WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell surface interaction

  1. The cell-surface interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J S; Czekanska, E M; Richards, R G

    2012-01-01

    The realm of surface-dependent cell and tissue responses is the foundation of orthopaedic-device-related research. However, to design materials that elicit specific responses from tissues is a complex proposition mainly because the vast majority of the biological principles controlling the interaction of cells with implants remain largely ambiguous. Nevertheless, many surface properties, such as chemistry and topography, can be manipulated in an effort to selectively control the cell-material interaction. On the basis of this information there has been much research in this area, including studies focusing on the structure and composition of the implant interface, optimization of biological and chemical coatings and elucidation of the mechanisms involved in the subsequent cell-material interactions. Although a wealth of information has emerged, it also advocates the complexity and dynamism of the cell-material interaction. Therefore, this chapter aims to provide the reader with an introduction to the basic concepts of the cell-material interaction and to provide an insight into the factors involved in determining the cell and tissue response to specific surface features, with specific emphasis on surface microtopography. PMID:21984613

  2. Melittin interaction with sulfated cell surface sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocek, Gabriela; Seelig, Joachim

    2008-03-01

    Melittin is a 26-residue cationic peptide with cytolytic and antimicrobial properties. Studies on the action mechanism of melittin have focused almost exclusively on the membrane-perturbing properties of this peptide, investigating in detail the melittin-lipid interaction. Here, we report physical-chemical studies on an alternative mechanism by which melittin could interact with the cell membrane. As the outer surface of many cells is decorated with anionic (sulfated) glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a strong Coulombic interaction between the two oppositely charged molecules can be envisaged. Indeed, the present study using isothermal titration calorimetry reveals a high affinity of melittin for several GAGs, that is, heparan sulfate (HS), dermatan sulfate, and heparin. The microscopic binding constant of melittin for HS is 2.4 x 10 (5) M (-1), the reaction enthalpy is Delta H melittin (0) = -1.50 kcal/mol, and the peptide-to-HS stoichiometry is approximately 11 at 10 mM Tris, 100 mM NaCl at pH 7.4 and 28 degrees C. Delta H melittin (0) is characterized by a molar heat capacity of Delta C P (0) = -227 cal mol (-1) K (-1). The large negative heat capacity change indicates that hydrophobic interactions must also be involved in the binding of melittin to HS. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrates that the binding of the peptide to HS induces a conformational change to a predominantly alpha-helical structure. A model for the melittin-HS complex is presented. Melittin binding was compared with that of magainin 2 and nisin Z to HS. Magainin 2 is known for its antimicrobial properties, but it does not cause lysis of the eukaryotic cells. Nisin Z shows activity against various Gram-positive bacteria. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that magainin 2 and nisin Z do not bind to HS (5-50 degrees C, 10 mM Tris, and 100 mM NaCl at pH 7.4). PMID:18220363

  3. Micropatterned Surfaces to Study Hyaluronic Acid Interactions with Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Laura E.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Cancer invasion and progression involves a motile cell phenotype, which is under complex regulation by growth factors/cytokines and extracellular matrix (ECM) components within the tumor microenvironment. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one stromal ECM component that is known to facilitate tumor progression by enhancing invasion, growth, and angiogenesis1. Interaction of HA with its cell surface receptor CD44 induces signaling events that promote tumor cell growth, survival, and migration, thereby in...

  4. Development of living cell force sensors for the interrogation of cell surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott Chang

    The measurement of cell surface interactions, or cell interaction forces, are critical for the early diagnosis and prevention of disease, the design of targeted drug and gene delivery vehicles, the development of next-generation implant materials, and much more. However, the technologies and devices that are currently available are highly limited with respect to the dynamic force range over which they can measure cell-cell or cell-substratum interactions, and with their ability to adequately mimic biologically relevant systems. Consequently, research efforts that involve cell surface interactions have been limited. In this dissertation, existing tools for research at the nanoscale (i.e., atomic force microscopy microcantilevers) are modified to develop living cell force sensors that allow for the highly sensitive measurement of cell-mediated interactions over the entire range of forces expected in biotechnology (and nano-biotechnology) research (from a single to millions of receptor-ligand bonds). Several force sensor motifs have been developed that can be used to measure interactions using single adherent cells, single suspension culture cell, and cell monolayers (tissues) over a wide range of interaction conditions (e.g., approach velocity, shear rate, contact time) using a conventional atomic force microscope. This new tool has been applied to study the pathogenesis of spontaneous pneumothorax and the interaction of cells with 14 man-made interfaces. Consequently, a new hypothesis of the interactions that manifest spontaneous pneumothorax has been developed. Additionally, these findings have the potential to lead to the development of tools for data mining materials and surfaces for unique cell interactions that could have an immense societal impact.

  5. Surface modification of hydrophobic polymers for improvement of endothelial cell-surface interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, A.; Reitsma, K.; Beugeling, T.; Bantjes, A.; Feijen, J.; Kirkpatrick, C.J.; Aken, van W.G.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study is to improve the interaction of endothelial cells with polymers used in vascular prostheses. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE; Teflon) films were treated by means of nitrogen and oxygen plasmas. Depending on the plasma exposure time, modified PTFE surfaces showed water-contact an

  6. Multi-scale cell/surface interaction on modified titanium aluminum vanadium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo

    This dissertation presents a series of experimental studies of the effects of multi-scale cell/surface interactions on modified Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. These include laser-grooved surfaces; porous structures and RGD-coated laser-grooved surfaces. A nano-second DPSS UV lasers with a Gaussian pulse energy profile was used to introduce the desired micro-groove geometries onto Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. This was done without inducing micro-cracks or significant changes in surface chemistry within the heat affected zones. The desired 8-12 mum groove depths and widths were achieved by the control of pulse frequency, scan speed, and the lens focal length that controls spot size. The interactions between human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells and laser-grooved Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were investigated after 48 hours of cell culture. The cell behavior, including cell spreading, alignment and adhesion, was elucidated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), immuno-fluorescence staining and enzymatic detachment. Contact guidance was shown to increase as grooved spacing decreased. For the range of micro-groove geometries studied, micro-grooves with groove spacings of 20 mum provided the best combination of cell orientation and adhesion. Short-term adhesion experiments (15 mins to 1 day) also revealed that there is a positive correlation between cell orientation and cell adhesion. Contact guidance on the micro-grooved surfaces is shown to be enhanced by nano- and micro-scale asperities that provide sites for the attachment of lamellopodia during cell locomotion and spreading. Contact guidance is also promoted by the geometrical confinement provided by laser grooves. An experimental study of initial cell spreading and ingrowth into Ti-6Al-4V porous structures was also carried out on porous structures with different pore sizes and geometries. A combination of SEM, the tetrazolium salt (MTT) colorimetric assay and enzymatic detachment were used to study cell spreading and adhesion. The extent of cell

  7. Interaction of KSHV with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanan Valiya Veettil

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus entry is a complex process characterized by a sequence of events. Since the discovery of KSHV in 1994, tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of KSHV entry into its in vitro target cells. KSHV entry is a complex multistep process involving viral envelope glycoproteins and several cell surface molecules that is utilized by KSHV for its attachment and entry. KSHV has a broad cell tropism and the attachment and receptor engagement on target cells have an important role in determining the cell type-specific mode of entry. KSHV utilizes heparan sulfate, integrins and EphrinA2 molecules as receptors which results in the activation of host cell pre-existing signal pathways that facilitate the subsequent cascade of events resulting in the rapid entry of virus particles, trafficking towards the nucleus followed by viral and host gene expression. KSHV enters human fibroblast cells by dynamin dependant clathrin mediated endocytosis and by dynamin independent macropinocytosis in dermal endothelial cells. Once internalized into endosomes, fusion of the viral envelope with the endosomal membranes in an acidification dependent manner results in the release of capsids which subsequently reaches the nuclear pore vicinity leading to the delivery of viral DNA into the nucleus. In this review, we discuss the principal mechanisms that enable KSHV to interact with the host cell surface receptors as well as the mechanisms that are required to modulate cell signaling machinery for a successful entry.

  8. Human epithelial cells exposed to functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes: interactions and cell surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanizza, C; Casciardi, S; Incoronato, F; Cavallo, D; Ursini, C L; Ciervo, A; Maiello, R; Fresegna, A M; Marcelloni, A M; Lega, D; Alvino, A; Baiguera, S

    2015-09-01

    With the expansion of the production and applications of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in several industrial and science branches, the potential adverse effects on human health have attracted attention. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate how chemical functionalization may affect MWCNT effects; however, controversial data have been reported, showing either increased or reduced toxicity. In particular, the impact of carboxylation on MWCNT cytotoxicity is far from being completely understood. The aim of this work was the evaluation of the modifications induced by carboxylated-MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) on cell surface and the study of cell-MWCNT-COOH interactions by means of field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) were incubated with MWCNTs-COOH for different exposure times and concentrations (10 μg/mL for 1, 2, 4 h; 5, 10, 20 μg/mL for 24 h). At short incubation time, MWCNTs-COOH were easily observed associated with plasma membrane and in contact with microvilli. After 24 h exposure, FESEM analysis revealed that MWCNTs-COOH induced evident changes in the cellular surface in comparison to control cells: treated cells showed blebs, holes and a depletion of the microvilli density in association with structure modifications, such as widening and/or lengthening. In particular, an increase of cells showing holes and microvilli structure alterations was observed at 20 μg/mL concentration. FESEM analysis showed nanotube agglomerates, of different sizes, entering into the cell with two different mechanisms: inward bending of the membrane followed by nanotube sinking, and nanotube internalization directly through holes. The observed morphological microvilli modifications, induced by MWCNTs-COOH, could affect epithelial functions, such as the control of surfactant production and secretion, leading to pathological conditions, such as alveolar proteinosis. More detailed studies will be, however, necessary to

  9. Significance of Nano- and Microtopography for Cell-Surface Interactions in Orthopaedic Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jäger

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell-surface interactions play a crucial role for biomaterial application in orthopaedics. It is evident that not only the chemical composition of solid substances influence cellular adherence, migration, proliferation and differentiation but also the surface topography of a biomaterial. The progressive application of nanostructured surfaces in medicine has gained increasing interest to improve the cytocompatibility and osteointegration of orthopaedic implants. Therefore, the understanding of cell-surface interactions is of major interest for these substances. In this review, we elucidate the principle mechanisms of nano- and microscale cell-surface interactions in vitro for different cell types onto typical orthopaedic biomaterials such as titanium (Ti, cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo alloys, stainless steel (SS, as well as synthetic polymers (UHMWPE, XLPE, PEEK, PLLA. In addition, effects of nano- and microscaled particles and their significance in orthopaedics were reviewed. The significance for the cytocompatibility of nanobiomaterials is discussed critically.

  10. Keynote Paper: Cell-Surface Adhesive Interactions in Microchannels and Microvessels

    CERN Document Server

    King, M R

    2003-01-01

    Adhesive interactions between white blood cells and the interior surface of the blood vessels they contact is important in inflammation and in the progression of heart disease. Parallel-plate microchannels have been useful in characterizing the strength of these interactions, in conditions that are much simplified over the complex environment these cells experience in the body. Recent computational and experimental work by several laboratories have attempted to bridge this gap between behavior observed in flow chamber experiments, and cell-surface interactions observed in the microvessels of anesthetized animals.

  11. Interaction of PC-3 cells with fibronectin adsorbed on sulfonated polystyrene surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna M. Kowalczyńska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of cancer cells to invade neighboring tissues is crucial for cell dissemination and tumor metastasis. It is generally assumed that cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins is an important stage of cancer progression. Hence, adhesion of cancer cells under in vitro conditions to proteins adsorbed on a substratum surface has been studied to provide a better understanding of cell-protein interaction mechanisms. A protein, adsorbed in an appropriate conformation on a substratum surface, creates a biologically active layer that regulates such cell functions as adhesion, spreading, proliferation and migration. In our study, we examined the interaction of PC-3 cells under in vitro conditions with fibronectin adsorbed on sulfonated polystyrene surfaces of a defined chemical composition and topography. We investigated cell adhesion to fibronectin and cell spreading. Using automatic, sequential microscopic image registration, we are the first to present observations of the dynamics of PC-3 cell spreading and the cell shape during this process. Our results show that cell adhesion and the shape of spreading cells strongly depend on the time interaction with fibronectin. The analysis of images of cytoskeletal protein distribution in the cell region near the cell-substratum interface revealed that induction of a signal cascade took place, which led to the reorganization of the cytoskeletal proteins and the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 706–718

  12. Interaction of Epithelial Cells with Surfaces and Surfaces Decorated by Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, Daniele; Beil, Michael; Paust, T; Huang, C; Moosmann, M; Jin, J; Heiler, T; Gröger, R; Schimmel, Thomas; Walheim, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the interface between living cells and substrate materials is of rising importance in many fields of medicine, biology and biotechnology. Cells at interfaces often form epithelia. The physical barrier that they form is one of their main functions. It is governed by the properties of the networks forming the cytoskeleton systems and by cell-to-cell contacts. Different substrates with varying surface properties modify the migration velocity of the cells. On the one hand one can change the materials composition. Organic and inorganic materials induce differing migration velocities in the same cell system. Within the same class of materials, a change of the surface stiffness or of the surface energy modifies the migration velocity, too. For our cell adhesion studies a variety of different, homogeneous substrates were used (polymers, bio-polymers, metals, oxides). In addition, an effective lithographic method, Polymer Blend Lithography (PBL), is reported, to produce patterned Self-Assem...

  13. Interaction of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC with mammalian cell surface molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Tal-Singer, R; Peng, C.; Ponce de Leon, M; Abrams, W R; Banfield, B W; Tufaro, F; Cohen, G H; Eisenberg, R J

    1995-01-01

    The entry of herpes simplex virus (HSV) into mammalian cells is a multistep process beginning with an attachment step involving glycoproteins gC and gB. A second step requires the interaction of glycoprotein gD with a cell surface molecule. We explored the interaction between gC and the cell surface by using purified proteins in the absence of detergent. Truncated forms of gC and gD, gC1(457t), gC2(426t), and gD1(306t), lacking the transmembrane and carboxyl regions were expressed in the bacu...

  14. Aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform with simplified medium exchange process for facilitating cell-surface interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyeonjun; Park, Sung Jea; Han, Seon Jin; Lim, Jiwon; Kim, Dong Sung

    2016-02-01

    Establishing fundamentals for regulating cell behavior with engineered physical environments, such as topography and stiffness, requires a large number of cell culture experiments. However, cell culture experiments in cell-surface interaction studies are generally labor-intensive and time-consuming due to many experimental tasks, such as multiple fabrication processes in sample preparation and repetitive medium exchange in cell culture. In this work, a novel aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform (AFIP) is presented. AFIP aims to facilitate the experiments on the cell-surface interaction studies, especially the medium exchange process. AFIP was devised to capture and dispense cell culture medium based on interactions between an elastic polymer substrate and a liquid medium. Thus, the medium exchange can be performed easily and without the need of other instruments, such as a vacuum suction and pipette. An appropriate design window of AFIP, based on scaling analysis, was identified to provide a criterion for achieving stability in medium exchange as well as various surface characteristics of the petal substrates. The developed AFIP, with physically engineered petal substrates, was also verified to exchange medium reliably and repeatedly. A closed structure capturing the medium was sustained stably during cell culture experiments. NIH3T3 proliferation results also demonstrated that AFIP can be applied to the cell-surface interaction studies as an alternative to the conventional method. PMID:26683462

  15. Remote Control of Tissue Interactions via Engineered Photo-switchable Cell Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Pulsipher, Abigail; Dutta, Debjit; Lamb, Brian M.; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2014-09-01

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture spheroid tissue assembly in solution and co-culture tissue multilayer assembly on materials was demonstrated by an intercellular photo-oxime ligation that could be remotely cleaved and disassembled on demand. Spatial and temporal control of microtissue structures containing multiple cell types was demonstrated by the generation of patterned multilayers for controlling stem cell differentiation. Remote control of cell interactions via cell surface engineering that allows for real-time manipulation of tissue dynamics may provide tools with the scope to answer fundamental questions of cell communication and initiate new biotechnologies ranging from imaging probes to drug delivery vehicles to regenerative medicine, inexpensive bioreactor technology and tissue engineering therapies.

  16. Oxygen Modulates Human Decidual Natural Killer Cell Surface Receptor Expression and Interactions with Trophoblasts1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Alison E.; Goulwara, Sonu S.; Whitley, Guy S.; Cartwright, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Decidual natural killer (dNK) cells have been shown to both promote and inhibit trophoblast behavior important for decidual remodeling in pregnancy and have a distinct phenotype compared to peripheral blood NK cells. We investigated whether different levels of oxygen tension, mimicking the physiological conditions of the decidua in early pregnancy, altered cell surface receptor expression and activity of dNK cells and their interactions with trophoblast. dNK cells were isolated from terminated first-trimester pregnancies and cultured in oxygen tensions of 3%, 10%, and 21% for 24 h. Cell surface receptor expression was examined by flow cytometry, and the effects of secreted factors in conditioned medium (CM) on the trophoblast cell line SGHPL-4 were assessed in vitro. SGHPL-4 cells treated with dNK cell CM incubated in oxygen tensions of 10% were significantly more invasive (P oxygen tensions of 3% or 21%. After 24 h, a lower percentage of dNK cells expressed CD56 at 21% oxygen (P oxygen (P oxygen tensions, with large patient variation. This study demonstrates dNK cell phenotype and secreted factors are modulated by oxygen tension, which induces changes in trophoblast invasion and endovascular-like differentiation. Alterations in dNK cell surface receptor expression and secreted factors at different oxygen tensions may represent regulation of function within the decidua during the first trimester of pregnancy. PMID:25232021

  17. Surface modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles: Interaction with fibroblasts in primary cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An inorganic layer before an organic material shell onto MNPs improves cell viability. • The coating type and the concentration of nanoparticles directly affect cell viability. • Modified magnetite nanoparticles with organic and inorganic materials was developed. - Abstract: The development of a variety of medical applications such as drug delivery, cell labeling, and medical imaging have been possible owing to the unique features exhibited by magnetic nanoparticles. Nanoparticle–cell interaction is related to the surface aspects of nanoparticle, which may be described based on their chemistry or inorganic/organic characteristics. The coating on particle surface reduces the inter-particle interactions and provides properties such as biocompatibility. Among the coating materials used for nanoparticles employed in biomedical applications, oleic acid is one of the most utilized due to its biocompatibility. However, a major drawback with this naturally occurring fatty acid is that it is easily oxidized by cells and this reduces their performance in biomedical applications. In order to avoid the direct contact of the cell with the magnetite particle, coating with an inorganic material prior to the oleic acid shell would be effective. This would retard the magnetite dissociation thereby improve the cell viability. Here we report our investigation on the effect of surface modified magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) on the cell viability using primary cultures incubated with those particles. We prepared magnetite nanoparticles by chemical co-precipitation method; nanoparticle surface was first modified by silanol condensation followed by chemisorption of oleic acid. All nanostructures have a particle size less than 100 nm, depending on the material coating and superparamagnetic behavior. The saturated magnetizations (Ms) of the magnetite samples coated with oleic acid (MAO; 49.15 emu/g) and double shell silica-oleic acid (MSAO; 46.16 emu/g) are lower

  18. Modeling bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two cell membrane targets indicates the importance of surface diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengers, Bram G; McGinty, Sean; Nouri, Fatma Z; Argungu, Maryam; Hawkins, Emma; Hadji, Aymen; Weber, Andrew; Taylor, Adam; Sepp, Armin

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a mathematical framework for describing a bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two independent membrane-bound targets that are expressed on the same cell surface. The bispecific antibody in solution binds either of the two targets first, and then cross-links with the second one while on the cell surface, subject to rate-limiting lateral diffusion step within the lifetime of the monovalently engaged antibody-antigen complex. At experimental densities, only a small fraction of the free targets is expected to lie within the reach of the antibody binding sites at any time. Using ordinary differential equation and Monte Carlo simulation-based models, we validated this approach against an independently published anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab experimental data set. As a result of dimensional reduction, the cell surface reaction is expected to be so rapid that, in agreement with the experimental data, no monovalently bound bispecific antibody binary complexes accumulate until cross-linking is complete. The dissociation of the bispecific antibody from the ternary cross-linked complex is expected to be significantly slower than that from either of the monovalently bound variants. We estimate that the effective affinity of the bivalently bound bispecific antibody is enhanced for about 4 orders of magnitude over that of the monovalently bound species. This avidity enhancement allows for the highly specific binding of anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab to the cells that are positive for both target antigens over those that express only one or the other We suggest that the lateral diffusion of target antigens in the cell membrane also plays a key role in the avidity effect of natural antibodies and other bivalent ligands in their interactions with their respective cell surface receptors. PMID:27097222

  19. Soluble CD44 interacts with intermediate filament protein vimentin on endothelial cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päll, Taavi; Pink, Anne; Kasak, Lagle; Turkina, Marina; Anderson, Wally; Valkna, Andres; Kogerman, Priit

    2011-01-01

    CD44 is a cell surface glycoprotein that functions as hyaluronan receptor. Mouse and human serum contain substantial amounts of soluble CD44, generated either by shedding or alternative splicing. During inflammation and in cancer patients serum levels of soluble CD44 are significantly increased. Experimentally, soluble CD44 overexpression blocks cancer cell adhesion to HA. We have previously found that recombinant CD44 hyaluronan binding domain (CD44HABD) and its non-HA-binding mutant inhibited tumor xenograft growth, angiogenesis, and endothelial cell proliferation. These data suggested an additional target other than HA for CD44HABD. By using non-HA-binding CD44HABD Arg41Ala, Arg78Ser, and Tyr79Ser-triple mutant (CD443MUT) we have identified intermediate filament protein vimentin as a novel interaction partner of CD44. We found that vimentin is expressed on the cell surface of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Endogenous CD44 and vimentin coprecipitate from HUVECs, and when overexpressed in vimentin-negative MCF-7 cells. By using deletion mutants, we found that CD44HABD and CD443MUT bind vimentin N-terminal head domain. CD443MUT binds vimentin in solution with a Kd in range of 12-37 nM, and immobilised vimentin with Kd of 74 nM. CD443MUT binds to HUVEC and recombinant vimentin displaces CD443MUT from its binding sites. CD44HABD and CD443MUT were internalized by wild-type endothelial cells, but not by lung endothelial cells isolated from vimentin knock-out mice. Together, these data suggest that vimentin provides a specific binding site for soluble CD44 on endothelial cells. PMID:22216242

  20. Plasma-treated polystyrene surfaces : model surfaces for studying cell-biomaterial interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, TG; Spijker, HT; Busscher, HJ

    2004-01-01

    Biocompatibility of biomaterials relates, amongst others, to the absence of adverse cellular reactions and modulation of cell adhesion and subsequent responses. With respect to tissue-engineering applications, most materials need to evoke cell adhesion and spreading, while potentially displaying dif

  1. Nano Petri dishes: a new polystyrene platform for studying cell-nanoengineered surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we fabricated and fully characterized a new type of polystyrene (PS) cell-culture platform containing nanoengineered surfaces (NES), referred to as a nano Petri dish, which can be used at the transition stage of basic cell–NES interaction studies for clinical applications. Nano-injection molding in this study was used for the mass production of the nano Petri dish having nanopore arrays. The effects of processing parameters of the injection molding on the replication quality of the nanopore arrays were quantitatively evaluated by means of design of experiments based on the Taguchi method. This allowed efficient and reliable cell culture studies by providing large numbers of the same dishes, in addition to removing the fixation step of the NES plates inside the cell-culture container. Physical, chemical and mechanical properties of the NES, as well as cell behavior including attachment and proliferation of human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells on the NES, were then characterized, with and without the oxygen plasma surface treatment. (paper)

  2. Remote Control of Tissue Interactions via Engineered Photo-switchable Cell Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Luo; Abigail Pulsipher; Debjit Dutta; Lamb, Brian M.; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2014-01-01

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture ...

  3. Modeling multivalent ligand-receptor interactions with steric constraints on configurations of cell surface receptor aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monine, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Posner, Richard [TRANSLATION GENOMICS RESAEARCH INSTITUTE; Savage, Paul [BYU; Faeder, James [UNIV OF PITTSBURGH; Hlavacek, William S [UNM

    2008-01-01

    Signal transduction generally involves multivalent protein-protein interactions, which can produce various protein complexes and post-translational modifications. The reaction networks that characterize these interactions tend to be so large as to challenge conventional simulation procedures. To address this challenge, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method has been developed that can take advantage of a model specification in terms of reaction rules for molecular interactions. A set of rules implicitly defines the reactions that can occur as a result of the interactions represented by the rules. With the rule-based KMC method, explicit generation of the underlying chemical reaction network implied by rules is avoided. Here, we apply and extend this method to characterize the interactions of a trivalent ligand with a bivalent cell-surface receptor. This system is also studied experimentally. We consider the following kinetic models: an equivalent-site model, an extension of this model, which takes into account steric constraints on the configurations of receptor aggregates, and finally, a model that accounts for cyclic receptor aggregates. Simulation results for the equivalent-site model are consistent with an equilibrium continuum model. Using these models, we investigate the effects of steric constraints and the formation of cyclic aggregates on the kinetics and equilibria of small and large aggregate formation and the percolation phase transition that occurs in this system.

  4. Interaction of progenitor bone cells with different surface modifications of titanium implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the physical and chemical properties of Ti surfaces can be attributed to cell performance, which improves surface biocompatibility. The cell proliferation, mineralization ability, and gene expression of progenitor bone cells (D1 cell) were compared on five different Ti surfaces, namely, mechanical grinding (M), electrochemical modification through potentiostatic anodization (ECH), sandblasting and acid etching (SLA), sandblasting, hydrogen peroxide treatment, and heating (SAOH), and sandblasting, alkali heating, and etching (SMART). SAOH treatment produced the most hydrophilic surface, whereas SLA produced the most hydrophobic surface. Cell activity indicated that SLA and SMART produced significantly rougher surfaces and promoted D1 cell attachment within 1 day of culturing, whereas SAOH treatment produced moderate roughness (Ra = 1.26 μm) and accelerated the D1 cell proliferation up to 7 days after culturing. The ECH surface significantly promoted alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression and osteocalcin (OCN) secretion in the D1 cells compared with the other surface groups. The ECH and SMART-treated Ti surfaces resulted in maximum ALP and OCN expressions during the D1 cell culture. SLA, SAOH, and SMART substrate surfaces were rougher and exhibited better cell metabolic responses during the early stage of cell attachment, proliferation, and morphologic expressions within 1 day of D1 cell culture. The D1 cells cultured on the ECH and SMART substrates exhibited higher differentiation, and higher ALP and OCN expressions after 10 days of culture. Thus, the ECH and SMART treatments promote better ability of cell mineralization in vitro, which demonstrate their great potential for clinical use. - Highlights: • Progenitor bone cells onto Ti with different modifications are characterized. • Surface roughness and hydrophilicity encourage early stage cell attachment. • Composition and surface treatments are more vital in bone cell mineralization.

  5. Interaction of progenitor bone cells with different surface modifications of titanium implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng, E-mail: wencchen@fcu.edu.tw [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, College of Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Chen, Ya-Shun [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, College of Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Ko, Chia-Ling [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, College of Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Dental Medical Devices and Materials Research Center, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yi; Kuo, Tzu-Huang; Kuo, Hsien-Nan [Medical Device Development Division, Metal Industries Research and Development Centre, Kaohsiung 82151, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-01

    Changes in the physical and chemical properties of Ti surfaces can be attributed to cell performance, which improves surface biocompatibility. The cell proliferation, mineralization ability, and gene expression of progenitor bone cells (D1 cell) were compared on five different Ti surfaces, namely, mechanical grinding (M), electrochemical modification through potentiostatic anodization (ECH), sandblasting and acid etching (SLA), sandblasting, hydrogen peroxide treatment, and heating (SAOH), and sandblasting, alkali heating, and etching (SMART). SAOH treatment produced the most hydrophilic surface, whereas SLA produced the most hydrophobic surface. Cell activity indicated that SLA and SMART produced significantly rougher surfaces and promoted D1 cell attachment within 1 day of culturing, whereas SAOH treatment produced moderate roughness (Ra = 1.26 μm) and accelerated the D1 cell proliferation up to 7 days after culturing. The ECH surface significantly promoted alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression and osteocalcin (OCN) secretion in the D1 cells compared with the other surface groups. The ECH and SMART-treated Ti surfaces resulted in maximum ALP and OCN expressions during the D1 cell culture. SLA, SAOH, and SMART substrate surfaces were rougher and exhibited better cell metabolic responses during the early stage of cell attachment, proliferation, and morphologic expressions within 1 day of D1 cell culture. The D1 cells cultured on the ECH and SMART substrates exhibited higher differentiation, and higher ALP and OCN expressions after 10 days of culture. Thus, the ECH and SMART treatments promote better ability of cell mineralization in vitro, which demonstrate their great potential for clinical use. - Highlights: • Progenitor bone cells onto Ti with different modifications are characterized. • Surface roughness and hydrophilicity encourage early stage cell attachment. • Composition and surface treatments are more vital in bone cell mineralization.

  6. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.bhattacharjee@wur.nl [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Netherlands); Opstal, Edward J. van; Alink, Gerrit M. [Wageningen University, Division of Toxicology (Netherlands); Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Netherlands); Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M. [Wageningen University, Division of Toxicology (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size {approx}45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size {approx}50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  7. Charge carrier dynamics and surface plasmon interaction in gold nanorod-blended organic solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Aniket; Gupta, Neeraj; Lochan, Abhiram; Sharma, G. D.; Chand, Suresh; Kumar, Mahesh; Singh, Rajiv K.

    2016-08-01

    The inclusion of plasmonic nanoparticles into organic solar cell enhances the light harvesting properties that lead to higher power conversion efficiency without altering the device configuration. This work defines the consequences of the nanoparticle overloading amount and energy transfer process between gold nanorod and polymer (active matrix) in organic solar cells. We have studied the hole population decay dynamics coupled with gold nanorods loading amount which provides better understanding about device performance limiting factors. The exciton and plasmon together act as an interacting dipole; however, the energy exchange between these two has been elucidated via plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) mechanism. Further, the charge species have been identified specifically with respect to their energy levels appearing in ultrafast time domain. The specific interaction of these charge species with respective surface plasmon resonance mode, i.e., exciton to transverse mode of oscillation and polaron pair to longitudinal mode of oscillations, has been explained. Thus, our analysis reveals that PRET enhances the carrier population density in polymer via non-radiative process beyond the concurrence of a particular plasmon resonance oscillation mode and polymer absorption range. These findings give new insight and reveal specifically the factors that enhance and control the performance of gold nanorods blended organic solar cells. This work would lead in the emergence of future plasmon based efficient organic electronic devices.

  8. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Stack, Andrew G; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-02-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) and corundum (α-Al(2)O(3)) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3±0.7nN to 0.8±0.4nN as hematite NPs increased from 26nm to 98nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed. PMID:20932723

  9. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wen [Georgia Institute of Technology; Chen, Yongsheng [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite ( -Fe2 O3 ) and corundum ( -Al2 O3 ) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3 0.7 nN to 0.8 0.4 nN as hematite NPs increased from 26 nm to 98 nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed.

  10. Laser-surface interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the interaction of laser radiation with various surfaces at variable parameters of radiation. As a basic principle of classification we chose the energetic or intensity level of interaction of laser radiation with the surfaces. These two characteristics of laser radiation are the most important parameters defining entire spectrum of the processes occurring on the surfaces during interaction with electromagnetic waves. This is a first book containing a whole spectrum of the laser-surface interactions distinguished by the ranges of used laser intensity. It combines the surface response starting from extremely weak laser intensities (~1 W cm-2) up to the relativistic intensities (~1020 W cm-2 and higher). The book provides the basic information about lasers and acquaints the reader with both common applications of laser-surface interactions (laser-related printers, scanners, barcode readers, discs, material processing, military, holography, medicine, etc) and unusual uses of the processes on t...

  11. Peptides on non-fouling surfaces: controlling the cell behavior by eliciting specific cell-biomimetic surface interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Kotelnikov, Ilya; Novotná, Katarína; Proks, Vladimír; Bačáková, Lucie; Rypáček, František

    Prague : Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry AS CR, 2015. s. 45. ISBN 978-80-85009-82-8. [Functional Polymers at Bio -Material Interfaces - 79th Prague Meeting on Macromolecules. 28.06.2015-02.07.2015, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : surface modification * bio active surface Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  12. Probing the interaction of a membrane receptor with a surface-attached ligand using whole cells on acoustic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitakis, Michael; Tsortos, Achilleas; Gizeli, Electra

    2010-03-15

    Two different types of acoustic sensors, a surface acoustic wave device supporting a Love-wave (Love-SAW) and a quartz crystal microbalance system with dissipation (QCM-D), were used to demonstrate the potential of acoustic devices to probe the binding of a cell membrane receptor to an immobilized ligand. The class I Major Histocompatibility Complex molecule HLA-A2 on the surface of whole cells and anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies immobilized on the sensor were used as an interaction pair. Acoustic measurements consisted of recording the energy and velocity or frequency of the acoustic wave. Results showed that both devices could detect the number of cells in solution as well as the cells bound to the surface. In addition, the Love-wave sensor, which can sense binding events within the relatively short distance of approximately 50 nm from the device surface, was sensitive to the number of bonds formed between the cell membrane and the device surface while the QCM-D, which can sense deeper within the liquid, was found to respond well to stimuli that affected the cell membrane rigidity (cytochalasin D treatment). The above results suggest that acoustic biosensors can be a powerful tool in the study of cell/substrate interactions and acoustic devices of different type can be used in a complementary way. PMID:20045307

  13. The interaction between LYVE-1 with hyaluronan on the cell surface may play a role in the diversity of adhesion to cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Du

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan (HA, a simple disaccharide unit, can polymerize and is considered a primary component of the extracellular matrix, which has a wide range of biological functions. In recent years, HA was found on the surface of tumor cells. According to previous reports, differing HA content on the cell surface of tumor cells is closely related to lymph node metastases, but the mechanisms mediating this process remained unclear. This research intended to study the surface content of HA on tumor cells and analyze cell adhesive changes caused by the interaction between HA and its lymphatic endothelial receptor (LYVE-1. We screened and observed high HA content on HS-578T breast cells and low HA content on MCF-7 breast cells through particle exclusion, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry experiments. The expression of LYVE-1, the lymph-vessel specific HA receptor, was consistent with our previous report and enhanced the adhesion of HA(high-HS-578T cells to COS-7(LYVE-1(+ through HA in cell static adhesion and dynamic parallel plate flow chamber experiments. MCF-7 breast cells contain little HA on the surface; however, our results showed little adhesion difference between MCF-7 cells and COS-7(LYVE-1(+ and COS-7(LYVE-1(- cells. Similar results were observed concerning the adhesion of HS-578T cells or MCF-7 cells to SVEC4-10 cells. Furthermore, we observed for the first time that the cell surface HA content of high transfer tumor cells was rich, and we visualized the cross-linking of HA cable structures, which may activate LYVE-1 on lymphatic endothelial cells, promoting tumor adhesion. In summary, high-low cell surface HA content of tumor cells through the interaction with LYVE-1 leads to adhesion differences.

  14. Fibronectin-cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Austria, M R; Woods, A

    1990-01-01

    in vivo. Much data suggests that fibronectins may promote extracellular matrix assembly, and cell adhesion to those matrices. However, one outstanding enigma is that fibronectins may, under different circumstances, promote both cell migration and anchorage. An analysis of the interaction of fibroblasts...... with proteolytically derived and purified domains of plasma fibronectin revealed that the type of adhesion and the correlated cytoskeletal organization depended on multiple interactions of fibronectin domains with the cell surface. Human dermal fibroblasts were capable of interacting with the integrin-binding domain...... and both heparin-binding domains of the plasma fibronectin molecule and their interactions determined the type of adhesion. The same principle was seen in a study of the ability of plasma fibronectin to promote basement membrane assembly in an endodermal cell line, PF-HR9. There also, interactions of both...

  15. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Lu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs.Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela and suspended cells (K562 even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it.These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results.

  16. Interactions of bovine viral diarrhoea virus glycoprotein E(rns) with cell surface glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, M; Flick-Smith, H; McCauley, J W

    2000-02-01

    Recombinant E(rns) glycoprotein of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) has been tagged with a marker epitope or linked to an immunoglobulin Fc tail and expressed in insect and mammalian cell lines. The product was shown to be functional, both having ribonuclease activity and binding to a variety of cells that were permissive and non-permissive for replication of BVDV. Addition of soluble E(rns) to the medium blocked replication of BVDV in permissive cells. Binding of epitope-tagged E(rns) to permissive calf testes (CTe) cells was abolished and virus infection was reduced when cells were treated with heparinases I or III. E(rns) failed to bind to mutant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that lacked glycosaminoglycans (pgsA-745 cells) or heparan sulphate (pgsD-677 cells) but bound to normal CHO cells. E(rns) also bound to heparin immobilized on agarose and could be eluted by heparin and by a high concentration of salt. Flow cytometric analysis of E(rns) binding to CTe cell cultures showed that glycosaminoglycans such as heparin, fucoidan and dermatan sulphate all inhibit binding but dextran sulphate, keratan sulphate, chondroitin sulphate and mannan fail to inhibit binding. The low molecular mass polysulphonated inhibitor suramin also inhibited binding to CTe cells but poly-L-lysine did not. Furthermore, suramin, the suramin analogue CPD14, fucoidan and pentosan polysulphate inhibited the infectivity of virus. It is proposed that binding of E(rns) to cells is through an interaction with glycosaminoglycans and that BVDV may bind to cells initially through this interaction. PMID:10644844

  17. Curcumin induced nanoscale CD44 molecular redistribution and antigen-antibody interaction on HepG2 cell surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Mu [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ruan Yuxia [Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Xing Xiaobo; Chen Qian; Peng, Yuan [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Cai Jiye, E-mail: tjycai@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2011-07-04

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > In this study, we investigate the changes of CD44 expression and distribution on HepG2 cells after curcumin treatment. > We find curcumin is able to change the morphology and ultrastructure of HepG2 cells. > Curcumin can reduce the expression of CD44 molecules and induce the nanoscale molecular redistribution on cell surface. > The binding force between CD44-modified AFM tip and the HepG2 cell surface decreases after curcumin-treatment. - Abstract: The cell surface glycoprotein CD44 was implicated in the progression, metastasis and apoptosis of certain human tumors. In this study, we used atomic force microscope (AFM) to monitor the effect of curcumin on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell surface nanoscale structure. High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with curcumin. The membrane average roughness increased (10.88 {+-} 4.62 nm to 129.70 {+-} 43.72 nm) and the expression of CD44 decreased (99.79 {+-} 0.16% to 75.14 {+-} 8.37%). Laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) imaging showed that CD44 molecules were located on the cell membrane. The florescence intensity in control group was weaker than that in curcumin treated cells. Most of the binding forces between CD44 antibodies and untreated HepG2 cell membrane were around 120-220 pN. After being incubated with curcumin, the major forces focused on 70-150 pN (10 {mu}M curcumin-treated) and 50-120 pN (20 {mu}M curcumin-treated). These results suggested that, as result of nanoscale molecular redistribution, changes of the cell surface were in response to external treatment of curcumin. The combination of AFM and LSCM could be a powerful method to detect the distribution of cell surface molecules and interactions between molecules and their ligands.

  18. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 forms dimeric interactions with E-selectin but monomeric interactions with L-selectin on cell surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available Interactions of selectins with cell surface glycoconjugates mediate the first step of the adhesion and signaling cascade that recruits circulating leukocytes to sites of infection or injury. P-selectin dimerizes on the surface of endothelial cells and forms dimeric bonds with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1, a homodimeric sialomucin on leukocytes. It is not known whether leukocyte L-selectin or endothelial cell E-selectin are monomeric or oligomeric. Here we used the micropipette technique to analyze two-dimensional binding of monomeric or dimeric L- and E-selectin with monomeric or dimeric PSGL-1. Adhesion frequency analysis demonstrated that E-selectin on human aortic endothelial cells supported dimeric interactions with dimeric PSGL-1 and monomeric interactions with monomeric PSGL-1. In contrast, L-selectin on human neutrophils supported monomeric interactions with dimeric or monomeric PSGL-1. Our work provides a new method to analyze oligomeric cross-junctional molecular binding at the interface of two interacting cells.

  19. Dynamic Morphological Changes Induced By GM1 and Protein Interactions on the Surface of Cell-Sized Liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Takagi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the physicochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the morphological changes in the cell membrane in the presence of various stimuli such as osmotic pressure. Lipid rafts are believed to play a crucial role in various cellular processes. It is well established that Ctb (Cholera toxin B subunit recognizes and binds to GM1 (monosialotetrahexosylganglioside on the cell surface with high specificity and affinity. Taking advantage of Ctb-GM1 interaction, we examined how Ctb and GM1 molecules affect the dynamic movement of liposomes. GM1 a natural ligand for cholera toxin, was incorporated into liposome and the interaction between fluorescent Ctb and the liposome was analyzed. The interaction plays an important role in determining the various surface interaction phenomena. Incorporation of GM1 into membrane leads to an increase of the line tension leading to either rupture of liposome membrane or change in the morphology of the membrane. This change in morphology was found to be GM1 concentration specific. The interaction between Ctb-GM1 leads to fast and easy rupture or to morphological changes of the liposome. The interactions of Ctb and the glycosyl chain are believed to affect the surface and the curvature of the membrane. Thus, the results are highly beneficial in the study of signal transduction processes.

  20. Tritium-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report deals broadly with tritium-surface interactions as they relate to a fusion power reactor enterprise, viz., the vacuum chamber, first wall, peripherals, pumping, fuel recycling, isotope separation, repair and maintenance, decontamination and safety. The main emphasis is on plasma-surface interactions and the selection of materials for fusion chamber duty. A comprehensive review of the international (particularly U.S.) research and development is presented based upon a literature review (about 1 000 reports and papers) and upon visits to key laboratories, Sandia, Albuquerque, Sandia, Livermore and EGβG Idaho. An inventory of Canadian expertise and facilities for RβD on tritium-surface interactions is also presented. A number of proposals are made for the direction of an optimal Canadian RβD program, emphasizing the importance of building on strength in both the technological and fundamental areas. A compendium of specific projects and project areas is presented dealing primarily with plasma-wall interactions and permeation, anti-permeation materials and surfaces and health, safety and environmental considerations. Potential areas of industrial spinoff are identified

  1. Layilin, a cell surface hyaluronan receptor, interacts with merlin and radixin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layilin is a widely expressed integral membrane hyaluronan receptor, originally identified as a binding partner of talin located in membrane ruffles. We have identified merlin, the neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein and radixin, as other interactors with the carboxy-terminal domain of layilin. We show that the carboxy-terminal domain of layilin is capable of binding to the amino-terminal domain of radixin. An interdomain interaction between the amino- and the carboxy-terminal domains of radixin inhibits its ability to bind to layilin. In the presence of acidic phospholipids, the interdomain interaction of radixin is inhibited and layilin can bind to full-length radixin. In contrast, layilin binds both full-length and amino-terminal merlin-GST fusion proteins without a requirement for phospholipids. Furthermore, layilin antibody can immunoprecipitate merlin, confirming association in vivo between these two proteins, which also display similar subcellular localizations in ruffling membranes. No interaction was observed between layilin and ezrin or layilin and moesin. These findings expand the known binding partners of layilin to include other members of the talin/band 4.1/ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) family of cytoskeletal-membrane linker molecules. This in turn suggests that layilin may mediate signals from extracellular matrix to the cell cytoskeleton via interaction with different intracellular binding partners and thereby be involved in the modulation of cortical structures in the cell

  2. Tumorigenicity and adenovirus-transformed cells: Collagen interaction and cell surface laminin are controlled by the serotype origin of the E1A and E1B genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bober, F.J.; Birk, D.E.; Raska, K. Jr. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA)); Shenk, T. (Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway (USA))

    1988-02-01

    A library of cells transformed with recombinant adenoviruses was used to study tumorigenicity and interaction with extracellular matrix. Cells expressing the complete E1 region of highly oncogenic adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) are tumorigenic, adhere preferentially to type IV collagen, and express cell surface laminin. Weakly tumorigenic cells, which express the E1A oncogene of Ad12 and the E1B genes of Ad5, also attach preferentially to type IV collagen but do not contain laminin on their surface. Cells which express the E1A oncogene of Ad5 and the E1B genes of Ad12 are nontumorigenic and do not preferentially attach to type IV versus type I collagen but have laminin on their surface. There is no significant difference in the amounts of laminin secreted into the culture medium among cells expressing the E1B genes of Ad5 or Ad12. In vitro assays show that cells which express the E1B genes of Ad12, irrespective of the origin of the E1A genes, can bind three times more exogenously added {sup 125}I-laminin than cells expressing the E1B genes of nononcogenic Ad5. The interaction of adenovirus-transformed cells with collagen is controlled by the serotype origin of the E1A oncogene, whereas cell surface laminin is controlled by the serotype origin of the E1B genes.

  3. Micro-structured peptide surfaces for the detection of high-affinity peptide-receptor interactions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Anna-Maria; Ji, Bozhi; Hager, Roland; Haas, Sandra; Schweiggl, Simone; Sonnleitner, Alois; Haselgrübler, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    Peptide ligands have great potential as selective agents for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic targeting of human cancers. A number of high-throughput assays for screening potential candidate peptides have been developed. Although these screening assays are indispensable for the identification of peptide ligands at a large scale, it is crucial to validate peptide binding and selectivity for targeted receptors in a live-cell context. For testing high-affinity peptide-receptor interactions in the plasma membrane of living cells, we developed cell-resistant, micro-structured glass surfaces with high-density and high-contrast peptide features. Cell adhesion and recruitment of fluorescent receptors to micro-patterned peptides in the live-cell membrane were evaluated by reflection interference contrast (RIC) and total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, respectively. To demonstrate both the specificity and modularity of the assay, co-patterning of fluorescent receptors with three different immobilized micro-structured ligands was shown: first, interaction of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expressed in Jurkat cells with immobilized EGF was detected and quantified. Second, using Jurkat cells, we demonstrated specific interaction of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged β3 integrin with c(RGDfK) peptide. Third, we identified indirect recruitment of GFP-tagged α5 integrin to an 11-mer peptide. In summary, our results show that the developed micro-structured surfaces are a useful tool for the validation and quantification of peptide-receptor interactions in their natural cellular environment. PMID:26210593

  4. Evolvement of cell–substrate interaction over time for cells cultivated on a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APTES) modified silicon dioxide (SiO2) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Cell–substrate interaction of single cells was observed directly from the post-cell-removal imprint left on γ-APTES soft substrate surface. ► The time evolvement of the cell–substrate interaction can be obtained by cultivating cells on the γ-APTES surface for different periods of time. ► The cell–substrate interaction property can be found from the post-cell-removal surface morphology profiles determined by AFM. ► It was found that the cancer cells tend to form deeper trenches along the circumference of the imprints, while the normal cells do not. - Abstract: Since cell–substrate interaction is directly related to the traction force of the cell, the cell property can be judged from the imprint it leaves on the soft substrate surface onto which the cell is cultured. In this letter, the evolvement of the cell–substrate interaction over time was observed by cultivating cells on a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APTES) modified silicon dioxide (SiO2) surface for different periods of time. The cell–substrate interaction property as a function of time can then be found from the post-cell-removal surface morphology profiles determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Different surface morphology profiles were found between normal cells and cancer cells. It was found that the cancer cells tend to form deeper trenches along the circumference of the imprints, while the normal cells do not. In addition, our results indicated that normal cells involve cell–substrate interaction mechanisms that are different from those for cancer cells.

  5. Curcumin induced nanoscale CD44 molecular redistribution and antigen-antibody interaction on HepG2 cell surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → In this study, we investigate the changes of CD44 expression and distribution on HepG2 cells after curcumin treatment. → We find curcumin is able to change the morphology and ultrastructure of HepG2 cells. → Curcumin can reduce the expression of CD44 molecules and induce the nanoscale molecular redistribution on cell surface. → The binding force between CD44-modified AFM tip and the HepG2 cell surface decreases after curcumin-treatment. - Abstract: The cell surface glycoprotein CD44 was implicated in the progression, metastasis and apoptosis of certain human tumors. In this study, we used atomic force microscope (AFM) to monitor the effect of curcumin on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell surface nanoscale structure. High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with curcumin. The membrane average roughness increased (10.88 ± 4.62 nm to 129.70 ± 43.72 nm) and the expression of CD44 decreased (99.79 ± 0.16% to 75.14 ± 8.37%). Laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) imaging showed that CD44 molecules were located on the cell membrane. The florescence intensity in control group was weaker than that in curcumin treated cells. Most of the binding forces between CD44 antibodies and untreated HepG2 cell membrane were around 120-220 pN. After being incubated with curcumin, the major forces focused on 70-150 pN (10 μM curcumin-treated) and 50-120 pN (20 μM curcumin-treated). These results suggested that, as result of nanoscale molecular redistribution, changes of the cell surface were in response to external treatment of curcumin. The combination of AFM and LSCM could be a powerful method to detect the distribution of cell surface molecules and interactions between molecules and their ligands.

  6. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabbir A Ansari

    Full Text Available Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF.

  7. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Shabbir A; Pendurthi, Usha R; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  8. Surface functionalization of nanoparticles to control cell interactions and drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rongcong; Neu, Björn; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2012-08-20

    Nanoparticles made from poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) are used to deliver a wide range of bioactive molecules, due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability. This study investigates the surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles via the layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of polyelectrolytes, and the effects of these coatings on the release behavior, cytotoxicity, hemolytic activity, and cellular uptake efficiency. PLGA nanoparticles are modified via LbL adsorption of two polyelectrolyte pairs: 1) poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) and 2) poly(L-lysine hydrobromide) (PLL) and dextran sulfate (DES). It is demonstrated that both PAH/PSS and PLL/DES coatings suppress the burst release usually observed for unmodified PLGA nanoparticles and that the release behavior can be adjusted by changing the layer numbers, layer materials, or by crosslinking the layer constituents. Neither bare nor polyelectrolyte-modified PLGA nanoparticles show any signs of cytotoxicity. However, nanoparticles with a positively charged polyelectrolyte as the outermost layer induce hemolysis, whereas uncoated particles or particles with a negatively charged polyelectrolyte as the outermost layer show no hemolytic activity. Furthermore, particles with either PAH or PLL as the outermost layer also demonstrate a higher uptake efficiency by L929 fibroblast cells, due to a higher cell-particle affinity. This study suggests that LbL coating of PLGA nanoparticles can control the release behavior of bioactive molecules as well as the surface activity, therefore providing a promising strategy to enhance the efficiency of nanoparticulate drug-delivery systems. PMID:22674655

  9. A dual gradient assay for the parametric analysis of cell-surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Paul M; Pedersen, Rasmus H; Riehle, Mathis O; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2012-08-20

    Cellular response to microgrooves is addressed using a new assay format, comprising orthogonal gradients of continuously varied groove pitch and depth. Dual layer etch masks are created using a combination of micropatterning and plasma polymer deposition. A silicon substrate with a constant groove width of 8 μm and with ridge width increasing from 8 μm in 0.5 μm steps across 10 mm is fabricated by photolithography. A plasma-polymerized hexane film which is 120 nm thick at one end of these grooves, and 10 nm at the other, is deposited under a diffusion mask. Reactive etching of the patterned sample transfers a gradient of groove pitch and groove depth into the silicon substrate. A silicon master with a gradient of groove depth spanning more than two orders of magnitude (less than 10 nm to over 1000 nm) is used to create an injection molding inlay for mass replication of the screening topography. Polycarbonate replicas are molded for use in cell culture studies, and the functionality of the topography as a high-throughput screening platform is investigated. The response of MDCK, h-TERT fibroblasts, and LE2 endothelial cells is examined, in terms of attachment and morphological response to the variation in topographical cues, with the aim of pinpointing the optimal combination of groove pitch and depth to elicit a tailored response from each cell type. When the range of topographical features screened on a single substrate is considered, this new assay represents a significant step forward in the parametric design and analysis of topographical cues at the biomaterial interface. PMID:22678878

  10. Characterization of the aspects of osteoprogenitor cell interactions with physical tetracalcium phosphate anchorage on titanium implant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Well-designed implants are used not only to modify the geometry of the implant but also to change the chemical properties of its surfaces. The present study aims to assess the biofunctional effects of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) particles as a physical anchor on the implant surface derived through sandblasting. The characteristics of the surface, cell viability, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity toward osteoprogenitor cells (D1) were obtained. D1 cells were cultured on a plain surface that underwent sandblasting and acid etching (SLA) (control SLA group) and on different SLA surfaces with different anchoring TTCP rates (new test groups, M and H). The mean anchoring rates were 57% (M) and 74% (H), and the anchored thickness was estimated to range from 12.6 μm to 18.3 μm. Compared with the control SLA surface on Ti substrate, the new test groups with different TTCP anchoring rates (M and H) failed to improve cell proliferation significantly but had a well-differentiated D1 cell phenotype that enhanced ALP expression in the early stage of cell cultures, specifically, at day 7. Results suggest that the SLA surface with anchored TTCP can accelerate progenitor bone cell mineralization. This study shows the potential clinical application of the constructed geometry in TTCP anchorage on Ti for dental implant surface modification. - Highlights: • TTCP (tetracalcium phosphate) as a physical anchorage on implant is characterized. • Theoretical values of anchored thickness and capping areas were estimated. • TTCP anchored by sandblasting can accelerate progenitor bone cell mineralization. • TTCP anchored on SLA (sandblasting and acid etching) surface is a promising method

  11. Characterization of the aspects of osteoprogenitor cell interactions with physical tetracalcium phosphate anchorage on titanium implant surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Chia-Ling [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Dental Medical Devices and Materials Research Center, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ya-Yuan; Liou, Cian-Hua [Alliance Global Technology Co., Ltd., Kaohsiung Medical Device Special Zone in Southern Taiwan Science Park, Kaohsiung 82151, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Cheng, E-mail: wencchen@fcu.edu.tw [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-01

    Well-designed implants are used not only to modify the geometry of the implant but also to change the chemical properties of its surfaces. The present study aims to assess the biofunctional effects of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) particles as a physical anchor on the implant surface derived through sandblasting. The characteristics of the surface, cell viability, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity toward osteoprogenitor cells (D1) were obtained. D1 cells were cultured on a plain surface that underwent sandblasting and acid etching (SLA) (control SLA group) and on different SLA surfaces with different anchoring TTCP rates (new test groups, M and H). The mean anchoring rates were 57% (M) and 74% (H), and the anchored thickness was estimated to range from 12.6 μm to 18.3 μm. Compared with the control SLA surface on Ti substrate, the new test groups with different TTCP anchoring rates (M and H) failed to improve cell proliferation significantly but had a well-differentiated D1 cell phenotype that enhanced ALP expression in the early stage of cell cultures, specifically, at day 7. Results suggest that the SLA surface with anchored TTCP can accelerate progenitor bone cell mineralization. This study shows the potential clinical application of the constructed geometry in TTCP anchorage on Ti for dental implant surface modification. - Highlights: • TTCP (tetracalcium phosphate) as a physical anchorage on implant is characterized. • Theoretical values of anchored thickness and capping areas were estimated. • TTCP anchored by sandblasting can accelerate progenitor bone cell mineralization. • TTCP anchored on SLA (sandblasting and acid etching) surface is a promising method.

  12. An acoustically driven microliter flow chamber on a chip (muFCC) for cell-cell and cell-surface interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Matthias F; Guttenberg, Zeno; Schneider, Stefan W; Sritharan, Kumudesh; Myles, Vanessa M; Pamukci, Umut; Wixforth, Achim

    2008-03-14

    A novel method for pumping very small volumes of liquid by using surface acoustic waves is employed to create a microfluidic flow chamber on a chip. It holds a volume of only a few mul and its planar design provides complete architectural freedom. This allows for the reconstruction of even complex flow scenarios (e.g. curvatures, bifurcations and stenosis). Addition of polymer walls to the planar fluidic track enables cell culturing on the chip surface and the investigation of cell-cell adhesion dynamics under flow. We demonstrate the flexibility of the system for application in many areas of microfluidic investigations including blood clotting phenomena under various flow conditions and the investigation of different stages of cell adhesion. PMID:18306189

  13. Nitrogen interactions at metal surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gleeson, M. A.; Kleyn, A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular beam experiments with specially prepared beams allow the study of the interaction of very reactive species with surfaces. In the present case the interaction of N-atoms with Ag(1 1 1) is studied. The energy of the atoms is around 5 eV, precisely between the classical energy regimes of seed

  14. The surface charge of liposomal adjuvants is decisive for their interactions with the Calu-3 and A549 airway epithelial cell culture models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvarsson, Pall Thor; Rasmussen, Ida Svahn; Viaene, Michelle; Irlik, Przemyslaw Jedrzej; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Foged, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    potential for mucosal vaccination via the airways. The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of the liposomal surface charge on the interaction with lung epithelial cells. Thus, the cationic DDA in the liposomes was subjected to a step-wise replacement with the zwitterionic...

  15. Interaction of the 2,6-dimethoxysemiquinone and ascorbyl free radicals with Ehrlich ascites cells: a probe of cell-surface charge.

    OpenAIRE

    Pethig, R; Gascoyne, P R; McLaughlin, J. A.; Szent-Györgyi, A

    1984-01-01

    The rate of quenching by Ehrlich ascites cells of anionic 2,6-dimethoxy-p-semiquinone and ascorbyl free radicals is investigated as a function of cell concentration, the blocking of cell-surface sulfhydryl groups by N-ethylmaleimide, and the reduction of cell-surface charge by neuraminidase. The rate of quenching is found to be proportional to cell viability and to the number of free cell-surface sulfhydryl groups. The enzymatic action of neuraminidase results in an increase of the free radic...

  16. Collaboration Meets Interactive Surfaces (CMIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anslow, Craig; Campos, Pedro; Grisoni, Laurent;

    2015-01-01

    exist, but the ITS, CHI, CSCW, and other HCI communities have not yet thoroughly addressed the problem of bringing effective collaboration activities together using multiple interactive surfaces, especially in complex work domains. Of particular interest is the potential synergy that one can obtain by......This workshop proposes to bring together researchers who are interested in improving collaborative experiences through the combination of multiple interaction surfaces with diverse sizes and formats, ranging from large-scale walls, to tables, mobiles, and wearables. The opportunities for innovation...

  17. Interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with cultured epithelial cells: roles of surface structures in adhesion and invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Anne; House, Deborah; Perkins, Timothy; Baker, Stephen; Kingsley, Robert A.; Dougan, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    In this study we investigate the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) surface structures to influence invasion and adhesion in epithelial cell assay systems. In general, S. Typhi was found to be less adherent, invasive and cytotoxic than S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Culture conditions had little effect on adhesion of S. Typhi to cultured cells but had a marked influence on invasion. In contrast, bacterial growth conditions did not influence S. Typhi api...

  18. Modelling land surface - atmosphere interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Højmark

    The study is investigates modelling of land surface – atmosphere interactions in context of fully coupled climatehydrological model. With a special focus of under what condition a fully coupled model system is needed. Regional climate model inter-comparison projects as ENSEMBLES have shown bias...

  19. THE USE OF INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY FOR FOLLOWING DRUG-MEMBRANE INTERACTIONS: PROBING PACLITAXEL (TAXOL-CELL PHOSPHOLIPID SURFACE RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Süleymanoglu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, of the several new chemotherapeutic agents, taxol (Paclitaxel has played a crucial role in the treatment of various malignancies, including those of the ovary, breast, lung, head and neck, esophagus, as well as Kaposi's sarcoma. Despite its well documented mechanisms of action causing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis following microtubule stabilization, further details still remain to be clarified. Alterations of lipid membrane composition of cancer cells as compared with normal cells are well established. In addition, the mechanisms of drug resistance, which severely limit the effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy are undertaken by membrane located proteins such as multidrug resistance (MDR-1 or P-glycoprotein (Pgp. On the other hand, recent chemotherapeutic regimens employ anticancer drug induced apoptosis, during which dynamic structural changes occur in cellular dynamics characterizing cell death phase leading to fragmentation into membrane-bound apoptotic bodies. Thus, cell membranes represent an attractive research field in cellular carcinogenesis and cancer therapy. Besides DNA, plasma membrane is considered as the most important target for many antineoplastic drugs. However, its role in chemotherapy-induced cell death is not well understood. Hence, it is interesting to study the molecular interactions of the anticancer drugs in phospholipid environment. Both cell biological and biotechnological aspects are aimed. By further clarifying the precise mechanisms of taxol-lipid interactions, better understanding of its pharmacological targets can be obtained. Moreover, gaining further insights on such drug-lipid interactions would encourage the design of novel lipid based antitumor drug formulations with improved bioavailability properties and decreased toxic side effects. The currently employed analytical approaches to follow drug-cell or drug-membrane interactions are limited by either the requirement of experienced

  20. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images. PMID:23085529

  1. Secreted NS1 of dengue virus attaches to the surface of cells via interactions with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panisadee Avirutnan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV nonstructural protein-1 (NS1 is a secreted glycoprotein that is absent from viral particles but accumulates in the supernatant and on the plasma membrane of cells during infection. Immune recognition of cell surface NS1 on endothelial cells has been hypothesized as a mechanism for the vascular leakage that occurs during severe DENV infection. However, it has remained unclear how NS1 becomes associated with the plasma membrane, as it contains no membrane-spanning sequence motif. Using flow cytometric and ELISA-based binding assays and mutant cell lines lacking selective glycosaminoglycans, we show that soluble NS1 binds back to the surface of uninfected cells primarily via interactions with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate E. DENV NS1 binds directly to the surface of many types of epithelial and mesenchymal cells yet attaches poorly to most peripheral blood cells. Moreover, DENV NS1 preferentially binds to cultured human microvascular compared to aortic or umbilical cord vein endothelial cells. This binding specificity was confirmed in situ as DENV NS1 bound to lung and liver but not intestine or brain endothelium of mouse tissues. Differential binding of soluble NS1 by tissue endothelium and subsequent recognition by anti-NS1 antibodies could contribute to the selective vascular leakage syndrome that occurs during severe secondary DENV infection.

  2. Transforming Growth Factor β1 Signaling via Interaction with Cell Surface Hyal-2 and Recruitment of WWOX/WOX1*

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Li-Jin; Schultz, Lori; Hong, Qunying; van Moer, Kris; Heath, John; Li, Meng-Yen; Lai, Feng-Jie; Lin, Sing-Ru; Lee, Ming-Hui; Lo, Cheng-Peng; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chen, Shur-Tzu; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) initiates multiple signal pathways and activates many downstream kinases. Here, we determined that TGF-β1 bound cell surface hyaluronidase Hyal-2 on microvilli in type II TGF-β receptor-deficient HCT116 cells, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy. This binding resulted in recruitment of proapoptotic WOX1 (also named WWOX or FOR) and formation of Hyal-2·WOX1 complexes for relocation to the nuclei. TGF-β1 strengthened the binding of the catalytic domai...

  3. Interactive Design of Developable Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Chengcheng

    2016-01-15

    We present a new approach to geometric modeling with developable surfaces and the design of curved-creased origami. We represent developables as splines and express the nonlinear conditions relating to developability and curved folds as quadratic equations. This allows us to utilize a constraint solver, which may be described as energy-guided projection onto the constraint manifold, and which is fast enough for interactive modeling. Further, a combined primal-dual surface representation enables us to robustly and quickly solve approximation problems.

  4. The Role of Cell Surface Architecture of Lactobacilli in Host-Microbe Interactions in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjita Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus species can exert health promoting effects in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT through many mechanisms, which include pathogen inhibition, maintenance of microbial balance, immunomodulation, and enhancement of the epithelial barrier function. Different species of the genus Lactobacillus can evoke different responses in the host, and not all strains of the same species can be considered beneficial. Strain variations may be related to diversity of the cell surface architecture of lactobacilli and the bacteria's ability to express certain surface components or secrete specific compounds in response to the host environment. Lactobacilli are known to modify their surface structures in response to stress factors such as bile and low pH, and these adaptations may help their survival in the face of harsh environmental conditions encountered in the GIT. In recent years, multiple cell surface-associated molecules have been implicated in the adherence of lactobacilli to the GIT lining, immunomodulation, and protective effects on intestinal epithelial barrier function. Identification of the relevant bacterial ligands and their host receptors is imperative for a better understanding of the mechanisms through which lactobacilli exert their beneficial effects on human health.

  5. αB-Crystallin Interacts with Nav1.5 and Regulates Ubiquitination and Internalization of Cell Surface Nav1.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan; Wang, Zhijie; Liu, Yinan; Xiong, Hongbo; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Wu, Ling; Yuan, Chao; Wang, Longfei; Hou, Yuxi; Yu, Gang; Huang, Zhengrong; Xu, Chengqi; Chen, Qiuyun; Wang, Qing K

    2016-05-20

    Nav1.5, the pore-forming α subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated Na(+) channel complex, is required for the initiation and propagation of the cardiac action potential. Mutations in Nav1.5 cause cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. The cardiac Na(+) channel functions as a protein complex; however, its complete components remain to be fully elucidated. A yeast two-hybrid screen identified a new candidate Nav1.5-interacting protein, αB-crystallin. GST pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining analyses validated the interaction between Nav1.5 and αB-crystallin. Whole-cell patch clamping showed that overexpression of αB-crystallin significantly increased peak sodium current (INa) density, and the underlying molecular mechanism is the increased cell surface expression level of Nav1.5 via reduced internalization of cell surface Nav1.5 and ubiquitination of Nav1.5. Knock-out of αB-crystallin expression significantly decreased the cell surface expression level of Nav1.5. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis showed that αB-crystallin interacted with Nedd4-2; however, a catalytically inactive Nedd4-2-C801S mutant impaired the interaction and abolished the up-regulation of INa by αB-crystallin. Nav1.5 mutation V1980A at the interaction site for Nedd4-2 eliminated the effect of αB-crystallin on reduction of Nav1.5 ubiquitination and increases of INa density. Two disease-causing mutations in αB-crystallin, R109H and R151X (nonsense mutation), eliminated the effect of αB-crystallin on INa This study identifies αB-crystallin as a new binding partner for Nav1.5. αB-Crystallin interacts with Nav1.5 and increases INa by modulating the expression level and internalization of cell surface Nav1.5 and ubiquitination of Nav1.5, which requires the protein-protein interactions between αB-crystallin and Nav1.5 and between αB-crystallin and functionally active Nedd4-2. PMID:26961874

  6. Surface Functionalization for Protein and Cell Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpo, Pascal; Ruiz, Ana; Ceriotti, Laura; Rossi, François

    The interaction of biological systems with synthetic material surfaces is an important issue for many biological applications such as implanted devices, tissue engineering, cell-based sensors and assays, and more generally biologic studies performed ex vivo. To ensure reliable outcomes, the main challenge resides in the ability to design and develop surfaces or artificial micro-environment that mimic 'natural environment' in interacting with biomolecules and cells without altering their function and phenotype. At this effect, microfabrication, surface chemistry and material science play a pivotal role in the design of advanced in-vitro systems for cell culture applications. In this chapter, we discuss and describe different techniques enabling the control of cell-surface interactions, including the description of some techniques for immobilization of ligands for controlling cell-surface interactions and some methodologies for the creation of well confined cell rich areas.

  7. Evaluation of epidermal growth factor interaction with cell surface and its accumulation in nuclei of lung carcinoma, epidermoid carcinoma and melanoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specificity of binding to cell surface and nuclear accumulation of labelled epidermal growth factor (EGF) was investigated in lung carcinoma (A549), epidermoid carcinoma (HEp-2) and melanoma (B16) cell lines. It was demonstrated that the labelled EGF was bound specifically to the cell surface in line A549, HEp-2 and B16 cells; the latter exhibiting the lowest binding capacity and highest binding affinity. Comparison of nuclear accumulation of the labelled growth factor in these cell lines indicated, that melanoma cell line specifically accumulated the 125I-EGF in nuclei whereas A549 and HEp-2 did not. Thus, in order to evaluate the effect of EGF in various cells, a strict control of binding affinity and background binding is required. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  8. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.; Kiso, M.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in the toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.

  9. Interaction of human osteoblast-like Saos-2 and MG-63 cells with thermally oxidized surfaces of a titanium-niobium alloy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Vandrovcova

    Full Text Available An investigation was made of the adhesion, growth and differentiation of osteoblast-like MG-63 and Saos-2 cells on titanium (Ti and niobium (Nb supports and on TiNb alloy with surfaces oxidized at 165°C under hydrothermal conditions and at 600°C in a stream of air. The oxidation mode and the chemical composition of the samples tuned the morphology, topography and distribution of the charge on their surfaces, which enabled us to evaluate the importance of these material characteristics in the interaction of the cells with the sample surface. Numbers of adhered MG-63 and Saos-2 cells correlated with the number of positively-charged (related with the Nb2O5 phase and negatively-charged sites (related with the TiO2 phase on the alloy surface. Proliferation of these cells is correlated with the presence of positively-charged (i.e. basic sites of the Nb2O5 alloy phase, while cell differentiation is correlated with negatively-charged (acidic sites of the TiO2 alloy phase. The number of charged sites and adhered cells was substantially higher on the alloy sample oxidized at 600°C than on the hydrothermally treated sample at 165°C. The expression values of osteoblast differentiation markers (collagen type I and osteocalcin were higher for cells grown on the Ti samples than for those grown on the TiNb samples. This was more particularly apparent in the samples treated at 165°C. No considerable immune activation of murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells on the tested samples was found. The secretion of TNF-α by these cells into the cell culture media was much lower than for either cells grown in the presence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, or untreated control samples. Thus, oxidized Ti and TiNb are both promising materials for bone implantation; TiNb for applications where bone cell proliferation is desirable, and Ti for induction of osteogenic cell differentiation.

  10. A novel receptor – ligand pathway for entry of Francisella tularensis in monocyte-like THP-1 cells: interaction between surface nucleolin and bacterial elongation factor Tu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charbit Alain

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is one of the most infectious human bacterial pathogens. It is phagocytosed by immune cells, such as monocytes and macrophages. The precise mechanisms that initiate bacterial uptake have not yet been elucidated. Participation of C3, CR3, class A scavenger receptors and mannose receptor in bacterial uptake have been already reported. However, contribution of an additional, as-yet-unidentified receptor for F. tularensis internalization has been suggested. Results We show here that cell-surface expressed nucleolin is a receptor for Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS and promotes LVS binding and infection of human monocyte-like THP-1 cells. The HB-19 pseudopeptide that binds specifically carboxy-terminal RGG domain of nucleolin inhibits LVS binding and infection of monocyte-like THP-1 cells. In a pull-down assay, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu, a GTP-binding protein involved in protein translation, usually found in cytoplasm, was recovered among LVS bacterial membrane proteins bound on RGG domain of nucleolin. A specific polyclonal murine antibody was raised against recombinant LVS EF-Tu. By fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments, we found that a fraction of EF-Tu could be detected at the bacterial surface. Anti-EF-Tu antibodies reduced LVS binding to monocyte-like THP-1 cells and impaired infection, even in absence of complement and complement receptors. Interaction between EF-Tu and nucleolin was illustrated by two different pull-down assays using recombinant EF-Tu proteins and either RGG domain of nucleolin or cell solubilized nucleolin. Discussion Altogether, our results demonstrate that the interaction between surface nucleolin and its bacterial ligand EF-Tu plays an important role in Francisella tularensis adhesion and entry process and may therefore facilitate invasion of host tissues. Since phagosomal escape and intra-cytosolic multiplication of

  11. Microscale Gas-Surface Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, W. M.; Rader, D. J.; Gallis, M. A.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    In gas-filled microsystems, noncontinuum phenomena such as velocity slip and temperature jump become increasingly important as devices become smaller or packaging pressures are reduced. These phenomena are governed by the interaction of gas molecules with the adjacent solid surfaces. Experiments are performed to quantify the interaction of common gases (e.g., nitrogen, argon, helium) with solids of interest for microsystems (e.g., stainless steel, aluminum, gold, silicon dioxide, silicon). The gas is confined between two parallel plates at unequal temperatures, and the gas-phase heat flux is inferred from temperature measurements (radiation is accounted for). For comparison purposes, heat-flux values are also inferred from electron-beam-fluorescence measurements of the gas-phase density gradient. Heat-flux values at several pressures allow the accommodation coefficient to be determined. As well as being useful in its own right, this type of information enables molecular gas dynamics simulations of microscale gas flow using Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Groundwater-surface water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter discusses natural and modified interactions between groundwater and surface water. Theory on recharge to groundwater from rivers is introduced, and the relative importance of groundwater recharge from rivers is illustrated with an example from the Ngaruroro River, Hawke's Bay. Some of the techniques used to identify and measure recharge to groundwater from gravel-bed rivers will be outlined, with examples from the Ngaruroro River, where the recharge reach is relatively well defined, and from the Rakaia River, where it is poorly defined. Groundwater recharged from rivers can have characteristic chemical and isotopic signatures, as shown by Waimakariri River water in the Christchurch-West Melton groundwater system. The incorporation of groundwater-river interaction in a regional groundwater flow model is outlined for the Waimea Plains, and relationships between river scour and groundwater recharge are examined for the Waimakariri River. Springs are the result of natural discharge from groundwater systems and are important water sources. The interactions between groundwater systems, springs, and river flow for the Avon River in New Zealand will be outlined. The theory of depletion of stream flow by groundwater pumpage will be introduced with a case study from Canterbury, and salt-water intrusion into groundwater systems with examples from Nelson and Christchurch. The theory of artificial recharge to groundwater systems is introduced with a case study from Hawke's Bay. Wetlands are important to flora, and the relationship of the wetland environment to groundwater hydrology will be discussed, with an example from the South Taupo wetland. (author). 56 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Interaction between Simian Virus 40 Major Capsid Protein VP1 and Cell Surface Ganglioside GM1 Triggers Vacuole Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Motamedi, Nasim; Magaldi, Thomas G.; Gee, Gretchen V.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus that has served as an important model to understand many aspects of biology, induces dramatic cytoplasmic vacuolization late during productive infection of monkey host cells. Although this activity led to the discovery of the virus in 1960, the mechanism of vacuolization is still not known. Pentamers of the major SV40 capsid protein VP1 bind to the ganglioside GM1, which serves as the cellular receptor for the virus. In this report, we show that binding of VP1 to cell surface GM1 plays a key role in SV40 infection-induced vacuolization. We previously showed that SV40 VP1 mutants defective for GM1 binding fail to induce vacuolization, even though they replicate efficiently. Here, we show that interfering with GM1-VP1 binding by knockdown of GM1 after infection is established abrogates vacuolization by wild-type SV40. Vacuole formation during permissive infection requires efficient virus release, and conditioned medium harvested late during SV40 infection rapidly induces vacuoles in a VP1- and GM1-dependent fashion. Furthermore, vacuolization can also be induced by a nonreplicating SV40 pseudovirus in a GM1-dependent manner, and a mutation in BK pseudovirus VP1 that generates GM1 binding confers vacuole-inducing activity. Vacuolization can also be triggered by purified pentamers of wild-type SV40 VP1, but not by GM1 binding-defective pentamers or by intracellular expression of VP1. These results demonstrate that SV40 infection-induced vacuolization is caused by the binding of released progeny viruses to GM1, thereby identifying the molecular trigger for the activity that led to the discovery of SV40. PMID:27006465

  14. Intentional formation of a protein corona on nanoparticles: Serum concentration affects protein corona mass, surface charge, and nanoparticle-cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, Christine; Weidner, Andreas; Lühe, Moritz V D; Bergemann, Christian; Schacher, Felix H; Clement, Joachim H; Dutz, Silvio

    2016-06-01

    The protein corona, which immediately is formed after contact of nanoparticles and biological systems, plays a crucial role for the biological fate of nanoparticles. In the here presented study we describe a strategy to control the amount of corona proteins which bind on particle surface and the impact of such a protein corona on particle-cell interactions. For corona formation, polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) were incubated in a medium consisting of fetal calf serum (FCS) and cell culture medium. To modulate the amount of proteins bind to particles, the composition of the incubation medium was varied with regard to the FCS content. The protein corona mass was estimated and the size distribution of the participating proteins was determined by means of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Additionally, the zeta potential of incubated particles was measured. Human blood-brain barrier-representing cell line HBMEC was used for in vitro incubation experiments. To investigate the consequences of the FCS dependent protein corona formation on the interaction of MNP and cells flow cytometry and laser scanning microscopy were used. Zeta potential as well as SDS-PAGE clearly reveal an increase in the amount of corona proteins on MNP with increasing amount of FCS in incubation medium. For MNP incubated with lower FCS concentrations especially medium-sized proteins of molecular weights between 30kDa and 100kDa could be found within the protein corona, whereas for MNP incubated within higher FCS concentrations the fraction of corona proteins of 30kDa and less increased. The presence of the protein corona reduces the interaction of PEI-coated MNP with HBMEC cells within a 30min-incubation. PMID:26556312

  15. A fiber-modified adenoviral vector interacts with immunoevasion molecules of the B7 family at the surface of murine leukemia cells derived from dormant tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogée Sophie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor cells can escape the immune system by overexpressing molecules of the B7 family, e.g. B7-H1 (PD-L1 or CD86, which suppresses the anti-tumor T-cell responses through binding to the PD-1 receptor, and similarly for B7.1 (CD80, through binding to CTLA-4. Moreover, direct interactions between B7-H1 and B7.1 molecules are also likely to participate in the immunoevasion mechanism. In this study, we used a mouse model of tumor dormancy, DA1-3b leukemia cells. We previously showed that a minor population of DA1-3b cells persists in equilibrium with the immune system for long periods of time, and that the levels of surface expression of B7-H1 and B7.1 molecules correlates with the dormancy time. We found that leukemia cells DA1-3b/d365 cells, which derived from long-term dormant tumors and overexpressed B7-H1 and B7.1 molecules, were highly permissive to Ad5FB4, a human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 vector pseudotyped with chimeric human-bovine fibers. Both B7-H1 and B7.1 were required for Ad5FB4-cell binding and entry, since (i siRNA silencing of one or the other B7 gene transcript resulted in a net decrease in the cell binding and Ad5FB4-mediated transduction of DA1-3b/d365; and (ii plasmid-directed expression of B7.1 and B7-H1 proteins conferred to Ad5FB4-refractory human cells a full permissiveness to this vector. Binding data and flow cytometry analysis suggested that B7.1 and B7-H1 molecules played different roles in Ad5FB4-mediated transduction of DA1-3b/d365, with B7.1 involved in cell attachment of Ad5FB4, and B7-H1 in Ad5FB4 internalization. BRET analysis showed that B7.1 and B7-H1 formed heterodimeric complexes at the cell surface, and that Ad5FB4 penton, the viral capsomere carrying the fiber projection, could negatively interfere with the formation of B7.1/B7-H1 heterodimers, or modify their conformation. As interactors of B7-H1/B7.1 molecules, Ad5FB4 particles and/or their penton capsomeres represent potential therapeutic agents

  16. Interaction with Dopamine D2 Receptor Enhances Expression of Transient Receptor Potential Channel 1 at the Cell Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Hannan, Meredith A.; Kabbani, Nadine; Paspalas, Constantinos D.; Levenson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Receptor signaling is mediated by direct protein interaction with various types of cytoskeletal, adapter, effector, and additional receptor molecules. In brain tissue and in cultured neurons, activation of dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) has been found to impact cellular calcium signaling. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach, we have uncovered a direct physical interaction between the D2R and the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) subtypes 1, 4 and 5. The TRPC/D2R interaction was further ...

  17. Transient Surface CCR5 Expression by Naive CD8+ T Cells within Inflamed Lymph Nodes Is Dependent on High Endothelial Venule Interaction and Augments Th Cell-Dependent Memory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, David; Su, Charles A; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Dorand, R Dixon; Myers, Jay; Liou, Rachel; Nthale, Joseph; Huang, Alex Y

    2016-05-01

    In inflamed lymph nodes, Ag-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells encounter Ag-bearing dendritic cells and, together, this complex enhances the release of CCL3 and CCL4, which facilitate additional interaction with naive CD8(+) T cells. Although blocking CCL3 and CCL4 has no effect on primary CD8(+) T cell responses, it dramatically impairs the development of memory CD8(+) T cells upon Ag rechallenge. Despite the absence of detectable surface CCR5 expression on circulating native CD8(+) T cells, these data imply that naive CD8(+) T cells are capable of expressing surface CCR5 prior to cognate Ag-induced TCR signaling in inflamed lymph nodes; however, the molecular mechanisms have not been characterized to date. In this study, we show that CCR5, the receptor for CCL3 and CCL4, can be transiently upregulated on a subset of naive CD8(+) T cells and that this upregulation is dependent on direct contact with the high endothelial venule in inflamed lymph node. Binding of CD62L and CD11a on T cells to their ligands CD34 and CD54 on the high endothelial venule can be enhanced during inflammation. This enhanced binding and subsequent signaling promote the translocation of CCR5 molecules from intracellular vesicles to the surface of the CD8(+) T cell. The upregulation of CCR5 on the surface of the CD8(+) T cells increases the number of contacts with Ag-bearing dendritic cells, which ultimately results in increased CD8(+) T cell response to Ag rechallenge. PMID:26994221

  18. Invited review: Growth-promoting effects of colostrum in calves based on interaction with intestinal cell surface receptors and receptor-like transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontsouka, Edgar C; Albrecht, Christiane; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2016-06-01

    The postnatal development and maturation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of neonatal calves is crucial for their survival. Major morphological and functional changes in the calf's GI tract initiated by colostrum bioactive substances promote the establishment of intestinal digestion and absorption of food. It is generally accepted that colostrum intake provokes the maturation of organs and systems in young calves, illustrating the significance of the cow-to-calf connection at birth. These postnatal adaptive changes of the GI tissues in neonatal calves are especially induced by the action of bioactive substances such as insulin-like growth factors, hormones, or cholesterol carriers abundantly present in colostrum. These substances interact with specific cell-surface receptors or receptor-like transporters expressed in the GI wall of neonatal calves to elicit their biological effects. Therefore, the abundance and activity of cell surface receptors and receptor-like transporters binding colostral bioactive substances are a key aspect determining the effects of the cow-to-calf connection at birth. The present review compiles the information describing the effects of colostrum feeding on selected serum metabolic and endocrine traits in neonatal calves. In this context, the current paper discusses specifically the consequences of colostrum feeding on the GI expression and activity of cell-receptors and receptor-like transporters binding growth hormone, insulin-like growth factors, insulin, or cholesterol acceptors in neonatal calves. PMID:26874414

  19. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms of...

  20. The interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review discusses different examples for the interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces based on work reported previously by various authors and work performed by the author with colleagues at other institutions and with his graduate students at CEEL. Traditionally it has been assumed that the interaction of bacteria with metal surfaces always causes increased corrosion rates ('microbiologically influenced corrosion' (MIC)). However, more recently it has been observed that many bacteria can reduce corrosion rates of different metals and alloys in many corrosive environments. For example, it has been found that certain strains of Shewanella can prevent pitting of Al 2024 in artificial seawater, tarnishing of brass and rusting of mild steel. It has been observed that corrosion started again when the biofilm was killed by adding antibiotics. The mechanism of corrosion protection seems to be different for different bacteria since it has been found that the corrosion potential Ecorr became more negative in the presence of Shewanella ana and algae, but more positive in the presence of Bacillus subtilis. These findings have been used in an initial study of the bacterial battery in which Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was added to a cell containing Al 2024 and Cu in a growth medium. It was found that the power output of this cell continuously increased with time. In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) bacteria oxidize the fuel and transfer electrons directly to the anode. In initial studies EIS has been used to characterize the anode, cathode and membrane properties for different operating conditions of a MFC that contained Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Cell voltage (V)-current density (i) curves were obtained using potentiodynamic sweeps. The current output of a MFC has been monitored for different experimental conditions

  1. Thermal imaging for interactive surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelrahman, Yomna

    2013-01-01

    Thermal camera operating in Far Infrared (FIR) is considered to be un- derexplored in elds other than security and law enforcement. Nevertheless, recently it drawn the attention of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) re- searchers as a new sensory system enabling novel interactive systems. They are robust to illumination changes and using it with well-known computer vi- sion techniques, the complexity of the interaction detection is highly reduced as compared to RGB and depth cameras. FIR radiat...

  2. A 3D immersed finite element method with non-homogeneous interface flux jump for applications in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma-lunar surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Daoru; Wang, Pu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao; Wang, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the need to handle complex boundary conditions efficiently and accurately in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, this paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) linear immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions for solving electrostatic field involving complex boundary conditions using structured meshes independent of the interface. This method treats an object boundary as part of the simulation domain and solves the electric field at the boundary as an interface problem. In order to resolve charging on a dielectric surface, a new 3D linear IFE basis function is designed for each interface element to capture the electric field jump on the interface. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the optimal convergence rates in L2 and H1 norms of the IFE solution. This new IFE method is integrated into a PIC method for simulations involving charging of a complex dielectric surface in a plasma. A numerical study of plasma-surface interactions at the lunar terminator is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the new method.

  3. Physical-chemical characterization of nanoparticles in relevant biological environments and their interactions with the cell surface

    OpenAIRE

    Di Silvio, Desire

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are versatile tools for nanomedicine and tuning features such as material, size and charge, imaging and targeting can be accomplished. However, NPs behaviour in vivo is modified upon interaction with the biological matter and formation of a protein corona (PC) coating the NP. The PC determines the NP biological identity and it is the ultimate interface with the surrounding environment. Therefore, a deep characterization of the NPs in biological media is important to predic...

  4. A rapid and efficient method for studies of virus interaction at the host cell surface using enteroviruses and real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israelsson Stina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring virus attachment to host cells is of great importance when trying to identify novel receptors. The presence of a usable receptor is a major determinant of viral host range and cell tropism. Furthermore, identification of appropriate receptors is central for the understanding of viral pathogenesis and gives possibilities to develop antiviral drugs. Attachment is presently measured using radiolabeled and subsequently gradient purified viruses. Traditional methods are expensive and time-consuming and not all viruses are stable during a purification procedure; hence there is room for improvement. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR has become the standard method to detect and quantify virus infections, including enteroviruses, in clinical samples. For instance, primers directed to the highly conserved 5' untranslated region (5'UTR of the enterovirus genome enable detection of a wide spectrum of enteroviruses. Here, we evaluate the capacity of the RT-PCR technology to study enterovirus host cell interactions at the cell surface and compare this novel implementation with an established assay using radiolabeled viruses. Results Both purified and crude viral extracts of CVB5 generated comparable results in attachment studies when analyzed with RT-PCR. In addition, receptor binding studies regarding viruses with coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR and/or decay accelerating factor (DAF affinity, further demonstrated the possibility to use RT-PCR to measure virus attachment to host cells. Furthermore, the RT-PCR technology and crude viral extracts was used to study attachment with low multiplicity of infection (0.05 × 10-4TCID50/cell and low cell numbers (250, which implies the range of potential implementations of the presented technique. Conclusion We have implemented the well-established RT-PCR technique to measure viral attachment to host cells with high accuracy and reproducibility, at low cost and with less effort than

  5. Interactions of nanoparticles and surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Merkt, Florian

    2008-01-01

    The adhesion forces of micro- to nanoscopic particles on surfaces are the main topic of this dissertation. As a model system, the contact between colloidal particles and smooth silicon and glass substrates are investigated. To achieve information about their adhesion forces, particles are detached from the substrates on the timescale of tens of nanoseconds. For this purpose a laser is focussed on the back side of the sample. There a plasma is generated, which evokes a shock wave that travels ...

  6. Plasma surface interaction processes and possible synergisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process determining the plasma surface interaction in today's high temperature plasma experiments are investigated following several lines. First, in plasma devices, the particle and energy fluxes to the different first wall areas the fluxes from the walls back into the plasma are measured and the boundary plasma parameters are determined. The surface composition and structure of the walls, limiters and divertor plates are analyzed following exposure to many discharges. Secondly, the different surface processes which are expected to contribute to the plasma surface interaction (particularly to hydrogen particle balance and impurity introduction) are studied in simulation experiments using well defined particle beams

  7. A Framework for Networked Interactive Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    CUYPERS, Tom; Frederix, Karel; RAYMAEKERS, Chris; Bekaert, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The development of interactive surfaces has led to a number of applications as it allows for natural interaction and collaboration. The use of co-located collaboration on this kind of surfaces provides new possibilities. It is our belief, however, that an even higher degree of collaboration can be achieved by overcoming the boundaries of a single device or setup. Therefore, we extended our previously built multi-touch framework to realize collaborative multi-device setups. In order to assess ...

  8. Organic chemistry on Titan: Surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of Titan's organic sediments with the surface (solubility in nonpolar fluids) is discussed. How Titan's sediments can be exposed to an aqueous medium for short, but perhaps significant, periods of time is also discussed. Interactions with hydrocarbons and with volcanic magmas are considered. The alteration of Titan's organic sediments over geologic time by the impacts of meteorites and comets is discussed.

  9. A PDZ-Like Motif in the Biliary Transporter ABCB4 Interacts with the Scaffold Protein EBP50 and Regulates ABCB4 Cell Surface Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quitterie Venot

    Full Text Available ABCB4/MDR3, a member of the ABC superfamily, is an ATP-dependent phosphatidylcholine translocator expressed at the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Defects in the ABCB4 gene are associated with rare biliary diseases. It is essential to understand the mechanisms of its canalicular membrane expression in particular for the development of new therapies. The stability of several ABC transporters is regulated through their binding to PDZ (PSD95/DglA/ZO-1 domain-containing proteins. ABCB4 protein ends by the sequence glutamine-asparagine-leucine (QNL, which shows some similarity to PDZ-binding motifs. The aim of our study was to assess the potential role of the QNL motif on the surface expression of ABCB4 and to determine if PDZ domain-containing proteins are involved. We found that truncation of the QNL motif decreased the stability of ABCB4 in HepG2-transfected cells. The deleted mutant ABCB4-ΔQNL also displayed accelerated endocytosis. EBP50, a PDZ protein highly expressed in the liver, strongly colocalized and coimmunoprecipitated with ABCB4, and this interaction required the QNL motif. Down-regulation of EBP50 by siRNA or by expression of an EBP50 dominant-negative mutant caused a significant decrease in the level of ABCB4 protein expression, and in the amount of ABCB4 localized at the canalicular membrane. Interaction of ABCB4 with EBP50 through its PDZ-like motif plays a critical role in the regulation of ABCB4 expression and stability at the canalicular plasma membrane.

  10. Effects and interactions of sodium lactate, sodium diacetate, and pediocin on the thermal inactivation of starved cells of Listeria monocytogenes on the surface of bologna

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects and interactions of temperature (56.3-60C) sodium lactate (SL; 0-4.8%), sodium diacetate (SDA; 0-2.5%), and pediocin (0-10,000 AU) on starved Listeria monocytogenes on bologna were investigated. Bologna slices containing SL and SDA in the formulation were dipped in pediocin, surface inoc...

  11. Interaction of nitrogen ions with beryllium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobes, Katharina [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Association EURATOM ÖAW, Vienna (Austria); Köppen, Martin [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Oberkofler, Martin [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lungu, Cristian P.; Porosnicu, Corneliu [National Institute for Laser, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Höschen, Till; Meisl, Gerd [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Linsmeier, Christian [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Aumayr, Friedrich, E-mail: aumayr@iap.tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Association EURATOM ÖAW, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of energetic nitrogen projectiles with a beryllium surface is studied using a highly sensitive quartz crystal microbalance technique. The overall mass change rate of the beryllium sample under N{sub 2}{sup +} ion impact at an ion energy of 5000 eV (i.e. 2500 eV per N) is investigated in situ and in real-time. A strong dependency of the observed mass change rate on the nitrogen fluence (at constant flux) is found and can be attributed to the formation of a nitrogen-containing mixed material layer within the ion penetration depth. The presented data elucidate the dynamics of the interaction process and the surface saturation with increasing nitrogen fluence in a unique way. Basically, distinct interaction regimes can be discriminated, which can be linked to the evolution of the surface composition upon nitrogen impact. Steady state surface conditions are obtained at a total cumulative nitrogen fluence of ∼80 × 10{sup 16} N atoms per cm{sup 2}. In dynamic equilibrium, the interaction is marked by continuous surface erosion. In this case, the observed total sputtering yield becomes independent from the applied nitrogen fluence and is of the order of 0.4 beryllium atoms per impinging nitrogen atom.

  12. Ciliary contact interactions dominate surface scattering of swimming eukaryotes

    CERN Document Server

    Kantsler, Vasily; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between swimming cells and surfaces are essential to many microbiological processes, from bacterial biofilm formation to human fertilization. However, in spite of their fundamental importance, relatively little is known about the physical mechanisms that govern the scattering of flagellated or ciliated cells from solid surfaces. A more detailed understanding of these interactions promises not only new biological insights into structure and dynamics of flagella and cilia, but may also lead to new microfluidic techniques for controlling cell motility and microbial locomotion, with potential applications ranging from diagnostic tools to therapeutic protein synthesis and photosynthetic biofuel production. Due to fundamental differences in physiology and swimming strategies, it is an open question whether microfluidic transport and rectification schemes that have recently been demonstrated for pusher-type microswimmers such as bacteria and sperm cells, can be transferred to puller-type algae and other...

  13. Interaction of Protein and Cell with Different Chitosan Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between proteins, cells and biomaterial surfaces is commonly observed and often used to measure biocompatibility of biomaterials.In this investigation, three kinds of biomaterials derived from chitosan were prepared.The surface wettability of these polymers, interaction of protein with material surface, and their effects on cell adhesion and growth were studied.The results show that the surface contact angle and surface charge of biomaterials have a close bearing on protein adsorption as well as cell adhesion and growth, indicating that through different chemical modifications, chitosan can be made into different kinds of biomedical materials to satisfy various needs.

  14. The Plant Cell Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne-Mie C.Emons; Kurt V.Fagerstedt

    2010-01-01

    @@ Multicellular organization and tissue construction has evolved along essentially different lines in plants and animals. Since plants do not run away, but are anchored in the soil, their tissues are more or less firm and stiff. This strength stems from the cell walls, which encase the fragile cytoplasm, and protect it.

  15. Plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, M.; Costanzo, L. [and others

    2000-07-01

    This report brings together all the contributions of EURATOM/CEA association to the 14. international conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices. 24 papers are presented and they deal mainly with the ergodic divertor and the first wall of Tore-supra tokamak.

  16. INTERACTION OF SEEDS WITH VIBRATING SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petunina I. A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article we present the results of theoretical and experimental researches of physic-mechanical proper-ties of seeds of vegetable cultures and their interaction with vibrating surfaces of working bodies of sowing devices. The general view of the laboratory installation developed by the authors of the article has been presented

  17. Plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report brings together all the contributions of EURATOM/CEA association to the 14. international conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices. 24 papers are presented and they deal mainly with the ergodic divertor and the first wall of Tore-supra tokamak

  18. Plasma-Surface Interaction Activities in KSTAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, S. H.; Yu, Y.; Kim, K. P.; Bak, J. G.; Park, H. J.; Oh, Y. S.; Chung, J.; Nam, Y. U.; Bang, E. N.; Kim, K. R.; Litnovsky, A.; Hellwig, M.; Matveev, D.; Komm, M.; van den Berg, M. A.; Kim, W. C.; Kim, H. K.; Rho, T. H.; Chu, Y.; Oh, Y. K.; Yang, H. L.; Park, K. R.; Chung, K. S.; Kstar Team,

    2013-01-01

    Selected topics of Plasma-Surface Interaction (PSI) activities in KSTAR are briefly introduced. SOL parameter measurements, particle balance and fuel retention, in-vessel dust research, and finally tungsten R & D are discussed. Some quantitative numbers from the initial phase of the operation ar

  19. Interactions between whey proteins and kaolinite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of the interactions between whey proteins and kaolinite surfaces was investigated by adsorption-desorption experiments at room temperature, performed at the isoelectric point (IEP) of the proteins and at pH 7. It was found that kaolinite is a strong adsorbent for proteins, reaching the maximum adsorption capacity at the IEP of each protein. At pH 7.0, the retention capacity decreased considerably. The adsorption isotherms showed typical Langmuir characteristics. X-ray diffraction data for the protein-kaolinite complexes showed that protein molecules were not intercalated in the mineral structure, but immobilized at the external surfaces and the edges of the kaolinite. Fourier transform IR results indicate the absence of hydrogen bonding between kaolinite surfaces and the polypeptide chain. The adsorption patterns appear to be related to electrostatic interactions, although steric effects should be also considered

  20. A functional glycoprotein competitive recognition and signal amplification strategy for carbohydrate-protein interaction profiling and cell surface carbohydrate expression evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangzhong; Chen, Zhuhai; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong

    2013-07-01

    A simple and sensitive carbohydrate biosensor has been suggested as a potential tool for accurate analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression as well as carbohydrate-based therapeutics for a variety of diseases and infections. In this work, a sensitive biosensor for carbohydrate-lectin profiling and in situ cell surface carbohydrate expression was designed by taking advantage of a functional glycoprotein of glucose oxidase acting as both a multivalent recognition unit and a signal amplification probe. Combining the gold nanoparticle catalyzed luminol electrogenerated chemiluminescence and nanocarrier for active biomolecules, the number of cell surface carbohydrate groups could be conveniently read out. The apparent dissociation constant between GOx@Au probes and Con A was detected to be 1.64 nM and was approximately 5 orders of magnitude smaller than that of mannose and Con A, which would arise from the multivalent effect between the probe and Con A. Both glycoproteins and gold nanoparticles contribute to the high affinity between carbohydrates and lectin. The as-proposed biosensor exhibits excellent analytical performance towards the cytosensing of K562 cells with a detection limit of 18 cells, and the mannose moieties on a single K562 cell were determined to be 1.8 × 1010. The biosensor can also act as a useful tool for antibacterial drug screening and mechanism investigation. This strategy integrates the excellent biocompatibility and multivalent recognition of glycoproteins as well as the significant enzymatic catalysis and gold nanoparticle signal amplification, and avoids the cell pretreatment and labelling process. This would contribute to the glycomic analysis and the understanding of complex native glycan-related biological processes.A simple and sensitive carbohydrate biosensor has been suggested as a potential tool for accurate analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression as well as carbohydrate-based therapeutics for a variety of diseases and

  1. Pipette-surface interaction: current enhancement and intrinsic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Richard W; Zhukov, Alexander; Richards, Owen; Johnson, Nicholas; Ostanin, Victor; Klenerman, David

    2013-01-01

    There is an intrinsic repulsion between glass and cell surfaces that allows noninvasive scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) of cells and which must be overcome in order to form the gigaseals used for patch clamping investigations of ion channels. However, the interactions of surfaces in physiological solutions of electrolytes, including the presence of this repulsion, for example, do not obviously agree with the standard Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) colloid theory accurate at much lower salt concentrations. In this paper we investigate the interactions of glass nanopipettes in this high-salt regime with a variety of surfaces and propose a way to resolve DLVO theory with the results. We demonstrate the utility of this understanding to SICM by topographically mapping a live cell's cytoskeleton. We also report an interesting effect whereby the ion current though a nanopipette can increase under certain conditions upon approaching an insulating surface, rather than decreasing as would be expected. We propose that this is due to electroosmotic flow separation, a high-salt electrokinetic effect. Overall these experiments yield key insights into the fundamental interactions that take place between surfaces in strong solutions of electrolytes. PMID:23210472

  2. Toward stimulated interaction of surface phonon polaritons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, B. D.; Trew, R. J.; Kim, K. W., E-mail: kwk@ncsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7911 (United States)

    2013-12-21

    Thermal emission spectra mediated by surface phonon polariton are examined by using a theoretical model that accounts for generation processes. Specifically, the acoustic phonon fusion mechanism is introduced to remedy theoretical deficiencies of the near thermal equilibrium treatments. The model clarifies the thermal excitation mechanism of surface phonon polaritons and the energy transfer path under non-zero energy flow. When applied to GaAs and SiC semi-infinite surfaces, the nonequilibrium model predicts that the temperature dependence of the quasi-monochromatic peak can exhibit distinctly different characteristics of either sharp increase or slow saturation depending on the materials, which is in direct contrast with the estimate made by the near-equilibrium model. The proposed theoretical tool can accurately analyze the nonequilibrium steady states, potentially paving a pathway to demonstrate stimulated interaction/emission of thermally excited surface phonon polaritons.

  3. On the role of Nb-related sites of an oxidized beta-TiNb alloy surface in its interaction with osteoblast-like MG-63 cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirka, Ivan; Vandrovcová, Marta; Frank, Otakar; Tolde, Z.; Plšek, Jan; Luxbacher, T.; Bačáková, Lucie; Starý, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2013), s. 1636-1645. ISSN 0928-4931 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1858 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : Osteoblast-like MG-63 cell s * beta-TiNb alloy surface * Biocompatibility Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics (FGU-C) Impact factor: 2.736, year: 2013

  4. Surface interactions in TMP process waters

    OpenAIRE

    Tammelin, Tekla

    2006-01-01

    The overall goal of the thesis was to better understand on a molecular level different interactions present in the wet-end of the paper machine that uses thermomechanical (TMP) pulp. The work is divided into three parts: Introduction of the QCM-D technique to papermaking applications (polyelectrolyte adsorption studies) Development of model surfaces for cellulose, lignin and wood extractives for adsorption studies Adsorption studies of dissolved hemicelluloses and colloidal wood extracti...

  5. Atmosphere-surface interactions over polar oceans and heterogeneous surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vihma, T.

    1995-12-31

    Processes of interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the planetary surface have been studied with special emphasis on polar ocean surfaces: the open ocean, leads, polynyas and sea ice. The local exchange of momentum, heat and moisture has been studied experimentally both in the Weddell Sea and in the Greenland Sea. Exchange processes over heterogeneous surfaces are addressed by modelling studies. Over a homogeneous surface, the local turbulent fluxes can be reasonably well estimated using an iterative flux-profile scheme based on the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. In the Greenland Sea, the near-surface air temperature and the generally small turbulent fluxes over the open ocean were affected by the sea surface temperature fronts. Over the sea ice cover in the Weddell Sea, the turbulent sensible heat flux was generally downwards, and together with an upward oceanic heat flux through the ice it compensated the heat loss from the surface via long-wave radiation. The wind dominated on time scales of days, while the current became important on longer time scales. The drift dynamics showed apparent spatial differences between the eastern and western regions, as well as between the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the rest of the Weddell Sea. Inertial motion was present in regions of low ice concentration. The surface heterogeneity, arising e.g. from roughness or temperature distribution, poses a problem for the parameterization of surface exchange processes in large-scale models. In the case of neutral flow over a heterogeneous terrain, an effective roughness length can be used to parameterize the roughness effects

  6. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction - Scrubbing Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity to the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from the community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Green's function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Green's function decreases with increasing source frequency and/or jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Green's function in the absence of the surface, and flight effects are also investigated

  7. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vesel, Alenka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Marinšek, Marjan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona, E-mail: polona.znidarsic@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A very efficient approach for immobilization of cells into microreactors is presented. • It is applicable to various materials, including PFA and cyclic olefin (co)polymers. • It was used to immobilize different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes. • Cells were immobilized on the surface in high density and showed good stability. • Mechanisms of APTES interactions with target materials are proposed. - Abstract: Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor{sup ®} and Topas{sup ®}.

  8. Interaction of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells with a nanoporous titanium surface is sufficient to induce their osteogenic differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schürmann

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenic differentiation of various adult stem cell populations such as neural crest-derived stem cells is of great interest in the context of bone regeneration. Ideally, exogenous differentiation should mimic an endogenous differentiation process, which is partly mediated by topological cues. To elucidate the osteoinductive potential of porous substrates with different pore diameters (30 nm, 100 nm, human neural crest-derived stem cells isolated from the inferior nasal turbinate were cultivated on the surface of nanoporous titanium covered membranes without additional chemical or biological osteoinductive cues. As controls, flat titanium without any topological features and osteogenic medium was used. Cultivation of human neural crest-derived stem cells on 30 nm pores resulted in osteogenic differentiation as demonstrated by alkaline phosphatase activity after seven days as well as by calcium deposition after 3 weeks of cultivation. In contrast, cultivation on flat titanium and on membranes equipped with 100 nm pores was not sufficient to induce osteogenic differentiation. Moreover, we demonstrate an increase of osteogenic transcripts including Osterix, Osteocalcin and up-regulation of Integrin β1 and α2 in the 30 nm pore approach only. Thus, transplantation of stem cells pre-cultivated on nanostructured implants might improve the clinical outcome by support of the graft adherence and acceleration of the regeneration process.

  9. Conformational changes in Sindbis virions resulting from exposure to low pH and interactions with cells suggest that cell penetration may occur at the cell surface in the absence of membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alphaviruses have the ability to induce cell-cell fusion after exposure to acid pH. This observation has served as an article of proof that these membrane-containing viruses infect cells by fusion of the virus membrane with a host cell membrane upon exposure to acid pH after incorporation into a cell endosome. We have investigated the requirements for the induction of virus-mediated, low pH-induced cell-cell fusion and cell-virus fusion. We have correlated the pH requirements for this process to structural changes they produce in the virus by electron cryo-microscopy. We found that exposure to acid pH was required to establish conditions for membrane fusion but that membrane fusion did not occur until return to neutral pH. Electron cryo-microscopy revealed dramatic changes in the structure of the virion as it was moved to acid pH and then returned to neutral pH. None of these treatments resulted in the disassembly of the virus protein icosahedral shell that is a requisite for the process of virus membrane-cell membrane fusion. The appearance of a prominent protruding structure upon exposure to acid pH and its disappearance upon return to neutral pH suggested that the production of a 'pore'-like structure at the fivefold axis may facilitate cell penetration as has been proposed for polio (J. Virol. 74 (2000) 1342) and human rhino virus (Mol. Cell 10 (2002) 317). This transient structural change also provided an explanation for how membrane fusion occurs after return to neutral pH. Examination of virus-cell complexes at neutral pH supported the contention that infection occurs at the cell surface at neutral pH by the production of a virus structure that breaches the plasma membrane bilayer. These data suggest an alternative route of infection for Sindbis virus that occurs by a process that does not involve membrane fusion and does not require disassembly of the virus protein shell

  10. Homophilic Protocadherin Cell-Cell Interactions Promote Dendrite Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molumby, Michael J; Keeler, Austin B; Weiner, Joshua A

    2016-05-01

    Growth of a properly complex dendrite arbor is a key step in neuronal differentiation and a prerequisite for neural circuit formation. Diverse cell surface molecules, such as the clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs), have long been proposed to regulate circuit formation through specific cell-cell interactions. Here, using transgenic and conditional knockout mice to manipulate γ-Pcdh repertoire in the cerebral cortex, we show that the complexity of a neuron's dendritic arbor is determined by homophilic interactions with other cells. Neurons expressing only one of the 22 γ-Pcdhs can exhibit either exuberant or minimal dendrite complexity, depending only on whether surrounding cells express the same isoform. Furthermore, loss of astrocytic γ-Pcdhs, or disruption of astrocyte-neuron homophilic matching, reduces dendrite complexity cell non-autonomously. Our data indicate that γ-Pcdhs act locally to promote dendrite arborization via homophilic matching, and they confirm that connectivity in vivo depends on molecular interactions between neurons and between neurons and astrocytes. PMID:27117416

  11. Homophilic Protocadherin Cell-Cell Interactions Promote Dendrite Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Molumby

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth of a properly complex dendrite arbor is a key step in neuronal differentiation and a prerequisite for neural circuit formation. Diverse cell surface molecules, such as the clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs, have long been proposed to regulate circuit formation through specific cell-cell interactions. Here, using transgenic and conditional knockout mice to manipulate γ-Pcdh repertoire in the cerebral cortex, we show that the complexity of a neuron’s dendritic arbor is determined by homophilic interactions with other cells. Neurons expressing only one of the 22 γ-Pcdhs can exhibit either exuberant or minimal dendrite complexity, depending only on whether surrounding cells express the same isoform. Furthermore, loss of astrocytic γ-Pcdhs, or disruption of astrocyte-neuron homophilic matching, reduces dendrite complexity cell non-autonomously. Our data indicate that γ-Pcdhs act locally to promote dendrite arborization via homophilic matching, and they confirm that connectivity in vivo depends on molecular interactions between neurons and between neurons and astrocytes.

  12. Plasma Surface interaction in Controlled fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subjects presented in the 9th conference on plasma surface interaction in controlled fusion devices were: the modifications of power scrape-off-length and power deposition during various configurations in Tore Supra plasmas; the effects observed in ergodic divertor experiments in Tore-Supra; the diffuse connexion induced by the ergodic divertor and the topology of the heat load patterns on the plasma facing components in Tore-Supra; the study of the influence of air exposure on graphite implanted by low energy high density deuterium plasma

  13. Plasma diagnostics surface analysis and interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Auciello, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Plasmas and their interaction with materials have become subjects of major interest because of their importance in modern forefront technologies such as microelectronics, fusion energy, and space. Plasmas are used in microelectronics to process semiconductors (etching of patterns for microcircuits, plasma-induced deposition of thin films, etc.); plasmas produce deleterious erosion effects on surfaces of materials used for fusion devices and spaceships exposed to the low earth environment.Diagnostics of plasmas and materials exposed to them are fundamental to the understanding of the physical a

  14. Blast wave interaction with a rigid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple model used to investigate blast wave interactions with a rigid surface is presented. The model uses a constant volume energy source analogue to predict pressure histories at gauges located directly above the charge. A series of two-dimensional axi-symmetric CFD calculations were performed, varying the height of the charge relative to the ground. Pressure histories, along with isopycnic plots are presented to evaluate the effects of placing a charge in close proximity to a rigid surface. When a charge is placed near a solid surface the pressure histories experienced at gauges above the charge indicate the presence of two distinct pressure peaks. The first peak is caused by the primary shock and the second peak is a result of the wave reflections from the rigid surface. As the distance from the charge to the wall is increased the magnitude of the second pressure peak is reduced, provided that the distance between the charge and the gauge is maintained constant. The simple model presented is able to capture significant, predictable flow features. (author)

  15. Nanoembossed polymer substrates for biomedical surface interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Christopher A; Martinez, Elena; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Engel, Elisabeth; Funes, Miriam; Moormann, Christian; Wahlbrink, Thorsten; Gomila, Gabriel; Planell, Josep; Samitier, Josep

    2007-12-01

    Biomedical devices are moving towards the incorporation of nanostructures to investigate the interactions of biological species with such topological surfaces found in nature. Good optical transparency and sealing properties, low fabrication cost, fast design realization times, and biocompatibility make polymers excellent candidates for the production of surfaces containing such nanometric structures. In this work, a method for the production of nanostructures in free-standing sheets of different thermoplastic polymers is presented, with a view to using these substrates in biomedical cell-surface applications where optical microscopy techniques are required. The process conditions for the production of these structures in poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(ethylene naphthalate), poly(lactic acid), poly(styrene), and poly(ethyl ether ketone) are given. The fabrication method used is based on a modified nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technique using silicon based moulds, fabricated via reactive ion etching or focused ion beam lithography, to emboss nanostructures into the surface of the biologically compatible thermoplastic polymers. The method presented here is designed to faithfully replicate the nanostructures in the mould while maximising the mould lifetime. Examples of polymer replicas with nanostructures of different topographies are presented in poly(methyl methacrylate), including nanostructures for use in cell-surface interactions and nanostructure-containing microfluidic devices. PMID:18283849

  16. Surface properties and interaction forces of biopolymer-doped conductive polypyrrole surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto, Jani M; Haimi, Suvi P; Siljander, Aliisa S; Miettinen, Susanna S; Tappura, Kirsi M; Higgins, Michael J; Wallace, Gordon G

    2013-05-21

    Surface properties and electrical charges are critical factors elucidating cell interactions on biomaterial surfaces. The surface potential distribution and the nanoscopic and microscopic surface elasticity of organic polypyrrole-hyaluronic acid (PPy-HA) were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in a fluid environment in order to explain the observed enhancement in the attachment of human adipose stem cells on positively charged PPy-HA films. The electrostatic force between the AFM tip and a charged PPy-HA surface, the tip-sample adhesion force, and elastic moduli were estimated from the AFM force curves, and the data were fitted to electrostatic double-layer and elastic contact models. The surface potential of the charged and dried PPy-HA films was assessed with Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), and the KPFM data were correlated to the fluid AFM data. The surface charge distribution and elasticity were both found to correlate well with the nodular morphology of PPy-HA and to be sensitive to the electrochemical charging conditions. Furthermore, a significant change in the adhesion was detected when the surface was electrochemically charged positive. The results highlight the potential of positively charged PPy-HA as a coating material to enhance the stem cell response in tissue-engineering scaffolds. PMID:23621360

  17. Cell-cell interactions promote mammary epithelial cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Mammary epithelium differentiates in a stromal milieu of adipocytes and fibroblasts. To investigate cell-cell interactions that may influence mammary epithelial cell differentiation, we developed a co-culture system of murine mammary epithelium and adipocytes and other fibroblasts. Insofar as caseins are specific molecular markers of mammary epithelial differentiation, rat anti-mouse casein monoclonal antibodies were raised against the three major mouse casein components to study this interac...

  18. The 37/67kDa laminin receptor (LR) inhibitor, NSC47924, affects 37/67kDa LR cell surface localization and interaction with the cellular prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnataro, Daniela; Pepe, Anna; Altamura, Gennaro; De Simone, Imma; Pesapane, Ada; Nitsch, Lucio; Montuori, Nunzia; Lavecchia, Antonio; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The 37/67 kDa laminin receptor (LR) is a non-integrin protein, which binds both laminin-1 of the extracellular matrix and prion proteins, that hold a central role in prion diseases. The 37/67 kDa LR has been identified as interactor for the prion protein (PrPC) and to be required for pathological PrP (PrPSc) propagation in scrapie-infected neuronal cells, leading to the possibility that 37/67 kDa LR-PrPC interaction is related to the pathogenesis of prion diseases. A relationship between 37/67 kDa LR and PrPC in the presence of specific LR inhibitor compounds has not been investigated yet. We have characterized the trafficking of 37/67 kDa LR in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells, finding the receptor on the cell surface and nuclei, and identified the 67 kDa LR as the almost exclusive isoform interacting with PrPC. Here, we show that the treatment with the 37/67 kDa LR inhibitor, NSC47924, affects both the direct 37/67 kDa LR-PrPC interaction in vitro and the formation of the immunocomplex in live cells, inducing a progressive internalization of 37/67 kDa LR and stabilization of PrPC on the cell surface. These data reveal NSC47924 as a useful tool to regulate PrPC and 37/67 kDa LR trafficking and degradation, representing a novel small molecule to be tested against prion diseases. PMID:27071549

  19. Osteoblast cell response to surface-modified carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the interaction of cells with modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for their potential biomedical applications, the MWCNTs were chemically modified with carboxylic acid groups (–COOH), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer and biomimetic apatite on their surfaces. Additionally, human osteoblast MG-63 cells were cultured in the presence of the surface-modified MWCNTs. The metabolic activities of osteoblastic cells, cell proliferation properties, as well as cell morphology were studied. The surface modification of MWCNTs with biomimetic apatite exhibited a significant increase in the cell viability of osteoblasts, up to 67.23%. In the proliferation phases, there were many more cells in the biomimetic apatite-modified MWCNT samples than in the MWCNTs–COOH. There were no obvious changes in cell morphology in osteoblastic MG-63 cells cultured in the presence of these chemically-modified MWCNTs. The surface modification of MWCNTs with apatite achieves an effective enhancement of their biocompatibility.

  20. Interaction of hyperthermia and radiation: the survival surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loshek, D D; Orr, J S; Solomonidis, E

    1977-12-01

    The interaction of hyperthermia and radiation on cell survival is illustrated by the increase in sensitivity to radiation caused by hyperthermia and the increase in sensitivity to hyperthermia caused by radiation. A method of expressing the total response to a combination of these two agents by means of a survival surface in three dimensions is explained and discussed. A simple mathematical model of the suface is formulated in which is a first order interaction term is separated from the two terms representing unperturbed radiation survival and unperturbed hyperthermia survival. An experiment is described in which survival data points were obtained for 77 combinations of radiation and hypertermia doses in the form of a matrix. These data points are plotted as 11 radiation survival curves and seven hyperthermia survival curves. The results are also analysed to give the parameters of the survival surface model. The model with its three components is shown to be a good approximation to the experimental results. PMID:588919

  1. Interactions of Candida albicans with host epithelial surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Williams

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic, fungal pathogen of humans that frequently causes superficial infections of oral and vaginal mucosal surfaces of debilitated and susceptible individuals. The organism is however, commonly encountered as a commensal in healthy individuals where it is a component of the normal microflora. The key determinant in the type of relationship that Candida has with its host is how it interacts with the epithelial surface it colonises. A delicate balance clearly exists between the potentially damaging effects of Candida virulence factors and the nature of the immune response elicited by the host. Frequently, it is changes in host factors that lead to Candida seemingly changing from a commensal to pathogenic existence. However, given the often reported heterogeneity in morphological and biochemical factors that exist between Candida species and indeed strains of C. albicans, it may also be the fact that colonising strains differ in the way they exploit resources to allow persistence at mucosal surfaces and as a consequence this too may affect the way Candida interacts with epithelial cells. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of some of the possible interactions that may occur between C. albicans and host epithelial surfaces that may in turn dictate whether Candida removal, its commensal persistence or infection follows.

  2. Surface Delta Interaction and g factors

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Xiaofei

    2015-01-01

    Using an attractive surface delta interaction we obtain wave functions for 2 neutrons (or neutron holes) in the model space of 2 orbits (l=4, j=7/2) and (l=2, j=5/2). If we take the single particle energies to be degenerate we find that the g factors for I=2, 4 and 6 are all the same -namely the orbital g factor of the single nucleon. For a free neutron this quantity zero all 2particle or 2 hole g factors are equal to zero as well.. Only the orbital part of the g -factors contribute - the spin part cancels out. We then consider the effects of introducing a single energy splititng between the 2 orbits.

  3. Friction Effects in Atom-Surface Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentschura, Ulrich D.

    2016-05-01

    Atom-surface interactions both have a conservative as well as a dissipative component. A treatment of the dissipative terms requires the use of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, and the calculation of the imaginary part of the polarizability of an atom is required. The paper will review the recent resolution of a long-standing question regarding the low-frequency asymptotics of the imaginary part, as summarized in and, together with K. Pachucki, G. Lach and M. De Kieviet. The surprising conclusion is that the precise form of the imaginary part for low driving frequency is dominated by a so-called quantum electrodynamic loop correction, where ``correction'' here is not to be taken literally. The one-loop QED term dominates over the tree-level contribution! The findings drastically alter theoretical predictions for non-contact friction, and blackbody friction (due to the atom's interaction with a bath of thermal photons). The basic principle behind the calculation and the methods of nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics will be discussed. Supported by the NSF (Grant PHY-1403973).

  4. Smooth Muscle Cell Functionality on Collagen Immobilized Polycaprolactone Nanowire Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Leszczak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of smooth muscle cell (SMC proliferation and preservation of a differentiated state are important aspects in the management, avoidance and progression of vascular diseases. An understanding of the interaction between SMCs and the biomaterial involved is essential for a successful implant. In this study, we have developed collagen immobilized nanostructured surfaces with controlled arrays of high aspect ratio nanowires for the growth and maintenance of human aortic SMCs. The nanowire surfaces were fabricated from polycaprolactone and were immobilized with collagen. The objective of this study is to reveal how SMCs interact with collagen immobilized nanostructures. The results indicate significantly higher cellular adhesion on nanostructured and collagen immobilized surfaces; however, SMCs on nanostructured surfaces exhibit a more elongated phenotype. The reduction of MTT was significantly lower on nanowire (NW and collagen immobilized NW (colNW surfaces, suggesting that SMCs on nanostructured surfaces may be differentiated and slowly dividing. Scanning electron microscopy results reveal that SMCs on nanostructured surfaces are more elongated and that cells are interacting with the nano-features on the surface. After providing differentiation cues, heavy chain myosin and calponin, specific to a contractile SMC phenotype, are upregulated on collagen immobilized surfaces. These results suggest that nanotopography affects cell adhesion, proliferation, as well as cell elongation, while collagen immobilized surfaces greatly affect cell differentiation.

  5. Nonlinear Interaction of Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Thomsen, Kenneth

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction of externally excited convective cells was investigated experimentally. Two cells of the same polarity were observed to coalesce into one large cell provided their relative distance was sufficiently short. The nonlinear nature of the interaction was explicitly demonstrat...

  6. FABRICATION AND BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF CELL OUTER MEMBRANE MIMETIC SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-ming Zong; Yong-kuan Gong

    2011-01-01

    The surface design used for improving biocompatibility is one of the most important issues for the fabrication of medical devices. For mimicking the ideal surface structure of cell outer membrane, a large number of polymers bearing phosphorylcholine (PC) groups have been employed to modify the surfaces of biomaterials and medical devices. It has been demonstrated that the biocompatibility of the modified materials whose surface is required to interact with a living organism has been obviously improved by introducing PC groups. In this review, the fabrication strategies of cell outer membrane mimetic surfaces and their resulted biocompatibilities were summarized.

  7. Nonlinear Interaction of Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Thomsen, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction of externally excited convective cells was investigated experimentally. Two cells of the same polarity coalesced into one large cell provided their relative distance was sufficiently short, while cells of opposite polarity interacted through a mutual perturbation of orbi...... only. The nonlinear nature of the coalescence was explicitly demonstrated. The implications of the observations for interpreting the cascade in a turbulent spectrum in two-dimensional systems are pointed out....

  8. Surface interactions in a cold plasma atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of pyrocoating on conmercial grade graphite in a cold plasma atmosphere of argon and propylene mixtures was investigated. The experiments were performed in an evacuated glass tube at low pressure (6 Hz), and in some experiments by micro-wave frequency irradiation (2.45x106 Hz) through an external antenna that was located around the middle of the tube. The research was performed in four complementary directions: (a) Characterization of the plasma. The effect of various experimental parameters on the composition of the plasma was investigated; the density of the positive ions; the temperature of the electrons. The following parameters were investigated: the concentration of the hydrocarbon in the feed mixture; the total gas pressure in the tube; the induced power; the location of the sampling position in relation to the location of the antenna and the direction of the gas flow. (b) Measurements of the deposition rate as a function of the concentration of the propylene in the feed mixture and of the total gas pressure in the tube. (c) Characterization of the coating. The characterization included structure and morphology analysis, and measurements of microporosity, composition, optical anisotropy and density. (d) Development of a theoretical model of the deposition process which is based on the plasma-surface interactions, and relates the characteristics of the plasma to those of the deposited coating. The values for the composition of the coating and its rate of deposition that were calculated using the model agree well with those that were measured experimentally

  9. Fluid dynamics and noise in bacterial cell-cell and cell-surface scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Drescher, Knut; Cisneros, Luis H; Ganguly, Sujoy; Goldstein, Raymond E; 10.1073/pnas.1019079108

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial processes ranging from gene expression to motility and biofilm formation are constantly challenged by internal and external noise. While the importance of stochastic fluctuations has been appreciated for chemotaxis, it is currently believed that deterministic long-range fluid dynamical effects govern cell-cell and cell-surface scattering - the elementary events that lead to swarming and collective swimming in active suspensions and to the formation of biofilms. Here, we report the first direct measurements of the bacterial flow field generated by individual swimming Escherichia coli both far from and near to a solid surface. These experiments allowed us to examine the relative importance of fluid dynamics and rotational diffusion for bacteria. For cell-cell interactions it is shown that thermal and intrinsic stochasticity drown the effects of long-range fluid dynamics, implying that physical interactions between bacteria are determined by steric collisions and near-field lubrication forces. This dom...

  10. Cell Surface Sensors: Lightning the Cellular Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Md Monsur; Kang, Dong-Ku; Tsang, Kyle; Fu, Moyu; Karp, Jeffrey M; Zhao, Weian

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface sensors are powerful tools to elucidate cell functions including cell signaling, metabolism and cell-to-cell communication. These sensors not only facilitate our understanding in basic biology but also advance the development of effective therapeutics and diagnostics. While genetically encoded fluorescent protein/peptide sensors have been most popular, emerging cell surface sensor systems including polymer-, nanoparticle-, and nucleic acid aptamer-based sensors have largely expan...

  11. Cells behaviors and genotoxicity on topological surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, N.; Yang, M.K.; Bi, S.X. [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Fiber Modification and Functional Fiber, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin, 300387 (China); Chen, L., E-mail: chenlis@tjpu.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Fiber Modification and Functional Fiber, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin, 300387 (China); Zhu, Z.Y.; Gao, Y.T.; Du, Z. [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Artificial Cell, Tianjin Third Central Hospital, Tianjin, 300170 (China)

    2013-08-01

    To investigate different cells behaviors and genotoxicity, which were driven by specific microenvironments, three patterned surfaces (pillars, wide grooves and narrow grooves) and one smooth surface were prepared by template-based technique. Vinculin is a membrane-cytoskeletal protein in focal adhesion plaques and associates with cell–cell and cell–matrix junctions, which can promote cell adhesion and spreading. The immunofluorescence staining of vinculin revealed that the narrow grooves patterned substrate was favorable for L929 cell adhesion. For cell multiplication, the narrow grooves surface was fitted for the proliferation of L929, L02 and MSC cells, the pillars surface was only in favor of L929 cells to proliferate during 7 days of cell cultivation. Cell genetic toxicity was evaluated by cellular micronuclei test (MNT). The results indicated that topological surfaces were more suitable for L929 cells to proliferate and maintain the stability of genome. On the contrary, the narrow grooves surface induced higher micronuclei ratio of L02 and MSC cells than other surfaces. With the comprehensive results of cell multiplication and MNT, it was concluded that the wide grooves surface was best fitted for L02 cells to proliferate and have less DNA damages, and the smooth surface was optimum for the research of MSC cells in vitro. - Highlights: • Different cells behaviors on microstructure surfaces were discussed in this paper. • The expression of cell protein of Vinculin was studied in this research. • Cellular micronuclei test was applied to evaluate cells' genotoxicity. • Cell genotoxicity was first studied in the research field of topological surfaces.

  12. Cells behaviors and genotoxicity on topological surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate different cells behaviors and genotoxicity, which were driven by specific microenvironments, three patterned surfaces (pillars, wide grooves and narrow grooves) and one smooth surface were prepared by template-based technique. Vinculin is a membrane-cytoskeletal protein in focal adhesion plaques and associates with cell–cell and cell–matrix junctions, which can promote cell adhesion and spreading. The immunofluorescence staining of vinculin revealed that the narrow grooves patterned substrate was favorable for L929 cell adhesion. For cell multiplication, the narrow grooves surface was fitted for the proliferation of L929, L02 and MSC cells, the pillars surface was only in favor of L929 cells to proliferate during 7 days of cell cultivation. Cell genetic toxicity was evaluated by cellular micronuclei test (MNT). The results indicated that topological surfaces were more suitable for L929 cells to proliferate and maintain the stability of genome. On the contrary, the narrow grooves surface induced higher micronuclei ratio of L02 and MSC cells than other surfaces. With the comprehensive results of cell multiplication and MNT, it was concluded that the wide grooves surface was best fitted for L02 cells to proliferate and have less DNA damages, and the smooth surface was optimum for the research of MSC cells in vitro. - Highlights: • Different cells behaviors on microstructure surfaces were discussed in this paper. • The expression of cell protein of Vinculin was studied in this research. • Cellular micronuclei test was applied to evaluate cells' genotoxicity. • Cell genotoxicity was first studied in the research field of topological surfaces

  13. Surface delta interaction and properties of medium mass nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea of Surface Delta Interaction (SDI) is that because of Pauli principle, the interaction between nucleons is peaked near the surface of the nucleus. The delta potential is short ranged like free NN interaction. It has some interesting properties which makes it a quite 'realistic' interaction, to use. SDI gives matrix elements which are quite close to empirical matrix elements found from shell model studies. Also this interaction reproduces deformation properties quite well in complex nuclei. Comparison of SDI matrix elements with two modern interactions, namely, JUN45 and G-f5pg9 interaction has been made and report some applications to finite nuclei

  14. Interactions between semiconductor nanowires and living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiconductor nanowires are increasingly used for biological applications and their small dimensions make them a promising tool for sensing and manipulating cells with minimal perturbation. In order to interface cells with nanowires in a controlled fashion, it is essential to understand the interactions between nanowires and living cells. The present paper reviews current progress in the understanding of these interactions, with knowledge gathered from studies where living cells were interfaced with vertical nanowire arrays. The effect of nanowires on cells is reported in terms of viability, cell–nanowire interface morphology, cell behavior, changes in gene expression as well as cellular stress markers. Unexplored issues and unanswered questions are discussed. (topical review)

  15. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27408707

  16. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27408707

  17. CD229 (Ly9) lymphocyte cell surface receptor interacts homophilically through its N-terminal domain and relocalizes to the immunological synapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romero, [No Value; Zapater, N; Calvo, M; Kalko, SG; de la Fuente, MA; Tovar, [No Value; Ockeloen, C; Pizcueta, P; Engel, P

    2005-01-01

    CD229 is a member of the CD150 family of the Ig superfamily expressed on T and B cells. Receptors of this family regulate cytokine production and cytotoxicity of lymphocytes and NK cells. The cytoplasmic tail of CD229 binds to SAP, a protein that is defective in X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome

  18. INTERACTION OF SIMILARLY CHARGED SURFACES MEDIATED BY NANOPARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Klemen Bohinc; Leo Lue

    2011-01-01

    We study the interaction between two like charged surfaces embedded in a solution of oppositely charged multivalent rod-like counterions. The counterions consist of two rigidly bonded point charges, each of valency Z. The strength of the electrostatic coupling increases with increasing surface charge density or valency of the charges. The system is analyzed by employing a self-consistent field theory, which treats the short and long range interactions of the counterions within different approximations. We find that in the weak coupling limit, the interactions are only repulsive. In the intermediate coupling regime, the multivalent rod-like counterions can mediate attractive interactions between the surfaces.For sufficiently long rods, bridging contributes to the attractive interaction. In the strong coupling limit, the charge correlations can contribute to the attractive interactions at short separations between the charged surfaces. Two minima can then appear in the force curve between surfaces.

  19. Role of surface temperature in fluorocarbon plasma-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Caleb T.; Overzet, Lawrence J.; Goeckner, Matthew J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, PO Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    This article examines plasma-surface reaction channels and the effect of surface temperature on the magnitude of those channels. Neutral species CF{sub 4}, C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, and C{sub 3}F{sub 8} are produced on surfaces. The magnitude of the production channel increases with surface temperature for all species, but favors higher mass species as the temperature is elevated. Additionally, the production rate of CF{sub 2} increases by a factor of 5 as the surface temperature is raised from 25 Degree-Sign C to 200 Degree-Sign C. Fluorine density, on the other hand, does not change as a function of either surface temperature or position outside of the plasma glow. This indicates that fluorine addition in the gas-phase is not a dominant reaction. Heating reactors can result in higher densities of depositing radical species, resulting in increased deposition rates on cooled substrates. Finally, the sticking probability of the depositing free radical species does not change as a function of surface temperature. Instead, the surface temperature acts together with an etchant species (possibly fluorine) to elevate desorption rates on that surface at temperatures lower than those required for unassisted thermal desorption.

  20. Role of surface temperature in fluorocarbon plasma-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article examines plasma-surface reaction channels and the effect of surface temperature on the magnitude of those channels. Neutral species CF4, C2F6, and C3F8 are produced on surfaces. The magnitude of the production channel increases with surface temperature for all species, but favors higher mass species as the temperature is elevated. Additionally, the production rate of CF2 increases by a factor of 5 as the surface temperature is raised from 25 °C to 200 °C. Fluorine density, on the other hand, does not change as a function of either surface temperature or position outside of the plasma glow. This indicates that fluorine addition in the gas-phase is not a dominant reaction. Heating reactors can result in higher densities of depositing radical species, resulting in increased deposition rates on cooled substrates. Finally, the sticking probability of the depositing free radical species does not change as a function of surface temperature. Instead, the surface temperature acts together with an etchant species (possibly fluorine) to elevate desorption rates on that surface at temperatures lower than those required for unassisted thermal desorption.

  1. Probe microscopy: Scanning below the cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ozgur

    2008-08-01

    Conventional atomic force microscopy probes only the surface of specimens. A related technique called scanning near-field ultrasonic holography can now image nanoparticles buried below the surfaces of cells, which could prove useful in nanotoxicology.

  2. Interaction between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and B-Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Linxiao; Hu, Chenxia; Chen, Jiajia; Cen, Panpan; Wang, Jie; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent; non-hematopoietic stem cells. Because of their immunoregulatory abilities; MSCs are widely used for different clinical applications. Compared with that of other immune cells; the investigation of how MSCs specifically regulate B-cells has been superficial and insufficient. In addition; the few experimental studies on this regulation are often contradictory. In this review; we summarize the various interactions between different types or states of MSCs and B-cells; address how different types of MSCs and B-cells affect this interaction and examine how other immune cells influence the regulation of B-cells by MSCs. Finally; we hypothesize why there are conflicting results on the interaction between MSCs and B-cells in the literature. PMID:27164080

  3. Anomalous interaction of ultracold neutrons with beryllium trap surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependence of the cross section of ultracold neutron interaction with Be is experimentally investigated. A difference in the cross section of neutron interaction with Be on the surface and inside the substance, making up about 0.9 b is obtained. The respective value of loss factor makes up 3 x 10-5 per a single reflection from the surface

  4. The pancreatic beta cell surface proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Stützer, I.; Esterházy, D.; Stoffel, M.

    2012-01-01

    The pancreatic beta cell is responsible for maintaining normoglycaemia by secreting an appropriate amount of insulin according to blood glucose levels. The accurate sensing of the beta cell extracellular environment is therefore crucial to this endocrine function and is transmitted via its cell surface proteome. Various surface proteins that mediate or affect beta cell endocrine function have been identified, including growth factor and cytokine receptors, transporters, ion channels and prote...

  5. Cell Docking, Movement and Cell-Cell Interactions of Heterogeneous Cell Suspensions in a Cell Manipulation Microdevice

    OpenAIRE

    Long-Sun Huang; Yu-Hung Wang; Yu-Wei Chung; Fei-Lung Lai; Shiaw-Min Hwang

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel cell manipulation microdevice for cell docking, culturing, cell-cell contact and interaction by microfluidic manipulation of heterogeneous cell suspensions. Heterogeneous cell suspensions include disparate blood cells of natural killer cells and leukemia cancer cells for immune cell transplantation therapy. However, NK cell alloreactivity from different healthy donors present various recovery response levels. Little is still known about the interactions and cyt...

  6. Colloidal Electrostatic Interactions Near a Conducting Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Polin, Marco; Grier, David G.; Han, Yilong

    2006-01-01

    Charge-stabilized colloidal spheres dispersed in deionized water are supposed to repel each other. Instead, artifact-corrected video microscopy measurements reveal an anomalous long-ranged like-charge attraction in the interparticle pair potential when the spheres are confined to a layer by even a single charged glass surface. These attractions can be masked by electrostatic repulsions at low ionic strengths. Coating the bounding surfaces with a conducting gold layer suppresses the attraction...

  7. The interaction of water and hydrogen with nickel surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Shan, Junjun

    2009-01-01

    As nickel and platinum are in the same group of the periodic table, the Ni(111) and Pt(111) surfaces may be expected to show similar interaction with water and hydrogen. However in this thesis, we show these interactions for Ni(111) are quite different from those of Pt(111). Moreover, our results show that the Ni(111) surface is a unique surface with regards to its chemistry of water and hydrogen.

  8. The cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderley de Souza

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell surface of trypanosomatids is formed by the plasma membrane and a layer of sub-pellicular microtubules which are connected to the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is composed by proteins, lipids and carbohydrates which form the glycocalix. In this paper we will review briefly aspects related to the organization of the cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi.

  9. The cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Wanderley de Souza; Thais Souto-Padrón

    1984-01-01

    The cell surface of trypanosomatids is formed by the plasma membrane and a layer of sub-pellicular microtubules which are connected to the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is composed by proteins, lipids and carbohydrates which form the glycocalix. In this paper we will review briefly aspects related to the organization of the cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi.

  10. Background Oriented Schlieren Implementation in a Jet-Surface Interaction Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Brown, Clifford A.; Fagan, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Many current and future aircraft designs rely on the wing or other aircraft surfaces to shield the engine noise from observers on the ground. However the available data regarding how a planar surface interacts with a jet to shield and/or enhance the jet noise are currently limited. Therefore, the Jet-Surface Interaction Tests supported by NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program's Fixed Wing Project were undertaken to supply experimental data covering a wide range of surface geometries and positions interacting with high-speed jet flows in order to support the development of noise prediction methods. Phase 1 of the Test was conducted in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory at NASA Glenn Research Center and consisted of validating noise prediction schemes for a round nozzle interacting with a planar surface. Phased array data and far-field acoustic data were collected for both the shielded and reflected sides of the surface. Phase 1 results showed that the broadband shock noise was greatly reduced by the surface when the jet was operated at the over-expanded condition, however, it was unclear whether this reduction was due a change in the shock cell structure by the surface. In the present study, Background Oriented Schlieren is implemented in Phase 2 of the Jet-Surface Interaction Tests to investigate whether the planar surface interacts with the high-speed jet ow to change the shock cell structure. Background Oriented Schlieren data are acquired for under-expanded, ideally-expanded, and over-expanded ow regimes for multiple axial and radial positions of the surface at three different plate lengths. These data are analyzed with far-field noise measurements to relate the shock cell structure to the broadband shock noise produced by a jet near a surface.

  11. Radioimmunoassay to quantitatively measure cell surface immunoglobulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay techniques developed to quantitatively measure the presence of immunoglobulins on the surface of cells, is described. The amount of immunoglobulins found on different tumor cells varied from 200 to 1140 ng/106 cells. Determination of immunoglobulins on the peripheral lymphocytes obtained from different cancer patients varied between 340 to 1040 ng/106 cells. Cultured tumor cells, on the other hand, were found to contain negligible quantities of human IgG

  12. Interaction of alcohols with the calcite surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovet, Nicolas Emile; Yang, Mingjun; Javadi, Meshkat Sadat;

    2015-01-01

    A clearer understanding of calcite interactions with organic molecules would contribute to a range of fields including harnessing the secrets of biomineralisation where organisms produce hard parts, increasing oil production from spent reservoirs, remediating contaminated soils and drinking water...... aquifers and improving manufacturing methods for industrial products such as pigments, soft abrasives, building materials and optical devices. Biomineralisation by some species of blue green algae produces beautifully elaborate platelets of calcite where the individual crystals are of nanometer scale...

  13. Interactions between bacterial surfaces and milk proteins, impact on food emulsions stability

    OpenAIRE

    Ly, M. H.; Aguedo, Mario; Goudot, S.; Le, M. L.; Cayot, P.; Teixeira, J.A.; Le, T.M.; Belin, J.-M.; Waché, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria possess physicochemical surface properties such as hydrophobicity, Lewis acid/base and charge which are involved in physicochemical interactions between cells and interfaces. Moreover, food matrices are complex and heterogeneous media, with a microstructure depending on interactions between the components in media (van der Waals, electrostatic or structural forces, etc.). Despite the presence of bacteria in fermented products, few works have investigated how bacteria interact with ot...

  14. Interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert Hendrik

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in tumor biology have revealed that a detailed analysis of the complex interactions of tumor cells with their adjacent microenvironment (tumor stroma is mandatory in order to understand the various mechanisms involved in tumor growth and the development of metastasis. The mutual interactions between tumor cells and cellular and non-cellular components (extracellular matrix = ECM of the tumor microenvironment will eventually lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and promote tumor development and progression. Thus, interactions of genetically altered tumor cells and the ECM on the one hand and reactive non-neoplastic cells on the other hand essentially control most aspects of tumorigenesis such as epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT, migration, invasion (i.e. migration through connective tissue, metastasis formation, neovascularisation, apoptosis and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. In this mini-review we will focus on these issues that were recently raised by two review articles in CCS.

  15. Biosorption of uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and surface interactions under culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Yan, Xiuying; Zeng, Wenming; Hou, Liangyu; Pang, Xiaofeng

    2010-11-01

    Few studies have focused on biosorption by microorganisms under culture conditions. To explore the biosorption of uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under culture conditions, the S. cerevisiae growth curve, biosorption capacity and surface interaction under batch culture conditions were investigated in this study. The growth curve showed that uranium (yeast cell surfaces, as well as culture medium, and produced uranium precipitate on cell surfaces. Fourier transformed infrared spectra revealed that cell walls were the major sorption sites, and -O--H, -C==O and -PO(2-) contributed to the major binding groups. PMID:20599379

  16. Adhesion defective BHK cell mutant has cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan of altered properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Austria, R; Woods, A; Hughes, R C

    1988-01-01

    In the light of accumulating data that implicate cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with a role in cell interactions with extracellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin, we have compared the properties of these molecules in wild-type BHK cells and an adhesion-defective ricin......-resistant mutant (RicR14). Our results showed that the mutant, unlike BHK cells, cannot form focal adhesions when adherent to planar substrates in the presence of serum. Furthermore, while both cell lines possess similar amounts of cell surface HSPG with hydrophobic properties, that of RicR14 cells had decreased...... sulfation, reduced affinity for fibronectin and decreased half-life on the cell surface when compared to the normal counterpart. Our conclusions based on this data are that these altered properties may, in part, account for the adhesion defect in the ricin-resistant mutant. Whether this results from the...

  17. Nanostructuring of Solar Cell Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Solar energy is by far the most abundant renewable energy source available, but the levelized cost of solar energy is still not competitive with that of fossil fuels. Therefore there is a need to improve the power conversion effciency of solar cells without adding to the production cost. The main...... objective of this PhD thesis is to develop nanostructured silicon (Si) solar cells with higher power conversion efficiency using only scalable and cost-efficient production methods. The nanostructures, known as 'black silicon', are fabricated by single-step, maskless reactive ion etching and used as front...... and characterized for comparison. Power conversion eciency of 16.5% was obtained for this batch of RIE-textured Si solar cells. The eciency of the KOH-textured reference cell was 17.8%. Quantum Efficiency measurements and carrier loss analysis show that the lower eciency of the RIE-textured cells is primarily due...

  18. Interaction of Vortices with a progressive Surface Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LinlinWANG; HuiyangMA

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of submerged vortices with a progressive surface wave is investigated by the finite-difference numerical solution of Navier-Stokes equations.The progressive wave is the surface gravity water wave in a finite depth.The initial vortex model is Oseen vortex.The numerical computations show that a special pattern of the wave surface may be observed by the interaction from the submerged vortices.The influences of Froude number,the initial geometric configuration of vortices,and the amplitude,inital phase of surface wave on the wave pattern are discussed.

  19. Electroreflectance and the problem of studying plasma-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A long standing problem in low-temperature plasma discharge physics is to understand in detail the mutual interaction of real exposed surfaces (electrodes) with the reactive plasma environment. In particular, one wishes to discern the influence of these surfaces on the plasma parameters given their contributions from secondary electrons and ions. This paper briefly reviews the known surface interaction processes as well as currently available diagnostics to study the interface between plasmas and surfaces. Next comes a discussion describing the application of plasma-modulated electroreflectance to this research and some potential experimental techniques

  20. Interaction of Stellate Cells with Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by its late detection, aggressive growth, intense infiltration into adjacent tissue, early metastasis, resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy and a strong “desmoplastic reaction”. The dense stroma surrounding carcinoma cells is composed of fibroblasts, activated stellate cells (myofibroblast-like cells), various inflammatory cells, proliferating vascular structures, collagens and fibronectin. In particular the cellular components of the stroma produce the tumor microenvironment, which plays a critical role in tumor growth, invasion, spreading, metastasis, angiogenesis, inhibition of anoikis, and chemoresistance. Fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and activated stellate cells produce the extracellular matrix components and are thought to interact actively with tumor cells, thereby promoting cancer progression. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the role of pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) in the desmoplastic response of pancreas cancer and the effects of PSC on tumor progression, metastasis and drug resistance. Finally we present some novel ideas for tumor therapy by interfering with the cancer cell-host interaction

  1. Cell behaviour on chemically microstructured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnani, Agnese; Priamo, Alfredo; Pasqui, Daniela; Barbucci, Rolando

    2003-03-03

    Micropatterned surfaces with different chemical topographies were synthesised in order to investigate the influence of surface chemistry and topography on cell behaviour. The microstructured materials were synthesised by photoimmobilising natural Hyaluronan (Hyal) and its sulphated derivative (HyalS), both adequately functionalised with a photorective moiety, on glass substrates. Four different grating patterns (10, 25, 50 and 100 {mu}m) were used to pattern the hyaluronan. The micropatterned samples were analysed by Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy to investigate the chemistry and the topography of the surfaces. The spectroscopic and microscopic analysis of the microstructured surfaces revealed that the photoimmobilisation process was successful, demonstrating that the photomask patterns were well reproduced on the sample surface. The influence of chemical topographies on the cell behaviour was then analysed. Human and 3T3 fibroblasts, bovine aortic and human (HGTFN line) endothelial cells were used and their behaviour on the micropatterned surfaces was analysed in terms of adhesion, proliferation, locomotion and orientation. Both chemical and topographical controls were found to be important for cell guidance. By decreasing the stripe dimensions, a more fusiform shape of cell was observed. At the same time, the cell locomotion and orientation parallel to the structure increased. However, differences in cell behaviour were detected according to both cell type and micropattern dimensions.

  2. Interaction of peptides with cell membranes: insights from molecular modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of the interaction of peptides with cell membranes is the focus of active research. It can enhance the understanding of basic membrane functions such as membrane transport, fusion, and signaling processes, and it may shed light on potential applications of peptides in biomedicine. In this review, we will present current advances in computational studies on the interaction of different types of peptides with the cell membrane. Depending on the properties of the peptide, membrane, and external environment, the peptide–membrane interaction shows a variety of different forms. Here, on the basis of recent computational progress, we will discuss how different peptides could initiate membrane pores, translocate across the membrane, induce membrane endocytosis, produce membrane curvature, form fibrils on the membrane surface, as well as interact with functional membrane proteins. Finally, we will present a conclusion summarizing recent progress and providing some specific insights into future developments in this field. (topical review)

  3. Molecular Dynamics for Low Temperature Plasma-Surface Interaction Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Graves, David B.; Brault, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of physical and chemical interactions of low temperature plasmas with surfaces can be fruitfully explored using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. MD simulations follow the detailed motion of sets of interacting atoms through integration of atomic equations of motion, using inter-atomic potentials that can account for bond breaking and formation that result when energetic species from the plasma impact surfaces. This article summarizes the current status of the technique for ...

  4. Interactions of germanium atoms with silica surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Scott K.; Coffee, Shawn S.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2005-11-01

    GeH 4 is thermally cracked over a hot filament depositing 0.7-15 ML Ge onto 2-7 nm SiO 2/Si(1 0 0) at substrate temperatures of 300-970 K. Ge bonding changes are analyzed during annealing with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ge, GeH x, GeO, and GeO 2 desorption is monitored through temperature programmed desorption in the temperature range 300-1000 K. Low temperature desorption features are attributed to GeO and GeH 4. No GeO 2 desorption is observed, but GeO 2 decomposition to Ge through high temperature pathways is seen above 750 K. Germanium oxidization results from Ge etching of the oxide substrate. With these results, explanations for the failure of conventional chemical vapor deposition to produce Ge nanocrystals on SiO 2 surfaces are proposed.

  5. Investigation of the ion beryllium surface interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guseva, M.I.; Birukov, A.Yu.; Gureev, V.M. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The self -sputtering yield of the Be was measured. The energy dependence of the Be self-sputtering yield agrees well with that calculated by W. Eckstein et. al. Below 770 K the self-sputtering yield is temperature independent; at T{sub irr}.> 870 K it increases sharply. Hot-pressed samples at 370 K were implanted with monoenergetic 5 keV hydrogen ions and with a stationary plasma (flux power {approximately} 5 MW/m{sup 2}). The investigation of hydrogen behavior in beryllium shows that at low doses hydrogen is solved, but at doses {ge} 5x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} the bubbles and channels are formed. It results in hydrogen profile shift to the surface and decrease of its concentration. The sputtering results in further concentration decrease at doses > 10{sup 25}m{sup -2}.

  6. Interactions of germanium atoms with silica surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GeH4 is thermally cracked over a hot filament depositing 0.7-15 ML Ge onto 2-7 nm SiO2/Si(1 0 0) at substrate temperatures of 300-970 K. Ge bonding changes are analyzed during annealing with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ge, GeH x, GeO, and GeO2 desorption is monitored through temperature programmed desorption in the temperature range 300-1000 K. Low temperature desorption features are attributed to GeO and GeH4. No GeO2 desorption is observed, but GeO2 decomposition to Ge through high temperature pathways is seen above 750 K. Germanium oxidization results from Ge etching of the oxide substrate. With these results, explanations for the failure of conventional chemical vapor deposition to produce Ge nanocrystals on SiO2 surfaces are proposed

  7. Surface strategies for control of neuronal cell adhesion: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, P.; Parker, T.; Gadegaard, N.; Alexander, M. R.

    2010-06-01

    Material engineering methods have been used for many years to develop biomedical devices for use within the body to augment, repair or replace damaged tissues ranging from contact lenses to heart valves. Here we review the findings gathered from the wide and varied surface analytical approaches applied to study the interaction between biology and man-made materials. The key material characteristics identified to be important for biological recognition are surface chemistry, topography and compliance. Model surfaces with controlled chemistry and topography have provided insight into biological response to various types of topographical features over a wide range of length scales from nano to micrometres, along with 3D matrices that have been used as scaffolds to support cells for tissue formation. The cellular response to surfaces with localised areas of patterned chemistry and to those presenting gradually changing chemistry are discussed. Where previous reviews have been structured around specific classes of surface modification, e.g. self-assembly, or have broadly examined the response of various cells to numerous surfaces, we aim in this article to focus in particular on the tissues involved in the nervous system whilst providing a broad overview of key issues from the field of cell and protein surface interactions with surfaces. The goal of repair and treatment of diseases related to the central and peripheral nervous systems rely on understanding the local interfacial environment and controlling responses at the cellular level. The role of the protein layer deposited from serum containing media onto man-made surfaces is discussed. We highlight the particular problems associated with the repair of the nervous system, and review how neuronal attachment and axon guidance can be accomplished using various surface cues when cultured with single and multiple cell types. We include a brief glossary of techniques discussed in the body of this article aimed at the

  8. Plasma–Surface Interactions Under High Heat and Particle Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory De Temmerman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasma-surface interactions expected in the divertor of a future fusion reactor are characterized by extreme heat and particle fluxes interacting with the plasma-facing surfaces. Powerful linear plasma generators are used to reproduce the expected plasma conditions and allow plasma-surface interactions studies under those very harsh conditions. While the ion energies on the divertor surfaces of a fusion device are comparable to those used in various plasma-assited deposition and etching techniques, the ion (and energy fluxes are up to four orders of magnitude higher. This large upscale in particle flux maintains the surface under highly non-equilibrium conditions and bring new effects to light, some of which will be described in this paper.

  9. Linear response theory of activated surface diffusion with interacting adsorbates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Activated surface diffusion with interacting adsorbates is analyzed within the Linear Response Theory framework. The so-called interacting single adsorbate model is justified by means of a two-bath model, where one harmonic bath takes into account the interaction with the surface phonons, while the other one describes the surface coverage, this leading to defining a collisional friction. Here, the corresponding theory is applied to simple systems, such as diffusion on flat surfaces and the frustrated translational motion in a harmonic potential. Classical and quantum closed formulas are obtained. Furthermore, a more realistic problem, such as atomic Na diffusion on the corrugated Cu(0 0 1) surface, is presented and discussed within the classical context as well as within the framework of Kramer's theory. Quantum corrections to the classical results are also analyzed and discussed. - Abstract: Activated surface diffusion with interacting adsorbates is analyzed within the Linear Response Theory framework. The so-called interacting single adsorbate model is justified by means of a two-bath model, where one harmonic bath takes into account the interaction with the surface phonons, while the other one describes the surface coverage, this leading to defining a collisional friction. Here, the corresponding theory is applied to simple systems, such as diffusion on flat surfaces and the frustrated translational motion in a harmonic potential. Classical and quantum closed formulas are obtained. Furthermore, a more realistic problem, such as atomic Na diffusion on the corrugated Cu(0 0 1) surface, is presented and discussed within the classical context as well as within the framework of Kramer's theory. Quantum corrections to the classical results are also analyzed and discussed.

  10. VIGO: Instrumental Interaction in Multi-Surface Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted; Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel

    This paper addresses interaction in multi-surface environments and questions whether the current application-centric approaches to user interfaces are adequate in this context, and presents an alternative approach based on instrumental interaction. The paper presents the VIGO (Views, Instruments,...

  11. The interaction of water and hydrogen with nickel surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Junjun

    2009-01-01

    As nickel and platinum are in the same group of the periodic table, the Ni(111) and Pt(111) surfaces may be expected to show similar interaction with water and hydrogen. However in this thesis, we show these interactions for Ni(111) are quite different from those of Pt(111). Moreover, our results sh

  12. Mimicking the inflammatory cell adhesion cascade by nucleic acid aptamer programmed cell-cell interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Weian; Loh, Weili; Droujinine, Ilia A.; Teo, Weisuong; Kumar, Namit; Schafer, Sebastian; Cui, Cheryl H.; Zhang, Liang; Sarkar, Debanjan; Karnik, Rohit; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Nature has evolved effective cell adhesion mechanisms to deliver inflammatory cells to inflamed tissue; however, many culture-expanded therapeutic cells are incapable of targeting diseased tissues following systemic infusion, which represents a great challenge in cell therapy. Our aim was to develop simple approaches to program cell-cell interactions that would otherwise not exist toward cell targeting and understanding the complex biology of cell-cell interactions. We employed a chemistry ap...

  13. High vacuum cells for classical surface techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel glass cells were designed and built to be able to perform surface potential and surface tension measurements in a contained environment. The cells can withstand pressures of approximately 1x10-6 Torr, providing a reasonable level of control in terms of the amounts of volatile contaminants during experimentation. The measurements can take several hours; thus the cells help maintain the integrity of the sample in the course of the experiment. To test for the feasibility of the cell design, calibration measurements were performed. For the surface potential cell, the modified TREK 6000B-7C probe exhibited performance comparable to its unmodified counterpart. The correlation measurements between applied potential on the test surface and the measured potential showed R-values very close to 1 as well as standard deviation values of less than 1. Results also demonstrate improved measurement values for experiments performed in vacuum. The surface tension cell, on the other hand, which was used to perform the pendant drop method, was tested on common liquids and showed percentage errors of 0.5% when compared to literature values. The fabricated cells redefine measurements using classical surface techniques, providing unique and novel methods of sample preparation, premeasurement preparation, and sample analysis at highly beneficial expenditure cost.

  14. Surface interactions in a reverse field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principle findings of the investigations were: (1) mechanical deformation occurring at the end of the bellows section adjacent to the weld. (2) Very localised erosion on at least three deformed sections, leading in one case to the puncturing of the liner wall. These eroded spots were all at a region of the liner underneath a gap in the shell. The mechanism whereby the energy is deposited locally is not understood. (3) Deposition of stainless steel as molten droplets was observed over a much larger area adjacent to the shell gap. There is no obvious link between this deposition and the puncture. (4) Arcing is observed over a large proportion of the liner surface: the highest local density of arcs is found on the outer part of the torus, especially near the ports. (5) The inside of the vessel has large coloured areas which were identified as oxide layers probably formed as the result of liner heating by the plasma in the presence of leaks during the last weeks of operation. (orig./RW)

  15. Interaction of a strong blast wave with a free surface. [at ocean surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falade, A.; Holt, M.

    1978-01-01

    When a point source explosion is initiated at the ocean surface, the shock propagated into the water is reflected at the surface as a centered expansion wave. The solution in the neighborhood of the interaction point is obtained by writing the equations of motion in the appropriate similarity variables and then changing the independent variables to polar coordinates based at the interaction point. From the zero-order solution of the resulting equations the slopes of boundaries at the interaction point are obtained. A first-order perturbation of this solution provides more accurate representation of the flow variables and the curvature of the shock surface near the interaction point.

  16. Niche interactions in epidermal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hye-Ryung Choi; Sang-Young Byun; Soon-Hyo Kwon; Kyoung-Chan Park

    2015-01-01

    Within the epidermis and dermis of the skin, cellssecrete and are surrounded by the extracellular matrix(ECM), which provides structural and biochemicalsupport. The ECM of the epidermis is the basementmembrane, and collagen and other dermal componentsconstitute the ECM of the dermis. There is significantvariation in the composition of the ECM of the epidermisand dermis, which can affect "cell to cell" and "cellto ECM" interactions. These interactions, in turn, caninfluence biological responses, aging, and woundhealing; abnormal ECM signaling likely contributes toskin diseases. Thus, strategies for manipulating cell-ECM interactions are critical for treating wounds and avariety of skin diseases. Many of these strategies focuson epidermal stem cells, which reside in a unique nichein which the ECM is the most important component;interactions between the ECM and epidermal stemcells play a major role in regulating stem cell fate. Asthey constitute a major portion of the ECM, it is likelythat integrins and type Ⅳ collagens are important instem cell regulation and maintenance. In this review,we highlight recent research-including our previouswork-exploring the role that the ECM and its associatedcomponents play in shaping the epidermal stem cellniche.

  17. Bimanual Interaction with Interscopic Multi-Touch Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöning, Johannes; Steinicke, Frank; Krüger, Antonio; Hinrichs, Klaus; Valkov, Dimitar

    Multi-touch interaction has received considerable attention in the last few years, in particular for natural two-dimensional (2D) interaction. However, many application areas deal with three-dimensional (3D) data and require intuitive 3D interaction techniques therefore. Indeed, virtual reality (VR) systems provide sophisticated 3D user interface, but then lack efficient 2D interaction, and are therefore rarely adopted by ordinary users or even by experts. Since multi-touch interfaces represent a good trade-off between intuitive, constrained interaction on a touch surface providing tangible feedback, and unrestricted natural interaction without any instrumentation, they have the potential to form the foundation of the next generation user interface for 2D as well as 3D interaction. In particular, stereoscopic display of 3D data provides an additional depth cue, but until now the challenges and limitations for multi-touch interaction in this context have not been considered. In this paper we present new multi-touch paradigms and interactions that combine both traditional 2D interaction and novel 3D interaction on a touch surface to form a new class of multi-touch systems, which we refer to as interscopic multi-touch surfaces (iMUTS). We discuss iMUTS-based user interfaces that support interaction with 2D content displayed in monoscopic mode and 3D content usually displayed stereoscopically. In order to underline the potential of the proposed iMUTS setup, we have developed and evaluated two example interaction metaphors for different domains. First, we present intuitive navigation techniques for virtual 3D city models, and then we describe a natural metaphor for deforming volumetric datasets in a medical context.

  18. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  19. Cell-cell and cell-stromal interactions in differentiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, D.; Huberman, E.

    1987-01-01

    Differentiation and proliferation of tumor cells can be modulated by direct cell contact and by diffusable macromolecules produced by stromal cells. The expression of specific functions of stromal, as well as epithelial cells can be influenced by specific inducers that can modulate synthesis and secretion of growth factors, extracellular matrix molecules and cell surface molecules. The end result of such alterations of stromal cell function is a decrease in proliferation and/or increase in differentiative properties of the tumor cell. The important factors in normal prostate gland differentiation are not well defined, whereas a variety of molecules have been defined in mammary gland and hematopoetic growth and differentiation. It is important to recognize that the induction of differentiation in epithelial systems does not automatically signify an alteration in tumorigenesis, much less prove the importance of cell-cell interactions in differentiation of epithelial tumors. Although there are reports of regression of tumors in strong embryonic fields or in regenerating fields and isolated reports of non-neural epithelial tumors converting to benign growth when placed in heterotypic cellular interactions, what is desperately needed is convincing evidence in well-documented model systems that specific induction of differentiated function in epithelial tumors occurs and that the phenomenon operates under the same fundamental laws that regulate cell differentiation in normal development. Until such results can be demonstrated and accepted widely, the concept of differentiation therapy will only be applicable to specialized cases like hematopoetic tumors and teratocarcinomas. To simply demonstrate that an inducer generates a differentiated response in a tumor cell population is not sufficient to argue that growth and tumorigenicity will be compromised. 96 refs.

  20. Comparison of cluster expansion fitting algorithms for interactions at surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Laura M.; Bray, Jason M.; Schneider, William F.

    2015-10-01

    Cluster expansions (CEs) are Ising-type interaction models that are increasingly used to model interaction and ordering phenomena at surfaces, such as the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions that control coverage-dependent adsorption or surface-vacancy interactions that control surface reconstructions. CEs are typically fit to a limited set of data derived from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The CE fitting process involves iterative selection of DFT data points to include in a fit set and selection of interaction clusters to include in the CE. Here we compare the performance of three CE fitting algorithms-the MIT Ab-initio Phase Stability code (MAPS, the default in ATAT software), a genetic algorithm (GA), and a steepest descent (SD) algorithm-against synthetic data. The synthetic data is encoded in model Hamiltonians of varying complexity motivated by the observed behavior of atomic adsorbates on a face-centered-cubic transition metal close-packed (111) surface. We compare the performance of the leave-one-out cross-validation score against the true fitting error available from knowledge of the hidden CEs. For these systems, SD achieves lowest overall fitting and prediction error independent of the underlying system complexity. SD also most accurately predicts cluster interaction energies without ignoring or introducing extra interactions into the CE. MAPS achieves good results in fewer iterations, while the GA performs least well for these particular problems.

  1. Inverting adherent cells for visualizing ECM interactions at the basal cell side

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) govern a wide range of cellular functions, including survival, migration and invasion. However, in adherent cells these interactions occur primarily on the basal cell side, making them inaccessible to high-resolution, surface-scanning imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Here we describe a fast and reliable method for inverting adherent cells, exposing the basal cell membrane for direct analysis by AFM or SEM in combination with fluorescence microscopy. Cells including their matrix adhesion sites remain intact during the inversion process and are transferred together with the complete array of basally associated ECM proteins. Molecular features of ECM proteins, such as the characteristic 67 nm collagen D-periodicity, are well preserved after inversion. To demonstrate the versatility of the method, we compared basal interactions of fibroblasts with fibrillar collagen I and fibronectin matrices. While fibroblasts remodel the fibronectin layer exclusively from above, they actively invade even thin collagen layers by contacting individual collagen nanofibrils both basally and apically through a network of cellular extensions. Cell–matrix entanglement coincides with enhanced cell spreading and flattening, indicating that nanoscale ECM interactions govern macroscopic changes in cell morphology. The presented cell inversion technique can thus provide novel insight into nanoscale cell–matrix interactions at the basal cell side. - Highlights: ► We present a novel method for inverting adherent cells to expose the basal cell side. ► Basal cell sides can be imaged at high resolution by AFM and SEM. ► Cells can be inverted together with the underlying extracellular matrix. ► AFM images of inverted cells provide a nanoscale look at basal cell–ECM interactions

  2. Cluster-surface interaction: from soft landing to implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Barke, Ingo; Campbell, Eleanor E.B.;

    2011-01-01

    . For cluster-surface interactions, one of the important scenarios is the low-energy regime where the kinetic energy per atom of the accelerated cluster stays well below the binding (cohesive) energy of the cluster constituents. This case is often called soft landing: the deposition typically does not......The current paper presents a state-of-the-art review in the field of interaction of atomic and molecular clusters with solids. We do not attempt to overview the entire broad field but rather concentrate on impact phenomena: how the physics of the cluster-surface interaction depends on the kinetic...... deposition and implantation, i.e. slight cluster embedding into the surface – otherwise known as cluster pinning. At higher impact energies, cluster structure is lost and the impact results in local damage of the surface and often in crater and hillock formation. We consider both experimental data and...

  3. Adhesion of cells to polystyrene surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The surface treatment of polystyrene, which is required to make polystyrene suitable for cell adhesion and spreading, was investigated. Examination of surfaces treated with sulfuric acid or various oxidizing agents using (a) x-ray photoelectron and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy and (b) measurement of surface carboxyl-, hydroxyl-, and sulfur-containing groups by various radiochemical methods showed that sulfuric acid produces an insignificant number of sulfonic acid groups on polyst...

  4. Nanotomography of Cell Surfaces with Evanescent Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM and its application to nanotomography of cell surfaces are described. Present applications include (1 3D imaging of chromosomes in their metaphase to demonstrate axial resolution in the nanometre range, (2 measurements of cell-substrate topology, which upon cholesterol depletion shows some loosening of cell-substrate contacts, and (3 measurements of cell topology upon photodynamic therapy (PDT, which demonstrate cell swelling and maintenance of focal contacts. The potential of the method for in vitro diagnostics, but also some requirements and limitations are discussed.

  5. Fibronectin adsorption, cell adhesion, and proliferation on nanostructured tantalum surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A; Jensen, T; Kraft, David Christian; Foss, Morten; Kingshott, Peter; Hansen, John Lundsgaard; Larsen, Arne Nylandsted; Chevallier, Jacques; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2010-05-25

    The interaction between dental pulp derived mesenchymal stem cells (DP-MSCs) and three different tantalum nanotopographies with and without a fibronectin coating is examined: sputter-coated tantalum surfaces with low surface roughness tantalum surfaces were examined, as well as cellular attachment, proliferation, and vinculin focal adhesion spot assembly on the respective surfaces. The results showed the highest fibronectin mass uptake on the hut structures, with a slightly higher availability of cell-binding domains and the most pronounced formation of vinculin focal adhesion spots as compared to the other surfaces. The proliferation of DP-MSCs was found to be significantly higher on dome and hut surfaces coated with fibronectin compared to the uncoated flat tantalum surfaces. Consequently, the results presented in this study indicate that fibronectin-coated nanotopographies with a vertical dimension of less than 5 nm influence cell adhesion. This rather interesting behavior is argued to originate from the more available fibronectin cell-binding domains observed on the hut structures. PMID:20443575

  6. Engineered Rydberg Atom-Surface Interactions Using Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuanxi; Sheng, Jiteng; Sedlacek, Jonathan; Shaffer, James

    2016-05-01

    We report on studies of Rydberg atom-surface interactions aimed at engineering Rydberg atom coupling to metamaterials. Rydberg atoms posses large electric dipole moments that can be strongly coupled to the tightly confined electromagnetic fields of surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes of a properly constructed piezoelectric superlattice (PSL). Coupling of Rb87 Rydberg atoms, typically in microwave range, to real SPhP resonances on a periodically poled lithium niobate surface is studied theoretically for different periodic domain and surface orientations. Coupling constants, much larger than the dissipation of the atom-surface system, are calculated for atom-surface separations in the near field. This remarkable result opens up a simple way to design and conduct experiments to study the atom-surface interactions in the strong coupling regime which is usually hard to reach in other systems. The light-matter interaction described can be used for a quantum hybrid system that has potential applications for quantum photonic devices. Experimental studies of surfaces showing the efficacy of our calculations are also presented. This work is supported by AFOSR.

  7. Cell Adhesion on Surface-Functionalized Magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Victoria; Schilling, Achim; Mainka, Astrid; Hennig, Diana; Gerum, Richard; Kelch, Marie-Luise; Keim, Simon; Fabry, Ben; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2016-05-18

    The biocompatibility of commercially pure magnesium-based (cp Mg) biodegradable implants is compromised of strong hydrogen evolution and surface alkalization due to high initial corrosion rates of cp Mg in the physiological environment. To mitigate this problem, the addition of corrosion-retarding alloying elements or coating of implant surfaces has been suggested. In the following work, we explored the effect of organic coatings on long-term cell growth. cp Mg was coated with aminopropyltriehtoxysilane + vitamin C (AV), carbonyldiimidazole (CDI), or stearic acid (SA). All three coatings have been previously suggested to reduce initial corrosion and to enhance protein adsorption and hence cell adhesion on magnesium surfaces. Endothelial cells (DH1+/+) and osteosarcoma cells (MG63) were cultured on coated samples for up to 20 days. To quantify Mg corrosion, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was measured after 1, 3, and 5 days of cell culture. We also investigated the speed of initial cell spreading after seeding using fluorescently labeled fibroblasts (NIH/3T3). Hydrogen evolution after contact with cell culture medium was markedly decreased on AV- and SA-coated Mg compared to uncoated Mg. These coatings also showed improved cell adhesion and spreading after 24 h of culture comparable to tissue-treated plastic surfaces. On AV-coated cp Mg, a confluent layer of endothelial cells formed after 5 days and remained intact for up to 20 days. Together, these data demonstrate that surface coating with AV is a viable strategy for improving long-term biocompatibility of cp Mg-based implants. EIS measurements confirmed that the presence of a confluent cell layer increased the corrosion resistance. PMID:27089250

  8. The surface chemistry of metal-oxygen interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Baroni, Stefano

    1997-01-01

    We report on a computational study of the clean and oxygen-covered Rh(110) surface, based on density-functional theory within the local-density approximation. We have used plane-wave basis sets and Vanderbilt ultra-soft pseudopotentials. For the clean surface, we present results for the equilibrium...... structure, surface energy and surface stress of the unreconstructed and (1 x 2) reconstructed structures. For the oxygen-covered surface we have performed a geometry optimization at 0.5, 1, and 2 monolayer oxygen coverages, and we present results for the equilibrium configurations, workfunctions and oxygen...... chemisorption energies. At half monolayer coverage, we find that oxygen induces a (1 x 2) reconstruction of the surface, while at one monolayer coverage the chemisorption energy is highest for the unreconstructed surface. Our results are rationalized by a simple tight-binding description of the interaction...

  9. Developing an Empirical Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2014-01-01

    The process of developing an empirical model for jet-surface interaction noise is described and the resulting model evaluated. Jet-surface interaction noise is generated when the high-speed engine exhaust from modern tightly integrated or conventional high-bypass ratio engine aircraft strikes or flows over the airframe surfaces. An empirical model based on an existing experimental database is developed for use in preliminary design system level studies where computation speed and range of configurations is valued over absolute accuracy to select the most promising (or eliminate the worst) possible designs. The model developed assumes that the jet-surface interaction noise spectra can be separated from the jet mixing noise and described as a parabolic function with three coefficients: peak amplitude, spectral width, and peak frequency. These coefficients are fit to functions of surface length and distance from the jet lipline to form a characteristic spectra which is then adjusted for changes in jet velocity and/or observer angle using scaling laws from published theoretical and experimental work. The resulting model is then evaluated for its ability to reproduce the characteristic spectra and then for reproducing spectra measured at other jet velocities and observer angles; successes and limitations are discussed considering the complexity of the jet-surface interaction noise versus the desire for a model that is simple to implement and quick to execute.

  10. Proteomics of cell-cell interactions in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindoso, Rafael S; Sandim, Vanessa; Collino, Federica; Carvalho, Adriana B; Dias, Juliana; da Costa, Milene R; Zingali, Russolina B; Vieyra, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of cell-cell communications are now under intense study by proteomic approaches. Proteomics has unraveled changes in protein profiling as the result of cell interactions mediated by ligand/receptor, hormones, soluble factors, and the content of extracellular vesicles. Besides being a brief overview of the main and profitable methodologies now available (evaluating theory behind the methods, their usefulness, and pitfalls), this review focuses on-from a proteome perspective-some signaling pathways and post-translational modifications (PTMs), which are essential for understanding ischemic lesions and their recovery in two vital organs in mammals, the heart, and the kidney. Knowledge of misdirection of the proteome during tissue recovery, such as represented by the convergence between fibrosis and cancer, emerges as an important tool in prognosis. Proteomics of cell-cell interaction is also especially useful for understanding how stem cells interact in injured tissues, anticipating clues for rational therapeutic interventions. In the effervescent field of induced pluripotency and cell reprogramming, proteomic studies have shown what proteins from specialized cells contribute to the recovery of infarcted tissues. Overall, we conclude that proteomics is at the forefront in helping us to understand the mechanisms that underpin prevalent pathological processes. PMID:26552723

  11. Surface plasmon resonance imaging of cells and surface-associated fibronectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhadriraju Kiran

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical challenge in cell biology is quantifying the interactions of cells with their extracellular matrix (ECM environment and the active remodeling by cells of their ECM. Fluorescence microscopy is a commonly employed technique for examining cell-matrix interactions. A label-free imaging method would provide an alternative that would eliminate the requirement of transfected cells and modified biological molecules, and if collected nondestructively, would allow long term observation and analysis of live cells. Results Using surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI, the deposition of protein by vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC cultured on fibronectin was quantified as a function of cell density and distance from the cell periphery. We observed that as much as 120 ng/cm2 of protein was deposited by cells in 24 h. Conclusion SPRI is a real-time, low-light-level, label-free imaging technique that allows the simultaneous observation and quantification of protein layers and cellular features. This technique is compatible with live cells such that it is possible to monitor cellular modifications to the extracellular matrix in real-time.

  12. Pycortex: an interactive surface visualizer for fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, James S; Huth, Alexander G; Lescroart, Mark D; Gallant, Jack L

    2015-01-01

    Surface visualizations of fMRI provide a comprehensive view of cortical activity. However, surface visualizations are difficult to generate and most common visualization techniques rely on unnecessary interpolation which limits the fidelity of the resulting maps. Furthermore, it is difficult to understand the relationship between flattened cortical surfaces and the underlying 3D anatomy using tools available currently. To address these problems we have developed pycortex, a Python toolbox for interactive surface mapping and visualization. Pycortex exploits the power of modern graphics cards to sample volumetric data on a per-pixel basis, allowing dense and accurate mapping of the voxel grid across the surface. Anatomical and functional information can be projected onto the cortical surface. The surface can be inflated and flattened interactively, aiding interpretation of the correspondence between the anatomical surface and the flattened cortical sheet. The output of pycortex can be viewed using WebGL, a technology compatible with modern web browsers. This allows complex fMRI surface maps to be distributed broadly online without requiring installation of complex software. PMID:26483666

  13. Pycortex: an interactive surface visualizer for fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Shuang Gao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface visualizations of fMRI provide a comprehensive view of cortical activity. However, surface visualizations are difficult to generate and most common visualization techniques rely on unnecessary interpolation which limits the fidelity of the resulting maps. Furthermore, it is difficult to understand the relationship between flattened cortical surfaces and the underlying 3D anatomy using tools available currently. To address these problems we have developed pycortex, a Python toolbox for interactive surface mapping and visualization. Pycortex exploits the power of modern graphics cards to sample volumetric data on a per-pixel basis, allowing dense and accurate mapping of the voxel grid across the surface. Anatomical, functional and fiduciary information can be projected onto the cortical surface. The surface can be inflated and flattened interactively, aiding interpretation of the correspondence between the anatomical surface and the flattened cortical sheet. The output of pycortex can be viewed using WebGL, a technology compatible with modern web browsers. This allows complex fMRI surface maps to be distributed broadly online without requiring installation of complex software.

  14. Thrombospondin-1 Interacts with Trypanosoma cruzi Surface Calreticulin to Enhance Cellular Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Candice A.; Kleshchenko, Yulia Y.; Ikejiani, Adaeze O.; Udoko, Aniekanabasi N.; Cardenas, Tatiana C.; Pratap, Siddharth; Duquette, Mark A.; Lima, Maria F.; Lawler, Jack; Villalta, Fernando; Nde, Pius N.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which is a neglected tropical disease that produces severe pathology and mortality. The mechanisms by which the parasite invades cells are not well elucidated. We recently reported that T. cruzi up-regulates the expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) to enhance the process of cellular invasion. Here we characterize a novel TSP-1 interaction with T. cruzi that enhances cellular infection. We show that labeled TSP-1 interacts specifically with the surfac...

  15. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic; Vesel, Alenka; Marinšek, Marjan; Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona

    2014-11-01

    Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor® and Topas®.

  16. Augmenting Surface Interaction through Context-Sensitive Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olwal, Alex

    We discuss the benefits of using a mobile device to expand and improve the interactions on a large touch-sensitive surface. The mobile device’s denser arrangement of pixels and touch-sensor elements, and its rich set of mechanical on-board input controls, can be leveraged for increased expressiveness, visual feedback and more precise direct-manipulation. We also show how these devices can support unique input from multiple simultaneous users in collaborative scenarios. Handheld mobile devices and large interactive surfaces can be mutually beneficial in numerous ways, while their complementary nature allows them to preserve the behavior of the original user interface.

  17. Interaction forces between surfaces coated with highly branched polyelectrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Pericet-Cámara, Ramón; Borkovec, Michal

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, interactions between surfaces with adsorbed highly branched polyelectrolytes were studied with the colloidal probe technique. By studying the adsorption behavior of highly branched polyelectrolytes, the lateral distribution of the surface charge could be tuned by the appropriate adsorption conditions. By choosing different polyelecrtrolytes, namely highly branched poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) and poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, it was possible to investigate the forces betwe...

  18. Interaction forces between surfaces coated with highly branched polyelectrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Pericet-Cámara, Ramón

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, interactions between surfaces with adsorbed highly branched polyelectrolytes were studied with the colloidal probe technique. By studying the adsorption behavior of highly branched polyelectrolytes, the lateral distribution of the surface charge could be tuned by the appropriate adsorption conditions. By choosing different polyelecrtrolytes, namely highly branched poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) and poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, it was possible to investigate the forces betwe...

  19. Interactions of Candida albicans with host epithelial surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    David W. Williams; Jordan, Rachael P. C.; Wei, Xiao-qing; Alves, Carlos T.; Wise, Matt P; Wilson, Melanie J.; Michael A. O. Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic, fungal pathogen of humans that frequently causes superficial infections of oral and vaginal mucosal surfaces of debilitated and susceptible individuals. The organism is however, commonly encountered as a commensal in healthy individuals where it is a component of the normal microflora. The key determinant in the type of relationship that Candida has with its host is how it interacts with the epithelial surface it colonises. A delicate balance clearly exis...

  20. Stem cell autotomy and niche interaction in different systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, David C; Dorn, August

    2015-07-26

    The best known cases of cell autotomy are the formation of erythrocytes and thrombocytes (platelets) from progenitor cells that reside in special niches. Recently, autotomy of stem cells and its enigmatic interaction with the niche has been reported from male germline stem cells (GSCs) in several insect species. First described in lepidopterans, the silkmoth, followed by the gipsy moth and consecutively in hemipterans, foremost the milkweed bug. In both, moths and the milkweed bug, GSCs form finger-like projections toward the niche, the apical cells (homologs of the hub cells in Drosophila). Whereas in the milkweed bug the projection terminals remain at the surface of the niche cells, in the gipsy moth they protrude deeply into the singular niche cell. In both cases, the projections undergo serial retrograde fragmentation with progressing signs of autophagy. In the gipsy moth, the autotomized vesicles are phagocytized and digested by the niche cell. In the milkweed bug the autotomized vesicles accumulate at the niche surface and disintegrate. Autotomy and sprouting of new projections appears to occur continuously. The significance of the GSC-niche interactions, however, remains enigmatic. Our concept on the signaling relationship between stem cell-niche in general and GSC and niche (hub cells and cyst stem cells) in particular has been greatly shaped by Drosophila melanogaster. In comparing the interactions of GSCs with their niche in Drosophila with those in species exhibiting GSC autotomy it is obvious that additional or alternative modes of stem cell-niche communication exist. Thus, essential signaling pathways, including niche-stem cell adhesion (E-cadherin) and the direction of asymmetrical GSC division - as they were found in Drosophila - can hardly be translated into the systems where GSC autotomy was reported. It is shown here that the serial autotomy of GSC projections shows remarkable similarities with Wallerian axonal destruction, developmental axon

  1. CD80 and CD86 differentially regulate mechanical interactions of T-cells with antigen-presenting dendritic cells and B-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tong Seng; Goh, James Kang Hao; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hämmerling, Günter J; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs) and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force spectroscopy to characterize and compare the mechanical forces of interactions between DC:T-cells and B:T-cells. Following antigen stimulation, intercellular interactions of DC:T-cell conjugates were stronger than B:T-cell interactions. DCs induced higher levels of T-cell calcium mobilization and production of IL-2 and IFNγ than were elicited by B-cells, thus suggesting that tight intercellular contacts are important in providing mechanically stable environment to initiate T-cell activation. Blocking antibodies targeting surface co-stimulatory molecules CD80 or CD86 weakened intercellular interactions and dampen T-cell activation, highlighting the amplificatory roles of CD80/86 in regulating APC:T-cell interactions and T-cell functional activation. The variable strength of mechanical forces between DC:T-cells and B:T-cell interactions were not solely dependent on differential APC expression of CD80/86, since DCs were superior to B-cells in promoting strong interactions with T-cells even when CD80 and CD86 were inhibited. These data provide mechanical insights into the effects of co-stimulatory molecules in regulating APC:T-cell interactions. PMID:23024807

  2. CD80 and CD86 differentially regulate mechanical interactions of T-cells with antigen-presenting dendritic cells and B-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Seng Lim

    Full Text Available Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs, including dendritic cells (DCs and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force spectroscopy to characterize and compare the mechanical forces of interactions between DC:T-cells and B:T-cells. Following antigen stimulation, intercellular interactions of DC:T-cell conjugates were stronger than B:T-cell interactions. DCs induced higher levels of T-cell calcium mobilization and production of IL-2 and IFNγ than were elicited by B-cells, thus suggesting that tight intercellular contacts are important in providing mechanically stable environment to initiate T-cell activation. Blocking antibodies targeting surface co-stimulatory molecules CD80 or CD86 weakened intercellular interactions and dampen T-cell activation, highlighting the amplificatory roles of CD80/86 in regulating APC:T-cell interactions and T-cell functional activation. The variable strength of mechanical forces between DC:T-cells and B:T-cell interactions were not solely dependent on differential APC expression of CD80/86, since DCs were superior to B-cells in promoting strong interactions with T-cells even when CD80 and CD86 were inhibited. These data provide mechanical insights into the effects of co-stimulatory molecules in regulating APC:T-cell interactions.

  3. Observation of resonant interactions among surface gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnefoy, F; Michel, G; Semin, B; Humbert, T; Aumaître, S; Berhanu, M; Falcon, E

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally study resonant interactions of oblique surface gravity waves in a large basin. Our results strongly extend previous experimental results performed mainly for perpendicular or collinear wave trains. We generate two oblique waves crossing at an acute angle, while we control their frequency ratio, steepnesses and directions. These mother waves mutually interact and give birth to a resonant wave whose properties (growth rate, resonant response curve and phase locking) are fully characterized. All our experimental results are found in good quantitative agreement with four-wave interaction theory with no fitting parameter. Off-resonance experiments are also reported and the relevant theoretical analysis is conducted and validated.

  4. Smooth Muscle Cell Functionality on Collagen Immobilized Polycaprolactone Nanowire Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria Leszczak; Baskett, Dominique A.; Popat, Ketul C.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and preservation of a differentiated state are important aspects in the management, avoidance and progression of vascular diseases. An understanding of the interaction between SMCs and the biomaterial involved is essential for a successful implant. In this study, we have developed collagen immobilized nanostructured surfaces with controlled arrays of high aspect ratio nanowires for the growth and maintenance of human aortic SMCs. The nanow...

  5. Interfacial energetics approach for analysis of endothelial cell and segmental polyurethane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Michael J; Cheah, Calvin; Sarkar, Debanjan

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the physicochemical interactions between endothelial cells and biomaterials is vital for regenerative medicine applications. Particularly, physical interactions between the substratum interface and spontaneously deposited biomacromolecules as well as between the induced biomolecular interface and the cell in terms of surface energetics are important factors to regulate cellular functions. In this study, we examined the physical interactions between endothelial cells and segmental polyurethanes (PUs) using l-tyrosine based PUs to examine the structure-property relations in terms of PU surface energies and endothelial cell organization. Since, contact angle analysis used to probe surface energetics provides incomplete interpretation and understanding of the physical interactions, we sought a combinatorial surface energetics approach utilizing water contact angle, Zisman's critical surface tension (CST), Kaelble's numerical method, and van Oss-Good-Chaudhury theory (vOGCT), and applied to both substrata and serum adsorbed matrix to correlate human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) behavior with surface energetics of l-tyrosine based PU surfaces. We determined that, while water contact angle of substratum or adsorbed matrix did not correlate well with HUVEC behavior, overall higher polarity according to the numerical method as well as Lewis base character of the substratum explained increased HUVEC interaction and monolayer formation as opposed to organization into networks. Cell interaction was also interpreted in terms of the combined effects of substratum and adsorbed matrix polarity and Lewis acid-base character to determine the effect of PU segments. PMID:27065449

  6. Attractive interaction between an atom and a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a general self-energy formalism we examine the interaction between an atom and a surface. Considered in detail are deviations from the Van der Waals force due to recoil and finite velocity of the particle. Calculations for positronium near a metal surface show that for such systems recoil and velocity effects are significant even at very low energies. We also examine the mechanisms for energy exchange with the surface and calculations show that single quantum events do not always dominate the exchange rates. 8 references, 2 figures

  7. Probing mechanical principles of cell-nanomaterial interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huajian

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, various types of nanoparticles, nanowires, nanofibers, nanotubes, and atomically thin plates and sheets have emerged as candidates for an ever increasing list of potential applications for next generation electronics, microchips, composites, barrier coatings, biosensors, drug delivery, and energy harvesting and conversion systems. There is now an urgent societal need to understand both beneficial and hazardous effects of nanotechnology which is projected to produce and release thousands of tons of nanomaterials into the environment in the coming decades. This paper aims to present an overview of some recent studies conducted at Brown University on the mechanics of cell-nanomaterial interactions, including the modeling of nanoparticles entering cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles interacting with cell membranes. The discussions will be organized around the following questions: Why and how does cellular uptake of nanoparticles depend on particle size, shape, elasticity and surface structure? In particular, we will discuss the effect of nanoparticle size on receptor-mediated endocytosis, the effect of elastic stiffness on cell-particle interactions, how high aspect ratio nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphenes enter cells and how different geometrical patterns of ligands on a nanoparticle can be designed to control the rate of particle uptake.

  8. Interactions of Histophilus somni with Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling-Kelly, Erica; Rivera-Rivas, Jose; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    Histophilus somni resides as part of the normal microflora in the upper respiratory tract of healthy cattle. From this site, the organism can make its way into the lower respiratory tract, where it is one of the important bacterial agents of the respiratory disease complex. If H. somni cells disseminate to the bloodstream, they frequently result in thrombus formation. A series of in vitro investigations have examined potential mechanisms that might contribute to such thrombus formation. Earlier work showed that H. somni can stimulate some bovine endothelial cells to undergo apoptosis. More recent studies indicate that H. somni stimulates endothelial cell tissue factor activity and disrupts intercellular junctions. The net effect is to enhance procoagulant activity on the endothelium surface and to make the endothelial monolayer more permeable to molecules, leukocytes, and perhaps H. somni cells. H. somni also activates bovine platelets, which also can enhance tissue factor activity on the endothelium surface. When exposed to H. somni, bovine neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes form extracellular traps in vitro. Ongoing research is investigating how the interplay among endothelial cells, platelets, and leukocytes might contribute to the thrombus formation seen in infected cattle. PMID:26728064

  9. DLVO theory for like-charged polyelectrolyte and surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of adsorption of charged polymers onto like-charged surfaces has been a matter of debates in recent years. We propose a mean-field theory for the interactions of like-charged polyelectrolyte and a plane surface in the presence of 1:1 and 2:1 electrolyte, which takes into account long-range van der Waals and double-layer forces. The theory is able to predict the optimum conditions, such as solvent composition, pH and temperature, for polyelectrolyte adsorption on like-charged surfaces as well as to account for the conformational properties of a polymer at the surfaces. An excellent agreement of the predictions of the theory with the available experimental data suggests that it can be used as a simple tool for predicting the optimum conditions for studying various polyelectrolyte properties, including their biological activity, at the surfaces. Particularly simple expressions for the polymer/surface interaction energy have been obtained in the Debye-Huckel limit. The applicability of this approximation to the biological molecules at the surfaces is discussed

  10. On the Interaction of Capillary Shapes with Solid Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musterd, M.

    2015-01-01

    Control over the interaction of droplets with solid surfaces is commonplace in nature. Famous examples are the water-shedding capabilities of the lotus leaf and the water-harvesting skin of certain types of beetles. To date, this type of control remains a challenge in engineering applications. Consi

  11. Evaluation of osteogenic cell culture and osteogenic/peripheral blood mononuclear human cell co-culture on modified titanium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to determine the effect of a bioactive ceramic coating on titanium in the nanothickness range on human osteogenic cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and on osteogenic cells co-cultured with PBMC without exogenous stimuli. Cell viability, proliferation, adhesion, cytokine release (IL1β, TGFβ1, IL10 and IL17) and intracellular stain for osteopontin and alkaline phosphatase were assessed. Morphologic evaluation showed smaller and less spread cell aspects in co-culture relative to osteogenic cell culture. Cell viability, proliferation and adhesion kinetics were differently influenced by surface texture/chemistry in culture versus co-culture. Cytokine release was also influenced by the interaction between mononuclear and osteogenic cells (mediators released by mononuclear cells acted on osteogenic cells and vice versa). In general, ‘multi-cell type’ interactions played a more remarkable role than the surface roughness or chemistry utilized on the in vitro cellular events related to initial stages of bone formation. (paper)

  12. MEMS-based dynamic cell-to-cell culture platforms using electrochemical surface modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MEMS-based biological platforms with the capability of both spatial placements and time releases of living cells for cell-to-cell culture experiments have been designed and demonstrated utilizing electrochemical surface modification effects. The spatial placement is accomplished by electrochemical surface modification of substrate surfaces to be either adhesive or non-adhesive for living cells. The time control is achieved by the electrical activation of the selective indium tin oxide co-culture electrode to allow the migration of living cells onto the electrode to start the cell-to-cell culture studies. Prototype devices have a three-electrode design with an electrode size of 50 × 50 µm2 and the separation gaps of 2 µm between them. An electrical voltage of −1.5 V has been used to activate the electrodes independently and sequentially to demonstrate the dynamic cell-to-cell culture experiments of NIH 3T3 fibroblast and Madin Darby canine kidney cells. As such, this MEMS platform could be a basic yet versatile tool to characterize transient cell-to-cell interactions

  13. Sikorsky interactive graphics surface design/manufacturing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, R.

    1975-01-01

    An interactive graphics system conceived to be used in the design, analysis, and manufacturing of aircraft components with free form surfaces was described. In addition to the basic surface definition and viewing capabilities inherent in such a system, numerous other features are present: surface editing, automated smoothing of control curves, variable milling patch boundary definitions, surface intersection definition and viewing, automatic creation of true offset surfaces, digitizer and drafting machine interfaces, and cutter path optimization. Documented costs and time savings of better than six to one are being realized with this system. The system was written in FORTRAN and GSP for use on IBM 2250 CRT's in conjunction with an IBM 370/158 computer.

  14. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Measurement Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; TJ Jackson; B. Kustas; PJ Lamb; G McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Tuner

    2007-06-01

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of CLASIC includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the ACRF SGP site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations. An overview of the measurement platforms that will be used during the CLASIC are described in this report. The coordination of measurements, especially as it relates to aircraft flight plans, will be discussed in the CLASIC Implementation Plan.

  15. Molecular Dynamics for Low Temperature Plasma-Surface Interaction Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Graves, David B

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of physical and chemical interactions of low temperature plasmas with surfaces can be fruitfully explored using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. MD simulations follow the detailed motion of sets of interacting atoms through integration of atomic equations of motion, using inter-atomic potentials that can account for bond breaking and formation that result when energetic species from the plasma impact surfaces. This article summarizes the current status of the technique for various applications of low temperature plasmas to material processing technologies. The method is reviewed, and commonly used inter-atomic potentials are described. Special attention is paid to the use of MD in understanding various representative applications, including tetrahedral amorphous carbon film deposition from energetic carbon ions; the interactions of radical species with amorphous hydrogenated silicon films; silicon nano-particles in plasmas; and plasma etching.

  16. Dendritic cell – regulatory T-cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Wojas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The one of the main modes of homeostasis protection is maintaining the balance between antimicrobial immunological reactions and mechanisms involved in immune response suppression. The interaction between dendritic and T cells plays a crucial role in inducing both an immune response and immunological tolerance. Dendritic cells are also able to affect the differentiation, migration, and activation of CD4 T cells using cell-to-cell contact and/or cytokine production. The proper cytokine microenvironment can influence the induction of FoxP3 transcription factor in T cells, determining the regulatory properties of these cells. However, it is still unclear what is more substantial for Treg induction: th e cytokines in the microenvironment, stimulation by a specific DC population, or the type of antigens presented by DC. Activated natural Treg as well as induced Treg cells use similar mechanisms to generate tolerance, for example by the production of such anti-inflammatory cytokines as TGF-β or IL-10 and by direct contact with target cells. Recently, some reports have described the possibility that Treg cells lose FoxP3 expression followed by loss of suppressive function directed against proliferating T lymphocytes.

  17. Localized surface plasmons in metal nanostructures: interaction with fluorophors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Metal nanostructures show shape-dependent localized surface plasmon resonances which cause strong optical absorption and an enhanced optical near field close to their surface. For dye molecules in that near field zone this field enhancement modifies the local density of states, leading to modified optical behaviour of the molecule. Concerning the electronic de-excitation process, the corresponding radiative and non-radiative de-excitation rates can be enhanced by orders of magnitude, in contrast to molecules interacting with flat metal surfaces where only the non-radiative rate is essentially affected. In the case of a well overlapping plasmon resonance with the molecule's fluorescence emission frequency the interacting molecules show a dramatically shortened fluorescence lifetime and an enhanced signal amplitude. (author)

  18. iSat Surface Charging and Thruster Plume Interactions Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Willis, E. M.; Minow, J. I.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the electromagnetic interaction of a satellite in low Earth, high inclination orbit with the space plasma environment and identifying viable charging mitigation strategies is a critical mission design task. High inclination orbits expose the vehicle to auroral charging environments that can potentially charge surfaces to kilovolt potentials and electric thruster propulsion systems will interact with the ambient plasma environment throughout the orbit. NASA is designing the Iodine Satellite (iSAT) cubesat mission to demonstrate operations of an iodine electric thruster system. The spacecraft will be deployed as a secondary payload from a launch vehicle which has not yet been identified so the program must plan for the worst case environments over a range of orbital inclinations. We will first present results from a NASA and Air Force Charging Analyzer Program (Nascap) -2k surface charging calculation used to evaluate the effects of auroral charging on the spacecraft and to provide the charging levels at other locations in orbit for a thruster plume interaction analysis for the iSAT mission. We will then discuss results from the thruster interactions analysis using the Electric Propulsion Interactions Code (EPIC) with inputs from Nascap-2k. The results of these analyses are being used by the iSAT program to better understand how their spacecraft will interact with the space plasma environment in the range of environments that could be encountered when the final mission orbit is selected.

  19. Multi-scale surface-groundwater interactions: Processes and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, A. I.; Harvey, J. W.; Worman, A.; Cardenas, M. B.; Schumer, R.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Tank, J. L.; Stonedahl, S. H.

    2009-05-01

    Site-based investigations of stream-subsurface interactions normally focus on a limited range of spatial scales - typically either very shallow subsurface flows in the hyporheic zone, or much larger scale surface- groundwater interactions - but subsurface flows are linked across this entire continuum. Broad, multi-scale surface-groundwater interactions produce complex patterns in porewater flows, and interfacial fluxes do not average in a simple fashion because of the competitive effects of flows induced at different scales. For example, reach-scale stream-groundwater interactions produce sequences of gaining and losing reaches that can either suppress or enhance local-scale hyporheic exchange. Many individual topographic features also produce long power-law tails in surface residence time distributions, and the duration of these tails is greatly extended by interactions over a wide range of spatial scales. Simultaneous sediment transport and landscape evolution further complicates the analysis of porewater flow dynamics in rivers. Finally, inhomogeneity in important biogeochemical processes, particularly microbial processes that are stimulated near the sediment- water interface, leads to a great degree of non-linearity in chemical transformation rates in stream channels. This high degree of complexity in fluvial systems requires that careful approaches be used to extend local observations of hyporheic exchange and associated nutrient, carbon, and contaminant transformations to larger spatial scales. It is important to recognize that conventional advection-dispersion models are not expected to apply, and instead anomalous transport models must be used. Unfortunately, no generally applicable model is available for stream-groundwater interactions at the present time. Alternative approaches for modeling conservative and reactive transport will be discussed, and a strategy articulated for coping with the complexity of coupled surface-subsurface dynamics in fluvial

  20. Cell adhesion on Ti surface with controlled roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos-Asperilla, L.; Garcia-Alonso, M. C.; Escudero, M. L.; Alonso, C.

    2015-07-01

    In this report, the in situ interaction between Saos-2 osteoblast cells and a smooth Ti surface was examined over time. The adhesion kinetics and mechanisms of cellular proliferation were monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The rate of Saos-2 attachment on Ti surfaces, obtained from the measurements performed with the QCM, is a first-order reaction, with k=2.10{sup -}3 min{sup -}1. The impedance measurements indicate that in the absence of cells, the Ti resistance diminishes over time (7 days), due to the presence of amino acids and proteins from the culture medium that have been adsorbed, while in the presence of osteoblasts, this decrease is much greater because of the compounds generated by the cells that accelerate the dissolution of Ti. (Author)

  1. Identification of Posttranslational Modification-Dependent Protein Interactions Using Yeast Surface Displayed Human Proteome Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact specifically with posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation is often necessary to understand cellular signaling pathways. Numerous methods for identifying proteins that interact with posttranslational modifications have been utilized, including affinity-based purification and analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and tethered catalysis. Although these techniques have been used successfully, each has limitations. Recently, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries have been utilized to identify protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules, including phosphorylated peptides. When coupled with fluorescently activated cell sorting and high throughput methods for the analysis of selection outputs, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries can rapidly and efficiently identify protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including posttranslational modifications. In this review we compare the use of yeast surface display libraries to other methods for the identification of interactions between proteins and posttranslational modifications and discuss future applications of the technology. PMID:26060076

  2. A reference guide to microbial cell surface hydrophobicity based on contact angles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Acid-base interactions form the origin of the hydrophobicity of microbial cell-surfaces and can be quantitated from contact angle measurements on microbial lawns with water, formamide, methyleneiodide and/or alpha-bromonaphthalene. This review provides a reference guide to microbial cell surface hyd

  3. Calving seismicity from iceberg-sea surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomaus, T.C.; Larsen, C.F.; O'Neel, S.; West, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Iceberg calving is known to release substantial seismic energy, but little is known about the specific mechanisms that produce calving icequakes. At Yahtse Glacier, a tidewater glacier on the Gulf of Alaska, we draw upon a local network of seismometers and focus on 80 hours of concurrent, direct observation of the terminus to show that calving is the dominant source of seismicity. To elucidate seismogenic mechanisms, we synchronized video and seismograms to reveal that the majority of seismic energy is produced during iceberg interactions with the sea surface. Icequake peak amplitudes coincide with the emergence of high velocity jets of water and ice from the fjord after the complete submergence of falling icebergs below sea level. These icequakes have dominant frequencies between 1 and 3 Hz. Detachment of an iceberg from the terminus produces comparatively weak seismic waves at frequencies between 5 and 20 Hz. Our observations allow us to suggest that the most powerful sources of calving icequakes at Yahtse Glacier include iceberg-sea surface impact, deceleration under the influence of drag and buoyancy, and cavitation. Numerical simulations of seismogenesis during iceberg-sea surface interactions support our observational evidence. Our new understanding of iceberg-sea surface interactions allows us to reattribute the sources of calving seismicity identified in earlier studies and offer guidance for the future use of seismology in monitoring iceberg calving.

  4. Non-contact friction for ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-contact friction forces are exerted on physical systems through dissipative processes, when the two systems are not in physical contact with each other, or, in quantum mechanical terms, when the overlap of their wave functions is negligible. Non-contact friction is mediated by the exchange of virtual quanta, with the additional requirement that the scattering process needs to have an inelastic component. For finite-temperature ion-surface interactions, the friction is essentially caused by Ohmic resistance due to the motion of the image charge moving in a dielectric material. A conceivable experiment is difficult because the friction force needs to be isolated from the interaction with the image charge, which significantly distorts the ion's flight path. We propose an experimental setup which is designed to minimize the influence of the image charge interaction though a compensation mechanism, and evaluate the energy loss due to non-contact friction for helium ions (He+) interacting with gold, vanadium, titanium and graphite surfaces. Interactions with the infinite series of mirror charges in the plates are summed in terms of the logarithmic derivatives of the Gamma function, and of the Hurwitz zeta function. (authors)

  5. Surface interactions involved in flashover with high density electronegative gases.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Keith Conquest; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wallace, Zachariah Red; Lehr, Jane Marie

    2010-01-01

    This report examines the interactions involved with flashover along a surface in high density electronegative gases. The focus is on fast ionization processes rather than the later time ionic drift or thermalization of the discharge. A kinetic simulation of the gas and surface is used to examine electron multiplication and includes gas collision, excitation and ionization, and attachment processes, gas photoionization and surface photoemission processes, as well as surface attachment. These rates are then used in a 1.5D fluid ionization wave (streamer) model to study streamer propagation with and without the surface in air and in SF6. The 1.5D model therefore includes rates for all these processes. To get a better estimate for the behavior of the radius we have studied radial expansion of the streamer in air and in SF6. The focus of the modeling is on voltage and field level changes (with and without a surface) rather than secondary effects, such as, velocities or changes in discharge path. An experiment has been set up to carry out measurements of threshold voltages, streamer velocities, and other discharge characteristics. This setup includes both electrical and photographic diagnostics (streak and framing cameras). We have observed little change in critical field levels (where avalanche multiplication sets in) in the gas alone versus with the surface. Comparisons between model calculations and experimental measurements are in agreement with this. We have examined streamer sustaining fields (field which maintains ionization wave propagation) in the gas and on the surface. Agreement of the gas levels with available literature is good and agreement between experiment and calculation is good also. Model calculations do not indicate much difference between the gas alone versus the surface levels. Experiments have identified differences in velocity between streamers on the surface and in the gas alone (the surface values being larger).

  6. The effect of cerium valence states at cerium oxide nanoparticle surfaces on cell proliferation

    KAUST Repository

    Naganuma, Tamaki

    2014-05-01

    Understanding and controlling cell proliferation on biomaterial surfaces is critical for scaffold/artificial-niche design in tissue engineering. The mechanism by which underlying integrin ligates with functionalized biomaterials to induce cell proliferation is still not completely understood. In this study, poly-l-lactide (PL) scaffold surfaces were functionalized using layers of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs), which have recently attracted attention for use in therapeutic application due to their catalytic ability of Ce4+ and Ce3+ sites. To isolate the influence of Ce valance states of CNPs on cell proliferation, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and osteoblast-like cells (MG63) were cultured on the PL/CNP surfaces with dominant Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions. Despite cell type (hMSCs and MG63 cells), different surface features of Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions clearly promoted and inhibited cell spreading, migration and adhesion behavior, resulting in rapid and slow cell proliferation, respectively. Cell proliferation results of various modified CNPs with different surface charge and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, indicate that Ce valence states closely correlated with the specific cell morphologies and cell-material interactions that trigger cell proliferation. This finding suggests that the cell-material interactions, which influence cell proliferation, may be controlled by introduction of metal elements with different valence states onto the biomaterial surface. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, C.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  8. Interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomers and surface treatment studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Dhiman, Rajnish; Borghei, Maryam;

    2014-01-01

    equilibrium constant (Keq.) and maximum surface coverage (Γmax) were determined based on the model. In general, the ionomer showed stronger adsorption for MWCNTs (Keq. = 21 − 377 depending on treatment) comparing to Vulcan (Keq. = 18), and slightly lower monolayer coverage. The interaction was found to be...... strongly affected by surface composition, morphology, porosity and oxygen containing functional groups, which are varied with purification and functionalization treatments. The modification of the surface properties was also studied with HR-TEM, BET, porosity measurement, EDXS, XPS, Raman and TG. The......The interaction between high surface area nano-carbon catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and perfluorinated sulfonic acid (Nafion®) ionomer was studied 19 fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F-NMR). The method was developed and improved for more...

  9. Characterization of cell-surface determinants important for baculovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, H; Nishijima, M; Ushijima, H; Miyamura, T; Matsuura, Y

    2001-01-01

    Baculovirus gp64 envelope glycoprotein is a major component of the envelope of the budded virus and is involved in virus entry into the host cells by endocytosis. To investigate the cell-surface molecules important for infection of baculovirus into mammalian cells, we constructed a recombinant baculovirus, Ac64-CAluc, which has gp64 and luciferase genes under the polyhedrin and the CAG promoter, respectively. For controls, we constructed recombinant viruses possessing vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) S protein, or green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene under the polyhedrin promoter and the luciferase gene under the CAG promoter (AcVSVG-CAluc, AcMHVS-CAluc, and AcGFP-CAluc). Treatment of HepG2 cells with phospholipase C markedly reduced the reporter gene expression by Ac64-CAluc or AcVSVG-CAluc in a dose-dependent manner, whereas AcMHVS-CAluc was shown to be resistant to the treatment. Inhibition with purified lipids and susceptibility to the mutant CHO hamster cell lines deficient in phospholipids synthesis suggest that the interaction of gp64 and phospholipids on the cell surface might play an important role in baculovirus infection into mammalian cells. PMID:11145915

  10. Exchange interactions at surfaces of Fe, Co, and Gd

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Turek, Ilja; Blugel, S.; Bihlmayer, G.; Weinberger, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2003), s. 81-88. ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Surface Physics /9./. Trest, 02.09.2002-06.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/00/0122; GA ČR GA106/02/0943; GA MŠk ME 374 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : surface magnetism * exchange interactions * Curie temperature Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.263, year: 2003

  11. Metabolic behavior of cell surface biotinylated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The turnover of proteins on the surface of cultured mammalian cells was measured by a new approach. Reactive free amino or sulfhydryl groups on surface-accessible proteins were derivatized with biotinyl reagents and the proteins solubilized from culture dishes with detergent. Solubilized, biotinylated proteins were then adsorbed onto streptavidin-agarose, released with sodium dodecyl sulfate and mercaptoethanol, and separated on polyacrylamide gels. Biotin-epsilon-aminocaproic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (BNHS) or N-biotinoyl-N'-(maleimidohexanoyl)hydrazine (BM) were the derivatizing agents. Only 10-12 bands were adsorbed onto streptavidin-agarose from undervatized cells or from derivatized cells treated with free avidin at 4 degrees C. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis resolved greater than 100 BNHS-derivatized proteins and greater than 40 BM-derivatized proteins. There appeared to be little overlap between the two groups of derivatized proteins. Short-term pulse-chase studies showed an accumulation of label into both groups of biotinylated proteins up until 1-2 h of chase and a rapid decrease over the next 1-5 h. Delayed appearance of labeled protein at the cell surface was attributed to transit time from site of synthesis. The unexpected and unexplained rapid disappearance of pulse-labeled proteins from the cell surface was invariant for all two-dimensionally resolved proteins and was sensitive to temperature reduction to 18 degrees C. Long-term pulse-chase experiments beginning 4-8 h after the initiation of chase showed the disappearance of derivatized proteins to be a simple first-order process having a half-life of 115 h in the case of BNHS-derivatized proteins and 30 h in the case of BM-derivatized proteins

  12. The cell-surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnenberg, Albert D; Meyer, E Michael; Rubin, J Peter; Donnenberg, Vera S

    2015-07-01

    In this technical note we describe a method to evaluate the cell surface proteome of human primary cell cultures and cell lines. The method utilizes the BD Biosciences lyoplate, a system covering 242 surface proteins, glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids plus relevant isotype controls, automated plate-based flow cytometry, conventional file-level analysis and unsupervised K-means clustering of markers on the basis of percent of positive events and mean fluorescence intensity of positive and total clean events. As an example, we determined the cell surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells (ASC) derived from 5 independent clinical isolates. Between-sample agreement of very strongly expressed (n = 32) and strongly expressed (n =16) markers was excellent, constituting a reliable profile for ASC identification and determination of functional properties. Known mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105) were among the identified strongly expressed determinants. Among other strongly expressed markers are several that are potentially immunomodulatory including three proteins that protect from complement mediated effects (CD46, CD55, and CD59), two that regulate apoptosis (CD77 and CD95) and several with ectoenzymatic (CD10, CD26, CD13, CD73, and CD143) or receptor tyrosine kinase (CD140b (PDGFR), CD340 (Her-2), EGFR) activity, suggesting mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory and tissue remodeling properties of ASC. Because variables are standardized for K-means clustering, results generated using this methodology should be comparable between instrumentation platforms. It is widely generalizable to human primary explant cultures and cells lines and will prove useful to determine how cell passage, culture interventions, and gene expression and silencing affect the cell-surface proteome. PMID:25929697

  13. Interaction of Hg Atom with Bare Si(111) Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-Jun; LIU Ying

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the interaction between Hg atom and bare Si(111) surface, three types of silicon cluster models of Si4H7, Si7H10 and Si16H20 together with their Hg complexes were studied by using hybrid (U)B3LYP density functional theory method. Optimized geometries and energies for Hg atom on different adsorption sites indicate that: 1) the binding energies at different adsorption sites are small (ranging from ~3 to 8 kJ/mol dependent on the adsorption sites), suggesting a weak interaction between Hg atom and silicon surface; 2) the most favorable adsorption site is the on top (T) site. By analyzing their natural bonding orbitals, the possible reason of this difference is suggested.

  14. Surface water and groundwater interaction on a hill island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Rasmus Rumph; Rasmussen, Keld Rømer; Christensen, Steen

    hill islands – is relatively unknown. This study aims at providing new information about the rainfall-runoff processes in hill island landscapes where surface water and groundwater interaction is expected to have a dominant role and hill-slope processes not. Through stream flow measurements, field...... observed from old topographical maps as well as in the field. The geological data indicate shallow low permeable sediments primarily on the western side of Abild stream, and the geophysical data indicate shallow low resistivity layers on the western side of the stream. All these findings indicate a......A number of recent studies have indicated that the hydrological system in stream valleys is often complex and exchange of water takes place through semi-permeable contacts and flow paths may be quite diverse. Yet, surface water and groundwater interaction in one of the major Danish landscapes – the...

  15. Cell Surface Markers in HTLV-1 Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea K. Kress

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The phenotype of HTLV-1-transformed CD4+ T lymphocytes largely depends on defined viral effector molecules such as the viral oncoprotein Tax. In this review, we exemplify the expression pattern of characteristic lineage markers, costimulatory receptors and ligands of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, cytokine receptors, and adhesion molecules on HTLV-1-transformed cells. These molecules may provide survival signals for the transformed cells. Expression of characteristic surface markers might therefore contribute to persistence of HTLV-1-transformed lymphocytes and to the development of HTLV-1-associated disease.

  16. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I., E-mail: lotkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kashin, Oleg A., E-mail: okashin@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A., E-mail: yulia-k1970@mail.ru; Antonova, Larisa V., E-mail: antonova.la@mail.ru; Matveeva, Vera G., E-mail: matveeva-vg@mail.ru; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A., E-mail: sergeewa.ew@yandex.ru [Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, 650002 (Russian Federation); Kudryashov, Andrey N., E-mail: kudryashov@angioline.ru [Angioline Interventional Device Ltd, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture.

  17. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I.; Kashin, Oleg A.; Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A.; Antonova, Larisa V.; Kudryashov, Andrey N.; Matveeva, Vera G.; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A.

    2015-10-01

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture.

  18. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture

  19. Anthocyanins influence tannin-cell wall interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Martínez-Hernández, Alejandro; Ruiz-García, Yolanda; Gil-Muñoz, Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2016-09-01

    The rate of tannin extraction was studied in a vinification of red grapes and the results compared with another vinification made with white grapes fermented as for typical red wine, in the presence of skins and seeds. Even though the grapes presented a quite similar skin and seed tannin content, the differences in tannin concentration between both vinifications was very large, despite the fact that the only apparent difference between the phenolic composition of both wines was the anthocyanin content. This suggests that anthocyanins play an important role in tannin extractability, perhaps because they affect the extent of the tannin-cell wall interaction, a factor that largely controls the resulting quantity of tannins in wines. To confirm this observation, the effect of anthocyanins on the tannin extractability from grape seeds and skin and on the interaction between tannins and grape cell walls suspended in model solutions were studied. The results indicated that anthocyanins favored skin and seed tannin extraction and that there is a competition for the adsorption sites between anthocyanins and tannins that increases the tannin content when anthocyanins are present. PMID:27041322

  20. Promoted cell and material interaction on atmospheric pressure plasma treated titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Inho [Convergence Technology Exam. Div. II, Korean Intellectual Patent Office, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Vagaska, Barbora [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyok Jin [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jae Kyeong [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Byeong-Ju [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi Hee [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong-Chul, E-mail: parkjc@yuhs.ac [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-01

    Surface carbon contamination is a natural phenomenon. However, it interferes with cell-biomaterial interaction. In order to eliminate the interference, atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was employed. Dielectric barrier discharge treatment of titanium surface for less than 10 min turned titanium super-hydrophilic. Adsorption of fibronectin which is the major cell adhesive protein increased after plasma treatment. Cell attachment parameters of osteoblast cells such as population, cell area, perimeter, Feret's diameter and cytoskeleton development were also enhanced. Cell proliferation increased on the plasma treated titanium. In conclusion, dielectric barrier discharge type atmospheric pressure plasma system is effective to modify titanium surface and the modified titanium promotes cell and material interactions.

  1. Bioactive sugar surfaces for hepatocyte cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    Ambury, Rachael

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, develop and characterise a novel bioactive surface capable of binding hepatocytes and enabling the retention of hepatocyte-specific cell function during in-vitro culture. The materials were designed to exploit a unique characteristic of hepatocyte biology, with β-galactose moieties displayed to allow cellular adhesion via the specific asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R) found on hepatocytes. Hydrogels were created by modifying a commercia...

  2. Anodized titania: Processing and characterization to improve cell-materials interactions for load bearing implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kakoli

    The objective of this study is to investigate in vitro cell-materials interactions using human osteoblast cells on anodized titanium. Titanium is a bioinert material and, therefore, gets encapsulated after implantation into the living body by a fibrous tissue that isolates them from the surrounding tissues. In this work, bioactive nonporous and nanoporous TiO2 layers were grown on commercially pure titanium substrate by anodization process using different electrolyte solutions namely (1) H3PO 4, (2) HF and (3) H2SO4, (4) aqueous solution of citric acid, sodium fluoride and sulfuric acid. The first three electrolytes produced bioactive TiO2 films with a nonporous structure showing three distinctive surface morphologies. Nanoporous morphology was obtained on Ti-surfaces from the fourth electrolyte at 20V for 4h. Cross-sectional view of the nanoporous surface reveals titania nanotubes of length 600 nm. It was found that increasing anodization time initially increased the height of the nanotubes while maintaining the tubular array structure, but beyond 4h, growth of nanotubes decreased with a collapsed array structure. Human osteoblast (HOB) cell attachment and growth behavior were studied using an osteoprecursor cell line (OPC 1) for 3, 7 and 11 days. Colonization of the cells was noticed with distinctive cell-to-cell attachment on HF anodized surfaces. TiO2 layer grown in H2SO4 electrolyte did not show significant cell growth on the surface, and some cell death was also noticed. Good cellular adherence with extracellular matrix extensions in between the cells was noticed for samples anodized with H3PO 4 electrolyte and nanotube surface. Cell proliferation was excellent on anodized nanotube surfaces. An abundant amount of extracellular matrix (ECM) between the neighboring cells was also noticed on nanotube surfaces with filopodia extensions coming out from cells to grasp the nanoporous surface for anchorage. To better understand and compare cell-materials interactions

  3. Germ Tube Formation Changes Surface Hydrophobicity of Candida Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Fonseca

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrophobic interaction is generally considered to play an important role in the adherence of microorganisms to eukaryotic cells and also to certain inert surfaces. Using a microbe adhesion assay to hydrocarbons (n-hexadecane, 68 strains of Candida albicans and 30 non-albicans strains were studied. Influence of source of isolate, age of the culture, and percentage of germ tube formation on adhesion were studied. C: albicans blastoconidia were found to be hydrophilic; conversely, blastoconidia of non-albicans strains were slightly more hydrophobic. Germ tube formation was associated with a significant rise in cell surface hydrophobicity. Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol. 7:222–226, 1999.

  4. Surface grafting of carboxylic groups onto thermoplastic polyurethanes to reduce cell adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of polymers with other materials is an important issue, being their surface properties clearly crucial. For some important polymer applications, their surfaces have to be modified. Surface modification aims to tailor the surface characteristics of a material for a specific application without affecting its bulk properties. Materials can be surface modified by using biological, chemical or physical methods. The aim of this work was to improve the reactivity of the thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) material (Elastollan®) surface and to make its surface cell repellent by grafting carboxylic groups onto its surface. Two TPU materials were studied: a polyether-based TPU and a polyester-based TPU. The grafting efficiency was evaluated by contact angle measurements and by analytical determination of the COOH groups. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the membranes surface was performed as well as cell adhesion tests. It was proved that the surfaces of the TPUs membranes were successfully modified and that cell adhesion was remarkably reduced.

  5. Wettability influences cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces with different topographies

    OpenAIRE

    Lourenco, B.N.; Marchioli, G.; Song, W.; Reis, R.L.; Blitterswijk, van, C.A.; Karperien, H.B.J.; Apeldoorn, van, D.F.; Mano, J.F

    2012-01-01

    Surface wettability and topography are recognized as critical factors influencing cell behavior on biomaterials. So far only few works have reported cell responses on surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability in combination with surface topography. The goal of this work is to study whether cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces is influenced by surface topography and polymer type. Biomimetic superhydrophobic rough surfaces of polystyrene and poly(l-lactic acid) with different micro/nanotopo...

  6. Turbulent flow over an interactive alternating land-water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heerwaarden, C.; Mellado, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The alternating land-water surface is a challenging surface to represent accurately in weather and climate models, but it is of great importance for the surface energy balance in polar regions. The complexity of this surface lies in the fact that secondary circulations, which form at the boundary of water and land, interact strongly with the surface energy balance. Due to its large heat capacity, the water temperature adapts slowly to the flow, thus the properties of the atmosphere determine the uptake of energy from the water. In order to study this complex system in a simpler way, retaining only the most essential physics, we have simplified the full surface energy balance including radiation. We have derived a boundary condition that mimics the full balance and can be formulated as a so-called Robin boundary condition: a linear combination of Dirichlet (fixed temperature) and Neumann (fixed temperature gradient) ones. By spatially varying the coefficients, we are able to express land and water using this boundary condition. We have done a series of direct numerical simulations in which we generate artificial land-water patterns from noise created from a Gaussian spectrum centered around a dominant wave number. This method creates realistic random patterns, but we are still in control of the length scales. We show that the system can manifest itself in three regimes: micro-, meso- and macro-scale. In the micro-scale, we find perfect mixing of the near-surface atmosphere that results in identical air properties over water and land. In the meso-scale, secondary circulations alter the heat exchange considerably by advecting air between land and water. In addition, they bring the surface temperature of the land closer to that of the air, thereby modulating the energy loss due to outgoing longwave radiation. In the macro-scale regime, the flow over land and water become independent of each other and only the large scale forcings determine the energy balance.

  7. Emulsion/Surface Interactions from Quiescent Quartz Crystal Microbalance Measurements with an Inverted Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafi, Roozbeh; Pelton, Robert H

    2015-07-01

    Interactions of three oil-in-water emulsion types with polystyrene-coated quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor surfaces were probed with the QCM cell in both the conventional orientation (i.e., polystyrene surface on the bottom, "looking up") and the inverted orientation (polystyrene on top interior surface of sensor chamber, "looking down"). With the conventionally oriented QCM sensors, the adsorption of soluble and/or dispersed species quickly gave steady-state frequency and dissipation outputs. By contrast, the inverted sensors gave changing responses at long times because of the gravity driven buildup of a viscous consolidation layer next to but not necessarily bound to the sensor surface. Three emulsion types (a simple hexadecane/phosphatidylcholine emulsion, 2% homogenized milk, and a diluted commercial ophthalmic emulsion) displayed a wide range of behaviors. We propose that quiescent QCM measurement made with an inverted sample chamber is a new approach to probing emulsion behaviors near solid surfaces. PMID:26083783

  8. Surface free energy predominates in cell adhesion to hydroxyapatite through wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Miho; Hori, Naoko; Ando, Hiroshi; Namba, Saki; Toyama, Takeshi; Nishimiya, Nobuyuki; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2016-05-01

    The initial adhesion of cells to biomaterials is critical in the regulation of subsequent cell behaviors. The purpose of this study was to investigate a mechanism through which the surface wettability of biomaterials can be improved and determine the effects of biomaterial surface characteristics on cellular behaviors. We investigated the surface characteristics of various types of hydroxyapatite after sintering in different atmospheres and examined the effects of various surface characteristics on cell adhesion to study cell-biomaterial interactions. Sintering atmosphere affects the polarization capacity of hydroxyapatite by changing hydroxide ion content and grain size. Compared with hydroxyapatite sintered in air, hydroxyapatite sintered in saturated water vapor had a higher polarization capacity that increased surface free energy and improved wettability, which in turn accelerated cell adhesion. We determined the optimal conditions of hydroxyapatite polarization for the improvement of surface wettability and acceleration of cell adhesion. PMID:26952425

  9. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  10. Foreword: In situ gas surface interactions: approaching realistic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Edvin; Over, Herbert

    2008-03-01

    This special issue is devoted to the application of in situ surface-sensitive techniques in the elucidation of catalysed reactions at (model) catalyst surfaces. Both reaction intermediates and the nature of the catalytically active phase are the targets of these investigations. In situ surface science techniques are also used to study the interaction of water with surfaces under realistic conditions. Since 80% of all technical chemicals are manufactured by utilizing (heterogeneous) catalysis, scientific understanding and technological development of catalysis are of central practical importance in modern society [1]. Heterogeneously catalysed reactions take place at the gas/solid interface. Therefore one of the major topics in surface chemistry and physics is closely related to heterogeneous catalysis, with the aim of developing novel catalysts and to improve catalysts' performances on the basis of atomic scale based knowledge. Despite the economical and environmental rewards—if such a goal is achieved—and despite 40 years of intensive research, practical catalysis is still safely in a black box: the reactivity and selectivity of a catalyst are commercially still optimized on a trial and error basis, applying the high throughput screening approach. The reason for this discrepancy between ambition and reality lies in the inherent complexity of the catalytic system, consisting of the working catalyst and the interaction of the catalyst with the reactant mixture. Practical (solid) catalysts consist of metal or oxide nanoparticles which are dispersed and stabilized on a support and which may be promoted by means of additives. These particles catalyse a reaction in pressures as high as 100 bar. Practical catalysis is in general considered to be far too complex for gaining atomic-scale understanding of the mechanism of the catalysed reaction of an industrial catalyst during its operation. Therefore it has been necessary to introduce idealization and simplification of

  11. Groundwater surface water interaction study using natural isotopes tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Kim, Yong Chul; Cho, Soo Young; Lee, Kil Yong

    2015-04-01

    Tritium and stable isotopes are a component of the water molecule, they are the most conservative tracer for groundwater study. And also, radon is natural radioactive nuclide and well dissolved in groundwater. Therefore, these isotopes are used natural tracer for the study of surface water and groundwater interaction of water curtain greenhouse area. The study area used groundwater as a water curtain for warming tool of greenhouse during the winter, and is associated with issues of groundwater shortage while being subject to groundwater-river water interaction. During the winter time, these interactions were studied by using Rn-222, stable isotopes and H-3. These interaction was monitored in multi depth well and linear direction well of groundwater flow. And dam effect was also compared. Samples were collected monthly from October 2013 to April 2014. Radon and tritium were analyzed using Quantulus low background liquid scintillation counter and stable isotopes were analyzed using an IRIS (Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectroscopy ; L2120-i, Picarro). During the winter time, radon concentration was varied from 0.07 Bq/L to 8.9 Bq/L and different interaction was showed between dam. Surface water intrusion was severe at February and restored April when greenhouse warming was ended. The stable isotope results showed different trend with depth and ranged from -9.16 ‰ to -7.24 ‰ for δ 18O value, while the δD value was ranged from -57.86 ‰ to -50.98 ‰. The groundwater age as dated by H-3 was ranged 0.23 Bq/L - 0.59 Bq/L with an average value of 0.37 Bq/L.

  12. Hydrophobic and electrostatic cell surface properties of thermophilic dairy streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mei, H C; de Vries, J; Busscher, H J

    1993-12-01

    Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) and microelectrophoresis were done in 10 mM potassium phosphate solutions to characterize the surfaces of thermophilic dairy streptococci, isolated from pasteurizers. Regardless of whether they were grown (in M17 broth) with lactose, sucrose, or glucose added, strains were relatively hydrophilic (showing low initial removal rates by hexadecane) and slightly negatively charged. A tendency exists for cells grown with sucrose added to be more hydrophilic than cells grown with glucose or lactose added. Also, the lowest isoelectric points, i.e., the pH values for which the zeta potentials are zero, were measured for strains with glucose added to the growth medium. The isoelectric points for the strains were all rather high, between pH 3 and 5, indicative of protein-rich surfaces, although X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy did not measure excessively large amounts of nitrogen on the cell surfaces. Both MATH and microelectrophoresis were done as a function of pH. Maxima in hydrophobicity were observed at certain pH values. Usually these pH values were in the range of the isoelectric points of the cells. Thus it appears that MATH measures an interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatic interactions. MATH measures solely hydrophobicity only when electrostatic interactions are absent, i.e., close to the isoelectric points of the cells. Considering that these thermophilic streptococci are all rather hydrophilic, a possible pathway to prevent fouling in the pasteurization process might be to render the heat exchanger plates of the pasteurizer more hydrophobic. PMID:16349127

  13. Engineering Cell Instructive Materials To Control Cell Fate and Functions through Material Cues and Surface Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventre, Maurizio; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-06-22

    Mastering the interaction between cells and extracellular environment is a fundamental prerequisite in order to engineer functional biomaterial interfaces able to instruct cells with specific commands. Such advanced biomaterials might find relevant application in prosthesis design, tissue engineering, diagnostics and stem cell biology. Because of the highly complex, dynamic, and multifaceted context, a thorough understanding of the cell-material crosstalk has not been achieved yet; however, a variety of material features including biological cues, topography, and mechanical properties have been proved to impact the strength and the nature of the cell-material interaction, eventually affecting cell fate and functions. Although the nature of these three signals may appear very different, they are equated by their participation in the same material-cytoskeleton crosstalk pathway as they regulate cell adhesion events. In this work we present recent and relevant findings on the material-induced cell responses, with a particular emphasis on how the presentation of biochemical/biophysical signals modulates cell behavior. Finally, we summarize and discuss the literature data to draw out unifying elements concerning cell recognition of and reaction to signals displayed by material surfaces. PMID:26693600

  14. Stem cell autotomy and niche interaction in differentsystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The best known cases of cell autotomy are theformation of erythrocytes and thrombocytes (platelets)from progenitor cells that reside in special niches.Recently, autotomy of stem cells and its enigmaticinteraction with the niche has been reported from malegermline stem cells (GSCs) in several insect species.First described in lepidopterans, the silkmoth, followedby the gipsy moth and consecutively in hemipterans,foremost the milkweed bug. In both, moths and themilkweed bug, GSCs form finger-like projectionstoward the niche, the apical cells (homologs of thehub cells in Drosophila). Whereas in the milkweedbug the projection terminals remain at the surfaceof the niche cells, in the gipsy moth they protrudedeeply into the singular niche cell. In both cases, theprojections undergo serial retrograde fragmentationwith progressing signs of autophagy. In the gipsy moth,the autotomized vesicles are phagocytized and digestedby the niche cell. In the milkweed bug the autotomizedvesicles accumulate at the niche surface and disintegrate.Autotomy and sprouting of new projectionsappears to occur continuously. The significance of theGSC-niche interactions, however, remains enigmatic.Our concept on the signaling relationship betweenstem cell-niche in general and GSC and niche (hubcells and cyst stem cells) in particular has been greatlyshaped by Drosophila melanogaster. In comparingthe interactions of GSCs with their niche in Drosophilawith those in species exhibiting GSC autotomy itis obvious that additional or alternative modes ofstem cell-niche communication exist. Thus, essentialsignaling pathways, including niche-stem cell adhesion(E-cadherin) and the direction of asymmetrical GSCdivision - as they were found in Drosophila - can hardlybe translated into the systems where GSC autotomy was reported. It is shown here that the serial autotomyof GSC projections shows remarkable similarities withWallerian axonal destruction, developmental axonpruning and dying

  15. Chemistry and material science at the cell surface

    OpenAIRE

    Weian Zhao; Grace Sock Leng Teo; Namit Kumar; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Cell surfaces are fertile ground for chemists and material scientists to manipulate or augment cell functions and phenotypes. This not only helps to answer basic biology questions but also has diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances in the engineering of the cell surface. In particular, we focus on the potential applications of surface engineered cells for 1) targeting cells to desirable sites in cell therapy, 2) programming assembly of c...

  16. Innovative Tools and Technology for Analysis of Single Cells and Cell-Cell Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konry, Tania; Sarkar, Saheli; Sabhachandani, Pooja; Cohen, Noa

    2016-07-11

    Heterogeneity in single-cell responses and intercellular interactions results from complex regulation of cell-intrinsic and environmental factors. Single-cell analysis allows not only detection of individual cellular characteristics but also correlation of genetic content with phenotypic traits in the same cell. Technological advances in micro- and nanofabrication have benefited single-cell analysis by allowing precise control of the localized microenvironment, cell manipulation, and sensitive detection capabilities. Additionally, microscale techniques permit rapid, high-throughput, multiparametric screening that has become essential for -omics research. This review highlights innovative applications of microscale platforms in genetic, proteomic, and metabolic detection in single cells; cell sorting strategies; and heterotypic cell-cell interaction. We discuss key design aspects of single-cell localization and isolation in microfluidic systems, dynamic and endpoint analyses, and approaches that integrate highly multiplexed detection of various intracellular species. PMID:26928209

  17. Globules of annealed amphiphilic copolymers: Surface structure and interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarkova, E.; Johner, A.; Maresov, E. A.; Semenov, A. N.

    2006-12-01

    A mean-field theory of globules of random amphiphilic copolymers in selective solvents is developed for the case of an annealed copolymer sequence: each unit can be in one of two states, H (insoluble) or P (soluble or less insoluble). The study is focussed on the regime when H and P units tend to form long blocks, and when P units dominate in the dilute phase, but are rare in the globule core. A first-order coil-to-globule transition is predicted at some T = Tcg. The globule core density at the transition point increases as the affinity of P units to the solvent, tildeɛ, is increased. Two collapse transitions, coil → “loose” globule and “loose” globule → “dense” globule, are predicted if tildeɛ is high enough and P units are marginally soluble or weakly insoluble. H and P concentration profiles near the globule surface are obtained and analyzed in detail. It is shown that the surface excess of P units rises as tildeɛ is increased. The surface tension decreases in parallel. Considering the interaction between close enough surfaces of two globules, we show that they always attract each other at a complete equilibrium. It is pointed out, however, that such equilibrium may be difficult to reach, so that partially equilibrium structures (defined by the condition that a chain forming one globule does not penetrate into the core of the other globule) are relevant. It is shown that at such partial equilibrium the interaction is repulsive, so the globules may be stabilized from aggregation. The strongest repulsion is predicted at the coil-to-globule transition point Tcg: the repulsion force decreases with the distance between the surfaces according to a power law. In the general case (apart from Tcg) the force vs. distance decay becomes exponential; the decay length ξ diverges as T → Tcg. The developed theory explains certain anomalous properties observed for globules of amphiphilic homopolymers.

  18. The DIPSI [Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions] computer code user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) is a one-dimensional, bounded particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code designed to investigate the interaction of plasma with a solid surface, such as a limiter or divertor plate in a tokamak fusion device. Plasma confinement and transport may be studied in a system which includes an applied magnetic field (oriented normal to the solid surface) and/or a self-consistent electrostatic potential. The PIC code DIPSI is an offshoot of the PIC code TESS (Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies) which was developed to study plasma confinement in mirror devices. The codes DIPSI and TESS are direct descendants of the PIC code ES1 that was created by A. B. Langdon. This document provides the user with a brief description of the methods used in the code and a tutorial on the use of the code. 11 refs., 2 tabs

  19. Interaction between Palladium Nanoparticles and Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotubes: Role of Surface Functionalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Bingsen; Shao, Lidong; Zhang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    feature, instability, and subtle response of the components upon application of an external field. Herein, we use insitu TEM, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques to record the interaction in palladium on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from room temperature to 600...... degrees C. We focus on probing the effects of oxygen and nitrogen-containing functional groups on supported palladium nanoparticles (NPs) in the model catalytic system. The stability of palladium NPs supported on CNTs depends strongly on the surface properties of CNTs. Moreover, the oxygen......-containing functional groups on the CNT surfaces, such as carboxylic acids and anhydrides, have an even stronger interaction with palladium NPs than the nitrogen-containing counterparts. Our work contributes to elucidation of the complex metal-carbon interaction and unlocks potential in activity and selectivity control...

  20. Interaction of surface and subsurface waters in the system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazukhina, Svetlana; Masloboev, Vladimir; Chudnenko, Konstantin; Bychinski, Valerii; Sandimirov, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    Purpose of the study - to assess the influence of the Khibiny massif on the formation of the chemical composition of surface and subsurface waters, generated within its boundaries using physical-chemical modeling ("Selector" software package). Objects of monitoring - rivers with sources in the upper reaches of the Khibiny massif (surface waters), and boreholes, located in these rivers' valleys (subsurface waters) have been chosen as objects of monitoring. Processes of formation of surface and subsurface waters, generated within the boundaries of the Khibiny massif, have been considered within the framework of a unified system "water-rock-atmosphere-carbon". The initial data of the model: chemical compositions of the Khibiny massif rocks and chemical analyses of atmospheric and surface waters. Besides, there have been considered Clarke concentrations S, Cl, F, C, their influence on the formation of chemical composition of water solutions; geochemical mobility of chemical elements. The previously developed model has been improved with the purpose of assessment of the influence of organic substance, either liquid or solid, on the formation of the chemical composition of water. The record of the base model of the multisystem includes 24 independent components (Al-B-Br-Ar-He-Ne-C-Ca-Cl-F-K-Mg-Mn-N-Na-P-S-Si-Sr-Cu-Zn-H-O-e), 872 dependent components, including, in a water solution - 295, in a gas phase - 76, liquid hydrocarbons - 111, solid phases, organic and mineral substances - 390. The record of solid phases of multisystem is made with consideration of the mineral composition of the Khibiny massif. Using the created model, the physical-chemical modeling of surface and subsurface water generation has been carried out: 1. The system "water-rock-atmosphere" has been studied, depending on the interaction degree (ksi) of rock with water. A model like this allowed investigating the interactions of surface waters (rivers and lakes) with rocks that form the Khibiny massif. 2

  1. Free Surface Wave Interaction with a Horizontal Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshkai, P.; Rockwell, D.

    1999-10-01

    Classes of vortex formation from a horizontal cylinder adjacent to an undulating free-surface wave are characterized using high-image-density particle image velocimetry. Instantaneous representations of the velocity field, streamline topology and vorticity patterns yield insight into the origin of unsteady loading of the cylinder. For sufficiently deep submergence of the cylinder, the orbital nature of the wave motion results in multiple sites of vortex development, i.e., onset of vorticity concentrations, along the surface of the cylinder, followed by distinctive types of shedding from the cylinder. All of these concentrations of vorticity then exhibit orbital motion about the cylinder. Their contributions to the instantaneous values of the force coefficients are assessed by calculating moments of vorticity. It is shown that large contributions to the moments and their rate of change with time can occur for those vorticity concentrations having relatively small amplitude orbital trajectories. In a limiting case, collision with the surface of the cylinder can occur. Such vortex-cylinder interactions exhibit abrupt changes in the streamline topology during the wave cycle, including abrupt switching of the location of saddle points in the wave. The effect of nominal depth of submergence of the cylinder is characterized in terms of the time history of patterns of vorticity generated from the cylinder and the free surface. Generally speaking, generic types of vorticity concentrations are formed from the cylinder during the cycle of the wave motion for all values of submergence. The proximity of the free surface, however, can exert a remarkable influence on the initial formation, the eventual strength, and the subsequent motion of concentrations of vorticity. For sufficiently shallow submergence, large-scale vortex formation from the upper surface of the cylinder is inhibited and, in contrast, that from the lower surface of the cylinder is intensified. Moreover

  2. Hepatitis C virus host cell interactions uncovered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith; Bukh, Jens

    2007-01-01

      Insights into virus-host cell interactions as uncovered by Randall et al. (1) in a recent issue of PNAS further our understanding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle, persistence, and pathogenesis and might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. HCV persistently infects 180...... million individuals worldwide, causing chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The only approved treatment, combination therapy with IFN- and ribavirin, targets cellular pathways (2); however, a sustained virologic response is achieved only in approximately half of the patients...... treated. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the identification of novel drugs against hepatitis C. Although most research focuses on the development of HCV-specific antivirals, such as protease and polymerase inhibitors (3), cellular targets could be pursued and might allow the development of broad...

  3. CZTSSe thin film solar cells: Surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, Chinmay Sunil

    Chalcopyrite semiconducting materials, specifically CZTS, are a promising alternative to traditional silicon solar cell technology. Because of the high absorption coefficient; films of the order of 1 micrometer thickness are sufficient for the fabrication of solar cells. Liquid based synthesis methods are advantageous because they are easily scalable using the roll to roll manufacturing techniques. Various treatments are explored in this study to enhance the performance of the selenized CZTS film based solar cells. Thiourea can be used as a sulfur source and can be used to tune band gap of CZTSSe. Bromine etching can be used to manipulate the thickness of sintered CZTSSe film. The etching treatment creates recombination centers which lead to poor device performance. Various after treatments were used to improve the performance of the devices. It was observed that the performance of the solar cell devices could not be improved by any of the after treatment steps. Other surface treatment processes are explored including KCN etching and gaseous H2S treatments. Hybrid solar cells which included use of CIGS nanoparticles at the interface between CZTSSe and CdS are also explored.

  4. Cdon, a cell surface protein, mediates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chun; Almazan, Guillermina

    2016-06-01

    During central nervous system development, oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) establish multiple branched processes and axonal contacts to initiate myelination. A complete understanding of the molecular signals implicated in cell surface interaction to initiate myelination/remyelination is currently lacking. The objective of our study was to assess whether Cdon, a cell surface protein that was shown to participate in muscle and neuron cell development, is involved in oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous Cdon protein is expressed in OLPs, increasing in the early differentiation stages and decreasing in mature OLGs. Immunocytochemistry of endogenous Cdon showed localization on both OLG cell membranes and cellular processes exhibiting puncta- or varicosity-like structures. Cdon knockdown with siRNA decreased protein levels by 62% as well as two myelin-specific proteins, MBP and MAG. Conversely, overexpression of full-length rat Cdon increased myelin proteins in OLGs. The complexity of OLGs branching and contact point numbers with axons were also increased in Cdon overexpressing cells growing alone or in coculture with dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Furthermore, myelination of DRGNs was decreased when OLPs were transfected with Cdon siRNA. Altogether, our results suggest that Cdon participates in OLG differentiation and myelination, most likely in the initial stages of development. GLIA 2016;64:1021-1033. PMID:26988125

  5. Groundwater- Surface Water Interaction at the Regional Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Roland; Banzhaf, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Today, both scientists and practitioners agree that management of water resources has to be performed in an integrated way. At the same time there is an increasing need for research at the regional scale (here 103 to 106 km2), because (i) this is the scale where interaction between environmental and human systems is fully developed through various links between supply and consumption, sources and sinks, etc. and (ii) the regional scale links global change to local impacts and action. The regional scale is the scale of management - to acknowledge this might be an important first step in finding the appropriate ways to address it. In any case, it is of utmost importance, that groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) interaction - as a central process of the hydrological cycle - is considered on the regional scale too. The starting point for the present contribution is two regional integrated models developed by the first author and the problems encountered in the attempt to implement adequately the GW-SW interaction therein. To evaluate if solutions to these problems were available from other studies, the available knowledge and tools were reviewed to extract common findings and guidance on how to analyse, describe and finally model GW-SW on the regional scale. Here we compare the characteristics of GW-SW interaction at different scales, the particularities of the regional scale, the available knowledge on how to regionalize and/or upscale processes, properties and parameters from smaller to larger scales and the model concepts available to describe GW-SW interaction at the regional scale. The overall conclusions are somewhat disillusioning: A large variety of research efforts has addressed the underlying problem setting and a plethora of tools were developed, yet GW-SW interaction at the regional scale is rarely explicitly addressed in a systematic way. It is evident that regional scale hydrological research on coupled surface-subsurface systems has to deal with high

  6. Flavonoid-membrane Interactions: A Protective Role of Flavonoids at the Membrane Surface?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia I. Oteiza

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids can exert beneficial health effects through multiple mechanisms. In this paper, we address the important, although not fully understood, capacity of flavonoids to interact with cell membranes. The interactions of polyphenols with bilayers include: (a the partition of the more non-polar compounds in the hydrophobic interior of the membrane, and (b the formation of hydrogen bonds between the polar head groups of lipids and the more hydrophilic flavonoids at the membrane interface. The consequences of these interactions are discussed. The induction of changes in membrane physical properties can affect the rates of membrane lipid and protein oxidation. The partition of certain flavonoids in the hydrophobic core can result in a chain breaking antioxidant activity. We suggest that interactions of polyphenols at the surface of bilayers through hydrogen bonding, can act to reduce the access of deleterious molecules (i.e. oxidants, thus protecting the structure and function of membranes.

  7. Interactions, particle size and surface effects in magnetic nanoparticle systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Mantecon, M

    2000-02-01

    This work has involved the study of the magnetic behaviour of small magnetic nanoparticle systems. Due to the reduced size of magnetic nanoparticles they present distinctive properties, such as size and surface effects, that have been analysed in this work, as well as the effect of interactions in such systems. The samples chosen for the study were magnetite particles in the form of a ferrofluid and Co nanoclusters in a nonmagnetic matrix of Cu. Both systems present very narrow particle size distributions, which facilitates the interpretation of the data. The samples have been subjected to basic characterisation, which includes the determination of the distribution of magnetic particle sizes using the magnetisation curves at room temperatures, TEM microscopy and X-ray diffraction, in the case of the ferrofluid samples. For the nanoclusters, a time of flight spectrometer has been used to obtain the number of atoms per cluster. Many of the measurements have been performed at low temperatures, where thermal effects are minimised. For such measurements the samples have been frozen in a zero applied field, so that they have a random distribution of magnetic moments prior to the measurement. The energy barrier distributions have been calculated via the temperature decay of remanence (TDR). From this study, an effective anisotropy constant has been calculated. For the study of the interactions, surface and size effects, magnetisation, susceptibility (ZFC), remanence and delta-M curves, as well as the time dependence of magnetisation have been studied. The attempt frequency of the different particle size systems has been calculated using different techniques. The basic magnetic behaviour can be explained on the basis of the Neel blocking model. It has been found that the systems with the smaller particles have significant surface effects, which are enhanced at lower temperatures. Interactions, which are weak due to the low concentration of magnetic material in the samples

  8. Nuclear Fusion Research Understanding Plasma-Surface Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Robert E.H

    2005-01-01

    It became clear in the early days of fusion research that the effects of the containment vessel (erosion of "impurities") degrade the overall fusion plasma performance. Progress in controlled nuclear fusion research over the last decade has led to magnetically confined plasmas that, in turn, are sufficiently powerful to damage the vessel structures over its lifetime. This book reviews current understanding and concepts to deal with this remaining critical design issue for fusion reactors. It reviews both progress and open questions, largely in terms of available and sought-after plasma-surface interaction data and atomic/molecular data related to these "plasma edge" issues.

  9. COMPRESSIBLE VORTEX RINGS AND THEIR INTERACTION WITH STATIONARY SURFACES

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, Raffaello

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted on the topic of the interaction of compressiblevortex rings on stationary surfaces. Throughout the campaign experimentswere carried out at pressure ratios of ! 4, 8, and 12. In the classical set up of airas both the driver and driven gas, these corresponded to theoretical incident Machnumbers Ms of 1.34, 1.54, and 1.61.Experiments were conducted on vortex rings impinging on a stationary surfacelocated at three (increasing) distances (1.66, 3.33, and 5....

  10. Interaction of Molecular Oxygen with Au (001) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Michael; Loheac, Andrew; Barbour, Andi; Komanicky, Vladimir; Ruffino, Anthony; You, Hoydoo

    Kinetics of dioxygen - Au (001) surface interaction has been studied at high temperature and near atmospheric pressures with in situ x-ray scattering measurements. We find that the hexagonal reconstruction (hex) of Au (001) surface lifts to (1×1) in the presence of dioxygen. The measured lifting rate constant vs. temperature shows a `volcano'-type behavior indicating that oxygen adsorption limits at high temperature while activation barrier of the lifting limits at low temperature. The pressure-temperature (PT) phase diagram obtained in our study shows three regions: hex at low P and T, (1×1) at high P and T, and coexistence of the hex and the (1×1) at the intermediate P and T. Funding provided by Research Corporation for Science Advancement. Work done at the Advanced Photon Source supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Surface interactions induced by polyelectrolytes, dendrimers, and dendronized polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Popa, Ionel

    2010-01-01

    Dans cette thèse, les interactions de surfaces induites par des polyélectrolytes linéaires, des dendrimères et des polymères dendronizés ont été étudiées. Les études ont été menées avec la microscopie à force atomique (AFM) et complétées par la réflectométrie. Première, l'influence de la force ionique sur l'adsorption de polyélectrolytes linéaires et du dendrimères sur des surfaces de silice planaires est étudiée. Les plateaux d'adsorption augmentent fortement avec la force ionique. Après, le...

  12. Superparamagnetic bead interactions with functionalized surfaces characterized by an immunomicroarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Moresco, Jacob Lange;

    2010-01-01

    Magneto-resistive sensors capable of detecting superparamagnetic micro-/nano-sized beads are promising alternatives to standard diagnostic assays based on absorbance or fluorescence and streptavidin-functionalized beads are widely used as an integral part of these sensors. Here we have developed an...... SiO2 performed better than polyethylene glycol-modified surfaces Two beads, Masterbeads and M-280 beads, were found to give superior results compared with other bead types. Antibody/ antigen interactions, Illustrated by C-reactive protein, were best performed with Masterbeads The results provide...... important information concerning the surface binding properties of streptavidin-functionalized beads and the immunomicroarray can be used when optimizing the performance of bead-based biosensors....

  13. Interaction of stress and phase transformations during thermochemical surface engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard

    model examined. The effect of pre-stressing the sample was also tested, to investigate the effects of a residual stress-state that might be present from processing of the metal specimen. Controlled thermochemical treatment of austenitic stainless steel was investigated experimentally by in-diffusion of......Low temperature nitriding of austenitic stainless steel causes a surface zone of expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behavior. During nitriding huge residual stresses are introduced in the treated zone, arising from the volume...... dissolution. The present project is devoted to understanding the mutual interaction of stresses and phase transformations during thermochemical surface engineering by combining numerical modelling with experimental materials science. The modelling was done by combining solid mechanics with thermodynamics and...

  14. Charged group surface accessibility determines micelleplexes formation and cellular interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yang; Sen, Soumyo; Král, Petr; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2015-04-01

    Micelleplexes are a class of nucleic acid carriers that have gained acceptance due to their size, stability, and ability to synergistically carry small molecules. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA gene regulator that is consists of 19-22 nucleotides. Altered expression of miRNAs plays an important role in many human diseases. Using a model 22-nucleotide miRNA sequence, we investigated the interaction between charged groups on the micelle surface and miRNA. The model micelle system was formed from methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide) (mPEG-PLA) mixed with methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide)-b-oligoarginine (mPEG-PLA-Rx, x = 8 or 15). Surface properties of the micelles were varied by controlling the oligoarginine block length and conjugation density. Micelles were observed to have a core-shell conformation in the aqueous environment where the PLA block constituted the hydrophobic core, mPEG and oligoarginine formed a hydrophilic corona. Significantly different thermodynamic behaviors were observed during the interaction of single stranded miRNA with micelles of different surface properties, and the resulting micelleplexes mediated substantial cellular association. Depending upon the oligoarginine length and density, micelles exhibited miRNA loading capacity directly related to the presentation of charged groups on the surface. The effect of charged group accessibility of cationic micelle on micelleplex properties provides guidance on future miRNA delivery system design.Micelleplexes are a class of nucleic acid carriers that have gained acceptance due to their size, stability, and ability to synergistically carry small molecules. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA gene regulator that is consists of 19-22 nucleotides. Altered expression of miRNAs plays an important role in many human diseases. Using a model 22-nucleotide miRNA sequence, we investigated the interaction between charged groups on the micelle surface and miRNA. The

  15. Frequency Selective Surfaces with Nanoparticles Unit Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nga Hung Poon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency selective surface (FSS is a periodic structure with filtering performance for optical and microwave signals. The general periodic arrays made with patterned metallic elements can act as an aperture or patch on a substrate. In this work, two kinds of materials were used to produce unit cells with various patterns. Gold nanoparticles of 25 nm diameter were used to form periodic monolayer arrays by a confined photocatalytic oxidation-based surface modification method. As the other material, silver gel was used to create multiple layers of silver. Due to the ultra-thin nature of the self-assembled gold nanoparticle monolayer, it is very easy to penetrate the FSS with terahertz radiation. However, the isolated silver islands made from silver gel form thicker multiple layers and contribute to much higher reflectance. This work demonstrated that multiple silver layers are more suitable than gold nanoparticles for use in the fabrication of FSS structures.

  16. Interaction of methanol and its dehydrogenation species with Pt-alloy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyanto, Wahyu Tri; Widanarto, Wahyu; Effendi, Mukhtar; Hamdi, Muhammad Raihan; Kasai, Hideaki

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption of sequential single methanol dehydrogenation intermediate species on Pt-, PtRu-, and PtRuMo-surfaces is investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). This work is a part of our efforts in understanding the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) on Pt-alloy surfaces for further possible prediction of decomposition processes. Particularly, effects of Ru and Mo impurity to the pure Pt surface to form PtRu and PtRuMo surfaces as possible candidates for promising catalysts of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are given. However, the study is limited to the scientific point of view, i.e., fundamental interactions between adsorbates and surfaces, in correspondence with adsorption mechanism using charge transfer analysis. The trend in the increase of adsorption energy and charge transfer by alloying Ru and Mo to the Pt surface is observed. Moreover, the increase of the d-orbital vacancy caused by alloying Ru and Mo possessing lesser filled d-orbital is suggested to responsible for the increase of surface-adsorbate interaction strength.

  17. Scanning tunnelling microscopy studies of cluster-surface interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kenny, D J

    2001-01-01

    experiments revealed that the localised damage formed by cluster implantation can be significantly reversed at temperatures substantially lower (923 K) than the melting temperature of graphite (4450 K). The experimental results presented in this thesis explore the interaction of clusters with the graphite surface over three energy regimes of cluster deposition: low (thermal), intermediate and high energy. Thermal evaporation of C sub 6 sub 0 onto graphite initially results in the nucleation of islands, which subsequently grow to form thin films on the surface. It is demonstrated that the growth of such films is highly dependent upon the cleanliness of the surface and the temperature of the substrate during deposition. It is further suggested that the energetically favoured growth mode is that of an initial bi-layer in preference to a monolayer. Energetic deposition of Ag sub 7 sup - onto graphite is shown to result in the pinning of the cluster to the surface at intermediate energies (approx 300 eV) and impla...

  18. Interaction of bacteria and a chemically patterned surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Maryam; Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2012-11-01

    We are investigating the mechanisms involved in the interactions between bacteria and chemically patched oil-water interface. Using micro-fabrication and soft-lithography, we have engineered a chemically patterned solid surface to mimic the real interfacial environment. Arrays of 2D geometries whose characteristic size ranges from 10 μm to 100 μm are patterned onto a glass substrate and subsequently functionalized using Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS). The photoresist covering geometries is further removed after functionalization. Consequently, a chemically patterned surface with alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions is produced as the substrate for microfluidics. The effects of this surface on bacteria attachment and detachment are evaluated in-situ. The growth rates of biofilm are quantified by measuring the morphology of bacterial colony. To elucidate hydrodynamic mechanism involved, bacteria swimming characteristics, such as swimming velocity, angle, tumbling frequency and dispersion, is measured within a microfluidics with a patterned substrate using 3D digital holographic microscopy. Comparative studies on smooth swimming and tumbling capable strains over such surfaces will also be presented. GoMRI.

  19. Impact of river restoration on groundwater - surface water - interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Anne-Marie; Schirmer, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Since the end of the 19th century, flood protection was increasingly based on the construction of impermeable dams and side walls (BWG, 2003). In spite of providing flood protection, these measures also limited the connectivity between the river and the land, restricted the area available for flooding, and hampered the natural flow dynamics of the river. Apart from the debilitating effect on riverine ecosystems due to loss of habitats, these measures also limited bank filtration, inhibited the infiltration of storm water, and affected groundwater-surface water-interactions. This in turn had a profound effect on ecosystem health, as a lack of groundwater-surface water interactions led to decreased cycling of pollutants and nutrients in the hyporheic zone and limited the moderation of the water temperature (EA, 2009). In recent decades, it has become apparent that further damages to riverine ecosystems must be prohibited, as the damages to ecology, economy and society surmount any benefits gained from exploiting them. Nowadays, the restoration of rivers is a globally accepted means to restore ecosystem functioning, protect water resources and amend flood protection (Andrea et al., 2012; Palmer et al., 2005; Wortley et al., 2013). In spite of huge efforts regarding the restoration of rivers over the last 30 years, the question of its effectiveness remains, as river restorations often reconstruct a naturally looking rather than a naturally functioning stream (EA, 2009). We therefore focussed our research on the effectiveness of river restorations, represented by the groundwater-surface water-interactions. Given a sufficiently high groundwater level, a lack of groundwater-surface water-interactions after restoration may indicate that the vertical connectivity in the stream was not fully restored. In order to investigate groundwater-surface water-interactions we determined the thermal signature on the stream bed and in +/- 40 cm depth by using Distributed Temperature

  20. Wettability influences cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces with different topographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourenco, B.N.; Marchioli, G.; Song, W; Reis, R.L.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Karperien, H.B.J.; Apeldoorn, van A.A.; Mano, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Surface wettability and topography are recognized as critical factors influencing cell behavior on biomaterials. So far only few works have reported cell responses on surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability in combination with surface topography. The goal of this work is to study whether cell behavi

  1. Cell Surface Enzymatic Engineering-Based Approaches to Improve Cellular Therapies

    KAUST Repository

    Abuelela, Ayman F.

    2014-06-06

    The cell surface represents the interface between the cell and its environment. As such, the cell surface controls cell–cell interactions and functions such as adhesion and migration, and will transfer external cues to regulate processes such as survival, death, and differentiation. Redefining the cell surface by temporarily (or permanently) modifying the molecular landscape of the plasma membrane affects the way in which the cell interacts with its environment and influences the information that is relayed into the cell along downstream signaling pathways. This chapter outlines the role of key enzymes, the glycosyltransferases, in posttranslationally modifying proteins and lipids to fine-tune cells, ability to migrate. These enzymes are critical in controlling the formation of a platform structure, sialyl Lewis x (sLex), on circulating cells that plays a central role in the recognition and recruitment by selectin counter receptors on endothelial cells that line blood vessels of tissues throughout the body. By developing methods to manipulate the activity of these enzymes and hence the cell surface structures that result, treatments can be envisioned that direct the migration of therapeutic cells to specific locations throughout the body and also to inhibit metastasis of detrimental cells such as circulating tumor cells.

  2. The interaction between multiple bubbles and the free surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang A-Man; Yao Xiong-Liang

    2008-01-01

    The flow is assumed to be potential, and a boundary integral method is used to solve the Laplace equation for the velocity potential to investigate the shape and the position of the bubble. A 3D code to study the bubble dynamics is developed, and the calculation results agree well with the experimental data. Numerical analyses are carried out for the interaction between multiple bubbles near the free surface including in-phase and out-of-phase bubbles. The calculation result shows that the bubble period increases with the decrease of the distance between bubble centres because of the depression effect between multiple bubbles. The depression has no relationship with the free surface and it is more apparent for out-of-phase bubbles. There are great differences in dynamic behaviour between the in-phase bubbles and the out-of-phase bubbles due to the depression effect. Furthermore, the interaction among eight bubbles is simulated with a three-dimensional model, and the evolving process and the relevant physical phenomena are presented. These phenomena can give a reference to the future work on the power of bubbles induced by multiple charges exploding simultaneously or continuously.

  3. Surface Properties of Cell-treated Polyethylene Terephthalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Shi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The materials used in artificial joints undergo degradation through fatigue and corrosive wear in human body. The lifetime for well-designed artificial joints like hip joints is at most 12 years and a patient will usually have two total joint replacements during his/her lifetime. Tissue engineering, an alternative to total joint implantation, is the replacement of damaged tissue with the tissue that is designed and constructed to meet the needs of the individual patient. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET in the form of overhead transparency films were investigated on their cell interactions and the tribological properties as an alternative tissue-engineering matrix. The base material of the transparency films is PET. Cell culture methods as well as atomic force microscope (AFM, contact angle goniometer, confocal microscope and universal tribotester were used to study the properties of the substrate materials and the interactions between the surface and the substrate materials. Results showed that cells grew on the substrate of the base materials of the PET. The tribological properties of the slides have been changed after being cell-treated.

  4. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    Galectin-1 is known to be one of the extracellular matrix proteins. To elucidate the biological roles of galectin-1 in cell adhesion and invasion of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we performed cell adhesion and invasion assays using the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line H-ALCL, which was previously established in our laboratory. From the cell surface lectin array, treatment with neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens which cleaves all linkage types of cell surface sialic acid enhanced Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Helix pomatia (HPA) and Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA) lectin binding reactivity to cell surface of lymphoma cells suggesting that neuraminidase removes cell surface sialic acid. In cell adhesion and invasion assays treatment with neuraminidase markedly enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1 and decreased cell invasive capacity through galectin-1. α2,6-linked sialic acid may be involved in masking the effect of the interaction between galectin-1 and cell surface glycans. H-ALCL cells expressed the β-galactoside-α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6Gal1. On resialylation assay by recombinant ST6Gal1 with CMP-Neu5Ac, α2,6-resialylation of L-PHA reactive oligosaccharide by ST6Gal1 resulted in inhibition of H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-1 compared to the desialylated H-ALCL cells. On knockdown experiments, knockdown of ST6Gal1 dramatically enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1. N-glycosylation inhibitor swainsonine treatment resulted in enhancement of cell adhesion to galectin-1. In glycomic analysis using the lectin blocking assay treatment with PNA, Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin), Glycine max (SBA), Helix pomatia (HPA), Vicia villosa (VVA), Ulex europaeus (UEA-1), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA), Phaseolus vulgaris-E4 (E-PHA), Datura stramonium (DSA) lectins resulted in modulation of lymphoma cell to galectin-1 suggesting that several types of glycans may regulate cell adhesion to galectin-1 by

  5. Scanning tunnelling microscopy studies of cluster-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental results presented in this thesis explore the interaction of clusters with the graphite surface over three energy regimes of cluster deposition: low (thermal), intermediate and high energy. Thermal evaporation of C60 onto graphite initially results in the nucleation of islands, which subsequently grow to form thin films on the surface. It is demonstrated that the growth of such films is highly dependent upon the cleanliness of the surface and the temperature of the substrate during deposition. It is further suggested that the energetically favoured growth mode is that of an initial bi-layer in preference to a monolayer. Energetic deposition of Ag7- onto graphite is shown to result in the pinning of the cluster to the surface at intermediate energies (∼ 300 eV) and implantation at high energies (> 1000 eV). An oxidative etching technique was used to transform the defects formed through cluster implantation into pits in the surface. Due to the anisotropic reactivity of graphite, these pits grow laterally, yet are known to remain of the same depth as the implanted cluster. Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) was used to characterise the depth of the pits and hence allowed the cluster implantation depth to be investigated as a function of the deposition energy. The results demonstrate that, for the case of Ag7-, the implantation depth scales with the velocity of the cluster and not its energy. Additional annealing experiments revealed that the localised damage formed by cluster implantation can be significantly reversed at temperatures substantially lower (923 K) than the melting temperature of graphite (4450 K). (author)

  6. Interaction of surfactants with hydrophobic surfaces in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumaru, Claudiu; Geng, Maxwell L

    2010-12-21

    Surfactant-induced wetting of hydrophobic nanopores is investigated. SDS micelles interact with the C18 layer on the nanopore walls with their hydrophobic tails, creating a charged wall lining with their head groups and inducing a breakthrough of the aqueous solution to wet the pores. The surface coverage of the surfactant molecules is evaluated electrophoretically. A surprising discovery is that pore wetting is achieved with 0.73 μmol/m(2) coverage of SDS surfactant, corresponding to only 18% of a monolayer on the walls of the nanopores. Clearly, the surfactant molecules cannot organize as a compact uninterrupted monolayer. Instead, formation of hemimicelles is thermodynamically favored. Modeling shows that, to be consistent with the experimental observations, the aggregation number of hemimicelles is lower than 25 and the size of hemimicelle is limited to a maximum radius of 11.7 Å. The hydrophobic tails of SDS thus penetrate into and intercalate with the C18 layer. The insight gained in the C18-surfactant interactions is essential in the surfactant-induced solubilization of hydrophobic nanoporous particles. The results have bearing on the understanding of the nature of hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21043464

  7. Micro checkerboard patterned polymeric surface with discrete rigidity for studying cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Juhee; Lee, Sujin; Park, Sukho; Lee, Junghoon

    2015-04-01

    The control of cell migration has an important role in processes ranging from developmental morphogenesis to the pathogenesis. In this study, we describe a novel approach to develop a micro-checkerboard patterned polymeric flat surface with discrete surface stiffness. This platform as a culture substrate allows us to explore the mechanism of durotaxis, referred to as the directed cell movement via the gradient of surface stiffness. The flat surface with different rigidity was achieved in two stages of fabrication. First, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was pressed and cured on a glass substrate with trenches of varying depths in a checkerboard arrangement, and then, a thin PDMS layer was spin coated on the previous pattern to make the flat surface. The stiff region is defined by a thin layer (2.5 µm) of PDMS and the soft region is defined by a thick one (7.5 µm). To investigate the migratory cell behavior, the NIH 3T3 cell was cultured. The result demonstrates that a single cell showed clearly a migratory cell behavior toward the stiffer regions driven by the difference of effective surface stiffness. At high cell density, the effect of cell migration on effective surface stiffness decreased with increasing cell-cell interactions. However, cell migration was still dominated by difference of effective surface stiffness while fluctuating at the boundary between the stiff and soft regions. This approach enables us to control the mechanical and topological properties of surface. The developed platform will also offer a useful tool to study cell-substrate interaction mediated by surface stiffness (e.g. mechanotransduction).

  8. Hydrophobic interaction governs unspecific adhesion of staphylococci: a single cell force spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Thewes; Peter Loskill; Philipp Jung; Henrik Peisker; Markus Bischoff; Mathias Herrmann; Karin Jacobs

    2014-01-01

    Unspecific adhesion of bacteria is usually the first step in the formation of biofilms on abiotic surfaces, yet it is unclear up to now which forces are governing this process. Alongside long-ranged van der Waals and electrostatic forces, short-ranged hydrophobic interaction plays an important role. To characterize the forces involved during approach and retraction of an individual bacterium to and from a surface, single cell force spectroscopy is applied: A single cell of the apathogenic spe...

  9. Interaction of flexible surface hairs with near-wall turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of near-wall turbulence with hairy surfaces is investigated in a turbulent boundary layer flow along a flat plate in an oil channel at Re = 1.2 x 106. The plate is covered locally with a dense carpet of elastomeric micro-hairs (length L = 1 mm, length in viscous units L+ = 30) which are arranged in a regular grid (60 x 30 hairs with a streamwise spacing Δx+∼15 and a spanwise spacing Δy+∼30). Instead of the micro-structures used in previous studies for sensory applications, the surface hairs are considerably larger and much more densely distributed with a spacing of S/D < 5 such that they interact with each other by flow coupling. The non-fluctuating mean part of the flow forces a substantial pre-bending in the streamwise direction (reconfiguration). As a consequence, the hairs align with the streamwise direction, thus imposing anisotropic damping characteristics with regard to flow fluctuations in streamwise and spanwise or wall-normal directions. Near-wall high-frequency disturbances excited by the passage of turbulent sweeps are dampened over their course along the carpet. The cooperative action of the hairs leads to an energy transfer from small-scale motion to larger scales, thus increasing the coherence of the motion pattern in streamwise and spanwise directions. As a consequence of the specific arrangement of the micro-hairs in streamwise columns a reduced spanwise meandering and stabilization of the streamwise velocity streaks is achieved by promoting varicose waves and inhibiting sinusoidal waves. Streak stabilization is known to be a major contributor to turbulent drag reduction. Thus it is concluded that hairy surfaces may be of benefit for turbulent drag reduction as hypothesized by Bartenwerfer and Bechert (1991 Z. Flugwiss. Weltraumforsch. 15 19-26).

  10. Single-cell dynamics of mast cell-CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossi, Barbara; D'Incà, Federica; Crivellato, Enrico; Sibilano, Riccardo; Gri, Giorgia; Mongillo, Marco; Danelli, Luca; Maggi, Laura; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2011-07-01

    The biological behavior of immune cells is determined by their intrinsic properties and interactions with other cell populations within their microenvironment. Several studies have confirmed the existence of tight spatial interactions between mast cells (MCs) and Tregs in different settings. For instance, we have recently identified the functional cross-talk between MCs and Tregs, through the OX40L-OX40 axis, as a new mechanism of reciprocal influence. However, there is scant information regarding the single-cell dynamics of this process. In this study, time-lapse video microscopy revealed direct interactions between Tregs and MCs in both murine and human cell co-cultures, resulting in the inhibition of the MC degranulation response. MCs incubated with WT, but not OX40-deficient, Tregs mediated numerous and long-lasting interactions and displayed different morphological features lacking the classical signs of exocytosis. MC degranulation and Ca2+ mobilization upon activation were inhibited by Tregs on a single-cell basis, without affecting overall cytokine secretion. Transmission electron microscopy showed ultrastructural evidence of vesicle-mediated secretion reconcilable with the morphological pattern of piecemeal degranulation. Our results suggest that MC morphological and functional changes following MC-Treg interactions can be ascribed to cell-cell contact and represent a transversal, non-species-specific mechanism of immune response regulation. Further research, looking at the molecular composition of this interaction will broaden our understanding of its contribution to immunity. PMID:21509780

  11. Electron microscopy study of antioxidant interaction with bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Oleg P.; Novikova, Olga V.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Gunkin, Ivan F.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    2000-10-01

    To maintain native microorganisms genotype and phenotype features a lyophylization technique is widely used. However in this case cells are affected by influences of vacuum and low temperature that cause a part of the cells population to be destruction. Another factor reduced microorganisms vitality is formation of reactive oxygen forms that damage certain biological targets (such as DNA, membranes etc.) Recently to raise microorganism's resistance against adverse condition natural and synthetic antioxidants are used. Antioxidant- are antagonists of free radicals. Introduction of antioxidants in protective medium for lyophylization increase bacteria storage life about 2,0-4,8 fold in comparison with reference samples. In the article the main results of our investigation of antioxidants interaction with microorganism cells is described. As bacteria cells we use vaccine strain yersinia pestis EV, that were grown for 48 h at 28 degree(s)C on the Hottinger agar (pH 7,2). Antioxidants are inserted on the agar surface in specimen under test. To investigate a localization of antioxidants for electron microscopy investigation, thallium organic antioxidants were used. The thallium organic compounds have an antioxidant features if thallium is in low concentration (about 1(mu) g/ml). The localization of the thallium organic antioxidants on bacteria Y. pestis EV is visible in electron microscopy images, thallium being heavy metal with high electron density. The negatively stained bacteria and bacteria thin sections with thallium organic compounds were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. The localization of the thallium organic compounds is clearly visible in electron micrographs as small dark spots with size about 10-80nm. Probably mechanisms of interaction of antioxidants with bacteria cells are discussed.

  12. Chemistry and material science at the cell surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weian Zhao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell surfaces are fertile ground for chemists and material scientists to manipulate or augment cell functions and phenotypes. This not only helps to answer basic biology questions but also has diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances in the engineering of the cell surface. In particular, we focus on the potential applications of surface engineered cells for 1 targeting cells to desirable sites in cell therapy, 2 programming assembly of cells for tissue engineering, 3 bioimaging and sensing, and ultimately 4 manipulating cell biology.

  13. Surface water and groundwater interaction in Marala - Khanki area, Punjab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope hydrological investigations were carried out in two selected areas of Indus Basin viz. Haripur Area and Chashma- Taunsa Area for elucidating various aspects of surface water and groundwater interaction. Groundwater samples were collected on seasonal basis (low and high river discharge periods) while surface water samples were collected more frequently (weekly or monthly basis). Isotopic data suggested that there is no contribution of surface water to groundwater recharge in Haripur Area and rain is the prevailing source of groundwater recharge. The data further revealed that isotopic values of the Haripur pocket of Tarbela Lake are higher than those of Main Lake / Indus River meaning that there is a significant contribution of base flow in this pocket. Indus River appeared to be the dominant source of groundwater recharge at most of the locations in Chashma- Taunsa Area. Isotopic data of Indus River showed an increase at Taunsa as compared to Chashma in low flow period indicating the high contribution of base flow at this point in time. Stable isotopes were successfully used to quantify the base flow contribution. (author)

  14. Calculation of cell volumes and surface areas in MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCNP is a general Monte Carlo neutron-photon particle transport code which treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces, and some special fourth-degree surfaces. It is necessary to calculate cell volumes and surface areas so that cell masses, fluxes, and other important information can be determined. The volume/area calculation in MCNP computes cell volumes and surface areas for cells and surfaces rotationally symmetric about any arbitrary axis. 5 figures, 1 table

  15. Hydrophobic interaction governs unspecific adhesion of staphylococci: a single cell force spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, Nicolas; Loskill, Peter; Jung, Philipp; Peisker, Henrik; Bischoff, Markus; Herrmann, Mathias; Jacobs, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Unspecific adhesion of bacteria is usually the first step in the formation of biofilms on abiotic surfaces, yet it is unclear up to now which forces are governing this process. Alongside long-ranged van der Waals and electrostatic forces, short-ranged hydrophobic interaction plays an important role. To characterize the forces involved during approach and retraction of an individual bacterium to and from a surface, single cell force spectroscopy is applied: A single cell of the apathogenic species Staphylococcus carnosus isolate TM300 is used as bacterial probe. With the exact same bacterium, hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces can be probed and compared. We find that as far as 50 nm from the surface, attractive forces can already be recorded, an indication of the involvement of long-ranged forces. Yet, comparing the surfaces of different surface energy, our results corroborate the model that large, bacterial cell wall proteins are responsible for adhesion, and that their interplay with the short-ranged hydrophobic interaction of the involved surfaces is mainly responsible for adhesion. The ostensibly long range of the attraction is a result of the large size of the cell wall proteins, searching for contact via hydrophobic interaction. The model also explains the strong (weak) adhesion of S. carnosus to hydrophobic (hydrophilic) surfaces. PMID:25247133

  16. Hydrophobic interaction governs unspecific adhesion of staphylococci: a single cell force spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Thewes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Unspecific adhesion of bacteria is usually the first step in the formation of biofilms on abiotic surfaces, yet it is unclear up to now which forces are governing this process. Alongside long-ranged van der Waals and electrostatic forces, short-ranged hydrophobic interaction plays an important role. To characterize the forces involved during approach and retraction of an individual bacterium to and from a surface, single cell force spectroscopy is applied: A single cell of the apathogenic species Staphylococcus carnosus isolate TM300 is used as bacterial probe. With the exact same bacterium, hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces can be probed and compared. We find that as far as 50 nm from the surface, attractive forces can already be recorded, an indication of the involvement of long-ranged forces. Yet, comparing the surfaces of different surface energy, our results corroborate the model that large, bacterial cell wall proteins are responsible for adhesion, and that their interplay with the short-ranged hydrophobic interaction of the involved surfaces is mainly responsible for adhesion. The ostensibly long range of the attraction is a result of the large size of the cell wall proteins, searching for contact via hydrophobic interaction. The model also explains the strong (weak adhesion of S. carnosus to hydrophobic (hydrophilic surfaces.

  17. Surface water and groundwater interaction on a hill island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumph Frederiksen, Rasmus; Rømer Rasmussen, Keld; Christensen, Steen

    2014-05-01

    A number of recent studies have indicated that the hydrological system in stream valleys is often complex and exchange of water takes place through semi-permeable contacts and flow paths may be quite diverse. Yet, surface water and groundwater interaction in one of the major Danish landscapes - the hill islands - is relatively unknown. This study aims at providing new information about the rainfall-runoff processes in hill island landscapes where surface water and groundwater interaction is expected to have a dominant role and hill-slope processes not. Through stream flow measurements, field observations, and existing geological and geophysical data, we have investigated the surface water and groundwater interaction in the Abild Stream catchment (flow indicating that shallow control by low permeable sediments is important. Nevertheless irrigation is intensive which indicates that the soil and shallow sediments are permeable. Since July 2014 we have measured stream flow during quarterly campaigns at 11 stations along the stream representing different spatial scales and using Acoustic Doppler techniques (ADCP) as well as current-meters. Furthermore we have mapped topography, soil types, geomorphology, ditches, drains and land use through field observations and digital maps. The shallow subsurface geology has been mapped using abundant well described geological data (boreholes) and geophysical data (airborne TEM). Our stream flow measurements show that the tributaries from west and north dry out during the summer period. Significant drained areas in the NW- and SW-part of the catchment have been observed from old topographical maps as well as in the field. The geological data indicate shallow low permeable sediments primarily on the western side of Abild stream, and the geophysical data indicate shallow low resistivity layers on the western side of the stream. All these findings indicate a catchment with at least two different hydrogeological settings. To further

  18. Quantification of antibody production of individual hybridoma cells by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, I.; Velden, van der T.J.G.; Mulder, H.W.; Schasfoort, R.B.M.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) is most frequently used for the label-free measurement of biomolecular interactions. Here we explore the potential of SPRi to measure antibody production of individual hybridoma cells. As a model system, cells from a hybridoma, producing monoclonal antibodies

  19. Interactions between bone cells and biomaterials: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Sabrina; Drevelle, Olivier; Jann, Jessica; Lauzon, Marc-Antoine; Foruzanmehr, Mohammadreza; Grenier, Guillaume; Roux, Sophie; Faucheux, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

     As the populations of the Western world become older, they will suffer more and more from bone defects related to osteoporosis (non-union fractures, vertebral damages), cancers (malignant osteolysis) and infections (osteomyelitis). Autografts are usually used to fill these defects, but they have several drawbacks such as morbidity at the donor site and the amount and quality of bone that can be harvested. Recent scientific milestones made in biomaterials development were shown to be promising to overcome these limitations. Cell interactions with biomaterials can be improved by adding at their surface functional groups such as adhesive peptides and/or growth factors. The development of such biomimetic materials able to control bone cell responses can only proceed if it is based on a sound understanding of bone cell behavior and regulation. This review focuses on bone physiology and the regulation of bone cell differentiation and function, and how the latest advances in biomimetic materials can be translated within promising clinical outcomes. PMID:27100704

  20. Interband interaction between bulk and surface resonance bands of a Pb-adsorbed Ge(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Tomohiro; Takeda, Sakura N.; Kitagawa, Kosuke; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the valence band structure of a Pb-adsorbed Ge(001) surface by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Three Ge bands, G1, G2, and G3, were observed in a Ge(001) 2 × 1 clean surface. In addition to these three bands, a fourth band (R band) is found on the surface with 2 ML of Pb. The R band continuously appeared even when the surface superstructure was changed. The position of the R band does not depend on Pb coverage. These results indicate that the R band derives from Ge subsurface states, known as surface resonance states. Furthermore, the effective mass of G3 is significantly reduced when the R band exists. We found that this reduction of G3 effective mass was explained by the interaction of the G3 and R bands. Consequently, the surface resonance band is considered to penetrate into the Ge subsurface region affecting the Ge bulk states. We determine the hybridization energy to be 0.068 eV by fitting the observed bands.

  1. Dynamics of gas-surface interactions atomic-level understanding of scattering processes at surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Díez Muniño, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    This book gives a representative survey of the state of the art of research on gas-surface interactions. It provides an overview of the current understanding of gas surface dynamics and, in particular, of the reactive and non-reactive processes of atoms and small molecules at surfaces. Leading scientists in the field, both from the theoretical and the experimental sides, write in this book about their most recent advances. Surface science grew as an interdisciplinary research area over the last decades, mostly because of new experimental technologies (ultra-high vacuum, for instance), as well as because of a novel paradigm, the ‘surface science’ approach. The book describes the second transformation which is now taking place pushed by the availability of powerful quantum-mechanical theoretical methods implemented numerically. In the book, experiment and theory progress hand in hand with an unprecedented degree of accuracy and control. The book presents how modern surface science targets the atomic-level u...

  2. Enhancement of Chemotactic Cell Aggregation by Haptotactic Cell-To-Cell Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Goo Kwon

    Full Text Available The crawling of biological cell is a complex phenomenon involving various biochemical and mechanical processes. Some of these processes are intrinsic to individual cells, while others pertain to cell-to-cell interactions and to their responses to extrinsically imposed cues. Here, we report an interesting aggregation dynamics of mathematical model cells, when they perform chemotaxis in response to an externally imposed global chemical gradient while they influence each other through a haptotaxis-mediated social interaction, which confers intriguing trail patterns. In the absence of the cell-to-cell interaction, the equilibrium population density profile fits well to that of a simple Keller-Segal population dynamic model, in which a chemotactic current density [Formula: see text] competes with a normal diffusive current density [Formula: see text], where p and ρ refer to the concentration of chemoattractant and population density, respectively. We find that the cell-to-cell interaction confers a far more compact aggregation resulting in a much higher peak equilibrium cell density. The mathematical model system is applicable to many biological systems such as swarming microglia and neutrophils or accumulating ants towards a localized food source.

  3. Revealing the role of catechol moieties in the interactions between peptides and inorganic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Priyadip; Reches, Meital

    2016-08-18

    Catechol (1,2-dihydroxy benzene) moieties are being widely used today in new adhesive technologies. Understanding their mechanism of action is therefore of high importance for developing their applications in materials science. This paper describes a single-molecule study of the interactions between catechol-related amino acid residues and a well-defined titanium dioxide (TiO2) surface. It is the first quantified measurement of the adhesion of these residues with a well-defined TiO2 surface. Single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements with AFM determined the role of different substitutions of the catechol moiety on the aromatic ring in the adhesion to the surface. These results shed light on the nature of interactions between these residues and inorganic metal oxide surfaces. This information is important for the design and fabrication of catechol-based materials such as hydrogels, coatings, and composites. Specifically, the interaction with TiO2 is important for the development of solar cells. PMID:27503417

  4. Relative states in quantum teleology of the ion - surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of the new results concerning the role of observers in quantum teleology, related with the Everett - Wheeler's 'relative state' formulation of quantum mechanics is presented. Our key argument is that a single active electron at intermediate stages of the ion - surface interaction can be described simultaneously within the framework of two different scenarios with two observers. The quantum experiences of these observers are based on two different relative electron states, |Ψ1(t)> and |Ψ2(t)>, evolving causally in two opposite directions of time. For the observer of the second scenario, two results of the post - selection test at time tfin are possible: the active electron can be in either bound ionic state or the state of the solid above the Fermi level. These alternatives are interpreted as the initial state |Ψ2(t)> in the time -inverted picture of the renormalized second scenario

  5. The derivative expansion approach to the interaction between close surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Fosco, C D; Mazzitelli, F D

    2014-01-01

    The derivative expansion approach to the calculation of the interaction between two surfaces, is a generalization of the proximity force approximation, a technique of widespread use in different areas of physics. The derivative expansion has so far been applied to seemingly unrelated problems in different areas; it is our principal aim here to present the approach in its full generality. To that end, we introduce an unified setting, which is independent of any particular application, provide a formal derivation of the derivative expansion in that general setting, and study some its properties. With a view on the possible application of the derivative expansion to other areas, like nuclear and colloidal physics, we also discuss the relation between the derivative expansion and some time-honoured uncontrolled approximations used in those contexts. By putting them under similar terms as the derivative expansion, we believe that the path is open to the calculation of next to leading order corrections also for tho...

  6. Soft surfaces of nanomaterials enable strong phonon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozyigit, Deniz; Yazdani, Nuri; Yarema, Maksym; Yarema, Olesya; Lin, Weyde Matteo Mario; Volk, Sebastian; Vuttivorakulchai, Kantawong; Luisier, Mathieu; Juranyi, Fanni; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-03-01

    Phonons and their interactions with other phonons, electrons or photons drive energy gain, loss and transport in materials. Although the phonon density of states has been measured and calculated in bulk crystalline semiconductors, phonons remain poorly understood in nanomaterials, despite the increasing prevalence of bottom-up fabrication of semiconductors from nanomaterials and the integration of nanometre-sized components into devices. Here we quantify the phononic properties of bottom-up fabricated semiconductors as a function of crystallite size using inelastic neutron scattering measurements and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that, unlike in microcrystalline semiconductors, the phonon modes of semiconductors with nanocrystalline domains exhibit both reduced symmetry and low energy owing to mechanical softness at the surface of those domains. These properties become important when phonons couple to electrons in semiconductor devices. Although it was initially believed that the coupling between electrons and phonons is suppressed in nanocrystalline materials owing to the scarcity of electronic states and their large energy separation, it has since been shown that the electron–phonon coupling is large and allows high energy-dissipation rates exceeding one electronvolt per picosecond (refs 10, 11, 12, 13). Despite detailed investigations into the role of phonons in exciton dynamics, leading to a variety of suggestions as to the origins of these fast transition rates and including attempts to numerically calculate them, fundamental questions surrounding electron–phonon interactions in nanomaterials remain unresolved. By combining the microscopic and thermodynamic theories of phonons and our findings on the phononic properties of nanomaterials, we are able to explain and then experimentally confirm the strong electron–phonon coupling and fast multi-phonon transition rates of charge carriers to trap states. This improved understanding of

  7. Local cell metrics: a novel method for analysis of cell-cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chien-Chiang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of many cell functions is inherently linked to cell-cell contact interactions. However, effects of contact interactions among adherent cells can be difficult to detect with global summary statistics due to the localized nature and noise inherent to cell-cell interactions. The lack of informatics approaches specific for detecting cell-cell interactions is a limitation in the analysis of large sets of cell image data, including traditional and combinatorial or high-throughput studies. Here we introduce a novel histogram-based data analysis strategy, termed local cell metrics (LCMs, which addresses this shortcoming. Results The new LCM method is demonstrated via a study of contact inhibition of proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. We describe how LCMs can be used to quantify the local environment of cells and how LCMs are decomposed mathematically into metrics specific to each cell type in a culture, e.g., differently-labelled cells in fluorescence imaging. Using this approach, a quantitative, probabilistic description of the contact inhibition effects in MC3T3-E1 cultures has been achieved. We also show how LCMs are related to the naïve Bayes model. Namely, LCMs are Bayes class-conditional probability functions, suggesting their use for data mining and classification. Conclusion LCMs are successful in robust detection of cell contact inhibition in situations where conventional global statistics fail to do so. The noise due to the random features of cell behavior was suppressed significantly as a result of the focus on local distances, providing sensitive detection of cell-cell contact effects. The methodology can be extended to any quantifiable feature that can be obtained from imaging of cell cultures or tissue samples, including optical, fluorescent, and confocal microscopy. This approach may prove useful in interpreting culture and histological data in fields where cell-cell interactions play a critical

  8. Lateral interactions and non-equilibrium in surface kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Dietrich

    2016-08-01

    Work modelling reactions between surface species frequently use Langmuir kinetics, assuming that the layer is in internal equilibrium, and that the chemical potential of adsorbates corresponds to that of an ideal gas. Coverage dependences of reacting species and of site blocking are usually treated with simple power law coverage dependences (linear in the simplest case), neglecting that lateral interactions are strong in adsorbate and co-adsorbate layers which may influence kinetics considerably. My research group has in the past investigated many co-adsorbate systems and simple reactions in them. We have collected a number of examples where strong deviations from simple coverage dependences exist, in blocking, promoting, and selecting reactions. Interactions can range from those between next neighbors to larger distances, and can be quite complex. In addition, internal equilibrium in the layer as well as equilibrium distributions over product degrees of freedom can be violated. The latter effect leads to non-equipartition of energy over molecular degrees of freedom (for products) or non-equal response to those of reactants. While such behavior can usually be described by dynamic or kinetic models, the deeper reasons require detailed theoretical analysis. Here, a selection of such cases is reviewed to exemplify these points.

  9. Pigment epithelium-derived factor binds to cell-surface F(1)-ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, Luigi; Arakaki, Naokatu; Mueller, David; Meier, Scott; Amaral, Juan; Becerra, S P

    2010-05-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a potent blocker of angiogenesis in vivo, and of endothelial cell migration and tubule formation, binds with high affinity to an as yet unknown protein on the surfaces of endothelial cells. Given that protein fingerprinting suggested a match of a approximately 60 kDa PEDF-binding protein in bovine retina with Bos taurus F(1)-ATP synthase beta-subunit, and that F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase components have been identified recently as cell-surface receptors, we examined the direct binding of PEDF to F(1). Size-exclusion ultrafiltration assays showed that recombinant human PEDF formed a complex with recombinant yeast F(1). Real-time binding as determined by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that yeast F(1) interacted specifically and reversibly with human PEDF. Kinetic evaluations revealed high binding affinity for PEDF, in agreement with PEDF affinities for endothelial cell surfaces. PEDF blocked interactions between F(1) and angiostatin, another antiangiogenic factor, suggesting overlapping PEDF-binding and angiostatin-binding sites on F(1). Surfaces of endothelial cells exhibited affinity for PEDF-binding proteins of approximately 60 kDa. Antibodies to F(1)beta-subunit specifically captured PEDF-binding components in endothelial plasma membranes. The extracellular ATP synthesis activity of endothelial cells was examined in the presence of PEDF. PEDF significantly reduced the amount of extracellular ATP produced by endothelial cells, in agreement with direct interactions between cell-surface ATP synthase and PEDF. In addition to demonstrating that PEDF binds to cell-surface F(1), these results show that PEDF is a ligand for endothelial cell-surface F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase. They suggest that PEDF-mediated inhibition of ATP synthase may form part of the biochemical mechanisms by which PEDF exerts its antiangiogenic activity. PMID:20412062

  10. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Couchman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton.

  11. Cancer stem cell-vascular endothelial cell interactions in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aman; Shiras, Anjali

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a higher grade glial tumor, is highly aggressive, therapy resistant and often shows poor patient prognosis due to frequent recurrence. These features of GBM are attributed to presence of a significantly smaller proportion of glioma stem cells (GSCs) that are endowed with self-renewal ability, multi-potent nature and show resistance to therapy in patients. GSCs preferably take shelter close to tumor vasculature due to paracrine need of soluble factors secreted by endothelial cells (ECs) of vasculature. The physical proximity of GSCs to ECs creates a localized perivascular niche where mutual GSC-EC interactions regulate GSC stemness, migration, therapy resistance, and cellular kinetics during tumor growth. Together, perivascular niche presents a therapeutically targetable tumor structure for clinical management of GBM. Thus, understanding cellular and non-cellular components in perivascular niche is vital for designing in vitro and in vivo GBM tumor models. Here, we discuss the components and structure of tumor vascular niche and its impact on tumor progression. PMID:26692486

  12. Micro checkerboard patterned polymeric surface with discrete rigidity for studying cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control of cell migration has an important role in processes ranging from developmental morphogenesis to the pathogenesis. In this study, we describe a novel approach to develop a micro-checkerboard patterned polymeric flat surface with discrete surface stiffness. This platform as a culture substrate allows us to explore the mechanism of durotaxis, referred to as the directed cell movement via the gradient of surface stiffness. The flat surface with different rigidity was achieved in two stages of fabrication. First, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was pressed and cured on a glass substrate with trenches of varying depths in a checkerboard arrangement, and then, a thin PDMS layer was spin coated on the previous pattern to make the flat surface. The stiff region is defined by a thin layer (2.5 µm) of PDMS and the soft region is defined by a thick one (7.5 µm). To investigate the migratory cell behavior, the NIH 3T3 cell was cultured. The result demonstrates that a single cell showed clearly a migratory cell behavior toward the stiffer regions driven by the difference of effective surface stiffness. At high cell density, the effect of cell migration on effective surface stiffness decreased with increasing cell–cell interactions. However, cell migration was still dominated by difference of effective surface stiffness while fluctuating at the boundary between the stiff and soft regions. This approach enables us to control the mechanical and topological properties of surface. The developed platform will also offer a useful tool to study cell–substrate interaction mediated by surface stiffness (e.g. mechanotransduction). (paper)

  13. Constraining the surface properties of effective Skyrme interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Jodon, R; Bennaceur, K; Meyer, J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is threefold: first, to identify a scheme for the determination of the surface energy coefficient a_surf that offers the best compromise between robustness, precision, and numerical efficiency; second, to analyze the correlation between values for a_surf and the characteristic energies of the fission barrier of Pu240; and third, to lay out a procedure how the deformation properties of the Skyrme energy density functional (EDF) can be constrained during the parameter fit. There are several frequently used possibilities to define and calculate the surface energy coefficient a_surf of effective interactions. The most direct access is provided by the model system of semi-infinite nuclear matter, but a_surf can also be extracted from the systematics of binding energies of finite nuclei. Calculations can be carried out either self-consistently (HF), which incorporates quantal shell effects, or in one of the semi-classical Extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) or Modified Thomas-Fermi (MTF) approxima...

  14. Association of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans of Schwann cells with extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, D J; Crumbling, D M; Stahl, R C; Evans, D M

    1990-11-25

    The terminal differentiation of Schwann cells is dependent on contact with basement membrane. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) in mediating Schwann cell responses to extracellular matrix contact. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C-releasable cell surface HSPGs purified from cultures of neonatal rat Schwann cells were subjected to affinity chromatography on immobilized laminin and fibronectin. Binding of the HSPG to both affinity matrices was observed. The strength of the association, however, was sensitive to the ionic strength of the buffer. In 0.1 M Tris-HCl, HSPG binding was essentially irreversible whereas in physiological ionic strength buffer (e.g. 0.142 M NaCl, 10 mM Tris), weaker binding was detected as a delay in elution of the HSPG from the affinity columns. Further studies of HSPG-laminin binding suggested that the binding was mediated by the glycosaminoglycan chains of the proteoglycans. Results of equilibrium gel filtration chromatography provided additional evidence for a reversible association of the HSPG and laminin with a Kd of approximately 1 x 10(-6) M. When Schwann cells were plated on plastic dishes coated with laminin, the cells attached and extended long slender processes. Inclusion of heparin, but not chondroitin sulfate, in the assay medium resulted in partial inhibition of process extension, but at concentrations of heparin which were higher than that needed to disrupt laminin-HSPG association in vitro. Addition of anti-integrin receptor antibodies resulted in more extensive inhibition of laminin-dependent process extension. Anti-integrin antibodies plus heparin essentially totally inhibited laminin-dependent process extension. These results demonstrate that cell surface HSPGs are capable of reversible association with extracellular matrix molecules and suggest that HSPG-laminin interactions play a role in laminin-dependent Schwann cell spreading. PMID

  15. Radical surface interactions in industrial silicon plasma etch reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon etching in Cl2-based plasmas is an important step for the fabrication of IC circuits but the plasma surface interactions involved in this process remain poorly understood. Based on the developments in plasma and reactor wall diagnostics, this paper reviews the recent progress in the understanding of radicals' interactions with surfaces during silicon etching processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the reactor walls shows that during Si etching in Cl2/O2 plasmas, the initial Al2O3 chamber walls are coated with a thin SiOCl layer. Broadband absorption spectroscopy with UV light emitting diodes is used to measure the densities of SiClX radicals (X = 0-2) and Cl2 molecules in steady state plasmas running with the chamber walls coated with different materials. To estimate the surface sticking/recombination probability of these radicals on different surfaces, we have performed time-resolved absorption measurements in the afterglow of pulsed discharges. Our work, in agreement with previous results, shows that the Cl2/Cl density ratio in the discharge is driven mainly by the chemical nature of the chamber walls explaining why process drifts are often observed in Cl2/O2 plasmas. The recombination coefficient of Cl atoms on SiOCl surfaces is about 0.007, while it is about 0.1 on clean walls (AlF3). Based on these results, we discuss the best strategy leading to reproducible process control, the present strategy being a systematic reactor cleaning/conditioning between wafers. The SiOCl layer deposition mechanism is then discussed in detail. The sticking coefficient of SiCl on this surface is near unity, while SiCl2 appears to be weakly reactive toward it. Therefore, SiCl (and SiCl+ ions) are the main vectors of Si deposition on the reactor walls, where their subsequent oxidization by O atoms leads to the formation of a SiOCl deposit. Furthermore, we show that SiCl reaction in the plasma volume with Cl2, through the exchange reaction SiCl + Cl2 → Si

  16. Radical surface interactions in industrial silicon plasma etch reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunge, G.; Vempaire, D.; Ramos, R.; Touzeau, M.; Joubert, O.; Bodard, P.; Sadeghi, N.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon etching in Cl2-based plasmas is an important step for the fabrication of IC circuits but the plasma surface interactions involved in this process remain poorly understood. Based on the developments in plasma and reactor wall diagnostics, this paper reviews the recent progress in the understanding of radicals' interactions with surfaces during silicon etching processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the reactor walls shows that during Si etching in Cl2/O2 plasmas, the initial Al2O3 chamber walls are coated with a thin SiOCl layer. Broadband absorption spectroscopy with UV light emitting diodes is used to measure the densities of SiClX radicals (X = 0-2) and Cl2 molecules in steady state plasmas running with the chamber walls coated with different materials. To estimate the surface sticking/recombination probability of these radicals on different surfaces, we have performed time-resolved absorption measurements in the afterglow of pulsed discharges. Our work, in agreement with previous results, shows that the Cl2/Cl density ratio in the discharge is driven mainly by the chemical nature of the chamber walls explaining why process drifts are often observed in Cl2/O2 plasmas. The recombination coefficient of Cl atoms on SiOCl surfaces is about 0.007, while it is about 0.1 on clean walls (AlF3). Based on these results, we discuss the best strategy leading to reproducible process control, the present strategy being a systematic reactor cleaning/conditioning between wafers. The SiOCl layer deposition mechanism is then discussed in detail. The sticking coefficient of SiCl on this surface is near unity, while SiCl2 appears to be weakly reactive toward it. Therefore, SiCl (and SiCl+ ions) are the main vectors of Si deposition on the reactor walls, where their subsequent oxidization by O atoms leads to the formation of a SiOCl deposit. Furthermore, we show that SiCl reaction in the plasma volume with Cl2, through the exchange reaction SiCl + Cl2 → Si

  17. A model system for carbohydrates interactions on single-crystalline Ru surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thanh Nam

    2015-07-01

    In this thesis, I present a model system for carbohydrate interactions with single-crystalline Ru surfaces. Geometric and electronic properties of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on top of graphene on hexagonal Ru(0001), rectangular Ru(10 anti 10) and vicinal Ru(1,1, anti 2,10) surfaces have been studied. First, the Fermi surfaces and band structures of the three Ru surfaces were investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The experimental data and theoretical calculations allow to derive detailed information about the momentum-resolved electronic structure. The results can be used as a reference to understand the chemical and catalytic properties of Ru surfaces. Second, graphene layers were prepared on the three different Ru surfaces. Using low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, it was found that graphene can be grown in well-ordered structures on all three surfaces, hexagonal Ru(0001), rectangular Ru(10 anti 10) and vicinal Ru(1,1, anti 2,10), although they have different surface symmetries. Evidence for a strong interaction between graphene and Ru surfaces is a 1.3-1.7 eV increase in the graphene π-bands binding energy with respect to free-standing graphene sheets. This energy variation is due to the hybridization between the graphene pi bands and the Ru 4d electrons, while the lattice mismatch does not play an important role in the bonding between graphene and Ru surfaces. Finally, the geometric and electronic structures of CuPc on Ru(10 anti 10), graphene/Ru(10 anti 10), and graphene/Ru(0001) have been studied in detail. CuPc molecules can be grown well-ordered on Ru(10 anti 10) but not on Ru(0001). The growth of CuPc on graphene/Ru(10 anti 10) and Ru(0001) is dominated by the Moire pattern of graphene. CuPc molecules form well-ordered structures with rectangular unit cells on graphene/Ru(10 anti 10) and Ru(0001). The distance of adjacent CuPc molecules is 15±0.5 Aa and 13±0.5 Aa on graphene/Ru(0001

  18. A photoactivatable nanopatterned substrate for analyzing collective cell migration with precisely tuned cell-extracellular matrix ligand interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Shimizu

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is involved in many biological and pathological processes. Various factors have been shown to regulate the decision to migrate collectively or individually, but the impact of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM interactions is still debated. Here, we developed a method for analyzing collective cell migration by precisely tuning the interactions between cells and ECM ligands. Gold nanoparticles are arrayed on a glass substrate with a defined nanometer spacing by block copolymer micellar nanolithography (BCML, and photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (Mw  =  12 kDa, PEG12K and a cyclic RGD peptide, as an ECM ligand, are immobilized on this substrate. The remaining glass regions are passivated with PEG2K-silane to make cells interact with the surface via the nanoperiodically presented cyclic RGD ligands upon the photocleavage of PEG12K. On this nanostructured substrate, HeLa cells are first patterned in photo-illuminated regions, and cell migration is induced by a second photocleavage of the surrounding PEG12K. The HeLa cells gradually lose their cell-cell contacts and become disconnected on the nanopatterned substrate with 10-nm particles and 57-nm spacing, in contrast to their behavior on the homogenous substrate. Interestingly, the relationship between the observed migration collectivity and the cell-ECM ligand interactions is the opposite of that expected based on conventional soft matter models. It is likely that the reduced phosphorylation at tyrosine-861 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK on the nanopatterned surface is responsible for this unique migration behavior. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the presented method in understanding the process of determining collective and non-collective migration features in defined micro- and nano-environments and resolving the crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions.

  19. Utilizing Yeast Surface Human Proteome Display Libraries to Identify Small Molecule-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact with small bioactive molecules is a critical but often difficult and time-consuming step in understanding cellular signaling pathways or molecular mechanisms of drug action. Numerous methods for identifying small molecule-interacting proteins have been developed and utilized, including affinity-based purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and three-hybrid approaches. Although all these methods have been used successfully, there remains a need for additional techniques for analyzing small molecule-protein interactions. A promising method for identifying small molecule-protein interactions is affinity-based selection of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries. Large and diverse libraries displaying human protein fragments on the surface of yeast cells have been constructed and subjected to FACS-based enrichment followed by comprehensive exon microarray-based output analysis to identify protein fragments with affinity for small molecule ligands. In a recent example, a proteome-wide search has been successfully carried out to identify cellular proteins binding to the signaling lipids PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Known phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins such as pleckstrin homology domains were identified, as well as many novel interactions. Intriguingly, many novel nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins were discovered. Although the existence of an independent pool of nuclear phosphatidylinositides has been known about for some time, their functions and mechanism of action remain obscure. Thus, the identification and subsequent study of nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins is expected to bring new insights to this important biological question. Based on the success with phosphatidylinositides, it is expected that the screening of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries will be of general use for the discovery of novel small

  20. Interaction of droplet and sidewalls with modified surfaces in a PEMFC gas flow channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mihir M.

    A Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is a clean and highly efficient way of power generation used primarily for transportation applications. Hydrogen and air are supplied to the fuel cell through gas channels, which also remove liquid water generated in the fuel cell. The clogged channels prevent reactant transport to the electrochemically active sites which comprise one of the channel walls and thus, degrading the performance of the cell. Proper management of the product water is a current topic of research interest in commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Liquid water, produced as by-product of the fuel cell reaction, can clog the gas channels easily since surface tension of water is significant at this length scale. In a PEMFC channel cross-section, water is assumed to be produced in the channel at the center along the flow axis. This assumption is primarily valid and extensively used for experimental purposes. However in a real PEMFC, the water entry is not constrained at the channel center. Hence, more investigations are made using water entry at channel corner (land region) which resulted in contradicting prior results for the water feature behavior for all relevant PEMFC operating conditions, leading to adverse two-phase flow behavior- including slug blockage and fluctuations at channel end. Very limited research is available to study the effect of gas channel surface modifications on the two-phase flow behavior and local PEMFC performance. In this study, the droplet--sidewall dynamic interactions and two--phase local pressure drop across the water droplet present in a PEMFC channel with trapezoidal geometries with surface modifications are studied. These surface modifications include micro-grooves that possess a hybrid wetting regime that will initiate and guide the water feature at channel ends to eject with general ease. Slugs are reduced to films after ejection and thus channel blockage is avoided overcoming the problems caused by water influx

  1. Raf-1 Physically Interacts with Rb and Regulates Its Function: a Link between Mitogenic Signaling and Cell Cycle Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sheng; Ghosh, Richik N.; Chellappan, Srikumar P

    1998-01-01

    Cells initiate proliferation in response to growth factor stimulation, but the biochemical mechanisms linking signals received at the cell surface receptors to the cell cycle regulatory molecules are not yet clear. In this study, we show that the signaling molecule Raf-1 can physically interact with Rb and p130 proteins in vitro and in vivo and that this interaction can be detected in mammalian cells without overexpressing any component. The binding of Raf-1 to Rb occurs subsequent to mitogen...

  2. Plasma-Surface Interaction Research At The Cambridge Laboratory Of Accelerator Studies Of Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The material requirements for plasma-facing components in a nuclear fusion reactor are some of the strictest and most challenging facing us today. These materials are simultaneously exposed to extreme heat loads (20 MW/m2 steady-state, 1 GW/m2 in millisecond transients) and particle fluxes (>1024 m-2 s-1) while also undergoing high neutron irradiation (1018 neutrons/m2 s). At the Cambridge Laboratory of Accelerator Studies of Surfaces (CLASS), many of the most important issues in plasma-surface interaction research, such as plasma-driven material erosion and deposition, material transport and irradiation and hydrogenic retention are investigated with the use of a 1.7 MV tandem ion accelerator. Ion-Beam Analysis (IBA) is used to investigate and quantify changes in materials due to plasma exposure and ion irradiation is used as a proxy for neutron irradiation to investigate plasma-surface interactions for irradiated materials. This report will outline the capabilities and current research activities at CLASS.

  3. Cellular interactions of surface modified nanoporous silicon particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbo, Luis M.; Sarparanta, Mirkka; Mäkilä, Ermei; Laaksonen, Timo; Laaksonen, Päivi; Salonen, Jarno; Linder, Markus B.; Hirvonen, Jouni; Airaksinen, Anu J.; Santos, Hélder A.

    2012-05-01

    In this study, the self-assembly of hydrophobin class II (HFBII) on the surface of thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) nanoparticles was investigated. The HFBII-coating converted the hydrophobic particles into more hydrophilic ones, improved the particles' cell viability in both HT-29 and Caco-2 cell lines compared to uncoated particles, and enhanced the particles' cellular association. The amount of HFBII adsorbed onto the particles was also successfully quantified by both the BCA assay and a HPLC method. Importantly, the permeation of a poorly water-soluble drug, indomethacin, loaded into THCPSi particles across Caco-2 monolayers was not affected by the protein coating. In addition, 125I-radiolabelled HFBII did not extensively permeate the Caco-2 monolayer and was found to be stably adsorbed onto the THCPSi nanoparticles incubated in pH 7.4, which renders the particles the possibility for further track-imaging applications. The results highlight the potential of HFBII coating for improving wettability, increasing biocompatibility and possible intestinal association of PSi nanoparticulates for drug delivery applications.In this study, the self-assembly of hydrophobin class II (HFBII) on the surface of thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) nanoparticles was investigated. The HFBII-coating converted the hydrophobic particles into more hydrophilic ones, improved the particles' cell viability in both HT-29 and Caco-2 cell lines compared to uncoated particles, and enhanced the particles' cellular association. The amount of HFBII adsorbed onto the particles was also successfully quantified by both the BCA assay and a HPLC method. Importantly, the permeation of a poorly water-soluble drug, indomethacin, loaded into THCPSi particles across Caco-2 monolayers was not affected by the protein coating. In addition, 125I-radiolabelled HFBII did not extensively permeate the Caco-2 monolayer and was found to be stably adsorbed onto the THCPSi

  4. Heparanase facilitates cell adhesion and spreading by clustering of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flonia Levy-Adam

    Full Text Available Heparanase is a heparan sulfate (HS degrading endoglycosidase participating in extracellular matrix degradation and remodeling. Apart of its well characterized enzymatic activity, heparanase was noted to exert also enzymatic-independent functions. Non-enzymatic activities of heparanase include enhanced adhesion of tumor-derived cells and primary T-cells. Attempting to identify functional domains of heparanase that would serve as targets for drug development, we have identified heparin binding domains of heparanase. A corresponding peptide (residues Lys(158-Asp(171, termed KKDC was demonstrated to physically associate with heparin and HS, and to inhibit heparanase enzymatic activity. We hypothesized that the pro-adhesive properties of heparanase are mediated by its interaction with cell surface HS proteoglycans, and utilized the KKDC peptide to examine this possibility. We provide evidence that the KKDC peptide interacts with cell membrane HS, resulting in clustering of syndecan-1 and syndecan-4. We applied classical analysis of cell morphology, fluorescent and time-lapse microscopy and demonstrated that the KKDC peptide efficiently stimulates the adhesion and spreading of various cell types, mediated by PKC, Src, and the small GTPase Rac1. These results support, and further substantiate the notion that heparanase function is not limited to its enzymatic activity.

  5. Basic surface properties of mononuclear cells from Didelphis marsupialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacife, V P; de Meirelles, M de N; Silva Filho, F C

    1998-01-01

    The electrostatic surface charge and surface tension of mononuclear cells/monocytes obtained from young and adult marsupials (Didelphis marsupialis) were investigated by using cationized ferritin and colloidal iron hydroxyde, whole cell electrophoresis, and measurements of contact angles. Anionic sites were found distributed throughout the entire investigated cell surfaces. The results revealed that the anionic character of the cells is given by electrostatic charges corresponding to -18.8 mV (cells from young animals) and -29.3 mV (cells from adult animals). The surface electrostatic charge decreased from 10 to 65.2% after treatment of the cells with each one of trypsin, neuraminidase and phospholipase C. The hydrophobic nature of the mononuclear cell surfaces studied by using the contact angle method revealed that both young and adult cells possess cell surfaces of high hidrofilicity since the angles formed with drops of saline water were 42.5 degrees and 40.8 degrees, respectively. Treatment of the cells with trypsin or neuraminidase rendered their surfaces more hydrophobic, suggesting that sialic acid-containing glycoproteins are responsible for most of the hydrophilicity observed in the mononuclear cell surfaces from D. marsupialis. PMID:9921307

  6. Basic Surface Properties of Mononuclear Cells from Didelphis marsupialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nacife Valéria Pereira

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrostatic surface charge and surface tension of mononuclear cells/monocytes obtained from young and adult marsupials (Didelphis marsupialis were investigated by using cationized ferritin and colloidal iron hydroxyde, whole cell electrophoresis, and measurements of contact angles. Anionic sites were found distributed throughout the entire investigated cell surfaces. The results revealed that the anionic character of the cells is given by electrostatic charges corresponding to -18.8 mV (cells from young animals and -29.3 mV (cells from adult animals. The surface electrostatic charge decreased from 10 to 65.2% after treatment of the cells with each one of trypsin, neuraminidase and phospholipase C. The hydrophobic nature of the mononuclear cell surfaces studied by using the contact angle method revealed that both young and adult cells possess cell surfaces of high hidrofilicity since the angles formed with drops of saline water were 42.5°and 40.8°, respectively. Treatment of the cells with trypsin or neuraminidase rendered their surfaces more hydrophobic, suggesting that sialic acid-containing glycoproteins are responsible for most of the hydrophilicity observed in the mononuclear cell surfaces from D. marsupialis.

  7. Characterization of adhesive interactions between human endothelial cells and megakaryocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Avraham, H; Cowley, S; Chi, S. Y.; Jiang, S.; Groopman, J E

    1993-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is essential for many immunological functions and is believed to be important in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Adhesive interactions between human endothelial cells and megakaryocytes were characterized in vitro using the CMK megakaryocytic cell line as well as marrow megakaryocytes. Although there was no adhesion between unactivated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and megakaryocytes, treatment of HUVEC with inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 beta, tumor ...

  8. Nanofabrication of Nonfouling Surfaces for Micropatterning of Cell and Microtissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Otsuka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface engineering techniques for cellular micropatterning are emerging as important tools to clarify the effects of the microenvironment on cellular behavior, as cells usually integrate and respond the microscale environment, such as chemical and mechanical properties of the surrounding fluid and extracellular matrix, soluble protein factors, small signal molecules, and contacts with neighboring cells. Furthermore, recent progress in cellular micropatterning has contributed to the development of cell-based biosensors for the functional characterization and detection of drugs, pathogens, toxicants, and odorants. In this regards, the ability to control shape and spreading of attached cells and cell-cell contacts through the form and dimension of the cell-adhesive patches with high precision is important. Commitment of stem cells to different specific lineages depends strongly on cell shape, implying that controlled microenvironments through engineered surfaces may not only be a valuable approach towards fundamental cell-biological studies, but also of great importance for the design of cell culture substrates for tissue engineering. To develop this kind of cellular microarray composed of a cell-resistant surface and cell attachment region, micropatterning a protein-repellent surface is important because cellular adhesion and proliferation are regulated by protein adsorption. The focus of this review is on the surface engineering aspects of biologically motivated micropatterning of two-dimensional surfaces with the aim to provide an introductory overview described in the literature. In particular, the importance of non-fouling surface chemistries is discussed.

  9. Plasma-surface interactions in large tandem mirror devices - MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present experiments on TMX-U and modeling of MFTF-B indicate that plasma-surface interactions can be controlled in MFTF-B. The MFTF-B configuration uses a hot electron population created by ECRH and a sloshing-ion population created by neutral beams in the thermal barrier region to create a potential that confines the central cell ions. Neutral beams and ICRH are used to heat the central cell ions. Plasma-surface interactions can be minimized at radial surfaces by control of the axial confinement of the edge plasma. The thermal barrier configuration is sensitive to the background neutral density, and requires low wall reflux and efficient shielding by the edge plasma. Glow discharge cleaning, titanium gettering, and control of the gas from neutral beams will be used to provide wall conditioning and to reduce the background gas pressure. The shielding efficiency of the plasma edge has been modeled in MFTF-B by comparing computer codes with current experimental measurements. In addition, it is very important to reduce high-energy neutral-beam-injected impurities; this is accomplished by using gettering or magnetic separation in the injector systems. Plasma-edge scrapers, diverter-like devices, and direct-conversion equipment will be located in the end region. Major disruptions are not anticipated. Finally, MFTF-B will also test some technological issues that are revelant to reactors: superconducting magnet systems and nearly steady-state (30-s) operation

  10. Plasma-surface interactions in large tandem mirror devices-MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present experiments on TMX-U and modeling of MFTF-B indicate that plasma-surface interactions can be controlled in MFTF-B. The MFTF-B configuration uses a hot electron population created by ECRH and a sloshing-ion population created by neutral beams in the thermal barrier region to create a potential that confines the central cell ions. Neutral beams and ICRH are used to heat the central cell ions. Plasma-surface interactions can be minimized at radial surfaces by control of the axial confinement of the edge plasma. The thermal barrier configuration is sensitive to the background neutral density, and requires low wall reflux and efficient shielding by the edge plasma. Glow discharge cleaning, titanium gettering, and control of the gas from neutral beams will be used to provide wall conditioning and to reduce the background gas pressure. The shielding efficiency of the plasma edge has been modeled in MFTF-B by comparing computer codes with current experimental measurements. In addition, it is very important to reduce high-energy neutral-beam-injected impurities; this is accomplished by using gettering or magnetic separation in the injector systems. Plasma-edge scrapers, diverter-like devices, and direct-conversion equipment will be located in the end region. Major disruptions are not anticipated. Finally, MFTF-B will also test some technological issues that are relevant to reactors: superconducting magnet systems and nearly steady-state (30 s) operation. (orig.)

  11. Surface cell differentiation controls tissue surface tension and tissue positioning during zebrafish gastrulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krens, S. F. G.

    2011-03-01

    Differences in tissue surface tension (TST) between different tissue types are thought to guide tissue organization and cell sorting in development. Measurements of TST have been useful to predict the outcome of in vitro cell sorting and envelopment experiments. However, the outcome of cell sorting experiments in vitro often substantially differs from tissue positioning in vivo, raising questions as to the actual contribution of TST to tissue positioning within the developing embryo. Here, we show that surface tension of germ layer tissues during zebrafish gastrulation critically relies on the differentiation of their surface cells. We also show that surface differentiation of the different germ layer tissues varies and is considerably different between the situation in vitro and in vivo, explaining the apparent dissimilar outcome of cell segregation between these two situations. To analyze germ layer TST as a function of surface cell differentiation, we interfere with surface cell properties of germ layer aggregates by misexpressing genes involved in surface cell differentiation specifically within surface cells using the GAL4-UAS system, and measure tissue surface tension using both parallel plate compression and micropipette aspiration techniques. Our data provides evidence in favor of a critical function of surface cell differentiation in modulating TST and subsequently tissue positioning within the developing embryo.

  12. Physical View on the Interactions Between Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cell Lining During Cancer Cell Transmigration and Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia T.

    There exist many reviews on the biological and biochemical interactions of cancer cells and endothelial cells during the transmigration and tissue invasion of cancer cells. For the malignant progression of cancer, the ability to metastasize is a prerequisite. In particular, this means that certain cancer cells possess the property to migrate through the endothelial lining into blood or lymph vessels, and are possibly able to transmigrate through the endothelial lining into the connective tissue and follow up their invasion path in the targeted tissue. On the molecular and biochemical level the transmigration and invasion steps are well-defined, but these signal transduction pathways are not yet clear and less understood in regards to the biophysical aspects of these processes. To functionally characterize the malignant transformation of neoplasms and subsequently reveal the underlying pathway(s) and cellular properties, which help cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression, the biomechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment come into focus in the physics-of-cancer driven view on the metastasis process of cancers. Hallmarks for cancer progression have been proposed, but they still lack the inclusion of specific biomechanical properties of cancer cells and interacting surrounding endothelial cells of blood or lymph vessels. As a cancer cell is embedded in a special environment, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix also cannot be neglected. Therefore, in this review it is proposed that a novel hallmark of cancer that is still elusive in classical tumor biological reviews should be included, dealing with the aspect of physics in cancer disease such as the natural selection of an aggressive (highly invasive) subtype of cancer cells displaying a certain adhesion or chemokine receptor on their cell surface. Today, the physical aspects can be analyzed by using state-of-the-art biophysical methods. Thus, this review will present

  13. In vivo tumor cell adhesion in the pulmonary microvasculature is exclusively mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mees Soeren T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis formation is the leading cause of death among colon cancer patients. We established a new in-situ model of in vivo microscopy of the lung to analyse initiating events of metastatic tumor cell adhesion within this typical metastatic target of colon cancer. Methods Anaesthetized CD rats were mechanically ventilated and 106 human HT-29LMM and T84 colon cancer cells were injected intracardially as single cell suspensions. Quantitative in vivo microscopy of the lung was performed in 10 minute intervals for a total of 40 minutes beginning with the time of injection. Results After vehicle treatment of HT-29LMM controls 15.2 ± 5.3; 14.2 ± 7.5; 11.4 ± 5.5; and 15.4 ± 6.5 cells/20 microscopic fields were found adherent within the pulmonary microvasculature in each 10 minute interval. Similar numbers were found after injection of the lung metastasis derived T84 cell line and after treatment of HT-29LMM with unspecific mouse control-IgG. Subsequently, HT-29LMM cells were treated with function blocking antibodies against β1-, β4-, and αv-integrins wich also did not impair tumor cell adhesion in the lung. In contrast, after hydrolization of sialylated glycoproteins on the cells' surface by neuraminidase, we observed impairment of tumor cell adhesion by more than 50% (p Conclusions These results demonstrate that the initial colon cancer cell adhesion in the capillaries of the lung is predominantly mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interactions, possibly supported by platelets. In contrast to reports of earlier studies that metastatic tumor cell adhesion occurs through integrin mediated binding of extracellular matrix proteins in liver, in the lung, the continuously lined endothelium appears to be specifically targeted by circulating tumor cells.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of interaction force of fibrinogen at well-defined surfaces with various structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weixin; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The effects of functional groups and structures at the surface of biomaterials on protein adsorption were examined using direct interaction force measurements. Three kinds of surface structures were evaluated: polymer brushes, self-assembled monolayers with low molecular weight compounds, and surfaces with conventional polymer coatings. These surfaces had various functional groups including phosphorylcholine (PC) group. The surface characterization demonstrated that surface wettability and flexibility depended on both the structure of the surface and the functional groups at the surface. The interactions of protein with these surfaces were evaluated by a force vs. distance curve using an atomic force microscope (AFM). We used fibrinogen as the protein, and the fibrinogen was immobilized on the surface of the AFM cantilever by a conventional technique. It was observed that the interaction force of fibrinogen was strongly related to surface hydrophobic nature and flexibility. That is, the interaction force increased with the increasing hydrophobic nature of the surface. The relationship between the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed on the surface and the interaction force showed good correlation in the range of fibrinogen adsorption from 0 to 250 ng/cm(2), that is, in a monolayered adsorption region. The interaction force decreased with increasing surface viscoelasticity. The most effective surface for preventing fibrinogen adsorption was the polymer brush surface with phosphorylcholine (PC) groups, that is, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) brush. The interaction force of this sample was less than 0.1 nN and the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed on the surface was minimal. It was found that the evaluation of protein adsorption based on the interaction force measurement is useful for low-protein adsorption surfaces. It was demonstrated that an extremely hydrophilic and flexible surface could weaken the protein interactions at the surface, resulting in

  15. Investigation of human cell response to covalently attached RADA16-I peptide on silicon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, Fahimeh

    2016-09-01

    We described a modification of the ionic (RADARADARADARADA)(1) peptide or RADA16-I with 4-azidophenyl isothiocyanate via a specific and gentle reaction. The azidated peptide was covalently immobilized on an alkyne-terminated monolayer on Si(111) via the Cu(I)-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Detailed characterization using Impedance spectroscopy (IS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy demonstrated high coverage of the RADA 16-I peptide on silicon surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and methyl tetrazole sulfate (MTS) assay were used to characterize the morphology and proliferation ability of human fibroblast cells on surfaces. Cell adhesion assay was performed to examine cell-substrate interactions. Significant differences in fibroblast cell morphology, adhesion, and viability were observed on the RADA16-I peptide modified surfaces compared to the control surfaces. These results may suggest a potential application of RADA16-I peptide modified surfaces in biomedical applications. PMID:27236098

  16. Toward Cell Selective Surfaces: Cell Adhesion and Proliferation on Breath Figures with Antifouling Surface Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Campos, Enrique; Elzein, Tamara; Bejjani, Alice; García-Granda, Maria Jesús; Santos-Coquillat, Ana; Ramos, Viviana; Muñoz-Bonilla, Alexandra; Rodríguez-Hernández, Juan

    2016-03-16

    We report the preparation of microporous functional polymer surfaces that have been proven to be selective surfaces toward eukaryotic cells while maintaining antifouling properties against bacteria. The fabrication of functional porous films has been carried out by the breath figures approach that allowed us to create porous interfaces with either poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene (5FS). For this purpose, blends of block copolymers in a polystyrene homopolymer matrix have been employed. In contrast to the case of single functional polymer, using blends enables us to vary the chemical distribution of the functional groups inside and outside the formed pores. In particular, fluorinated groups were positioned at the edges while the hydrophilic PEGMA groups were selectively located inside the pores, as demonstrated by TOF-SIMS. More interestingly, studies of cell adhesion, growth, and proliferation on these surfaces confirmed that PEGMA functionalized interfaces are excellent candidates to selectively allow cell growth and proliferation while maintaining antifouling properties. PMID:26909529

  17. Biofilm formation, communication and interactions of leaching bacteria during colonization of pyrite and sulfur surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellenberg, Sören; Díaz, Mauricio; Noël, Nanni; Sand, Wolfgang; Poetsch, Ansgar; Guiliani, Nicolas; Vera, Mario

    2014-11-01

    Bioleaching of metal sulfides is an interfacial process where biofilm formation is considered to be important in the initial steps of this process. Among the factors regulating biofilm formation, molecular cell-to-cell communication such as quorum sensing is involved. A functional LuxIR-type I quorum sensing system is present in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. However, cell-to-cell communication among different species of acidophilic mineral-oxidizing bacteria has not been studied in detail. These aspects were the scope of this study with emphasis on the effects exerted by the external addition of mixtures of synthetic N-acyl-homoserine-lactones on pure and binary cultures. Results revealed that some mixtures had inhibitory effects on pyrite leaching. Some of them correlated with changes in biofilm formation patterns on pyrite coupons. We also provide evidence that A. thiooxidans and Acidiferrobacter spp. produce N-acyl-homoserine-lactones. In addition, the observation that A. thiooxidans cells attached more readily to pyrite pre-colonized by living iron-oxidizing acidophiles than to heat-inactivated or biofilm-free pyrite grains suggests that other interactions also occur. Our experiments show that pre-cultivation conditions influence A. ferrooxidans attachment to pre-colonized pyrite surfaces. The understanding of cell-to-cell communication may consequently be used to develop attempts to influence biomining/bioremediation processes. PMID:25172572

  18. Surface water and groundwater interaction in Marala-Khanki area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope hydrological investigations were carried out in a selected sub-catchment of Indus Basin (Marala-Khanki Area) for elucidating various aspects of surface water and groundwater interaction. Groundwater samples were collected on seasonal basis (low and high river discharge periods) while surface water (Chenab River) samples were collected more frequently (weekly or monthly basis). Gamma /sup 18/O values of groundwater along the right bank are generally higher and vary over a narrow range of -3 to -6.5%. These values are close to the rain index. The data points of these samples lie below the local meteoric water line (LMWL) which indicates the evaporation effect. This trend is not altered even in the monsoon season when the river has very high discharge proving that the area receives recharge mainly from the rain and there is no significant contribution of river water. Data points pertaining to groundwater samples collected from the stations along the left bank of the river show large variations in gamma/sup 18/O and the values range from -10.2 to -2.5%. Some samples from this side indicate contribution of the river. Tritium and CFC dating suggest groundwater residence time ranging from >50 years to few years. The data further revealed that isotopic values of the river Chenab at Khanki (average gamma /sup 18/O and gamma /sup 2/H = -7.7% and -46%) are higher than those at Marala (average gamma /sup 18/O and gamma /sup 2/H = -9.4% and -56%). Enrichment of gamma/sup 18/O and gamma 2/H in river water at Khanki during low flow period as compared to Marala indicates the contribution of isotopically enriched base flow. Average base flow contribution in this river section during low flow period calculated by isotope data was about 30%. (orig./A.B.)

  19. Interaction of positron beams with thin silver foils and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental investigations of positron interactions with solid silver and the necessary platform to analyse the data have been presented. The main objective was to study Ps formation at a Ag(100) surface. The different ingredients of the scenario, including thermalization and diffusion of positrons and emission of Ps, were analysed and quantified in whatever way appropriate. The scattering and possible thermalization were described. The parametrization of Monte-Carlo simulated implantation profiles for semi-infinite materials were presented and the applicability of such profiles to thin foils assessed. The latter was done in conjunction with an analysis of experimental data on thermalization and diffusion in 1900 Aa Ag(100) foils. The necessity for MC simulated rather than parametrized implantation profiles was argued. The velocity of thermally desorbed Ps from a Ag(100) surface at ∼800 K appeared to obey and one-dimensional Maxwell Boltzmann distribution multiplied by a velocity dependent factor. More experimental investigations are needed before firm conclusions can be made on the nature of the emission process. The velocity distribution, though, was found to be near-thermal and indicative of the sample temperature. It has been shown that positrons can be converted into Ps atoms in the transmission geometry of a thin 1900 Aa Ag(100) foil with a high efficiency. Furthermore, 61% of the emitted Ps will have a mean velocity of vz=1.2x105 m/sec and 39% will have a maximum kinetic energy of 1.5 eV (vz=5.1x105 m/sec) at a foil temperature of 800 K, all velocities that are suitable for producing a 'dense' Ps gas target. (EG) 12 refs

  20. Neuronal chemokines : Versatile messengers in central nervous system cell interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, A. H.; van Weering, H. R. J.; de Jong, E. K.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Biber, K. P. H.

    2007-01-01

    Whereas chemokines are well known for their ability to induce cell migration, only recently it became evident that chemokines also control a variety of other cell functions and are versatile messengers in the interaction between a diversity of cell types. In the central nervous system (CNS), chemoki

  1. Enhanced cell disruption strategy in the release of recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen from Pichia pastoris using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam Yew

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell disruption strategies by high pressure homogenizer for the release of recombinant Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg from Pichia pastoris expression cells were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM based on the central composite design (CCD. The factors studied include number of passes, biomass concentration and pulse pressure. Polynomial models were used to correlate the above mentioned factors to project the cell disruption capability and specific protein release of HBsAg from P. pastoris cells. Results The proposed cell disruption strategy consisted of a number of passes set at 20 times, biomass concentration of 7.70 g/L of dry cell weight (DCW and pulse pressure at 1,029 bar. The optimized cell disruption strategy was shown to increase cell disruption efficiency by 2-fold and 4-fold for specific protein release of HBsAg when compared to glass bead method yielding 75.68% cell disruption rate (CDR and HBsAg concentration of 29.20 mg/L respectively. Conclusions The model equation generated from RSM on cell disruption of P. pastoris was found adequate to determine the significant factors and its interactions among the process variables and the optimum conditions in releasing HBsAg when validated against a glass bead cell disruption method. The findings from the study can open up a promising strategy for better recovery of HBsAg recombinant protein during downstream processing.

  2. Biomaterial design for specific cellular interactions: Role of surface functionalization and geometric features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhar, Poornima

    The areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering have experienced extraordinary growth in recent years with the application of engineering principles and their potential to support and improve the field of medicine. The tremendous progress in nanotechnology and biotechnology has lead to this explosion of research and development in biomedical applications. Biomaterials can now be engineered at a nanoscale and their specific interactions with the biological tissues can be modulated. Various design parameters are being established and researched for design of drug-delivery carriers and scaffolds to be implanted into humans. Nanoparticles made from versatile biomaterial can deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of bio-macromolecules, such as proteins and oligonucleotides. Similarly in the field of tissue engineering, current approaches emphasize nanoscale control of cell behavior by mimicking the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) unlike, traditional scaffolds. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely connected fields and both of these applications require materials with exceptional physical, chemical, biological, and biomechanical properties to provide superior therapy. In the current study the surface functionalization and the geometric features of the biomaterials has been explored. In particular, a synthetic surface for culture of human embryonic stem cells has been developed, demonstrating the importance of surface functionalization in maintaining the pluripotency of hESCs. In the second study, the geometric features of the drug delivery carriers are investigated and the polymeric nanoneedles mediated cellular permeabilization and direct cytoplasmic delivery is reported. In the third study, the combined effect of surface functionalization and geometric modification of carriers for vascular targeting is enunciated. These studies illustrate how the biomaterials can be designed to achieve various cellular behaviors and control the

  3. Studies of cell biomechanics with surface micro-/nano-technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the recent progress in our studies of cell biology using micro-/nano-technology. Cells have a size of several to tens of microns, which makes them easily manipulated by micro-/nano-technology. The shape of the cell influences the alignment of the actin cytoskeleton, which bears the main forces of the cell, maintains the shape,and mediates a series of biochemical reactions. We invented a stretching device and studied the real-time actin filament dynamics under stretch. We found that one stretch cycle shortened the actin filaments and promoted their reassemble process. Cell migration is a complex mechanical process. We found that cell geometry determines the cell polarity and migration direction. We fabricated three-dimensional surfaces to mimic the topography in vivo, and further built a cell culture model by integrating the three-dimensional surface, microfluidics, cell patterning,and coculturing of multiple cell types. We also investigated the neuronal guidance by surface patterning. (authors)

  4. Dendritic Cell Responses to Surface Properties of Clinical Titanium Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kou, Peng Meng; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D; Babensee, Julia E.

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play pivotal roles in responding to foreign entities during an innate immune response and initiating effective adaptive immunity as well as maintaining immune tolerance. The sensitivity of DCs to foreign stimuli also makes them useful cells to assess the inflammatory response to biomaterials. Elucidating the material property-DC phenotype relationships using a well-defined biomaterial system is expected to provide criteria for immuno-modulatory biomaterial design. Clinic...

  5. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Jiang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins.

  6. The interaction of plasma with quartz surfaces in pinch discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of plasma with quartz walls was investigated in theta pinch discharges preionized by axial discharges at filling pressures below 12 mTorr. Implantation and sputtering of hydrogen and deuterium in the surface was deduced from neutron yield and Balmer line intensity measurements. A simple model describing these processes yields an implanted deuterium density of 1.6 x 1016/cm2 and a detrapping cross-section of 5 x 10-17 cm2 for a plasma with about 50 eV particle energy. Impurities within the plasma were observed by line intensity measurements. The vacuum and the composition of the filling gas before and after discharges were analysed by means of a mass spectrometer. Stationary conditions could only be obtained after about 30 discharges. The impurity concentration depends on the energy of the preheating discharge, on filling density, on the fact whether the plasma touches the walls during preheating, and on available sources like back diffusion of pump oil, seals, walls and leaks. (Auth.)

  7. Influence of plasma surface interactions on tokamak startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The startup phase of a tokamak is a complex phenomenon involving burnthrough of the low-Z impurities and rampup of Ip, the plasma current. The design considerations of a tokamak are closely connected with the startup modeling. Plasma evolution is analysed using a zero-dimensional model. The particle and energy balance is considered of two subclasses of plasmas which are penetrable by neutral gas, together with another component, neutrals trapped in the wall. The first subclass includes plasmas being penetrated by slow neutrals of (∼few eV) temperature. The second includes plasmas being penetrated only by fast neutrals having a temperature comparable to that of the ions. The impact of impurities on energy balance is considered through their generation by ion induced desorption of adsorbed oxygen on the first wall and physical and chemical sputtering of carbon. The paper demonstrates self-consistently that the evolution of initial phase of the discharge is intimately linked to the condition of the plasma facing components (PFCs) and the resultant plasma surface interactions

  8. A Dual Receptor and Reporter for Multi-Modal Cell Surface Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Westcott, Nathan; Dutta, Debjit; Pulsipher, Abigail; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Chen, Jean; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2015-10-16

    The rapid development of new small molecule drugs, nanomaterials, and genetic tools to modulate cellular function through cell surface manipulation has revolutionized the diagnosis, study, and treatment of disorders in human health. Since the cell membrane is a selective gateway barrier that serves as the first line of defense/offense and communication to its environment, new approaches that molecularly engineer or tailor cell membrane surfaces would allow for a new era in therapeutic design, therapeutic delivery, complex coculture tissue construction, and in situ imaging probe tracking technologies. In order to develop the next generation of multimodal therapies, cell behavior studies, and biotechnologies that focus on cell membrane biology, new tools that intersect the fields of chemistry, biology, and engineering are required. Herein, we develop a liposome fusion and delivery strategy to present a novel dual receptor and reporter system at cell surfaces without the use of molecular biology or metabolic biosynthesis. The cell surface receptor is based on bio-orthogonal functional groups that can conjugate a range of ligands while simultaneously reporting the conjugation through the emission of fluorescence. We demonstrate this dual receptor and reporter system by conjugating and tracking various cell surface ligands for temporal control of cell fluorescent signaling, cell-cell interaction, and tissue assembly construction. PMID:26204094

  9. Subcellular distribution of uranium in the roots of Spirodela punctata and surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Xiaoqin, E-mail: xiaoqin_nie@163.com [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Wastes and Environmental Safety Laboratory, Mianyang 621010 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology (Sichuan University), Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Dong, Faqin, E-mail: fqdong2004@163.com [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Wastes and Environmental Safety Laboratory, Mianyang 621010 (China); Liu, Ning [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology (Sichuan University), Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Liu, Mingxue [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Wastes and Environmental Safety Laboratory, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhang, Dong; Kang, Wu [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry,China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Sun, Shiyong; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Jie [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Wastes and Environmental Safety Laboratory, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The proportion of uranium concentration approximate as 8:2:1 in the cell wall organelle and cytosol fractions of roots of S. punctata. • The particles including 35% Fe (wt%) released from the cells after 100 mg/L U treatment 48 h. • Most of the uranium bound onto the root surface and contacted with phosphorus ligands and formed as nano-scales U-P lamellar crystal. • FTIR and XPS analyses result indicates the uranium changed the band position and shapes of phosphate group, and the region of characteristic peak belongs to U(VI) and U(IV) were also observed. - Abstract: The subcellular distribution of uranium in roots of Spirodela punctata (duckweed) and the process of surface interaction were studied upon exposure to U (0, 5–200 mg/L) at pH 5. The concentration of uranium in each subcelluar fraction increased significantly with increasing solution U level, after 200 mg/L uranium solution treatment 120 h, the proportion of uranium concentration approximate as 8:2:1 in the cell wall organelle and cytosol fractions of roots of S. punctata. OM SEM and EDS showed after 5–200 mg/L U treatment 4–24 h, some intracellular fluid released from the root cells, after 100 mg/L U treatment 48 h, the particles including 35% Fe (wt%) and other organic matters such as EPS released from the cells, most of the uranium bound onto the root surface and contacted with phosphorus ligands and formed as nano-scales U-P lamellar crystal, similar crystal has been found in the cell wall and organelle fractions after 50 mg/L U treatment 120 h. FTIR and XPS analyses result indicates the uranium changed the band position and shapes of phosphate group, and the region of characteristic peak belongs to U(VI) and U(IV) were also observed.

  10. Cell Phone Roulette and "Consumer Interactive" Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Under current policies, cell phone consumers face a lower probability of finding the best carrier for their usage patterns than winning at roulette. Corroborating survey data consistently show significant dissatisfaction among cell phone users, network performance is a major issue, and customer "churn" is high. This problem may be traced to a new…

  11. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides. PMID:27003128

  12. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  13. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J.; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C.; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  14. Interaction and uptake of exosomes by ovarian cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Altevogt Peter; Keller Sascha; Escrevente Cristina; Costa Júlia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Exosomes consist of membrane vesicles that are secreted by several cell types, including tumors and have been found in biological fluids. Exosomes interact with other cells and may serve as vehicles for the transfer of protein and RNA among cells. Methods SKOV3 exosomes were labelled with carboxyfluoresceine diacetate succinimidyl-ester and collected by ultracentrifugation. Uptake of these vesicles, under different conditions, by the same cells from where they originated w...

  15. Stem cell autotomy and niche interaction in different systems

    OpenAIRE

    Dorn, David C.; Dorn, August

    2015-01-01

    The best known cases of cell autotomy are the formation of erythrocytes and thrombocytes (platelets) from progenitor cells that reside in special niches. Recently, autotomy of stem cells and its enigmatic interaction with the niche has been reported from male germline stem cells (GSCs) in several insect species. First described in lepidopterans, the silkmoth, followed by the gipsy moth and consecutively in hemipterans, foremost the milkweed bug. In both, moths and the milkweed bug, GSCs form ...

  16. Cell surface modulation of gene expression in brain cells by down regulation of glucocorticoid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1981-02-01

    The concentration of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH; sn-glycerol-3-phosphate:NAD/sup +/ 2-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.8) had previously been determined to be regulated by glucocorticoids in rat brain cells in vivo and in cell culture. We now demonstrate that concanavalin A (Con A) can inhibit the induction of GPDH in a dose-dependent manner in C6 rat glioma cells and in primary cultures of rat brain oligodendrocytes. The inhibition specifically prevents the appearance of new molecules of GPDH, although Con A does not significantly inhibit protein synthesis in these cells, nor does it affect the activity of another solube enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase. The ability to block enzyme induction is not limited to Con A, because other lectins also inhibit induction. The molecular mechanism by which Con A inhibits GPDH induction appears to be by the down regulation of the cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptors, because exposure to Con A results in the loss of more than 90% of the receptor activity. Con A does not inhibit the receptor assay and no direct interaction between the receptor and Con A could be demonstrated. This down regulation is not tumor cell specific and appears to be a general phenomenon, because it occurs in normal oligodendrocytes and even in normal astrocytes (a cell type in which the gene for GPDH is not expressed). The down regulation of glucocorticoid receptors in normal brain cells suggests two important corollaries. First, it demonstrates the existence of a rate-limiting step controlling the glucocorticoid-dependent gene expression in brain cells and possibly represents a regulatory site common to all glucocorticoid target cells. Second, it suggests that the response to glucocorticoids of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes can be regulated in vivo by cell surface contact with endogenous lectins, neighboring cells, or both.

  17. Multi-surface Interaction in the WILD Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel; Chapuis, Olivier; Eagan, James R.;

    2012-01-01

    The WILD (wall-sized interaction with large datasets) room serves as a testbed for exploring the next generation of interactive systems by distributing interaction across diverse computing devices, enabling multiple users to easily and seamlessly create, share, and manipulate digital content. The...... featured Web extra is a video of Michel Beaudouin-Lafon and his colleagues demonstrating how the WILD (wall-sized interaction with large datasets) room lets users view, explore, manipulate large amounts of digital content....

  18. How cells tiptoe on adhesive surfaces before sticking

    CERN Document Server

    Pierres, Anne; Touchard, Dominique; Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Cell membranes are studded with protrusions that were thoroughly analyzed with electron microscopy. However, the nanometer-scale three-dimensional motions generated by cell membranes to fit the topography of foreign surfaces and initiate adhesion remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the dynamics of surface deformations displayed by monocytic cells bumping against fibronectin-coated surfaces. We observed membrane undulations with typically 5 nm amplitude and 5-10 second lifetime. Cell membranes behaved as independent units of micrometer size. Cells detected the presence of foreign surfaces at 50 nm separation, resulting in time-dependent amplification of membrane undulations. Molecular contact then ensued with apparent cell-membrane separation of 30-40 nm, and this distance steadily decreased during the following tens of seconds. Contact maturation was associated with in-plane egress of bulky molecules and robust membrane fluctuations. Thus, membrane undulations may be the major determinant of cell sens...

  19. Impact of processing on the noncovalent interactions between procyanidin and apple cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourvellec, Carine; Watrelot, Aude A; Ginies, Christian; Imberty, Anne; Renard, Catherine M G C

    2012-09-19

    Procyanidins can bind cell wall material in raw product, and it could be supposed that the same mechanism of retention of procyanidins by apple cell walls takes place in cooked products. To evaluate the influence of cell wall composition and disassembly during cooking on the cell walls' capacity to interact with procyanidins, four cell wall materials differing in their protein contents and physical characteristics were prepared: cell wall with proteins, cell wall devoid of protein, and two processed cell walls differing by their drying method. Protein contents varied from 23 to 99 mg/g and surface areas from 1.26 to 3.16 m(2)/g. Apple procyanidins with an average polymerization degree of 8.7 were used. The adsorption of apple procyanidins on solid cell wall material was quantified using the Langmuir isotherm formulation. The protein contents in cell wall material had no effect on procyanidin/cell wall interactions, whereas modification of the cell wall material by boiling, which reduces pectin content, and drying decreased the apparent affinity and increased the apparent saturation levels when constants were expressed relative to cell wall weight. However, boiling and drying increased apparent saturation levels and had no effect on apparent affinity when the same data were expressed per surface units. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicated strong affinity (K(a) = 1.4 × 10(4) M(-1)) between pectins solubilized by boiling and procyanidins. This study higllights the impact of highly methylated pectins and drying, that is, composition and structure of cell wall in the cell wall/procyanidin interactions. PMID:22861056

  20. Mapping the Complex Morphology of Cell Interactions with Nanowire Substrates Using FIB-SEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Købler, Carsten; Jensen, Mikkel Ravn Boye;

    2013-01-01

    image post-processing were specifically optimised for cellular monolayers cultured on nanostructured substrates. Cells display a wide range of interactions with the nanostructures depending on the surface morphology, but also greatly varying from one cell to another on the same substrate, illustrating a...... substrates made from silicon black (Nanograss) with low- and high nanowire density. After culturing for 72 hours the cells were fixed, heavy metal stained, embedded in resin, and processed with FIB-SEM block face imaging without removing the substrate. The sample preparation procedure, image acquisition and......Using high resolution focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) we study the details of cell-nanostructure interactions using serial block face imaging. 3T3 Fibroblast cellular monolayers are cultured on flat glass as a control surface and on two types of nanostructured scaffold...

  1. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans: structure, protein interactions and cell signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana L. Dreyfuss

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are ubiquitously found at the cell surface and extracellular matrix in all the animal species. This review will focus on the structural characteristics of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans related to protein interactions leading to cell signaling. The heparan sulfate chains due to their vast structural diversity are able to bind and interact with a wide variety of proteins, such as growth factors, chemokines, morphogens, extracellular matrix components, enzymes, among others. There is a specificity directing the interactions of heparan sulfates and target proteins, regarding both the fine structure of the polysaccharide chain as well precise protein motifs. Heparan sulfates play a role in cellular signaling either as receptor or co-receptor for different ligands, and the activation of downstream pathways is related to phosphorylation of different cytosolic proteins either directly or involving cytoskeleton interactions leading to gene regulation. The role of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cellular signaling and endocytic uptake pathways is also discussed.Proteoglicanos de heparam sulfato são encontrados tanto superfície celular quanto na matriz extracelular em todas as espécies animais. Esta revisão tem enfoque nas características estruturais dos proteoglicanos de heparam sulfato e nas interações destes proteoglicanos com proteínas que levam à sinalização celular. As cadeias de heparam sulfato, devido a sua variedade estrutural, são capazes de se ligar e interagir com ampla gama de proteínas, como fatores de crescimento, quimiocinas, morfógenos, componentes da matriz extracelular, enzimas, entreoutros. Existe uma especificidade estrutural que direciona as interações dos heparam sulfatos e proteínas alvo. Esta especificidade está relacionada com a estrutura da cadeia do polissacarídeo e os motivos conservados da cadeia polipeptídica das proteínas envolvidas nesta interação. Os heparam

  2. Glioma cell dispersion is driven by α5 integrin-mediated cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandin, Anne-Florence; Noulet, Fanny; Renner, Guillaume; Mercier, Marie-Cécile; Choulier, Laurence; Vauchelles, Romain; Ronde, Philippe; Carreiras, Franck; Etienne-Selloum, Nelly; Vereb, Gyorgy; Lelong-Rebel, Isabelle; Martin, Sophie; Dontenwill, Monique; Lehmann, Maxime

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumor. The fibronectin receptor, α5 integrin is a pertinent novel therapeutic target. Despite numerous data showing that α5 integrin support tumor cell migration and invasion, it has been reported that α5 integrin can also limit cell dispersion by increasing cell-cell interaction. In this study, we showed that α5 integrin was involved in cell-cell interaction and gliomasphere formation. α5-mediated cell-cell cohesion limited cell dispersion from spheroids in fibronectin-poor microenvironment. However, in fibronectin-rich microenvironment, α5 integrin promoted cell dispersion. Ligand-occupied α5 integrin and fibronectin were distributed in fibril-like pattern at cell-cell junction of evading cells, forming cell-cell fibrillar adhesions. Activated focal adhesion kinase was not present in these adhesions but was progressively relocalized with α5 integrin as cell migrates away from the spheroids. α5 integrin function in GBM appears to be more complex than previously suspected. As GBM overexpressed fibronectin, it is most likely that in vivo, α5-mediated dissemination from the tumor mass overrides α5-mediated tumor cell cohesion. In this respect, α5-integrin antagonists may be useful to limit GBM invasion in brain parenchyma. PMID:27063097

  3. Soluble and cell surface receptors for tumor necrosis factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallach, D; Engelmann, H; Nophar, Y;

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) initiates its multiple effects on cell function by binding at a high affinity to specific cell surface receptors. Two different molecular species of these receptors, which are expressed differentially in different cells, have been identified. The cDNAs of both receptors...... certain pathological situations. Release of the soluble receptors from the cells seems to occur by proteolytic cleavage of the cell surface forms and appears to be a way of down-regulating the cell response to TNF. Because of their ability to bind TNF, the soluble receptors exert an inhibitory effect on...

  4. Interaction between alloying and hardening of cast iron surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘政军; 郝雪枫; 傅迎庆; 牟力军

    2002-01-01

    To improve wear resistance of surface will increase the service life of gray cast iron directly. This paper presents that gray cast iron surface coated with alloy powder is locally remelted by TIG arc to increase the wear resistance. The influences of arc current and scanning rate etc on surface properties are found. Under different conditions, the microstructure, hardness and wear resistance of remelted layer are analyzed and measured. The results indicate that the gray cast iron surface can be strengthened by TIG arc local remelting treatment. Especially, surface alloying hardening effect is best and surface properties are improved remarkably.

  5. Role of Glucosyltransferase B in Interactions of Candida albicans with Streptococcus mutans and with an Experimental Pellicle on Hydroxyapatite Surfaces ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, S.; Xiao, J.; Silva, B. B.; Gonzalez, I.; Agidi, P. S.; Klein, M. I.; Ambatipudi, K. S.; Rosalen, P. L.; Bauserman, R.; Waugh, R. E.; Koo, H.

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans and mutans streptococci are frequently detected in dental plaque biofilms from toddlers afflicted with early childhood caries. Glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) secreted by Streptococcus mutans bind to saliva-coated apatite (sHA) and to bacterial surfaces, synthesizing exopolymers in situ, which promote cell clustering and adherence to tooth enamel. We investigated the potential role Gtfs may play in mediating the interactions between C. albicans SC5314 and S. mutans UA159, both with each other and with the sHA surface. GtfB adhered effectively to the C. albicans yeast cell surface in an enzymatically active form, as determined by scintillation spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging. The glucans formed on the yeast cell surface were more susceptible to dextranase than those synthesized in solution or on sHA and bacterial cell surfaces (P mutans cells bound to C. albicans cells with glucans present on their surface than to yeast cells without surface glucans (uncoated). The glucans formed in situ also enhanced C. albicans interactions with sHA, as determined by a novel single-cell micromechanical method. Furthermore, the presence of glucan-coated yeast cells significantly increased the accumulation of S. mutans on the sHA surface (versus S. mutans incubated alone or mixed with uncoated C. albicans; P mutans on the tooth enamel surface, thereby modulating the development of virulent biofilms. PMID:21803906

  6. Interaction between natural convection and surface thermal radiation in tilted slender cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, R.; Xaman, J.; Alvarez, G. [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico, CENIDET-DGEST-SEP, Prol. Av. Palmira s/n, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Morelos, C.P. 62490 (Mexico); Hinojosa, J. [Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales, Col. Centro, Hermosillo, Sonora, C.P. 83000 (Mexico)

    2008-04-15

    In this paper a numerical investigation of the interaction between two modes of heat transfer, natural convection and surface thermal radiation, in a tilted slender cavity is studied. The bottom and top surfaces of the cavity are heated and cooled at constant temperatures, while its sidewalls remain thermally insulated. The studied parameters are: the Rayleigh number (10{sup 4}{<=}Ra{<=}10{sup 6}), the aspect ratio (8{<=} A{<=}16) and the inclination angle (15 {<=}{lambda}{<=}35 ). The steady state 2-D governing equations have been solved by the finite volume method. All the inner surfaces are assumed to be gray diffuse emitters and reflectors of radiation. The numerical model was reduced and compared to cases reported in the literature finding a good agreement. Streamlines, isotherms and total Nusselt numbers as a function of Rayleigh number for different inclinations are presented. The interaction between the two modes of heat transfer reveals that the decoupling of two mechanisms of heat transfer is not possible; the performance of the flow patterns, the isotherms and the radiative behavior on the walls was different for the uncoupled and coupled modes of heat transfer in the tilted slender cavity. The steady state results indicated that the radiative surface radiation coupled with natural convection modifies appreciably the flow patterns and the average heat transfer in the slender cavity. The total heat transfer increases when the inclination angle increases, except when the flow structure changes from the multi-cell to the unit-cell pattern. However, the total heat transfer decreases when the aspect ratio increases. A comprehensive correlation for the total Nusselt number has been proposed. (author)

  7. Experimental and numerical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and pollution interactions under tidal forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Bockelmann-Evans, Bettina; Schaefer, Florian; Kampanis, Nikolaos; Nanou-Giannarou, Aikaterini; Stamou, Anastasios; Falconer, Roger

    2015-04-01

    continuous tide on the coastal side. The integrated surface water-groundwater numerical model IRENE (Spanoudaki et al., 2009, Spanoudaki, 2010) was also used in the study, with the numerical model predictions being compared with experimental results, which provide a valuable database for model calibration and validation. IRENE couples the 3D, non-steady state Navier-Stokes equations, after Reynolds averaging and with the assumption of hydrostatic pressure distribution, to the equations describing 3D saturated groundwater flow of constant density. The model uses the finite volume method with a cell-centered structured grid providing thus flexibility and accuracy in simulating irregular boundary geometries. A semi-implicit finite difference scheme is used to solve the surface water flow equations, while a fully implicit finite difference scheme is used for the groundwater equations. Pollution interactions are simulated by coupling the advection-diffusion equation describing the fate and transport of contaminants introduced in a 3D turbulent flow field to the partial differential equation describing the fate and transport of contaminants in 3D transient groundwater flow systems. References Ebrahimi, K., Falconer, R.A. and Lin B. (2007). Flow and solute fluxes in integrated wetland and coastal systems. Environmental Modelling and Software, 22 (9), 1337-1348. Hughes, S.A. (1995). Physical Modelling and Laboratory Techniques in Coastal Engineering. World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., Singapore. Kuan, W.K., Jin, G., Xin, P., Robinson, C. Gibbes, B. and Li. L. (2012). Tidal influence on seawater intrusion in unconfined coastal aquifers. Water Resources Research, 48 (2), doi:10.1029/2011WR010678. Spanoudaki, K., Stamou, A.I. and Nanou-Giannarou, A. (2009). Development and verification of a 3-D integrated surface water-groundwater model. Journal of Hydrology, 375 (3-4), 410-427. Spanoudaki, K. (2010). Integrated numerical modelling of surface water groundwater systems (in Greek

  8. Interaction of Proteins Identified in Human Thyroid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Pietsch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of gravity forces on the regulation of protein expression by healthy and malignant thyroid cells was studied with the aim to identify protein interactions. Western blot analyses of a limited number of proteins suggested a time-dependent regulation of protein expression by simulated microgravity. After applying free flow isoelectric focusing and mass spectrometry to search for differently expressed proteins by thyroid cells exposed to simulated microgravity for three days, a considerable number of candidates for gravi-sensitive proteins were detected. In order to show how proteins sensitive to microgravity could directly influence other proteins, we investigated all polypeptide chains identified with Mascot scores above 100, looking for groups of interacting proteins. Hence, UniProtKB entry numbers of all detected proteins were entered into the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING and processed. The program indicated that we had detected various groups of interacting proteins in each of the three cell lines studied. The major groups of interacting proteins play a role in pathways of carbohydrate and protein metabolism, regulation of cell growth and cell membrane structuring. Analyzing these groups, networks of interaction could be established which show how a punctual influence of simulated microgravity may propagate via various members of interaction chains.

  9. Investigation of back surface fields effect on bifacial solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepeai, Suhaila; Sulaiman, M. Y.; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2012-11-01

    A bifacial solar cell, in contrast with a conventional monofacial solar cell, produces photo-generated current from both front and back sides. Bifacial solar cell is an attractive candidate for enhancing photovoltaic (PV) market competitiveness as well as supporting the current efforts to increase efficiency and lower material costs. This paper reports on the fabrication of bifacial solar cells using phosphorus-oxytrichloride (POCl3) emitter formation on p-type, nanotextured silicon (Si) wafer. Backside surface field was formed through Al-diffusion using conventional screen-printing process. Bifacial solar cells with a structure of n+pp+ with and without back surface field (BSF) were fabricated in which silicon nitride (SiN) anti reflection and passivation films were coated on both sides, followed by screen printing of Argentum (Ag) and Argentum/Aluminum (Ag/Al) on front and back contacts, respectively. Bifacial solar cells without BSF exhibited open circuit voltage (VOC) of 535 mV for front and 480 mV for back surface. With Al-alloyed BSF bifacial solar cells, the VOC improved to 580 mV for the front surface and 560 mV for the back surface. Simulation of bifacial solar cells using PC1D and AFORS software demonstrated good agreement with experimental results. Simulations showed that best bifacial solar cells are achieved through a combination of high lifetime wafer, low recombination back surface field, reduced contact resistance, and superior surface passivation.

  10. Visualization and targeted disruption of protein interactions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herce, Henry D; Deng, Wen; Helma, Jonas; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are the basis of all processes in living cells, but most studies of these interactions rely on biochemical in vitro assays. Here we present a simple and versatile fluorescent-three-hybrid (F3H) strategy to visualize and target protein-protein interactions. A high-affinity nanobody anchors a GFP-fusion protein of interest at a defined cellular structure and the enrichment of red-labelled interacting proteins is measured at these sites. With this approach, we visualize the p53-HDM2 interaction in living cells and directly monitor the disruption of this interaction by Nutlin 3, a drug developed to boost p53 activity in cancer therapy. We further use this approach to develop a cell-permeable vector that releases a highly specific peptide disrupting the p53 and HDM2 interaction. The availability of multiple anchor sites and the simple optical readout of this nanobody-based capture assay enable systematic and versatile analyses of protein-protein interactions in practically any cell type and species. PMID:24154492

  11. Morphology, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells cultured on titanium, tantalum, and chromium surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, Maik; Lind, M.; Mygind, Tina;

    2007-01-01

    interactions between human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and smooth surfaces of titanium (Ti), tantalum (Ta), and chromium (Cr). Mean cellular area was quantified using fluorescence microscopy (4 h). Cellular proliferation was assessed by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and methylene blue cell counting assays (4...... other surfaces tested. Cells cultured on Cr demonstrated reduced spreading and proliferation. In conclusion, Ta metal, as an alternative for Ti, can be considered as a promising biocompatible material, whereas further studies are needed to fully understand the role of Cr and its alloys in bone implants...

  12. Electrostatic Properties of N-Acetyl-Cysteine-Coated Gold Surfaces Interacting with ZrO{sub 2} Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jinwon [Seoul National Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The coating N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on gold surfaces may be used to design the distribution of either gold particle adsorbed to the ZrO{sub 2} surface or vice versa by adjusting the electrostatic interactions. In this study, it was performed to find out electrostatic properties of the NAC-coated-gold surface and the ZrO{sub 2} surface. The surface forces between the surfaces were measured as a function of the salt concentration and pH value using the AFM. By applying the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory to the surface forces, the surface potential and charge density of the surfaces were quantitatively acquired for each salt concentration and each pH value. The dependence of the potential and charge density on the concentration was explained with the law of mass action, and the pH dependence was with the ionizable groups on the surface.

  13. Electrostatic Properties of N-Acetyl-Cysteine-Coated Gold Surfaces Interacting with ZrO2 Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coating N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on gold surfaces may be used to design the distribution of either gold particle adsorbed to the ZrO2 surface or vice versa by adjusting the electrostatic interactions. In this study, it was performed to find out electrostatic properties of the NAC-coated-gold surface and the ZrO2 surface. The surface forces between the surfaces were measured as a function of the salt concentration and pH value using the AFM. By applying the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory to the surface forces, the surface potential and charge density of the surfaces were quantitatively acquired for each salt concentration and each pH value. The dependence of the potential and charge density on the concentration was explained with the law of mass action, and the pH dependence was with the ionizable groups on the surface

  14. Velocity dependence of angular distributions in gas/solid--surface collisions: Relationship to the interaction potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, J.W. Jr.; Doll, J.D.; Thompson, D.L.

    1978-10-15

    The angular and velocity distributions for gas/solid-surface collisions are examined. It is shown that the envelope of the scattered phase-space distribution is quite sensitive to the gas/surface interaction potential.

  15. MPQ-cytometry: a magnetism-based method for quantification of nanoparticle-cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipunova, V. O.; Nikitin, M. P.; Nikitin, P. I.; Deyev, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    Precise quantification of interactions between nanoparticles and living cells is among the imperative tasks for research in nanobiotechnology, nanotoxicology and biomedicine. To meet the challenge, a rapid method called MPQ-cytometry is developed, which measures the integral non-linear response produced by magnetically labeled nanoparticles in a cell sample with an original magnetic particle quantification (MPQ) technique. MPQ-cytometry provides a sensitivity limit 0.33 ng of nanoparticles and is devoid of a background signal present in many label-based assays. Each measurement takes only a few seconds, and no complicated sample preparation or data processing is required. The capabilities of the method have been demonstrated by quantification of interactions of iron oxide nanoparticles with eukaryotic cells. The total amount of targeted nanoparticles that specifically recognized the HER2/neu oncomarker on the human cancer cell surface was successfully measured, the specificity of interaction permitting the detection of HER2/neu positive cells in a cell mixture. Moreover, it has been shown that MPQ-cytometry analysis of a HER2/neu-specific iron oxide nanoparticle interaction with six cell lines of different tissue origins quantitatively reflects the HER2/neu status of the cells. High correlation of MPQ-cytometry data with those obtained by three other commonly used in molecular and cell biology methods supports consideration of this method as a prospective alternative for both quantifying cell-bound nanoparticles and estimating the expression level of cell surface antigens. The proposed method does not require expensive sophisticated equipment or highly skilled personnel and it can be easily applied for rapid diagnostics, especially under field conditions.Precise quantification of interactions between nanoparticles and living cells is among the imperative tasks for research in nanobiotechnology, nanotoxicology and biomedicine. To meet the challenge, a rapid method

  16. Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Timothy J.; Kullas, Amy L.; Southern, Peter J.; Davis, Dana A.

    2016-01-01

    The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals. C. albicans colonizes mucosal surfaces of most people, adhering to and interacting with epithelial cells. At low concentrations, C. albicans is not pathogenic nor does it cause epithelial cell damage in vitro; at high concentrations, C. albicans causes mucosal infections and kills epithelial cells in vitro. Here we show that while there are quantitative dose-dependent differences in exposed epithelial cell populations, these reflect a fundamental qualitative difference in host cell response to C. albicans. Using transcriptional profiling experiments and real time PCR, we found that wild-type C. albicans induce dose-dependent responses from a FaDu epithelial cell line. However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage. Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional. This places epithelial cells at a pivotal position in the interaction with C. albicans as epithelial cells themselves promote C. albicans stimulated damage. PMID:27088599

  17. INTERACTION BETWEEN THE SURFACE GLYCOSYLATED POLYPROPYLENE MEMBRANE AND LECTIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Yang; Ling-shu Wan; Zhi-kang Xu

    2008-01-01

    A glycopolymer bearing glucose residues was tethered onto the surface of polypropylene microporous membrane by UV-induced graft polymerization of α-allyl glucoside. Concanavalin A (Con A), a glucose recognizing lectin, could be specifically adsorbed to the membrane surface. On the other hand, the membrane surface showed no recognition ability to another lectin peanut agglutinin. Moreover, the recognition complex between the glycosylated membrane surface and Con Acould be inhibited by glucose and mannose solution. This surface glycosylated membrane could be used as affinity membrane for protein separation and purification.

  18. Gas-Surface Interactions in Low-Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Kenneth; Moe, Mildred M.

    2011-05-01

    When the space age began, some aerodynamicists expected that the surfaces of spacecraft would be cleaned by desorption in the high vacuum of space; while others, familiar with experiments on engineering surfaces, believed that satellite surfaces would be contaminated. During subsequent decades, satellite evidence has accumulated, showing that surfaces in low-Earth orbit are contaminated by adsorbed atomic oxygen and its reaction products. These contaminants cause accommodation coefficients to be high, and the angular distribution of reemitted molecules to be nearly diffuse. These surface conditions must be considered in calculating satellite drag coefficients in free-molecular flow. We describe the experimental and theoretical developments which have led to these conclusions.

  19. Cell surface hydrophobicity of dental plaque microorganisms in situ.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, M.; Judes, H; Weiss, E

    1983-01-01

    The cell surface hydrophobicity of bacteria obtained directly from human tooth surfaces was assayed by measuring their adherence to liquid hydrocarbons. Fresh samples of supragingival dental plaque were washed and dispersed in buffer. Adherence of the plaque microorganisms to hexadecane, octane, and xylene was tested turbidimetrically and by direct microscopic observation. The results clearly show that the vast majority of bacteria comprising dental plaque exhibit pronounced cell surface hydr...

  20. Microplicae: specialized surface structure of epithelial cells of wet-surfaced oral mucosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Asikainen; E. Sirviö; J.J.W. Mikkonen; S.P. Singh; E.A.J.M. Schulten; C.M. ten Bruggenkate; A.P. Koistinen; A.M. Kullaa

    2015-01-01

    The surface structure of the superficial cells of the oral mucosa is decorated with numerous membrane ridges, termed microplicae (MPLs). The MPL structure is typical of the epithelial surfaces that are covered with protective mucus. Cell membrane MPLs are no longer seen as passive consequences of ce

  1. Cell-surface serglycin promotes adhesion of myeloma cells to collagen type I and affects the expression of matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skliris, Antonis; Labropoulou, Vassiliki T; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Aletras, Alexios; Karamanos, Nikos K; Theocharis, Achilleas D

    2013-05-01

    Serglycin (SG) is mainly expressed by hematopoetic cells as an intracellular proteoglycan. Multiple myeloma cells constitutively secrete SG, which is also localized on the cell surface in some cell lines. In this study, SG isolated from myeloma cells was found to interact with collagen type I (Col I), which is a major bone matrix component. Notably, myeloma cells positive for cell-surface SG (csSG) adhered significantly to Col I, compared to cells lacking csSG. Removal of csSG by treatment of the cells with chondroitinase ABC or blocking of csSG by an SG-specific polyclonal antibody significantly reduced the adhesion of myeloma cells to Col I. Significant up-regulation of expression of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels was observed when culturing csSG-positive myeloma cells on Col I-coated dishes or in the presence of soluble Col I. MMP-9 and MMP-2 were also expressed in increased amounts by myeloma cells in the bone marrow of patients with multiple myeloma. Our data indicate that csSG of myeloma cells affects key functional properties, such as adhesion to Col I and the expression of MMPs, and imply that csSG may serve as a potential prognostic factor and/or target for pharmacological interventions in multiple myeloma. PMID:23387827

  2. Surface modification of Chlorella vulgaris cells using magnetite particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, G.; Šafařík, Ivo; Brányik, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 2012 (2012), s. 1778-1787. ISSN 1877-7058 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : microalgae * physicochemical approaches * surface interactions * magnetite * XDLVO theory * harvesting Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  3. Temperature-Responsive Polymer Modified Surface for Cell Sheet Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruo Okano

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades, as a novel approach for tissue engineering, cell sheet engineering has been proposed by our laboratory. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PIPAAm, which is a well-known temperature-responsive polymer, has been grafted on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS surfaces through an electron beam irradiated polymerization. At 37 °C, where the PIPAAm modified surface is hydrophobic, cells can adhere, spread on the surface and grow to confluence. By decreasing temperature to 20 °C, since the surface turns to hydrophilic, cells can detach themselves from the surface spontaneously and form an intact cell sheet with extracellular matrix. For obtaining a temperature-induced cell attachment and detachment, it is necessary to immobilize an ultra thin PIPAAm layer on the TCPS surfaces. This review focuses on the characteristics of PIAPAm modified surfaces exhibiting these intelligent properties. In addition, PIPAAm modified surfaces giving a rapid cell-sheet recovery has been further developed on the basis of the characteristic of the PIPAAm surface. The designs of temperature-responsive polymer layer have provided an enormous potential to fabricate clinically applicable regenerative medicine.

  4. Surface force analysis of molecular interfacial interactions of proteins and lipids with polymeric biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Adverse biological responses to biomedical devices are often caused by the irreversible accumulation of biological deposits onto the surfaces of devices. Such deposits cause blocking of artificial blood vessels, fibrous encapsulation of soft tissue regenerative devices, 'fouling' of contact lenses, secondary cataracts on intraocular lenses, and other undesirable events that interfere with the intended functions of biomedical devices. The formation of deposits is triggered by an initial stage in which various proteins and lipids rapidly adsorb onto the synthetic material surface; further biological molecules and ultimately cellular entities (e.g., host cells, bacteria) then settle onto the initial adsorbed layer. Hence, to avoid or control the accumulation of biological deposits, molecular understanding is required of the initial adsorption processes. Such adsorption is caused by attractive interfacial forces, which we are characterising by the use of a novel method. In the present study, polymeric thin film coatings, polyethylene oxide (PEO), and polysaccharide coatings have been analysed in terms of their surface forces and the ensuing propensity for protein and lipid adsorption. Interfacial forces are measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a colloid-modified tip in a liquid cell using solutions of physiological pH and ionic strength. The chemical composition and uniformity of the coatings was characterised by X-ray Photon Spectroscopy (XPS). For a polymeric solid coating, repulsive forces have been measured against a silica colloid probe, and the dominant surface force is electrostatic. For the highly hydrated, 'soft' PEO and polysaccharide coatings, on the other hand, steric/entropic forces are also significant and contribute to interfacial interactions with proteins and lipids. In one system we have observed a time dependence of the electrostatic surface potential, which affects interaction with charged proteins. Force measurements were

  5. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  6. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte; Corbeil, Denis; Hoflack, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  7. Topographical control of cell-cell interaction in C6 glioma by nanodot arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Hui; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Huang, G. Steven

    2014-05-01

    Nanotopography modulates the physiological behavior of cells and cell-cell interactions, but the manner of communication remains unclear. Cell networking (syncytium) of astroglia provides the optimal microenvironment for communication of the nervous system. C6 glioma cells were seeded on nanodot arrays with dot diameters ranging from 10 to 200 nm. Cell viability, morphology, cytoskeleton, and adhesion showed optimal cell growth on 50-nm nanodots if sufficient incubation was allowed. In particular, the astrocytic syncytium level maximized at 50 nm. The gap junction protein Cx43 showed size-dependent and time-dependent transport from the nucleus to the cell membrane. The transport efficiency was greatly enhanced by incubation on 50-nm nanodots. In summary, nanotopography is capable of modulating cell behavior and influencing the cell-cell interactions of astrocytes. By fine-tuning the nanoenvironment, it may be possible to regulate cell-cell communications and optimize the biocompatibility of neural implants.

  8. Potential electrode/electrolyte interactions in solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia and strontium-doped lanthanum manganite are the prime candidates for the electrolyte and the air electrode material, respectively, for the solid oxide fuel cell. In this study, the potential high temperature interactions, including intrinsic reactivity and interdiffusion, between these two fuel cell components have been investigated

  9. Detecting protein-protein interactions in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Marie; Bach, Anders; Hansen, Jakob Lerche;

    2009-01-01

    to the endogenous C-terminal peptide of the NMDA receptor, as evaluated by a cell-free protein-protein interaction assay. However, it is important to address both membrane permeability and effect in living cells. Therefore a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay was established, where the C...

  10. A cell-surface-anchored ratiometric i-motif sensor for extracellular pH detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Le; Xie, Nuli; Yang, Yanjing; Yang, Xiaohai; Zhou, Qifeng; Yin, Bincheng; Huang, Jin; Wang, Kemin

    2016-06-14

    A FRET-based sensor is anchored on the cell surface through streptavidin-biotin interactions. Due to the excellent properties of the pH-sensitive i-motif structure, the sensor can detect extracellular pH with high sensitivity and excellent reversibility. PMID:27241716

  11. Human immunodeficiencies related to APC/T cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinos eKallikourdis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary event for initiating adaptive immune responses is the encounter between T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APC in the T cell area of secondary lymphoid organs and the formation of highly organized inter-cellular junctions referred to as the immune synapses. In vivo live-cell imaging of APC-T cell interactions combined to functional studies unveiled that T cell fate is dictated, in large part, by the stability of the initial contact. Immune cell interaction is equally important during delivery of T cell help to B cells and for the killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. The critical role of contact dynamics and synapse stability on the immune response is well illustrated by human immune deficiencies in which disease pathogenesis is linked to altered adhesion or defective cross-talk between the synaptic partners. Here we will discuss in details the mechanisms of defective APC-T cell communications in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS and in warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, myelokathexis syndrome (WHIM. In addition, we will summarize the evidences pointing to a compromised conjugate formation in WIP deficiency, DOCK8 deficiency and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

  12. Neuronal Chemokines: Versatile Messengers In Central Nervous System Cell Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    de Haas, A. H.; van Weering, H. R. J.; Jong, E.K.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Biber, K.P.H.

    2007-01-01

    Whereas chemokines are well known for their ability to induce cell migration, only recently it became evident that chemokines also control a variety of other cell functions and are versatile messengers in the interaction between a diversity of cell types. In the central nervous system (CNS), chemokines are generally found under both physiological and pathological conditions. Whereas many reports describe chemokine expression in astrocytes and microglia and their role in the migration of leuko...

  13. Pycortex: an interactive surface visualizer for fMRI

    OpenAIRE

    James Shuang Gao; Alex G Huth; Mark D. Lescroart; Jack eGallant

    2015-01-01

    Surface visualizations of fMRI provide a comprehensive view of cortical activity. However, surface visualizations are difficult to generate and most common visualization techniques rely on unnecessary interpolation which limits the fidelity of the resulting maps. Furthermore, it is difficult to understand the relationship between flattened cortical surfaces and the underlying 3D anatomy using tools available currently. To address these problems we have developed pycortex, a Python toolbox for...

  14. Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer /

    OpenAIRE

    Garai, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Solar heating of the surface causes the near surface air to warm up and with sufficient buoyancy it ascends through the atmosphere as surface-layer plumes and thermals. The cold fluid from the upper part of the boundary layer descends as downdrafts. The downdrafts and thermals form streamwise roll vortices. All these turbulent coherent structures are important because they contribute most of the momentum and heat transport. While these structures have been studied in depth, their imprint on t...

  15. Cell surface syndecan-1 contributes to binding and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on epithelial tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualon, Tobias; Lue, Hongqi; Groening, Sabine; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Jahr, Holger; Denecke, Bernd; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Ludwig, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface expressed proteoglycans mediate the binding of cytokines and chemokines to the cell surface and promote migration of various tumor cell types including epithelial tumor cells. We here demonstrate that binding of the chemokine-like inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to epithelial lung and breast tumor cell lines A549 and MDA-MB231 is sensitive to enzymatic digestion of heparan sulphate chains and competitive inhibition with heparin. Moreover, MIF interaction with heparin was confirmed by chromatography and a structural comparison indicated a possible heparin binding site. These results suggested that proteoglycans carrying heparan sulphate chains are involved in MIF binding. Using shRNA-mediated gene silencing, we identified syndecan-1 as the predominant proteoglycan required for the interaction with MIF. MIF binding was decreased by induction of proteolytic shedding of syndecan-1, which could be prevented by inhibition of the metalloproteinases involved in this process. Finally, MIF induced the chemotactic migration of A549 cells, wound closure and invasion into matrigel without affecting cell proliferation. These MIF-induced responses were abrogated by heparin or by silencing of syndecan-1. Thus, our study indicates that syndecan-1 on epithelial tumor cells promotes MIF binding and MIF-mediated cell migration. This may represent a relevant mechanism through which MIF enhances tumor cell motility and metastasis. PMID:26852939

  16. An in situ study of amine and amide molecular interaction on Fe surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, P.; Terryn, H.; Mol, J. M. C.

    2015-11-01

    The interfacial bondings formed between N,N‧-diethylmethylamine, N-methyldiethanolamine and N,N‧-dimethylsuccinamide molecules with iron surfaces have been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and electrochemical spectroscopies. In this case, the interfacial interactions have been evaluated by analyzing ex situ FTIR peaks and probing potential variations upon molecular interactions to Fe surfaces. Moreover, integrated ATR-FTIR and chronovoltammetry analyses in Kretschmann geometry have been employed to probe the interactions between the molecules and Fe surfaces in situ. The results revealed that a charge transfer between molecules and Fe surfaces takes place indicating chemisorption of the molecules on Fe surfaces. In this case, the interaction of N,N‧-diethylmethylamine and Fe surface is negligible. However, N-methyldiethanolamine molecules interact with Fe surfaces through the nitrogen atoms. Interaction of N,N‧-dimethylsuccinamide molecules and Fe surface is promoted by nitrogen and carbonyl functional groups. Moreover, interactions of N-methyldiethanolamine and N,N‧-dimethylsuccinamide molecules to Fe surfaces are encouraged by application of anodic potentials implying that the molecules and Fe surfaces are charged positively and negatively, respectively.

  17. Visualization and targeted disruption of protein interactions in living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Herce, Henry D.; Deng, Wen; Helma, Jonas; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are the basis of all processes in living cells, but most studies of these interactions rely on biochemical in vitro assays. Here we present a simple and versatile fluorescent-three-hybrid (F3H) strategy to visualize and target protein–protein interactions. A high-affinity nanobody anchors a GFP-fusion protein of interest at a defined cellular structure and the enrichment of red-labelled interacting proteins is measured at these sites. With this approach, we visual...

  18. Effect of charge on ion-solid interaction at the surface of two-dimensional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of charge on the ion-solid interaction between an incident carbon ion and a surface of graphite or hexagonal boron nitride was studied using ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The computational model was based on a carbon ion with a charge of +1, 0, or -1 incident on a (0 0 0 1) surface of graphite or hexagonal boron nitride. Carbon cations were found to make a strong stable covalent bond with the surface; carbon nonions were attracted to the surface through a van der Waals interaction; carbon anions were repulsed from the graphite surface, but attracted to the h-BN surface through ionic interaction. The stability of the structure and character of the bond is discussed below with reference to the electronic structure of the interacting incident ions and the surface. In conclusion, carbon cations were found to be suitable for the production of covalent bonds

  19. Attachment and invasion of Neisseria meningitidis to host cells is related to surface hydrophobicity, bacterial cell size and capsule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N Bartley

    Full Text Available We compared exemplar strains from two hypervirulent clonal complexes, strain NMB-CDC from ST-8/11 cc and strain MC58 from ST-32/269 cc, in host cell attachment and invasion. Strain NMB-CDC attached to and invaded host cells at a significantly greater frequency than strain MC58. Type IV pili retained the primary role for initial attachment to host cells for both isolates regardless of pilin class and glycosylation pattern. In strain MC58, the serogroup B capsule was the major inhibitory determinant affecting both bacterial attachment to and invasion of host cells. Removal of terminal sialylation of lipooligosaccharide (LOS in the presence of capsule did not influence rates of attachment or invasion for strain MC58. However, removal of either serogroup B capsule or LOS sialylation in strain NMB-CDC increased bacterial attachment to host cells to the same extent. Although the level of inhibition of attachment by capsule was different between these strains, the regulation of the capsule synthesis locus by the two-component response regulator MisR, and the level of surface capsule determined by flow cytometry were not significantly different. However, the diplococci of strain NMB-CDC were shown to have a 1.89-fold greater surface area than strain MC58 by flow cytometry. It was proposed that the increase in surface area without changing the amount of anchored glycolipid capsule in the outer membrane would result in a sparser capsule and increase surface hydrophobicity. Strain NMB-CDC was shown to be more hydrophobic than strain MC58 using hydrophobicity interaction chromatography and microbial adhesion-to-solvents assays. In conclusion, improved levels of adherence of strain NMB-CDC to cell lines was associated with increased bacterial cell surface and surface hydrophobicity. This study shows that there is diversity in bacterial cell surface area and surface hydrophobicity within N. meningitidis which influence steps in meningococcal pathogenesis.

  20. A 160-kilodalton epithelial cell surface glycoprotein recognized by plant lectins that inhibit the adherence of Actinomyces naeslundii.

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, M J; Cisar, J O; Sandberg, A L

    1986-01-01

    The adherence of Actinomyces naeslundii to human epithelial (KB) cells is mediated by the interaction of a fimbrial lectin on this oral bacterium with epithelial cell receptors exposed by sialidase. The D-galactose- and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-reactive plant lectins from peanut and from Bauhinia purpurea inhibit this interaction. This report describes the partial purification and characterization of a 160-kilodalton (kDa) cell surface glycoprotein which is the principal receptor for these le...

  1. Solitary wave propagation in surface stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal cells

    OpenAIRE

    VIJ, JAGDISH; Song, Jang-Kun

    2008-01-01

    PUBLISHED Solitary wave propagation in surface stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal cells controlled by surface anchoring of the alignment layers is investigated for different conditions of alignment on the two opposite surfaces. We show that the critical field Ec, where the speed of the solitary wave becomes zero, is finite for asymmetric alignment on two surfaces. We also show that the polar anchoring energy difference (Deltawp) between the alignment layers can be calculated by measur...

  2. A Population Dynamics Analysis of the Interaction between Adaptive Regulatory T Cells and Antigen Presenting Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fouchet, David; Regoes, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells are central actors in the maintenance of tolerance of self-antigens or allergens and in the regulation of the intensity of the immune response during infections by pathogens. An understanding of the network of the interaction between regulatory T cells, antigen presenting cells and effector T cells is starting to emerge. Dynamical systems analysis can help to understand the dynamical properties of an interaction network and can shed light on the different tasks t...

  3. Microfluidic biofunctionalisation protocols to form multi-valent interactions for cell rolling and phenotype modification investigations

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we propose a fast, simple method to biofunctionalise microfluidic systems for cellomic investigations based on micro-fluidic protocols. Many available processes either require expensive and time-consuming protocols or are incompatible with the fabrication of microfluidic systems. Our method differs from the existing since it is applicable to an assembled system, uses few microlitres of reagents and it is based on the use of microbeads. The microbeads have specific surface moieties to link the biomolecules and couple cell receptors. Furthermore, the microbeads serve as arm spacer and offer the benefit of the multi-valent interaction. Microfluidics was adapted together with topology and biochemistry surface modifications to offer the microenvironment for cellomic studies. Based on this principle, we exploit the streptavidin-biotin interaction to couple antibodies to the biofunctionalised microfluidic environment within 5 h using 200 μL of reagents and biomolecules. We selected the antibodies able to form complexes with the MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules present on the cell membrane and involved in the immune surveillance. To test the microfluidic system, tumour cell lines (RMA) were rolled across the coupled antibodies to recognise and strip MHC-I molecules. As result, we show that cell rolling performed inside a microfluidic chamber functionalised with beads and the opportune antibody facilitate the removal of MHC class I molecules. We showed that the level of median fluorescent intensity of the MHC-I molecules is 300 for cells treated in a not biofunctionalised surface. It decreased to 275 for cells treated in a flat biofunctionalised surface and to 250 for cells treated on a surface where biofunctionalised microbeads were immobilised. The cells with reduced expression of MHC-I molecules showed, after cytotoxicity tests, susceptibility 3.5 times higher than normal cells. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Surface complexation of neptunium (V) onto whole cells and cell componets of Shewanella alga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Donald Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deo, Randhir P [ASU; Rittmann, Bruce E [ASU; Songkasiri, Warinthorn [UNAFFILIATED

    2008-01-01

    We systematically quantified surface complexation of neptunium(V) onto whole cells of Shewanella alga strain BrY and onto cell wall and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of S. alga. We first performed acid and base titrations and used the mathematical model FITEQL with constant-capacitance surface-complexation to determine the concentrations and deprotonation constants of specific surface functional groups. Deprotonation constants most likely corresponded to a carboxyl site associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 2.4), a carboxyl group not associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 5), a phosphoryl site (pK{sub a} {approx} 7.2), and an amine site (pK{sub a} > 10). We then carried out batch sorption experiments with Np(V) and each of the S. alga components at different pHs. Results show that solution pH influenced the speciation of Np(V) and each of the surface functional groups. We used the speciation sub-model of the biogeochemical model CCBATCH to compute the stability constants for Np(V) complexation to each surface functional group. The stability constants were similar for each functional group on S. alga bacterial whole cells, cell walls, and EPS, and they explain the complicated sorption patterns when they are combined with the aqueous-phase speciation of Np(V). For pH < 8, NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was the dominant form of Np(V), and its log K values for the low-pK{sub a} carboxyl, other carboxyl, and phosphoryl groups were 1.75, 1.75, and 2.5 to 3.1, respectively. For pH greater than 8, the key surface ligand was amine >XNH3+, which complexed with NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-}. The log K for NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-} complexed onto the amine groups was 3.1 to 3.6. All of the log K values are similar to those of Np(V) complexes with aqueous carboxyl and N-containing carboxyl ligands. These results point towards the important role of surface complexation in defining key actinide-microbiological interactions in the subsurface.

  5. Characteristics of a simple surface textured silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extend of surface availability for light exposure relate to the amount of generated photocarrier in a solar cell. The normal way of increasing the surface area is to increase the size of substrate. In this paper a study was made on the effect of chemical modification on the active surface to the characteristics of the solar cell. Different chemical solutions which are normally available in any laboratory are used. P-type silicon wafer with surface orientation (111) formed the substrate. Aluminium was used as back contact and front grid. No antireflecting coating was introduced. The result indicates that surface textured silicon solar cell give a higher current output as compared to a non texture solar cell. (Author)

  6. Surface passivation of high efficiency silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, A.; Warta, W.; Knobloch, J.; Voss, B.

    Theoretically and experimentally determined design guides for significantly reducing recombination at the emitter and rear surfaces of full-area Al-BSF (back-surface region) and oxide-passivated bifacial cells are given. The impact of emitter thickness and surface dopant concentration on emitter saturation current and solar cell efficiency is outlined. A modified emitter structure (locally deep diffused below the metal contacts) is predicted to have superior performance. Measured Voc values reveal the potential of deep emitter cells to achieve efficiencies above 20 percent in spite of high metallization factors. Experimentally, a strong dependence of passivation quality on oxide thickness and base doping concentration is found. The BSF quality of a diffused aluminum layer decreases strongly with increasing drive-in time. For SiO2-passivated rear surfaces of bifacial cells, measurements of the dependence of the surface recombination velocity on the excess carrier concentration are presented.

  7. Dynamic assessment of Amyloid oligomers - cell membrane interaction by advanced impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, M.; David, S.; Polonschii, C.; Bratu, D.; Gheorghiu, E.

    2013-04-01

    The amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are believed to be pivotal in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis and onset of vascular dysfunction. Recent studies indicate that Aβ1-42 treatment influences the expression of tight junction protein complexes, stress fibre formation, disruption and aggregation of actin filaments and cellular gap formation. Aiming for functional characterization of model cells upon Aβ1-42 treatment, we deployed an advanced Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing for monitoring cell evolution. A precision Impedance Analyzer with a multiplexing module developed in house was used for recording individual electrode sets in the 40 Hz - 100 KHz frequency range. In a step forward from the classical ECIS assays, we report on a novel data analysis algorithm that enables access to cellular and paracellular electrical parameters and cell surface interaction with fully developed cell monolayers. The evolution of the impedance at selected frequencies provides evidence for a dual effect of Aβ42 exposure, at both paracellular permeability and cell adherence level, with intricate dynamics that open up new perspectives on Aβ1-42 oligomers - cell membrane interaction. Validation of electrical impedance assays of the amyloid fibrils effect on cell membrane structure is achieved by both AFM analysis and Surface Plasmon Resonance studies. The capabilities of this noninvasive, real time platform for cell analysis in a wider applicative context are outlined.

  8. Targeting and molecular imaging of HepG2 cells using surface-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathinaraj, Pierson [Auckland University of Technology, Institute of Biomedical Technologies (New Zealand); Lee, Kyubae; Choi, Yuri; Park, Soo-Young [Kyungpook National University, School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Graduate School (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Hyeong [Kumoh National Institute of Technology, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Inn-Kyu, E-mail: ikkang@knu.ac.kr [Kyungpook National University, School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Graduate School (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Mercaptosuccinic acid (M)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (GM) were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscope and dynamic light scattering. M was used to improve the monodispersity and non-specific intracellular uptake of nanoparticles. Lactobionic acid (L) was subsequently conjugated to the GM to target preferentially HepG2 cells (liver cancer cells) that express asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) on their membrane surfaces and facilitate the transit of nanoparticles across the cell membrane. The mean size of lactobionic acid-conjugated gold nanoparticle (GL) was approximately 10 ± 0.2 nm. Finally, the Atto 680 dye (A6) was coupled to the nanoparticles to visualize their internalization into HepG2 cells. The interaction of surface-modified gold nanoparticles with HepG2 cells was studied after culturing cells in media containing the GM or L-conjugated GM (GL)

  9. Targeting and molecular imaging of HepG2 cells using surface-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercaptosuccinic acid (M)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (GM) were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscope and dynamic light scattering. M was used to improve the monodispersity and non-specific intracellular uptake of nanoparticles. Lactobionic acid (L) was subsequently conjugated to the GM to target preferentially HepG2 cells (liver cancer cells) that express asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) on their membrane surfaces and facilitate the transit of nanoparticles across the cell membrane. The mean size of lactobionic acid-conjugated gold nanoparticle (GL) was approximately 10 ± 0.2 nm. Finally, the Atto 680 dye (A6) was coupled to the nanoparticles to visualize their internalization into HepG2 cells. The interaction of surface-modified gold nanoparticles with HepG2 cells was studied after culturing cells in media containing the GM or L-conjugated GM (GL)

  10. Early Bunyavirus-Host Cell Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelina Albornoz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae is the largest family of RNA viruses, with over 350 members worldwide. Several of these viruses cause severe diseases in livestock and humans. With an increasing number and frequency of outbreaks, bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to public health and agricultural productivity globally. Yet, the receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely uncharacterized. The focus of this review is on the early steps of bunyavirus infection, from virus binding to penetration from endosomes. We address current knowledge and advances for members from each genus in the Bunyaviridae family regarding virus receptors, uptake, intracellular trafficking and fusion.

  11. Early Bunyavirus-Host Cell Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albornoz, Amelina; Hoffmann, Anja B; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is the largest family of RNA viruses, with over 350 members worldwide. Several of these viruses cause severe diseases in livestock and humans. With an increasing number and frequency of outbreaks, bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to public health and agricultural productivity globally. Yet, the receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely uncharacterized. The focus of this review is on the early steps of bunyavirus infection, from virus binding to penetration from endosomes. We address current knowledge and advances for members from each genus in the Bunyaviridae family regarding virus receptors, uptake, intracellular trafficking and fusion. PMID:27213430

  12. [Multipotent mesenchymal stromal and immune cells interaction: reciprocal effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, E R; Buravkova, L B

    2012-12-01

    Adult multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MMSCs) are considered now as one of the key players in physiological and pathological tissue remodeling. Clarification of the mechanisms that mediate MMSC functions, is one of the most intriguing issues in modern cell physiology. Present Review summarizes current understanding of the MMSC effects on different types of immune cells. The realization of MMSC immunomodulatory capacity is considered as a contribution of direct cell-to-cell contacts, soluble mediators and of local microenvironmental factors, the most important of which is the partial pressure of oxygen. MMSCs and immune cells interaction is discussed in the terms of reciprocal effects, modifying properties of all "partner cells". Special attention is paid to the influence of immune cells on the MMSCs. "Immunosuppressive" phenomenon of MMSCs is considered as the integral part of the "response to injury" mechanism. PMID:23461191

  13. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. PMID:27459246

  14. The interactions of intracellular Protista and their host cells, with special reference to heterotrophic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, L H

    1979-04-11

    Intracellular genera are found in all the major groups of Protista, but are particularly common among the dinoflagellates, trypanosomatid zooflagellates and suctorian ciliates; the Sporozoa are nearly all intracellular at some stage of their life, and the Microspora entirely so. Intracellular forms can dwell in the nucleus, within phagosomal or other vacuoles or may lie free in the hyaloplasm of their host cells. Organisms tend to select their hosts from a restricted taxonomic range although there are some notable exceptions. There is also great variation in the types of host cell inhabited. There are various reasons for both host and cell selectivity including recognition phenomena at the cell surfaces. Invasion of host cells is usually preceded by surface interactions with the invader. Some organisms depend upon phagocytosis for entry, but others induce host cells to engulf them by non-phagocytic means or invade by microinjection through the host plasma membrane. Protista avoid lysosomal destruction by their resistance to enzyme attack, by surrounding themselves with lysosome-inhibiting vacuoles, by escaping from the phagosomal system into the hyaloplasm and by choosing host cells which lack lysosomes. Nutrition of intracellular heterotrophic organisms involves some degree of competition with the host cell's metabolism as well as erosion of host cell cytoplasm. In Plasmodium infections, red cells are made more permeable to required nutrients by the action of the parasite on the host cell membrane. The parasite is often dependent upon the host cell for complex nutrients which it cannot synthesize for itself. Intracellular forms often profoundly modify the structure and metabolism of the host cell or interfere with its growth and multiplication. This may result in the final lysis of the host cell at the end of the intracellular phase or before the infection of other cells. Certain types of intracellular organisms may have arisen initially as forms attached to the

  15. Studies on the interaction of hydrogen atoms with diamond surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vibration modes of hydrogen-atom adsorption on the diamond surface were studied with high resolution-electron energy loss spectroscopy. Two main losses were observed at 360 MeV and 160 MeV. They are assigned to the C-H stretch vibrations and the angle-changing deformation vibrations respectively. Replacing H-atom with D-atom, isotopic shifts were observed in the loss spectra. Heating the diamond surface to 900 deg C, all of the loss features disappear, but an inelastic continuous loss-structure was observed. Due to H-atom desorption, the dangling-bonds became horizontal bonds on the diamond surface, resulting in the graphitization of diamond surface. The appearance of the inelastic continuous loss-structure was the characteristic of graphite π-band. The graphitization of the diamond surface was affirmed further by UPS and AES studies

  16. The role of particle-to-cell interactions in dictating nanoparticle aided magnetophoretic separation of microalgal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Pey Yi; Ng, Bee Wah; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Chieh, Derek Chan Juinn; Lim, JitKang

    2014-11-01

    Successful application of a magnetophoretic separation technique for harvesting biological cells often relies on the need to tag the cells with magnetic nanoparticles. This study investigates the underlying principle behind the attachment of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) onto microalgal cells, Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp., in both freshwater and seawater, by taking into account the contributions of various colloidal forces involved. The complex interplay between van der Waals (vdW), electrostatic (ES) and Lewis acid-base interactions (AB) in dictating IONP attachment was studied under the framework of extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) analysis. Our results showed that ES interaction plays an important role in determining the net interaction between the Chlorella sp. cells and IONPs in freshwater, while the AB and vdW interactions play a more dominant role in dictating the net particle-to-cell interaction in high ionic strength media (≥100 mM NaCl), such as seawater. XDLVO predicted effective attachment between cells and surface functionalized IONPs (SF-IONPs) with an estimated secondary minimum of -3.12 kT in freshwater. This prediction is in accordance with the experimental observation in which 98.89% of cells can be magnetophoretically separated from freshwater with SF-IONPs. We have observed successful magnetophoretic separation of microalgal cells from freshwater and/or seawater for all the cases as long as XDLVO analysis predicts particle attachment. For both the conditions, no pH adjustment is required for particle-to-cell attachment. PMID:25227473

  17. Alteration of pancreatic cancer cell functions by tumor-stromal cell interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Shin eHamada; Atsushi eMasamune; Tooru eShimosegawa

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a characteristic tissue structure called desmoplasia, which consists of dense fibrotic stroma surrounding cancer cells. Interactions between pancreatic cancer cells and stromal cells promote invasive growth of cancer cells and establish a specific microenvironment such as hypoxia which further aggravates the malignant behavior of cancer cells. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play pivotal role in the development of fibrosis within the pancreatic cancer tissue, and also...

  18. Alteration of pancreatic cancer cell functions by tumor-stromal cell interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a characteristic tissue structure called desmoplasia, which consists of dense fibrotic stroma surrounding cancer cells. Interactions between pancreatic cancer cells and stromal cells promote invasive growth of cancer cells and establish a specific microenvironment such as hypoxia which further aggravates the malignant behavior of cancer cells. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in the development of fibrosis within the pancreatic cancer tissue, and al...

  19. Surface Plasmon Resonance for Cell-Based Clinical Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhki Yanase

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real-time observations and the evaluation of living cell conditions and functions are increasingly demanded in life sciences. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors detect the refractive index (RI changes on the surface of sensor chips in label-free and on a real-time basis. Using SPR sensors, we and other groups have developed techniques to evaluate living cells’ reactions in response to stimuli without any labeling in a real-time manner. The SPR imaging (SPRI system for living cells may visualize single cell reactions and has the potential to expand application of SPR cell sensing for clinical diagnosis, such as multi-array cell diagnostic systems and detection of malignant cells among normal cells in combination with rapid cell isolation techniques.

  20. Functions of proteoglycans at the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höök, M; Woods, A; Johansson, S; Kjellén, L; Couchman, J R

    1986-01-01

    -associated proteoglycans, including: regulation of cell-substrate adhesion; regulation of cell proliferation; participation in the binding and uptake of extracellular components; and participation in the regulation of extracellular matrix formation. Evidence is discussed suggesting that the cell-associated heparan...... sulphate helps to connect the intracellular cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix in focal adhesions. This evidence includes: the co-localization of actin and heparan sulphate proteoglycan during the process of cell spreading, and in isolated focal adhesions; biochemical analyses of a hydrophobic...... heparan sulphate proteoglycan from isolated focal adhesions; and the formation of focal adhesions on substrates made from isolated fibronectin fragments requires the presence of a heparan sulphate-binding site....

  1. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are products of interactions with combinatorial microenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Nelson, Celeste M; Villadsen, Rene; Fridriksdottir, Agla; Ruth, Jason R; Stampfer, Martha R; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-09-19

    In adult tissues, multi-potent progenitor cells are some of the most primitive members of the developmental hierarchies that maintain homeostasis. That progenitors and their more mature progeny share identical genomes, suggests that fate decisions are directed by interactions with extrinsic soluble factors, ECM, and other cells, as well as physical properties of the ECM. To understand regulation of fate decisions, therefore, would require a means of understanding carefully choreographed combinatorial interactions. Here we used microenvironment protein microarrays to functionally identify combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells. Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell-cell versus cell-ECM interactions, as well as constellations of signaling molecules; and these were used in conjunction with physiologically relevant 3 dimensional human breast cultures. Both immortalized and primary human breast progenitors were analyzed. We report on the functional ability of those proteins of the mammary gland that maintain quiescence, maintain the progenitor state, and guide progenitor differentiation towards myoepithelial and luminal lineages.

  2. Groundwater - surface water interactions on deeply weathered surfaces of low relief in the Upper Nile Basin of Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Owor, M.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known of the interactions between groundwater and surface water on the deeply weathered surfaces of low relief in the Great Lakes Region of Africa (GLRA). The role of groundwater in sustaining water levels in lakes, rivers and wetlands during periods of absent rainfall is also unclear. Indeed, groundwater is commonly excluded from estimations of the surface water balances. Piezometer nests constructed on the shores of Lakes Victoria (Jinja, Entebbe) and Kyoga (Bugondo) through this ...

  3. Spectral asymptotics of a strong δ′ interaction supported by a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Attractive δ′ interactions supported by a smooth surface are considered. • Surfaces can be either infinite and asymptotically planar, or compact and closed. • Spectral asymptotics is determined by the geometry of the interaction support. - Abstract: We derive asymptotic expansion for the spectrum of Hamiltonians with a strong attractive δ′ interaction supported by a smooth surface in R3, either infinite and asymptotically planar, or compact and closed. Its second term is found to be determined by a Schrödinger type operator with an effective potential expressed in terms of the interaction support curvatures

  4. Surface Passivation Studies on n+pp+ Bifacial Solar Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Suhaila Sepeai; M. Y. Sulaiman; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Saleem H. Zaidi

    2012-01-01

    Bifacial solar cell is a specially designed solar cell for the production of electricity from both sides of the solar cell. It is an active field of research to make photovoltaics (PV) more competitive by increasing its efficiency and lowering its costs. We developed an n+pp+ structure for the bifacial solar cell. The fabrication used phosphorus-oxy-trichloride (POCl3) diffusion to form the emitter and Al diffusion using conventional screen printing to produce the back surface field (BSF). Th...

  5. Interactions of the cell-wall glycopolymers of lactic acid bacteria with their bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre eChapot-Chartier

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram positive bacteria widely used in the production of fermented food in particular cheese and yoghurts. Bacteriophage infections during fermentation processes have been for many years a major industrial concern and have stimulated numerous research efforts. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of bacteriophage interactions with their host bacteria is required for the development of efficient strategies to fight against infections. The bacterial cell wall plays key roles in these interactions. First, bacteriophages must adsorb at the bacterial surface through specific interactions with receptors that are cell wall components. At next step, phages must overcome the barrier constituted by cell wall peptidoglycan to inject DNA inside bacterial cell. Also at the end of the infection cycle, phages synthesize endolysins able to hydrolyze peptidoglycan and lyse bacterial cells to release phage progeny. In the last decade, concomitant development of genomics and structural analysis of cell wall components allowed considerable advances in the knowledge of their structure and function in several model LAB. Here, we describe the present knowledge on the structure of the cell wall glycopolymers of the best characterized LAB emphasizing their structural variations and we present the available data regarding their role in bacteria-phage specific interactions at the different steps of the infection cycle.

  6. Interactions between chitosan and cells measured by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitosan, a biocompatible material that has been widely used in bone tissue engineering, is believed to have a high affinity to osteoblastic cells. This research is the first to prove this hypothesis. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a chitosan-modified cantilever, quantitative evaluation of the interforce between chitosan and cells was carried out. A chitosan tip functionalized with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was also used to measure the interforce between RGD-chitosan and osteoblastic cells. This research concluded by examining cell adhesion and spreading of chitosan substrates as further characterization of the interactions between cells and chitosan. The force measured by AFM showed that the interforce between chitosan and osteoblasts was the highest (209 nN). The smallest adhesion force (61.8 nN) appeared between chitosan and muscle fibroblasts, which did not demonstrate any osteoblastic properties. This result proved that there was a significant interaction between chitosan and bone cells, and correlated with the observations of cell attachment and spreading. The technique developed in this research directly quantified the adhesion between chitosan and cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that specific interaction exists between chitosan and osteoblasts.

  7. Interactions between chitosan and cells measured by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Wen; Thien, Doan Van Hong; Ho, Ming-Hua [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Li, Chung-Hsing [Division of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chang-Hsiang [Department of Dentistry, Kinmen Hospital Department of Health, Taiwan (China); Li, Hsi-Hsin, E-mail: mhho@mail.ntust.edu.t [Deputy Superintendent, Kinmen Hospital Department of Health, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-01

    Chitosan, a biocompatible material that has been widely used in bone tissue engineering, is believed to have a high affinity to osteoblastic cells. This research is the first to prove this hypothesis. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a chitosan-modified cantilever, quantitative evaluation of the interforce between chitosan and cells was carried out. A chitosan tip functionalized with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was also used to measure the interforce between RGD-chitosan and osteoblastic cells. This research concluded by examining cell adhesion and spreading of chitosan substrates as further characterization of the interactions between cells and chitosan. The force measured by AFM showed that the interforce between chitosan and osteoblasts was the highest (209 nN). The smallest adhesion force (61.8 nN) appeared between chitosan and muscle fibroblasts, which did not demonstrate any osteoblastic properties. This result proved that there was a significant interaction between chitosan and bone cells, and correlated with the observations of cell attachment and spreading. The technique developed in this research directly quantified the adhesion between chitosan and cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that specific interaction exists between chitosan and osteoblasts.

  8. Surface grafting of carboxylic groups onto thermoplastic polyurethanes to reduce cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, P., E-mail: palves@eq.uc.pt [CIEPQPF, Departamento de Engenharia Química, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-790 Coimbra (Portugal); Ferreira, P. [CIEPQPF, Departamento de Engenharia Química, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-790 Coimbra (Portugal); Kaiser, Jean-Pierre [EMPA, St. Gallen, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, CH-9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Salk, Natalie [Mikrofertigung – Micro Engineering, Fraunhofer IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, D-288359 Bremen (Germany); Bruinink, Arie [EMPA, St. Gallen, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, CH-9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Sousa, Hermínio C. de; Gil, M.H. [CIEPQPF, Departamento de Engenharia Química, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-790 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2013-10-15

    The interaction of polymers with other materials is an important issue, being their surface properties clearly crucial. For some important polymer applications, their surfaces have to be modified. Surface modification aims to tailor the surface characteristics of a material for a specific application without affecting its bulk properties. Materials can be surface modified by using biological, chemical or physical methods. The aim of this work was to improve the reactivity of the thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) material (Elastollan{sup ®}) surface and to make its surface cell repellent by grafting carboxylic groups onto its surface. Two TPU materials were studied: a polyether-based TPU and a polyester-based TPU. The grafting efficiency was evaluated by contact angle measurements and by analytical determination of the COOH groups. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the membranes surface was performed as well as cell adhesion tests. It was proved that the surfaces of the TPUs membranes were successfully modified and that cell adhesion was remarkably reduced.

  9. Interactions between segmented polyurethane surfaces and the plasma protein fibrinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupp, S I; Kauffman, J W; Carr, S H

    1977-03-01

    Surfaces of a segmented polyurethane were varied by casting on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and glass substrates, and were characterized through infrared-attenuated total-reflection spectroscopy (ATR). Surfaces cast on glass substrates showed a higher content of polyether segments, whereas those cast on PET contained a higher relative concentration of aromatic segments. Adsorption, and possible conformational changes of fibrinogen, were found to be more substantial on polymer surfaces having a higher content of polyether segments. It is concluded that the relatively good blood compatibility of segmented polyurethanes is partly due to the presence of peptide-like bonds on aromatic segments. PMID:140169

  10. A Simple Hydrophilic Treatment of SU-8 Surfaces for Cell Culturing and Cell Patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Stangegaard, Michael; Dufva, Hans Martin;

    2005-01-01

    SU-8, an epoxy-based photoresist, widely used in constitution different mTAS systems, is incompatible with mammalian cell adhesion and culture in its native form. Here, we demonstrate a simple, cheap and robust two-step method to render a SU-8 surface hydrophilic and compatible with cell culture....... The contact angle of SU-8 surface was significantly reduced from 90° to 25° after the surface modification. The treated SU-8 surfaces provided a cell culture environment that was comparable with cell culture flask surface in terms of generation time and morphology....

  11. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  12. Ancestral vascular lumen formation via basal cell surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Kucera

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular system of bilaterians developed from a common ancestor. However, no endothelial cells exist in invertebrates demonstrating that primitive cardiovascular tubes do not require this vertebrate-specific cell type in order to form. This raises the question of how cardiovascular tubes form in invertebrates? Here we discovered that in the invertebrate cephalochordate amphioxus, the basement membranes of endoderm and mesoderm line the lumen of the major vessels, namely aorta and heart. During amphioxus development a laminin-containing extracellular matrix (ECM was found to fill the space between the basal cell surfaces of endoderm and mesoderm along their anterior-posterior (A-P axes. Blood cells appear in this ECM-filled tubular space, coincident with the development of a vascular lumen. To get insight into the underlying cellular mechanism, we induced vessels in vitro with a cell polarity similar to the vessels of amphioxus. We show that basal cell surfaces can form a vascular lumen filled with ECM, and that phagocytotic blood cells can clear this luminal ECM to generate a patent vascular lumen. Therefore, our experiments suggest a mechanism of blood vessel formation via basal cell surfaces in amphioxus and possibly in other invertebrates that do not have any endothelial cells. In addition, a comparison between amphioxus and mouse shows that endothelial cells physically separate the basement membranes from the vascular lumen, suggesting that endothelial cells create cardiovascular tubes with a cell polarity of epithelial tubes in vertebrates and mammals.

  13. Improving surface acousto-optical interaction by high aspect ratio electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2009-01-01

    The acousto-optical interaction of an optical wave confined inside a waveguide and a surface acoustic wave launched by an interdigital transducer (IDT) at the surface of a piezoelectric material is considered. The IDT with high aspect ratio electrodes supports several acoustic modes that are strongly confined to the surface, causing a significant increase in the strain underneath the surface. A finite element method is employed to model the surface acoustic waves generated by a finite length ...

  14. Role of the retinoblastoma protein in cell cycle arrest mediated by a novel cell surface proliferation inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enebo, D. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Moos, P. J.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A novel cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS-18), purified from the cell surface of bovine cerebral cortex cells has been shown to be a potent and reversible inhibitor of proliferation of a wide array of fibroblasts as well as epithelial-like cells and nontransformed and transformed cells. To investigate the possible mechanisms by which CeReS-18 exerts its inhibitory action, the effect of the inhibitor on the posttranslational regulation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (RB), a tumor suppressor gene, has been examined. It is shown that CeReS-18 mediated cell cycle arrest of both human diploid fibroblasts (HSBP) and mouse fibroblasts (Swiss 3T3) results in the maintenance of the RB protein in the hypophosphorylated state, consistent with a late G1 arrest site. Although their normal nontransformed counterparts are sensitive to cell cycle arrest mediated by CeReS-18, cell lines lacking a functional RB protein, through either genetic mutation or DNA tumor virus oncoprotein interaction, are less sensitive. The refractory nature of these cells is shown to be independent of specific surface receptors for the inhibitor, and another tumor suppressor gene (p53) does not appear to be involved in the CeReS-18 inhibition of cell proliferation. The requirement for a functional RB protein product, in order for CeReS-18 to mediate cell cycle arrest, is discussed in light of regulatory events associated with density-dependent growth inhibition.

  15. Plasmonics—the interaction of light with metal surface electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroó, Norbert; Rácz, Péter

    2016-08-01

    The realization of light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation opened up an enormous wealth of potential new research and technologies in a broad wavelength range of electromagnetic waves. One of the new fields is plasmonics, based on the special properties of some materials with negative refractive index. In this case surface electromagnetic waves, coupled to surface electrons, the so-called surface plasmons can be generated. These waves among others represent a large enhancement of the EM field near the surface of the materials. The present paper illustrates some of the consequences of this phenomenon for a broad range of phenomena from ‘lasing’ to electron pairing. The latter is the basic condition for superconductivity, in our case found at room temperature. Measurements with a scanning tunneling microscope, furthermore electron and photon emission studies are the source of the presented experimental data.

  16. Controlling coverage of solution cast materials with unfavourable surface interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2014-03-03

    Creating uniform coatings of a solution-cast material is of central importance to a broad range of applications. Here, a robust and generic theoretical framework for calculating surface coverage by a solid film of material de-wetting a substrate is presented. Using experimental data from semiconductor thin films as an example, we calculate surface coverage for a wide range of annealing temperatures and film thicknesses. The model generally predicts that for each value of the annealing temperature there is a range of film thicknesses leading to poor surface coverage. The model accurately reproduces solution-cast thin film coverage for organometal halide perovskites, key modern photovoltaic materials, and identifies processing windows for both high and low levels of surface coverage. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  17. Differentiating surface and bulk interactions in nanoplasmonic interferometric sensor arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Beibei; Bartoli, Filbert J

    2014-01-01

    Detecting specific target analytes and differentiating them from interfering background effects is a crucial but challenging task in complex multi-component solutions commonly encountered in environmental, chemical, biological, and medical sensing applications. Here we present a simple nanoplasmonic interferometric sensor platform that can differentiate the adsorption of a thin protein layer on the sensor surface (surface effects) from bulk refractive index changes (interfering background effects) at a single sensing spot, exploiting the different penetration depths of multiple propagating surface plasmon polaritons excited in the ring-hole nanostructures. A monolayer of bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules with an effective thickness of 1.91nm is detected and differentiated from a 10-3 change in the bulk refractive index unit of the solution. The noise level of the retrieved real-time sensor output compares favorably with traditional prism-based surface plasmon resonance sensors, but is achieved using a sign...

  18. Interaction between a surface dielectric barrier discharge and transonic airflows

    OpenAIRE

    Pavón, Samantha; Ott, Peter; Thome, John Richard

    2009-01-01

    The use of plasmas in aerodynamics has become a recent topic of interest. The potentialities of different types of plasmas are being investigated for low velocity and high velocity flow control, as well as for plasma-assisted combustion. Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are good candidates since the transition of the glow or filamentary discharge to an arc is prevented by the dielectric barrier. Moreover, surface DBDs allow to ionize the gas very close to the dielectric surface and can be...

  19. Interaction between a surface dielectric barrier discharge and transonic airflows

    OpenAIRE

    Pavón, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    The use of plasmas in aerodynamics has become a recent topic of interest. The potentialities of different types of plasmas are being investigated for low velocity and high velocity flow control, as well as for plasma-assisted combustion. Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are good candidates since the transition of the glow or filamentary discharge to an arc is prevented by the dielectric barrier. Moreover, surface DBDs allow to ionize the gas very close to the dielectric surface and can be...

  20. Effects of Vegetation on Subsurface-Surface-Atmosphere interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yen-Sen; Rihani, Jehan; Langensiepen, Matthias; Simmer, Clemens

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this project is to investigate the effect of vegetation on the coupling between groundwater, surface energy fluxes, and the atmospheric boundary layer. Literature demonstrates that conditions at the land surface can affect water table dynamics and development of the atmospheric boundary layer. Leaf Area Index (LAI) in particular is shown to have an important effect on land surface processes such as interception, albedo, evaporation, and transpiration. In this work, we perform a sensitivity analysis on a range of LAI values within a real catchment to investigate the role of vegetation on transition zones of strongest coupling between water table and energy fluxes at the land surface on one hand, and between water table dynamics and the atmospheric boundary layer on the other hand. In the first phase of this work, integrated groundwater-surface water simulations using the coupled model ParFlow-CLM are performed for different LAI values. These will be based on ranges obtained from observations for specific vegetation types within the real catchment. The subsurface-surface simulations are used to obtain the equilibrium soil moisture field given a specific set of atmospheric forcing conditions. Furthermore, results are analyzed to investigate LAI effects on the hydrologic and energy balance at the land surface, and how this affects the regions and times of strongest feedbacks between energy fluxes and water table depth. In the second phase, the equilibrium soil moisture field obtained from ParFlow-CLM will be used to initialize a second set of sensitivity analysis simulations using the fully coupled subsurface-surface-atmospheric model ParFlow-CLM-COSMO. Results will help draw conclusions on which regions within a watershed exhibit stronger vegetation effects on the two-way feedbacks between water table and atmospheric boundary layer on both diurnal and seasonal timescales.

  1. Spherical Shock-wave-2D Surface Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Viktorovich Bulat; Mikhail Vladimirovich Silnikov; Mikhail Viktorovich Chernyshev

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of research is the study of the transformation of the shock-wave configuration, caused by the reflection of a spherical shock wave from a flat surface. The blast of HE charge heightened over earth surface leads to formation of shock-wave triple configuration. In spite of static pressure equality of gas streams after the different wave sequences, the velocities, densities and other flow parameters are not equal. In view of the fact that flow velocities are sufficiently different, w...

  2. Quantitative visualization of droplet hot-surface interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, Nejdet; Okamoto, Koji

    2013-11-01

    Up to this date liquid droplet impingement phenomenon onto hot surfaces has drawn massive attention from a broad spectrum of research fields, since its hydrodynamic and thermodynamic characteristics has profound importance for various industrial applications Although tremendous experimental and computational work exist in the literature, thermal-hydraulic mechanism of droplet impingement boiling on hot surfaces received several contradictory approaches due to the parametric sensitivity of the problem. To understand and to predict the physical mechanism, an experimental database including large amount of spatio-temporal data, which is formed by the tests performed under well-controlled BCs and high sensitive devices, is still a necessity. This study investigates the parametric variation of droplet boiling regimes due to the experimental BCs (e.g surface roughness, ambient pressure) by performing separate effect tests employing high-speed visualization system. Differences in the impingement boiling characteristics of water droplets on solid (with surface roughness) and liquid metal (without surface roughness) in film boiling regime are investigated. A unique quantitative velocity data inside the droplet at several surface temperatures including (Leidenfrost temperatures) captured by Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). This data is a unique component for the validation of CFD simulations which are performed to resolve the phenomena.

  3. Measurement of the interaction between the flow and the free surface of a liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between the flow and free surface was evaluated measuring the velocity distribution and surface movement simultaneously. The test section was a rectangular tank having a free surface. A rectangular nozzle was set near the free surface, causing the wavy free surface condition. The flow under the free surface was visualized by a laser light sheet and small tracer particles. With image processing techniques, the movement of the free surface and the movement of the particles were simultaneously measured from the recorded images, resulting in the velocity distributions and surface locations. Then, the interactions between the flow and free surface were evaluated using the form of turbulent energy and surface-related turbulent values. By increasing the turbulent energy near the free surface, the fluctuations of the free surface height and the inclination of the free surface were increased. The higher fluctuation of horizontal velocity was related to the higher surface position and negative inclination. The image processing technique is found to be very useful to evaluate the interaction between free surface and flow

  4. Measurement of the interaction between the flow and the free surface of a liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Koji [Univ. of Tokyo, Ibaraki (Japan); Schmidl, W.D.; Philip, O.G. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The interaction between the flow and free surface was evaluated measuring the velocity distribution and surface movement simultaneously. The test section was a rectangular tank having a free surface. A rectangular nozzle was set near the free surface, causing the wavy free surface condition. The flow under the free surface was visualized by a laser light sheet and small tracer particles. With image processing techniques, the movement of the free surface and the movement of the particles were simultaneously measured from the recorded images, resulting in the velocity distributions and surface locations. Then, the interactions between the flow and free surface were evaluated using the form of turbulent energy and surface-related turbulent values. By increasing the turbulent energy near the free surface, the fluctuations of the free surface height and the inclination of the free surface were increased. The higher fluctuation of horizontal velocity was related to the higher surface position and negative inclination. The image processing technique is found to be very useful to evaluate the interaction between free surface and flow.

  5. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity

  6. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alan M. [School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L. [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Grover, Liam M., E-mail: l.m.grover@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity.

  7. The microbial cell surface electric field: life in an ion cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, N.

    2005-05-01

    Electrical charge on microbial cell surfaces arises from the ionization of proton-active functional groups attached to cell wall polymers. In Gram-positive cell walls, ionizable functional groups are associated with peptidoglycan and secondary polymers such as teichoic or teichuronic acids. Carboxyl functional groups attached to the unlinked peptide crosslinks of peptidoglycan and phosphoryl groups associated with the teichoic acids can deprotonate to form negatively charged surface sites. These anionic functional groups generate charge in the cell wall which results in the formation of an electric field that surrounds the entire cell. The cell surface electric field controls the concentration and spatial distribution of ions and counterions at the cell-water interface, and strongly affects microbe-fluid and microbe-mineral interactions. Recently, we have used potentiometric titration, infrared spectroscopy, electrophoretic mobility, metal sorption experiments to characterize the surface electrical potential properties of the various Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species. Potentiometric titration experiments show that the deprotonation of acidic cell wall functional groups generate surface charge density values typically ranging from 1.1 to 2.2 mol sites/g of bacteria. Spectroscopic measurements have confirmed that the dominant proton-active sites in the cell wall are carboxyl functional groups. Electrophoretic mobility experiments show that the magnitude of the electrostatic surface potential increases with increasing pH, and decreases with increasing ionic strength. Metal sorption experiments conducted with Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) exhibit strong ionic strength dependence, suggesting that high concentrations of metal ions are electrostatically bound to bacterial cell walls via outer-sphere complexation. We demonstrate that the electrostatic potential effects on ion sorption at the cell-water interface can be quantified using the Donnan model.

  8. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE HUMAN GASTRIC CARCINOMA CELL AND THE HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To definite the interactions between the human gastric carcinoma cell and the human vascular endothelial cell during the establishment and maintenance of the tumor vascular system and the tumor hematogenous metastasis.Methods We prepared the conditioned mediums of each cell so as to study the effect of the conditioned medium on itself or others by MTT colorimetry. The comprehensive effect of interactions between two cells was determined by stratified transfilter co-culture or direct contact co-culture.Results The conditioned medium of human gastric carcinoma cell can stimulate the proliferation of the human vascular endothelial cell, but the CM of HVEC can inhibit the growth of HGCC. Both kinds of cells can inhibit the growth of itself. The ultimate comprehensive effect of the interactions between two kinds of cells was increase of total cell numbers.Conclusion There exist the complicated interactions between the human gastric carcinoma cell and the human vascular endothelial cell during the tumor angiogenesis and the tumor hematogenous metastasis. The ultimate comprehensive effect of the interactions is increase of total cells numbers and tumor volume.

  9. Surface passivation of high efficiency silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretically and experimentally determined design guides for significantly reducing recombination at the emitter and rear surfaces of full-area Al-BSF and oxide passivated bifacial cells are given. The impact of emitter thickness and surface dopant concentration on emitter saturation current and solar cell efficiency is outlined. A modified emitter structure (locally deep diffused below the metal contacts) is predicted to have superior performance. Measured Voc-values reveal the potential of deep emitter cells to achieve efficiencies above 20% in spite of high metallization factors. Experimentally the authors find a strong dependence of passivation quality on oxide thickness and base doping concentration. The BSF quality of a diffused aluminum layer decreases strongly with increasing drive-in- time. For SiO2-passivated rear surfaces of bifacial cells measurements of the dependence of the surface recombination velocity on the excess carrier concentration are presented

  10. Interaction of dermatologically relevant nanoparticles with skin cells and skin

    OpenAIRE

    Annika Vogt; Fiorenza Rancan; Sebastian Ahlberg; Berouz Nazemi; Chun Sik Choe; Darvin, Maxim E.; Sabrina Hadam; Ulrike Blume-Peytavi; Kateryna Loza; Jörg Diendorf; Matthias Epple; Christina Graf; Eckart Rühl; Meinke, Martina C; Jürgen Lademann

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of nanoparticle interactions with tissues is complex. High levels of standardization, ideally testing of different material types in the same biological model, and combinations of sensitive imaging and detection methods are required. Here, we present our studies on nanoparticle interactions with skin, skin cells, and biological media. Silica, titanium dioxide and silver particles were chosen as representative examples for different types of skin exposure to nanomaterials, e....

  11. Cell-material interactions on biphasic polyurethane matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicesare, Patrick; Fox, Wade M; Hill, Michael J; Krishnan, G Rajesh; Yang, Shuying; Sarkar, Debanjan

    2013-08-01

    Cell-matrix interaction is a key regulator for controlling stem cell fate in regenerative tissue engineering. These interactions are induced and controlled by the nanoscale features of extracellular matrix and are mimicked on synthetic matrices to control cell structure and functions. Recent studies have shown that nanostructured matrices can modulate stem cell behavior and exert specific role in tissue regeneration. In this study, we have demonstrated that nanostructured phase morphology of synthetic matrix can control adhesion, proliferation, organization and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Nanostructured biodegradable polyurethanes (PU) with segmental composition exhibit biphasic morphology at nanoscale dimensions and can control cellular features of MSCs. Biodegradable PU with polyester soft segment and hard segment composed of aliphatic diisocyanates and dipeptide chain extender were designed to examine the effect polyurethane phase morphology. By altering the polyurethane composition, morphological architecture of PU was modulated and its effect was examined on MSC. Results show that MSCs can sense the nanoscale morphology of biphasic polyurethane matrix to exhibit distinct cellular features and, thus, signifies the relevance of matrix phase morphology. The role of nanostructured phases of a synthetic matrix in controlling cell-matrix interaction provides important insights for regulation of cell behavior on synthetic matrix and, therefore, is an important tool for engineering tissue regeneration. PMID:23255285

  12. Cell orientation on a stripe-micropatterned surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN JianGuo; TANG Jian; DING JianDong

    2009-01-01

    Stripe-micropatterned surfaces have recently been a unique tool to study cell orientation. In this paper,we prepared,by the photolithography transfer technique,stable gold (Au) micropatterns on PEG hydrogel surfaces with defined cell-resistant (PEG hydrogel) and cell-adhesive (gold microstripes) proparties. 3T3 fibroblasts were cultured on Au-microstripe surfaces to observe cell adhesion and orientation. Five statistical parameters were defined and used to describe cell orientation on micropatterns.With the increase of inter-stripe distance,the orientational order parameter,the ratio of long and short axes of a cell,and the occupation fraction of cells on stripes increased gradually,whereas the spreading area of a single cell decreased. The abrupt changes of these four parameters did not happen at the same inter-distance. The adhesion ratio of a cell on Au stripes over cell spreading area did not change monotonically as a function of inter-stripe distance. The combination of the 5 statistical parameters represented well the cell orientation behaviors semi-quantitatively.

  13. Counting NMDA Receptors at the Cell Surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Martin; Suh, Y. H.

    Totowa: Humana Press Inc., 2016, s. 31-44. (Neuromethods. 106). ISBN 978-1-4939-2811-8 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02219S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : NMDA receptor * ionotropic glutamate receptor * mammalian cell lines * intracellular trafficking * quantitative assay * biotinylation assay * biochemistry Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  14. High intensity laser-plasma grating interaction: surface wave excitation and particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface waves in solids were first observed by Wood in 1902 as an anomaly in the diffraction of a continuous light source from a metal grating: the diffracted spectrum presented dark lines corresponding to certain wavelengths, which were later explained (Fano, 1941) in terms of the excitation of a surface wave sustained by the grating. Similarly to the metal grating case, a surface plasma wave (SPW) can be resonantly excited by a laser pulse at the surface of a laser-produced over-dense plasma, if the correct matching conditions are provided. SPWs propagate along the plasma-vacuum interface and are characterized by a localized, high frequency, resonant electric field. In the present work we describe numerically the dynamics of the plasma and the field distribution associated to SPW excitation, using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, where the plasma surface is initially pre-formed so that the SPW excitation conditions are fulfilled. We examine the surface wave excitation for a large range of laser intensities (Iλ02 =1015 - 1020 Wcm-2μm2) in order to study the transition from the non-relativistic to the relativistic regime. The simulations in which the wave is resonantly excited are compared to cases in which the resonant conditions are not provided and the coupling of the laser with the target is analyzed. We have considered the following aspects of the laser-plasma interaction, for different laser and target parameters: i) the laser absorption and the electric field at the surface ii) the generation of a quasi-static magnetic field iii) the electron heating and iiii) the ion acceleration. The possibility to excite a surface plasma wave on a structured target for a large range of laser energies has been demonstrated. In the cases where the surface wave is excited the electric field component normal to the target is amplified at the surface by a factor ranging from 3.2 to 7.2 with respect to the laser field. The absorption is also increased for

  15. An interaction analysis of twin surface crack by the line spring model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In practice, minute surface cracks are formed and coalesced before being developed as a through crack. Because of difficulties in experiments and numerical analysis, there are only few papers dealing with an interaction effect of multiple surface cracks. The objective of this paper is to numerically investigate an interaction effect of twin surface cracks in plate and cylindrical geometries. First, the line spring model of the program Abaqus was verified by analyzing a single surface crack in a plate. Subsequently, twin surface crack problems in plate and cylindrical geometries were analyzed to investigate the effect of crack spacing on K values

  16. Human Papillomavirus Infection Requires Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate

    OpenAIRE

    Giroglou, Tzenan; Florin, Luise; Schäfer, Frank; Streeck, Rolf E.; Sapp, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Using pseudoinfection of cell lines, we demonstrate that cell surface heparan sulfate is required for infection by human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-33 pseudovirions. Pseudoinfection was inhibited by heparin but not dermatan or chondroitin sulfate, reduced by reducing the level of surface sulfation, and abolished by heparinase treatment. Carboxy-terminally deleted HPV-33 virus-like particles still bound efficiently to heparin. The kinetics of postattachment neutralization by antis...

  17. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction

  18. Interaction of low energy electrons with platinum surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Monte Carlo simulation of low energy electrons backscattered from platinum (Pt) surface. We take into account both elastic and inelastic collisions during the simulation. For the case of the elastic scattering of electrons by Pt atoms we use the static field approximation with non-relativistic Schrödinger partial wave analysis. For the case of inelastic scattering we use the dielectric response formalism. In our simulations the primary electron energy is 250 eV and the incidence angle of the electron beam with respect to the surface is varied between 1° and 90°. The backscattered electron energy loss distributions for primary and as well for secondary electrons and the distribution of maximum electron penetration depths in the Pt sample were calculated using only the bulk and also the surface dielectric function. We found that the maximum attained depth of the electrons is around 20 Å, i.e. the electrons are at the vicinity of the surface. Therefore we expect that the experimental data will be close to our simulation using surface-excitations modes

  19. Interaction of low energy electrons with platinum surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borka, D.; Tőkési, K.

    2015-07-01

    We present Monte Carlo simulation of low energy electrons backscattered from platinum (Pt) surface. We take into account both elastic and inelastic collisions during the simulation. For the case of the elastic scattering of electrons by Pt atoms we use the static field approximation with non-relativistic Schrödinger partial wave analysis. For the case of inelastic scattering we use the dielectric response formalism. In our simulations the primary electron energy is 250 eV and the incidence angle of the electron beam with respect to the surface is varied between 1° and 90°. The backscattered electron energy loss distributions for primary and as well for secondary electrons and the distribution of maximum electron penetration depths in the Pt sample were calculated using only the bulk and also the surface dielectric function. We found that the maximum attained depth of the electrons is around 20 Å, i.e. the electrons are at the vicinity of the surface. Therefore we expect that the experimental data will be close to our simulation using surface-excitations modes.

  20. Interaction of low energy electrons with platinum surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borka, D., E-mail: dusborka@vinca.rs [Atomic Physics Laboratory (040), Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Tőkési, K. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    We present Monte Carlo simulation of low energy electrons backscattered from platinum (Pt) surface. We take into account both elastic and inelastic collisions during the simulation. For the case of the elastic scattering of electrons by Pt atoms we use the static field approximation with non-relativistic Schrödinger partial wave analysis. For the case of inelastic scattering we use the dielectric response formalism. In our simulations the primary electron energy is 250 eV and the incidence angle of the electron beam with respect to the surface is varied between 1° and 90°. The backscattered electron energy loss distributions for primary and as well for secondary electrons and the distribution of maximum electron penetration depths in the Pt sample were calculated using only the bulk and also the surface dielectric function. We found that the maximum attained depth of the electrons is around 20 Å, i.e. the electrons are at the vicinity of the surface. Therefore we expect that the experimental data will be close to our simulation using surface-excitations modes.

  1. Surface texturing of multicrystalline silicon solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; A. Drygała

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to elaborate a laser method of texturization multicrystalline silicon. The main reason for taking up the research is that most conventional methods used for texturization of monocrystalline silicon are ineffective when applied for texturing multicrystalline silicon. This is related to random distribution of grains of different crystalographic orientations on the surface of multicrystalline silicon.Design/methodology/approach: The topography of laser ...

  2. Surface immobilized protein multilayers for cell seeding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brynda, Eduard; Pacherník, J.; Houska, Milan; Pientka, Zbyněk; Dvořák, P.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 17 (2005), s. 7877. ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/1326; GA ČR GA102/03/0633; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A065 Keywords : surface modification * layer-by-layer deposition * protein multilayers Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.705, year: 2005

  3. Predicting Nanocrystal Shape through Consideration of Surface-Ligand Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bealing, Clive R.

    2012-03-27

    Density functional calculations for the binding energy of oleic acid-based ligands on Pb-rich {100} and {111} facets of PbSe nanocrystals determine the surface energies as a function of ligand coverage. Oleic acid is expected to bind to the nanocrystal surface in the form of lead oleate. The Wulff construction predicts the thermodynamic equilibrium shape of the PbSe nanocrystals. The equilibrium shape is a function of the ligand surface coverage, which can be controlled by changing the concentration of oleic acid during synthesis. The different binding energy of the ligand on the {100} and {111} facets results in different equilibrium ligand coverages on the facets, and a transition in the equilibrium shape from octahedral to cubic is predicted when increasing the ligand concentration during synthesis. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Modeling Local Hygrothermal Interaction: Local surface transfer coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steskens, Paul Wilhelmus Maria Hermanus; Janssen, Hans; Rode, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Current models to predict heat, air and moisture (HAM) conditions in building components assume uniform boundary conditions, both for the temperature and relative humidity of the air in an indoor space as well as for the heat and moisture surface transfer coefficients. In order to obtain a reliable...... prediction of the HAM conditions in a building component, an accurate description of the indoor boundary conditions is required. This paper presents the modelling of the local indoor environmental conditions, using a (sub)zonal airflow model, focussing on the prediction of the local interior surface heat and...... moisture transfer coefficients. The research showed that the developed model gives good agreement with the local convective surface transfer coefficients predicted from CFD. The main advantage of the presented (sub)zonal airflow model is that the computational effort is relatively small, while the...

  5. Interaction of Serum Proteins with Surface of Hemodialysis Fiber Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rehana; Shirako, Yuji; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2012-08-01

    The poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-covered hydrophilic surface of hollow-fiber membranes (fiber membrane, hereafter) for hemodialysis was mechanically probed using modified tips on an atomic force microscope (AFM) with covalent crosslinkers and several types of serum protein. The retraction part of many of the force extension (F-E) curves obtained with AFM tips coated with serum albumin had a long and smooth extension up to 200-300 nm indicating forced elongation of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) chains. When fibrinogen-coated tips were used, long extension F-E curves up to 500 nm with multiple peaks were obtained in addition to smooth curves most likely reflecting the unfolding of fibrinogen molecules. The results indicated that individual polymer chains had a significant affinity toward serum proteins. The adhesion frequency of tips coated with serum proteins was lower on the poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) surface than on the uncoated hydrophobic polysulfone surface.

  6. Highly Sensitive Detection of Target Biomolecules on Cell Surface Using Gold Nanoparticle Conjugated with Aptamer Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyonchol; Terazono, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Masahito; Takei, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    A method of gold nanoparticle (Au NP) labeling with backscattered electron (BE) imaging of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was applied for specific detection of target biomolecules on a cell surface. A single-stranded DNA aptamer, which specifically binds to the target molecule on a human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell, was conjugated with a 20 nm Au NP and used as a probe to label its target molecule on the cell. The Au NP probe was incubated with the cell, and the interaction was confirmed using BE imaging of FE-SEM through direct counting of the number of Au NPs attached on the target cell surface. Specific Au NP-aptamer probes were observed on a single cell surface and their spatial distributions including submicron-order localizations were also clearly visualized, whereas the nonspecific aptamer probes were not observed on it. The aptamer probe can be potentially dislodged from the cell surface with treatment of nucleases, indicating that Au NP-conjugated aptamer probes can be used as sensitive and reversible probes to label target biomolecules on cells.

  7. Scattering approach to dispersive atom-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalvit, Diego [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Messina, Riccardo [LAB KASTLER BROSSEL; Maia Neto, Paulo [INSTITUTO DE FISICA UFRJ; Lambrecht, Astrid [LAB KASTLER BROSSEL; Reynaud, Serge [LAB KASTLER BROSSEL

    2009-01-01

    We develop the scattering approach for the dispersive force on a ground state atom on top of a corrugated surface. We present explicit results to first order in the corrugation amplitude. A variety of analytical results are derived in different limiting cases, including the van der Waals and Casimir-Polder regimes. We compute numerically the exact first-order dispersive potential for arbitrary separation distances and corrugation wavelengths, for a Rubidium atom on top of a silicon or gold corrugated surface. We consider in detail the correction to the proximity force approximation, and present a very simple approximation algorithm for computing the potential.

  8. Surface charge and interactions of 20-nm nanocolloids in a nematic liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkova, A. V.; Škarabot, M.; Muševič, I.

    2015-04-01

    We studied real-time motion of individual 20-nm silica nanoparticles in a thin layer of a nematic liquid crystal using a dark-field optical videomicroscopy. By tracking the positions of individual nanoparticles we observed that particle pair interactions are not only mediated by strong thermal fluctuations of the nematic liquid crystal, but also with a repulsive force of electric origin. We determined the total electric charge of silanated silica particles in the nematic liquid crystal 5CB by observing the electric-force-driven drift. Surprisingly, the surface electric charge density depends on colloidal size and is ˜4.5 ×10-3C/m2 for 20-nm nanocolloids, and two orders of magnitude lower, i.e., ˜2.3 ×10-5C/m2 , for 1 -μ m colloids. We conclude that electrostatic repulsion between like-charged particles prevents the formation of permanent colloidal assemblies of nanometer size. We also observed strong attraction of 20-nm silica nanoparticles to confining polyimide surfaces and larger clusters, which gradually results in complete expulsion of nanoparticles from the nematic liquid crystal to the surfaces of the confining cell.

  9. Synergistic interaction between selective drugs in cell populations models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Doldán-Martelli

    Full Text Available The design of selective drugs and combinatorial drug treatments are two of the main focuses in modern pharmacology. In this study we use a mathematical model of chimeric ligand-receptor interaction to show that the combination of selective drugs is synergistic in nature, providing a way to gain optimal selective potential at reduced doses compared to the same drugs when applied individually. We use a cell population model of proliferating cells expressing two different amounts of a target protein to show that both selectivity and synergism are robust against variability and heritability in the cell population. The reduction in the total drug administered due to the synergistic performance of the selective drugs can potentially result in reduced toxicity and off-target interactions, providing a mechanism to improve the treatment of cell-based diseases caused by aberrant gene overexpression, such as cancer and diabetes.

  10. Cell-scaffold interactions in the bone tissue engineering triad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CM Murphy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering has emerged as one of the leading fields in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The success of bone tissue engineering relies on understanding the interplay between progenitor cells, regulatory signals, and the biomaterials/scaffolds used to deliver them – otherwise known as the tissue engineering triad. This review will discuss the roles of these fundamental components with a specific focus on the interaction between cell behaviour and scaffold structural properties. In terms of scaffold architecture, recent work has shown that pore size can affect both cell attachment and cellular invasion. Moreover, different materials can exert different biomechanical forces, which can profoundly affect cellular differentiation and migration in a cell type specific manner. Understanding these interactions will be critical for enhancing the progress of bone tissue engineering towards clinical applications.

  11. Immunogold labels: cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Grooth, de Bart G.; Hansma, Paul K.; Hulst, van Niek F.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using immunogold labels as cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy is shown in this paper. The atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to image the surface of immunogold-labeled human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes were isolated from whole blood and labeled by an indirect imm

  12. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  13. A new approach to follow a single extracellular vesicle-cell interaction using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Ilaria; Amin, Ladan; Furlan, Roberto; Legname, Giuseppe; Verderio, Claudia; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical membrane structures released by most cells. These highly conserved mediators of intercellular communication carry proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, and transfer these cellular components between cells by different mechanisms, such as endocytosis, macropinocytosis, or fusion. However, the temporal and spatial dynamics of vesicle-cell interactions still remain largely unexplored. Here we used optical tweezers to drive single EVs produced by microglial cells onto the surface of astrocytes or microglia in primary culture. By visualizing single EV-cell contacts, we observed that microglial vesicles displayed different motilities on the surface of astrocytes compared with microglia. After contact, EVs positioned on astrocytes displayed some minor oscillatory motion around the point of adhesion, while vesicles dragged to microglia displayed quite regular directional movement on the plasma membrane. Both the adhesion and motion of vesicles on glial cells were strongly reduced by cloaking phosphatidylserine (PS) residues, which are externalized on the vesicle membrane and act as determinants for vesicle recognition by target cells. These data identify optical manipulation as a powerful tool to monitor in vitro vesicle-cell dynamics with high temporal and spatial resolution and to determine in a quantitative manner the contribution of surface receptors/extracellular protein ligands to the contact. PMID:26757810

  14. Functional living biointerfaces to direct cell-material interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Navarro, Aleixandre

    2015-01-01

    [EN] This thesis deals with the development of a living biointerface between synthetic substrates and living cells to engineer cell-material interactions for tissue engineering purposes. This living biointerface is made of Lactococcus lactis, a non-pathogenic lactic bacteria widely used as starter in the dairy industry and, recently, in the expression of heterologous proteins in applications such as oral vaccine delivery or membrane-bound expression of proteins. L. lactis has been engine...

  15. Dimethylsulfoxide exposure modulates HL-60 cell rolling interactions

    OpenAIRE

    David J. Gee; L. Kate Wright; Jonathan Zimmermann; Kayla Cole; Karen Soule; Michelle Ubowski

    2012-01-01

    Human leukaemic HL-60 cells are widely used for studying interactions involving adhesion molecules [e.g. P-selectin and PSGL-1 (P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1)] since their rolling behaviour has been shown to mimic the dynamics of leucocyte rolling in vitro. HL-60 cells are neutrophilic promyelocytes that can undergo granulocytic differentiation upon exposure to compounds such as DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide). Using a parallel plate flow chamber functionalized with recombinant P-selectin–...

  16. Interaction of surface-modified silica nanoparticles with clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omurlu, Cigdem; Pham, H.; Nguyen, Q. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the adsorption of 5-nm silica nanoparticles onto montmorillonite and illite is investigated. The effect of surface functionalization was evaluated for four different surfaces: unmodified, surface-modified with anionic (sulfonate), cationic (quaternary ammonium (quat)), and nonionic (polyethylene glycol (PEG)) surfactant. We employed ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy to determine the concentration of adsorbed nanoparticles in conditions that are likely to be found in subsurface reservoir environments. PEG-coated and quat/PEG-coated silica nanoparticles were found to significantly adsorb onto the clay surfaces, and the effects of electrolyte type (NaCl, KCl) and concentration, nanoparticle concentration, pH, temperature, and clay type on PEG-coated nanoparticle adsorption were studied. The type and concentration of electrolytes were found to influence the degree of adsorption, suggesting a relationship between the interlayer spacing of the clay and the adsorption ability of the nanoparticles. Under the experimental conditions reported in this paper, the isotherms for nanoparticle adsorption onto montmorillonite at 25 °C indicate that adsorption occurs less readily as the nanoparticle concentration increases.

  17. Experimental studies of ions and atoms interaction with insulating surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grazing collisions (+, Ne+, Ne0, Na+ on LiF (001) single crystal, an ionic insulator, are investigated by a time of flight technique. The incident beam is chopped and the scattered particles are collected on a position sensitive detector providing differential cross section while the time of flight gives the energy loss. Deflection plates allow the charge state analysis. Secondary electrons are detected in coincidence allowing direct measurements of electron emission yield, angular and energetic distribution through time of flight measurements. The target electronic structure characterized by a large band gap, governs the collisional processes: charge exchange, electronic excitations and electron emission. In particular, these studies show that the population of local target excitations surface excitons is the major contribution to the kinetic energy transfer (stopping power). Auger neutralization of Ne+ and He+ ions reveals the population of quasi-molecular excitons, an exciton bound on two holes. Referenced in the literature as trion. A direct energy balance determines the binding energy associated with these excited states of the surface. Besides these electronic energy loss processes, two nuclear energy loss mechanisms are characterized. These processes imply momentum transfer to individual target atoms during close binary collisions or, if the projectile is charged, to collective mode of optical phonons induced by the projectile coulomb field. The effect of the temperature on the scattering profile, the contribution of topological surface defects to the energy loss profile and to skipping motion on the surface are analyzed in view of classical trajectory simulations. (author)

  18. Interaction of blood plasma with „antifouling“ surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brynda, Eduard; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Sedláková, Zdeňka; Houska, Milan

    Paris: ENS Cachan, 2008. s. 33. [Label- Free Protein Array Workshop /2./. 03.07.2008-04.07.2008, Paris] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : SPR biosensor * antifouling surface * blood plasma Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  19. Interactions of fast N-2 molecules with palladium surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlatholter, T; Schlathölter, Thomas; Vicanek, M; Heiland, W

    1996-01-01

    Time-of-flight measurements of N-2 and N-2(+) scattered off clean and potassium covered Pd-surfaces indicate a collisional dissociation mechanism for kinetic energies of 250 up to 5000 eV and grazing incidence (5 degrees). Therefore, this system is predestined to be described within the framework of

  20. Superparamagnetic bead interactions with functionalized surfaces characterized by an immunomicroarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Moresco, Jacob Lange;

    2010-01-01

    optimized Polyethylene glycol-based surfaces with different end groups on the anchor molecule, 2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine (TsT), were synthesized and compared with the standard (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTS)/glutaraldehyde chemistry APTS/glutaraldehyde, directly linked TsT and bare H2O2-activated...

  1. Auger neutralization and ionization in grazing ion-surface interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimny, R. (Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Univ. Muenster (Germany)); Miskovic, Z.L. (Boris Kidric Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia))

    1991-06-01

    The effect of the projectile velocity parallel to the surface v{sub parallel} on Auger-type neutralization and ionization processes during grazing scattering of atomic particles from surfaces will be discussed. It is found that, contrary to the static case (v{sub parallel}=0), under grazing collision the Auger-type electron exchange between the metallic conduction band and an atomic orbital is a two-way process: atomic particles may be neutralized, as well as ionized. In particular, two types of v{sub parallel} dependence are obtained: (1) a gradual decrease of the final atomic level population with increasing v{sub parallel} in the case of atomic levels below the Fermi level E{sub F}, and (2) a peak-shaped v{sub parallel} dependence for atomic levels above E{sub F}. The leading features of these basic electron-exchange mechanisms between atoms and surfaces are illustrated for various atomic quasi-one-electron systems scattered from silver and magnesium surfaces. (orig.).

  2. Cell adhesion on Ti surface with controlled roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgos-Asperilla, Laura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this report, the in situ interaction between Saos-2 osteoblast cells and a smooth Ti surface was examined over time. The adhesion kinetics and mechanisms of cellular proliferation were monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The rate of Saos-2 attachment on Ti surfaces, obtained from the measurements performed with the QCM, is a first-order reaction, with k=2.10−3 min−1. The impedance measurements indicate that in the absence of cells, the Ti resistance diminishes over time (7 days, due to the presence of amino acids and proteins from the culture medium that have been a dsorbed, while in the presence of osteoblasts, this decrease is much greater because of the compounds generated by the cells that accelerate the dissolution of Ti.En este trabajo, se ha estudiado la interacción in situ entre células osteoblásticas Saos-2 y una superficie de Ti de rugosidad controlada a lo largo del tiempo. El estudio de la cinética y los mecanismos de proliferación celular de adhesión se ha realizado a través de la microbalanza de cristal de cuarzo (QCM y espectroscopía de impedancia electroquímica (EIS. La velocidad de adhesión de los osteoblastos sobre la superficie de Ti obtenida a través de medidas con la QCM, sigue una reacción de primer orden, con k=2×10−3 min−1. Los ensayos de impedancia indican que, en ausencia de las células, la resistencia del Ti disminuye con el tiempo (7 días, debido a la presencia de aminoácidos y proteínas del medio de cultivo que se han adsorbido, mientras que en presencia de células, esta disminución es mucho mayor debido a los productos metabólicos generados por las células que aceleran la disolución del Ti.

  3. Characterization of Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 (IGFBP-3) interaction with the Bovine Aortic Endothelial (BAE) cell surface : Examination of the Role of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans (HSPG).

    OpenAIRE

    Parghi, Nirav

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are known to be important modulators of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I). However, their precise role is as yet unclear. Further, recent studies have indicated that IGFBP-3 has a receptor mediated growth inhibitory response of its own. In the present study, we quantified the binding characteristics of IGFBP-3 to bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells. Binding studies at 4 oC were conducted and a specific binding curve for IGFB...

  4. Are there generic mechanisms governing interactions between nanoparticles and cells? Epitope mapping the outer layer of the protein material interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Iseult

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of a general paradigm for cell-biomaterial and cell-nanoparticle interactions. The basis of the paradigm is that the nature of the biomaterial or nanoparticle surface is not the important parameter, but rather the nature of the outermost layer of adsorbed proteins as well as long-lived misfolded proteins shed from the surfaces. If the adsorbed protein is irreversibly adsorbed onto the surface it may be sufficiently disrupted so that a variety of peptide units (here termed “cryptic epitopes”) not usually expressed in nature at the surface of the protein become exposed. Similarly, where there is a slow exchange time with the surface, surface-induced perturbations may lead to long-lived misfolded proteins being shed from the surface and continuing to express altered surface peptide sequences. In cases where the proteins have lost most of their tertiary structure, anomalous peptide sequences and geometries that are not displayed at the surface by the native protein may in fact be presented after surface adsorption of a protein. Such anomalous surface expressions could contain novel epitopes that trigger various signalling pathways or even diseases. Thus, future approaches to understanding cell-biomaterial and cell-nanoparticle interactions should focus on characterising the outer layer of the adsorbed proteins, or “epitope mapping” as well as examining the possibility of formation of essentially “new” proteins as a result of desorption of conformationally or geometrically altered proteins.

  5. Incorporation of Nasutitermes takasagoensis endoglucanase into cell surface-displayed minicellulosomes in Pichia pastoris X33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jingshen; Cao, Yicheng

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the yeast Pichia pastoris was genetically modified to assemble minicellulosomes on its cell surface by the heterologous expression of a truncated scaffoldin CipA from Clostridium acetobutylicum. Fluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis confirmed that CipA was targeted to the yeast cell surface and that NtEGD, the Nasutitermes takasagoensis endoglucanase that was fused with dockerin, interacted with CipA on the yeast cell surface, suggesting that the cohesin and dockerin domains and cellulose-binding module of C. acetobutylicum were functional in the yeasts. The enzymatic activities of the cellulases in the minicellulosomes that were displayed on the yeast cell surfaces increased dramatically following interaction with the cohesin-dockerin domains. Additionally, the hydrolysis efficiencies of NtEGD for carboxymethyl cellulose, microcrystal cellulose, and filter paper increased up to 1.4-fold, 2.0-fold, and 3.2-fold, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the expression of C. acetobutylicum minicellulosomes in yeast and the incorporation of animal cellulases into cellulosomes. This strategy of heterologous cellulase incorporation lends novel insight into the process of cellulosome assembly. Potentially, the surface display of cellulosomes, such as that reported in this study, may be utilized in the engineering of S. cerevisiae for ethanol production from cellulose and additional future applications. PMID:24851815

  6. Polymers' surface interactions with molten iron: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadi, M. Hussein N.; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2014-10-01

    Environmental concerns are the chief drive for more innovative recycling techniques for end-of-life polymeric products. One attractive option is taking advantage of C and H content of polymeric waste in steelmaking industry. In this work, we examined the interaction of two high production polymers i.e. polyurethane and polysulfide with molten iron using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. We demonstrate that both polymers can be used as carburizers for molten iron. Additionally, we found that light weight H2 and CHx molecules were released as by-products of the polymer-molten iron interaction. The outcomes of this study will have applications in the carburization of molten iron during ladle metallurgy and waste plastic injection in electric arc furnace.

  7. Amplified effect of surface charge on cell adhesion by nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Shuaitao; Ma, Xinlei; Wang, Shutao

    2016-06-01

    Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration.Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM, KFM AFM, chemical modification and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00649c

  8. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) based multichannel cell sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Lapsley, Michael Ian; Li, Sixing; Guo, Xiang; Chan, Chung Yu Keith; Chiang, I-Kao; Wang, Lin; McCoy, J. Philip; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel microfluidic device for cell sorting in continuous flow using tunable standing surface acoustic waves. This method allows individual cells to be precisely directed into five different outlet channels in a single step. It is versatile, simple, label-free, non-invasive, and highly controllable.

  9. Biocompatibility of Ir/Ti-oxide coatings: Interaction with platelets, endothelial and smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibzadeh, Sajjad; Li, Ling; Omanovic, Sasha; Shum-Tim, Dominique; Davis, Elaine C.

    2014-05-01

    Applying surface coatings on a biomedical implant is a promising modification technique which can enhance the implant's biocompatibility via controlling blood constituents- or/and cell-surface interaction. In this study, the influence of composition of IrxTi1-x-oxide coatings (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1) formed on a titanium (Ti) substrate on the responses of platelets, endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was investigated. The results showed that a significant decrease in platelet adhesion and activation was obtained on Ir0.2Ti0.8-oxide and Ir0.4Ti0.6-oxide coatings, rendering the surfaces more blood compatible, in comparison to the control (316L stainless steel, 316L-SS) and other coating compositions. Further, a substantial increase in the EC/SMC surface count ratio after 4 h of cell attachment to the Ir0.2Ti0.8-oxide and Ir0.4Ti0.6-oxide coatings, relative to the 316L-SS control and the other coating compositions, indicated high potential of these coatings for the enhancement of surface endothelialization. This indicates the capability of the corresponding coating compositions to promote EC proliferation on the surface, while inhibiting that of SMCs, which is important in cardiovascular stents applications.

  10. Surface nucleation and growth in the system of interacting particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chvoj, Zdeněk; Chromcová, Zdeňka

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 13 (2012), 1-8. ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP204/10/P331; GA MŠk ME09048; GA AV ČR IAA100100903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : epitaxy * nucleation * island density * graphene * long-range interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.355, year: 2012

  11. Cell-cell interactions during patterning of the Arabidopsis anther.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoqi; Dickinson, Hugh G

    2010-04-01

    Key steps in the evolution of the angiosperm anther include the patterning of the concentrically organized microsporangium and the incorporation of four such microsporangia into a leaf-like structure. Mutant studies in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana are leading to an increasingly accurate picture of (i) the cell lineages culminating in the different cell types present in the microsporangium (the microsporocytes, the tapetum, and the middle and endothecial layers), and (ii) some of the genes responsible for specifying their fates. However, the processes that confer polarity on the developing anther and position the microsporangia within it remain unclear. Certainly, data from a range of experimental strategies suggest that hormones play a central role in establishing polarity and the patterning of the anther initial, and may be responsible for locating the microsporangia. But the fact that microsporangia were originally positioned externally suggests that their development is likely to be autonomous, perhaps with the reproductive cells generating signals controlling the growth and division of the investing anther epidermis. These possibilities are discussed in the context of the expression of genes which initiate and maintain male and female reproductive development, and in the perspective of our current views of anther evolution. PMID:20298223

  12. Study of surface cell Madelung constant and surface free energy of nanosized crystal grain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei-Jia; Wang Tian-Min; Rong Ai-Lun; Cui Min

    2006-01-01

    Surface cell Madelung constant is firstly defined for calculating the surface free energy of nanosized crystal grains,which explains the physical performance of small crystals and may be greatly beneficial to the analysis of surface states and the study of the dynamics of crystal nucleation and growth.A new approximative expression of the surface energy and relevant thermodynamic data are used in this calculation.New formula and computing method for calculating the Madelung constant α of any complex crystals are proposed,and the surface free energies and surface electrostatic energies of nanosized crystal grains and the Madelung constant of some complex crystals are theoretically calculated in this paper.The surface free energy of nanosized-crystal-grain TiO2 and the surface electrostatic energy (absolute value) of nanosized-crystal-grain α-A12O3 are found to be the biggest among all the crystal grains including those of other species.

  13. Study of Surface Cell Madelung Constant and Surface Free Energy of Nanosized Crystal Grain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei-Jia; WANG Tian-Min; CUI Min

    2005-01-01

    Surface cell Madelung constant is firstly defined in calculating surface free energy of nanosized crystal grains, which explains the physical performance of small crystals and may be great benefit to make surface analysis and study dynamics of crystal nucleus growth. A new ap- proximative expression of surface energy and relevant thermodynamic data was used in this cal- culation. A new formula and computing method for calculating the Madelung constant α of any complex crystals is proposed, and surface free energies and surface electrostatic energies of nano- sized crystal grains as well as Madelung constant of some complex crystals are theoretically cal- culated in this paper. The surface free energy of nanosized crystal grain TiO2 and surface elec- trostatic energy(absolute value) of nanosized crystal grain α-Al2O3 are found to be the biggest among other crystal grains.

  14. Biomimetic surface modification of titanium surfaces for early cell capture by advanced electrospinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time required for osseointegration with a metal implant having a smooth surface ranges from three to six months. We hypothesized that biomimetic coating surfaces with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/collagen fibers and nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) on the implant would enhance the adhesion of mesenchymal stem cells. Therefore, this surface modification of dental and bone implants might enhance the process of osseointegration. In this study, we coated PLGA or PLGA/collagen (50:50 w/w ratio) fiber on Ti disks by modified electrospinning for 5 s to 2 min; after that, we further deposited n-HA on the fibers. PLGA fibers of fiber diameter 0.957 ± 0.357 µm had a contact angle of 9.9 ± 0.3° and PLGA/collagen fibers of fiber diameter 0.378 ± 0.068 µm had a contact angle of 0°. Upon n-HA incorporation, all the fibers had a contact angle of 0° owing to the hydrophilic nature of n-HA biomolecule. The cell attachment efficiency was tested on all the scaffolds for different intervals of time (10, 20, 30 and 60 min). The alkaline phosphatase activity, cell proliferation and mineralization were analyzed on all the implant surfaces on days 7, 14 and 21. Results of the cell adhesion study indicated that the cell adhesion was maximum on the implant surface coated with PLGA/collagen fibers deposited with n-HA compared to the other scaffolds. Within a short span of 60 min, 75% of the cells adhered onto the mineralized PLGA/collagen fibers. Similarly by day 21, the rate of cell proliferation was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) on the mineralized PLGA/collagen fibers owing to enhanced cell adhesion on these fibers. This enhanced initial cell adhesion favored higher cell proliferation, differentiation and mineralization on the implant surface coated with mineralized PLGA/collagen fibers.

  15. Zinc uptake by brain cells: `surface' versus `bulk'

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStasio, Gelsomina; Pochon, S.; Lorusso, G. F.; Tonner, B. P.; Mercanti, Delio; Ciotti, M. Teresa; Oddo, Nino; Galli, Paolo; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.

    1996-08-01

    The uptake of zinc by cerebellar rat cultures upon exposure to 0022-3727/29/8/023/img12 solutions was comparatively investigated using two well known condensed matter physics techniques: synchrotron photoelectron spectromicroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The objective was to apply a strategy - well known in surface physics - to distinguish between `surface' and `bulk' phenomena. The results clearly demonstrate that exposure significantly enhances the bulk (cell cytoplasm) Zn concentration with respect to the physiological level, whereas the effect on the surface (cell membrane) is negligible.

  16. Investigation of cell proliferative activity on the surface of the nanocomposite material produced by laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhurbina, N. N.; Kurilova, U. E.; Ickitidze, L. P.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Selishchev, S. V.; Suetina, I. A.; Mezentseva, M. V.; Eganova, E. M.; Pavlov, A. A.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.

    2016-04-01

    A new method for the formation of composite nanomaterials based on multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) on a silicon substrate has been developed. Formation is carried out by ultrasound coating of a silicon substrate by homogenous dispersion of CNTs in the albumin matrix and further irradiation with the continuous laser beam with a wavelength of 810 nm and power of 5.5 watts. The high electrical conductivity of CNTs provides its structuring under the influence of the laser radiation electric field. The result is a scaffold that provides high mechanical strength of nanocomposite material (250 MPa). For in vitro studies of materials biocompatibility a method of cell growth microscopic analysis was developed. Human embryonic fibroblasts (EPP) were used as biological cells. Investigation of the interaction between nanocomposite material and cells was carried out by optical and atomic force microscopy depending on the time of cells incubation. The study showed that after 3 hours incubation EPP were fixed on the substrate surface, avoiding the surface of the composite material. However, after 24 hours of incubation EPP fix on the sample surface and then begin to grow and divide. After 72 hours of incubation, the cells completely fill the sample surface of nanocomposite material. Thus, a nanocomposite material based on CNTs in albumin matrix does not inhibit cell growth on its surface, and favours their growth. The nanocomposite material can be used for creating soft tissue implants

  17. Influence of engineered surface on cell directionality and motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control of cell migration is important in numerous key biological processes, and is implicated in pathological conditions such as cancer metastasis and inflammatory diseases. Many previous studies indicated that cell migration could be guided by micropatterns fabricated on cell culture surfaces. In this study, we designed a polydimethylsiloxane cell culture substrate with gratings punctuated by corners and ends, and studied its effects on the behavior of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. MC3T3-E1 cells elongated and aligned with the gratings, and the migration paths of the cells appeared to be guided by the grating pattern. Interestingly, more than 88% of the cells cultured on these patterns were observed to reverse their migration directions at least once during the 16 h examination period. Most of the reversal events occurred at the corners and the ends of the pattern, suggesting these localized topographical features induce an abrupt loss in directional persistence. Moreover, the cell speed was observed to increase temporarily right after each directional reversal. Focal adhesion complexes were more well-established in cells on the angular gratings than on flat surfaces, but the formation of filipodia appeared to be imbalanced at the corners and the ends, possibly leading to the loss of directional persistence. This study describes the first engineered cell culture surface that consistently induces changes in the directional persistence of adherent cells. This will provide an experimental model for the study of this phenomenon and a valuable platform to control the cell motility and directionality, which can be used for cell screening and selection. (paper)

  18. Interaction of oxygen with the (111) surface of NaAu2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Widmer, Roland; Gröning, Oliver; Deniz, Okan; Walen, Holly; Yuen, Chad D.; Huang, Wenyu; Schlagel, Deborah L.; Wallingford, Mark; Brundle, C. R.; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2016-08-01

    NaAu2, in powder form, is known to be an active catalyst for CO oxidation. The goal of the present study is to elucidate the interaction of one reactant, molecular oxygen, with a single-crystal surface of this material, NaAu2(111). Exposing the clean surface to gas-phase molecular oxygen produces three types of oxygen on the surface. One type is bound in spurious carbonate that forms during exposure. The second is adsorbed atomic oxygen that interacts both with Na and Au. The third type is atomic oxygen that interacts mainly or only with Na. We propose that the last species is an oxide of Na distributed throughout the surface and near-surface region. Its formation is accompanied by surface segregation of Na.

  19. Improving surface acousto-optical interaction by high aspect ratio electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2009-01-01

    propagating in a waveguide buried in the lithium niobate substrate supporting the electrodes. The interaction can be increased up to 600 times using these new types of surface acoustic waves as compared to using a conventional IDT with thin electrodes. This result could find applications in improved acousto......The acousto-optical interaction of an optical wave confined inside a waveguide and a surface acoustic wave launched by an interdigital transducer (IDT) at the surface of a piezoelectric material is considered. The IDT with high aspect ratio electrodes supports several acoustic modes that are...... strongly confined to the surface, causing a significant increase in the strain underneath the surface. A finite element method is employed to model the surface acoustic waves generated by a finite length IDT with 12 electrode pairs and subsequently to study their interaction with an optical wave...

  20. Nanoparticle generation and interactions with surfaces in vacuum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khopkar, Yashdeep

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is the most likely candidate as the next generation technology beyond immersion lithography to be used in high volume manufacturing in the semiconductor industry. One of the most problematic areas in the development process is the fabrication of mask blanks used in EUVL. As the masks are reflective, there is a chance that any surface aberrations in the form of bumps or pits could be printed on the silicon wafers. There is a strict tolerance to the number density of such defects on the mask that can be used in the final printing process. Bumps on the surface could be formed when particles land on the mask blank surface during the deposition of multiple bi-layers of molybdenum and silicon. To identify, and possibly mitigate the source of particles during mask fabrication, SEMATECH investigated particle generation in the VEECO Nexus deposition tool. They found several sources of particles inside the tool such as valves. To quantify the particle generation from vacuum components, a test bench suitable for evaluating particle generation in the sub-100 nm particle size range was needed. The Nanoparticle test bench at SUNY Polytechnic Institute was developed as a sub-set of the overall SEMATECH suite of metrology tools used to identify and quantify sources of particles inside process tools that utilize these components in the semiconductor industry. Vacuum valves were tested using the test bench to investigate the number, size and possible sources of particles inside the valves. Ideal parameters of valve operation were also investigated using a 300-mm slit valve with the end goal of finding optimized parameters for minimum particle generation. SEMATECH also pursued the development of theoretical models of particle transport replicating the expected conditions in an ion beam deposition chamber assuming that the particles were generated. In the case of the ion beam deposition tool used in the mask blank fabrication process, the ion