulted in an ~7 fold enhancement in total HBsAg production with more than 30% of soluble protein competent for assembly into VLPs. This work opens up the possibility of significantly reducing the cost of vaccine production with implications for expanding hepatitis B vaccination in resource-poor countries.

  8. Tumor cells engineered to codisplay on their surface 4-1BBL and LIGHT costimulatory proteins as a novel vaccine approach for cancer immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Rajesh Kumar; Yolcu, Esma S.; Elpek, Kutlu G.; Shirwan, Haval

    2010-01-01

    Primary tumor cells genetically modified to express on their surface a collection of immunological ligands may have utility as therapeutic autologous cancer vaccines. However, genetic modification of primary tumor cells is not only cost, labor, and time intensive, but also has safety repercussions. As an alternative, we developed the ProtEx™ technology that involves generation of immunological ligands with core streptavidin (SA) and their display on biotinylated cells in a rapid and efficient...

  9. The Plant Cell Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne-Mie C.Emons; Kurt V.Fagerstedt

    2010-01-01

    @@ Multicellular organization and tissue construction has evolved along essentially different lines in plants and animals. Since plants do not run away, but are anchored in the soil, their tissues are more or less firm and stiff. This strength stems from the cell walls, which encase the fragile cytoplasm, and protect it.

  10. Cell Adhesion on Surface-Functionalized Magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Victoria; Schilling, Achim; Mainka, Astrid; Hennig, Diana; Gerum, Richard; Kelch, Marie-Luise; Keim, Simon; Fabry, Ben; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2016-05-18

    The biocompatibility of commercially pure magnesium-based (cp Mg) biodegradable implants is compromised of strong hydrogen evolution and surface alkalization due to high initial corrosion rates of cp Mg in the physiological environment. To mitigate this problem, the addition of corrosion-retarding alloying elements or coating of implant surfaces has been suggested. In the following work, we explored the effect of organic coatings on long-term cell growth. cp Mg was coated with aminopropyltriehtoxysilane + vitamin C (AV), carbonyldiimidazole (CDI), or stearic acid (SA). All three coatings have been previously suggested to reduce initial corrosion and to enhance protein adsorption and hence cell adhesion on magnesium surfaces. Endothelial cells (DH1+/+) and osteosarcoma cells (MG63) were cultured on coated samples for up to 20 days. To quantify Mg corrosion, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was measured after 1, 3, and 5 days of cell culture. We also investigated the speed of initial cell spreading after seeding using fluorescently labeled fibroblasts (NIH/3T3). Hydrogen evolution after contact with cell culture medium was markedly decreased on AV- and SA-coated Mg compared to uncoated Mg. These coatings also showed improved cell adhesion and spreading after 24 h of culture comparable to tissue-treated plastic surfaces. On AV-coated cp Mg, a confluent layer of endothelial cells formed after 5 days and remained intact for up to 20 days. Together, these data demonstrate that surface coating with AV is a viable strategy for improving long-term biocompatibility of cp Mg-based implants. EIS measurements confirmed that the presence of a confluent cell layer increased the corrosion resistance. PMID:27089250

  11. cDNA cloning of a mouse mammary epithelial cell surface protein reveals the existence of epidermal growth factor-like domains linked to factor VIII-like sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2.1-kilobase cDNA coding for a surface protein of mammary epithelial cells has been isolated from a mouse mammary gland λgt11 cDNA library. Sequence analysis of this cDNA reveals an open reading frame of 1,389 base pairs that defines a protein with a molecular mass of 51.5 dKa. Structural analysis of the predicted sequence identifies two putative functional domains of the protein: (i) an N-terminal cysteine-rich region that is similar to epidermal growth factor-like domains of Drosophila Notch-1 protein and (ii) a large segment of the sequence that exhibited 54.5% identify with C-terminal domains of human coagulation factors VIII and V. These similarities in structure are used to predict the possible functions of the protein and its means of interaction with the cell surface. mRNA expression was detectable in mammary tissue from nonpregnant animals but was maximal in the lactating gland. In cultured cells, mRNA levels also correlated with the degree of cellular differentiation

  12. The cell-surface interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J S; Czekanska, E M; Richards, R G

    2012-01-01

    The realm of surface-dependent cell and tissue responses is the foundation of orthopaedic-device-related research. However, to design materials that elicit specific responses from tissues is a complex proposition mainly because the vast majority of the biological principles controlling the interaction of cells with implants remain largely ambiguous. Nevertheless, many surface properties, such as chemistry and topography, can be manipulated in an effort to selectively control the cell-material interaction. On the basis of this information there has been much research in this area, including studies focusing on the structure and composition of the implant interface, optimization of biological and chemical coatings and elucidation of the mechanisms involved in the subsequent cell-material interactions. Although a wealth of information has emerged, it also advocates the complexity and dynamism of the cell-material interaction. Therefore, this chapter aims to provide the reader with an introduction to the basic concepts of the cell-material interaction and to provide an insight into the factors involved in determining the cell and tissue response to specific surface features, with specific emphasis on surface microtopography. PMID:21984613

  13. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  14. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte; Corbeil, Denis; Hoflack, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  15. Nanofabrication of Nonfouling Surfaces for Micropatterning of Cell and Microtissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Otsuka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface engineering techniques for cellular micropatterning are emerging as important tools to clarify the effects of the microenvironment on cellular behavior, as cells usually integrate and respond the microscale environment, such as chemical and mechanical properties of the surrounding fluid and extracellular matrix, soluble protein factors, small signal molecules, and contacts with neighboring cells. Furthermore, recent progress in cellular micropatterning has contributed to the development of cell-based biosensors for the functional characterization and detection of drugs, pathogens, toxicants, and odorants. In this regards, the ability to control shape and spreading of attached cells and cell-cell contacts through the form and dimension of the cell-adhesive patches with high precision is important. Commitment of stem cells to different specific lineages depends strongly on cell shape, implying that controlled microenvironments through engineered surfaces may not only be a valuable approach towards fundamental cell-biological studies, but also of great importance for the design of cell culture substrates for tissue engineering. To develop this kind of cellular microarray composed of a cell-resistant surface and cell attachment region, micropatterning a protein-repellent surface is important because cellular adhesion and proliferation are regulated by protein adsorption. The focus of this review is on the surface engineering aspects of biologically motivated micropatterning of two-dimensional surfaces with the aim to provide an introductory overview described in the literature. In particular, the importance of non-fouling surface chemistries is discussed.

  16. A functional glycoprotein competitive recognition and signal amplification strategy for carbohydrate-protein interaction profiling and cell surface carbohydrate expression evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangzhong; Chen, Zhuhai; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong

    2013-07-01

    A simple and sensitive carbohydrate biosensor has been suggested as a potential tool for accurate analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression as well as carbohydrate-based therapeutics for a variety of diseases and infections. In this work, a sensitive biosensor for carbohydrate-lectin profiling and in situ cell surface carbohydrate expression was designed by taking advantage of a functional glycoprotein of glucose oxidase acting as both a multivalent recognition unit and a signal amplification probe. Combining the gold nanoparticle catalyzed luminol electrogenerated chemiluminescence and nanocarrier for active biomolecules, the number of cell surface carbohydrate groups could be conveniently read out. The apparent dissociation constant between GOx@Au probes and Con A was detected to be 1.64 nM and was approximately 5 orders of magnitude smaller than that of mannose and Con A, which would arise from the multivalent effect between the probe and Con A. Both glycoproteins and gold nanoparticles contribute to the high affinity between carbohydrates and lectin. The as-proposed biosensor exhibits excellent analytical performance towards the cytosensing of K562 cells with a detection limit of 18 cells, and the mannose moieties on a single K562 cell were determined to be 1.8 × 1010. The biosensor can also act as a useful tool for antibacterial drug screening and mechanism investigation. This strategy integrates the excellent biocompatibility and multivalent recognition of glycoproteins as well as the significant enzymatic catalysis and gold nanoparticle signal amplification, and avoids the cell pretreatment and labelling process. This would contribute to the glycomic analysis and the understanding of complex native glycan-related biological processes.A simple and sensitive carbohydrate biosensor has been suggested as a potential tool for accurate analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression as well as carbohydrate-based therapeutics for a variety of diseases and

  17. Tau protein function in living cells

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Tau protein from mammalian brain promotes microtubule polymerization in vitro and is induced during nerve cell differentiation. However, the effects of tau or any other microtubule-associated protein on tubulin assembly within cells are presently unknown. We have tested tau protein activity in vivo by microinjection into a cell type that has no endogenous tau protein. Immunofluorescence shows that tau protein microinjected into fibroblast cells associates specifically with microtubules. The i...

  18. Protein-mediated surface structuring in biomembranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggio B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipids and proteins of biomembranes exhibit highly dissimilar conformations, geometrical shapes, amphipathicity, and thermodynamic properties which constrain their two-dimensional molecular packing, electrostatics, and interaction preferences. This causes inevitable development of large local tensions that frequently relax into phase or compositional immiscibility along lateral and transverse planes of the membrane. On the other hand, these effects constitute the very codes that mediate molecular and structural changes determining and controlling the possibilities for enzymatic activity, apposition and recombination in biomembranes. The presence of proteins constitutes a major perturbing factor for the membrane sculpturing both in terms of its surface topography and dynamics. We will focus on some results from our group within this context and summarize some recent evidence for the active involvement of extrinsic (myelin basic protein, integral (Folch-Lees proteolipid protein and amphitropic (c-Fos and c-Jun proteins, as well as a membrane-active amphitropic phosphohydrolytic enzyme (neutral sphingomyelinase, in the process of lateral segregation and dynamics of phase domains, sculpturing of the surface topography, and the bi-directional modulation of the membrane biochemical reactivity.

  19. Denaturation of proteins near polar surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzyk, Anna; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-12-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations for proteins placed near a model mica surface indicate existence of two types of evolution. One type leads to the surface-induced unfolding and the other just to a deformation. The two behaviors are characterized by distinct properties of the radius of gyration and of a novel distortion parameter that distinguishes between elongated, globular, and planar shapes. They also differ in the nature of their single site diffusion and two-site distance fluctuations. The four proteins chosen for the studies, the tryptophan cage, protein G, hydrophobin and lyzozyme, are small to allow for a fair determination of the forces generated by the surface as the effects of finite cutoffs in the Coulombic interactions are thus minimized. When the net charge on the surface is set to zero artificially, infliction of deformation is seen to persists but no unfolding takes place. Unfolding may also be prevented by a cluster of disulfide bonds, as we observe in simulations of hydrophobin.

  20. Reprogramming cells with synthetic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Malik, Vikas; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of one cell type into another cell type by forcibly expressing specific cocktails of transcription factors (TFs) has demonstrated that cell fates are not fixed and that cellular differentiation can be a two-way street with many intersections. These experiments also illustrated the sweeping potential of TFs to "read" genetically hardwired regulatory information even in cells where they are not normally expressed and to access and open up tightly packed chromatin to execute gene expression programs. Cellular reprogramming enables the modeling of diseases in a dish, to test the efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patient-derived cells and ultimately, could enable cell-based therapies to cure degenerative diseases. Yet, producing terminally differentiated cells that fully resemble their in vivocounterparts in sufficient quantities is still an unmet clinical need. While efforts are being made to reprogram cells nongenetically by using drug-like molecules, defined TF cocktails still dominate reprogramming protocols. Therefore, the optimization of TFs by protein engineering has emerged as a strategy to enhance reprogramming to produce functional, stable and safe cells for regenerative biomedicine. Engineering approaches focused on Oct4, MyoD, Sox17, Nanog and Mef2c and range from chimeric TFs with added transactivation domains, designer transcription activator-like effectors to activate endogenous TFs to reprogramming TFs with rationally engineered DNA recognition principles. Possibly, applying the complete toolkit of protein design to cellular reprogramming can help to remove the hurdles that, thus far, impeded the clinical use of cells derived from reprogramming technologies. PMID:25652623

  1. Reprogramming cells with synthetic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Conversion of one cell type into another cell type by forcibly expressing specific cocktails of transcription factors (TFs has demonstrated that cell fates are not fixed and that cellular differentiation can be a two-way street with many intersections. These experiments also illustrated the sweeping potential of TFs to "read" genetically hardwired regulatory information even in cells where they are not normally expressed and to access and open up tightly packed chromatin to execute gene expression programs. Cellular reprogramming enables the modeling of diseases in a dish, to test the efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patient-derived cells and ultimately, could enable cell-based therapies to cure degenerative diseases. Yet, producing terminally differentiated cells that fully resemble their in vivocounterparts in sufficient quantities is still an unmet clinical need. While efforts are being made to reprogram cells nongenetically by using drug-like molecules, defined TF cocktails still dominate reprogramming protocols. Therefore, the optimization of TFs by protein engineering has emerged as a strategy to enhance reprogramming to produce functional, stable and safe cells for regenerative biomedicine. Engineering approaches focused on Oct4, MyoD, Sox17, Nanog and Mef2c and range from chimeric TFs with added transactivation domains, designer transcription activator-like effectors to activate endogenous TFs to reprogramming TFs with rationally engineered DNA recognition principles. Possibly, applying the complete toolkit of protein design to cellular reprogramming can help to remove the hurdles that, thus far, impeded the clinical use of cells derived from reprogramming technologies.

  2. Combination of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA with whole cell pertussis vaccine increases protection against pneumococcal challenge in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leonor S Oliveira

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory acute infections around the world. In Latin America, approximately 20,000 children under 5 years of age die of pneumococcal diseases annually. Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA is among the best-characterized pneumococcal antigens that confer protection in animal models of pneumococcal infections and, as such, is a good alternative for the currently available conjugated vaccines. Efficient immune responses directed to PspA in animal models have already been described. Nevertheless, few low cost adjuvants for a subunit pneumococcal vaccine have been proposed to date. Here, we have tested the adjuvant properties of the whole cell Bordetella pertussis vaccine (wP that is currently part of the DTP (diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine administrated to children in several countries, as an adjuvant to PspA. Nasal immunization of BALB/c mice with a combination of PspA5 and wP or wP(low--a new generation vaccine that contains low levels of B. pertussis LPS--conferred protection against a respiratory lethal challenge with S. pneumoniae. Both PspA5-wP and PspA5-wP(low vaccines induced high levels of systemic and mucosal antibodies against PspA5, with similar profile, indicating no essential requirement for B. pertussis LPS in the adjuvant properties of wP. Accordingly, nasal immunization of C3H/HeJ mice with PspA5-wP conferred protection against the pneumococcal challenge, thus ruling out a role for TLR4 responses in the adjuvant activity and the protection mechanisms triggered by the vaccines. The high levels of anti-PspA5 antibodies correlated with increased cross-reactivity against PspAs from different clades and also reflected in cross-protection. In addition, passive immunization experiments indicated that antibodies played an important role in protection in this model. Finally, subcutaneous immunization with a combination of PspA5 with DTP(low protected mice against challenge with two

  3. The cell-surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnenberg, Albert D; Meyer, E Michael; Rubin, J Peter; Donnenberg, Vera S

    2015-07-01

    In this technical note we describe a method to evaluate the cell surface proteome of human primary cell cultures and cell lines. The method utilizes the BD Biosciences lyoplate, a system covering 242 surface proteins, glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids plus relevant isotype controls, automated plate-based flow cytometry, conventional file-level analysis and unsupervised K-means clustering of markers on the basis of percent of positive events and mean fluorescence intensity of positive and total clean events. As an example, we determined the cell surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells (ASC) derived from 5 independent clinical isolates. Between-sample agreement of very strongly expressed (n = 32) and strongly expressed (n =16) markers was excellent, constituting a reliable profile for ASC identification and determination of functional properties. Known mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105) were among the identified strongly expressed determinants. Among other strongly expressed markers are several that are potentially immunomodulatory including three proteins that protect from complement mediated effects (CD46, CD55, and CD59), two that regulate apoptosis (CD77 and CD95) and several with ectoenzymatic (CD10, CD26, CD13, CD73, and CD143) or receptor tyrosine kinase (CD140b (PDGFR), CD340 (Her-2), EGFR) activity, suggesting mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory and tissue remodeling properties of ASC. Because variables are standardized for K-means clustering, results generated using this methodology should be comparable between instrumentation platforms. It is widely generalizable to human primary explant cultures and cells lines and will prove useful to determine how cell passage, culture interventions, and gene expression and silencing affect the cell-surface proteome. PMID:25929697

  4. Cyclic AMP-Rap1A signaling mediates cell surface translocation of microvascular smooth muscle α2C-adrenoceptors through the actin-binding protein filamin-2

    OpenAIRE

    Motawea, Hanaa K. B.; Selvi C. Jeyaraj; Eid, Ali H; Mitra, Srabani; Unger, Nicholas T.; Ahmed, Amany A. E.; Flavahan, Nicholas A.; Chotani, Maqsood A.

    2013-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) plays a vital role in vascular physiology, including vasodilation of large blood vessels. We recently demonstrated cAMP activation of Epac-Rap1A and RhoA-Rho-associated kinase (ROCK)-F-actin signaling in arteriolar-derived smooth muscle cells increases expression and cell surface translocation of functional α2C-adrenoceptors (α2C-ARs) that mediate vasoconstriction in small blood vessels (arterioles). The Ras-related small GTPAse Rap1A increased expressio...

  5. Silica surface characterization as a function of formation and surface treatment using traditional methods and proteins as surface probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korwin-Edson, Michelle Lynn

    Previous works have shown that cells proliferate differently depending on the chemistry of the glass on which they are growing. Since proteins form the bonds between cells and glass, the hypothesis of this study is that proteins can distinguish between surface chemical variations of glass. This theory was examined through the use of various silica forms, a few select proteins, four surface treatment procedures, and a variety of characterization techniques. The silica forms include amorphous slides, cane, fiber, microspheres, fumed silica and quartz crystal terminals. The proteins selected were human serum albumin, mouse Immunoglobulin G, streptavidin, antimouse IgG, and biotin. The surface treatments utilized to bring about chemical variation on the silica surface were HF acid etching, ethanol cleaning, water plasma treatments, and 1000°C heat treatments. The characterization techniques encompassed both traditional material techniques and biological methods. The techniques studied were atomic force microscopy (AFM), chemical force microscopy (CFM), glancing incidence X-ray analysis (GIXA), fluorescence spectrometry, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay. It was the main goal of this project to determine the feasibility of these techniques in utilizing proteins as glass surface probes. Proteins were adsorbed to all of the various forms and the binding ability was studied by either stripping off the protein and quantifying them, or by deductive reasoning through the use of "depleted" protein solutions. Fluorimetry and BCA assay both utilized the depleted solutions, but the high error associated with this protocol was prohibitive. SDS-PAGE with streptavidin was very difficult due to staining problems, however the IgG proteins were able to be quantified with some success. GIXA showed that the protein layer thickness is monolayer in nature, which agrees well with the AFM fluid tapping data on protein height, but in addition

  6. A Synthetic Virus-Like Particle Streptococcal Vaccine Candidate Using B-Cell Epitopes from the Proline-Rich Region of Pneumococcal Surface Protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tamborrini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alternatives to the well-established capsular polysaccharide-based vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae that circumvent limitations arising from limited serotype coverage and the emergence of resistance due to capsule switching (serotype replacement are being widely pursued. Much attention is now focused on the development of recombinant subunit vaccines based on highly conserved pneumococcal surface proteins and virulence factors. A further step might involve focusing the host humoral immune response onto protective protein epitopes using as immunogens structurally optimized epitope mimetics. One approach to deliver such epitope mimetics to the immune system is through the use of synthetic virus-like particles (SVLPs. SVLPs are made from synthetic coiled-coil lipopeptides that are designed to spontaneously self-assemble into 20–30 nm diameter nanoparticles in aqueous buffer. Multivalent display of epitope mimetics on the surface of SVLPs generates highly immunogenic nanoparticles that elicit strong epitope-specific humoral immune responses without the need for external adjuvants. Here, we set out to demonstrate that this approach can yield vaccine candidates able to elicit a protective immune response, using epitopes derived from the proline-rich region of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA. These streptococcal SVLP-based vaccine candidates are shown to elicit strong humoral immune responses in mice. Following active immunization and challenge with lethal doses of streptococcus, SVLP-based immunogens are able to elicit significant protection in mice. Furthermore, a mimetic-specific monoclonal antibody is shown to mediate partial protection upon passive immunization. The results show that SVLPs combined with synthetic epitope mimetics may have potential for the development of an effective vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  7. Identification of a Surface Protein from Lactobacillus reuteri JCM1081 That Adheres to Porcine Gastric Mucin and Human Enterocyte-Like HT-29 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bin; Wei, Hong; Yuan, Jing; Li, Qiurong; Li, Yousheng; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion of lactobacilli to the host gastrointestinal (GI) tract is considered an important factor in health-promoting effects. However, studies addressing the molecular mechanisms of the adhesion of lactobacilli to the host GI tract have not yet been performed. The aim of this work was to identify Lactobacillus reuteri surface molecules mediating adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and mucins. Nine strains of lactobacilli were tested for their ability to adhere to human enterocyte-like H...

  8. Haloarchaeal myovirus φCh1 harbours a phase variation system for the production of protein variants with distinct cell surface adhesion specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, R; Rössler, N; Iro, M; Scholz, H; Witte, A

    2012-01-01

    The φCh1 myovirus, which infects the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natrialba magadii, contains an invertible region that comprises the convergent open reading frames (ORFs) 34 and 36, which code for the putative tail fibre proteins gp34 and gp36 respectively. The inversion leads to an exchange of the C-termini of these proteins, thereby creating different types of tail fibres. Gene expression experiments revealed that only ORF34 is transcribed, indicating that φCh1 produces tail fibre proteins exclusively from this particular ORF. Only one of the two types of tail fibres encoded by ORF34 is able to bind to Nab. magadii in vitro. This is reflected by the observation that during the early phases of the infection cycle, the lysogenic strain L11 carries its invertible region exclusively in the orientation that produces that specific type of tail fibre. Obviously, Nab. magadii can only be infected by viruses carrying this particular type of tail fibre. By mutational analysis, the binding domain of gp34 was localized to the C-terminal part of the protein, particularly to a galactose-binding domain. The involvement of galactose residues in cell adhesion was supported by the observation that the addition of α-D-galactose to purified gp34 or whole virions prevented their attachment to Nab. magadii. PMID:22111759

  9. Switchable surface coatings for control over protein adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Martin A.; Jasieniak, Marek; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Thissen, Helmut; Horn, Roger; Griesser, Hans J.

    2007-12-01

    Control over biomolecule interactions at interfaces is becoming an increasingly important goal for a range of scientific fields and is being intensively studied in areas of biotechnological, biomedical and materials science. Improvement in the control over materials and biomolecules is particularly important to applications such as arrays, biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery and 'lab on a chip' devices. Further development of these devices is expected to be achieved with thin coatings of stimuli responsive materials that can have their chemical properties 'switched' or tuned to stimulate a certain biological response such as adsorption/desorption of proteins. Switchable coatings show great potential for the realisation of spatial and temporal immobilisation of cells and biomolecules such as DNA and proteins. This study focuses on protein adsorption onto coatings of the thermosensitive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) which can exhibit low and high protein adsorption properties based on its temperature dependent conformation. At temperatures above its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) pNIPAM polymer chains are collapsed and protein adsorbing whilst below the LCST they are hydrated and protein repellent. Coatings of pNIPAM on silicon wafers were prepared by free radical polymerisation in the presence of surface bound polymerisable groups. Surface analysis and protein adsorption was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and contact angle measurements. This study is expected to aid the development of stimuli-responsive coatings for biochips and biodevices.

  10. Development of a strategy for the identification of surface proteins in the pathogenic microsporidian Nosema bombycis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weixi; Hao, Youjin; Wang, Linglin; Zhou, Zeyang; Li, Zhi

    2015-06-01

    Parasite-host interactions mediated by cell surface proteins have been implicated as a critical step in infections caused by the microsporidian Nosema bombycis. Such cell surface proteins are considered as promising diagnostic markers and targets for drug development. However, little research has specifically addressed surface proteome identification in microsporidia due to technical barriers. Here, a combined strategy was developed to separate and identify the surface proteins of N. bombycis. Briefly, following (1) biotinylation of the spore surface, (2) extraction of total proteins with an optimized method and (3) streptavidin affinity purification of biotinylated proteins, 22 proteins were identified based on LC-MS/MS analysis. Among them, 5 proteins were confirmed to be localized on the surface of N. bombycis. A total of 8 proteins were identified as hypothetical extracellular proteins, whereas 7 other hypothetical proteins had no available function annotation. Furthermore, a protein with a molecular weight of 18·5 kDa was localized on the spore surface by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis, even though it was predicted to be a nuclear protein by bioinformatics. Collectively, our work provides an effective strategy for isolating microsporidian surface protein components for both drug target identification and further diagnostic research on microsporidian disease control. PMID:25811320

  11. Computational Protein Design with Explicit Consideration of Surface Hydrophobic Patches

    OpenAIRE

    Jacak, Ron; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Kuhlman, Brian

    2011-01-01

    De novo protein design requires the identification of amino-acid sequences that favor the target folded conformation and are soluble in water. One strategy for promoting solubility is to disallow hydrophobic residues on the protein surface during design. However, naturally occurring proteins often have hydrophobic amino acids on their surface that contribute to protein stability via the partial burial of hydrophobic surface area or play a key role in the formation of protein-protein interacti...

  12. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, C.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  13. Surface peptide mapping of protein I and protein III of four strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, R.C.

    1982-08-01

    Whole cells and isolated outer membranes (OMs) of four strains of gonococci were surface radioiodinated with either lactoperoxidase or Iodogen (Pierce Chemical Co., Rockford, Ill.). These preparations were solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Surface-radioiodinated protein I (PI) and PIII bands were excised from the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels and digested with alpha-chymotrypsin, and the resultant /sup 125/I-peptide fragments were resolved by high-voltage electrophoresis and thin-layer chromatography (i.e., surface peptide mapping). Radioemitting peptidic fragments were visualized by autoradiography. Results demonstrated that the PI molecule of each gonococcal strain studied had unique iodinatable peptides exposed on the surface of whole cells and OMs, whereas PIIIs appeared to have the same portion of the molecule exposed on the surface of bacteria or OMs, regardless of the gonococcal strain from which they were isolated. Many more radiolabeled peptides were seen in surface peptide maps of PIs from radiolabeled OMs than in those from radioiodinated whole cells, whereas different peptidic fragments were seen in the surface peptide maps of PIIIs from radiolabeled OMs than were seen in those from radiolabeled whole cells. These data suggest that PI may contribute strain-specific antigenic determinants and PIII may contribute cross-reactive determinants and that the surface exposure of PI and PIII is different in isolated OMs than in the OM of intact gonococci.

  14. Mapping the energy and diffusion landscapes of membrane proteins at the cell surface using high-density single-molecule imaging and Bayesian inference: application to the multi-scale dynamics of glycine receptors in the neuronal membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Salvatico, Charlotte; Renner, Marianne; Specht, Christian G; Triller, Antoine; Dahan, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Protein mobility is conventionally analyzed in terms of an effective diffusion. Yet, this description often fails to properly distinguish and evaluate the physical parameters (such as the membrane friction) and the biochemical interactions governing the motion. Here, we present a method combining high-density single-molecule imaging and statistical inference to separately map the diffusion and energy landscapes of membrane proteins across the cell surface at ~100 nm resolution (with acquisition of a few minutes). When applying these analytical tools to glycine neurotransmitter receptors (GlyRs) at inhibitory synapses, we find that gephyrin scaffolds act as shallow energy traps (~3 kBT) for GlyRs, with a depth modulated by the biochemical properties of the receptor-gephyrin interaction loop. In turn, the inferred maps can be used to simulate the dynamics of proteins in the membrane, from the level of individual receptors to that of the population, and thereby, to model the stochastic fluctuations of physiologi...

  15. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27408707

  16. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27408707

  17. Protein adsorption on materials surfaces with nano-topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Protein adsorption behavior on the surfaces of biomedical materials is highly related to the biocompatibility of the materials. In the past, numerous research reports were mainly focused on the effect of chemical components of a material's surface on protein adsorption. The effect of surface topography on protein adsorption, the topic of this review, has recently receuvedkeen interest. The influence of surface nano-topographic factors, including roughness, curvature and geometry, on protein adsorption as well as the protein adsorption behavior, such as the amount of protein adsorbed, the activity and morphology of adsorbed protein, is introduced.

  18. A comparison between protein profiles of B cell subpopulations and mantle cell lymphoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehtiö Janne

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background B-cell lymphomas are thought to reflect different stages of B-cell maturation. Based on cytogenetics and molecular markers, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL is presumed to derive predominantly from naïve, pre-germinal centre (pre-GC B lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to investigate the similarity between MCL cells and different B-cell compartments on a protein expression level. Methods Subpopulations of B cells representing the germinal centre (GC, the pre-GC mantle zone and the post-GC marginal zone were isolated from tonsils using automated magnetic cell sorting (AutoMACS of cells based on their expression of CD27 and IgD. Protein profiling of the B cell subsets, of cell lines representing different lymphomas and of primary MCL samples was performed using top-down proteomics profiling by surface-enhanced laser detection/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS. Results Quantitative MS data of significant protein peaks (p-value Conclusion AutoMACS sorting generates sufficient purity to enable a comparison between protein profiles of B cell subpopulations and malignant B lymphocytes applying SELDI-TOF-MS. Further validation with an increased number of patient samples and identification of differentially expressed proteins would enable a search for possible treatment targets that are expressed during the early development of MCL.

  19. Role of sperm surface proteins in reproduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonáková, Věra; Postlerová, Pavla; Davidová, Nina; Tichá, M.; Pěknicová, Jana

    Barcelona : The American Society, 2009. s. 1-155 ISSN 0196-3635. [9th International Congress of Andrology. 07.03.2009-10.03.2009, Barcelona] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06011; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/06/0895; GA ČR(CZ) GD523/08/H064 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : sperm surface protein * spermadhesin * reproduction Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality

  20. Hydrophobic surface protein masking by the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Hazen, K C; Hazen, B W

    1992-01-01

    Ultrastructural and biochemical analyses of hydrophobic and hydrophilic yeast cell surface proteins of Candida albicans were performed. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic yeast cells were obtained by growth at 23 and 37 degrees C, respectively. In addition, hydrophilic yeast cells were converted to surface hydrophobicity by treatment with tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. When freeze-etched cells were examined, the temperature-induced hydrophilic cells had long (0.198 micron), compact, evenly distribu...

  1. The 37/67kDa laminin receptor (LR) inhibitor, NSC47924, affects 37/67kDa LR cell surface localization and interaction with the cellular prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnataro, Daniela; Pepe, Anna; Altamura, Gennaro; De Simone, Imma; Pesapane, Ada; Nitsch, Lucio; Montuori, Nunzia; Lavecchia, Antonio; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The 37/67 kDa laminin receptor (LR) is a non-integrin protein, which binds both laminin-1 of the extracellular matrix and prion proteins, that hold a central role in prion diseases. The 37/67 kDa LR has been identified as interactor for the prion protein (PrPC) and to be required for pathological PrP (PrPSc) propagation in scrapie-infected neuronal cells, leading to the possibility that 37/67 kDa LR-PrPC interaction is related to the pathogenesis of prion diseases. A relationship between 37/67 kDa LR and PrPC in the presence of specific LR inhibitor compounds has not been investigated yet. We have characterized the trafficking of 37/67 kDa LR in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells, finding the receptor on the cell surface and nuclei, and identified the 67 kDa LR as the almost exclusive isoform interacting with PrPC. Here, we show that the treatment with the 37/67 kDa LR inhibitor, NSC47924, affects both the direct 37/67 kDa LR-PrPC interaction in vitro and the formation of the immunocomplex in live cells, inducing a progressive internalization of 37/67 kDa LR and stabilization of PrPC on the cell surface. These data reveal NSC47924 as a useful tool to regulate PrPC and 37/67 kDa LR trafficking and degradation, representing a novel small molecule to be tested against prion diseases. PMID:27071549

  2. Nanogel-based pneumococcal surface protein A nasal vaccine induces microRNA-associated Th17 cell responses with neutralizing antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Y; Yuki, Y; Katakai, Y; Harada, N; Takahashi, H; Takeda, S; Mejima, M; Joo, S; Kurokawa, S; Sawada, S; Shibata, H; Park, E J; Fujihashi, K; Briles, D E; Yasutomi, Y; Tsukada, H; Akiyoshi, K; Kiyono, H

    2015-09-01

    We previously established a nanosized nasal vaccine delivery system by using a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan nanogel (cCHP nanogel), which is a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free nasal vaccination. In the present study, we examined the central nervous system safety and efficacy of nasal vaccination with our developed cCHP nanogel containing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA-nanogel) against pneumococcal infection in nonhuman primates. When [(18)F]-labeled PspA-nanogel was nasally administered to a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), longer-term retention of PspA was noted in the nasal cavity when compared with administration of PspA alone. Of importance, no deposition of [(18)F]-PspA was seen in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination effectively induced PspA-specific serum IgG with protective activity and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) Ab responses in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nasal PspA-nanogel-induced immune responses were mediated through T-helper (Th) 2 and Th17 cytokine responses concomitantly with marked increases in the levels of miR-181a and miR-326 in the serum and respiratory tract tissues, respectively, of the macaques. These results demonstrate that nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination is a safe and effective strategy for the development of a nasal vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia in humans. PMID:25669148

  3. Antigenic characterization of dimorphic surface protein in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuba, Takashi; Siddiqi, Umme Ruman; Hattori, Toshio; Nakajima, Chie; Fujii, Jun; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv0679c protein is a surface protein that contributes to host cell invasion. We previously showed that a single nucleotide transition of the Rv0679c gene leads to a single amino acid substitution from asparagine to lysine at codon 142 in the Beijing genotype family. In this study, we examined the immunological effect of this substitution. Several recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis and characterized with antisera and two monoclonal antibodies named 5D4-C2 and 8G10-H2. A significant reduction of antibody binding was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot analysis in the Lys142-type protein. This reduction of 8G10-H2 binding was more significant, with the disappearance of a signal in the proteins expressed by recombinant mycobacteria in western blot analysis. In addition, epitope mapping analysis of the recombinant proteins showed a linear epitope by 5D4-C2 and a discontinuous epitope by 8G10-H2. The antibody recognizing the conformational epitope detected only mycobacterial Asn142-type recombinant protein. Our results suggest that a single amino acid substitution of Rv0679c has potency for antigenic change in Beijing genotype strains. PMID:27190237

  4. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Stem Cells and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer R. Lynch; Jenny Yingzi Wang

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of cell-surface signaling proteins that bind extracellular ligands and transduce signals into cells via heterotrimeric G proteins. GPCRs are highly tractable drug targets. Aberrant expression of GPCRs and G proteins has been observed in various cancers and their importance in cancer stem cells has begun to be appreciated. We have recently reported essential roles for G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) and G protein subunit Gαq in ...

  5. Screening protein refolding using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel B; Hutchinson, Matthew H; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2004-04-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements were used to screen refolding conditions to identify a physicochemical environment which gives an acceptable refolding yield for samples of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) denatured in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride and 32 mM dithiothreitol. The SPR measurements were performed on carboxymethylcellulose coated chips that could accommodate two separate flow paths. One side of the chip was derivatized with immobilized glutathione and the other with goat anti-GST antibody. This created a dual-derivatized chip capable of showing both the presence of GST and providing a measure of enzyme activity. The dual-derivatized chip could be regenerated using a two-step washing procedure and reused to analyze multiple samples from a screening study of protein refolding conditions. SPR measurements have been shown to be suitable for screening protein refolding conditions due to the high sensitivity, ease of chip regeneration and the ability to incorporate a control in the experimental design. The combination of such advantages with the high-throughput automated SPR systems currently available may be a valuable approach to determine conditions suitable for protein refolding following insoluble expression in a bacterial host. PMID:15048982

  6. Surface-tethered polymers to influence protein adsorption and microbial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norde, Willem

    2007-01-01

    In various applications it is desired that biological cells or protein molecules are immobilized at surfaces. Examples are enzymes or cells in bioreactors and biosensors, immuno-proteins in solid-state diagnostics and proteinaceous farmacons in drug delivery systems. In order to retain biological ac

  7. Surface Display of Domain Ⅲ of Japanese Encephalitis Virus E Protein on Salmonella Typhimurium by Using an Ice Nucleation Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-lin Dou; Tao Jing; Jing-jing Fan; Zhi-ming Yuan

    2011-01-01

    A bacterial cell surface display technique based on an ice nucleation protein has been employed for the development of live vaccine against viral infection.Due to its ubiquitous ability to invade host cells,Salmonella typhimurium might be a good candidate for displaying viral antigens.We demonstrated the surface display of domain III of Japanese encephalitis virus E protein and the enhanced green fluorescent protein on S.typhimurium BRD509 using the ice nucleation protein.The effects of the motif in the ice nucleation protein on the effective display of integral protein were also investigated.The results showed that display motifs in the protein can target integral foreign protein on the surface of S.typhimurium BRD509.Moreover,recombinant strains with surface displayed viral proteins retained their invasiveness,suggesting that the recombinant S.typhimurium can be used as live vaccine vector for eliciting complete immunogenicity.The data may yield better understanding of the mechanism by which ice nucleation protein displays foreign proteins in the Salmonella strain.

  8. Cell surface recycling in yeast: mechanisms and machineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Chris; Piper, Robert C

    2016-04-15

    Sorting internalized proteins and lipids back to the cell surface controls the supply of molecules throughout the cell and regulates integral membrane protein activity at the surface. One central process in mammalian cells is the transit of cargo from endosomes back to the plasma membrane (PM) directly, along a route that bypasses retrograde movement to the Golgi. Despite recognition of this pathway for decades we are only beginning to understand the machinery controlling this overall process. The budding yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae, a stalwart genetic system, has been routinely used to identify fundamental proteins and their modes of action in conserved trafficking pathways. However, the study of cell surface recycling from endosomes in yeast is hampered by difficulties that obscure visualization of the pathway. Here we briefly discuss how recycling is likely a more prevalent process in yeast than is widely appreciated and how tools might be built to better study the pathway. PMID:27068957

  9. Detecting protein-protein interactions in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Marie; Bach, Anders; Hansen, Jakob Lerche;

    2009-01-01

    to the endogenous C-terminal peptide of the NMDA receptor, as evaluated by a cell-free protein-protein interaction assay. However, it is important to address both membrane permeability and effect in living cells. Therefore a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay was established, where the C...

  10. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. den Blaauwen; J.M. Andreu; O. Monasterio

    2014-01-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of protein

  11. Adsorption of a model protein, the GroEL chaperonin, on surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Carl; Palmer, Richard E [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: carl.leung@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-09-03

    Understanding and controlling protein adsorption on surfaces is fundamental to many biological processes ranging from cell adhesion to the fabrication of protein biochips. In general, proteins need to retain their 3D conformation to perform their intended functions. However, when they are presented with a solid surface, complex interactions ranging from weak non-covalent binding to strong covalent bonding may occur, which can potentially induce conformational changes within the adsorbed protein. To investigate the surface adsorption process and its effects on a model protein, the chaperonin GroEL, we have applied contact mode atomic force microscopy, in buffer solution to probe the interactions between single proteins and surfaces in real space. We will discuss the adsorption of GroEL molecules on planar surfaces (mica, graphite and gold) and specifically tailored nanostructured surfaces, which present structural features on the size scale of individual biological molecules. (topical review)

  12. Adsorption of a model protein, the GroEL chaperonin, on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding and controlling protein adsorption on surfaces is fundamental to many biological processes ranging from cell adhesion to the fabrication of protein biochips. In general, proteins need to retain their 3D conformation to perform their intended functions. However, when they are presented with a solid surface, complex interactions ranging from weak non-covalent binding to strong covalent bonding may occur, which can potentially induce conformational changes within the adsorbed protein. To investigate the surface adsorption process and its effects on a model protein, the chaperonin GroEL, we have applied contact mode atomic force microscopy, in buffer solution to probe the interactions between single proteins and surfaces in real space. We will discuss the adsorption of GroEL molecules on planar surfaces (mica, graphite and gold) and specifically tailored nanostructured surfaces, which present structural features on the size scale of individual biological molecules. (topical review)

  13. Investigation of the Cell Surface Proteome of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jimin; Menicanin, Danijela; Zilm, Peter S; Marino, Victor; Bartold, P Mark; Gronthos, Stan

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the cell surface proteome of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC) compared to human fibroblasts. Cell surface proteins were prelabelled with CyDye before processing to extract the membrane lysates, which were separated using 2D electrophoresis. Selected differentially expressed protein "spots" were identified using Mass spectrometry. Four proteins were selected for validation: CD73, CD90, Annexin A2, and sphingosine kinase 1 previously associated with mesenchymal stem cells. Flow cytometric analysis found that CD73 and CD90 were highly expressed by human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts but not by keratinocytes, indicating that these antigens could be used as potential markers for distinguishing between mesenchymal cells and epithelial cell populations. Annexin A2 was also found to be expressed at low copy number on the cell surface of human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts, while human keratinocytes lacked any cell surface expression of Annexin A2. In contrast, sphingosine kinase 1 expression was detected in all the cell types examined using immunocytochemical analysis. These proteomic studies form the foundation to further define the cell surface protein expression profile of PDLSC in order to better characterise this cell population and help develop novel strategies for the purification of this stem cell population. PMID:27579043

  14. Surface proteins of bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Dylus

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Beneficial effects due to the presence of probiotic bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium in the human intestinal tract are still an interesting object of study. So far activities have been confirmed of bifidobacteria in stimulation of the host immune system, stimulation of tumor cell apoptosis, improvement of bowel motility, alleviation of symptoms of lactose intolerance, cholesterol lowering capacity, prevention and treatment of diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome, alleviation of allergy or atopic dermatitis, maintenance of homeostasis of the intestine, and stimulation of the development of normal intestinal microflora in infants. A multitude of therapeutic properties encourages researchers to investigate the possibility of using the potential of Bifidobacterium in the prevention and treatment of other conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and depression. Although it is known that the beneficial effects are due to intestinal mucosal colonization by these bacteria, the cell components responsible for the colonization are still not determined. In addition to the beneficial effects of probiotic administration, there were also negative effects including sepsis. Therefore research has been directed to identify specific components of Bifidobacterium responsible for probiotic effects. Currently researchers are focused on identifying, isolating and evaluating the properties of surface proteins that are probably involved in the adhesion of bacterial cells to the intestinal epithelium, improving colonization. This paper is an overview of current knowledge on Bifidobacterium surface proteins. The ways of transport and anchoring proteins in Gram-positive bacterial cells, the assembly of cell wall, and a description of the genus Bifidobacterium are presented.

  15. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: Regulatory roles of cell surface glycans

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-1 is known to be one of the extracellular matrix proteins. To elucidate the biological roles of galectin-1 in cell adhesion and invasion of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we performed cell adhesion and invasion assays using the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line H-ALCL, which was previously established in our laboratory. From the cell surface lectin array, treatment with neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens which cleaves all linkage types of cell surface sialic ac...

  16. Systematic studies of protein immobilization by surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jing

    2005-01-01

    The research interest of this study is to investigate surface immobilization strategies for proteins and other biomolecules by the surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) technique. The recrystallization features of the S-layer proteins and the possibility of combining the S-layer lattice arrays with other functional molecules make this protein a prime candidate for supramolecular architectures. The recrystallization behavior on gold or on the secondary cell wall po...

  17. Cloning and surface expression in Escherichia coli of a structural gene encoding a surface protein of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    OpenAIRE

    Holmans, P L; Loftus, T A; Hansen, E J

    1985-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technology was used to clone a gene coding for a surface protein of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) into Escherichia coli. Chromosomal DNA from a clinical isolate of Hib was cleaved with EcoRI and ligated into plasmid vectors containing three different translational reading frames. E. coli carrying recombinant plasmids were screened in a colony blot-radioimmunoassay system by using murine monoclonal antibodies (mabs) directed against cell surface-exposed proteins of Hib. m...

  18. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein

    OpenAIRE

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Jonathan S Weissman; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respec...

  19. Establishment of cell surface engineering and its development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Cell surface display of proteins/peptides has been established based on mechanisms of localizing proteins to the cell surface. In contrast to conventional intracellular and extracellular (secretion) expression systems, this method, generally called an arming technology, is particularly effective when using yeasts as a host, because the control of protein folding that is often required for the preparation of proteins can be natural. This technology can be employed for basic and applied research purposes. In this review, I describe various strategies for the construction of engineered yeasts and provide an outline of the diverse applications of this technology to industrial processes such as the production of biofuels and chemicals, as well as bioremediation and health-related processes. Furthermore, this technology is suitable for novel protein engineering and directed evolution through high-throughput screening, because proteins/peptides displayed on the cell surface can be directly analyzed using intact cells without concentration and purification. Functional proteins/peptides with improved or novel functions can be created using this beneficial, powerful, and promising technique. PMID:27305282

  20. Pre-absorbed immunoproteomics: a novel method for the detection of Streptococcus suis surface proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2 is a zoonotic pathogen that can cause infections in pigs and humans. Bacterial surface proteins are often investigated as potential vaccine candidates and biomarkers of virulence. In this study, a novel method for identifying bacterial surface proteins is presented, which combines immunoproteomic and immunoserologic techniques. Critical to the success of this new method is an improved procedure for generating two-dimensional electrophoresis gel profiles of S. suis proteins. The S. suis surface proteins identified in this study include muramidase-released protein precursor (MRP and an ABC transporter protein, while MRP is thought to be one of the main virulence factors in SS2 located on the bacterial surface. Herein, we demonstrate that the ABC transporter protein can bind to HEp-2 cells, which strongly suggests that this protein is located on the bacterial cell surface and may be involved in pathogenesis. An immunofluorescence assay confirmed that the ABC transporter is localized to the bacterial outer surface. This new method may prove to be a useful tool for identifying surface proteins, and aid in the development of new vaccine subunits and disease diagnostics.

  1. Fate of the surface protein gp70 during entry of retrovirus into mouse fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of the viral surface protein gp70 and the viral core proteins p30 and p15C were followed during retrovirus entry into mouse fibroblasts. All three proteins were internalized, but whereas essentially all the gp70 was degraded, approximately one-third of the core proteins remained stable in the cells. These diverging routes of the different proteins are in agreement with the proposed route, that retrovirus enters the cells by endocytosis followed by a membrane fusion between the virus membrane and the vesicle membrane

  2. POLY(N-VINYLPYRROLIDONE)-MODIFIED SURFACES REPEL PLASMA PROTEIN ADSORPTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-li Liu; Zhao-qiang Wu; Dan Li; Hong Chen

    2012-01-01

    The present work aimed to study the interaction between plasma proteins and PVP-modified surfaces under more complex protein conditions.In the competitive adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg) and human serum albumin (HSA),the modified surfaces showed preferential adsorption of HSA.In 100% plasma,the amount of Fg adsorbed onto PVP-modified surfaces was as low as 10 ng/cm2,suggesting the excellent protein resistance properties of the modified surfaces.In addition,immunoblots of proteins eluted from the modified surfaces after plasma contact confirmed that PVP-modified surfaces can repel most plasma proteins,especially proteins that play important roles in the process of blood coagulation.

  3. 14-3-3 proteins in guard cell signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie eCotelle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Guard cells are specialized cells located at the leaf surface delimiting pores which control gas exchanges between the plant and the atmosphere. To optimize the CO2 uptake necessary for photosynthesis while minimizing water loss, guard cells integrate environmental signals to adjust stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is regulated by movements of the guard cells driven by variations in their volume and turgor. As guard cells perceive and transduce a wide array of environmental cues, they provide an ideal system to elucidate early events of plant signaling. Reversible protein phosphorylation events are known to play a crucial role in the regulation of stomatal movements. However, in some cases, phosphorylation alone is not sufficient to achieve complete protein regulation, but is necessary to mediate the binding of interactors that modulate protein function. Among the phosphopeptide-binding proteins, the 14-3-3 proteins are the best characterized in plants. The 14-3-3s are found as multiple isoforms in eukaryotes and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stomatal movements. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about 14-3-3 roles in the regulation of their binding partners in guard cells: receptors, ion pumps, channels, protein kinases and some of their substrates. Regulation of these targets by 14-3-3 proteins is discussed and related to their function in guard cells during stomatal movements in response to abiotic or biotic stresses.

  4. 14-3-3 Proteins in Guard Cell Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotelle, Valérie; Leonhardt, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells are specialized cells located at the leaf surface delimiting pores which control gas exchanges between the plant and the atmosphere. To optimize the CO2 uptake necessary for photosynthesis while minimizing water loss, guard cells integrate environmental signals to adjust stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is regulated by movements of the guard cells driven by variations in their volume and turgor. As guard cells perceive and transduce a wide array of environmental cues, they provide an ideal system to elucidate early events of plant signaling. Reversible protein phosphorylation events are known to play a crucial role in the regulation of stomatal movements. However, in some cases, phosphorylation alone is not sufficient to achieve complete protein regulation, but is necessary to mediate the binding of interactors that modulate protein function. Among the phosphopeptide-binding proteins, the 14-3-3 proteins are the best characterized in plants. The 14-3-3s are found as multiple isoforms in eukaryotes and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stomatal movements. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about 14-3-3 roles in the regulation of their binding partners in guard cells: receptors, ion pumps, channels, protein kinases, and some of their substrates. Regulation of these targets by 14-3-3 proteins is discussed and related to their function in guard cells during stomatal movements in response to abiotic or biotic stresses. PMID:26858725

  5. A novel dual promoter DNA vaccine induces CD8+ response against Toxoplasma gondii sporozoite specific surface protein “SporoSAG” through non-apoptotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Gülçe İz

    2014-01-01

    The results of this study reveal the ability of SporoSAG protein to induce CD8+ T lymphocyte response for the first time. Overall, SporoSAG protein can be included to multivalant vaccine formulations in future studies to increase the protection in infections acquired through T. gondii oocysts.

  6. Nanoparticles-cell association predicted by protein corona fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchetti, S.; Digiacomo, L.; Pozzi, D.; Peruzzi, G.; Micarelli, E.; Mahmoudi, M.; Caracciolo, G.

    2016-06-01

    In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface chemistry (unmodified and PEGylated) to investigate the relationships between NP physicochemical properties (nanoparticle size, aggregation state and surface charge), protein corona fingerprints (PCFs), and NP-cell association. We found out that none of the NPs' physicochemical properties alone was exclusively able to account for association with human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). For the entire library of NPs, a total of 436 distinct serum proteins were detected. We developed a predictive-validation modeling that provides a means of assessing the relative significance of the identified corona proteins. Interestingly, a minor fraction of the HC, which consists of only 8 PCFs were identified as main promoters of NP association with HeLa cells. Remarkably, identified PCFs have several receptors with high level of expression on the plasma membrane of HeLa cells.In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface

  7. Nanoparticles-cell association predicted by protein corona fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchetti, S; Digiacomo, L; Pozzi, D; Peruzzi, G; Micarelli, E; Mahmoudi, M; Caracciolo, G

    2016-07-01

    In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a "protein corona" layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø≈ 100-250 nm) and surface chemistry (unmodified and PEGylated) to investigate the relationships between NP physicochemical properties (nanoparticle size, aggregation state and surface charge), protein corona fingerprints (PCFs), and NP-cell association. We found out that none of the NPs' physicochemical properties alone was exclusively able to account for association with human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). For the entire library of NPs, a total of 436 distinct serum proteins were detected. We developed a predictive-validation modeling that provides a means of assessing the relative significance of the identified corona proteins. Interestingly, a minor fraction of the HC, which consists of only 8 PCFs were identified as main promoters of NP association with HeLa cells. Remarkably, identified PCFs have several receptors with high level of expression on the plasma membrane of HeLa cells. PMID:27279572

  8. Probe microscopy: Scanning below the cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ozgur

    2008-08-01

    Conventional atomic force microscopy probes only the surface of specimens. A related technique called scanning near-field ultrasonic holography can now image nanoparticles buried below the surfaces of cells, which could prove useful in nanotoxicology.

  9. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  10. Involvement of cell surface phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoproteins in cell-cell adhesion of chick embryo myoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    During myogenesis myoblasts fuse to form multinucleate cells that express muscle-specific proteins. A specific cell-cell adhesion process precedes lipid bilayer union during myoblast fusion (Knudsen, K. A., and A. F. Horwitz. 1977. Dev. Biol. 58:328-338) and is mediated by cell surface glycoproteins (Knudsen, K. A., 1985. J. Cell Biol. 101:891- 897). In this paper we show that myoblast adhesion and myotube formation are inhibited by treating fusion-competent myoblasts with phosphatidylinosito...

  11. Evolutionary analysis of circumsporozoite surface protein and merozoite surface protein-1 (CSP and MSP-1) sequences of malaria parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Vijay; Gupta, Dwijendra

    2011-01-01

    Malaria, one of the world's most common diseases, is caused by the intracellular protozoan parasite known as Plasmodium. In this study, we have determined the evolutionary relationship of two single-copy proteins, circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1), among Plasmodium species using various bioinformatics tools and softwares. These two proteins are major blood stage antigens of Plasmodium species. This study demonstrates that the circumsporozoite protein of Pl...

  12. A Cell Lysis and Protein Purification - Single Molecule Assay Devices for Evaluation of Genetically Engineered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakyama, Tetsuya; Tabata, Kazuhito; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    We have developed two devices applicable to evaluate genetically engineered proteins in single molecule assay: on-chip cell lysis device, and protein purification - assay device. A motor protein, F1-ATPase expressed in E.coli, was focused in this report as a target protein. Cell lysis was simply performed by applying pulse voltage between Au electrodes patterned by photolithography, and its efficiency was determined by absorptiometry. The subsequent processes, purification and assay of extracted proteins, were demonstrated in order to detect F1-ATPase and to evaluate its activity. The specific bonding between his-tag in F1-ATPase and Ni-NTA coated on a glass surface was utilized for the purification process. After immobilization of F1-ATPase, avidin-coated microspheres and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) solution were infused sequentially to assay the protein. Microsphere rotation was realized by activity of F1-ATPase corresponding to ATP hydrolysis. Results show that the cell lysis device, at the optimum condition, extracts enough amount of protein for single molecule assay. Once cell lysate was injected to the purification - assay device, proteins were diffused in the lateral direction in a Y-shape microchannel. The gradient of protein concentratioin provides an optimal concentration for the assay i.e. the highest density of rotating beads. Density of rotating beads is also affected by the initial concentration of protein injected to the device. The optimum concentration was achieved by our cell lysis device not by the conventional method by ultrasonic wave. Rotation speed was analyzed for several microspheres assayed in the purification - assay device, and the results were compatible to that of conventional assay in which F1-ATPase was purified in bulk scale. In conclusion, we have demonstrated on-chip cell lysis and assay appropriate for the sequential analysis without any pretreatment. On-chip devices replacing conventional bioanalytical methods will be

  13. Surface modification of diamond-like carbon films with protein via polydopamine inspired coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report a facile two-step approach to immobilize proteins onto DLC surfaces. The first step was a simple immersion of DLC in a solution of dopamine. Polydopamine was deposited on DLC as a stable anchor to present protein molecules. Then the protein ad-layer was deposited on it. The chemical components of the modified DLC surfaces were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of it was evaluated in vitro by the tetrazolium salt method. And it was indicated that the BSA modified surface had good haemocompatibility properties, and was cytocompatible to PC-12 cells.

  14. Surface modification of diamond-like carbon films with protein via polydopamine inspired coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Caihong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China); China and Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Yang Shengrong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang Junyan, E-mail: zhangjunyan@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Jinqing [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, we report a facile two-step approach to immobilize proteins onto DLC surfaces. The first step was a simple immersion of DLC in a solution of dopamine. Polydopamine was deposited on DLC as a stable anchor to present protein molecules. Then the protein ad-layer was deposited on it. The chemical components of the modified DLC surfaces were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of it was evaluated in vitro by the tetrazolium salt method. And it was indicated that the BSA modified surface had good haemocompatibility properties, and was cytocompatible to PC-12 cells.

  15. Apoplastic Venom Allergen-like Proteins of Cyst Nematodes Modulate the Activation of Basal Plant Innate Immunity by Cell Surface Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano Torres, J.L.; Wilbers, R.H.P.; Warmerdam, S.; Finkers-Tomczak, A.M.; Diaz Granados Muñoz, A.; Schaik, van C.C.; Helder, J.; Bakker, J.; Goverse, A.; Schots, A.; Smant, G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite causing considerable damage to host tissue during the onset of parasitism, nematodes establish remarkably persistent infections in both animals and plants. It is thought that an elaborate repertoire of effector proteins in nematode secretions suppresses damage-triggered immune responses of t

  16. cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and the dynamics of epithelial cell surface domains : moving membranes to keep in shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojtal, Kacper A.; Hoekstra, Dick; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) are evolutionary conserved molecules with a well-established position in the complex network of signal transduction pathways. cAMP/PKA-mediated signaling pathways are implicated in many biological processes that cooperat

  17. Interaction between Entamoeba histolytica and intestinal epithelial cells involves a CD44 cross-reactive protein expressed on the parasite surface.

    OpenAIRE

    Renesto, P; Sansonetti, P. J.; Guillén, N

    1997-01-01

    This study shows that Entamoeba histolytica binds hyaluronic acid. The binding molecule was identified as an 80-kDa membrane protein and was recognized by anti-CD44 monoclonal antibodies. These data indicate that a CD44 cross-reacting adherence molecule is expressed on E. histolytica.

  18. Protein variants in human cells: enumeration by protein indexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In any attempt to construct a catalog of the proteins of a given species, the genetic heterogeneity of natural plant and animal populations makes it necessary to consider variants of each protein. Thus in compiling a Human Protein Index using high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis as a separating technique, protein variants differing from the wild type by charge or by polypeptide length will be recognized as different and must be accounted for. Results of several recent investigations have argued for average heterozygosities of approximately 1% for human cellular proteins examined by two-dimensional electrophoresis, while the results of classical biochemical genetics lead to higher results. The ability to observe genetic variation in large numbers of proteins can be valuable in several contexts. More than 2000 human genetic diseases have been identified, the vast majority of which have not as yet been associated with a defect in a particular protein. The present study of 63 human fibroblast cell lines was initiated in order to determine the level of genetic variation at many loci and to see whether known genetic diseases were associated with any obvious variant proteins that might be expressed in fibroblasts in culture. The main result is a group of ten new putative variants available in permanent cell lines

  19. Identification of Major Outer Surface Proteins of Streptococcus agalactiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Martin J. G.; Moore, Joanne C.; Lane, Jonathan D.; Wilson, Rebecca; Pribul, Philippa K.; Younes, Zabin N.; Dobson, Richard J; Everest, Paul; Reason, Andrew J.; Redfern, Joanne M.; Greer, Fiona M.; Paxton, Thanai; Panico, Maria; Morris, Howard R; Feldman, Robert G.

    2002-01-01

    To identify the major outer surface proteins of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus), a proteomic analysis was undertaken. An extract of the outer surface proteins was separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The visualized spots were identified through a combination of peptide sequencing and reverse genetic methodologies. Of the 30 major spots identified as S. agalactiae specific, 27 have been identified. Six of these proteins, previously unidentified in S. agalactiae, were ...

  20. Acetylene plasma coated surfaces for covalent immobilization of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified plasma enhanced chemical vapor method was used for acetylene plasma polymerization of biocompatible surfaces on a range of substrates. Smooth polymerized surfaces with excellent mechanical properties were achieved suitable for a wide range of biochemical and biomedical applications. Horseradish peroxidase activity analysis showed that the proteins immobilized on the plasma polymerized surfaces maintained their biological function for a much longer period of time compared to untreated surfaces. The plasma polymerized surfaces and the protein immobilization were also analyzed using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation analysis, spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and tensile strength analysis. The results indicate that the plasma polymerized surfaces provide covalent bonding sites and immobilize a dense monolayer of proteins after incubation in protein containing solution.

  1. Yeast cell surface display for lipase whole cell catalyst and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Rui; Lian, Zhongshuai; Wang, Shihui; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-08-01

    The cell surface display technique allows for the expression of target proteins or peptides on the microbial cell surface by fusing an appropriate protein as an anchoring motif. Yeast display systems, such as Pichia pastoris, Yarowia lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are ideal, alternative and extensive display systems with the advantage of simple genetic manipulation and post-translational modification of expressed heterologous proteins. Engineered yeasts show high performance characteristics and variant utilizations. Herein, we comprehensively summarize the variant factors affecting lipase whole cell catalyst activity and display efficiency, including the structure and size of target proteins, screening anchor proteins, type and chain length of linkers, and the appropriate matching rules among the above-mentioned display units. Furthermore, we also address novel approaches to enhance stability and activity of recombinant lipases, such as VHb gene co-expression, multi-enzyme co-display technique, and the micro-environmental interference and self-assembly techniques. Finally, we represent the variety of applications of whole cell surface displayed lipases on yeast cells in non-aqueous phases, including synthesis of esters, PUFA enrichment, resolution of chiral drugs, organic synthesis and biofuels. We demonstrate that the lipase surface display technique is a powerful tool for functionalizing yeasts to serve as whole cell catalysts, and increasing interest is providing an impetus for broad application of this technique.

  2. Identification of Posttranslational Modification-Dependent Protein Interactions Using Yeast Surface Displayed Human Proteome Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact specifically with posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation is often necessary to understand cellular signaling pathways. Numerous methods for identifying proteins that interact with posttranslational modifications have been utilized, including affinity-based purification and analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and tethered catalysis. Although these techniques have been used successfully, each has limitations. Recently, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries have been utilized to identify protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules, including phosphorylated peptides. When coupled with fluorescently activated cell sorting and high throughput methods for the analysis of selection outputs, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries can rapidly and efficiently identify protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including posttranslational modifications. In this review we compare the use of yeast surface display libraries to other methods for the identification of interactions between proteins and posttranslational modifications and discuss future applications of the technology. PMID:26060076

  3. A cell cycle and nutritional checkpoint controlling bacterial surface adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aretha Fiebig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments, bacteria often adhere to surfaces where they form complex multicellular communities. Surface adherence is determined by the biochemical composition of the cell envelope. We describe a novel regulatory mechanism by which the bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, integrates cell cycle and nutritional signals to control development of an adhesive envelope structure known as the holdfast. Specifically, we have discovered a 68-residue protein inhibitor of holdfast development (HfiA that directly targets a conserved glycolipid glycosyltransferase required for holdfast production (HfsJ. Multiple cell cycle regulators associate with the hfiA and hfsJ promoters and control their expression, temporally constraining holdfast development to the late stages of G1. HfiA further functions as part of a 'nutritional override' system that decouples holdfast development from the cell cycle in response to nutritional cues. This control mechanism can limit surface adhesion in nutritionally sub-optimal environments without affecting cell cycle progression. We conclude that post-translational regulation of cell envelope enzymes by small proteins like HfiA may provide a general means to modulate the surface properties of bacterial cells.

  4. Surface N-glycoproteome patterns reveal key proteins of neuronal differentiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tylečková, Jiřina; Valeková, Ivona; Žižková, Martina; Rákocyová, Michaela; Maršala, S.; Maršala, M.; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 1 (2016), s. 13-20. ISSN 1874-3919 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : cell adhesion proteins * cell surface capture * neuronal differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.888, year: 2014

  5. Dynamics of Agglutinin-Like Sequence (ALS) Protein Localization on the Surface of Candida Albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, David Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The ALS gene family encodes large cell-surface glycoproteins associated with "C. albicans" pathogenesis. Als proteins are thought to act as adhesin molecules binding to host tissues. Wide variation in expression levels among the ALS genes exists and is related to cell morphology and environmental conditions. "ALS1," "ALS3," and "ALS4" are three of…

  6. Pneumocystis carinii major surface glycoprotein induces interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 release from a human alveolar epithelial cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Lundgren, Bettina; Shelhamer, J H;

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The major surface glycoprotein (MSG) is an abundant, immunogenic glycoprotein located on the surface of Pneumocystis carinii. Little is known about the proinflammatory effects of MSG. DESIGN: We have investigated the effect of human MSG on the secretion of the chemokines interleukin 8...... in response to MSG stimulation occurred by 4 h and persisted throughout 8 h of stimulation. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that MSG can alter alveolar epithelial cytokine release and may be capable of modulating the local inflammatory response in this manner....

  7. Identification of a cell membrane protein that binds alveolar surfactant.

    OpenAIRE

    Strayer, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar surfactants are complex mixtures of proteins and phospholipids produced by type II alveolar cells and responsible for lowering pulmonary surface tension. The process by which surfactant is produced and exported and by which its production by pulmonary cells is regulated are not well understood. This study was designed to identify a cellular receptor for surfactant constituents. To do so, monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against antibodies to porcine and rabbit surfactant...

  8. Radioimmunoassay to quantitatively measure cell surface immunoglobulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay techniques developed to quantitatively measure the presence of immunoglobulins on the surface of cells, is described. The amount of immunoglobulins found on different tumor cells varied from 200 to 1140 ng/106 cells. Determination of immunoglobulins on the peripheral lymphocytes obtained from different cancer patients varied between 340 to 1040 ng/106 cells. Cultured tumor cells, on the other hand, were found to contain negligible quantities of human IgG

  9. Association of lipids with integral membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyorhinis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triton X-114 (TX-114)-phase fractionation was used to identify and characterize integral membrane surface proteins of the wall-less procaryote Mycoplasma hyorhinis GDL. Phase fractionation of mycoplasmas followed by analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed selective partitioning of approximately 30 [35S]methionine-labeled intrinsic membrane proteins into the TX-114 phase. Similar analysis of [3H]palmitate-labeled cells showed that approximately 20 proteins of this organism were associated with lipid, all of which also efficiently partitioned as integral membrane components into the detergent phase. Immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from 125I-surface-labeled cells with four monoclonal antibodies to distinct surface epitopes of M. hyorhinis identified surface proteins p120, p70, p42, and p23 as intrinsic membrane components. Immunoprecipitation of [3H]palmitate-labeled TX-114-phase proteins further established that surface proteins p120, p70, and p23 (a molecule that mediates complement-dependent mycoplasmacidal monoclonal antibody activity) were among the lipid-associated proteins of this organism. Two of these proteins, p120 and p123, were acidic (pI less than or equal to 4.5), as shown by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing. This study established that M. hyorhinis contains an abundance of integral membrane proteins tightly associated with lipids and that many of these proteins are exposed at the external surface of the single limiting plasma membrane. Monoclonal antibodies are reported that will allow detailed analysis of the structure and processing of lipid-associated mycoplasma proteins

  10. Major membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae selectively modified by covalently bound lipid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface protein antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were identified by direct antibody-surface binding or by radioimmunoprecipitation of surface 125I-labeled proteins with a series of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Radioimmunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from cells labeled with [35S] methionine, 14C-amino acids, or [3H] palmitic acid showed that proteins p65, p50, and p44 were abundant and (with one other hydrophobic protein, p60) were selectively labeled with lipid. Alkaline hydroxylamine treatment of labeled proteins indicated linkage of lipids by amide or stable O-linked ester bonds. Proteins p65, p50, and p44 were highly immunogenic in the natural host as measured by immunoblots of TX-114-phase proteins with antisera from swine inoculated with whole organisms. These proteins were antigenically and structurally unrelated, since hyperimmune mouse antibodies to individual gel-purified proteins were monospecific and gave distinct proteolytic epitope maps. Intraspecies size variants of one surface antigen of M. hyopneumoniae were revealed by a MAb to p70 (defined in strain J, ATCC 25934), which recognized a large p73 component on strain VPP11 (ATCC 25617). In addition, MAb to internal, aqueous-phase protein p82 of strain J failed to bind an analogous antigen in strain VPP11

  11. Major membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae selectively modified by covalently bound lipid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise K.S.; Kim, M.F.

    1987-12-01

    Surface protein antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were identified by direct antibody-surface binding or by radioimmunoprecipitation of surface /sup 125/I-labeled proteins with a series of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Radioimmunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from cells labeled with (/sup 35/S) methionine, /sup 14/C-amino acids, or (/sup 3/H) palmitic acid showed that proteins p65, p50, and p44 were abundant and (with one other hydrophobic protein, p60) were selectively labeled with lipid. Alkaline hydroxylamine treatment of labeled proteins indicated linkage of lipids by amide or stable O-linked ester bonds. Proteins p65, p50, and p44 were highly immunogenic in the natural host as measured by immunoblots of TX-114-phase proteins with antisera from swine inoculated with whole organisms. These proteins were antigenically and structurally unrelated, since hyperimmune mouse antibodies to individual gel-purified proteins were monospecific and gave distinct proteolytic epitope maps. Intraspecies size variants of one surface antigen of M. hyopneumoniae were revealed by a MAb to p70 (defined in strain J, ATCC 25934), which recognized a large p73 component on strain VPP11 (ATCC 25617). In addition, MAb to internal, aqueous-phase protein p82 of strain J failed to bind an analogous antigen in strain VPP11.

  12. Surface plasmon resonance imaging of cells and surface-associated fibronectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhadriraju Kiran

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical challenge in cell biology is quantifying the interactions of cells with their extracellular matrix (ECM environment and the active remodeling by cells of their ECM. Fluorescence microscopy is a commonly employed technique for examining cell-matrix interactions. A label-free imaging method would provide an alternative that would eliminate the requirement of transfected cells and modified biological molecules, and if collected nondestructively, would allow long term observation and analysis of live cells. Results Using surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI, the deposition of protein by vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC cultured on fibronectin was quantified as a function of cell density and distance from the cell periphery. We observed that as much as 120 ng/cm2 of protein was deposited by cells in 24 h. Conclusion SPRI is a real-time, low-light-level, label-free imaging technique that allows the simultaneous observation and quantification of protein layers and cellular features. This technique is compatible with live cells such that it is possible to monitor cellular modifications to the extracellular matrix in real-time.

  13. The Assessment of Cytokine and Antibody Responses to Recombinant 31kDa Brucella Cell-Surface Protein in Brucella Abortus Infected Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Khoramabadi

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: These findings suggest that specific humoral and cell-mediated responses to BCSP31 is formed during murine host infection with B. abortus. Based on these findings, rBCSP31 can be used in further design of immunogenic strategies for vaccination against brucellosis.

  14. Lacritin and other autophagy associated proteins in ocular surface health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnati, Roy; Talla, Venu; Peterson, Katherine; Laurie, Gordon W

    2016-03-01

    Advantage may be taken of macroautophagy ('autophagy') to promote ocular health. Autophagy continually captures aged or damaged cellular material for lysosomal degradation and recyling. When autophagic flux is chronically elevated, or alternatively deficient, health suffers. Chronic elevation of flux and stress are the consequence of inflammatory cytokines or of dry eye tears but not normal tears invitro. Exogenous tear protein lacritin transiently accelerates flux to restore homeostasis invitro and corneal health invivo, and yet the monomeric active form of lacritin appears to be selectively deficient in dry eye. Tissue transglutaminase-dependent cross-linking of monomer decreases monomer quantity and monomer affinity for coreceptor syndecan-1 thereby abrogating activity. Tissue transglutaminase is elevated in dry eye. Mutation of arylsulfatase A, arylsulfatase B, ceroid-lipofuscinosis neuronal 3, mucolipin, or Niemann-Pick disease type C1 respectively underlie several diseases of apparently insufficient autophagic flux that affect the eye, including: metachromatic leukodystrophy, mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, juvenile-onset Batten disease, mucolipidosis IV, and Niemann-Pick type C associated with myelin sheath destruction of corneal sensory and ciliary nerves and of the optic nerve; corneal clouding, ocular hypertension, glaucoma and optic nerve atrophy; accumulation of 'ceroid-lipofuscin' in surface conjunctival cells, and in ganglion and neuronal cells; decreased visual acuity and retinal dystrophy; and neurodegeneration. For some, enzyme or gene replacement, or substrate reduction, therapy is proving to be successful. Here we discuss examples of restoring ocular surface homeostasis through alteration of autophagy, with particular attention to lacritin. PMID:26318608

  15. Surface strategies for control of neuronal cell adhesion: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, P.; Parker, T.; Gadegaard, N.; Alexander, M. R.

    2010-06-01

    Material engineering methods have been used for many years to develop biomedical devices for use within the body to augment, repair or replace damaged tissues ranging from contact lenses to heart valves. Here we review the findings gathered from the wide and varied surface analytical approaches applied to study the interaction between biology and man-made materials. The key material characteristics identified to be important for biological recognition are surface chemistry, topography and compliance. Model surfaces with controlled chemistry and topography have provided insight into biological response to various types of topographical features over a wide range of length scales from nano to micrometres, along with 3D matrices that have been used as scaffolds to support cells for tissue formation. The cellular response to surfaces with localised areas of patterned chemistry and to those presenting gradually changing chemistry are discussed. Where previous reviews have been structured around specific classes of surface modification, e.g. self-assembly, or have broadly examined the response of various cells to numerous surfaces, we aim in this article to focus in particular on the tissues involved in the nervous system whilst providing a broad overview of key issues from the field of cell and protein surface interactions with surfaces. The goal of repair and treatment of diseases related to the central and peripheral nervous systems rely on understanding the local interfacial environment and controlling responses at the cellular level. The role of the protein layer deposited from serum containing media onto man-made surfaces is discussed. We highlight the particular problems associated with the repair of the nervous system, and review how neuronal attachment and axon guidance can be accomplished using various surface cues when cultured with single and multiple cell types. We include a brief glossary of techniques discussed in the body of this article aimed at the

  16. SURF'S UP! – Protein classification by surface comparisons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joanna M Sasin; Adam Godzik; Janusz M Bujnicki

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale genome sequencing and structural genomics projects generate numerous sequences and structures for ‘hypothetical’ proteins without functional characterizations. Detection of homology to experimentally characterized proteins can provide functional clues, but the accuracy of homology-based predictions is limited by the paucity of tools for quantitative comparison of diverging residues responsible for the functional divergence. SURF’S UP! is a web server for analysis of functional relationships in protein families, as inferred from protein surface maps comparison according to the algorithm. It assigns a numerical score to the similarity between patterns of physicochemical features (charge, hydrophobicity) on compared protein surfaces. It allows recognizing clusters of proteins that have similar surfaces, hence presumably similar functions. The server takes as an input a set of protein coordinates and returns files with ``spherical coordinates” of proteins in a PDB format and their graphical presentation, a matrix with values of mutual similarities between the surfaces, and the unrooted tree that represents the clustering of similar surfaces, calculated by the neighbor-joining method. SURF’S UP! facilitates the comparative analysis of physicochemical features of the surface, which are the key determinants of the protein function. By concentrating on coarse surface features, SURF’S UP! can work with models obtained from comparative modelling. Although it is designed to analyse the conservation among homologs, it can also be used to compare surfaces of non-homologous proteins with different three-dimensional folds, as long as a functionally meaningful structural superposition is supplied by the user. Another valuable characteristic of our method is the lack of initial assumptions about the functional features to be compared. SURF’S UP! is freely available for academic researchers at http://asia.genesilico.pl/surfs_up/.

  17. Nanostructuring of Solar Cell Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Solar energy is by far the most abundant renewable energy source available, but the levelized cost of solar energy is still not competitive with that of fossil fuels. Therefore there is a need to improve the power conversion effciency of solar cells without adding to the production cost. The main...... objective of this PhD thesis is to develop nanostructured silicon (Si) solar cells with higher power conversion efficiency using only scalable and cost-efficient production methods. The nanostructures, known as 'black silicon', are fabricated by single-step, maskless reactive ion etching and used as front...... and characterized for comparison. Power conversion eciency of 16.5% was obtained for this batch of RIE-textured Si solar cells. The eciency of the KOH-textured reference cell was 17.8%. Quantum Efficiency measurements and carrier loss analysis show that the lower eciency of the RIE-textured cells is primarily due...

  18. Characterization of cell-surface determinants important for baculovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, H; Nishijima, M; Ushijima, H; Miyamura, T; Matsuura, Y

    2001-01-01

    Baculovirus gp64 envelope glycoprotein is a major component of the envelope of the budded virus and is involved in virus entry into the host cells by endocytosis. To investigate the cell-surface molecules important for infection of baculovirus into mammalian cells, we constructed a recombinant baculovirus, Ac64-CAluc, which has gp64 and luciferase genes under the polyhedrin and the CAG promoter, respectively. For controls, we constructed recombinant viruses possessing vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) S protein, or green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene under the polyhedrin promoter and the luciferase gene under the CAG promoter (AcVSVG-CAluc, AcMHVS-CAluc, and AcGFP-CAluc). Treatment of HepG2 cells with phospholipase C markedly reduced the reporter gene expression by Ac64-CAluc or AcVSVG-CAluc in a dose-dependent manner, whereas AcMHVS-CAluc was shown to be resistant to the treatment. Inhibition with purified lipids and susceptibility to the mutant CHO hamster cell lines deficient in phospholipids synthesis suggest that the interaction of gp64 and phospholipids on the cell surface might play an important role in baculovirus infection into mammalian cells. PMID:11145915

  19. Surface energetics and protein-protein interactions: analysis and mechanistic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Peri; Giulia Morra; Giorgio Colombo

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the molecular level is a fundamental task in the design of new drugs, the prediction of protein function and the clarification of the mechanisms of (dis)regulation of biochemical pathways. In this study, we use a novel computational approach to investigate the energetics of aminoacid networks located on the surface of proteins, isolated and in complex with their respective partners. Interestingly, the analysis of individual proteins identifi...

  20. Cell behaviour on chemically microstructured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnani, Agnese; Priamo, Alfredo; Pasqui, Daniela; Barbucci, Rolando

    2003-03-03

    Micropatterned surfaces with different chemical topographies were synthesised in order to investigate the influence of surface chemistry and topography on cell behaviour. The microstructured materials were synthesised by photoimmobilising natural Hyaluronan (Hyal) and its sulphated derivative (HyalS), both adequately functionalised with a photorective moiety, on glass substrates. Four different grating patterns (10, 25, 50 and 100 {mu}m) were used to pattern the hyaluronan. The micropatterned samples were analysed by Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy to investigate the chemistry and the topography of the surfaces. The spectroscopic and microscopic analysis of the microstructured surfaces revealed that the photoimmobilisation process was successful, demonstrating that the photomask patterns were well reproduced on the sample surface. The influence of chemical topographies on the cell behaviour was then analysed. Human and 3T3 fibroblasts, bovine aortic and human (HGTFN line) endothelial cells were used and their behaviour on the micropatterned surfaces was analysed in terms of adhesion, proliferation, locomotion and orientation. Both chemical and topographical controls were found to be important for cell guidance. By decreasing the stripe dimensions, a more fusiform shape of cell was observed. At the same time, the cell locomotion and orientation parallel to the structure increased. However, differences in cell behaviour were detected according to both cell type and micropattern dimensions.

  1. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a putative Clostridium difficile surface protein Cwp19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cwp19 is a putatively surface-located protein from Clostridium difficile. A recombinant N-terminal protein (residues 27–401) lacking the signal peptide and the C-terminal cell-wall-binding repeats (PFam04122) was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2 Å resolution. Cwp19 is a putatively surface-located protein from Clostridium difficile. A recombinant N-terminal protein (residues 27–401) lacking the signal peptide and the C-terminal cell-wall-binding repeats (PFam04122) was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2 Å resolution. The crystal appeared to belong to the primitive monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 109.1, b = 61.2, c = 109.2 Å, β = 111.85°, and is estimated to contain two molecules of Cwp19 per asymmetric unit

  2. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces

  3. Semiquantitative determination of circulating islet cell surface antibodies in diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circulating pancreatic islet cell antibodies have been demonstrated in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes (IDD). The islet cell surface antibodies (ICSA) were determined by an indirect immunofluorescence test using a suspension of viable islet cells, and similar cytoplasmic antibodies which require the use of group O human pancreas were also found in the serum of some patients. A strong association exists between the presence of islet cell antibodies and the onset of insulin-dependent diabetes. The quantitative determination of circulating ICSA using 125I-protein A, which binds to IgG attached to the islet cell surface, was essentially as described by Lernmark et al. In the present study, we determined the circulating ICSA in diabetes, especially in IDD. The ICSA were estimated in various sera from both indirect immunofluorescence and 125I-protein A. Controls bound 125I-protein A. Sera from 4 IDD patients with circulating ICSA demonstrated by immunofluorescence showed >3,000 cpm 125I-protein A binding activity, and that from 5 patients without ICSA bound <2,000 cpm. Sera from newly-diagnosed diabetics who had severe hyperglycemia showed <2,000 cpm, with or without ICSA. (author)

  4. Cleaning of biomaterial surfaces: protein removal by different solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Fabian; Grass, Simone; Umanskaya, Natalia; Scheibe, Christian; Müller-Renno, Christine; Davoudi, Neda; Hannig, Matthias; Ziegler, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    The removal of biofilms or protein films from biomaterials is still a challenging task. In particular, for research investigations on real (applied) surfaces the reuse of samples is of high importance, because reuse allows the comparison of the same sample in different experiments. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cleaning efficiency of different solvents (SDS, water, acetone, isopropanol, RIPA-buffer and Tween-20) on five different biomaterials (titanium, gold, PMMA (no acetone used), ceramic, and PTFE) with different wettability which were covered by layers of two different adsorbed proteins (BSA and lysozyme). The presence of a protein film after adsorption was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After treatment of the surfaces with the different solvents, the residual proteins on the surface were determined by BCA-assay (bicinchoninic acid assay). Data of the present study indicate that SDS is an effective solvent, but for several protein-substrate combinations it does not show the cleaning efficiency often mentioned in literature. RIPA-buffer and Tween-20 were more effective. They showed very low residual protein amounts after cleaning on all examined material surfaces and for both proteins, however, with small differences for the respective substrate-protein combinations. RIPA-buffer in combination with ultrasonication completely removed the protein layer as confirmed by TEM. PMID:25725311

  5. Cell-to-cell propagation of infectious cytosolic protein aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Julia P.; Denner, Philip; Nussbaum-Krammer, Carmen; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Suhre, Michael H.; Scheibel, Thomas; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Schätzl, Hermann M.; Bano, Daniele; Vorberg, Ina M.

    2013-01-01

    Prions are self-templating protein conformers that replicate by recruitment and conversion of homotypic proteins into growing protein aggregates. Originally identified as causative agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, increasing evidence now suggests that prion-like phenomena are more common in nature than previously anticipated. In contrast to fungal prions that replicate in the cytoplasm, propagation of mammalian prions derived from the precursor protein PrP is confined to the cell membrane or endocytic vesicles. Here we demonstrate that cytosolic protein aggregates can also behave as infectious entities in mammalian cells. When expressed in the mammalian cytosol, protein aggregates derived from the prion domain NM of yeast translation termination factor Sup35 persistently propagate and invade neighboring cells, thereby inducing a self-perpetuating aggregation state of NM. Cell contact is required for efficient infection. Aggregates can also be induced in primary astrocytes, neurons, and organotypic cultures, demonstrating that this phenomenon is not specific to immortalized cells. Our data have important implications for understanding prion-like phenomena of protein aggregates associated with human diseases and for the growing number of amyloidogenic proteins discovered in mammals. PMID:23509289

  6. Origins of Protein Functions in Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Burchard; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis and in vitro evolution of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions yet, important clues have been uncovered. In one example (Keefe and Szostak, 2001), novel ATP binding proteins were identified that appear to be unrelated in both sequence and structure to any known ATP binding proteins. One of these proteins was subsequently redesigned computationally to bind GTP through introducing several mutations that introduce targeted structural changes to the protein, improve its binding to guanine and prevent water from accessing the active center. This study facilitates further investigations of individual evolutionary steps that lead to a change of function in primordial proteins. In a second study (Seelig and Szostak, 2007), novel enzymes were generated that can join two pieces of RNA in a reaction for which no natural enzymes are known

  7. Cell ``vision'': complementary factor of protein corona in nanotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Saeedi-Eslami, Seyyed N.; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A.; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Hassanlou, Maryam; Kalhor, Hamid R.; Burtea, Carmen; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Laurent, Sophie; Sheibani, Sara; Vali, Hojatollah

    2012-08-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are increasingly being considered for use as biosensors, imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles. Their versatility in design and applications make them an attractive proposition for new biological and biomedical approaches. Despite the remarkable speed of development in nanoscience, relatively little is known about the interaction of nanoscale objects with living systems. In a biological fluid, proteins associate with nanoparticles, and the amount and the presentation of the proteins on their surface could lead to a different in vivo response than an uncoated particle. Here, in addition to protein adsorption, we are going to introduce concept of cell ``vision'', which would be recognized as another crucial factor that should be considered for the safe design of any type of nanoparticles that will be used in specific biomedical applications. The impact of exactly the same nanoparticles on various cells is significantly different and could not be assumed for other cells; the possible mechanisms that justify this cellular response relate to the numerous detoxification strategies that any particular cell can utilize in response to nanoparticles. The uptake and defence mechanism could be considerably different according to the cell type. Thus, what the cell ``sees'', when it is faced with nanoparticles, is most likely dependent on the cell type.Engineered nanoparticles are increasingly being considered for use as biosensors, imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles. Their versatility in design and applications make them an attractive proposition for new biological and biomedical approaches. Despite the remarkable speed of development in nanoscience, relatively little is known about the interaction of nanoscale objects with living systems. In a biological fluid, proteins associate with nanoparticles, and the amount and the presentation of the proteins on their surface could lead to a different in vivo response than an uncoated particle. Here

  8. High vacuum cells for classical surface techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel glass cells were designed and built to be able to perform surface potential and surface tension measurements in a contained environment. The cells can withstand pressures of approximately 1x10-6 Torr, providing a reasonable level of control in terms of the amounts of volatile contaminants during experimentation. The measurements can take several hours; thus the cells help maintain the integrity of the sample in the course of the experiment. To test for the feasibility of the cell design, calibration measurements were performed. For the surface potential cell, the modified TREK 6000B-7C probe exhibited performance comparable to its unmodified counterpart. The correlation measurements between applied potential on the test surface and the measured potential showed R-values very close to 1 as well as standard deviation values of less than 1. Results also demonstrate improved measurement values for experiments performed in vacuum. The surface tension cell, on the other hand, which was used to perform the pendant drop method, was tested on common liquids and showed percentage errors of 0.5% when compared to literature values. The fabricated cells redefine measurements using classical surface techniques, providing unique and novel methods of sample preparation, premeasurement preparation, and sample analysis at highly beneficial expenditure cost.

  9. Controlled release of proteins from polymer-modified surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Fang; Szleifer, I.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to control the rate of adsorption and desorption of proteins from surfaces is studied by using a molecular theory. We show how changing the chemical structure and charge of short linear and branched grafted polymers to an electrode surface can be used to promote fast adsorption of charged proteins on a time scale of seconds and control the desorption in a time scale ranging from milliseconds to hours. The optimal controlled release is found from the interplay of electrostatic attr...

  10. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D; Marshall, Wallace F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications. PMID:26988139

  11. Conferring Thermostability to Mesophilic Proteins through Optimized Electrostatic Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Torrez, Michael; Schultehenrich, Michael; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, there have been several experimental reports of proteins displaying appreciable stability gains through mutation of one or two amino acid residues. Here, we employ a simple theoretical model to quickly screen mutant structures for increased thermostability through optimization of the protein's electrostatic surface. Our results are able to reproduce the experimental observation that elimination of like-charge repulsions and creation of opposite-charge attractions on the protein surf...

  12. Modulating Protein Adsorption on Oxygen Plasma Modified Polysiloxane Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper we report the study on the adsorption behaviour of three model globular proteins, Human Serum Albumin, Lactoferrin and Egg Chicken Lysozyme onto both unmodified surfaces of a silicon-based polymer and the corresponding plasma treated surfaces. In particular, thin films of hydrophobic polysiloxane (about 90 degree of static water contact angle, WCA) were converted by oxygen plasma treatment at reduced pressure into very hydrophilic phases of SiOx (WCA less than 5 degree). The kinetics of protein adsorption processes were investigated by QCM-D technique, while the chemical structure and topography of the protein adlayer have been studied by Angular resolved-XPS and AFM respectively. It turned out that Albumin and Lysozyme exhibited the opposite preferential adsorption respectively onto the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, while Lactoferrin did not exhibit significant differences. The observed protein behaviour are discussed both in terms of surface-dependent parameters, including surface free energy and chemical structure, and in terms of protein-dependent parameters, including charge as well as the average molecular orientation in the adlayers. Finally, some examples of differential adsorption behaviour of the investigated proteins are reported onto nanopatterned polysiloxane surfaces consisting of hydrophobic nanopores surrounded by hydrophilic (plasma-treated) matrix and the reverse

  13. Shotgun proteomic analytical approach for studying proteins adsorbed onto liposome surface

    KAUST Repository

    Capriotti, Anna Laura

    2011-07-02

    The knowledge about the interaction between plasma proteins and nanocarriers employed for in vivo delivery is fundamental to understand their biodistribution. Protein adsorption onto nanoparticle surface (protein corona) is strongly affected by vector surface characteristics. In general, the primary interaction is thought to be electrostatic, thus surface charge of carrier is supposed to play a central role in protein adsorption. Because protein corona composition can be critical in modifying the interactive surface that is recognized by cells, characterizing its formation onto lipid particles may serve as a fundamental predictive model for the in vivo efficiency of a lipidic vector. In the present work, protein coronas adsorbed onto three differently charged cationic liposome formulations were compared by a shotgun proteomic approach based on nano-liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. About 130 proteins were identified in each corona, with only small differences between the different cationic liposome formulations. However, this study could be useful for the future controlled design of colloidal drug carriers and possibly in the controlled creation of biocompatible surfaces of other devices that come into contact with proteins into body fluids. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Femtosecond UV-laser pulses to unveil protein-protein interactions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Francesco; Monti, Daria M; Della Ventura, Bartolomeo; Vinciguerra, Roberto; Chino, Marco; Gesuele, Felice; Lombardi, Angelina; Velotta, Raffaele; Altucci, Carlo; Birolo, Leila; Piccoli, Renata; Arciello, Angela

    2016-02-01

    A hallmark to decipher bioprocesses is to characterize protein-protein interactions in living cells. To do this, the development of innovative methodologies, which do not alter proteins and their natural environment, is particularly needed. Here, we report a method (LUCK, Laser UV Cross-linKing) to in vivo cross-link proteins by UV-laser irradiation of living cells. Upon irradiation of HeLa cells under controlled conditions, cross-linked products of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were detected, whose yield was found to be a linear function of the total irradiation energy. We demonstrated that stable dimers of GAPDH were formed through intersubunit cross-linking, as also observed when the pure protein was irradiated by UV-laser in vitro. We proposed a defined patch of aromatic residues located at the enzyme subunit interface as the cross-linking sites involved in dimer formation. Hence, by this technique, UV-laser is able to photofix protein surfaces that come in direct contact. Due to the ultra-short time scale of UV-laser-induced cross-linking, this technique could be extended to weld even transient protein interactions in their native context. PMID:26265182

  15. Interaction of PC-3 cells with fibronectin adsorbed on sulfonated polystyrene surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna M. Kowalczyńska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of cancer cells to invade neighboring tissues is crucial for cell dissemination and tumor metastasis. It is generally assumed that cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins is an important stage of cancer progression. Hence, adhesion of cancer cells under in vitro conditions to proteins adsorbed on a substratum surface has been studied to provide a better understanding of cell-protein interaction mechanisms. A protein, adsorbed in an appropriate conformation on a substratum surface, creates a biologically active layer that regulates such cell functions as adhesion, spreading, proliferation and migration. In our study, we examined the interaction of PC-3 cells under in vitro conditions with fibronectin adsorbed on sulfonated polystyrene surfaces of a defined chemical composition and topography. We investigated cell adhesion to fibronectin and cell spreading. Using automatic, sequential microscopic image registration, we are the first to present observations of the dynamics of PC-3 cell spreading and the cell shape during this process. Our results show that cell adhesion and the shape of spreading cells strongly depend on the time interaction with fibronectin. The analysis of images of cytoskeletal protein distribution in the cell region near the cell-substratum interface revealed that induction of a signal cascade took place, which led to the reorganization of the cytoskeletal proteins and the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 706–718

  16. Enhanced T cell responses to antigenic peptides targeted to B cell surface Ig, Ia, or class I molecules

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The helper T cell recognition of soluble globular protein antigens requires that the proteins be processed by an APC, releasing a peptide that is transported to and held on the APC surface where it is recognized by the specific T cell in conjunction with Ia. When cellular processing functions are blocked, APC lose their ability to present native antigens while retaining the capacity to activate T cells when provided with a cognate peptide fragment that contains the T cell antigenic determinan...

  17. Adhesion of cells to polystyrene surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The surface treatment of polystyrene, which is required to make polystyrene suitable for cell adhesion and spreading, was investigated. Examination of surfaces treated with sulfuric acid or various oxidizing agents using (a) x-ray photoelectron and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy and (b) measurement of surface carboxyl-, hydroxyl-, and sulfur-containing groups by various radiochemical methods showed that sulfuric acid produces an insignificant number of sulfonic acid groups on polyst...

  18. Detection of vitamin D binding protein on the surface of cytotrophoblasts isolated from human placentae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitamin D binding protein (DBP), a Mr 56,000-58,000 alpha 2-glycoprotein, is the major serum protein involved in the transport of vitamin D sterols. Recently it has been suggested that DBP may also be involved in immunoglobulin G binding to cells. Because the trophoblast is involved in the transport of molecules such as vitamin D and immunoglobulin G to the fetus, we asked whether DBP could be detected on the surface of human placental trophoblast cells. Cytotrophoblasts purified from human term placentae were fixed and made permeant with Triton X-100 and examined by indirect immunofluorescence after incubation with a monoclonal antibody to DBP. Greater than 90% of these cells stained positively, whereas no staining was observed with nonimmune antiserum. The presence of DBP on/in the surface of cytotrophoblasts could also be demonstrated by fluorescent cytometry. When cell surface-associated proteins of cytotrophoblasts were radioiodinated, a Mr 57,000 radiolabeled protein could be immunoisolated from the cell lysate with a purified monospecific polyclonal antibody to DBP. Immunoisolation of this radiolabeled protein was prevented by the addition of excess unlabeled human DBP to the cell lysate before incubation with antibody. This Mr 57,000 radiolabeled protein could also be isolated by affinity chromatography selecting for proteins that bind to globular actin. When cytotrophoblasts were incubated with [35S]methionine for 3 or 18 h, active synthesis of DBP could not be demonstrated by immunoisolation techniques. These studies demonstrate the presence of DBP on the surface of well washed, human cytotrophoblasts. This DBP may be maternally derived, since active synthesis of DBP could not be demonstrated

  19. Nanotomography of Cell Surfaces with Evanescent Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM and its application to nanotomography of cell surfaces are described. Present applications include (1 3D imaging of chromosomes in their metaphase to demonstrate axial resolution in the nanometre range, (2 measurements of cell-substrate topology, which upon cholesterol depletion shows some loosening of cell-substrate contacts, and (3 measurements of cell topology upon photodynamic therapy (PDT, which demonstrate cell swelling and maintenance of focal contacts. The potential of the method for in vitro diagnostics, but also some requirements and limitations are discussed.

  20. Intrinsic surface-drying properties of bioadhesive proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdogan, Yasar; Wei, Wei; Huang, Kuo-Ying; Kageyama, Yoshiyuki; Danner, Eric W; Miller, Dusty R; Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Waite, J Herbert; Han, Songi

    2014-10-13

    Sessile marine mussels must "dry" underwater surfaces before adhering to them. Synthetic adhesives have yet to overcome this fundamental challenge. Previous studies of bioinspired adhesion have largely been performed under applied compressive forces, but such studies are poor predictors of the ability of an adhesive to spontaneously penetrate surface hydration layers. In a force-free approach to measuring molecular-level interaction through surface-water diffusivity, different mussel foot proteins were found to have different abilities to evict hydration layers from surfaces-a necessary step for adsorption and adhesion. It was anticipated that DOPA would mediate dehydration owing to its efficacy in bioinspired wet adhesion. Instead, hydrophobic side chains were found to be a critical component for protein-surface intimacy. This direct measurement of interfacial water dynamics during force-free adsorptive interactions at solid surfaces offers guidance for the engineering of wet adhesives and coatings. PMID:25168789

  1. Intercellular Protein Transfer from Thymocytes to Thymic Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Promiscuous expression of tissue restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is crucial for negative selection of self-reactive T cells to establish central tolerance. Intercellular transfer of self-peptide-MHC complexes from mTECs to thymic dendritic cells (DCs) allows DCs to acquire TRAs, which in turn contributes to negative selection and regulatory T cell generation. However, mTECs are unlikely to express all TRAs, such as immunoglobulins generated only in B cells after somatic recombination, hyper-mutation, or class-switches. We report here that both mTECs and cortical TECs can efficiently acquire not only cell surface but also intracellular proteins from thymocytes. This reveals a previously unappreciated intercellular sharing of molecules from thymocytes to TECs, which may broaden the TRA inventory in mTECs for establishing a full spectrum of central tolerance. PMID:27022746

  2. Intrinsic Surface-Drying Properties of Bio-adhesive Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Akdogan, Yasar; Wei, Wei; Huang, Kuo-Ying; Kageyama, Yoshiyuki; Danner, Eric W.; Miller, Dusty R.; Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Herbert Waite, J.; Han, Songi

    2014-01-01

    Sessile marine mussels must “dry” underwater surfaces before adhering to them. Synthetic adhesives have yet to overcome this fundamental challenge. Previous studies of bio-inspired adhesion have largely been performed under applied compressive forces but these are poor predictors of an adhesive’s ability to spontaneously penetrate surface hydration layers. In a force-free approach to measuring molecular-level interaction via the surface water diffusivity, different mussel foot proteins were f...

  3. Lipid rafts: cell surface platforms for T cell signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TONY MAGEE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Src family tyrosine kinase Lck is essential for T cell development and T cell receptor (TCR* signaling. Lck is post-translationally fatty acylated at its N-terminus conferring membrane targeting and concentration in plasma membrane lipid rafts, which are lipid-based organisational platforms. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows that Lck colocalises in rafts with GPI-linked proteins, the adaptor protein LAT and Ras, but not with non-raft membrane proteins including the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45. The TCR also associates with lipid rafts and its cross-linking causes coaggregation of raft-associated proteins including Lck, but not of CD45. Cross-linking of either the TCR or rafts strongly induces specific tyrosine phosphorylation of the TCR in the rafts. Remarkably, raft patching alone induces signalling events analogous to TCR stimulation, with the same dependence on expression of key TCR signalling molecules. Our results indicate a mechanism whereby TCR engagement promotes aggregation of lipid rafts, which facilitates colocalisation of signaling proteins including Lck, LAT, and the TCR, while excluding CD45, thereby potentiating protein tyrosine phosphorylation and downstream signaling. We are currently testing this hypothesis as well as using imaging techniques such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET microscopy to study the dynamics of proteins and lipids in lipid rafts in living cells undergoing signaling events. Recent data show that the key phosphoinositide PI(4,5P2 is concentrated in T cell lipid rafts and that on stimulation of the cells it is rapidly converted to PI(3,4,5P3 and diacylglycerol within rafts. Thus rafts are hotspots for both protein and lipid signalling pathways.

  4. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning, E-mail: xin@egr.msu.edu [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-11-01

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  5. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm2) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells

  6. The surface modification of stainless steel and the correlation between the surface properties and protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chan-Koo; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2007-07-01

    Protein adsorption on a biomaterial surface is of great importance as it usually induces unfavorable biological cascades, with the result that much surface modification research has had to be performed in an effort to prevent this. In this study, we developed surface modification methods for stainless steel, which is a representative metal for biomedical device. The stainless steels were first smoothened to different extents by electropolishing, in order to obtain a rough or smooth surface. On these two kinds of substrates, we introduced epoxide groups to the metal surface by silanization with 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTS). Then, various polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly(tetrahydrofuran glycol) (PTG), poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) were grafted on the silanized stainless steels. Each surface modification step was confirmed by various analytical methods. Contact angle measurement revealed that the surface hydrophilicity was controllable by polymer grafting. Root-mean-square (RMS) data of atomic force microscopy showed that surface roughness was dramatically changed by electropolishing. Based on these results, the correlation between surface properties and protein adsorption was investigated. In the protein adsorption study, we observed that all of the polymer-grafted stainless steels exhibited lower protein adsorption, when compared with bare stainless steel. Moreover, a hydrophilic and smooth surface was found to be the best of choice for decreasing the protein adsorption. PMID:17277988

  7. Investigation of cellular and protein interactions with model self-assembled monolayer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegoulia, Vassiliki Apostolou

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates on gold have been used to investigate the effect of substrate surface properties on bacterial and blood cell adhesion in the presence and absence of blood proteins. Protein adsorption and binding strength on SAMs as well as complement activation by these model surfaces were also studied. It is hoped that information gained, regarding factors that influence biological processes, will lead to strategies for designing materials and surfaces that specifically inhibit cell adhesion and protein adsorption. Single component SAMs of the general formula HS(CH2) 10X, where X = CH3, CH2OH. COOH and CH2(OCH 2CH2)3OH, and two component mixed SAMs created from binary solutions of HS(CH2), OCH3 and HS(CH 2)10CH2OH, were used. Adhesion was investigated under well-defined flow conditions. Adhesion was found to be higher for the hydrophobic methyl and minimal for the tri(ethyleneoxide) terminated SAM. Preincubation of the SAMs with fibrinogen led to an increase in cell adhesion for bacteria and a decrease for leukocyte adhesion. The effect of surface chemistry on protein adsorption was studied for three blood proteins, fibrinogen, fibronectin and albumin. Adsorption was found to be higher on the hydrophobic CH3 surface and lower but comparable for the other surfaces while proteins adsorbed strongly on all surfaces. SAMs were also used to evaluate complement activation by foreign surfaces. The hydroxyl rich SAMs were found to activate complement more significantly than the anionic carboxyl and the hydrophobic methyl terminated SAMs. A surface modification was introduced to incorporate a zwitterionic phosphorylcholine (PC) group on a hydroxyl monolayer in an effort to create a biomimetic surface that could minimize cell adhesion and protein adsorption. The good antifouling properties of the phosphorylcholine modified surface led to the synthesis of a novel phosphorylcholine functionalized thiol. Single component and two component

  8. Simultaneous detection of mRNA and protein stem cell markers in live cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Gang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological studies and medical application of stem cells often require the isolation of stem cells from a mixed cell population, including the detection of cancer stem cells in tumor tissue, and isolation of induced pluripotent stem cells after eliciting the expression of specific genes in adult cells. Here we report the detection of Oct-4 mRNA and SSEA-1 protein in live carcinoma stem cells using respectively molecular beacon and dye-labeled antibody, aiming to establish a new method for stem cells detection and isolation. Results Quantification of Oct-4 mRNA and protein in P19 mouse carcinoma stem cells using respectively RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry confirmed that their levels drastically decreased after differentiation. To visualize Oct-4 mRNA in live stem cells, molecular beacons were designed, synthesized and validated, and the detection specificity was confirmed using control studies. We found that the fluorescence signal from Oct-4-targeting molecular beacons provides a clear discrimination between undifferentiated and retinoic acid-induced differentiated cells. Using deconvolution fluorescence microscopy, Oct-4 mRNAs were found to reside on one side of the cytosol. We demonstrated that, using a combination of Oct-4 mRNA-targeting molecular beacon with SSEA-1 antibody in flow cytometric analysis, undifferentiated stem cells can be clearly distinguished from differentiated cells. We revealed that Oct-4 targeting molecular beacons do not seem to affect stem cell biology. Conclusion Molecular beacons have the potential to provide a powerful tool for highly specific detection and isolation of stem cells, including cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells without disturbing cell physiology. It is advantageous to perform simultaneous detection of intracellular (mRNA and cell-surface (protein stem cell markers in flow cytometric analysis, which may lead to high detection sensitivity and efficiency.

  9. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection: Role of a Surface Protein in the Attachment Organelle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, P. C.; Cole, R. M.; Huang, Y. S.; Graham, J. A.; Gardner, D. E.; Collier, A. M.; Clyde, W. A.

    1982-04-01

    Attachment of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to host cells by means of a specialized terminus initiates infection. Monoclonal antibodies to a surface protein (P1) inhibit this process, and react with a region of the tip covered with peplomer-like particles. Since antibodies against the P1 protein are generated by natural and experimental infection and by immunization, the substance may be an important determinant of protective immunity.

  10. Identification of novel surface-exposed proteins of Rickettsia rickettsii by affinity purification and proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Gong

    Full Text Available Rickettsia rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, is the most pathogenic member among Rickettsia spp. Surface-exposed proteins (SEPs of R. rickettsii may play important roles in its pathogenesis or immunity. In this study, R. rickettsii organisms were surface-labeled with sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin and the labeled proteins were affinity-purified with streptavidin. The isolated proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and 10 proteins were identified among 23 protein spots by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Five (OmpA, OmpB, GroEL, GroES, and a DNA-binding protein of the 10 proteins were previously characterized as surface proteins of R. rickettsii. Another 5 proteins (Adr1, Adr2, OmpW, Porin_4, and TolC were first recognized as SEPs of R. rickettsii herein. The genes encoding the 5 novel SEPs were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, resulting in 5 recombinant SEPs (rSEPs, which were used to immunize mice. After challenge with viable R. rickettsii cells, the rickettsial load in the spleen, liver, or lung of mice immunized with rAdr2 and in the lungs of mice immunized with other rSEPs excluding rTolC was significantly lower than in mice that were mock-immunized with PBS. The in vitro neutralization test revealed that sera from mice immunized with rAdr1, rAdr2, or rOmpW reduced R. rickettsii adherence to and invasion of vascular endothelial cells. The immuno-electron microscopic assay clearly showed that the novel SEPs were located in the outer and/or inner membrane of R. rickettsii. Altogether, the 5 novel SEPs identified herein might be involved in the interaction of R. rickettsii with vascular endothelial cells, and all of them except TolC were protective antigens.

  11. Induction of heat shock proteins in B-cell exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Aled; Turkes, Attilla; Navabi, Hossein; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2005-08-15

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized vesicles secreted by a diverse range of live cells that probably have physiological roles in modulating cellular immunity. The extracellular factors that regulate the quantity and phenotype of exosomes produced are poorly understood, and the properties of exosomes that dictate their immune functions are not yet clear. We investigated the effect of cellular stress on the exosomes produced by B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. Under steady-state conditions, the exosomes were positive for hsp27, hsc70, hsp70 and hsp90, and other recognised exosome markers such as MHC class I, CD81, and LAMP-2. Exposing cells to heat stress (42 degrees C for up to 3 hours), resulted in a marked increase in these heat shock proteins (hsps), while the expression of other stress proteins such as hsp60 and gp96 remained negative, and other exosome markers remained unchanged. Stress also triggered a small increase in the quantity of exosomes produced [with a ratio of 1.245+/-0.07 to 1 (mean+/-s.e.m., n=20) of 3-hour-stress-exosomes to control-exosomes]. Flow-cytometric analysis of exosome-coated beads and immuno-precipitation of intact exosomes demonstrated that hsps were located within the exosome lumen, and not present at the exosome-surface, suggesting that such exosomes may not interact with target cells through cell-surface hsp-receptors. Functional studies further supported this finding, in that exosomes from control or heat-stressed B cells did not trigger dendritic cell maturation, assessed by analysis of dendritic-cell-surface phenotype, and cytokine secretion profile. Our findings demonstrate that specific alterations in exosome phenotype are a hitherto unknown component of the cellular response to environmental stress and their extracellular function does not involve the direct activation of dendritic cells. PMID:16046478

  12. Protein Adsorption to Surface Chemistry and Crystal Structure Modification of Titanium Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Jimbo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To observe the early adsorption of extracellular matrix and blood plasma proteins to magnesium-incorporated titanium oxide surfaces, which has shown superior bone response in animal models.Material and Methods: Commercially pure titanium discs were blasted with titanium dioxide (TiO2 particles (control, and for the test group, TiO2 blasted discs were further processed with a micro-arc oxidation method (test. Surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, surface topography by optic interferometry, characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The adsorption of 3 different proteins (fibronectin, albumin, and collagen type I was investigated by an immunoblotting technique.Results: The test surface showed a porous structure, whereas the control surface showed a typical TiO2 blasted structure. XPS data revealed magnesium-incorporation to the anodic oxide film of the surface. There was no difference in surface roughness between the control and test surfaces. For the protein adsorption test, the amount of albumin was significantly higher on the control surface whereas the amount of fibronectin was significantly higher on the test surface. Although there was no significant difference, the test surface had a tendency to adsorb more collagen type I.Conclusions: The magnesium-incorporated anodized surface showed significantly higher fibronectin adsorption and lower albumin adsorption than the blasted surface. These results may be one of the reasons for the excellent bone response previously observed in animal studies.

  13. Immobilization of multivalent glycoprobes on gold surfaces for sensing proteins and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Madhuri; Khandelwal, Puneet; Sangabathuni, Sivakoti; Bavireddi, Harikrishna; Murthy, Raghavendra Vasudeva; Poddar, Pankaj; Kikkeri, Raghavendra

    2016-04-01

    The multivalent display of carbohydrates on the cell surface provides cooperative binding to improve the specific biological events. In addition to multivalency, the spatial arrangement and orientation of sugars with respect to external stimuli also trigger carbohydrate-protein interactions. Herein, we report a non-covalent host-guest strategy to immobilize heptavalent glyco-β-cyclodextrin on gold-coated glass slides to study multivalent carbohydrate-protein interactions. We have found that the localization of sugar entities on surfaces using β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) chemistry increased the avidity of carbohydrate-protein and carbohydrate-macrophage interactions compared to monovalent-β-CD sugar coated surfaces. This platform is expected to be a promising tool to amplify the avidity of sugar-mediated interactions on surfaces and contribute to the development of next generation bio-medical products. PMID:26934683

  14. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic; Vesel, Alenka; Marinšek, Marjan; Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona

    2014-11-01

    Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor® and Topas®.

  15. 'MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE' INFECTION: ROLE OF A SURFACE PROTEIN IN THE ATTACHMENT ORGANELLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attachment of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to host cells by means of a specialized terminus initiates infection. Monoclonal antibodies to a surface protein (Pl) inhibit this process, and react with a region of the tip covered with peplomer-like particles. Since antibodies against the Pl...

  16. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vesel, Alenka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Marinšek, Marjan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona, E-mail: polona.znidarsic@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A very efficient approach for immobilization of cells into microreactors is presented. • It is applicable to various materials, including PFA and cyclic olefin (co)polymers. • It was used to immobilize different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes. • Cells were immobilized on the surface in high density and showed good stability. • Mechanisms of APTES interactions with target materials are proposed. - Abstract: Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor{sup ®} and Topas{sup ®}.

  17. Revealing Surface Waters on an Antifreeze Protein by Fusion Protein Crystallography Combined with Molecular Dynamic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianjun; Gauthier, Sherry Y; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2015-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) adsorb to ice through an extensive, flat, relatively hydrophobic surface. It has been suggested that this ice-binding site (IBS) organizes surface waters into an ice-like clathrate arrangement that matches and fuses to the quasi-liquid layer on the ice surface. On cooling, these waters join the ice lattice and freeze the AFP to its ligand. Evidence for the generality of this binding mechanism is limited because AFPs tend to crystallize with their IBS as a preferred protein-protein contact surface, which displaces some bound waters. Type III AFP is a 7 kDa globular protein with an IBS made up two adjacent surfaces. In the crystal structure of the most active isoform (QAE1), the part of the IBS that docks to the primary prism plane of ice is partially exposed to solvent and has clathrate waters present that match this plane of ice. The adjacent IBS, which matches the pyramidal plane of ice, is involved in protein-protein crystal contacts with few surface waters. Here we have changed the protein-protein contacts in the ice-binding region by crystallizing a fusion of QAE1 to maltose-binding protein. In this 1.9 Å structure, the IBS that fits the pyramidal plane of ice is exposed to solvent. By combining crystallography data with MD simulations, the surface waters on both sides of the IBS were revealed and match well with the target ice planes. The waters on the pyramidal plane IBS were loosely constrained, which might explain why other isoforms of type III AFP that lack the prism plane IBS are less active than QAE1. The AFP fusion crystallization method can potentially be used to force the exposure to solvent of the IBS on other AFPs to reveal the locations of key surface waters. PMID:26371748

  18. Silver nanoparticle protein corona composition in cell culture media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H Shannahan

    Full Text Available The potential applications of nanomaterials as drug delivery systems and in other products continue to expand. Upon introduction into physiological environments and driven by energetics, nanomaterials readily associate proteins forming a protein corona (PC on their surface. This PC influences the nanomaterial's surface characteristics and may impact their interaction with cells. To determine the biological impact of nanomaterial exposure as well as nanotherapeutic applications, it is necessary to understand PC formation. Utilizing a label-free mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach, we examined the composition of the PC for a set of four silver nanoparticles (AgNPs including citrate-stabilized and polyvinlypyrrolidone-stabilized (PVP colloidal silver (20 or 110 nm diameter. To simulate cell culture conditions, AgNPs were incubated for 1 h in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, washed, coronal proteins solubilized, and proteins identified and quantified by label-free LC-MS/MS. To determine which attributes influence PC formation, the AgNPs were characterized in both water and cell culture media with 10% FBS. All AgNPs associated a common subset of 11 proteins including albumin, apolipoproteins, keratins, and other serum proteins. 110 nm citrate- and PVP-stabilized AgNPs were found to bind the greatest number of proteins (79 and 85 respectively compared to 20 nm citrate- and PVP-stabilized AgNPs (45 and 48 respectively, suggesting a difference in PC formation based on surface curvature. While no relationships were found for other protein parameters (isoelectric point or aliphatic index, the PC on 20 nm AgNPs (PVP and citrate consisted of more hydrophobic proteins compared to 110 nm AgNPs implying that this class of proteins are more receptive to curvature-induced folding and crowding in exchange for an increased hydration in the aqueous environment. These observations demonstrate the significance of

  19. A global optimization algorithm for protein surface alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerra Concettina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A relevant problem in drug design is the comparison and recognition of protein binding sites. Binding sites recognition is generally based on geometry often combined with physico-chemical properties of the site since the conformation, size and chemical composition of the protein surface are all relevant for the interaction with a specific ligand. Several matching strategies have been designed for the recognition of protein-ligand binding sites and of protein-protein interfaces but the problem cannot be considered solved. Results In this paper we propose a new method for local structural alignment of protein surfaces based on continuous global optimization techniques. Given the three-dimensional structures of two proteins, the method finds the isometric transformation (rotation plus translation that best superimposes active regions of two structures. We draw our inspiration from the well-known Iterative Closest Point (ICP method for three-dimensional (3D shapes registration. Our main contribution is in the adoption of a controlled random search as a more efficient global optimization approach along with a new dissimilarity measure. The reported computational experience and comparison show viability of the proposed approach. Conclusions Our method performs well to detect similarity in binding sites when this in fact exists. In the future we plan to do a more comprehensive evaluation of the method by considering large datasets of non-redundant proteins and applying a clustering technique to the results of all comparisons to classify binding sites.

  20. Are there generic mechanisms governing interactions between nanoparticles and cells? Epitope mapping the outer layer of the protein material interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Iseult

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of a general paradigm for cell-biomaterial and cell-nanoparticle interactions. The basis of the paradigm is that the nature of the biomaterial or nanoparticle surface is not the important parameter, but rather the nature of the outermost layer of adsorbed proteins as well as long-lived misfolded proteins shed from the surfaces. If the adsorbed protein is irreversibly adsorbed onto the surface it may be sufficiently disrupted so that a variety of peptide units (here termed “cryptic epitopes”) not usually expressed in nature at the surface of the protein become exposed. Similarly, where there is a slow exchange time with the surface, surface-induced perturbations may lead to long-lived misfolded proteins being shed from the surface and continuing to express altered surface peptide sequences. In cases where the proteins have lost most of their tertiary structure, anomalous peptide sequences and geometries that are not displayed at the surface by the native protein may in fact be presented after surface adsorption of a protein. Such anomalous surface expressions could contain novel epitopes that trigger various signalling pathways or even diseases. Thus, future approaches to understanding cell-biomaterial and cell-nanoparticle interactions should focus on characterising the outer layer of the adsorbed proteins, or “epitope mapping” as well as examining the possibility of formation of essentially “new” proteins as a result of desorption of conformationally or geometrically altered proteins.

  1. Proteinaceous determinants of surface colonization in bacteria: Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation from a protein secretion perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MickaelDesvaux

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial colonization of biotic or abiotic surfaces results from two quite distinct physiological processes, namely bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Broadly speaking, a biofilm is defined as the sessile development of microbial cells. Biofilm formation arises following bacterial adhesion but not all single bacterial cells adhering reversibly or irreversibly engage inexorably into a sessile mode of growth. Among molecular determinants promoting bacterial colonization, surface proteins are the most functionally diverse active components. To be present on the bacterial cell surface, though, a protein must be secreted in the first place. Considering the close association of secreted proteins with their cognate secretion systems, the secretome (which refers both to the secretion systems and their protein substrates is a key concept to apprehend the protein secretion and related physiological functions. The protein secretion systems are here considered in light of the differences in the cell-envelope architecture between diderm-LPS (archetypal Gram-negative, monoderm (archetypal Gram-positive and diderm-mycolate (archetypal acid-fast bacteria. Besides, their cognate secreted proteins engaged in the bacterial colonization process are regarded from single protein to supramolecular protein structure as well as the non-classical protein secretion. This state-of-the-art on the complement of the secretome (the secretion systems and their cognate effectors involved in the surface colonization process in diderm-LPS and monoderm bacteria paves the way for future research directions in the field.

  2. Interaction of Serum Proteins with Surface of Hemodialysis Fiber Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rehana; Shirako, Yuji; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2012-08-01

    The poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-covered hydrophilic surface of hollow-fiber membranes (fiber membrane, hereafter) for hemodialysis was mechanically probed using modified tips on an atomic force microscope (AFM) with covalent crosslinkers and several types of serum protein. The retraction part of many of the force extension (F-E) curves obtained with AFM tips coated with serum albumin had a long and smooth extension up to 200-300 nm indicating forced elongation of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) chains. When fibrinogen-coated tips were used, long extension F-E curves up to 500 nm with multiple peaks were obtained in addition to smooth curves most likely reflecting the unfolding of fibrinogen molecules. The results indicated that individual polymer chains had a significant affinity toward serum proteins. The adhesion frequency of tips coated with serum proteins was lower on the poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) surface than on the uncoated hydrophobic polysulfone surface.

  3. The Role of Surface Receptor Density in Surface-Initiated Polymerizations for Cancer Cell Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Jacob L; Berron, Brad J

    2016-06-01

    Fluid biopsies potentially offer a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsies for the continual monitoring of metastatic cancer. Current established technologies for isolating circulating tumor cells (CTCs) suffer from poor purity and yield and require fixatives that preclude the collection of viable cells for longitudinal analyses of biological function. Antigen specific lysis (ASL) is a rapid, high-purity method of cell isolation based on targeted protective coatings on antigen-presenting cells and lysis depletion of unprotected antigen-negative cells. In ASL, photoinitiators are specifically labeled on cell surfaces that enable subsequent surface-initiated polymerization. Critically, the significant determinants of process yield have yet to be investigated for this emerging technology. In this work, we show that the labeling density of photoinitiators is strongly correlated with the yield of intact cells during ASL by flow cytometry analysis. Results suggest ASL is capable of delivering ∼25% of targeted cells after isolation using traditional antibody labeling approaches. Monomer formulations of two molecular weights of PEG-diacrylate (Mn ∼ 575 and 3500) are examined. The gelation response during ASL polymerization is also investigated via protein microarray analogues on planar glass. Finally, a density threshold of photoinitiator labeling required for protection during lysis is determined for both monomer formulations. These results indicate ASL is a promising technology for high yield CTC isolation for rare-cell function assays and fluid biopsies. PMID:27206735

  4. MC3T3-E1 Cells on Titanium Surfaces with Nanometer Smoothness and Fibronectin Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Hayakawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to evaluate the viability and total protein contents of osteoblast-like cells on the titanium surface with different surface mechanical treatment, namely, nanometer smoothing (Ra: approximately 2.0 nm and sandblasting (Ra: approximately 1.0 μm, and biochemical treatment, namely, with or without fibronectin immobilization. Fibronectin could be easily immobilized by tresyl chloride-activation technique. MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded on the different titanium surfaces. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. At 1 day of cell culture, there were no significant differences in cell viability among four different titanium surfaces. At 11 days, sandblasted titanium surface with fibronectin immobilization showed the significantly highest cell viability than other titanium surface. No significant differences existed for total protein contents among four different titanium surfaces at 11 days of cell culture. Scanning electron microscopy observation revealed that smoothness of titanium surface produced more spread cell morphologies, but that fibronectin immobilization did not cause any changes of the morphologies of attached cells. Fibronectin immobilization provided greater amount of the number of attached cells and better arrangement of attached cells. In conclusion, the combination of sandblasting and fibronectin immobilization enhanced the cell viability and fibronectin immobilization providing better arrangements of attached cells.

  5. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-3

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda R Bitencourt; Elaine C Vicentin; Jimenez, Maria C.; Ricardo Ricci; Leite, Juliana A.; Fabio T Costa; Luis C Ferreira; Bruce Russell; François Nosten; Laurent Rénia; Galinski, Mary R.; Barnwell, John W.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Soares, Irene S

    2013-01-01

    A recent clinical trial in African children demonstrated the potential utility of merozoite surface protein (MSP)-3 as a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The present study evaluated the use of Plasmodium vivax MSP-3 (PvMSP-3) as a target antigen in vaccine formulations against malaria caused by P. vivax. Recombinant proteins representing MSP-3α and MSP-3β of P. vivax were expressed as soluble histidine-tagged bacterial fusions. Antigenicity during natural infection was evaluated...

  6. Cell adhesion on Ti surface with controlled roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos-Asperilla, L.; Garcia-Alonso, M. C.; Escudero, M. L.; Alonso, C.

    2015-07-01

    In this report, the in situ interaction between Saos-2 osteoblast cells and a smooth Ti surface was examined over time. The adhesion kinetics and mechanisms of cellular proliferation were monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The rate of Saos-2 attachment on Ti surfaces, obtained from the measurements performed with the QCM, is a first-order reaction, with k=2.10{sup -}3 min{sup -}1. The impedance measurements indicate that in the absence of cells, the Ti resistance diminishes over time (7 days), due to the presence of amino acids and proteins from the culture medium that have been adsorbed, while in the presence of osteoblasts, this decrease is much greater because of the compounds generated by the cells that accelerate the dissolution of Ti. (Author)

  7. Selectivity by small-molecule inhibitors of protein interactions can be driven by protein surface fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Johnson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Small-molecules that inhibit interactions between specific pairs of proteins have long represented a promising avenue for therapeutic intervention in a variety of settings. Structural studies have shown that in many cases, the inhibitor-bound protein adopts a conformation that is distinct from its unbound and its protein-bound conformations. This plasticity of the protein surface presents a major challenge in predicting which members of a protein family will be inhibited by a given ligand. Here, we use biased simulations of Bcl-2-family proteins to generate ensembles of low-energy conformations that contain surface pockets suitable for small molecule binding. We find that the resulting conformational ensembles include surface pockets that mimic those observed in inhibitor-bound crystal structures. Next, we find that the ensembles generated using different members of this protein family are overlapping but distinct, and that the activity of a given compound against a particular family member (ligand selectivity can be predicted from whether the corresponding ensemble samples a complementary surface pocket. Finally, we find that each ensemble includes certain surface pockets that are not shared by any other family member: while no inhibitors have yet been identified to take advantage of these pockets, we expect that chemical scaffolds complementing these "distinct" pockets will prove highly selective for their targets. The opportunity to achieve target selectivity within a protein family by exploiting differences in surface fluctuations represents a new paradigm that may facilitate design of family-selective small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  8. Surface N-glycoproteome patterns reveal key proteins of neuronal differentiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tylečková, Jiřina; Valeková, Ivona; Žižková, Martina; Rákocyová, Michaela; Maršala, S.; Maršala, M.; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    Poznaň : PTP, 2015. s. 1-1. [Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference (CEEPC) /9./. 15.06.2015-18.06.2015, Poznaň] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : cell adhesion proteins * cell surface capture * neuronal differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  9. Production of Borreliacidal Antibody to Outer Surface Protein A In Vitro and Modulation by Interleukin-4

    OpenAIRE

    Munson, Erik L.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Jobe, Dean A.; Lovrich, Steven D.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2000-01-01

    Borreliacidal antibody production is one of several parameters for establishing the effectiveness of Borrelia burgdorferi vaccines. The production of borreliacidal antibody was studied in vitro by culturing immune lymph node cells with macrophages and B. burgdorferi. We showed that borreliacidal antibody, directed primarily against outer surface protein A (OspA), was readily produced by lymph node cells obtained from C3H/HeJ mice vaccinated with formalin-inactivated B. burgdorferi in aluminum...

  10. Proteome Analysis and Serological Characterization of Surface-Exposed Proteins of Rickettsia heilongjiangensis

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Yong; Xiong, Xiaolu; Wang, Xile; Duan, Changsong; Jia, Yinjun; Jiao, Jun; Gong, Wenping; Wen, Bohai

    2013-01-01

    Background Rickettsia heilongjiangensis, the agent of Far-Eastern spotted fever (FESF), is an obligate intracellular bacterium. The surface-exposed proteins (SEPs) of rickettsiae are involved in rickettsial adherence to and invasion of host cells, intracellular bacterial growth, and/or interaction with immune cells. They are also potential molecular candidates for the development of diagnostic reagents and vaccines against rickettsiosis. Methods R. heilongjiangensis SEPs were identified by bi...

  11. Soluble surface proteins from Helicobacter pylori activate monocytes/macrophages by lipopolysaccharide-independent mechanism.

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, U E; Perez-Perez, G I; Wahl, L. M.; Wahl, S M; Blaser, M J; Smith, P. D.

    1991-01-01

    The inflammatory lesions associated with Helicobacter pylori gastritis and duodenitis contain large numbers of mononuclear cells. The close proximity of H. pylori to gastric mucosa suggests that the organism interacts with mononuclear cells, thereby modulating the inflammatory response. To investigate the role of monocytes/macrophages in this response, we examined the effect of whole H. pylori bacteria, H. pylori surface proteins, and H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on purified human monoc...

  12. Surface proteins of Propionibacterium freudenreichii are involved in its anti-inflammatory properties.

    OpenAIRE

    Le Maréchal, Caroline; Péton, Vincent; Plé, Coline; Vroland, Christophe; Jardin, Julien; Briard-Bion, Valérie; Durant, Gaël; Chuat, Victoria; Loux, Valentin; Foligné, Benoit; Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Falentin, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium freudenreichii is a beneficial bacterium used in the food industry as a vitamin producer, as a bio-preservative, as a cheese ripening starter and as a probiotic. It is known to adhere to the intestinal epithelial cells and mucus and to modulate important functions of the gut mucosa, including cell proliferation and immune response. Adhesion of probiotics and cross-talk with the host rely on the presence of key surface proteins, still poorly identified. Identification of the ...

  13. Surface energetics and protein-protein interactions: analysis and mechanistic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Claudio; Morra, Giulia; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the molecular level is a fundamental task in the design of new drugs, the prediction of protein function and the clarification of the mechanisms of (dis)regulation of biochemical pathways. In this study, we use a novel computational approach to investigate the energetics of aminoacid networks located on the surface of proteins, isolated and in complex with their respective partners. Interestingly, the analysis of individual proteins identifies patches of surface residues that, when mapped on the structure of their respective complexes, reveal regions of residue-pair couplings that extend across the binding interfaces, forming continuous motifs. An enhanced effect is visible across the proteins of the dataset forming larger quaternary assemblies. The method indicates the presence of energetic signatures in the isolated proteins that are retained in the bound form, which we hypothesize to determine binding orientation upon complex formation. We propose our method, BLUEPRINT, as a complement to different approaches ranging from the ab-initio characterization of PPIs, to protein-protein docking algorithms, for the physico-chemical and functional investigation of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27050828

  14. Quantifying protein-protein interactions in the ubiquitin pathway by surface plasmon resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2005-01-01

    The commercial availability of instruments, such as Biacore, that are capable of monitoring surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has greatly simplified the quantification of protein-protein interactions. Already, this technique has been used for some studies of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we...

  15. Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Stem Cell Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Guo-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Stress response is well appreciated to induce the expression of heat shock proteins (Hsps) in the cell. Numerous studies have demonstrated that Hsps function as molecular chaperones in the stabilization of intracellular proteins, repairing damaged proteins, and assisting in protein translocation. Various kinds of stem cells (embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells) have to maintain their stemness and, under certain circumstances, undergo stress. Therefore, Hs...

  16. Surface characteristics determining the cell compatibility of ionically cross-linked alginate gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we investigated differences in the characteristics determining the suitability of five types of ion (Fe3+, Al3+, Ca2+, Ba2+ and Sr2+)-cross-linked alginate films as culture substrates for cells. Human dermal fibroblasts were cultured on each alginate film to examine the cell affinity of the alginates. Since cell behavior on the surface of a material is dependent on the proteins adsorbed to it, we investigated the protein adsorption ability and surface features (wettability, morphology and charge) related to the protein adsorption abilities of alginate films. We observed that ferric, aluminum and barium ion-cross-linked alginate films supported better cell growth and adsorbed higher amounts of serum proteins than other types. Surface wettability analysis demonstrated that ferric and aluminum ion-cross-linked alginates had moderate hydrophilic surfaces, while other types showed highly hydrophilic surfaces. The roughness was exhibited only on barium ion-cross-linked alginate surface. Surface charge measurements revealed that alginate films had negatively charged surfaces, and showed little difference among the five types of gel. These results indicate that the critical factors of ionically cross-linked alginate films determining the protein adsorption ability required for their cell compatibility may be surface wettability and morphology. (paper)

  17. Identification of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Surface Proteins by Shotgun Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, Matthew S.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2009-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause the majority of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in humans. In the process of identifying candidate antigens for a vaccine, two methods for the identification of the UPEC surface proteome during growth in human urine were investigated. The first approach utilized a protease to ‘shave’ surface-exposed peptides from the bacterial cell surface and identify them by mass spectrometry. Although this approach has been successfully applied to a Gram-p...

  18. Asymmetric protein localization in planar cell polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The polarization of epithelial cells along an axis orthogonal to their apical-basal axis is increasingly recognized for roles in a variety of developmental events and physiological functions. While now studied in many model organisms, mechanistic understanding is rooted in intensive investigations of Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) in Drosophila. Consensus has emerged that two molecular modules, referred to here as the global and core modules, operate upstream of effector proteins to produce morphological PCP. Proteins of the core module develop subcellular asymmetry, accumulating in two groups on opposite sides of cells, consistent with proposed functions in producing cell polarity and in communicating that polarity between neighboring cells. Less clear are the molecular and cell biological mechanisms underlying core module function in the generation and communication of subcellular asymmetry, and the relationship between the global and core modules. In this review, we discuss these two unresolved questions, highlighting important studies and potentially enlightening avenues for further investigation. It is likely that results from Drosophila will continue to inform our views of the growing list of examples of PCP in vertebrate systems. PMID:23140624

  19. Biological Evaluation of Single Cell Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the nutritional value of single cell protein (SCP) was evaluated as a non conventional protein source produced by fermenting fungal local strains of Trichoderma longibrachiatum, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus and Penicillium funiculosum with alkali treated sugar cane bagasse. Amino acid analysis revealed that the produced SCP contains essential and non essential amino acids. Male mice were fed on normal (basal) diet which contains 18% conventional protein and served as control group. In the second (T1) and the third (T2) group, the animals were fed on a diet in which 15% and 30% of conventional protein source were replaced by SCP, respectively. At intervals of 15, 30, 45 and 60 days, mice were sacrificed and the blood samples were collected for the biochemical evaluation. The daily averages of body weight were significantly higher with group T2 than group T1. Where as, the kidney weights in groups (T1) and (T2) were significantly increased as compared with control. A non significant difference between the tested groups in the enzyme activities of AST, ALT and GSH content of liver tissue were recorded. While, cholesterol and triglycerides contents showed a significant decrease in both (T1) and (T2) groups as compared with control. The recorded values of the serum hormone (T4), ALP activities, albumin and A/G ratio did not changed by the previous treatments. Serum levels of total protein, urea, creatinine and uric acid were higher for groups (T1) and (T2) than the control group. In conclusion, partial substitution of soy bean protein in mice diet with single cell protein (15%) improved the mice growth without any adverse effects on some of the physiological functions tested

  20. Iodo-gen-catalysed iodination for identification of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins of Escherichia coli K12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface proteins of Escherichia coli K12 were identified by radiolabelling using 1,3,4,6 - tatrachloro, 3-alpha, 6-alpha - diphenylgycoluryl (Iodo-Gen) and 131I. Labelled proteins were localized in the outer membrane of the cells. Using this technique it has been possible to observe technique it has been possible to observe that the eletrophoretic pattern of surface proteins changes according to the growth phases in culture. Radiolabelling of E.coli cells inculbated at 420C showed that the syntheses of two surface proteins were temperature-inducible. At least one such protein may be involved in the process of cell division in E.coli K12. (author)

  1. Hepatitis B virus large surface protein: function and fame

    OpenAIRE

    Churin, Yuri; Roderfeld, Martin; Roeb, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. HBV life cycle begins with viral attachment to hepatocytes, mediated by the large HBV surface protein (LHBs). Identification of the sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) as a HBV receptor has revealed a suitable target for viral entry inhibition. Analysis of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) level is a non-invasive diagnostic parameter that imp...

  2. Simian and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Nef Proteins Use Different Surfaces To Downregulate Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigen Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Swigut, Tomek; Iafrate, A. John; Muench, Jan; Kirchhoff, Frank; Skowronski, Jacek

    2000-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Nef proteins are related regulatory proteins that share several functions, including the ability to downregulate class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and CD4 expression on the cell surface and to alter T-cell-receptor-initiated signal transduction in T cells. We compared the mechanisms used by SIV mac239 Nef and HIV-1 Nef to downregulate class I MHC and found that the ability of SIV Nef to downregula...

  3. Surface proteins of radiation-induced and radiation leukemia virus-induced thymic lymphosarcomas in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thymic lymphosarcomas (TLS) were induced in C57BL mice by X-rays or by Radiation Leukemia Virus (RadLV) and their surface glycoproteins (gps) compared after cell-surface radio-iodination and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). All lymphocytic antigens tested (T200, 170/100, Thy-1) and proteins with apparent molecular weight (Mr) around 120,000 and 100,000 were present on all tumours, as well as retrovirus - encoded proteins but considerable variation in the Mr of several serologically-related proteins was observed. Therefore, the TLS in C57BL mice form a heterogeneous group, suggesting that T cells can be transformed at different stages of maturation. The possibility that transformation allows or even triggers differentiation is also entertained. (author)

  4. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    Galectin-1 is known to be one of the extracellular matrix proteins. To elucidate the biological roles of galectin-1 in cell adhesion and invasion of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we performed cell adhesion and invasion assays using the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line H-ALCL, which was previously established in our laboratory. From the cell surface lectin array, treatment with neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens which cleaves all linkage types of cell surface sialic acid enhanced Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Helix pomatia (HPA) and Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA) lectin binding reactivity to cell surface of lymphoma cells suggesting that neuraminidase removes cell surface sialic acid. In cell adhesion and invasion assays treatment with neuraminidase markedly enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1 and decreased cell invasive capacity through galectin-1. α2,6-linked sialic acid may be involved in masking the effect of the interaction between galectin-1 and cell surface glycans. H-ALCL cells expressed the β-galactoside-α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6Gal1. On resialylation assay by recombinant ST6Gal1 with CMP-Neu5Ac, α2,6-resialylation of L-PHA reactive oligosaccharide by ST6Gal1 resulted in inhibition of H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-1 compared to the desialylated H-ALCL cells. On knockdown experiments, knockdown of ST6Gal1 dramatically enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1. N-glycosylation inhibitor swainsonine treatment resulted in enhancement of cell adhesion to galectin-1. In glycomic analysis using the lectin blocking assay treatment with PNA, Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin), Glycine max (SBA), Helix pomatia (HPA), Vicia villosa (VVA), Ulex europaeus (UEA-1), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA), Phaseolus vulgaris-E4 (E-PHA), Datura stramonium (DSA) lectins resulted in modulation of lymphoma cell to galectin-1 suggesting that several types of glycans may regulate cell adhesion to galectin-1 by

  5. Utilizing Yeast Surface Human Proteome Display Libraries to Identify Small Molecule-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact with small bioactive molecules is a critical but often difficult and time-consuming step in understanding cellular signaling pathways or molecular mechanisms of drug action. Numerous methods for identifying small molecule-interacting proteins have been developed and utilized, including affinity-based purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and three-hybrid approaches. Although all these methods have been used successfully, there remains a need for additional techniques for analyzing small molecule-protein interactions. A promising method for identifying small molecule-protein interactions is affinity-based selection of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries. Large and diverse libraries displaying human protein fragments on the surface of yeast cells have been constructed and subjected to FACS-based enrichment followed by comprehensive exon microarray-based output analysis to identify protein fragments with affinity for small molecule ligands. In a recent example, a proteome-wide search has been successfully carried out to identify cellular proteins binding to the signaling lipids PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Known phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins such as pleckstrin homology domains were identified, as well as many novel interactions. Intriguingly, many novel nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins were discovered. Although the existence of an independent pool of nuclear phosphatidylinositides has been known about for some time, their functions and mechanism of action remain obscure. Thus, the identification and subsequent study of nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins is expected to bring new insights to this important biological question. Based on the success with phosphatidylinositides, it is expected that the screening of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries will be of general use for the discovery of novel small

  6. Label-free measuring and mapping of binding kinetics of membrane proteins in single living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yunze; Wang, Shaopeng; Nagaraj, Vinay J.; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Jie; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-10-01

    Membrane proteins mediate a variety of cellular responses to extracellular signals. Although membrane proteins are studied intensively for their values as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets, in situ investigation of the binding kinetics of membrane proteins with their ligands has been a challenge. Traditional approaches isolate membrane proteins and then study them ex situ, which does not reflect accurately their native structures and functions. We present a label-free plasmonic microscopy method to map the local binding kinetics of membrane proteins in their native environment. This analytical method can perform simultaneous plasmonic and fluorescence imaging, and thus make it possible to combine the strengths of both label-based and label-free techniques in one system. Using this method, we determined the distribution of membrane proteins on the surface of single cells and the local binding kinetic constants of different membrane proteins. Furthermore, we studied the polarization of the membrane proteins on the cell surface during chemotaxis.

  7. Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor (PEDF) Binds to Cell-surface F1-ATP Synthase

    OpenAIRE

    NOTARI, LUIGI; Arakaki, Naokatu; Mueller, David; Meier, Scott; Amaral, Juan; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a potent blocker of angiogenesis in vivo, and of endothelial cell migration and tubule formation, binds with high affinity to a yet unknown protein on the surface of endothelial cells. Given that protein fingerprinting suggested a match of a ~60-kDa PEDF-binding protein in bovine retina to Bos taurus F1-ATP synthase β-subunit, and that F1F0-ATP synthase components have been identified recently as cell-surface receptors, we examined the direct binding ...

  8. Impaired cell surface expression of HLA-B antigens on mesenchymal stem cells and muscle cell progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Nehlin, Jan; Sabir, Hardee Jawad;

    2010-01-01

    HLA class-I expression is weak in embryonic stem cells but increases rapidly during lineage progression. It is unknown whether all three classical HLA class-I antigens follow the same developmental program. In the present study, we investigated allele-specific expression of HLA-A, -B, and -C...... at the mRNA and protein levels on human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue as well as striated muscle satellite cells and lymphocytes. Using multicolour flow cytometry, we found high cell surface expression of HLA-A on all stem cells and PBMC examined. Surprisingly, HLA-B was either...... undetectable or very weakly expressed on all stem cells protecting them from complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) using relevant human anti-B and anti-Cw sera. IFNgamma stimulation for 48-72 h was required to induce full HLA-B protein expression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed that IFNgamma induced...

  9. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhaime, Michael J; Page, Khaliph O; Varela, Fausto A; Murray, Andrew S; Silverman, Michael E; Zoratti, Gina L; List, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1476-1483, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26297835

  10. Surface-protein interactions on different stainless steel grades: effects of protein adsorption, surface changes and metal release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Y; Wang, X; Hedberg, J; Lundin, M; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2013-04-01

    Implantation using stainless steels (SS) is an example where an understanding of protein-induced metal release from SS is important when assessing potential toxicological risks. Here, the protein-induced metal release was investigated for austenitic (AISI 304, 310, and 316L), ferritic (AISI 430), and duplex (AISI 2205) grades in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution containing either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme (LSZ). The results show that both BSA and LSZ induce a significant enrichment of chromium in the surface oxide of all stainless steel grades. Both proteins induced an enhanced extent of released iron, chromium, nickel and manganese, very significant in the case of BSA (up to 40-fold increase), whereas both proteins reduced the corrosion resistance of SS, with the reverse situation for iron metal (reduced corrosion rates and reduced metal release in the presence of proteins). A full monolayer coverage is necessary to induce the effects observed. PMID:23378148

  11. Techniques to Study Specific Cell-Surface Receptor-Mediated Cellular Vitamin A Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    KAWAGUCHI, RIKI; Sun, Hui

    2010-01-01

    STRA6 is a multitransmembrane domain protein that was recently identified as the cell-surface receptor for plasma retinol binding protein (RBP), the vitamin A carrier protein in the blood. STRA6 binds to RBP with high affinity and mediates cellular uptake of vitamin A from RBP. It is not homologous to any known receptors, transporters, and channels, and it represents a new class of membrane transport protein. Consistent with the diverse physiological functions of vitamin A, STRA6 is widely ex...

  12. Proteinase production in Pseudomonas fluorescens ON2 is affected by carbon sources and allows surface-attached but not planktonic cells to utilize protein for growth in lake water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Mette Haubjerg; Worm, Jakob; Jørgensen, Niels O. G.;

    2012-01-01

    Proteins may be an important carbon and nitrogen source to bacteria in aquatic habitats, yet knowledge on the actual utilization of this substrate by proteolytic bacteria is scarce. In the present study, Pseudomonas fluorescens ON2 produced an alkaline proteinase (AprX) during growth and there was...... no evidence for cell density-regulated or starvation-induced proteinase production. Proteinase was produced in the absence of an organic nitrogen source, and citrate had a negative while glucose had a positive effect on the production. Hence P. fluorescens ON2 seems to exploit protein sources by...

  13. Surface Grafted Glycopolymer Brushes to Enhance Selective Adhesion of HepG2 Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chernyy, Sergey; Jensen, Bettina Elisabeth Brøgger; Shimizu, Kyoko;

    2013-01-01

    process on a previously formed poly(LAMA) brushes. The morphology of human hepatocellular carcinoma cancer cells (HepG2) on the comb-like poly(LAMA) brush layer has been studied. The fluorescent images of the HepG2 cells on the glycopolymer brush surface display distinct protrusions that extend outside of...... the cell periphery. On the other hand the cells on bare glass substrate display spheroid morphology. Further analysis using ToF-SIMS imaging shows that the HepG2 cells on glycopolymer surfaces is enriched with protein fragment along the cell periphery which is absent in the case of cells on bare glass...

  14. Protein Dynamics in Individual Human Cells: Experiment and Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Ariel Aharon; Kalisky, Tomer; Mayo, Avi; Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Danon, Tamar; Issaeva, Irina; Perzov, Natalie; Sigal, Alex; Alon, Uri; Isalan, Mark; Kopito, Ronen; Milo, Ron

    2009-01-01

    A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle–dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time pe...

  15. Overview of Production of Protein Using Cell-free Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Fei Philip

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important steps in protein research is production of the target protein. Cell based systems are mature tools that have long been used to express recombinant proteins by manipulation of the expression organisms. However, it is often challenging to find suitable cell systems that allow for rapid screening of conditions and constructs to produce properly folded, functional proteins in a cost effective manner. As a result, cell-free protein production emerged as an attractive alte...

  16. Display of recombinant proteins at the surface of lactic acid bacteria: strategies and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michon, C; Langella, P; Eijsink, V G H; Mathiesen, G; Chatel, J M

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are promising vectors of choice to deliver active molecules to mucosal tissues. They are recognized as safe by the World Health Organization and some strains have probiotic properties. The wide range of potential applications of LAB-driven mucosal delivery includes control of inflammatory bowel disease, vaccine delivery, and management of auto-immune diseases. Because of this potential, strategies for the display of proteins at the surface of LAB are gaining interest. To display a protein at the surface of LAB, a signal peptide and an anchor domain are necessary. The recombinant protein can be attached to the membrane layer, using a transmembrane anchor or a lipoprotein-anchor, or to the cell wall, by a covalent link using sortase mediated anchoring via the LPXTG motif, or by non-covalent liaisons employing binding domains such as LysM or WxL. Both the stability and functionality of the displayed proteins will be affected by the kind of anchor used. The most commonly surfaced exposed recombinant proteins produced in LAB are antigens and antibodies and the most commonly used LAB are lactococci and lactobacilli. Although it is not necessarily so that surface-display is the preferred localization in all cases, it has been shown that for certain applications, such as delivery of the human papillomavirus E7 antigen, surface-display elicits better biological responses, compared to cytosolic expression or secretion. Recent developments include the display of peptides and proteins targeting host cell receptors, for the purpose of enhancing the interactions between LAB and host. Surface-display technologies have other potential applications, such as degradation of biomass, which is of importance for some potential industrial applications of LAB. PMID:27142045

  17. Methods To Identify Aptamers against Cell Surface Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Ducongé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are nucleic acid-based ligands identified through a process of molecular evolution named SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment. During the last 10-15 years, numerous aptamers have been developed specifically against targets present on or associated with the surface of human cells or infectious pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites. Several of the aptamers have been described as potent probes, rivalling antibodies, for use in flow cytometry or microscopy. Some have also been used as drugs by inhibiting or activating functions of their targets in a manner similar to neutralizing or agonistic antibodies. Additionally, it is straightforward to conjugate aptamers to other agents without losing their affinity and they have successfully been used in vitro and in vivo to deliver drugs, siRNA, nanoparticles or contrast agents to target cells. Hence, aptamers identified against cell surface biomarkers represent a promising class of ligands. This review presents the different strategies of SELEX that have been developed to identify aptamers for cell surface-associated proteins as well as some of the methods that are used to study their binding on living cells.

  18. Mitogen-activated protein kinases mediate Mycobacterium tuberculosis–induced CD44 surface expression in monocytes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Natarajan Palaniappan; S Anbalagan; Sujatha Narayanan

    2012-03-01

    CD44, an adhesion molecule, has been reported to be a binding site for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) in macrophages and it also mediates mycobacterial phagocytosis, macrophage recruitment and protective immunity against pulmonary tuberculosis in vivo. However, the signalling pathways that are involved in M. tuberculosis–induced CD44 surface expression in monocytic cells are currently unknown. Exposure of THP-1 human monocytes to M. tuberculosis H37Rv and H37Ra induced distinct, time-dependent, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1, extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3/6, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-jun N-terminal kinases. The strains also differed in their usage of CD14 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) receptors in mediating mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain induced lower CD44 surface expression and tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, whereas H37Ra the reverse. Using highly specific inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-jun N-terminal kinase, we report that inhibition of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 and c-jun N-terminal kinases increases, but that inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase decreases M. tuberculosis–induced CD44 surface expression in THP-1 human monocytes.

  19. Pathogenic Leptospira species express surface-exposed proteins belonging to the bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, James; Barocchi, Michele A; Croda, Julio; Young, Tracy A; Sanchez, Yolanda; Siqueira, Isadora; Bolin, Carole A; Reis, Mitermayer G; Riley, Lee W; Haake, David A; Ko, Albert I

    2003-08-01

    Proteins with bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains, such as the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis invasin and Escherichia coli intimin, are surface-expressed proteins that mediate host mammalian cell invasion or attachment. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a new family of Big domain proteins, referred to as Lig (leptospiral Ig-like) proteins, in pathogenic Leptospira. Screening of L. interrogans and L. kirschneri expression libraries with sera from leptospirosis patients identified 13 lambda phage clones that encode tandem repeats of the 90 amino acid Big domain. Two lig genes, designated ligA and ligB, and one pseudogene, ligC, were identified. The ligA and ligB genes encode amino-terminal lipoprotein signal peptides followed by 10 or 11 Big domain repeats and, in the case of ligB, a unique carboxy-terminal non-repeat domain. The organization of ligC is similar to that of ligB but contains mutations that disrupt the reading frame. The lig sequences are present in pathogenic but not saprophytic Leptospira species. LigA and LigB are expressed by a variety of virulent leptospiral strains. Loss of Lig protein and RNA transcript expression is correlated with the observed loss of virulence during culture attenuation of pathogenic strains. High-pressure freeze substitution followed by immunocytochemical electron microscopy confirmed that the Lig proteins were localized to the bacterial surface. Immunoblot studies with patient sera found that the Lig proteins are a major antigen recognized during the acute host infection. These observations demonstrate that the Lig proteins are a newly identified surface protein of pathogenic Leptospira, which by analogy to other bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily virulence factors, may play a role in host cell attachment and invasion during leptospiral pathogenesis. PMID:12890019

  20. A restricted set of apical proteins recycle through the trans-Golgi network in MDCK cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Brändli, A W; Simons, K

    1989-01-01

    Sorting of newly synthesized proteins destined for the apical plasma membrane takes place in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) in MDCK cells. This process is most likely receptor mediated and requires components that recycle between both compartments. We have developed an assay to detect apical proteins that recycle through the sialyltransferase-containing TGN. Cell surface glycoproteins were exogalactosylated apically using a mutant cell line derived from MDCK, MDCKII-RCAr. The mutant exhibits i...

  1. Organic bioelectronics probing conformational changes in surface confined proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Alberga, Domenico; Manoli, Kyriaki; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe F.; Magliulo, Maria; Palazzo, Gerardo; Giordano, Francesco; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Torsi, Luisa

    2016-06-01

    The study of proteins confined on a surface has attracted a great deal of attention due to its relevance in the development of bio-systems for laboratory and clinical settings. In this respect, organic bio-electronic platforms can be used as tools to achieve a deeper understanding of the processes involving protein interfaces. In this work, biotin-binding proteins have been integrated in two different organic thin-film transistor (TFT) configurations to separately address the changes occurring in the protein-ligand complex morphology and dipole moment. This has been achieved by decoupling the output current change upon binding, taken as the transducing signal, into its component figures of merit. In particular, the threshold voltage is related to the protein dipole moment, while the field-effect mobility is associated with conformational changes occurring in the proteins of the layer when ligand binding occurs. Molecular Dynamics simulations on the whole avidin tetramer in presence and absence of ligands were carried out, to evaluate how the tight interactions with the ligand affect the protein dipole moment and the conformation of the loops surrounding the binding pocket. These simulations allow assembling a rather complete picture of the studied interaction processes and support the interpretation of the experimental results.

  2. Organic bioelectronics probing conformational changes in surface confined proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Alberga, Domenico; Manoli, Kyriaki; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe F; Magliulo, Maria; Palazzo, Gerardo; Giordano, Francesco; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Torsi, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The study of proteins confined on a surface has attracted a great deal of attention due to its relevance in the development of bio-systems for laboratory and clinical settings. In this respect, organic bio-electronic platforms can be used as tools to achieve a deeper understanding of the processes involving protein interfaces. In this work, biotin-binding proteins have been integrated in two different organic thin-film transistor (TFT) configurations to separately address the changes occurring in the protein-ligand complex morphology and dipole moment. This has been achieved by decoupling the output current change upon binding, taken as the transducing signal, into its component figures of merit. In particular, the threshold voltage is related to the protein dipole moment, while the field-effect mobility is associated with conformational changes occurring in the proteins of the layer when ligand binding occurs. Molecular Dynamics simulations on the whole avidin tetramer in presence and absence of ligands were carried out, to evaluate how the tight interactions with the ligand affect the protein dipole moment and the conformation of the loops surrounding the binding pocket. These simulations allow assembling a rather complete picture of the studied interaction processes and support the interpretation of the experimental results. PMID:27312768

  3. Vaccines based on the cell surface carbohydrates of pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycoconjugate vaccines, in which a cell surface carbohydrate from a micro-organism is covalently attached to an appropriate carrier protein are proving to be the most effective means to generate protective immune responses to prevent a wide range of diseases. The technology appears to be generic and applicable to a wide range of pathogens, as long as antibodies against surface carbohydrates help protect against infection. Three such vaccines, against Haemophilus influenzae type b, Neisseria meningitidis Group C and seven serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae, have already been licensed and many others are in development. This article discusses the rationale for the development and use of glycoconjugate vaccines, the mechanisms by which they elicit T cell-dependent immune responses and the implications of this for vaccine development, the role of physicochemical methods in the characterisation and quality control of these vaccines, and the novel products which are under development.

  4. Surface display of proteins by Gram-negative bacterial autotransporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourez Michael

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Expressing proteins of interest as fusions to proteins of the bacterial envelope is a powerful technique with many biotechnological and medical applications. Autotransporters have recently emerged as a good tool for bacterial surface display. These proteins are composed of an N-terminal signal peptide, followed by a passenger domain and a translocator domain that mediates the outer membrane translocation of the passenger. The natural passenger domain of autotransporters can be replaced by heterologous proteins that become displayed at the bacterial surface by the translocator domain. The simplicity and versatility of this system has made it very attractive and it has been used to display functional enzymes, vaccine antigens as well as polypeptides libraries. The recent advances in the study of the translocation mechanism of autotransporters have raised several controversial issues with implications for their use as display systems. These issues include the requirement for the displayed polypeptides to remain in a translocation-competent state in the periplasm, the requirement for specific signal sequences and "autochaperone" domains, and the influence of the genetic background of the expression host strain. It is therefore important to better understand the mechanism of translocation of autotransporters in order to employ them to their full potential. This review will focus on the recent advances in the study of the translocation mechanism of autotransporters and describe practical considerations regarding their use for bacterial surface display.

  5. Enhanced cell disruption strategy in the release of recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen from Pichia pastoris using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam Yew

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell disruption strategies by high pressure homogenizer for the release of recombinant Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg from Pichia pastoris expression cells were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM based on the central composite design (CCD. The factors studied include number of passes, biomass concentration and pulse pressure. Polynomial models were used to correlate the above mentioned factors to project the cell disruption capability and specific protein release of HBsAg from P. pastoris cells. Results The proposed cell disruption strategy consisted of a number of passes set at 20 times, biomass concentration of 7.70 g/L of dry cell weight (DCW and pulse pressure at 1,029 bar. The optimized cell disruption strategy was shown to increase cell disruption efficiency by 2-fold and 4-fold for specific protein release of HBsAg when compared to glass bead method yielding 75.68% cell disruption rate (CDR and HBsAg concentration of 29.20 mg/L respectively. Conclusions The model equation generated from RSM on cell disruption of P. pastoris was found adequate to determine the significant factors and its interactions among the process variables and the optimum conditions in releasing HBsAg when validated against a glass bead cell disruption method. The findings from the study can open up a promising strategy for better recovery of HBsAg recombinant protein during downstream processing.

  6. Divalent ion encapsulated nano titania on Ti metal as a bioactive surface with enhanced protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, Esaitamil; Rajendran, Archana; Natarajan, Duraipandy; Kiran, M S; Pattanayak, Deepak K

    2016-07-01

    A novel approach on incorporation of divalent species such as Mg, Ca and Sr into the titania nanostructures formed on Ti metal surface and their comparative study on enhancement of bioactivity, protein adsorption and cell compatibility is reported. When treated with hydrogen peroxide, Ti metal forms hydrogen titanate. On subsequent treatment with Mg or Ca or Sr nitrate solutions, respective ions are incorporated into hydrogen titanate layer, and heat treatment leads to titania decorated with these ions. The resultant heat-treated samples when soaked in simulated body fluid form bone-like apatite which indicates the present surface modification enhances the bioactivity. Further, enhanced protein adsorption in bovine serum albumin is an indication of suitability of these divalent species to form chelate compounds with amino acids, and Ca containing titania nanostructure favours more protein adsorption compared to the others. Cytocompatibility studies using MG-63, human osteosarcoma cell lines shows these divalent ion containing titania nanostructure favours the cell attachment and did not show any cytotoxicity. Bioactivity, enhanced protein adsorption along with cytocompatibility clearly indicates such surface modification approach to be useful to design hard tissue replacement materials in orthopaedic and dental field. PMID:27011351

  7. Probing protein complexes inside living cells using a silicon nanowire-based pull-down assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sojoong; Kim, Hyunju; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2016-06-01

    Most proteins perform their functions as interacting complexes. Here we propose a novel method for capturing an intracellular protein and its interacting partner out of living cells by utilizing intracellular access of antibody modified vertical silicon nanowire arrays whose surface is covered with a polyethylene glycol layer to prevent strong cell adhesion. Such a feature facilitates the removal of cells by simple washing, enabling subsequent detection of a pulled-down protein and its interacting partner, and further assessment of a drug-induced change in the interacting complex. Our new SiNW-based tool is thus suitable for authentication of protein networks inside living cells.Most proteins perform their functions as interacting complexes. Here we propose a novel method for capturing an intracellular protein and its interacting partner out of living cells by utilizing intracellular access of antibody modified vertical silicon nanowire arrays whose surface is covered with a polyethylene glycol layer to prevent strong cell adhesion. Such a feature facilitates the removal of cells by simple washing, enabling subsequent detection of a pulled-down protein and its interacting partner, and further assessment of a drug-induced change in the interacting complex. Our new SiNW-based tool is thus suitable for authentication of protein networks inside living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials, experimental methods and Fig. S1-S8. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00171h

  8. Is the surface area of the red cell membrane skeleton locally conserved?

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, T M

    1992-01-01

    The incompressibility of the lipid bilayer keeps the total surface area of the red cell membrane constant. Local conservation of membrane surface area requires that each surface element of the membrane skeleton keeps its area when its aspect ratio is changed. A change in area would require a flow of lipids past the intrinsic proteins to which the skeleton is anchored. in fast red cell deformations, there is no time for such a flow. Consequently, the bilayer provides for local area conservatio...

  9. Surface expressed nucleolin is constantly induced in tumor cells to mediate calcium-dependent ligand internalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ara G Hovanessian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nucleolin is one of the major proteins of the nucleolus, but it is also expressed on the cell surface where is serves as a binding protein for variety of ligands implicated in tumorigenesis and angiogenesis. Emerging evidence suggests that the cell-surface expressed nucleolin is a strategic target for an effective and nontoxic cancer therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By monitoring the expression of nucleolin mRNA, and by measuring the level of nucleolin protein recovered from the surface and nucleus of cells, here we show that the presence of nucleolin at the cell surface is dependent on the constant induction of nucleolin mRNA. Indeed, inhibitors of RNA transcription or translation block expression of surface nucleolin while no apparent effect is observed on the level of nucleolin in the nucleus. The estimated half-life of surface nucleolin is less than one hour, whereas that of nuclear nucleolin is more than 8 hours. Nucleolin mRNA induction is reduced markedly in normal fibroblasts that reach confluence, while it occurs continuously even in post-confluent epithelial tumor cells consistent with their capacity to proliferate without contact inhibition. Interestingly, cold and heat shock induce nucleolin mRNA concomitantly to enhanced mRNA expression of the heat shock protein 70, thus suggesting that surface nucleolin induction also occurs in response to an environmental insult. At the cell surface, one of the main functions of nucleolin is to shuttle specific extracellular ligands by an active transport mechanism, which we show here to be calcium dependent. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that the expression of surface nucleolin is an early metabolic event coupled with tumor cell proliferation and stress response. The fact that surface nucleolin is constantly and abundantly expressed on the surface of tumor cells, makes them a preferential target for the inhibitory action of anticancer agents that target

  10. Cell Surface Markers in HTLV-1 Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea K. Kress

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The phenotype of HTLV-1-transformed CD4+ T lymphocytes largely depends on defined viral effector molecules such as the viral oncoprotein Tax. In this review, we exemplify the expression pattern of characteristic lineage markers, costimulatory receptors and ligands of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, cytokine receptors, and adhesion molecules on HTLV-1-transformed cells. These molecules may provide survival signals for the transformed cells. Expression of characteristic surface markers might therefore contribute to persistence of HTLV-1-transformed lymphocytes and to the development of HTLV-1-associated disease.

  11. Protein immobilization and detection on laser processed polystyrene surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bovine serum albumin (BSA)-polystyrene (PS) interface layer is laser photo activated at 157 nm for site selective multiple target-protein immobilization. The 5-15 nm photon induced interface layer has different chemical, wetting, and stiffness properties than the PS photon processed surface. The irradiated areas exhibit target-protein binding, followed by localized probe-target protein detection. The photon induced chemical modification of the BSA-PS interface layer is identified by: (1) Morphological, imaging, and analysis of surface parameters with atomic force microscopy, (2) spectroscopic shift (4 cm-1), of the amide I group and formation of new C=N, NH2, C-O, C=O, and O-C=O groups following irradiation, identified with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and (3) the different hydrophilic/hydrophobic and force-distance response of the bare PS and BSA-PS surfaces. Near field edge diffraction (Fresnel) fluorescence imaging specifies the threshold photon energy and the fluence required to optically detect the protein binding on the photon induced BSA-PS interface layer. By approximating the Fresnel integrals with analytical functions, the threshold photon energy and the fluence are expressed as the sum of zero, first, and second order harmonic terms of two characteristic diffracted modes and they are specified to be 8.73x10-9 Jand623 J m-2, respectively. Furthermore, a bioarray of three probe-target proteins is fabricated with 1.5 μm spatial resolution using a 157 nm laser microstepper. The methodology eliminates the use of intermediate polymer layers between the blocking BSA protein and the PS substrate in bioarray fabrication.

  12. Protein immobilization and detection on laser processed polystyrene surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarantopoulou, Evangelia; Petrou, Panagiota S.; Kollia, Zoe; Palles, Dimitrios; Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, Nikolaos; Kakabakos, Sotirios; Cefalas, Alkiviadis-Constantinos

    2011-09-01

    The bovine serum albumin (BSA)-polystyrene (PS) interface layer is laser photo activated at 157 nm for site selective multiple target-protein immobilization. The 5-15 nm photon induced interface layer has different chemical, wetting, and stiffness properties than the PS photon processed surface. The irradiated areas exhibit target-protein binding, followed by localized probe-target protein detection. The photon induced chemical modification of the BSA-PS interface layer is identified by: (1) Morphological, imaging, and analysis of surface parameters with atomic force microscopy, (2) spectroscopic shift (4 cm-1), of the amide I group and formation of new C=N, NH2, C-O, C=O, and O-C=O groups following irradiation, identified with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and (3) the different hydrophilic/hydrophobic and force-distance response of the bare PS and BSA-PS surfaces. Near field edge diffraction (Fresnel) fluorescence imaging specifies the threshold photon energy and the fluence required to optically detect the protein binding on the photon induced BSA-PS interface layer. By approximating the Fresnel integrals with analytical functions, the threshold photon energy and the fluence are expressed as the sum of zero, first, and second order harmonic terms of two characteristic diffracted modes and they are specified to be 8.73×10-9Jand623 J m-2, respectively. Furthermore, a bioarray of three probe-target proteins is fabricated with 1.5 μm spatial resolution using a 157 nm laser microstepper. The methodology eliminates the use of intermediate polymer layers between the blocking BSA protein and the PS substrate in bioarray fabrication.

  13. Overexpression of human virus surface glycoprotein precursors induces cytosolic unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasnauskas Kęstutis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of human virus surface proteins, as well as other mammalian glycoproteins, is much more efficient in cells of higher eukaryotes rather than yeasts. The limitations to high-level expression of active viral surface glycoproteins in yeast are not well understood. To identify possible bottlenecks we performed a detailed study on overexpression of recombinant mumps hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (MuHN and measles hemagglutinin (MeH in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, combining the analysis of recombinant proteins with a proteomic approach. Results Overexpressed recombinant MuHN and MeH proteins were present in large aggregates, were inactive and totally insoluble under native conditions. Moreover, the majority of recombinant protein was found in immature form of non-glycosylated precursors. Fractionation of yeast lysates revealed that the core of viral surface protein aggregates consists of MuHN or MeH disulfide-linked multimers involving eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A and is closely associated with small heat shock proteins (sHsps that can be removed only under denaturing conditions. Complexes of large Hsps seem to be bound to aggregate core peripherally as they can be easily removed at high salt concentrations. Proteomic analysis revealed that the accumulation of unglycosylated viral protein precursors results in specific cytosolic unfolded protein response (UPR-Cyto in yeast cells, characterized by different action and regulation of small Hsps versus large chaperones of Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp110 families. In contrast to most environmental stresses, in the response to synthesis of recombinant MuHN and MeH, only the large Hsps were upregulated whereas sHsps were not. Interestingly, the amount of eEF1A was also increased during this stress response. Conclusions Inefficient translocation of MuHN and MeH precursors through ER membrane is a bottleneck for high-level expression in yeast. Overexpression of

  14. Diversity of T cell epitopes in Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein likely due to protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagesh R Aragam

    Full Text Available Circumsporozoite protein (CS is a leading vaccine antigen for falciparum malaria, but is highly polymorphic in natural parasite populations. The factors driving this diversity are unclear, but non-random assortment of the T cell epitopes TH2 and TH3 has been observed in a Kenyan parasite population. The recent publication of the crystal structure of the variable C terminal region of the protein allows the assessment of the impact of diversity on protein structure and T cell epitope assortment. Using data from the Gambia (55 isolates and Malawi (235 isolates, we evaluated the patterns of diversity within and between epitopes in these two distantly-separated populations. Only non-synonymous mutations were observed with the vast majority in both populations at similar frequencies suggesting strong selection on this region. A non-random pattern of T cell epitope assortment was seen in Malawi and in the Gambia, but structural analysis indicates no intramolecular spatial interactions. Using the information from these parasite populations, structural analysis reveals that polymorphic amino acids within TH2 and TH3 colocalize to one side of the protein, surround, but do not involve, the hydrophobic pocket in CS, and predominately involve charge switches. In addition, free energy analysis suggests residues forming and behind the novel pocket within CS are tightly constrained and well conserved in all alleles. In addition, free energy analysis shows polymorphic residues tend to be populated by energetically unfavorable amino acids. In combination, these findings suggest the diversity of T cell epitopes in CS may be primarily an evolutionary response to intermolecular interactions at the surface of the protein potentially counteracting antibody-mediated immune recognition or evolving host receptor diversity.

  15. SCAMP 37, a new marker within the general cell surface recycling system.

    OpenAIRE

    Brand, S H; Castle, J D

    1993-01-01

    Secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs) are widely distributed as components of post-Golgi membranes that function as recycling carriers to the cell surface. In fibroblasts, SCAMPs are concentrated in compartments involved in the endocytosis and recycling of cell surface receptors while in neurons and other cell types having regulated transport pathways, SCAMPs are also components of regulated carriers (synaptic vesicles, secretion granules and transporter vesicles). Their presence in mu...

  16. A cell surface receptor complex for collagen type I recognizes the Arg- Gly-Asp sequence

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    To isolate collagen-binding cell surface proteins, detergent extracts of surface-iodinated MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells were chromatographed on affinity matrices of either type I collagen- Sepharose or Sepharose carrying a collagen-like triple-helical peptide. The peptide was designed to be triple helical and to contain the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp, which has been implicated as the cell attachment site of fibronectin, vitronectin, fibrinogen, and von Willebrand factor, and is also present in ty...

  17. Electrochemistry of heparin binding to tau protein on Au surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Anionic heparin binds tau protein film on Au • N-terminal of tau protein is critical for heparin binding • Negatively charged heparin binds positively charged tau domains • Heparin binding to tau increases charge transfer resistance - ABSTRACT: The tau protein is a neurodegenerative disease biomarker. The in vitro aggregation of tau is triggered by electrostatic charge imbalance induced by an anionic inducing agent, such as heparin. The binding of the tau-heparin complex is based on electrostatic interactions, but the exact binding mode of heparin to the tau protein has not been fully identified. In this work, the effects of the tau protein orientation on gold (Au) electrode to heparin were explored by the cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. To modulate the accessibility of N-terminal of the tau to heparin, the tau films on Au surfaces were fabricated in two ways: immobilization of tau via the N-terminal of tau protein (N-tau-Au) or by the Cys291/Cys322 residues, located in the R-repeat domains of the tau protein (Cys-tau-Au). The sulfur-Au bonding was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The charge transfer resistance was measured for N-tau-Au and Cys-tau-Au as a function of heparin concentration. The heparin concentration range was varied from 0.2 pM to 216 μM with the optimal binding concentration at 21 nM (the highest charge transfer resistance value). The heparin binding to tau films was investigated in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3−/4− or benzoquinone redox probes. The tau-heparin binding was greater for the Cys-tau-Au surface over N-tau-Au, indicating specific tau domains may be required for optimal heparin binding

  18. Mass spectrometry based proteomics for absolute quantification of proteins from tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hong; Hanash, Sam

    2015-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of the proteome and sub-proteomes of tumor cells has relevance to tumor classification, the development of novel therapeutics, and of prognostic and predictive markers and to disease monitoring. In particular the tumor cell surface represents a highly relevant compartment for the development of targeted therapeutics and immunotherapy. We have developed a proteomic platform to profile tumor cells that encompasses enrichment of surface membrane proteins, intact p...

  19. Bioactive sugar surfaces for hepatocyte cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    Ambury, Rachael

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, develop and characterise a novel bioactive surface capable of binding hepatocytes and enabling the retention of hepatocyte-specific cell function during in-vitro culture. The materials were designed to exploit a unique characteristic of hepatocyte biology, with β-galactose moieties displayed to allow cellular adhesion via the specific asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R) found on hepatocytes. Hydrogels were created by modifying a commercia...

  20. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Couchman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton.

  1. Residual on column host cell protein analysis during lifetime studies of protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintern, Katherine; Pathak, Mili; Smales, C Mark; Howland, Kevin; Rathore, Anurag; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2016-08-26

    Capacity reduction in protein A affinity chromatography with extended cycling during therapeutic antibody manufacture is well documented. Identification of which residual proteins remain from previous cycles during the lifetime of these adsorbent materials is required to understand their role in this ageing process, but represents a significant metrological challenge. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are combined to detect and map this phenomenon of protein carry-over. We show that there is a morphological change at the surface of the agarose resin, revealing deposits on the polymer fibres increasing with cycle number. The amount of residual host cell proteins (HCPs) by LC-MS/MS present on the resin is shown to increase 10-fold between 50 and 100 cycles. During this same period the functional class of the predominant HCPs associated with the resin increased in diversity, with number of proteins identified increasing 5-fold. This ageing is observed in the context of the product quality of the eluate HCP and protein A leachate concentration remaining constant with cycle number. PMID:27473513

  2. Intracellular protein delivery by hollow mesoporous silica capsules with a large surface hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We prepared cell membrane-permeable hollow mesoporous silica capsules (HMSCs) by a simple new method. CTAB micellar assembly in cholesterol emulsion gave rise to a novel capsular morphology of the HMSC particles. The HMSCs consisted of mesostructured silica walls with a large surface hole (25–50 nm) and the average particle dimension was 100–300 nm. They exhibited high surface areas of up to 719.3 m2 g−1 and a mesoporous range of pores of 2.4–2.7 nm. The surface-functionalized HMSCs could also be prepared by a similar co-condensation method using tetraethoxysilane with various organoalkoxysilane precursors in the presence of cholesterol. These organically modified HMSCs could be further modified on demand. For example, a carboxy-functionalized HMSC could be surface-functionalized by a green fluorescent 5-aminofluorescein (AFL) through an amidation reaction to afford a fluorescent AFL–HMSC. The hollow capsular morphology of the HMSCs with a large surface hole enabled us to develop very efficient intracellular delivery systems for membrane-impermeable ions, molecules, and various functional proteins. Non-covalent sequestration and delivery of proteins as well as covalent linkage of fluorescent molecules on the silica surface are effective for this system. The highly negatively charged green fluorescent probe mag-fluo-4 could be intracellularly delivered into HeLa cells by HMSC without any difficulty. The HMSCs could also effectively transport large functional proteins such as antibodies into HeLa cells. The efficiency of protein delivery by HMSC seems to be 3–22-fold higher than that of mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSNs) based on confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis. (paper)

  3. Biosynthesis and release of proteins by isolated pulmonary Clara cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major proteins synthesized and released by Clara cells were identified and compared with those synthesized and released by mixed lung cells. Highly purified Clara cells (85.9 +/- 2.4%) and mixed lung cells (Clara cells 4%, Type II cells 33%, granulocytes 18%, macrophages 2.7%, ciliated cells 1.2%) were isolated from rabbit lungs, incubated with Ham's F12 medium in collagen/fibronectin-coated plastic culture dishes in the presence of 35S-methionine for periods of 4 and 18 hrs. Radiolabelled proteins were isolated from the cells and from the culture medium, electrophoresed on polyacrylamide gels in the presence of SDS under reducing conditions, and then autoradiographed. After 4 and 18 hr of incubation of the Clara cells the major radiolabelled cell-associated proteins were those with molecular weights of 6, 48, and 180 Kd. The major radiolabelled proteins released by Clara cells into the medium after 4 hrs of incubation had molecular weights of 6, 48, and 180 Kd, accounting for 42, 16, and 10%, respectively, of the total extracellular protein-associated radioactivity. After 18 hr of incubation the 6 and 48 Kd proteins represented 30 and 18% of the total released radioactivity, and the relative amount of the 180 Kd protein had decreased to 3%. With the mixed lung cells, the major proteins released into the medium had molecular weights of 6 and 48 Kd. Under nonreducing conditions the 6 Kd protein released by Clara cells had an apparent molecular weight of 12 Kd. Labelling isolated Clara cells with a mixture of 14C-amino acids also identified this low molecular weight protein as the major secretory product of the Clara cell. The 6 Kd protein did not label when the cells were incubated with 14C-glucosamine indicating that it was not a glycoprotein. Data demonstrate the release of several proteins from isolated Clara cells but the major protein had a M.W. of 6 Kd

  4. Single-cell protein from waste cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, C. E.; Callihan, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The recycle, reuse, or reclamation of single cell protein from liquid and solid agricultural waste fibers by a fermentation process is reported. It is shown that cellulose comprises the bulk of the fibers at 50% to 55% of the dry weight of the refuse and that its biodegradability is of prime importance in the choice of a substrate. The application of sodium hydroxide followed by heat and pressure serves to de-polymerize and disrupt lignin structure while swelling the cellulose to increase water uptake and pore volume. Some of the lignin, hemi-celluloses, ash, and cellulose of the material is hydrolized and solubilized. Introduction of microorganisms to the substrate fibers mixed with nutrients produces continuous fermentation of cellulose for further protein extraction and purification.

  5. A Cell-Based Protein-Protein Interaction Method Using a Permuted Luciferase Reporter

    OpenAIRE

    Eishingdrelo, Haifeng; Cai, Jidong; Weissensee, Paul; Sharma, Praveen; Tocci, Michael J; Wright, Paul S

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel cell-based protein-protein interaction assay method. The method relies on conversion of an inactive permuted luciferase containing a Tobacco Etch Virus protease (TEV) cleavage sequence fused onto protein (A) to an active luciferase upon interaction and cleavage by another protein (B) fused with the TEV protease. We demonstrate assay applicability for ligand-induced protein-protein interactions including G-protein coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases and nucle...

  6. Wettability influences cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces with different topographies

    OpenAIRE

    Lourenco, B.N.; Marchioli, G.; Song, W.; Reis, R.L.; Blitterswijk, van, C.A.; Karperien, H.B.J.; Apeldoorn, van, D.F.; Mano, J.F

    2012-01-01

    Surface wettability and topography are recognized as critical factors influencing cell behavior on biomaterials. So far only few works have reported cell responses on surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability in combination with surface topography. The goal of this work is to study whether cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces is influenced by surface topography and polymer type. Biomimetic superhydrophobic rough surfaces of polystyrene and poly(l-lactic acid) with different micro/nanotopo...

  7. Surface code—biophysical signals for apoptotic cell clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apoptotic cell death and the clearance of dying cells play an important and physiological role in embryonic development and normal tissue turnover. In contrast to necrosis, apoptosis proceeds in an anti-inflammatory manner. It is orchestrated by the timed release and/or exposure of so-called ‘find-me’, ‘eat me’ and ‘tolerate me’ signals. Mononuclear phagocytes are attracted by various ‘find-me’ signals, including proteins, nucleotides, and phospholipids released by the dying cell, whereas the involvement of granulocytes is prevented via ‘stay away’ signals. The exposure of anionic phospholipids like phosphatidylserine (PS) by apoptotic cells on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane is one of the main ‘eat me’ signals. PS is recognized by a number of innate receptors as well as by soluble bridging molecules on the surface of phagocytes. Importantly, phagocytes are able to discriminate between viable and apoptotic cells both exposing PS. Due to cytoskeleton remodeling PS has a higher lateral mobility on the surfaces of apoptotic cells thereby promoting receptor clustering on the phagocyte. PS not only plays an important role in the engulfment process, but also acts as ‘tolerate me’ signal inducing the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines by phagocytes. An efficient and fast clearance of apoptotic cells is required to prevent secondary necrosis and leakage of intracellular danger signals into the surrounding tissue. Failure or prolongation of the clearance process leads to the release of intracellular antigens into the periphery provoking inflammation and development of systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease like systemic lupus erythematosus. Here we review the current findings concerning apoptosis-inducing pathways, important players of apoptotic cell recognition and clearance as well as the role of membrane remodeling in the engulfment of apoptotic cells by phagocytes. (paper)

  8. Increasing binding density of yeast cells by control of surface charge with allylamine grafting to ion modified polymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Clara T H; Kondyurin, Alexey; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Bilek, Marcela M M; McKenzie, David R

    2014-10-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment of polymers creates a biointerface capable of direct covalent immobilization of biomolecules. The immobilization of protein molecules is achieved by covalent bonds formed between embedded radicals on the treated surface and amino acid side chains and cells can be immobilized through cell-wall proteins. The attachment density of negatively charged entities on a PIII treated surface is inhibited by its negative surface charge at neutral pH. To reduce the negative charge of PIII treated surfaces in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4, 11mM), we develop an effective approach of grafting allylamine monomers onto the treated surface. The results reveal reactions between allylamine and radicals on the PIII treated surface. One of these triggers polymerization, increasing the number of amine groups grafted. As a consequence, the PIII treated polystyrene surface after allylamine exposure becomes more hydrophobic and less negatively charged in phosphate buffer. Using yeast cells as an example, we have shown a significant improvement (6-15 times) of cell density immobilized on the PIII treated surface after exposure to allylamine. PMID:25092587

  9. Cytosolic Proteins Contribute to Surface Plasminogen Recruitment of Neisseria meningitidis

    OpenAIRE

    Knaust, Andreas; Weber, Martin V. R.; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Bergmann, Simone; Frosch, Matthias; Kurzai, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Plasminogen recruitment is a common strategy of pathogenic bacteria and results in a broad-spectrum surface-associated protease activity. Neisseria meningitidis has previously been shown to bind plasminogen. In this study, we show by several complementary approaches that endolase, DnaK, and peroxiredoxin, which are usually intracellular proteins, can also be located in the outer membrane and act as plasminogen receptors. Internal binding motifs, rather than C-terminal lysine residues, are res...

  10. Surface plasmon resonance imaging for parallelized detection of protein biomarkers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Piliarik, Marek; Párová, Lucie; Vaisocherová, Hana; Homola, Jiří

    Vol. 7356. Bellingham, Washington : SPIE, 2009 - (Baldini, F.; Homola, J.; Lieberman, R.), 73560D1-73560D8 ISBN 9780819476302. ISSN 0277-786X. - (Proceedings of SPIE. 7356). [Optical Sensors 2009. Praha (CZ), 20.04.2009-22.04.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance imaging * Biosensor * Protein detection Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation

  11. THE EFFECTS OF SURFACE CHEMISTRY ON THE PROPERTIES OF PROTEINS CONFINED IN NANO-POROUS MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, L. M.; O' Neill, H.

    2007-01-01

    The entrapment of proteins using the sol-gel route provides a means to retain its native properties and artifi cially reproduce the molecular crowding and confi nement experienced by proteins in the cell allowing investigation of the physico-chemical and structural properties of biomolecules at the biotic/abiotic interface. The biomolecules are spatially separated and ‘caged’ in the gel structure but solutes can freely permeate the matrix. Thus, properties such as the folding of ensembles of individual molecules can be examined in the absence of aggregation effects that can occur in solution studies. Green fl uorescent protein from Aequorea coerulescens was used as a model protein to examine the unfolding/re-folding properties of protein in silica gels. The recombinant protein was isolated and purifi ed from Escherichia coli extracts by cell lysis, three-phase partitioning, dialysis, and anion exchange chromatography. The purity of the protein was greater than 90% as judged by SDS PAGE gel analysis. Sol-gels were synthesized using tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) in combination with, methyltrimethoxyorthosilane (MTMOS), ethyltrimethoxyorthosilane (ETMOS), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The acid induced denaturation and renaturation of GFP was analyzed by UV-visible, fl uorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. No renaturation was observed in gels that were made with TMOS only, and in the presence of APTES, MTMOS, and ETMOS. However, in gels that were made with GPTMS, the CD and UV-visible spectra indicated that the protein had refolded. The fl uorescence emission spectrum indicated that approximately 20% of fl uorescence had returned. This study highlights the importance of the surface chemistry of the silica gels for the refolding properties of the entrapped GFP. Future studies will investigate the effect of surface chemistry on the thermal and solvent stability of the entrapped protein.

  12. Quantification of Protein Levels in Single Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-An Lo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of the amount of specific protein a cell produces is important for investigating basic molecular processes. We have developed a technique that allows for quantitation of protein levels in single cells in vivo. This protein quantitation ratioing (PQR technique uses a genetic tag that produces a stoichiometric ratio of a fluorescent protein reporter and the protein of interest during protein translation. The fluorescence intensity is proportional to the number of molecules produced of the protein of interest and is used to determine the relative amount of protein within the cell. We use PQR to quantify protein expression of different genes using quantitative imaging, electrophysiology, and phenotype. We use genome editing to insert Protein Quantitation Reporters into endogenous genomic loci in three different genomes for quantitation of endogenous protein levels. The PQR technique will allow for a wide range of quantitative experiments examining gene-to-phenotype relationships with greater accuracy.

  13. Exploring the Plant–Microbe Interface by Profiling the Surface-Associated Proteins of Barley Grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sultan, Abida; Andersen, Birgit; Svensson, Birte;

    2016-01-01

    Cereal grains are colonized by a microbial community that actively interacts with the plant via secretion of various enzymes, hormones, and metabolites. Microorganisms decompose plant tissues by a collection of depolymerizing enzymes, including β-1,4-xylanases, that are in turn inhibited by plant......-associated proteins and xylanolytic activities of two barley cultivars. The surface-associated proteome was dominated by plant proteins with roles in defense and stress-responses, while the relatively less abundant microbial (bacterial and fungal) proteins were involved in cell-wall and polysaccharide degradation and...... included xylanases. The surface-associated proteomes showed elevated xylanolytic activity and contained several xylanases. Integration of proteomics with enzyme assays is a powerful tool for analysis and characterization of the interaction between microbial consortia and plants in their natural environment....

  14. Protein Adsorption to Surface Chemistry and Crystal Structure Modification of Titanium Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ryo Jimbo; Mikael Ivarsson; Anita Koskela; Young-Taeg Sul; Johansson, Carina B.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To observe the early adsorption of extracellular matrix and blood plasma proteins to magnesium-incorporated titanium oxide surfaces, which has shown superior bone response in animal models. Material and Methods Commercially pure titanium discs were blasted with titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles (control), and for the test group, TiO2 blasted discs were further processed with a micro-arc oxidation method (test). Surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron micro...

  15. Optimising the Use of TRIzol-extracted Proteins in Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/ Ionization (SELDI Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlaky Laszlo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research with clinical specimens is always hampered by the limited availability of relevant samples, necessitating the use of a single sample for multiple assays. TRIzol is a common reagent for RNA extraction, but DNA and protein fractions can also be used for other studies. However, little is known about using TRIzol-extracted proteins in proteomic research, partly because proteins extracted from TRIzol are very resistant to solubilization. Results To facilitate the use of TRIzol-extracted proteins, we first compared the ability of four different common solubilizing reagents to solubilize the TRIzol-extracted proteins from an osteosarcoma cell line, U2-OS. Then we analyzed the solubilized proteins by Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/ Ionization technique (SELDI. The results showed that solubilization of TRIzol-extracted proteins with 9.5 M Urea and 2% CHAPS ([3-[(3-cholamidopropyl-dimethylammonio]propanesulfonate] (UREA-CHAPS was significantly better than the standard 1% SDS in terms of solubilization efficiency and the number of detectable ion peaks. Using three different types of SELDI arrays (CM10, H50, and IMAC-Cu, we demonstrated that peak detection with proteins solubilized by UREA-CHAPS was reproducible (r > 0.9. Further SELDI analysis indicated that the number of ion peaks detected in TRIzol-extracted proteins was comparable to a direct extraction method, suggesting many proteins still remain in the TRIzol protein fraction. Conclusion Our results suggest that UREA-CHAPS performed very well in solubilizing TRIzol-extracted proteins for SELDI applications. Protein fractions left over after TRIzol RNA extraction could be a valuable but neglected source for proteomic or biochemical analysis when additional samples are not available.

  16. Chemistry and material science at the cell surface

    OpenAIRE

    Weian Zhao; Grace Sock Leng Teo; Namit Kumar; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Cell surfaces are fertile ground for chemists and material scientists to manipulate or augment cell functions and phenotypes. This not only helps to answer basic biology questions but also has diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances in the engineering of the cell surface. In particular, we focus on the potential applications of surface engineered cells for 1) targeting cells to desirable sites in cell therapy, 2) programming assembly of c...

  17. The Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxic Function Is Modulated by HIV-1 Accessory Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Barker

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells’ major role in the control of viruses is to eliminate established infected cells. The capacity of NK cells to kill virus-infected cells is dependent on the interactions between ligands on the infected cell and receptors on the NK cell surface. Because of the importance of ligand-receptor interactions in modulating the NK cell cytotoxic response, HIV has developed strategies to regulate various NK cell ligands making the infected cell surprisingly refractory to NK cell lysis. This is perplexing because the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr induces expression of ligands for the NK cell activating receptor, NKG2D. In addition, the accessory protein Nef removes the inhibitory ligands HLA-A and -B. The reason for the ineffective killing by NK cells despite the strong potential to eliminate infected cells is due to HIV-1 Vpu’s ability to down modulate the co-activation ligand, NTB-A, from the cell surface. Down modulation of NTB-A prevents efficient NK cell degranulation. This review will focus on the mechanisms through which the HIV-1 accessory proteins modulate their respective ligands, and its implication for NK cell killing of HIV-infected cells.

  18. Improved accuracy of cell surface shaving proteomics in Staphylococcus aureus using a false-positive control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solis, Nestor; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2010-01-01

    lysis and were removed from the trypsin-shaved data set. We identified 42 predicted S. aureus COL surface proteins from 260 surface-exposed peptides. Trypsin and proteinase-K digests were highly complementary with ten proteins identified by both, 16 specific to proteinase-K treatment, 13 specific......0050 (pls) and penicillin-binding protein 2' (mecA), as well as bifunctional autolysin and the extracellular matrix-binding protein Ebh. The cell shaving strategy is a rapid method for identifying surface-exposed peptide epitopes that may be useful in the design of novel vaccines against S. aureus....... that complicate the final analysis. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, causing community and hospital-acquired infections, and is a serious healthcare concern due to the increasing prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistances amongst clinical isolates. We employed a cell surface "shaving" technique...

  19. CZTSSe thin film solar cells: Surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, Chinmay Sunil

    Chalcopyrite semiconducting materials, specifically CZTS, are a promising alternative to traditional silicon solar cell technology. Because of the high absorption coefficient; films of the order of 1 micrometer thickness are sufficient for the fabrication of solar cells. Liquid based synthesis methods are advantageous because they are easily scalable using the roll to roll manufacturing techniques. Various treatments are explored in this study to enhance the performance of the selenized CZTS film based solar cells. Thiourea can be used as a sulfur source and can be used to tune band gap of CZTSSe. Bromine etching can be used to manipulate the thickness of sintered CZTSSe film. The etching treatment creates recombination centers which lead to poor device performance. Various after treatments were used to improve the performance of the devices. It was observed that the performance of the solar cell devices could not be improved by any of the after treatment steps. Other surface treatment processes are explored including KCN etching and gaseous H2S treatments. Hybrid solar cells which included use of CIGS nanoparticles at the interface between CZTSSe and CdS are also explored.

  20. Pigment epithelium-derived factor binds to cell-surface F(1)-ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, Luigi; Arakaki, Naokatu; Mueller, David; Meier, Scott; Amaral, Juan; Becerra, S P

    2010-05-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a potent blocker of angiogenesis in vivo, and of endothelial cell migration and tubule formation, binds with high affinity to an as yet unknown protein on the surfaces of endothelial cells. Given that protein fingerprinting suggested a match of a approximately 60 kDa PEDF-binding protein in bovine retina with Bos taurus F(1)-ATP synthase beta-subunit, and that F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase components have been identified recently as cell-surface receptors, we examined the direct binding of PEDF to F(1). Size-exclusion ultrafiltration assays showed that recombinant human PEDF formed a complex with recombinant yeast F(1). Real-time binding as determined by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that yeast F(1) interacted specifically and reversibly with human PEDF. Kinetic evaluations revealed high binding affinity for PEDF, in agreement with PEDF affinities for endothelial cell surfaces. PEDF blocked interactions between F(1) and angiostatin, another antiangiogenic factor, suggesting overlapping PEDF-binding and angiostatin-binding sites on F(1). Surfaces of endothelial cells exhibited affinity for PEDF-binding proteins of approximately 60 kDa. Antibodies to F(1)beta-subunit specifically captured PEDF-binding components in endothelial plasma membranes. The extracellular ATP synthesis activity of endothelial cells was examined in the presence of PEDF. PEDF significantly reduced the amount of extracellular ATP produced by endothelial cells, in agreement with direct interactions between cell-surface ATP synthase and PEDF. In addition to demonstrating that PEDF binds to cell-surface F(1), these results show that PEDF is a ligand for endothelial cell-surface F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase. They suggest that PEDF-mediated inhibition of ATP synthase may form part of the biochemical mechanisms by which PEDF exerts its antiangiogenic activity. PMID:20412062

  1. Sputter deposited bioceramic coatings: surface characterisation and initial protein adsorption studies using surface-MALDI-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, A. R.; Burke, G. A.; Duffy, H.;

    2011-01-01

    Protein adsorption onto calcium phosphate (Ca–P) bioceramics utilised in hard tissue implant applications has been highlighted as one of the key events that influences the subsequent biological response, in vivo. This work reports on the use of surface-matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation ...

  2. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  3. Angiostatin binds ATP synthase on the surface of human endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Tammy L.; Stack, M. Sharon; Asplin, Iain; Enghild, Jan J; Højrup, Peter; Everitt, Lorraine; Hubchak, Susan; Schnaper, H. William; Pizzo, Salvatore V.

    1999-01-01

    Angiostatin, a proteolytic fragment of plasminogen, is a potent antagonist of angiogenesis and an inhibitor of endothelial cell migration and proliferation. To determine whether the mechanism by which angiostatin inhibits endothelial cell migration and/or proliferation involves binding to cell surface plasminogen receptors, we isolated the binding proteins for plasminogen and angiostatin from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Binding studies demonstrated that plasminogen and angiostatin...

  4. Cell surface thiol isomerases may explain the platelet-selective action of S-nitrosoglutathione

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Fang; Gordge, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) at low concentration inhibits platelet aggregation without causing vasodilation, suggesting platelet-selective nitric oxide delivery. The mechanism of this selectivity is unknown, but may involve cell surface thiol isomerases, in particular protein disulphide isomerase (csPDI) (EC 5.3.4.1). We have now compared csPDI expression and activity on platelets, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, and the dependence on thiol reductase activity of these cell...

  5. Coagulation factor Va binds to human umbilical vein endothelial cells and accelerates protein C activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, I.; Salem, H H; Majerus, P W

    1984-01-01

    In vitro the rate of protein C activation by thrombin is significantly accelerated by two distinct cofactors (a) the endothelial cell surface protein, thrombomodulin, and (b) human coagulation Factor Va. We have recently reported that the activity of Factor Va is contained in the 78,000-D light chain. In this study we have investigated the effects of Factor Va and its light chain on the activation of protein C in the presence of cultured endothelial cells. Thrombin-catalyzed protein C activat...

  6. Characterization of the Eimeria maxima sporozoite surface protein IMP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M C; Fetterer, R; Miska, K; Tuo, W; Kwok, O; Dubey, J P

    2015-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to characterize Eimeria maxima immune-mapped protein 1 (IMP1) that is hypothesized to play a role in eliciting protective immunity against E. maxima infection in chickens. RT-PCR analysis of RNA from unsporulated and sporulating E. maxima oocysts revealed highest transcription levels at 6-12h of sporulation with a considerable downregulation thereafter. Alignment of IMP1 coding sequence from Houghton, Weybridge, and APU-1 strains of E. maxima revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms that in some instances led to amino acid changes in the encoded protein sequence. The E. maxima (APU-1) IMP1 cDNA sequence was cloned and expressed in 2 different polyHis Escherichia coli expression vectors. Regardless of expression vector, recombinant E. maxima IMP1 (rEmaxIMP1) was fairly unstable in non-denaturing buffer, which is consistent with stability analysis of the primary amino acid sequence. Antisera specific for rEmaxIMP1 identified a single 72 kDa protein or a 61 kDa protein by non-reducing or reducing SDS-PAGE/immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence staining with anti-rEmaxIMP1, revealed intense surface staining of E. maxima sporozoites, with negligible staining of merozoite stages. Immuno-histochemical staining of E. maxima-infected chicken intestinal tissue revealed staining of E. maxima developmental stages in the lamnia propia and crypts at both 24 and 48 h post-infection, and negligible staining thereafter. The expression of IMP1 during early stages of in vivo development and its location on the sporozoite surface may explain in part the immunoprotective effect of this protein against E. maxima infection. PMID:26012860

  7. Characterization of Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 (IGFBP-3) interaction with the Bovine Aortic Endothelial (BAE) cell surface : Examination of the Role of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans (HSPG).

    OpenAIRE

    Parghi, Nirav

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are known to be important modulators of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I). However, their precise role is as yet unclear. Further, recent studies have indicated that IGFBP-3 has a receptor mediated growth inhibitory response of its own. In the present study, we quantified the binding characteristics of IGFBP-3 to bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells. Binding studies at 4 oC were conducted and a specific binding curve for IGFB...

  8. Surviving protein quality control catastrophes--from cells to organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kim; Bertolotti, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Organisms have evolved mechanisms to cope with and adapt to unexpected challenges and harsh conditions. Unfolded or misfolded proteins represent a threat for cells and organisms, and the deposition of misfolded proteins is a defining feature of many age-related human diseases, including the increasingly prevalent neurodegenerative diseases. These protein misfolding diseases are devastating and currently cannot be cured, but are hopefully not incurable. In fact, the aggregation-prone and potentially harmful proteins at the origins of protein misfolding diseases are expressed throughout life, whereas the diseases are late onset. This reveals that cells and organisms are normally resilient to disease-causing proteins and survive the threat of misfolded proteins up to a point. This Commentary will outline the limits of the cellular resilience to protein misfolding, and discuss the possibility of pushing these limits to help cells and organisms to survive the threat of misfolding proteins and to avoid protein quality control catastrophes. PMID:26483388

  9. A dual tag system for facilitated detection of surface expressed proteins in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmander Johan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of the autotransporter family has provided a mechanism for surface expression of proteins in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli. We have previously reported the use of the AIDA-I autotransport system to express the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis proteins SefA and H:gm. The SefA protein was successfully exposed to the medium, but the orientation of H:gm in the outer membrane could not be determined due to proteolytic cleavage of the N-terminal detection-tag. The goal of the present work was therefore to construct a vector containing elements that facilitates analysis of surface expression, especially for proteins that are sensitive to proteolysis or otherwise difficult to express. Results The surface expression system pAIDA1 was created with two detection tags flanking the passenger protein. Successful expression of SefA and H:gm on the surface of E. coli was confirmed with fluorescently labeled antibodies specific for the N-terminal His6-tag and the C-terminal Myc-tag. While both tags were detected during SefA expression, only the Myc-tag could be detected for H:gm. The negative signal indicates a proteolytic cleavage of this protein that removes the His6-tag facing the medium. Conclusions Expression levels from pAIDA1 were comparable to or higher than those achieved with the formerly used vector. The presence of the Myc- but not of the His6-tag on the cell surface during H:gm expression allowed us to confirm the hypothesis that this fusion protein was present on the surface and oriented towards the cell exterior. Western blot analysis revealed degradation products of the same molecular weight for SefA and H:gm. The size of these fragments suggests that both fusion proteins have been cleaved at a specific site close to the C-terminal end of the passenger. This proteolysis was concluded to take place either in the outer membrane or in the periplasm. Since H:gm was cleaved to a much greater extent

  10. Frequency Selective Surfaces with Nanoparticles Unit Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nga Hung Poon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency selective surface (FSS is a periodic structure with filtering performance for optical and microwave signals. The general periodic arrays made with patterned metallic elements can act as an aperture or patch on a substrate. In this work, two kinds of materials were used to produce unit cells with various patterns. Gold nanoparticles of 25 nm diameter were used to form periodic monolayer arrays by a confined photocatalytic oxidation-based surface modification method. As the other material, silver gel was used to create multiple layers of silver. Due to the ultra-thin nature of the self-assembled gold nanoparticle monolayer, it is very easy to penetrate the FSS with terahertz radiation. However, the isolated silver islands made from silver gel form thicker multiple layers and contribute to much higher reflectance. This work demonstrated that multiple silver layers are more suitable than gold nanoparticles for use in the fabrication of FSS structures.

  11. The use of cationic nanogels to deliver proteins to myeloma cells and primary T lymphocytes that poorly express heparan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kozo; Tsuchiya, Yumiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Ayame, Hirohito; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Tsubata, Takeshi

    2011-09-01

    Fusion proteins containing protein transduction domain (PTD) are widely used for intracellular delivery of exogenous proteins. PTD-mediated delivery requires expression of heparan sulfate on the surface of the target cells. However, some of metastatic tumor cells and primary lymphocytes poorly express heparan sulfate. Here we demonstrate that proteins complexed with nanosize hydrogels formed by cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulans (cCHP) are efficiently delivered to myeloma cells and primary CD4(+) T lymphocytes probably by induction of macropinocytosis, although these cells are resistant to PTD-mediated protein delivery as a consequence of poor heparan sulfate expression. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL delivered by cCHP nanogels efficiently blocked apoptosis of these cells, establishing functional regulation of cells by proteins delivered by cCHP nanogels. Thus, cCHP nanogel is a useful tool to deliver proteins for development of new cancer therapy and immune regulation. PMID:21605901

  12. Single step generation of protein arrays from DNA by cell-free expression and in situ immobilisation (PISA method)

    OpenAIRE

    He, Mingyue; Michael J. Taussig

    2001-01-01

    We describe a format for production of protein arrays termed ‘protein in situ array’ (PISA). A PISA is rapidly generated in one step directly from PCR-generated DNA fragments by cell-free protein expression and in situ immobilisation at a surface. The template for expression is DNA encoding individual proteins or domains, which is produced by PCR using primers designed from information in DNA databases. Coupled transcription and translation is carried out on a surface ...

  13. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  14. VP22 herpes simplex virus protein can transduce proteins into stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabanyi, I.; Lojudice, F.H.; Kossugue, P.M. [Centro de Terapia Celular e Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rebelato, E. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Demasi, M.A.; Sogayar, M.C. [Centro de Terapia Celular e Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-02-01

    The type I herpes simplex virus VP22 tegument protein is abundant and well known for its ability to translocate proteins from one cell to the other. In spite of some reports questioning its ability to translocate proteins by attributing the results observed to fixation artifacts or simple attachment to the cell membrane, VP22 has been used to deliver several proteins into different cell types, triggering the expected cell response. However, the question of the ability of VP22 to enter stem cells has not been addressed. We investigated whether VP22 could be used as a tool to be applied in stem cell research and differentiation due to its capacity to internalize other proteins without altering the cell genome. We generated a VP22.eGFP construct to evaluate whether VP22 could be internalized and carry another protein with it into two different types of stem cells, namely adult human dental pulp stem cells and mouse embryonic stem cells. We generated a VP22.eGFP fusion protein and demonstrated that, in fact, it enters stem cells. Therefore, this system may be used as a tool to deliver various proteins into stem cells, allowing stem cell research, differentiation and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells in the absence of genome alterations.

  15. VP22 herpes simplex virus protein can transduce proteins into stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The type I herpes simplex virus VP22 tegument protein is abundant and well known for its ability to translocate proteins from one cell to the other. In spite of some reports questioning its ability to translocate proteins by attributing the results observed to fixation artifacts or simple attachment to the cell membrane, VP22 has been used to deliver several proteins into different cell types, triggering the expected cell response. However, the question of the ability of VP22 to enter stem cells has not been addressed. We investigated whether VP22 could be used as a tool to be applied in stem cell research and differentiation due to its capacity to internalize other proteins without altering the cell genome. We generated a VP22.eGFP construct to evaluate whether VP22 could be internalized and carry another protein with it into two different types of stem cells, namely adult human dental pulp stem cells and mouse embryonic stem cells. We generated a VP22.eGFP fusion protein and demonstrated that, in fact, it enters stem cells. Therefore, this system may be used as a tool to deliver various proteins into stem cells, allowing stem cell research, differentiation and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells in the absence of genome alterations

  16. Mycoplasma pulmonis Vsa proteins and polysaccharide modulate adherence to pulmonary epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bolland, Jeffrey R; Dybvig, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The Mycoplasma pulmonis Vsa proteins are a family of size- and phase-variable lipoproteins that shield the mycoplasmas from complement and modulate attachment to abiotic surfaces. Mycoplasmas producing a long Vsa protein hemadsorb poorly and yet are proficient at colonizing rats and mice. The effect of the length of the Vsa protein on the attachment of mycoplasmas to epithelial cells has not been previously explored. We find that independent of Vsa isotype, mycoplasmas producing a long Vsa pr...

  17. Genetic and proteomic evidences support the localization of yeast enolase in the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Villar, Elena; Monteoliva, Lucía; Larsen, Martin Røssel;

    2006-01-01

    Although enolase, other glycolytic enzymes, and a variety of cytoplasmic proteins lacking an N-terminal secretion signal have been widely described as located at the cell surface in yeast and in mammalian cells, their presence in this external location is still controversial. Here, we report that...

  18. Corneal cell adhesion to contact lens hydrogel materials enhanced via tear film protein deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Elkins

    Full Text Available Tear film protein deposition on contact lens hydrogels has been well characterized from the perspective of bacterial adhesion and viability. However, the effect of protein deposition on lens interactions with the corneal epithelium remains largely unexplored. The current study employs a live cell rheometer to quantify human corneal epithelial cell adhesion to soft contact lenses fouled with the tear film protein lysozyme. PureVision balafilcon A and AirOptix lotrafilcon B lenses were soaked for five days in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS, borate buffered saline (BBS, or Sensitive Eyes Plus Saline Solution (Sensitive Eyes, either pure or in the presence of lysozyme. Treated contact lenses were then contacted to a live monolayer of corneal epithelial cells for two hours, after which the contact lens was sheared laterally. The apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus was then used to quantify the extent of cell adhesion to the contact lens surface. For both lens types, lysozyme increased corneal cell adhesion to the contact lens, with the apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus increasing up to an order of magnitude in the presence of protein. The magnitude of this increase depended on the identity of the soaking solution: lenses soaked in borate-buffered solutions (BBS, Sensitive Eyes exhibited a much greater increase in cell attachment upon protein addition than those soaked in PBS. Significantly, all measurements were conducted while subjecting the cells to moderate surface pressures and shear rates, similar to those experienced by corneal cells in vivo.

  19. Denaturation of membrane proteins and hyperthermic cell killing

    OpenAIRE

    Burgman, Paulus Wilhelmus Johannes Jozef

    1993-01-01

    Summarizing: heat induced denaturation of membrane proteins is probably related to hyperthermic cell killing. Induced resistance of heat sensitive proteins seems to be involved in the development of thermotolerance. Although many questions remain still to be answered, it appears that HSP72, when bound to membrane proteins, is capable of providing heat resistance to these proteins. ... Zie: Summary

  20. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to quantify protein-protein interactions inside cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R R

    2006-11-01

    Recent developments in cellular imaging spectroscopy now permit the minimally invasive study of protein dynamics inside living cells. These advances are of interest to cell biologists, as proteins rarely act in isolation, but rather in concert with others in forming cellular machinery. Until recently, all protein interactions had to be determined in vitro using biochemical approaches: this biochemical legacy has provided cell biologists with the basis to test defined protein-protein interactions not only inside cells, but now also with high spatial resolution. These techniques can detect and quantify protein behaviours down to the single-molecule level, all inside living cells. More recent developments in TCSPC (time-correlated single-photon counting) imaging are now also driving towards being able to determine protein interaction rates with similar spatial resolution, and together, these experimental advances allow investigators to perform biochemical experiments inside living cells. PMID:17052173

  1. Cell Adhesion and Proliferation on the "Living" Surface of a Polyelectrolyte Multilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Carlos J; Surmaitis, Richard L; Schlenoff, Joseph B

    2016-05-31

    The adhesion of living eukaryotic cells to a substrate, one of the most complex problems in surface science, requires adsorption of extracellular proteins such as fibronectin. Thin films of polyelectrolyte complex made layer-by-layer (polyelectrolyte multilayers or PEMUs) offer a high degree of control of surface charge and composition-interconnected and essential variables for protein adhesion. Fibroblasts grown on multilayers of poly(styrenesulfonate), PSS, and poly(diallyldimethylammonium), PDADMA, with increasing thickness exhibit good adhesion until the 12th layer of polyelectrolyte has been added, whereupon there is a sudden transition to nonadhesive behavior. This sharp change is due to the migration of excess positive charge to the surface-a previously unrecognized property of PEMUs. Precise radiotracer assays of adsorbed (125)I-albumin show how protein adsorption is related to multilayer surface charge. With more negative surface charge density from the sulfonates of PSS, more albumin adsorbs to the surface. However, a loosely held or "soft corona" exchanges with serum protein under the Vroman effect, which is correlated with poor cell adhesion. A comprehensive view of cell adhesion highlights the central role of robust protein adhesion, which is required before any secondary effects of matrix stiffness on cell fate can come into play. PMID:27191244

  2. Hemin uptake in Porphyromonas gingivalis: Omp26 is a hemin-binding surface protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Bramanti, T E; Holt, S C

    1993-01-01

    A 26-kDa outer membrane protein (Omp26) has been proposed to play a role in hemin acquisition by Porphyromonas gingivalis (T. E. Bramanti and S. C. Holt, J. Bacteriol. 174:5827-5839, 1992). We studied [55Fe]hemin uptake in P. gingivalis grown under conditions of hemin starvation (Omp26 expressed on the outer membrane surface) and hemin excess (Omp26 not expressed on surface). [55Fe]hemin uptake occurred rapidly in hemin-starved cells which incorporated up to 70% of total [55Fe]hemin within 3 ...

  3. Nanoparticle-cell interactions: molecular structure of the protein corona and cellular outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Candace C; Payne, Christine K

    2014-08-19

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biology and medicine requires a molecular-level understanding of how NPs interact with cells in a physiological environment. A critical difference between well-controlled in vitro experiments and in vivo applications is the presence of a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. It has been established that extracellular serum proteins present in blood will adsorb onto the surface of NPs, forming a "protein corona". Our goal was to understand how this protein layer affected cellular-level events, including NP binding, internalization, and transport. A combination of microscopy, which provides spatial resolution, and spectroscopy, which provides molecular information, is necessary to probe protein-NP-cell interactions. Initial experiments used a model system composed of polystyrene NPs functionalized with either amine or carboxylate groups to provide a cationic or anionic surface, respectively. Serum proteins adsorb onto the surface of both cationic and anionic NPs, forming a net anionic protein-NP complex. Although these protein-NP complexes have similar diameters and effective surface charges, they show the exact opposite behavior in terms of cellular binding. In the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), the cellular binding of BSA-NP complexes formed from cationic NPs is enhanced, whereas the cellular binding of BSA-NP complexes formed from anionic NPs is inhibited. These trends are independent of NP diameter or cell type. Similar results were obtained for anionic quantum dots and colloidal gold nanospheres. Using competition assays, we determined that BSA-NP complexes formed from anionic NPs bind to albumin receptors on the cell surface. BSA-NP complexes formed from cationic NPs are redirected to scavenger receptors. The observation that similar NPs with identical protein corona compositions bind to different cellular receptors suggested that a difference in the structure of the adsorbed protein may be responsible for the

  4. Wettability influences cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces with different topographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourenco, B.N.; Marchioli, G.; Song, W; Reis, R.L.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Karperien, H.B.J.; Apeldoorn, van A.A.; Mano, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Surface wettability and topography are recognized as critical factors influencing cell behavior on biomaterials. So far only few works have reported cell responses on surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability in combination with surface topography. The goal of this work is to study whether cell behavi

  5. Ligand-affinity cloning and structure of a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan that binds basic fibroblast growth factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Kiefer, M C; Stephans, J C; Crawford, K; Okino, K.; Barr, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Expression cloning of cDNAs encoding a basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF) binding protein confirms previous hypotheses that this molecule is a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan. A cDNA library constructed from a hamster kidney cell line rich in FGF receptor activity was transfected into a human lymphoblastoid cell line. Clones expressing functional basic FGF binding proteins at their surfaces were enriched by panning on plastic dishes coated with human basic FGF. The amino acid sequ...

  6. Protein and cell patterning in closed polymer channels by photoimmobilizing proteins on photografted poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Mikkelsen, Morten Bo Lindholm; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2014-01-01

    Definable surface chemistry is essential for many applications of microfluidic polymer systems. However, small cross-section channels with a high surface to volume ratio enhance passive adsorption of molecules that depletes active molecules in solution and contaminates the channel surface. Here, we...... present a one-step photochemical process to coat the inner surfaces of closed microfluidic channels with a nanometer thick layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), well known to strongly reduce non-specific adsorption, using only commercially available reagents in an aqueous environment. The coating consists...... shown to greatly improve cell adhesion compared to unexposed areas. This method opens for easy surface modification of closed microfluidic systems through combining a low protein binding PEG-based coating with spatially defined protein patterns of interest....

  7. Dual fluorescence labeling of surface-exposed and internal proteins in erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Dominique C; Sowa, Kordai M P; Arnot, David E

    2008-01-01

    There is a need for improved methods for in situ localization of surface proteins on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to help understand how these antigens are trafficked to, and positioned within, the host cell membrane. This protocol for confocal immunofluorescence microscopy combines...... the protocol is discussed here in the context of malaria parasite-infected cells, it can also be modified to visualize the membrane and intracellular distribution of surface and internal proteins in other eukaryotic cells....

  8. Genetic Immunization of BALB/c mice with a Plasmid Bearing the Gene Coding for a Hybrid Merozoite Surface Protein 1-Hepatitis B Virus Surface Protein Fusion Protects Mice against Lethal Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi PC1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Wunderlich, Gerhard; Moura, Ivan C.; del Portillo, Hernando A

    2000-01-01

    The genetic immunization of rodents with a plasmid coding for a Plasmodium chabaudi merozoite surface protein 1 (C terminus)-hepatitis B virus surface fusion protein (pPcMSP119-HBs) provided protection of mice against subsequent lethal challenge with P. chabaudi chabaudi PC1-infected red blood cells. The percentage of survivor mice was higher in DNA-immunized mice than in animals immunized with a recombinant rPcMSP119– glutathione S-transferase fusion protein administered in Freund adjuvant. ...

  9. A Surface Biotinylation Strategy for Reproducible Plasma Membrane Protein Purification and Tracking of Genetic and Drug-Induced Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörmann, Katrin; Stukalov, Alexey; Müller, André C; Heinz, Leonhard X; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Colinge, Jacques; Bennett, Keiryn L

    2016-02-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) proteins contribute to the identity of a cell, mediate contact and communication, and account for more than two-thirds of known drug targets.1-8 In the past years, several protocols for the proteomic profiling of PM proteins have been described. Nevertheless, comparative analyses have mainly focused on different variations of one approach.9-11 We compared sulfo-NHS-SS-biotinylation, aminooxy-biotinylation, and surface coating with silica beads to isolate PM proteins for subsequent analysis by one-dimensional gel-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Absolute and relative numbers of PM proteins and reproducibility parameters on a qualitative and quantitative level were assessed. Sulfo-NHS-SS-biotinylation outperformed aminooxy-biotinylation and surface coating using silica beads for most of the monitored criteria. We further simplified this procedure by a competitive biotin elution strategy achieving an average PM annotated protein fraction of 54% (347 proteins). Computational analysis using additional databases and prediction tools revealed that in total over 90% of the purified proteins were associated with the PM, mostly as interactors. The modified sulfo-NHS-SS-biotinylation protocol was validated by tracking changes in the plasma membrane proteome composition induced by genetic alteration and drug treatment. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins were depleted in PM purifications from cells deficient in the GPI transamidase component PIGS, and treatment of cells with tunicamycin significantly reduced the abundance of N-glycoproteins in surface purifications. PMID:26699813

  10. Interaction of Proteins Identified in Human Thyroid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Pietsch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of gravity forces on the regulation of protein expression by healthy and malignant thyroid cells was studied with the aim to identify protein interactions. Western blot analyses of a limited number of proteins suggested a time-dependent regulation of protein expression by simulated microgravity. After applying free flow isoelectric focusing and mass spectrometry to search for differently expressed proteins by thyroid cells exposed to simulated microgravity for three days, a considerable number of candidates for gravi-sensitive proteins were detected. In order to show how proteins sensitive to microgravity could directly influence other proteins, we investigated all polypeptide chains identified with Mascot scores above 100, looking for groups of interacting proteins. Hence, UniProtKB entry numbers of all detected proteins were entered into the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING and processed. The program indicated that we had detected various groups of interacting proteins in each of the three cell lines studied. The major groups of interacting proteins play a role in pathways of carbohydrate and protein metabolism, regulation of cell growth and cell membrane structuring. Analyzing these groups, networks of interaction could be established which show how a punctual influence of simulated microgravity may propagate via various members of interaction chains.

  11. Hydrophobic and electrostatic cell surface properties of thermophilic dairy streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mei, H C; de Vries, J; Busscher, H J

    1993-12-01

    Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) and microelectrophoresis were done in 10 mM potassium phosphate solutions to characterize the surfaces of thermophilic dairy streptococci, isolated from pasteurizers. Regardless of whether they were grown (in M17 broth) with lactose, sucrose, or glucose added, strains were relatively hydrophilic (showing low initial removal rates by hexadecane) and slightly negatively charged. A tendency exists for cells grown with sucrose added to be more hydrophilic than cells grown with glucose or lactose added. Also, the lowest isoelectric points, i.e., the pH values for which the zeta potentials are zero, were measured for strains with glucose added to the growth medium. The isoelectric points for the strains were all rather high, between pH 3 and 5, indicative of protein-rich surfaces, although X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy did not measure excessively large amounts of nitrogen on the cell surfaces. Both MATH and microelectrophoresis were done as a function of pH. Maxima in hydrophobicity were observed at certain pH values. Usually these pH values were in the range of the isoelectric points of the cells. Thus it appears that MATH measures an interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatic interactions. MATH measures solely hydrophobicity only when electrostatic interactions are absent, i.e., close to the isoelectric points of the cells. Considering that these thermophilic streptococci are all rather hydrophilic, a possible pathway to prevent fouling in the pasteurization process might be to render the heat exchanger plates of the pasteurizer more hydrophobic. PMID:16349127

  12. Distribution of Prestin on Outer Hair Cell Basolateral Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ning; ZHAI Suo-qiang; YANG Shi-ming; HAN Dong-yi; ZHAO Hong-bo

    2008-01-01

    Prestin has been identified as a motor protein responsible for outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility and is expressed on the OHC surface. Previous studies revealed that OHC eleetromotility and its associated nonlinear capacitance were mainly located at the OHC lateral wall and absent at the apical cutieular plate and the basal nucleus region. Immunofluorescent staining for prestin also failed to demonstrate prestin expression at the OHC basal ends in whole-mount preparation of the organ of Corti. However, there lacks a definitive demonstration of the pattern of prestin distribution. The OHC lateral wall has a trilaminate organization and is composed of the plasma membrane, cortical lattice, and subsurface cisternae. In this study, the location of prestin proteins in dissociated OHCs was examined using immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy. We found that prestin was uniformly expressed on the basolateral surface, including the basal pole. No staining was seen on the cuticular plate and stereocilia. When co-stained with a membrane marker di-8-ANEPPS, prestin-labeling was found to be in the outer layer of the OHC lateral wall. After separating the plasma membrane from the underlying subsurface eisternae using a hypotonic extracellular solution, prestin-labeling was found to be in the plasma membrane, not the subsurface cisternae. The data show that prestin is expressed in the plasma membrane on the entire OHC basolateral surface.

  13. HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum dots emerge as an attractive alternative to small molecule fluorophores as fluorescent tags for in vivo cell labeling and imaging. This communication presents a method for specific labeling of live cells using quantum dots. The labeling is mediated by HaloTag protein expressed at the cell surface which forms a stable covalent adduct with its ligand (HaloTag ligand). The labeling can be performed in one single step with quantum dot conjugates that are functionalized with HaloTag ligand, or in two steps with biotinylated HaloTag ligand first and followed by streptavidin coated quantum dots. Live cell fluorescence imaging indicates that the labeling is specific and takes place at the cell surface. This HaloTag protein-mediated cell labeling method should facilitate the application of quantum dots for live cell imaging

  14. Expression of group B protective surface protein (BPS) by invasive and colonizing isolates of group B streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Aurea E; Chhatwal, G S; Hillier, Sharon L; Baker, Carol J; Ferrieri, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Group B protective surface protein (BPS) is expressed on the cell surface of some group B streptococcal (GBS) (Streptococcus agalactiae) strains and adds to the identification by capsular polysaccharide (CPS), and c or R proteins. We investigated the prevalence of BPS among GBS clinical isolates (303 invasive, 4122 colonizing) collected over 11 years in four American cities. Hot HCl cell extracts were tested by immunoprecipitation in agarose with rabbit antisera to BPS; the alpha (α) and beta (β) components of c protein; R1, R3, and R4 species of R protein; and CPS serotypes Ia-VIII. BPS was found in 155 isolates (seven invasive, 148 colonizing). Of these, 87 were Ia, 37 II, 20 V; none were III. BPS was expressed usually with another protein: a species of R by 87 or a component of c by 39. The predominant CPS/protein profiles with BPS were Ia/R1,BPS and II/c(α + β),BPS. Thus, along with CPS serotype and other surface proteins, BPS can be a valuable marker for precise strain characterization of unique GBS clinical isolates with complex surface protein profiles. PMID:25108378

  15. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions

  16. S layer protein A of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM regulates immature dendritic cell and T cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Sergey R; Smidt, Hauke; de Vos, Willem M; Bruijns, Sven C M; Singh, Satwinder Kaur; Valence, Florence; Molle, Daniel; Lortal, Sylvie; Altermann, Eric; Klaenhammer, Todd R; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2008-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in mucosal tolerance. They regularly encounter beneficial intestinal bacteria, but the nature of these cellular contacts and the immune responses elicited by the bacteria are not entirely elucidated. Here, we examined the interactions of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and its cell surface compounds with DCs. L. acidophilus NCFM attached to DCs and induced a concentration-dependent production of IL-10, and low IL-12p70. We further demonstrated that the bacterium binds to DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), a DC- specific receptor. To identify the DC-SIGN ligand present on the bacterium, we took advantage of a generated array of L. acidophilus NCFM mutants. A knockout mutant of L. acidophilus NCFM lacking the surface (S) layer A protein (SlpA) was significantly reduced in binding to DC-SIGN. This mutant incurred a chromosomal inversion leading to dominant expression of a second S layer protein, SlpB. In the SlpB-dominant strain, the nature of the interaction of this bacterium with DCs changed dramatically. Higher concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-12p70, TNFalpha, and IL-1beta were produced by DCs interacting with the SlpB-dominant strain compared with the parent NCFM strain. Unlike the SlpA-knockout mutant, T cells primed with L. acidophilus NCFM stimulated DCs produced more IL-4. The SlpA-DC-SIGN interaction was further confirmed as purified SlpA protein ligated directly to the DC-SIGN. In conclusion, the major S layer protein, SlpA, of L. acidophilus NCFM is the first probiotic bacterial DC-SIGN ligand identified that is functionally involved in the modulation of DCs and T cells functions. PMID:19047644

  17. Identification of extracellular surface-layer associated proteins in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brant; Selle, Kurt; O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial surface (S-) layers are crystalline arrays of self-assembling, proteinaceous subunits called S-layer proteins (Slps), with molecular masses ranging from 40 to 200 kDa. The S-layer-forming bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM expresses three major Slps: SlpA (46 kDa), SlpB (47 kDa) and SlpX (51 kDa). SlpA has a demonstrated role in adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells in vitro, and has been shown to modulate dendritic cell (DC) and T-cell functionalities with murine DCs. In this study, a modification of a standard lithium chloride S-layer extraction revealed 37 proteins were solubilized from the S-layer wash fraction. Of these, 30 have predicted cleavage sites for secretion, 24 are predicted to be extracellular, six are lipid-anchored, three have N-terminal hydrophobic membrane spanning regions and four are intracellular, potentially moonlighting proteins. Some of these proteins, designated S-layer associated proteins (SLAPs), may be loosely associated with or embedded within the bacterial S-layer complex. Lba-1029, a putative SLAP gene, was deleted from the chromosome of L. acidophilus. Phenotypic characterization of the deletion mutant demonstrated that the SLAP LBA1029 contributes to a pro-inflammatory TNF-α response from murine DCs. This study identified extracellular proteins and putative SLAPs of L. acidophilus NCFM using LC-MS/MS. SLAPs appear to impart important surface display features and immunological properties to microbes that are coated by S-layers. PMID:24002751

  18. Protein dynamics in individual human cells: experiment and theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Aharon Cohen

    Full Text Available A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle-dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time per cell is quadratic for proteins with long mRNA life times and approximately linear for a protein with short mRNA lifetime. Both behaviors correspond to a classical model of transcription and translation. A stochastic model, in which genes slowly switch between ON and OFF states, captures measured cell-cell variability. The data suggests, in accordance with the model, that switching to the gene ON state is exponentially distributed and that the cell-cell distribution of protein levels can be approximated by a Gamma distribution throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that relatively simple models may describe protein dynamics in individual human cells.

  19. Seminal plasma and sperm surface proteins in reproduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonáková, Věra; Postlerová, Pavla; Davidová, Nina; Tichá, M.; Šutovský, P.; Pěknicová, Jana

    Praha: BTO-N, 2009. s. 31-32. [XV. Symposium českých reprodukčních imunologů s mezinárodní účastí. 29.05.2009-31.05.2009, Žďár nad Sázavou] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06011; GA ČR GA303/09/1285; GA ČR GD523/08/H064 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : sperm surface protein * ubiqutin C-terminal hydrolase * boar spermadhesin * AQN 1 * boar seminal plasma Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  20. Chemistry and material science at the cell surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weian Zhao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell surfaces are fertile ground for chemists and material scientists to manipulate or augment cell functions and phenotypes. This not only helps to answer basic biology questions but also has diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances in the engineering of the cell surface. In particular, we focus on the potential applications of surface engineered cells for 1 targeting cells to desirable sites in cell therapy, 2 programming assembly of cells for tissue engineering, 3 bioimaging and sensing, and ultimately 4 manipulating cell biology.

  1. Direct observation of the binding process between protein and quantum dots by in situ surface plasmon resonance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A layer-by-layer surface decoration technique has been developed to anchor quantum dots (QDs) onto a gold substrate and an in situ surface plasmon resonance technique has been used to study interactions between the QDs and different proteins. Direct observation of the binding of the protein onto the QDs and the kinetics of the adsorption and dissociation of different proteins on the QDs has been achieved. This would be helpful for the identification of particle-associated proteins and may offer a fundamental prerequisite for nanobiology, nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. The combination of the novel layer-by-layer surface modification method and in situ surface plasmon resonance would be powerful in studying biological systems such as DNA and cells.

  2. Direct observation of the binding process between protein and quantum dots by in situ surface plasmon resonance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Qi; Zhou Bo; Tian Fangfang; Ge Yushu; Liu Xiaorong; Liu Yi [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Huang Shan; Guan Hongliang; He Zhike, E-mail: prof.liuyi@263.ne [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2009-08-12

    A layer-by-layer surface decoration technique has been developed to anchor quantum dots (QDs) onto a gold substrate and an in situ surface plasmon resonance technique has been used to study interactions between the QDs and different proteins. Direct observation of the binding of the protein onto the QDs and the kinetics of the adsorption and dissociation of different proteins on the QDs has been achieved. This would be helpful for the identification of particle-associated proteins and may offer a fundamental prerequisite for nanobiology, nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. The combination of the novel layer-by-layer surface modification method and in situ surface plasmon resonance would be powerful in studying biological systems such as DNA and cells.

  3. Direct observation of the binding process between protein and quantum dots by in situ surface plasmon resonance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qi; Zhou, Bo; Huang, Shan; Tian, Fangfang; Guan, Hongliang; Ge, Yushu; Liu, Xiaorong; He, Zhike; Liu, Yi

    2009-08-01

    A layer-by-layer surface decoration technique has been developed to anchor quantum dots (QDs) onto a gold substrate and an in situ surface plasmon resonance technique has been used to study interactions between the QDs and different proteins. Direct observation of the binding of the protein onto the QDs and the kinetics of the adsorption and dissociation of different proteins on the QDs has been achieved. This would be helpful for the identification of particle-associated proteins and may offer a fundamental prerequisite for nanobiology, nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. The combination of the novel layer-by-layer surface modification method and in situ surface plasmon resonance would be powerful in studying biological systems such as DNA and cells.

  4. Surface nanotopography of an anodized Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy enhances cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Her-Hsiung [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Informatics, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chia-Ping [Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Sun, Ying-Sui [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Yang, Wei-En [Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tzu-Hsin, E-mail: biomaterials@hotmail.com [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Oral Medicine Center, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • An electrochemical anodization was applied to α/β-type Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy surface. • Anodized surface had a nontoxic nanoporous topography. • Anodized surface increased proteins adsorption due to nanotopography. • Anodized surface enhanced cell growth due to nanotopography. • Electrochemical anodization has potential as implant surface treatment. - Abstract: The α/β-type Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy is a potential replacement for α/β-type Ti–6Al–4V alloy, which is widely used in biomedical implant applications. The biological response to implant material is dependent on the surface characteristics of the material. In the present study, a simple and fast process was developed to perform an electrochemical anodization treatment on Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy. The proposed process yielded a thin surface nanotopography, which enhanced cell growth on the Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy. The surface characteristics, including the morphology, wettability, and protein adsorption, were investigated, and the cytotoxicity was evaluated according to International Organization for Standardization 10993-5 specifications. Cell adhesion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on the test specimens was observed via fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The anodization process produced a surface nanotopography (pore size <100 nm) on anodized Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy, which enhanced the wettability, protein adsorption, cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell mineralization. The results showed that the surface nanotopography produced using the proposed electrochemical anodization process enhanced cell growth on anodized Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy for implant applications.

  5. Surface nanotopography of an anodized Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy enhances cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An electrochemical anodization was applied to α/β-type Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy surface. • Anodized surface had a nontoxic nanoporous topography. • Anodized surface increased proteins adsorption due to nanotopography. • Anodized surface enhanced cell growth due to nanotopography. • Electrochemical anodization has potential as implant surface treatment. - Abstract: The α/β-type Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy is a potential replacement for α/β-type Ti–6Al–4V alloy, which is widely used in biomedical implant applications. The biological response to implant material is dependent on the surface characteristics of the material. In the present study, a simple and fast process was developed to perform an electrochemical anodization treatment on Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy. The proposed process yielded a thin surface nanotopography, which enhanced cell growth on the Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy. The surface characteristics, including the morphology, wettability, and protein adsorption, were investigated, and the cytotoxicity was evaluated according to International Organization for Standardization 10993-5 specifications. Cell adhesion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on the test specimens was observed via fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The anodization process produced a surface nanotopography (pore size <100 nm) on anodized Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy, which enhanced the wettability, protein adsorption, cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell mineralization. The results showed that the surface nanotopography produced using the proposed electrochemical anodization process enhanced cell growth on anodized Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy for implant applications

  6. Hepatitis B virus large surface protein: function and fame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churin, Yuri; Roderfeld, Martin; Roeb, Elke

    2015-02-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. HBV life cycle begins with viral attachment to hepatocytes, mediated by the large HBV surface protein (LHBs). Identification of the sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) as a HBV receptor has revealed a suitable target for viral entry inhibition. Analysis of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) level is a non-invasive diagnostic parameter that improves HBV treatment opportunities. Furthermore, HBsAg plays an important role in manipulation of host immune response by HBV. However, observations in patients with chronic hepatitis B under conditions of immune suppression and in transgenic mouse models of HBV infection suggest, that in absence of adaptive immune responses cellular mechanisms induced by HBV may also lead to the development of liver diseases. Thus, the multifaceted pathological aspects of HBsAg predetermine the design of new therapeutical options modulating associated biological implications. PMID:25713800

  7. ErpC, a member of the complement regulator-acquiring family of surface proteins from Borrelia burgdorferi, possesses an architecture previously unseen in this protein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of ErpC, a member of the complement regulator-acquiring surface protein family from B. burgdorferi, has been solved, providing insights into the strategies of complement evasion by this zoonotic bacterium and suggesting a common architecture for other members of this protein family. Borrelia burgdorferi is a spirochete responsible for Lyme disease, the most commonly occurring vector-borne disease in Europe and North America. The bacterium utilizes a set of proteins, termed complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs), to aid evasion of the human complement system by recruiting and presenting complement regulator factor H on its surface in a manner that mimics host cells. Presented here is the atomic resolution structure of a member of this protein family, ErpC. The structure provides new insights into the mechanism of recruitment of factor H and other factor H-related proteins by acting as a molecular mimic of host glycosaminoglycans. It also describes the architecture of other CRASP proteins belonging to the OspE/F-related paralogous protein family and suggests that they have evolved to bind specific complement proteins, aiding survival of the bacterium in different hosts

  8. Calculation of cell volumes and surface areas in MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCNP is a general Monte Carlo neutron-photon particle transport code which treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces, and some special fourth-degree surfaces. It is necessary to calculate cell volumes and surface areas so that cell masses, fluxes, and other important information can be determined. The volume/area calculation in MCNP computes cell volumes and surface areas for cells and surfaces rotationally symmetric about any arbitrary axis. 5 figures, 1 table

  9. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitencourt, Amanda R; Vicentin, Elaine C; Jimenez, Maria C; Ricci, Ricardo; Leite, Juliana A; Costa, Fabio T; Ferreira, Luis C; Russell, Bruce; Nosten, François; Rénia, Laurent; Galinski, Mary R; Barnwell, John W; Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Soares, Irene S

    2013-01-01

    A recent clinical trial in African children demonstrated the potential utility of merozoite surface protein (MSP)-3 as a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The present study evaluated the use of Plasmodium vivax MSP-3 (PvMSP-3) as a target antigen in vaccine formulations against malaria caused by P. vivax. Recombinant proteins representing MSP-3α and MSP-3β of P. vivax were expressed as soluble histidine-tagged bacterial fusions. Antigenicity during natural infection was evaluated by detecting specific antibodies using sera from individuals living in endemic areas of Brazil. A large proportion of infected individuals presented IgG antibodies to PvMSP-3α (68.2%) and at least 1 recombinant protein representing PvMSP-3β (79.1%). In spite of the large responder frequency, reactivity to both antigens was significantly lower than was observed for the immunodominant epitope present on the 19-kDa C-terminal region of PvMSP-1. Immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins was studied in mice in the absence or presence of different adjuvant formulations. PvMSP-3β, but not PvMSP-3α, induced a TLR4-independent humoral immune response in the absence of any adjuvant formulation. The immunogenicity of the recombinant antigens were also tested in formulations containing different adjuvants (Alum, Salmonella enterica flagellin, CpG, Quil A,TiterMax® and incomplete Freunds adjuvant) and combinations of two adjuvants (Alum plus flagellin, and CpG plus flagellin). Recombinant PvMSP-3α and PvMSP-3β elicited higher antibody titers capable of recognizing P. vivax-infected erythrocytes harvested from malaria patients. Our results confirm that P. vivax MSP-3 antigens are immunogenic during natural infection, and the corresponding recombinant proteins may be useful in elucidating their vaccine potential. PMID:23457498

  10. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R Bitencourt

    Full Text Available A recent clinical trial in African children demonstrated the potential utility of merozoite surface protein (MSP-3 as a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The present study evaluated the use of Plasmodium vivax MSP-3 (PvMSP-3 as a target antigen in vaccine formulations against malaria caused by P. vivax. Recombinant proteins representing MSP-3α and MSP-3β of P. vivax were expressed as soluble histidine-tagged bacterial fusions. Antigenicity during natural infection was evaluated by detecting specific antibodies using sera from individuals living in endemic areas of Brazil. A large proportion of infected individuals presented IgG antibodies to PvMSP-3α (68.2% and at least 1 recombinant protein representing PvMSP-3β (79.1%. In spite of the large responder frequency, reactivity to both antigens was significantly lower than was observed for the immunodominant epitope present on the 19-kDa C-terminal region of PvMSP-1. Immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins was studied in mice in the absence or presence of different adjuvant formulations. PvMSP-3β, but not PvMSP-3α, induced a TLR4-independent humoral immune response in the absence of any adjuvant formulation. The immunogenicity of the recombinant antigens were also tested in formulations containing different adjuvants (Alum, Salmonella enterica flagellin, CpG, Quil A,TiterMax® and incomplete Freunds adjuvant and combinations of two adjuvants (Alum plus flagellin, and CpG plus flagellin. Recombinant PvMSP-3α and PvMSP-3β elicited higher antibody titers capable of recognizing P. vivax-infected erythrocytes harvested from malaria patients. Our results confirm that P. vivax MSP-3 antigens are immunogenic during natural infection, and the corresponding recombinant proteins may be useful in elucidating their vaccine potential.

  11. Templating Biomineralization: Surface Directed Protein Self-assembly and External Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Xiaolan

    Biomineralization is a wide-spread phenomenon in the biological systems, which is the process of mineral formation by organisms through interaction between its organic contents and the inorganic minerals. The process is essential in a broad spectrum of biological phenomena ranging from bone and tooth formation to pathological mineralization under hypoxic conditions or cancerous formations. In this thesis I studied biomineralization at the earliest stages in order to obtain a better understanding of the fundamental principals involved. This knowledge is essential if we want to engineer devices which will increase bone regeneration or prevent unwanted mineral deposits. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins play an essential role during biomineralization in bone and engineered tissues. In this dissertation, I present an approach to mimic the ECM in vitro to probe the interactions of these proteins with calcium phosphate mineral and with each other. Early stage of mineralization is investigated by mechanical properties of the protein fibers using Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) and Shear Modulation Force Microscopy (SMFM). The development of mineral crystals on the protein matrices is also characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD). The results demonstrate complementary actions of the two ECM proteins to collect cations and template calcium phosphate mineral, respectively. Magnets have been clinically used as an "induction source" in various bone or orthodontic treatments. However, the mechanism and effects of magnetic fields remain unclear. In this dissertation, I also undertake the present investigation to study the effects of 150 mT static magnetic fields (SMF) on ECM development and cell biomineralization using MC3T3-E1 osteobalst-like cells. Early stage of biomineralization is characterized by SPM, SMFM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CSLM). Late stage of

  12. Proteome analysis and serological characterization of surface-exposed proteins of Rickettsia heilongjiangensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Qi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rickettsia heilongjiangensis, the agent of Far-Eastern spotted fever (FESF, is an obligate intracellular bacterium. The surface-exposed proteins (SEPs of rickettsiae are involved in rickettsial adherence to and invasion of host cells, intracellular bacterial growth, and/or interaction with immune cells. They are also potential molecular candidates for the development of diagnostic reagents and vaccines against rickettsiosis. METHODS: R. heilongjiangensis SEPs were identified by biotin-streptavidin affinity purification and 2D electrophoreses coupled with ESI-MS/MS. Recombinant SEPs were probed with various sera to analyze their serological characteristics using a protein microarray and an enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA. RESULTS: Twenty-five SEPs were identified, most of which were predicted to reside on the surface of R. heilongjiangensis cells. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that these proteins could be involved in bacterial pathogenesis. Eleven of the 25 SEPs were recognized as major seroreactive antigens by sera from R. heilongjiangensis-infected mice and FESF patients. Among the major seroreactive SEPs, microarray assays and/or ELISAs revealed that GroEL, OmpA-2, OmpB-3, PrsA, RplY, RpsB, SurA and YbgF had modest sensitivity and specificity for recognizing R. heilongjiangensis infection and/or spotted fever. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the SEPs identified herein have potentially important roles in R. heilongjiangensis pathogenicity. Some of them have potential as serodiagnostic antigens or as subunit vaccine antigens against the disease.

  13. Exosomal Heat Shock Proteins as New Players in Tumour Cell-to-cell Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Campanella

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes have recently been proposed as novel elements in the study of intercellular communication in normal and pathological conditions. The biomolecular composition of exosomes reflects the specialized functions of the original cells. Heat shock proteins (Hsps are a group of chaperone proteins with diverse biological roles. In recent years, many studies have focused on the extracellular roles played by Hsps that appear to be involved in cancer development and immune system stimulation. Hsps localized on the surface of exosomes, secreted by normal and tumour cells, could be key players in intercellular cross-talk, particularly during the course of different diseases, such as cancer. Exosomal Hsps offer significant opportunities for clinical applications, including their use as potential novel biomarkers for the diagnoses or prognoses of different diseases, or for therapeutic applications and drug delivery.

  14. Selective Labeling of Proteins on Living Cell Membranes Using Fluorescent Nanodiamond Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Sotoma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The impeccable photostability of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs is an ideal property for use in fluorescence imaging of proteins in living cells. However, such an application requires highly specific labeling of the target proteins with FNDs. Furthermore, the surface of unmodified FNDs tends to adsorb biomolecules nonspecifically, which hinders the reliable targeting of proteins with FNDs. Here, we combined hyperbranched polyglycerol modification of FNDs with the β-lactamase-tag system to develop a strategy for selective imaging of the protein of interest in cells. The combination of these techniques enabled site-specific labeling of Interleukin-18 receptor alpha chain, a membrane receptor, with FNDs, which eventually enabled tracking of the diffusion trajectory of FND-labeled proteins on the membrane surface.

  15. Development of novel cell surface display in Corynebacterium glutamicum using porin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, Toshihiro; Hatada, Kazuki; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a novel cell surface display in Corynebacterium glutamicum using porin proteins as anchor proteins. Porins are localized at C. glutamicum mycolic acid layer and exist as a hexamer. We used alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis 148 (AmyA) as a model protein to be displayed on the C. glutamicum cell surface. AmyA was fused to the C terminus of the porins PorB, PorC, or PorH. Expression vectors using fused proteins under the control of the cspB promoter were constructed and introduced into the C. glutamicum Cm strain. Immunostaining microscopy and flow cytometric analysis revealed that PorB-AmyA, PorC-AmyA, and PorH-AmyA were displayed on the C. glutamicum cell surface. AmyA activity was only detected in the cell fraction of C. glutamicum cells that displayed AmyA fused to PorB, PorC or PorH and AmyA activity was not detected in the supernatants of C. glutamicum culture broths after 72 h cultivation. Thus, we have demonstrated that C. glutamicum porins are very efficient anchor proteins for protein display in C. glutamicum. PMID:19430772

  16. Surface Proteins of Streptococcus agalactiae and Related Proteins in Other Bacterial Pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindahl, Gunnar; Stålhammar-Carlemalm, Margaretha; Areschoug, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus) is the major cause of invasive bacterial disease, including meningitis, in the neonatal period. Although prophylactic measures have contributed to a substantial reduction in the number of infections, development of a vaccine remains an important goal. While much work in this field has focused on the S. agalactiae polysaccharide capsule, which is an important virulence factor that elicits protective immunity, surface proteins have received incre...

  17. Systematic discovery of linear binding motifs targeting an ancient protein interaction surface on MAP kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeke, András; Bastys, Tomas; Alexa, Anita; Garai, Ágnes; Mészáros, Bálint; Kirsch, Klára; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Kalinina, Olga V; Reményi, Attila

    2015-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are broadly used regulators of cellular signaling. However, how these enzymes can be involved in such a broad spectrum of physiological functions is not understood. Systematic discovery of MAPK networks both experimentally and in silico has been hindered because MAPKs bind to other proteins with low affinity and mostly in less-characterized disordered regions. We used a structurally consistent model on kinase-docking motif interactions to facilitate the discovery of short functional sites in the structurally flexible and functionally under-explored part of the human proteome and applied experimental tools specifically tailored to detect low-affinity protein-protein interactions for their validation in vitro and in cell-based assays. The combined computational and experimental approach enabled the identification of many novel MAPK-docking motifs that were elusive for other large-scale protein-protein interaction screens. The analysis produced an extensive list of independently evolved linear binding motifs from a functionally diverse set of proteins. These all target, with characteristic binding specificity, an ancient protein interaction surface on evolutionarily related but physiologically clearly distinct three MAPKs (JNK, ERK, and p38). This inventory of human protein kinase binding sites was compared with that of other organisms to examine how kinase-mediated partnerships evolved over time. The analysis suggests that most human MAPK-binding motifs are surprisingly new evolutionarily inventions and newly found links highlight (previously hidden) roles of MAPKs. We propose that short MAPK-binding stretches are created in disordered protein segments through a variety of ways and they represent a major resource for ancient signaling enzymes to acquire new regulatory roles. PMID:26538579

  18. Display of wasp venom allergens on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulsen Lars K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast surface display is a technique, where the proteins of interest are expressed as fusions with yeast surface proteins and thus remain attached to the yeast cell wall after expression. Our purpose was to study whether allergens expressed on the cell surface of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae preserve their native allergenic properties and whether the yeast native surface glycoproteins interfere with IgE binding. We chose to use the major allergens from the common wasp Vespula vulgaris venom: phospholipase A1, hyaluronidase and antigen 5 as the model. Results The proteins were expressed on the surface as fusions with a-agglutinin complex protein AGA2. The expression was confirmed by fluorescent cytometry (FACS after staining the cells with antibody against a C-tag attached to the C-terminal end of the allergens. Phospholipase A1 and hyaluronidase retained their enzymatic activities. Phospholipase A1 severely inhibited the growth of the yeast cells. Antigen 5 - expressing yeast cells bound IgE antibodies from wasp venom allergic patient sera but not from control sera as demonstrated by FACS. Moreover, antigen 5 - expressing yeast cells were capable of mediating allergen-specific histamine release from human basophils. Conclusions All the three major wasp venom allergens were expressed on the yeast surface. A high-level expression, which was observed only for antigen 5, was needed for detection of IgE binding by FACS and for induction of histamine release. The non-modified S. cerevisiae cells did not cause any unspecific reaction in FACS or histamine release assay despite the expression of high-mannose oligosaccharides. In perspective the yeast surface display may be used for allergen discovery from cDNA libraries and possibly for sublingual immunotherapy as the cells can serve as good adjuvant and can be produced in large amounts at a low price.

  19. The establishment of a human myeloma cell line elaborating lambda-light chain protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niho, Y; Shibuya, T; Yamasaki, K; Kimura, N

    1984-05-01

    A human myeloma cell line (KMM-56) producing lambda-light chain protein was established in vitro by cultivation of the cells in the pleural effusion obtained from a patient with IgD-lambda-myeloma. The cells proliferate in suspension and do not aggregate or attach to the culture dish. Surface marker analysis revealed that the cells were negative for E-rosette, and surface immunoglobulin. Immunoelectrophoresis, immunodiffusion, and immunofluorescence with various antibodies demonstrated no heavy chains, while lambda-light chains were detected in the cytoplasm of the cells. Using the immunodiffusion technique, only lambda-light chains were detected in the frozen and thawed cell extract, the concentrated supernatant of the cell culture, and the urine of the patient. Electron microscopic examination revealed the plasmablastoid appearance of the cells. This cell line may be useful for future studies of human immunoglobulin genes and for the material of human-human hybridoma, which could produce monoclonal human immunoglobulin. PMID:6429256

  20. Binding of a cementum attachment protein to extracellular matrix components and to dental surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementum proteins (CP) have been shown to mediate cell attachment. Among these, a 55 kDa protein was isolated. The purpose of the present study was to assess the capacity of CP to bind to non-demineralized and demineralized root surfaces and to support cell attachment to dentin. CP were prepared by sequential extraction of bovine cementum with 25 mM EDTA, 0.5 M acetic acid followed by 4 M guanidine HCl. The latter was subjected to ion exchange chromatography on a DEAE-3SW column and eluted stepwise with a 0-0.5 M NaCl gradient. CP were labelled with 125I and the capacity of 125I-CP to bind to mineralized and partially demineralized dentin, synthetic hydroxyapatite, collagen, fibronectin and fibrillar collagen-fibronectin cimplex was assessed. It was found that CP bind specifically to mineralized dentin and synthetic hydroxyapatite but not to demineralized dentin. The specific binding was 60% of the total binding. SDS-PAGE analysis of the proteins bound to dentin indicated that the main bound protein had a molecular weight of 55 kDa. CP exhibited high affinity for fibronectin (kD = 1.56 x 10-10 M) and fibronectincollagen complex, but their binding to either molecular or fibrillar collagen was negligible. It is suggested that CP may play an important role in the attachment of cells of the periodontium to cementum extracellular matrix during homeostasis and regeneration. (au)

  1. Presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa influences biofilm formation and surface protein expression of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Ting, Yen Peng

    2015-11-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can individually colonize and infect their hosts, the commensalistic effect of the two is more tenacious and lethal. In this study, it was shown that in co-culture with P. aeruginosa, a sub-population of S. aureus exhibited improved resistance to kanamycin by selection of small colony variant (SCV) phenotype. Additionally, biofilm formation by the two bacteria was denser in the co-culture, compared with biofilm formed in individual pure cultures. Using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy for single cells, it was demonstrated that S. aureus cultured in the presence of P. aeruginosa bound more tenaciously to substrates. Surface-shaved peptides were isolated and identified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight and a homology search program spider. Results indicated that serine-rich adhesin, extracellular matrix binding protein and other putative adhesion proteins could be responsible for the enhanced attachment of S. aureus in the co-culture. Besides, several other proteins were differentially expressed, indicating the occurrence of a range of other interactions. Of particular interest was a multidrug resistant protein named ABC transporter permease which is known to expel xenobiotics out of the cells. Positive regulation of this protein could be involved in the SCV selection of S. aureus in the co-culture. PMID:25925222

  2. Uncovering surface-exposed antigens of Lactobacillus rhamnosus by cell shaving proteomics and two-dimensional immunoblotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino, Eva; Koskenniemi, Kerttu; Mato-Rodriguez, Lourdes; Nyman, Tuula A; Reunanen, Justus; Koponen, Johanna; Öhman, Tiina; Siljamäki, Pia; Alatossava, Tapani; Varmanen, Pekka; Savijoki, Kirsi

    2015-02-01

    The present study reports the identification and comparison of all expressed cell-surface exposed proteins from the well-known probiotic L. rhamnosus GG and a related dairy strain, Lc705. To obtain this information, the cell-surface bound proteins were released from intact cells by trypsin shaving under hypertonic conditions with and without DTT. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses of the purified peptides identified a total of 102 and 198 individual proteins from GG and Lc705, respectively. Comparison of both data sets suggested that the Msp-type antigens (Msp1, Msp2) and the serine protease HtrA were uniquely exposed at the cell surface of GG, whereas the Lc705-specific proteins included lactocepin and a wider range of different moonlighting proteins. ImmunoEM analyses with the GG and Lc705 antibodies suggested that the whole-cell immunization yielded antibodies toward surface-bound proteins and proteins that were secreted or released from the cell-surface. One of the detected antigens was a pilus-like structure on the surface of GG cells, which was not detected with Lc705 antibodies. Further 2-DE immunoblotting analysis of GG proteins with both L. rhamnosus antisera revealed that majority of the detected antigens were moonlighting proteins with potential roles in adhesion, pathogen exclusion or immune stimulation. The present study provides the first catalog of surface-exposed proteins from lactobacilli and highlights the importance of the specifically exposed moonlighting proteins for adaptation and probiotic functions of L. rhamnosus. PMID:25531588

  3. Majority of cellular fatty acid acylated proteins are localized to the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BC2Hl muscle cell line was previously reported to contain a broad array of fatty acid acylated proteins. Palmitate was shown to be attached to membrane proteins posttranslationally through thiol ester linkages, whereas myristate was attached cotranslationally, or within seconds thereafter, to soluble and membrane-bound proteins through amide linkages. The temporal and subcellular differences between palmitate and myristate acylation suggested that these two classes of acyl proteins might follow different intracellular pathways to distinct subcellular membrane systems or organelles. In this study, the authors examined the subcellular localization of the major fatty acylated proteins in BC4Hl cells. Palmitate-containing proteins were localized to the plasma membrane, but only a subset of myristate-containing proteins was localized to this membrane fraction. The majority of acyl proteins were nonglycosylated and resistant to digestion with extracellular proteases, suggesting that they were not exposed to the external surface of the plasma membrane. Many proteins were, however, digested during incubation of isolated membranes with proteases, which indicates that these proteins were, however, digested during incubation of isolated membranes with proteases, which indicates that these proteins face the cytoplasm. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins labeled with [3H]palmitate and [3H]myristate revealed that individual proteins were modified by only one of the two fatty acids and did not undergo both N-linked myristylation and ester-linked palmitylation. Together, these results suggest that the majority of cellular acyl proteins are routed to the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane, and they raise the possibility that fatty acid acylation may play a role in intracellular sorting of nontransmembranous, nonglycosylated membrane proteins

  4. Surface force analysis of molecular interfacial interactions of proteins and lipids with polymeric biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Adverse biological responses to biomedical devices are often caused by the irreversible accumulation of biological deposits onto the surfaces of devices. Such deposits cause blocking of artificial blood vessels, fibrous encapsulation of soft tissue regenerative devices, 'fouling' of contact lenses, secondary cataracts on intraocular lenses, and other undesirable events that interfere with the intended functions of biomedical devices. The formation of deposits is triggered by an initial stage in which various proteins and lipids rapidly adsorb onto the synthetic material surface; further biological molecules and ultimately cellular entities (e.g., host cells, bacteria) then settle onto the initial adsorbed layer. Hence, to avoid or control the accumulation of biological deposits, molecular understanding is required of the initial adsorption processes. Such adsorption is caused by attractive interfacial forces, which we are characterising by the use of a novel method. In the present study, polymeric thin film coatings, polyethylene oxide (PEO), and polysaccharide coatings have been analysed in terms of their surface forces and the ensuing propensity for protein and lipid adsorption. Interfacial forces are measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a colloid-modified tip in a liquid cell using solutions of physiological pH and ionic strength. The chemical composition and uniformity of the coatings was characterised by X-ray Photon Spectroscopy (XPS). For a polymeric solid coating, repulsive forces have been measured against a silica colloid probe, and the dominant surface force is electrostatic. For the highly hydrated, 'soft' PEO and polysaccharide coatings, on the other hand, steric/entropic forces are also significant and contribute to interfacial interactions with proteins and lipids. In one system we have observed a time dependence of the electrostatic surface potential, which affects interaction with charged proteins. Force measurements were

  5. Surface-layer protein from Caulobacter crescentus: expression, purification and X-ray crystallographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael D; Chan, Anson C K; Nomellini, John F; Murphy, Michael E P; Smit, John

    2016-09-01

    Protein surface layers are self-assembling, paracrystalline lattices on the surface of many prokaryotes. Surface-layer proteins have not benefited from widespread structural analysis owing to their resistance to crystallization. Here, the successful expression of a truncated version of RsaA, the surface-layer protein from Caulobacter crescentus, from a Caulobacter protein-expression system is reported. The purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the truncated RsaA, the largest surface-layer protein studied to date and the first from a Gram-negative bacterium, are also reported. PMID:27599857

  6. Tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors block invasin-promoted bacterial uptake by epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenshine, I.; Duronio, V; Finlay, B B

    1992-01-01

    The ability to enter into (invade) mammalian cells is an essential virulence determinant of many pathogenic bacteria and intracellular parasites. These organisms are internalized by host cells upon attachment to their surface. However, the mechanisms used by intracellular parasites to induce internalization into host cells have not been defined. We found that the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine blocks invasion by some pathogenic bacteria, including Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ...

  7. Cell Surface Enzymatic Engineering-Based Approaches to Improve Cellular Therapies

    KAUST Repository

    Abuelela, Ayman F.

    2014-06-06

    The cell surface represents the interface between the cell and its environment. As such, the cell surface controls cell–cell interactions and functions such as adhesion and migration, and will transfer external cues to regulate processes such as survival, death, and differentiation. Redefining the cell surface by temporarily (or permanently) modifying the molecular landscape of the plasma membrane affects the way in which the cell interacts with its environment and influences the information that is relayed into the cell along downstream signaling pathways. This chapter outlines the role of key enzymes, the glycosyltransferases, in posttranslationally modifying proteins and lipids to fine-tune cells, ability to migrate. These enzymes are critical in controlling the formation of a platform structure, sialyl Lewis x (sLex), on circulating cells that plays a central role in the recognition and recruitment by selectin counter receptors on endothelial cells that line blood vessels of tissues throughout the body. By developing methods to manipulate the activity of these enzymes and hence the cell surface structures that result, treatments can be envisioned that direct the migration of therapeutic cells to specific locations throughout the body and also to inhibit metastasis of detrimental cells such as circulating tumor cells.

  8. Proteins in the electric field near the surface of mica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzyk, Anna; Cieplak, Marek

    2013-07-01

    We elucidate the nature of the electric field produced by a model mica surface and show that above some 0.4 nm it is nearly uniform and of order 12 V/nm. The presence of ions in the solvent above the surface, up to the concentration of about 300 mM, does not modify the nature of the field much. We study the conformational changes of a small protein, the tryptophan cage, as induced by (a) uniform electric field and (b) the electric field near mica. We use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and provide evidence for the existence of unfolded and deformed conformations in each of these cases. The two behaviors are characterized by distinct properties of the radius of gyration and of the distortion parameter that distinguishes between elongated and globular shapes. The overall geometry of the conformations shifts with the strengths of the uniform field in a manner that depends on the nature of the simulation box — whether it is bounded by neutral walls or not — and on the ionic concentration. Near the mica surface, on the other hand, the fraction of unfolded conformations is close to 1/6 at the ionic strength of 350 mM compared to 1/2 at 20 mM. When the electric charge on the mica is fully neutralized by bringing more ions of the opposite charge then unfolded conformations stay unfolded but an evolution from the native state does not lead to any unfolding.

  9. Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) Binds to Phosphatidylserine Exposing Cells with Implications in the Phagocytosis of Apoptotic Cells and Activated Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Rieger; Alice Assinger; Katrin Einfinger; Barbora Sokolikova; Margarethe Geiger

    2014-01-01

    Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS) is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marke...

  10. Controlled expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein and hepatitis B virus precore protein in mammalian cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel tetracycline regulation expression system was used to regulate the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and hepatitis B virus precore protein in the mammalian cell lines with lipofectAMINE. Flow cytometry assays showed that application of the system resulted in about 18-fold induction of EGFP expression in CHO cell lines and 5-fold induction in SSMC-7721 cells and about 2-fold in the HEK293 cells. Furthermore, the effective use of this system for the controlled expression of HBV precore protein gene in hepatocellular carcinoma cells was tested.

  11. Recent advances in yeast cell-surface display technologies for waste biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuo; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ren, Nan-Qi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Waste biorefinery aims to maximize the output of value-added products from various artificial/agricultural wastes by using integrated bioprocesses. To make waste biorefinery economically feasible, it is thus necessary to develop a low-cost, environment-friendly technique to perform simultaneous biodegradation and bioconversion of waste materials. Cell-surface display engineering is a novel, cost-effective technique that can auto-immobilize proteins on the cell exterior of microorganisms, and has been applied for use with waste biofinery. Through tethering different enzymes (e.g., cellulase, lipase, and protease) or metal-binding peptides on cell surfaces, various yeast strains can effectively produce biofuels and biochemicals from sugar/protein-rich waste materials, catalyze waste oils into biodiesels, or retrieve heavy metals from wastewater. This review critically summarizes recent applications of yeast cell-surface display on various types of waste biorefineries, highlighting its potential and future challenges with regard to commercializing this technology. PMID:27039354

  12. Gangliosides in cell recognition and membrane protein regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Pablo H. H.; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    Gangliosides, sialic acid-bearing glycosphingolipids, are expressed on all vertebrate cells, and are the major glycans on nerve cells. They are anchored to the plasma membrane through their ceramide lipids with their varied glycans extending into the extracellular space. Through sugar-specific interactions with glycan binding proteins on apposing cells, gangliosides function as receptors in cell-cell recognition, regulating natural killer cell cytotoxicity via Siglec-7 binding, myelin-axon in...

  13. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrPC in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrPC protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrPC protein was generated by fusion of human PrPC with the Fc portion of human IgG1 (PrPC-Fc). PrPC-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56dim NK cells. PrPC-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrPC-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrPC-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrPC-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrPC-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrPC (PrPC-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrPC with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrPC-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrPC-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrPC-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways

  14. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Yeon-Jae [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hafis Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bum-Chan [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Su-Hyung [Laboratory of Translational Immunology and Vaccinology, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Eui-Cheol, E-mail: ecshin@kaist.ac.kr [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  15. Basic surface properties of mononuclear cells from Didelphis marsupialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacife, V P; de Meirelles, M de N; Silva Filho, F C

    1998-01-01

    The electrostatic surface charge and surface tension of mononuclear cells/monocytes obtained from young and adult marsupials (Didelphis marsupialis) were investigated by using cationized ferritin and colloidal iron hydroxyde, whole cell electrophoresis, and measurements of contact angles. Anionic sites were found distributed throughout the entire investigated cell surfaces. The results revealed that the anionic character of the cells is given by electrostatic charges corresponding to -18.8 mV (cells from young animals) and -29.3 mV (cells from adult animals). The surface electrostatic charge decreased from 10 to 65.2% after treatment of the cells with each one of trypsin, neuraminidase and phospholipase C. The hydrophobic nature of the mononuclear cell surfaces studied by using the contact angle method revealed that both young and adult cells possess cell surfaces of high hidrofilicity since the angles formed with drops of saline water were 42.5 degrees and 40.8 degrees, respectively. Treatment of the cells with trypsin or neuraminidase rendered their surfaces more hydrophobic, suggesting that sialic acid-containing glycoproteins are responsible for most of the hydrophilicity observed in the mononuclear cell surfaces from D. marsupialis. PMID:9921307

  16. Basic Surface Properties of Mononuclear Cells from Didelphis marsupialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nacife Valéria Pereira

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrostatic surface charge and surface tension of mononuclear cells/monocytes obtained from young and adult marsupials (Didelphis marsupialis were investigated by using cationized ferritin and colloidal iron hydroxyde, whole cell electrophoresis, and measurements of contact angles. Anionic sites were found distributed throughout the entire investigated cell surfaces. The results revealed that the anionic character of the cells is given by electrostatic charges corresponding to -18.8 mV (cells from young animals and -29.3 mV (cells from adult animals. The surface electrostatic charge decreased from 10 to 65.2% after treatment of the cells with each one of trypsin, neuraminidase and phospholipase C. The hydrophobic nature of the mononuclear cell surfaces studied by using the contact angle method revealed that both young and adult cells possess cell surfaces of high hidrofilicity since the angles formed with drops of saline water were 42.5°and 40.8°, respectively. Treatment of the cells with trypsin or neuraminidase rendered their surfaces more hydrophobic, suggesting that sialic acid-containing glycoproteins are responsible for most of the hydrophilicity observed in the mononuclear cell surfaces from D. marsupialis.

  17. Microarray of surface-exposed proteins of rickettsia heilongjiangensis for serodiagnosis of Far-eastern spotted fever

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Yong; Gong, Wenping; Xiong, Xiaolu; Jiang, Jiafu; Wang, Yawei; Jiao, Jun; Duan, Changsong; Wen, Bohai

    2014-01-01

    Background Far-eastern spotted fever (FESF) is an important emerging infectious disease in Northeast Asia. The laboratory diagnosis of FESF in hospitals is mainly based on serological methods. However, these methods need to cultivate rickettsial cells as diagnostic antigens, which is both burdensome and dangerous. Methods Eleven surface-exposed proteins (SEPs) were identified in our previous study and their recombinant proteins (rSEPs) fabricated on a microarray were serologically analyzed wi...

  18. Lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination of membrane proteins in normal and neoplastic epidermal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell surface proteins of normal human, mouse, and rat cells in primary culture, of human basal cell carcinoma, and of carcinogen-transformed cell lines were examined by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination. Autoradiography was used to record the distribution of label in the polypeptide subunits separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. There was no significant difference in the results for normal cells of human, mouse, and rat. On the other hand, carcinogen-transformed mouse cells had many more labeled polypeptide bands of widely distributed molecular weights. The iodination profiles from human basal cell carcinoma cells were much more akin to those from normal cells than to those from carcinogen-transformed cells. Treatment of iodinated cells with proteolytic enzymes visibly altered the polypeptide bands

  19. Using Fluorescent Protein Fusions to Study Protein Subcellular Localization and Dynamics in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Gao, Caiji; Zhao, Qiong; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Studies of protein subcellular localization and dynamics are helpful in understanding the cellular functions of proteins in an organism. In the past decade, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fusion tag has dramatically extended our knowledge in this field. Transient expression and stable transformation of GFP-tagged proteins have been wildly used to study protein localization in vivo in different systems. Although GFP-based tags provide a fast and convenient way to characterize protein properties in living cells, several reports have demonstrated that GFP fusions might not accurately reflect the localization of the native protein as GFP tags may alter the protein properties. To facilitate proper usage of GFP tags in plant cell biology study, we describe detailed protocols to identify possible inhibitory effects of fluorescent tags on protein subcellular localization and to determine if a fluorescently tagged protein is localized to the correct subcellular compartment. Using Arabidopsis Endomembrane protein 12 (EMP12) as an example, we first show the possible inhibitory effect of GFP tags on proper protein localization and then describe the immunofluorescence labeling method to verify the correct localization of GFP fusion proteins. Next, a method is presented using the ImageJ program with the Pearson-Spearman correlation (PSC) colocalization plug-in for statistical quantification of colocalization ratios of two fluorophores. Finally we provide a detailed method for protein dynamics studies using spinning disk confocal microscopy in Arabidopsis cells. PMID:27515077

  20. Surface expression, single-channel analysis and membrane topology of recombinant Chlamydia trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McClafferty Heather

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydial bacteria are obligate intracellular pathogens containing a cysteine-rich porin (Major Outer Membrane Protein, MOMP with important structural and, in many species, immunity-related roles. MOMP forms extensive disulphide bonds with other chlamydial proteins, and is difficult to purify. Leaderless, recombinant MOMPs expressed in E. coli have yet to be refolded from inclusion bodies, and although leadered MOMP can be expressed in E. coli cells, it often misfolds and aggregates. We aimed to improve the surface expression of correctly folded MOMP to investigate the membrane topology of the protein, and provide a system to display native and modified MOMP epitopes. Results C. trachomatis MOMP was expressed on the surface of E. coli cells (including "porin knockout" cells after optimizing leader sequence, temperature and medium composition, and the protein was functionally reconstituted at the single-channel level to confirm it was folded correctly. Recombinant MOMP formed oligomers even in the absence of its 9 cysteine residues, and the unmodified protein also formed inter- and intra-subunit disulphide bonds. Its topology was modeled as a (16-stranded β-barrel, and specific structural predictions were tested by removing each of the four putative surface-exposed loops corresponding to highly immunogenic variable sequence (VS domains, and one or two of the putative transmembrane strands. The deletion of predicted external loops did not prevent folding and incorporation of MOMP into the E. coli outer membrane, in contrast to the removal of predicted transmembrane strands. Conclusions C. trachomatis MOMP was functionally expressed on the surface of E. coli cells under newly optimized conditions. Tests of its predicted membrane topology were consistent with β-barrel oligomers in which major immunogenic regions are displayed on surface-exposed loops. Functional surface expression, coupled with improved understanding of MOMP

  1. RNA interference-mediated silencing of speckle-type POZ protein promotes apoptosis of renal cell cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Sun, Guiling; Sun, Xiuju

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of silencing the speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) gene on renal cell cancer (RCC) cells and to explore its possible mechanism. The A498 and ACHN RCC cells were transfected with small interference RNA (siRNA)-SPOP by lipofection methods. The silencing efficiency was monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The effects of SPOP silencing on cell apoptosis, cell viability, colony formation ability, cell migration ability, and chemosensitivity to Sorafenib were assessed by flow cytometry, an MTT assay, a colony formation assay, a trans-well migration assay, and a CCK-8 assay, respectively. Its effects on the expression of several cytokines were determined by a protein microarray. Relevant signaling pathways were also analyzed. Compared with the control group, the cell apoptosis rate was significantly higher; the cell viability, the colony formation, and migration ability were s