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Sample records for cell sphingolipid biosynthesis

  1. Disruption of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis Blocks Phagocytosis of Candida albicans.

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    Fikadu G Tafesse

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of phagocytes to clear pathogens is an essential attribute of the innate immune response. The role of signaling lipid molecules such as phosphoinositides is well established, but the role of membrane sphingolipids in phagocytosis is largely unknown. Using a genetic approach and small molecule inhibitors, we show that phagocytosis of Candida albicans requires an intact sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Blockade of serine-palmitoyltransferase (SPT and ceramide synthase-enzymes involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis- by myriocin and fumonisin B1, respectively, impaired phagocytosis by phagocytes. We used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing to generate Sptlc2-deficient DC2.4 dendritic cells, which lack serine palmitoyl transferase activity. Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells exhibited a stark defect in phagocytosis, were unable to bind fungal particles and failed to form a normal phagocytic cup to engulf C. albicans. Supplementing the growth media with GM1, the major ganglioside present at the cell surface, restored phagocytic activity of Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells. While overall membrane trafficking and endocytic pathways remained functional, Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells express reduced levels of the pattern recognition receptors Dectin-1 and TLR2 at the cell surface. Consistent with the in vitro data, compromised sphingolipid biosynthesis in mice sensitizes the animal to C. albicans infection. Sphingolipid biosynthesis is therefore critical for phagocytosis and in vivo clearance of C. albicans.

  2. Enhanced killing of SCC17B human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells after photodynamic therapy plus fenretinide via the de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway and apoptosis.

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    Boppana, Nithin B; Stochaj, Ursula; Kodiha, Mohamed; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Pierce, Jason S; Korbelik, Mladen; Separovic, Duska

    2015-05-01

    Because photodynamic therapy (PDT) alone is not always effective as an anticancer treatment, PDT is combined with other anticancer agents for improved efficacy. The clinically-relevant fenretinide [N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide; 4HPR], was combined with the silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc4-mediated PDT to test for their potential to enhance killing of SCC17B cells, a clinically-relevant model of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Because each of these treatments induces apoptosis and regulates the de novo sphingolipid (SL) biosynthesis pathway, the role of ceramide synthase, the pathway-associated enzyme, in PDT+4HPR-induced apoptotic cell death was determined using the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1 (FB). PDT+4HPR enhanced loss of clonogenicity. zVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, and FB, protected cells from death post-PDT+4HPR. In contrast, the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 inhibitor ABT199 enhanced cell killing after PDT+4HPR. Combining PDT with 4HPR led to FB-sensitive, enhanced Bax associated with mitochondria and cytochrome c redistribution. Mass spectrometry data showed that the accumulation of C16-dihydroceramide, a precursor of ceramide in the de novo SL biosynthesis pathway, was enhanced after PDT+4HPR. Using quantitative confocal microscopy, we found that PDT+4HPR enhanced dihydroceramide/ceramide accumulation in the ER, which was inhibited by FB. The results suggest that SCC17B cells are sensitized to PDT by 4HPR via the de novo SL biosynthesis pathway and apoptosis, and imply potential clinical relevance of the combination for cancer treatment.

  3. Characterization of AnNce102 and its role in eisosome stability and sphingolipid biosynthesis.

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    Athanasopoulos, Alexandros; Gournas, Christos; Amillis, Sotiris; Sophianopoulou, Vicky

    2015-10-15

    The plasma membrane is implicated in a variety of functions, whose coordination necessitates highly dynamic organization of its constituents into domains of distinct protein and lipid composition. Eisosomes, at least partially, mediate this lateral plasma membrane compartmentalization. In this work, we show that the Nce102 homologue of Aspergillus nidulans colocalizes with eisosomes and plays a crucial role in density/number of PilA/SurG foci in the head of germlings. In addition we demonstrate that AnNce102 and PilA negatively regulate sphingolipid biosynthesis, since their deletions partially suppress the thermosensitivity of basA mutant encoding sphingolipid C4-hydroxylase and the growth defects observed upon treatment with inhibitors of sphingolipid biosynthesis, myriocin and Aureobasidin A. Moreover, we show that YpkA repression mimics genetic or pharmacological depletion of sphingolipids, conditions that induce the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), and can be partially overcome by deletion of pilA and/or annce102 at high temperatures. Consistent with these findings, pilAΔ and annce102Δ also show differential sensitivity to various oxidative agents, while AnNce102 overexpression can bypass sphingolipid depletion regarding the PilA/SurG foci number and organization, also leading to the mislocalization of PilA to septa.

  4. Sphingolipid biosynthesis upregulation by TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling during yeast adaptive response to acetic acid stress.

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    Guerreiro, Joana F; Muir, Alexander; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Thorner, Jeremy; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-12-01

    Acetic acid-induced inhibition of yeast growth and metabolism limits the productivity of industrial fermentation processes, especially when lignocellulosic hydrolysates are used as feedstock in industrial biotechnology. Tolerance to acetic acid of food spoilage yeasts is also a problem in the preservation of acidic foods and beverages. Thus understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation and tolerance to acetic acid stress is increasingly important in industrial biotechnology and the food industry. Prior genetic screens for Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with increased sensitivity to acetic acid identified loss-of-function mutations in the YPK1 gene, which encodes a protein kinase activated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 2 (TORC2). We show in the present study by several independent criteria that TORC2-Ypk1 signaling is stimulated in response to acetic acid stress. Moreover, we demonstrate that TORC2-mediated Ypk1 phosphorylation and activation is necessary for acetic acid tolerance, and occurs independently of Hrk1, a protein kinase previously implicated in the cellular response to acetic acid. In addition, we show that TORC2-Ypk1-mediated activation of l-serine:palmitoyl-CoA acyltransferase, the enzyme complex that catalyzes the first committed step of sphingolipid biosynthesis, is required for acetic acid tolerance. Furthermore, analysis of the sphingolipid pathway using inhibitors and mutants indicates that it is production of certain complex sphingolipids that contributes to conferring acetic acid tolerance. Consistent with that conclusion, promoting sphingolipid synthesis by adding exogenous long-chain base precursor phytosphingosine to the growth medium enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Thus appropriate modulation of the TORC2-Ypk1-sphingolipid axis in industrial yeast strains may have utility in improving fermentations of acetic acid-containing feedstocks.

  5. Bladder cancer cell growth and motility implicate cannabinoid 2 receptor-mediated modifications of sphingolipids metabolism

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    Bettiga, Arianna; Aureli, Massimo; Colciago, Giorgia; Murdica, Valentina; Moschini, Marco; Lucianò, Roberta; Canals, Daniel; Hannun, Yusuf; Hedlund, Petter; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Colombo, Renzo; Bassi, Rosaria; Samarani, Maura; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea; Benigni, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory effects demonstrated by activation of cannabinoid receptors (CB) on cancer proliferation and migration may also play critical roles in controlling bladder cancer (BC). CB expression on human normal and BC specimens was tested by immunohistochemistry. Human BC cells RT4 and RT112 were challenged with CB agonists and assessed for proliferation, apoptosis, and motility. Cellular sphingolipids (SL) constitution and metabolism were evaluated after metabolic labelling. CB1-2 were detected in BC specimens, but only CB2 was more expressed in the tumour. Both cell lines expressed similar CB2. Exposure to CB2 agonists inhibited BC growth, down-modulated Akt, induced caspase 3-activation and modified SL metabolism. Baseline SL analysis in cell lines showed differences linked to unique migratory behaviours and cytoskeletal re-arrangements. CB2 activation changed the SL composition of more aggressive RT112 cells by reducing (p < 0.01) Gb3 ganglioside (−50 ± 3%) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P, −40 ± 4%), which ended up to reduction in cell motility (−46 ± 5%) with inhibition of p-SRC. CB2-selective antagonists, gene silencing and an inhibitor of SL biosynthesis partially prevented CB2 agonist-induced effects on cell viability and motility. CB2 activation led to ceramide-mediated BC cell apoptosis independently of SL constitutive composition, which instead was modulated by CB2 agonists to reduce cell motility. PMID:28191815

  6. Inhibition of Sphingolipid Metabolism Enhances Resveratrol Chemotherapy in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

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    Shin, Kyong-Oh; Park, Nam-Young; Seo, Cho-hee; Hong, Seon-Pyo; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hong, Jin-Tae; Han, Sang-Kil; Lee, Yong-Moon

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol, a chemopreventive agent, is rapidly metabolized in the intestine and liver via glucuronidation. Thus, the pharmacokinetics of resveratrol limits its efficacy. To improve efficacy, the activity of resveratrol was investigated in the context of sphingolipid metabolism in human gastric cancer cells. Diverse sphingolipid metabolites, including dihydroceramides (DHCer), were tested for their ability to induce resveratrol cytotoxicity. Exposure to resveratrol (100 μM) for 24 hr induced...

  7. Smart drugs for smarter stem cells: making SENSe (sphingolipid-enhanced neural stem cells) of ceramide.

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    Bieberich, Erhard

    2008-01-01

    Ceramide and its derivative sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are important signaling sphingolipids for neural stem cell apoptosis and differentiation. Most recently, our group has shown that novel ceramide analogs can be used to eliminate teratoma (stem cell tumor)-forming cells from a neural stem cell graft. In new studies, we found that S1P promotes survival of specific neural precursor cells that undergo differentiation to cells expressing oligodendroglial markers. Our studies suggest that a combination of novel ceramide and S1P analogs eliminates tumor-forming stem cells and at the same time, triggers oligodendroglial differentiation. This review discusses recent studies on the function of ceramide and S1P for the regulation of apoptosis, differentiation, and polarity in stem cells. We will also discuss results from ongoing studies in our laboratory on the use of sphingolipids in stem cell therapy.

  8. Establishment of HeLa cell mutants deficient in sphingolipid-related genes using TALENs.

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    Toshiyuki Yamaji

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are essential components in eukaryotes and have various cellular functions. Recent developments in genome-editing technologies have facilitated gene disruption in various organisms and cell lines. We here show the disruption of various sphingolipid metabolic genes in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells by using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs. A TALEN pair targeting the human CERT gene (alternative name COL4A3BP encoding a ceramide transport protein induced a loss-of-function phenotype in more than 60% of HeLa cells even though the cell line has a pseudo-triploid karyotype. We have isolated several loss-of-function mutant clones for CERT, UGCG (encoding glucosylceramide synthase, and B4GalT5 (encoding the major lactosylceramide synthase, and also a CERT/UGCG double-deficient clone. Characterization of these clones supported previous proposals that CERT primarily contributes to the synthesis of SM but not GlcCer, and that B4GalT5 is the major LacCer synthase. These newly established sphingolipid-deficient HeLa cell mutants together with our previously established stable transfectants provide a 'sphingolipid-modified HeLa cell panel,' which will be useful to elucidate the functions of various sphingolipid species against essentially the same genomic background.

  9. A deficiency of ceramide biosynthesis causes cerebellar purkinje cell neurodegeneration and lipofuscin accumulation.

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    Lihong Zhao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids, lipids with a common sphingoid base (also termed long chain base backbone, play essential cellular structural and signaling functions. Alterations of sphingolipid levels have been implicated in many diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains largely unclear whether sphingolipid changes in these diseases are pathological events or homeostatic responses. Furthermore, how changes in sphingolipid homeostasis shape the progression of aging and neurodegeneration remains to be clarified. We identified two mouse strains, flincher (fln and toppler (to, with spontaneous recessive mutations that cause cerebellar ataxia and Purkinje cell degeneration. Positional cloning demonstrated that these mutations reside in the Lass1 gene. Lass1 encodes (dihydroceramide synthase 1 (CerS1, which is highly expressed in neurons. Both fln and to mutations caused complete loss of CerS1 catalytic activity, which resulted in a reduction in sphingolipid biosynthesis in the brain and dramatic changes in steady-state levels of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases. In addition to Purkinje cell death, deficiency of CerS1 function also induced accumulation of lipofuscin with ubiquitylated proteins in many brain regions. Our results demonstrate clearly that ceramide biosynthesis deficiency can cause neurodegeneration and suggest a novel mechanism of lipofuscin formation, a common phenomenon that occurs during normal aging and in some neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Sphingolipids and mitochondrial apoptosis.

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    Patwardhan, Gauri A; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-04-01

    The sphingolipid family of lipids modulate several cellular processes, including proliferation, cell cycle regulation, inflammatory signaling pathways, and cell death. Several members of the sphingolipid pathway have opposing functions and thus imbalances in sphingolipid metabolism result in deregulated cellular processes, which cause or contribute to diseases and disorders in humans. A key cellular process regulated by sphingolipids is apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Sphingolipids play an important role in both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways depending on the stimuli, cell type and cellular response to the stress. During mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, multiple pathways converge on mitochondria and induce mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). MOMP results in the release of intermembrane space proteins such as cytochrome c and Apaf1 into the cytosol where they activate the caspases and DNases that execute cell death. The precise molecular components of the pore(s) responsible for MOMP are unknown, but sphingolipids are thought to play a role. Here, we review evidence for a role of sphingolipids in the induction of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis with a focus on potential underlying molecular mechanisms by which altered sphingolipid metabolism indirectly or directly induce MOMP. Data available on these mechanisms is reviewed, and the focus and limitations of previous and current studies are discussed to present important unanswered questions and potential future directions.

  11. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity

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    Julien Véret

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated in the presence of hyperglycaemia, a phenomenon that has been termed gluco-lipotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of gluco-lipotoxicity in pancreatic β cells are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in gluco-lipotoxicity induced apoptosis and loss of function of pancreatic β cells. The present review focuses on how the two main sphingolipid mediators, ceramides and sphingoid base-1-phosphates, regulate the deleterious effects of gluco-lipotoxicity on pancreatic β cells. The review highlights the role of a sphingolipid biostat on the dysregulation of β cell fate and function induced by gluco-lipotoxicity, offering the possibility of new therapeutic targets to prevent the onset of T2D.

  12. Differential expression of sphingolipids in P-glycoprotein or multidrug resistance-related protein 1 expressing human neuroblastoma cell lines

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    Dijkhuis, AJ; Douwes, J; Kamps, W; Sietsma, H; Kok, JW

    2003-01-01

    The sphingolipid composition and multidrug resistance status of three human neuroblastoma cell lines were established. SK-N-FI cells displayed high expression and functional (efflux) activity of P-glycoprotein, while multidrug resistance-related protein 1 was relatively abundant and most active in S

  13. Sphingolipids as Mediators in the Crosstalk between Microbiota and Intestinal Cells: Implications for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

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    Bryan, Phillips-Farfán; Edgar Alejandro, Medina-Torres; Sara Elva, Espinosa-Padilla; Gemma, Fabrias

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) describes different illnesses characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the pathogenic mechanisms leading to IBD are poorly understood, immune system disturbances likely underlie its development. Sphingolipids (SLs) have been identified as important players and promising therapeutic targets to control inflammation in IBD. Interestingly, it seems that microorganisms of the normal gut microbiota and probiotics are involved in sphingolipid function. However, there is a great need to investigate the role of SLs as intermediates in the crosstalk between intestinal immunity and microorganisms. This review focuses on recent investigations that describe some mechanisms involved in the regulation of cytokine profiles by SLs. We also describe the importance of gut microbiota in providing signaling molecules that favor the communication between resident bacteria and intestinal cells. This, in turn, modulates the immune response in the bowel and likely in other peripheral organs. The potential of SLs and gut microbiota as targets or therapeutic agents for IBD is also discussed. PMID:27656050

  14. Sphingolipids in viral infection.

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    Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2015-06-01

    Viruses exploit membranes and their components such as sphingolipids in all steps of their life cycle including attachment and membrane fusion, intracellular transport, replication, protein sorting and budding. Examples for sphingolipid-dependent virus entry are found for: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which besides its protein receptors also interacts with glycosphingolipids (GSLs); rhinovirus, which promotes the formation of ceramide-enriched platforms and endocytosis; or measles virus (MV), which induces the surface expression of its own receptor CD150 via activation of sphingomyelinases (SMases). While SMase activation was implicated in Ebola virus (EBOV) attachment, the virus utilizes the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C protein 1 (NPC1) as 'intracellular' entry receptor after uptake into endosomes. Differential activities of SMases also affect the intracellular milieu required for virus replication. Sindbis virus (SINV), for example, replicates better in cells lacking acid SMase (ASMase). Defined lipid compositions of viral assembly and budding sites influence virus release and infectivity, as found for hepatitis C virus (HCV) or HIV. And finally, viruses manipulate cellular signaling and the sphingolipid metabolism to their advantage, as for example influenza A virus (IAV), which activates sphingosine kinase 1 and the transcription factor NF-κB.

  15. Targeting Cell Membrane Lipid Rafts by Stoichiometric Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles With a Sphingolipid-Binding Domain Peptide.

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    Paramelle, David; Nieves, Daniel; Brun, Benjamin; Kraut, Rachel S; Fernig, David G

    2015-04-22

    A non-membrane protein-based nanoparticle agent for the tracking of lipid rafts on live cells is produced by stoichiometric functionalization of gold nanoparticles with a previously characterized sphingolipid- and cell membrane microdomain-binding domain peptide (SBD). The SBD peptide is inserted in a self-assembled monolayer of peptidol and alkane thiol ethylene glycol, on gold nanoparticles surface. The stoichiometric functionalization of nanoparticles with the SBD peptide, essential for single molecule tracking, is achieved by means of non-affinity nanoparticle purification. The SBD-nanoparticles have remarkable long-term resistance to electrolyte-induced aggregation and ligand-exchange and have no detectable non-specific binding to live cells. Binding and diffusion of SBD-nanoparticles bound to the membrane of live cells is measured by real-time photothermal microscopy and shows the dynamics of sphingolipid-enriched microdomains on cells membrane, with evidence for clustering, splitting, and diffusion over time of the SBD-nanoparticle labeled membrane domains. The monofunctionalized SBD-nanoparticle is a promising targeting agent for the tracking of lipid rafts independently of their protein composition and the labelling requires no prior modification of the cells. This approach has potential for further functionalization of the particles to manipulate the organization of, or targeting to microdomains that control signaling events and thereby lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutics.

  16. Downregulation of the autophagy protein ATG-7 correlates with distinct sphingolipid profile in MCF-7 cells sensitized to photodamage

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    Separovic, Duska; Kelekar, Ameeta; Tarca, Adi L.; Bielawski, Jacek; Kessel, David

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the sphingolipid (SL) profile in autophagy-defective cells and overall cell death after PDT with Pc 4 (PDT). Human breast cancer MCF-7 cells with downregulated autophagy protein ATG-7 and their scrambled controls (Scr) were used. Exposure of ATG-7 knockdown cells to PDT led to defective processing of the autophagy marker LC3, and increased overall cell killing. In both cell types PDT evoked an early (2 h) increase in ceramides and dihydroceramides (DHceramides). When the two cell types were compared regarding time (2 and 24 h) and treatment conditions (with and without PDT), the levels of several ceramides and DHceramides were reduced, whereas the concentrations of C14-ceramide, C16-ceramide and C12-DHceramide were higher in ATG-7 knockdown cells. The data imply that the SL profile might be a marker of autophagy-deficiency in cells sensitized to PDT.

  17. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry for accurate analysis of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in drug resistance tumor cells.

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    Li, Lin; Wang, Linlin; Shangguan, Dihua; Wei, Yanbo; Han, Juanjuan; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2015-02-13

    Glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids are important signaling molecules which are involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Here we reported an effective method for accurate analysis of these lipids by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The methanol method was adopted for extraction of lipids due to its simplicity and high efficiency. It was found that two subclasses of sphingolipids, sulfatide (ST) and cerebroside (CB), were heat labile, so a decreased temperature in the ion source of MS might be necessary for these compounds analysis. In addition, it was found that the isobaric interferences were commonly existent, for example, the m/z of 16:0/18:1 PC containing two (13)C isotope being identical to that of 16:0/18:0 PC determined by a unit mass resolution mass spectrometer; therefore, a baseline separation of interferential species was required to maintain selectivity and accuracy of analysis. In this work, an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-based method was developed for separation of interferential species. Moreover, in order to deal with the characteristics of different polarity and wide dynamic range of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in biological systems, three detecting conditions were combined together for comprehensive and rational analysis of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids. The method was utilized to profile glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in drug resistant tumor cells. Our results showed that many lipids were significantly changed in drug resistant tumor cells compared to paired drug sensitive tumor cells. This is a systematic report about the isobaric interferences and heat labile compounds interferences when analyzing glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids by ESI-MS/MS, which aids in ruling out one potential source of systematic error to ensure the accuracy of analysis.

  18. Sphingolipids in human synovial fluid--a lipidomic study.

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    Marta Krystyna Kosinska

    Full Text Available Articular synovial fluid (SF is a complex mixture of components that regulate nutrition, communication, shock absorption, and lubrication. Alterations in its composition can be pathogenic. This lipidomic investigation aims to quantify the composition of sphingolipids (sphingomyelins, ceramides, and hexosyl- and dihexosylceramides and minor glycerophospholipid species, including (lysophosphatidic acid, (lysophosphatidylglycerol, and bis(monoacylglycerophosphate species, in the SF of knee joints from unaffected controls and from patients with early (eOA and late (lOA stages of osteoarthritis (OA, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA. SF without cells and cellular debris from 9 postmortem donors (control, 18 RA, 17 eOA, and 13 lOA patients were extracted to measure lipid species using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry--directly or coupled with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. We provide a novel, detailed overview of sphingolipid and minor glycerophospholipid species in human SF. A total of 41, 48, and 50 lipid species were significantly increased in eOA, lOA, and RA SF, respectively when compared with normal SF. The level of 21 lipid species differed in eOA SF versus SF from lOA, an observation that can be used to develop biomarkers. Sphingolipids can alter synovial inflammation and the repair responses of damaged joints. Thus, our lipidomic study provides the foundation for studying the biosynthesis and function of lipid species in health and most prevalent joint diseases.

  19. Synthesis of Sphingolipids Impacts Survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis and the Presentation of Surface Polysaccharides

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    Moye, Zachary D.; Valiuskyte, Kornelija; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Nichols, Frank C.; Davey, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria alter the biophysical properties of their membrane lipids in response to environmental cues, such as shifts in pH or temperature. In essence, lipid composition determines membrane structure, which in turn influences many basic functions, such as transport, secretion, and signaling. Like other members of the phylum Bacteroidetes, the oral anaerobe Porphyromonas gingivalis possesses the ability to synthesize a variety of novel membrane lipids, including species of dihydroceramides that are distinct, yet similar in structure to sphingolipids produced by the human host. The role of dihydroceramides in the physiology and pathogenic potential of the human microbiota is only beginning to be explored; yet there is increasing data indicating that these lipids play a role in human diseases, such as periodontitis and multiple sclerosis. Here, we report on the identification of a gene (PG1780) in the chromosome of P. gingivalis strain W83 encoding a putative serine palmitoyltransferase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in sphingolipid biosynthesis. While we were able to detect dihydroceramides in whole lipid extracts of P. gingivalis cells as well as crude preparations of outer membrane vesicles, sphingolipids were absent in the PG1780 mutant strain. Moreover, we show that the synthesis of sphingolipids plays an essential role in the long-term survival of the organism as well as its resistance to oxidative stress. Further, a PG1780 mutant displayed much lower activity of cell-associated arginine and lysine gingipains, yet slightly higher activity in the corresponding culture supernates, which we hypothesize is due to altered membrane properties and anchoring of these proteases to the cell surface. In addition, we determined that sphingolipid production is critical to the presentation of surface polysaccharides, with the mutant strain displaying less K-antigen capsule and more anionic polysaccharide (APS). Overall, we have discovered that, in addition to their

  20. Sphingolipid and Ceramide Homeostasis: Potential Therapeutic Targets

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    Simon A. Young

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells where they have been attributed a plethora of functions from the formation of structural domains to polarized cellular trafficking and signal transduction. Recent research has identified and characterised many of the key enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism and this has led to a heightened interest in the possibility of targeting these processes for therapies against cancers, Alzheimer's disease, and numerous important human pathogens. In this paper we outline the major pathways in eukaryotic sphingolipid metabolism and discuss these in relation to disease and therapy for both chronic and infectious conditions.

  1. Stoichiometric network reconstruction and analysis of yeast sphingolipid metabolism incorporating different states of hydroxylation.

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    Kavun Ozbayraktar, Fatma Betul; Ulgen, Kutlu O

    2011-04-01

    The first elaborate metabolic model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sphingolipid metabolism was reconstructed in silico. The model considers five different states of sphingolipid hydroxylation, rendering it unique among other models. It is aimed to clarify the significance of hydroxylation on sphingolipids and hence to interpret the preferences of the cell between different metabolic pathway branches under different stress conditions. The newly constructed model was validated by single, double and triple gene deletions with experimentally verified phenotypes. Calcium sensitivity and deletion mutations that may suppress calcium sensitivity were examined by CSG1 and CSG2 related deletions. The model enabled the analysis of complex sphingolipid content of the plasma membrane coupled with diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid biosynthesis and ATP consumption in in silico cell. The flux data belonging to these critically important key metabolites are integrated with the fact of phytoceramide induced cell death to propose novel potential drug targets for cancer therapeutics. In conclusion, we propose that IPT1, GDA1, CSG and AUR1 gene deletions may be novel candidates of drug targets for cancer therapy according to the results of flux balance and variability analyses coupled with robustness analysis.

  2. Isolation and Functional Characterisation of the Genes Encoding △8-Sphingolipid Desaturase from Brassica rapa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Fen Li; Li-Ying Song; Wei-Bo Yin; Yu-Hong Chen; Liang Chen; Ji-Lin Li; Richard R.-C. Wang; Zan-Min Hu

    2012-01-01

    △8-Sphingolipid desaturase is the key enzyme that catalyses desaturation at the C8 position of the long-chain base of sphingolipids in higher plants.There have been no previous studies on the genes encoding △8-sphingolipid desaturases in Brassica rapa.In this study,four genes encoding △8-sphingolipid desaturases from B.rapa were isolated and characterised.Phylogenetic analyses indicated that these genes could be divided into two groups:BrD8A,BrD8C and BrD8D in group Ⅰ,and BrD8B in group Ⅱ.The two groups of genes diverged before the separation of Arabidopsis and Brassica.Though the four genes shared a high sequence similarity,and their coding desaturases all located in endoplasmic reticulum,they exhibited distinct expression patterns.Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that BrD8A/B/C/D were functionally diverse △8-sphingolipid desaturases that catalyse different ratios of the two products 8(Z)- and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine.The aluminium tolerance of transgenic yeasts expressing BrD8A/B/C/D was enhanced compared with that of control cells.Expression of BrD8A in A rabidopsis changed the ratio of 8(Z):8(E)-C 18-phytosphingenine in transgenic plants.The information reported here provides new insights into the biochemical functional diversity and evolutionary relationship of △8-sphingolipid desaturase in plants and lays a foundation for further investigation of the mechanism of 8(Z)- and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine biosynthesis.

  3. Sphingolipid transport to the apical plasma membrane domain in human hepatoma cells is controlled by PKC and PKA activity : A correlation with cell polarity in HepG2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, MMP; Hoekstra, D

    1997-01-01

    The regulation of sphingolipid transport to the bile canalicular apical membrane in the well differentiated HepG2 hepatoma cells was studied. By employing fluorescent lipid analogs, trafficking in a transcytosis-dependent pathway and a transcytosis-independent ('direct') route between the trans-Golg

  4. Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharide Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ajay Pal S. Sandhu; Gursharn S. Randhawa; Kanwarpal S. Dhugga

    2009-01-01

    The wall of an expanding plant cell consists primarily of cellulose microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemi-cellulosic and pectic polysaccharides along with small amounts of structural and enzymatic proteins. Matrix polysacchar-ides are synthesized in the Golgi and exported to the cell wall by exocytosis, where they intercalate among cellulose microfibrUs, which are made at the plasma membrane and directly deposited into the cell wall. Involvement of Golgi glucan synthesis in auxin-induced cell expansion has long been recognized; however, only recently have the genes corresponding to glucan synthases been identified. Biochemical purification was unsuccessful because of the labile nature and very low abundance of these enzymes. Mutational genetics also proved fruitless. Expression of candidate genes identified through gene expression profiling or comparative genomics in heterologous systems followed by functional characterization has been relatively successful. Several genes from the cellulose synthase-like (Cs/) family have been found to be involved in the synthesis of various hemicellulosic glycans. The usefulness of this approach, however, is limited to those enzymes that probably do not form complexes consisting of unrelated proteins. Nonconventional approaches will continue to incre-mentally unravel the mechanisms of Golgi polysaccharide biosynthesis.

  5. Effects of stereochemistry, saturation, and hydrocarbon chain length on the ability of synthetic constrained azacyclic sphingolipids to trigger nutrient transporter down-regulation, vacuolation, and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryman, Michael S; Tessier, Jérémie; Wiher, Timothy; O'Donoghue, Heather; McCracken, Alison N; Kim, Seong M; Nguyen, Dean G; Simitian, Grigor S; Viana, Matheus; Rafelski, Susanne; Edinger, Aimee L; Hanessian, Stephen

    2016-09-15

    Constrained analogs containing a 2-hydroxymethylpyrrolidine core of the natural sphingolipids sphingosine, sphinganine, N,N-dimethylsphingosine and N-acetyl variants of sphingosine and sphinganine (C2-ceramide and dihydro-C2-ceramide) were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to down-regulate nutrient transporter proteins and trigger cytoplasmic vacuolation in mammalian cells. In cancer cells, the disruptions in intracellular trafficking produced by these sphingolipids lead to cancer cell death by starvation. Structure activity studies were conducted by varying the length of the hydrocarbon chain, the degree of unsaturation and the presence or absence of an aryl moiety on the appended chains, and stereochemistry at two stereogenic centers. In general, cytotoxicity was positively correlated with nutrient transporter down-regulation and vacuolation. This study was intended to identify structural and functional features in lead compounds that best contribute to potency, and to develop chemical biology tools that could be used to isolate the different protein targets responsible for nutrient transporter loss and cytoplasmic vacuolation. A molecule that produces maximal vacuolation and transporter loss is expected to have the maximal anti-cancer activity and would be a lead compound.

  6. TOR Complex 2-Ypk1 Signaling Maintains Sphingolipid Homeostasis by Sensing and Regulating ROS Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Niles

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced during normal metabolism and can function as signaling molecules. However, ROS at elevated levels can damage cells. Here, we identify the conserved target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2/Ypk1 signaling module as an important regulator of ROS in the model eukaryotic organism, S. cerevisiae. We show that TORC2/Ypk1 suppresses ROS produced both by mitochondria as well as by nonmitochondrial sources, including changes in acidification of the vacuole. Furthermore, we link vacuole-related ROS to sphingolipids, essential components of cellular membranes, whose synthesis is also controlled by TORC2/Ypk1 signaling. In total, our data reveal that TORC2/Ypk1 act within a homeostatic feedback loop to maintain sphingolipid levels and that ROS are a critical regulatory signal within this system. Thus, ROS sensing and signaling by TORC2/Ypk1 play a central physiological role in sphingolipid biosynthesis and in the maintenance of cell growth and viability.

  7. Legionella pneumophila S1P-lyase targets host sphingolipid metabolism and restrains autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, Monica; Escoll, Pedro; Nora, Tamara; Botti, Joëlle; Boitez, Valérie; Bedia, Carmen; Daniels, Craig; Abraham, Gilu; Stogios, Peter J; Skarina, Tatiana; Christophe, Charlotte; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Cazalet, Christel; Hilbi, Hubert; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W T; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J; Ong, Sze Ying; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Codogno, Patrice; Levade, Thierry; Naderer, Thomas; Savchenko, Alexei; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-02-16

    Autophagy is an essential component of innate immunity, enabling the detection and elimination of intracellular pathogens. Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia in humans, is able to modulate autophagy through the action of effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell by the pathogen's Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Many of these effectors share structural and sequence similarity with eukaryotic proteins. Indeed, phylogenetic analyses have indicated their acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from a eukaryotic host. Here we report that L. pneumophila translocates the effector protein sphingosine-1 phosphate lyase (LpSpl) to target the host sphingosine biosynthesis and to curtail autophagy. Our structural characterization of LpSpl and its comparison with human SPL reveals high structural conservation, thus supporting prior phylogenetic analysis. We show that LpSpl possesses S1P lyase activity that was abrogated by mutation of the catalytic site residues. L. pneumophila triggers the reduction of several sphingolipids critical for macrophage function in an LpSpl-dependent and -independent manner. LpSpl activity alone was sufficient to prevent an increase in sphingosine levels in infected host cells and to inhibit autophagy during macrophage infection. LpSpl was required for efficient infection of A/J mice, highlighting an important virulence role for this effector. Thus, we have uncovered a previously unidentified mechanism used by intracellular pathogens to inhibit autophagy, namely the disruption of host sphingolipid biosynthesis.

  8. Role of sphingosine kinase localization in sphingolipid signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Binks; W; Wattenberg

    2010-01-01

    The sphingosine kinases, SK1 and SK2, produce the potent signaling lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). These enzymes have garnered increasing interest for their roles in tumorigenesis, inflammation, vascular diseases, and immunity, as well as other functions. The sphingosine kinases are considered signaling enzymes by producing S1P, and their activity is acutely regulated by a variety of agonists. However, these enzymes are also key players in the control of sphingolipid metabolism. A variety of sphingolipids, such as sphingosine and the ceramides, are potent signaling molecules in their own right. The role of sphingosine kinases in regulating sphingolipid metabolism is potentially a critical aspect of their signaling function. A central aspect of signaling lipids is that their hydrophobic nature constrains them to membranes. Most enzymes of sphingolipid metabolism, including the enzymes that degrade S1P, are membrane enzymes. Therefore the localization of the sphingosine kinases and S1P is likely to be important in S1P signaling. Sphingosine kinase localization affects sphingolipid signaling in several ways. Translocation of SK1 to theplasma membrane promotes extracellular secretion of S1P. SK1 and SK2 localization to specific sites appears to direct S1P to intracellular protein effectors. SK localization also determines the access of these enzymes to their substrates. This may be an important mechanism for the regulation of ceramide biosynthesis by diverting dihydrosphingosine, a precursor in the ceramide biosynthetic pathway, from the de novo production of ceramide.

  9. The role of sphingolipids in selected cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Kurek

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive sphingolipids are engaged with numerous cellular processes such as cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. Sphingolipid metabolism in heart is regulated by physical exercise and PPARs. Ceramide, the main second messenger of sphingomyelin pathway of signal transduction, was found to be involved in development of cardiac dysfunction after ischemia/reperfusion. On the other hand ceramide derivative sphingosine- 1- phosphate has been shown to exert potent cardioprotective action and guards cardiomyocytes against ischemic/reperfusion injury. Pharmacological compounds, which regulate metabolism of sphingolipids can be potentially useful in treatment of selected cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this work is critical review of physiological and pathological role of sphingolipids in circulatory system.

  10. Cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis in regulation of the cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Singh

    Full Text Available The cell cycle is a ubiquitous, multi-step process that is essential for growth and proliferation of cells. The role of membrane lipids in cell cycle regulation is not explored well, although a large number of cytoplasmic and nuclear regulators have been identified. We focus in this work on the role of membrane cholesterol in cell cycle regulation. In particular, we have explored the stringency of the requirement of cholesterol in the regulation of cell cycle progression. For this purpose, we utilized distal and proximal inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis, and monitored their effect on cell cycle progression. We show that cholesterol content increases in S phase and inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis results in cell cycle arrest in G1 phase under certain conditions. Interestingly, G1 arrest mediated by cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors could be reversed upon metabolic replenishment of cholesterol. Importantly, our results show that the requirement of cholesterol for G1 to S transition is absolute, and even immediate biosynthetic precursors of cholesterol, differing with cholesterol merely in a double bond, could not replace cholesterol for reversing the cell cycle arrest. These results are useful in the context of diseases, such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease, that are associated with impaired cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis.

  11. Novel Functional Association of Serine Palmitoyltransferase Subunit 1-A Peptide in Sphingolipid Metabolism with Cytochrome P4501A1 Transactivation and Proliferative Capacity of the Human Glioma LN18 Brain Tumor Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stewart

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Some chemical modulators of cytochrome P4501A1, Cyp1A1, expression also perturb the activity of serine palmitoyltransferase, SPT, a heterodimeric protein responsible for catalyzing the first reaction in sphingolipid biosynthesis. The effect of altered SPT activity on Cyp1A1 expression has generally been attributed to changes in the composition of bioactive sphingolipids, generated downstream in the SPT metabolic pathway, but the precise mechanism remains poorly defined. A generally accepted model for chemical-induced transactivation of the Cyp1A1 gene involves intracellular signaling mediated by proteins including the arylhydrocarbon receptor, AhR, whose interaction with the 90 kilo Dalton heat shock protein, Hsp90, is essential for maintaining a high affinity ligandbinding receptor conformation. Because ligand-induced Cyp1A1 expression is important in the bioactivation of environmentally relevant compounds to genotoxic derivatives capable of perturbing cellular processes, binding to Hsp90 represents an important regulatory point in the cytotoxicity process. In the present study, based on evidence that indicates subunit 1 of serine palmitoyltransferase, SPT1, interacts with Hsp90, both ligand-induced Cyp1A1 transactivation and capacity for proliferation were evaluated using the wild type Glioma LN18 human brain cancer cell line and its recombinant counterparts expressing green fluorescent SPT1 fusion proteins. Exposure to the prototypical Cyp1A1 inducer, 3-methylcholanthrene, 3-MC, resulted in the translocation of SPT1 from a primarily cytoplasmic domain to sites of focal adhesion complexes. Immunolabel for Hsp90, which was dispersed throughout the cell, became primarily cytoplasmic, while the distribution of AhR remained unaffected. When compared to the wild type, cells transfected with recombinant SPT1-GFP vectors had significantly attenuated levels of 3-MC-induced Cyp1A1 mRNA, as determined by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Although

  12. Transformation-associated changes in sphingolipid metabolism sensitize cells to lysosomal cell death induced by inhibitors of acid sphingomyelinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Olsen, Ole D; Groth-Pedersen, Line

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and subsequent cell death may prove useful in cancer treatment, provided that cancer cell lysosomes can be specifically targeted. Here, we identify acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) inhibition as a selective means to destabilize cancer cell lysosomes. Lysosome-destab...... multidrug resistance. Their cancer selectivity is associated with transformation-associated reduction in ASM expression and subsequent failure to maintain sphingomyelin hydrolysis during drug exposure. Taken together, these data identify ASM as an attractive target for cancer therapy....

  13. Analyzing the complex machinery of cell wall biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J.F.P.

    2009-01-01

    The plant cell wall polymers make up most of the plant biomass and provide the raw material for many economically important products including food, feed, bio-materials, chemicals, textiles, and biofuel. This broad range of functions and applications make the biosynthesis of these polysaccharides a

  14. Roles of tRNA in cell wall biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dare, Kiley; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent research into various aspects of bacterial metabolism such as cell wall and antibiotic synthesis, degradation pathways, cellular stress, and amino acid biosynthesis has elucidated roles of aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (aa-tRNA) outside of translation. Although the two enzyme families...

  15. Sphingolipids: Important Players in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Halmer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is the most common cause for permanent disability in young adults. Current pathophysiological understanding has identified an autoaggressive immune reaction with infiltration of immune cells into the central nervous system and local inflammatory and demyelinating reactions. The current therapy focuses on a modulation or suppression of immune functions. Sphingolipids, main components of nervous tissue, have been linked to MS already 60 years ago with the description of an unusual myelin lipid distribution in diseased patients. There is tremendous information developing on the role of different sphingolipids in MS. Antibodies against sphingomyelin, sulfatide or galacosylceramide have been detected in serum or CSF of MS patients, although up to now, this knowledge did not find its way into clinical use. Ceramide and the enzymes linked to its production have been described to play a pivotal role in oligendrocyte damage and demyelination. Nowadays, especially sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is in the focus of pathophysiological research and therapy development. A S1P analogue, FTY720, is a widely distributed therapy against relapsing-remitting MS, attenuating the emigration of activated, autoreactive lymphocytes from lymph nodes, thereby preventing new inflammatory infiltration into the central nervous system. Beside, there is more and more evidence, that especially S1P receptors on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are involved in demyelination processes and subsequent axonal degeneration, important features of chonic progressive MS disease course. Further information and research on the manifold role of sphingolipids are needed to prepare the ground for further clinical trials. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the role of sphingolipids in MS and describes the current therapeutical implications.

  16. Sphingolipids: the nexus between Gaucher disease and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Maria

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sphingolipids constitute a diverse array of lipids in which fatty acids are linked through amide bonds to a long-chain base, and, structurally, they form the building blocks of eukaryotic membranes. Ceramide is the simplest and serves as a precursor for the synthesis of the three main types of complex sphingolipids; sphingomyelins, glycosphingolipids and gangliosides. Sphingolipids are no longer considered mere structural spectators, but bioactive molecules with functions beyond providing a mechanically stable and chemically resistant barrier to a diverse array of cellular processes. Although sphingolipids form a somewhat minor component of the total cellular lipid pool, their accumulation in certain cells forms the basis of many diseases. Human diseases caused by alterations in the metabolism of sphingolipids are conventionally inborn errors of degradation, the most common being Gaucher disease, in which the catabolism of glucosylceramide is defective and accumulates. Insulin resistance has been reported in patients with Gaucher disease and this article presents evidence that this is due to perturbations in the metabolism of sphingolipids. Ceramide and the more complex sphingolipids, the gangliosides, are constituents of specialised membrane microdomains termed lipid rafts. Lipid rafts play a role in facilitating and regulating lipid and protein interactions in cells, and their unique lipid composition enables them to carry out this role. The lipid composition of rafts is altered in cell models of Gaucher disease which may be responsible for impaired lipid and protein sorting observed in this disorder, and consequently pathology. Lipid rafts are also necessary for correct insulin signalling, and a perturbed lipid raft composition may impair insulin signalling. Unravelling common nodes of interaction between insulin resistance and Gaucher disease may lead to a better understanding of the biochemical mechanisms behind pathology.

  17. Sphingolipid metabolism regulates development and lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Roy G; Thompson, Kenneth W; Camandola, Simonetta; Mack, Kendra T; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-12-15

    Sphingolipids are a highly conserved lipid component of cell membranes involved in the formation of lipid raft domains that house many of the receptors and cell-to-cell signaling factors involved in regulating cell division, maturation, and terminal differentiation. By measuring and manipulating sphingolipid metabolism using pharmacological and genetic tools in Caenorhabditis elegans, we provide evidence that the synthesis and remodeling of specific ceramides (e.g., dC18:1-C24:1), gangliosides (e.g., GM1-C24:1), and sphingomyelins (e.g., dC18:1-C18:1) influence development rate and lifespan. We found that the levels of fatty acid chain desaturation and elongation in many sphingolipid species increased during development and aging, with no such changes in developmentally-arrested dauer larvae or normal adults after food withdrawal (an anti-aging intervention). Pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs directed against serine palmitoyl transferase and glucosylceramide synthase acted to slow development rate, extend the reproductive period, and increase lifespan. In contrast, worms fed an egg yolk diet rich in sphingolipids exhibited accelerated development and reduced lifespan. Our findings demonstrate that sphingolipid accumulation and remodeling are critical events that determine development rate and lifespan in the nematode model, with both development rate and aging being accelerated by the synthesis of sphingomyelin, and its metabolism to ceramides and gangliosides.

  18. The GARP complex is required for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Florian; Petit, Constance; Kory, Nora; Christiano, Romain; Hannibal-Bach, Hans-Kristian; Graham, Morven; Liu, Xinran; Ejsing, Christer S; Farese, Robert V; Walther, Tobias C

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are abundant membrane components and important signaling molecules in eukaryotic cells. Their levels and localization are tightly regulated. However, the mechanisms underlying this regulation remain largely unknown. In this study, we identify the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex, which functions in endosome-to-Golgi retrograde vesicular transport, as a critical player in sphingolipid homeostasis. GARP deficiency leads to accumulation of sphingolipid synthesis intermediates, changes in sterol distribution, and lysosomal dysfunction. A GARP complex mutation analogous to a VPS53 allele causing progressive cerebello-cerebral atrophy type 2 (PCCA2) in humans exhibits similar, albeit weaker, phenotypes in yeast, providing mechanistic insights into disease pathogenesis. Inhibition of the first step of de novo sphingolipid synthesis is sufficient to mitigate many of the phenotypes of GARP-deficient yeast or mammalian cells. Together, these data show that GARP is essential for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis and suggest a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PCCA2. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08712.001 PMID:26357016

  19. Function of laccases in cell wall biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders; Holm, Preben Bach; Andersen, Jeppe Reitan

    2011-01-01

    substrate specificities and expression patterns. As part of the strategic research centre Bio4Bio, the present project deals with laccase functions in relation to cell wall formation in grasses based on a study of the model species Brachypodium distachyon. Thirty-one isozymes have been retrieved from......Laccases are multicopper oxidases capable of polymerizing monolignols. Histochemical assays have shown temporal and spatial correlation with secondary cell wall formation in both herbs and woody perennials. However, in plants laccases constitutes a relatively large group of isoenzymes with unique...... hybridization. Specific isozymes that show high correlation with the process of secondary cell wall formation will be further studied in a reverse genetic study in which candidates will be knocked out using RNA interference. Phenotypes of knock-out mutants are to be described in relation to cell wall...

  20. Stereoselective total synthesis of sphingolipids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PARAMESH JANGILI; PERLA RAMESH; BISWANATH DAS

    2016-11-01

    A novel sphingosine, 1,2-diacetyl D-erythro-sphinganine having a characteristic almond flavour was isolated from the edible mushroom Grifola gargal. We have synthesized this sphinganine along with the three other sphingolipids, such as 1,2-diacetyl L-threo-sphinganine, D-erythro-sphinganine triacetateand L-threo-sphinganine triacetate using Garner aldehyde as the starting material involving the Grignard reaction and Mitsunobu inversion. The sphingolipids 1,2-diacetyl D-erythro-sphinganine and 1,2-diacetyl L-threo-sphinganine have been synthesized for the first time.

  1. Increased sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis and an apparent decrease in sterol biosynthesis in elicitor-treated tobacco cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voegeli, U.; Bhatt, P.N.; Chappell, J.

    1987-04-01

    Addition of fungel elicitor prepared from Phytophthora parasitica to tobacco cell suspension cultures leads to an increased production of the phytoalexin capsidiol. Capsidiol is a sesquiterpenoid which is most likely synthesized from farnesylpyrophosphat (FPP) by a bicyclic cyclase reaction. Because FPP is also a substrate for squalene synthetase and therefore a precursor of sterol biosynthesis, the question arises whether or not the accumulation of capsidiol in elicitor-treated cells occurs at the expense of sterol biosynthesis. (/sup 14/C)-acetate was given to elicitor-treated and control (no treatment) cell cultures and incorporation into sterols and capsidiol determined. No labeled capsidiol was detected in control cells. In elicitor-treated cells about 12-15% of the radioactivity taken up by the cells was incorporated into capsidiol. In contrast, control cells incorporated 4 times more radioactivity into sterols than elicitor-treated cells. Similar results were obtained using (/sup 3/H)-mevalonate as a precursor of capsidiol and sterol biosynthesis. Likely explanations for the apparently decline in sterol biosynthesis in elicitor-treated cells include: (1) inhibition of squalene synthetase; (2) induction of capsidiol synthesizing enzymes; and (3) metabolic channeling of FPP into capsidiol versus sterols. These possibilities will be discussed further together with other results.

  2. On-Off Switches for Secondary Cell Wall Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Zhong Wang; Richard A.Dixon

    2012-01-01

    Secondary cell walls provide plants with rigidity and strength to support their body weight and ensure water and nutrient transport.They also provide textiles,timber,and potentially second-generation biofuels for human use.Genes responsible for synthesis of the different cell wall components,namely cellulose,hemicelluloses,and lignin,are coordinately expressed and under transcriptional regulation.In the past several years,cell wall-related NAC and MYB transcription factors have been intensively investigated in different species and shown to be master switches of secondary cell wall biosynthesis.Positive and negative regulators,which function upstream of NAC master switches,have also been identified in different plant tissues.Further elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of cell wall synthesis will facilitate the engineering of plant feedstocks suitable for biofuel production.

  3. Two new sphingolipids from the leaves of Piper betle L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duo-Zhi; Xiong, Hua-Bin; Tian, Kai; Guo, Jun-Ming; Huang, Xiang-Zhong; Jiang, Zhi-Yong

    2013-09-12

    Two new sphingolipids, pipercerebrosides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the leaves of Piper betle L. Their structures, including absolute configurations, were determined by spectroscopic analysis and chemical degradation. These two compounds did not show significant cytotoxic activity against the cancer cell lines K562 and HL-60 in a MTT assay.

  4. Two New Sphingolipids from the Leaves of Piper betle L.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-Yong Jiang; Xiang-Zhong Huang; Jun-Ming Guo; Kai Tian; Hua-Bin Xiong; Duo-Zhi Chen

    2013-01-01

    Two new sphingolipids, pipercerebrosides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the leaves of Piper betle L. Their structures, including absolute configurations, were determined by spectroscopic analysis and chemical degradation. These two compounds did not show significant cytotoxic activity against the cancer cell lines K562 and HL-60 in a MTT assay.

  5. Two New Sphingolipids from the Leaves of Piper betle L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yong Jiang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Two new sphingolipids, pipercerebrosides A (1 and B (2, were isolated from the leaves of Piper betle L. Their structures, including absolute configurations, were determined by spectroscopic analysis and chemical degradation. These two compounds did not show significant cytotoxic activity against the cancer cell lines K562 and HL-60 in a MTT assay.

  6. Biosynthesis of a Fully Functional Cyclotide inside Living Bacterial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Kimura, R H; Woo, Y; Cantor, J; Shekhtman, A

    2007-04-05

    The cyclotide MCoTI-II is a powerful trypsin inhibitor recently isolated from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis, a plant member of cucurbitaceae family. We report for the first time the in vivo biosynthesis of natively-folded MCoTI-II inside live E. coli cells. Our biomimetic approach involves the intracellular backbone cyclization of a linear cyclotide-intein fusion precursor mediated by a modified protein splicing domain. The cyclized peptide then spontaneously folds into its native conformation. The use of genetically engineered E. coli cells containing mutations in the glutathione and thioredoxin reductase genes considerably improves the production of folded MCoTI-II in vivo. Biochemical and structural characterization of the recombinant MCoTI-II confirmed its identity. Biosynthetic access to correctly-folded cyclotides allows the possibility of generating cell-based combinatorial libraries that can be screened inside living cells for their ability to modulate or inhibit cellular processes.

  7. Brave little yeast, please guide us to thebes: sphingolipid function in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiter, R

    1999-12-01

    Sphingolipids typically cover the exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells. They differ from the more abundant glycerophospholipids in that they contain ceramide instead of diacylglycerol as a hydrophobic anchor. Why did nature choose to invent this complex class of lipids, and why do eukaryotic cells follow elaborate remodelling pathways in order to generate dozens to hundreds of different molecular species of sphingolipid, depending on cell type? Yeast may, once again, serve as a model to dissect sphingolipid function at various levels. Almost the complete pathway for sphingolipid synthesis in yeast has been uncovered during the past two decades. More recently, key enzymes in sphingolipid degradation and signalling have been identified. Together with a wealth of genetic data obtained from the characterization of various suppressor mutants, this information now allows for an unprecedented analysis of sphingolipid function in this organism. This overview summarizes recent data on sphingolipid function in cell signalling, their role in the heat-stress response and Ca(2+) homeostasis, and addresses their function in transport of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

  8. Alteration of glycerolipid and sphingolipid-derived second messenger kinetics in ras transformed 3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenz, J C; Gunn, J M; Jolly, C A; Chapkin, R S

    1996-01-05

    The effect of ras transformation (rasB fibroblasts) on basal and serum-stimulated diacylglycerol (DAG) composition and mass was examined over time with respect to changes in membrane phospholipid composition and ceramide mass. RasB cells vs. nontransformed control cells (rasD and NR6) had chronically elevated DAG levels (up to 240 min) following serum stimulation, indicating a defect in the recovery phase of the intracellular DAG pulse. Ras transformation also had a dramatic effect on DAG composition. Molecular species analysis revealed that DAG from unstimulated rasB cells was enriched in the delta 9 desaturase fatty acyl species (monoenoate 18:1(n - 7) and 18:1(n - 9)), and depleted in arachidonic acid (20:4(n - 6)). With the exception of glycerophosphoinositol (GPI), DAG remodeling paralleled the compositional alterations in individual phospholipid classes. Importantly, ras transformation altered the fatty acyl composition of sphingomyelin, a precursor to the ceramide second messenger. With the addition of serum, control cells (rasD) had a progressive increase in ceramide mass with levels approximately 5-fold higher by 240 min. In contrast, ceramide levels did not increase in rasB cells at either 4 or 240 min. These results demonstrate that ras-oncogene, in addition to its effects on DAG metabolism, can also abolish the cellular increase in ceramide mass in response to serum stimulation. Since DAG and ceramide may have opposing biological functions, the prolonged elevation of DAG and the suppression of ceramide levels would be consistent with an enhanced proliferative capacity.

  9. Rice Stripe Virus Infection Alters mRNA Levels of Sphingolipid-Metabolizing Enzymes and Sphingolipids Content in Laodelphax striatellus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei-Qiang; Bai, Yue-Liang; Shi, Xiao-Xiao; Zhu, Mu-Fei; Zhang, Min-Jing; Mao, Cun-Gui; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Sphingolipids and their metabolites have been implicated in viral infection and replication in mammal cells but how their metabolizing enzymes in the host are regulated by viruses remains largely unknown. Here we report the identification of 12 sphingolipid genes and their regulation by Rice stripe virus in the small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén), a serious pest of rice throughout eastern Asia. According to protein sequence similarity, we identified 12 sphingolipid enzyme genes in L. striatellus. By comparing their mRNA levels in viruliferous versus nonviruliferous L. striatellus at different life stages by qPCR, we found that RSV infection upregulated six genes (LsCGT1, LsNAGA1, LsSGPP, LsSMPD4, LsSMS, and LsSPT) in most stages of L. striatellus. Especially, four genes (LsCGT1, LsSMPD2, LsNAGA1, and LsSMS) and another three genes (LsNAGA1, LsSGPP, and LsSMS) were significantly upregulated in viruliferous third-instar and fourth-instar nymphs, respectively. HPLC-MS/MS results showed that RSV infection increased the levels of various ceramides, such as Cer18:0, Cer20:0, and Cer22:0 species, in third and fourth instar L. striatellus nymphs. Together, these results demonstrate that RSV infection alters the transcript levels of various sphingolipid enzymes and the contents of sphingolipids in L. striatellus, indicating that sphingolipids may be important for RSV infection or replication in L. striatellus. PMID:28130458

  10. Sphingolipids and plant defense/disease: the "death" connection and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eBerkey

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids comprise a major class of structural materials and lipid signaling molecules in all eukaryotic cells. Over the past two decades, there has been a phenomenal growth in the study of sphingolipids (i.e. sphingobiology at an average rate of >1000 research articles per year. Sphingolipid studies in plants, though accounting for only a small fraction (~6% of the total number of publications, have also enjoyed proportionally rapid growth in the past decade. Concomitant with the growth of sphingobiology, there has also been tremendous progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant innate immunity. In this review, we (i cross examine and analyze the major findings that establish and strengthen the intimate connections between sphingolipid metabolism and plant programmed cell death (PCD associated with plant defense or disease; (ii highlight and compare key bioactive sphingolipids involved in the regulation of plant PCD and possibly defense; (iii discuss the potential role of sphingolipids in polarized membrane/protein trafficking and formation of lipid rafts as subdomains of cell membranes in relation to plant defense; and (iv where possible, attempt to identify potential parallels for immunity-related mechanisms involving sphingolipids across kingdoms.

  11. Tools for the analysis of metabolic flux through the sphingolipid pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Montañés, Fernando; Schneiter, Roger

    2016-11-01

    Discerning the complex regulation of the enzymatic steps necessary for sphingolipid biosynthesis is facilitated by the utilization of tracers that allow a time-resolved analysis of the pathway dynamics without affecting the metabolic flux. Different strategies have been used and new tools are continuously being developed to probe the various enzymatic conversions that occur within this complex pathway. Here, we provide a short overview of the divergent fungal and mammalian sphingolipid biosynthetic routes, and of the tracers and methods that are frequently employed to follow the flux of intermediates throughout these pathways.

  12. Plant Sterols: Diversity, Biosynthesis, and Physiological Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valitova, J N; Sulkarnayeva, A G; Minibayeva, F V

    2016-08-01

    Sterols, which are isoprenoid derivatives, are structural components of biological membranes. Special attention is now being given not only to their structure and function, but also to their regulatory roles in plants. Plant sterols have diverse composition; they exist as free sterols, sterol esters with higher fatty acids, sterol glycosides, and acylsterol glycosides, which are absent in animal cells. This diversity of types of phytosterols determines a wide spectrum of functions they play in plant life. Sterols are precursors of a group of plant hormones, the brassinosteroids, which regulate plant growth and development. Furthermore, sterols participate in transmembrane signal transduction by forming lipid microdomains. The predominant sterols in plants are β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. These sterols differ in the presence of a methyl or an ethyl group in the side chain at the 24th carbon atom and are named methylsterols or ethylsterols, respectively. The balance between 24-methylsterols and 24-ethylsterols is specific for individual plant species. The present review focuses on the key stages of plant sterol biosynthesis that determine the ratios between the different types of sterols, and the crosstalk between the sterol and sphingolipid pathways. The main enzymes involved in plant sterol biosynthesis are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, C24-sterol methyltransferase, and C22-sterol desaturase. These enzymes are responsible for maintaining the optimal balance between sterols. Regulation of the ratios between the different types of sterols and sterols/sphingolipids can be of crucial importance in the responses of plants to stresses.

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies novel loci associated with circulating phospho- and sphingolipid concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Demirkan (Ayşe); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); P. Ugocsai (Peter); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); G. Liebisch (Gerhard); J.F. Wilson (James); A. Johansson (Åsa); I. Rudan (Igor); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); A.V. Kirichenko (Anatoly); A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); R.C. Jansen (Ritsert); C. Gnewuch (Carsten); I. Domingues (Inês); C. Pattaro (Cristian); S.H. Wild (Sarah); I. Jonasson (Inger); O. Polasek (Ozren); I.V. Zorkoltseva (Irina); A. Hofman (Albert); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); M.V. Struchalin (Maksim); J. Floyd (Jamie); W. Igl (Wilmar); Z. Biloglav (Zrinka); L. Broer (Linda); A. Pfeufer (Arne); I. Pichler (Irene); S. Campbell (Susan); G. Zaboli (Ghazal); I. Kolcic (Ivana); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); N. Hastie (Nick); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); L. Franke (Lude); C.S. Franklin (Christopher); V. Vitart (Veronique); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); M. Preuss (Michael); J.C. Bis (Joshua); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); N. Franceschini (Nora); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); T.I. Axenovich (Tatiana); B.A. Oostra (Ben); T. Meitinger (Thomas); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); C. Hayward (Caroline); A.F. Wright (Alan); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); H. Campbell (Harry); G. Schmitz (Gerd)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPhospho- and sphingolipids are crucial cellular and intracellular compounds. These lipids are required for active transport, a number of enzymatic processes, membrane formation, and cell signalling. Disruption of their metabolism leads to several diseases, with diverse neurological, psyc

  14. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbacci, Adelin; Lahaye, Marc; Magnenet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i) a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii) new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper.

  15. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelin Barbacci

    Full Text Available Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper.

  16. Inhibition of lipid mediator biosynthesis in human inflammatory cells by BIRM 270.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, T P; Hoffman, A F; Homon, C A; Graham, A G; Lazer, E S; Chilton, F H; Borgeat, P; Raible, D; Schulman, E; Bass, D A

    1995-01-01

    BIRM 270 was developed as a potent and enantioselective inhibitor of LTB4 biosynthesis by human neutrophils, and was also found to inhibit LTC4 production by human eosinophils and lung mast cells. BIRM 270 inhibited LTB4 synthesis in neutrophils by preventing arachidonate release from membrane phospholipids, and over the same concentration range, inhibited PAF biosynthesis. BIRM 270 did not directly inhibit acylhydrolases which have been implicated in eicosanoid and PAF biosynthesis, suggesting an indirect mode of action.

  17. Plant sphingolipids today - Are they still enigmatic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spassieva, S; Hille, J; Voesenek, L.A.C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a diverse group of lipids found in all eukaryotes and some bacteria, consisting of a hydrophobic ceramide and a hydrophilic head group. We have summarised the contemporary understanding of the structure of plant sphingolipids with an emphasis on glucosylceramides and inositolphosph

  18. Lysophospholipid acyltransferases and eicosanoid biosynthesis in zebrafish myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarini, Simona; Hankin, Joseph A; Murphy, Robert C; Gijón, Miguel A

    2014-10-01

    Eicosanoids derived from the enzymatic oxidation of arachidonic acid play important roles in a large number of physiological and pathological processes in humans. Many animal and cellular models have been used to investigate the intricate mechanisms regulating their biosynthesis and actions. Zebrafish is a widely used model to study the embryonic development of vertebrates. It expresses homologs of the key enzymes involved in eicosanoid production, and eicosanoids have been detected in extracts from adult or embryonic fish. In this study we prepared cell suspensions from kidney marrow, the main hematopoietic organ in fish. Upon stimulation with calcium ionophore, these cells produced eicosanoids including PGE2, LTB4, 5-HETE and, most abundantly, 12-HETE. They also produced small amounts of LTB5 derived from eicosapentaenoic acid. These eicosanoids were also produced in kidney marrow cells stimulated with ATP, and this production was greatly enhanced by preincubation with thimerosal, an inhibitor of arachidonate reacylation into phospholipids. Microsomes from these cells exhibited acyltransferase activities consistent with expression of MBOAT5/LPCAT3 and MBOAT7/LPIAT1, the main arachidonoyl-CoA:lysophospholipid acyltransferases. In summary, this work introduces a new cellular model to study the regulation of eicosanoid production through a phospholipid deacylation-reacylation cycle from a well-established, versatile vertebrate model species.

  19. Pathways and Subcellular Compartmentation of NAD Biosynthesis in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Ziegler, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    NAD is a vital redox carrier, and its degradation is a key element of important regulatory pathways. NAD-mediated functions are compartmentalized and have to be fueled by specific biosynthetic routes. However, little is known about the different pathways, their subcellular distribution, and regulation in human cells. In particular, the route(s) to generate mitochondrial NAD, the largest subcellular pool, is still unknown. To visualize organellar NAD changes in cells, we targeted poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity into the mitochondrial matrix. This activity synthesized immunodetectable poly(ADP-ribose) depending on mitochondrial NAD availability. Based on this novel detector system, detailed subcellular enzyme localizations, and pharmacological inhibitors, we identified extracellular NAD precursors, their cytosolic conversions, and the pathway of mitochondrial NAD generation. Our results demonstrate that, besides nicotinamide and nicotinic acid, only the corresponding nucleosides readily enter the cells. Nucleotides (e.g. NAD and NMN) undergo extracellular degradation resulting in the formation of permeable precursors. These precursors can all be converted to cytosolic and mitochondrial NAD. For mitochondrial NAD synthesis, precursors are converted to NMN in the cytosol. When taken up into the organelles, NMN (together with ATP) serves as substrate of NMNAT3 to form NAD. NMNAT3 was conclusively localized to the mitochondrial matrix and is the only known enzyme of NAD synthesis residing within these organelles. We thus present a comprehensive dissection of mammalian NAD biosynthesis, the groundwork to understand regulation of NAD-mediated processes, and the organismal homeostasis of this fundamental molecule. PMID:21504897

  20. Sphingolipids and Brain Resident Macrophages in Neuroinflammation: An Emerging Aspect of Nervous System Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Assi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipid metabolism is deeply regulated along the differentiation and development of the central nervous system (CNS, and the expression of a peculiar spatially and temporarily regulated sphingolipid pattern is essential for the maintenance of the functional integrity of the nervous system. Microglia are resident macrophages of the CNS involved in general maintenance of neural environment. Modulations in microglia phenotypes may contribute to pathogenic forms of inflammation. Since defects in macrophage/microglia activity contribute to neurodegenerative diseases, it will be essential to systematically identify the components of the microglial cell response that contribute to disease progression. In such complex processes, the sphingolipid systems have recently emerged to play important roles, thus appearing as a key new player in CNS disorders. This review provides a rationale for harnessing the sphingolipid metabolic pathway as a potential target against neuroinflammation.

  1. Orm family proteins mediate sphingolipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslow, David K; Collins, Sean R; Bodenmiller, Bernd;

    2010-01-01

    in humans)-a conserved gene family that includes ORMDL3, which has recently been identified as a potential risk factor for childhood asthma. Starting from an unbiased functional genomic approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we identify Orm proteins as negative regulators of sphingolipid synthesis that form...... a conserved complex with serine palmitoyltransferase, the first and rate-limiting enzyme in sphingolipid production. We also define a regulatory pathway in which phosphorylation of Orm proteins relieves their inhibitory activity when sphingolipid production is disrupted. Changes in ORM gene expression...

  2. Sphingolipids contribute to acetic acid resistance in Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Lina; Genheden, Samuel; Eriksson, Leif A; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Lignocellulosic raw material plays a crucial role in the development of sustainable processes for the production of fuels and chemicals. Weak acids such as acetic acid and formic acid are troublesome inhibitors restricting efficient microbial conversion of the biomass to desired products. To improve our understanding of weak acid inhibition and to identify engineering strategies to reduce acetic acid toxicity, the highly acetic-acid-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii was studied. The impact of acetic acid membrane permeability on acetic acid tolerance in Z. bailii was investigated with particular focus on how the previously demonstrated high sphingolipid content in the plasma membrane influences acetic acid tolerance and membrane permeability. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we concluded that membranes with a high content of sphingolipids are thicker and more dense, increasing the free energy barrier for the permeation of acetic acid through the membrane. Z. bailii cultured with the drug myriocin, known to decrease cellular sphingo-lipid levels, exhibited significant growth inhibition in the presence of acetic acid, while growth in medium without acetic acid was unaffected by the myriocin addition. Furthermore, following an acetic acid pulse, the intracellular pH decreased more in myriocin-treated cells than in control cells. This indicates a higher inflow rate of acetic acid and confirms that the reduction in growth of cells cultured with myriocin in the medium with acetic acid was due to an increase in membrane permeability, thereby demonstrating the importance of a high fraction of sphingolipids in the membrane of Z. bailii to facilitate acetic acid resistance; a property potentially transferable to desired production organisms suffering from weak acid stress.

  3. Biosynthesis of thiophenes in cell cultures of Tagetes patula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helsper, H.; Blaakmeer, A. (Research Institute Ital, Wageningen (Netherlands))

    1989-04-01

    Cell cultures of Tagetes patula incorporate {sup 35}S-label from methionine, cysteine, sulfide and sulfate into thiophenes, a group of heterocyclic biocides. In time course studies up to 4% of the total {sup 35}S-label from ({sup 35}S) sulfate was incorporated into thiophenes within 24 hours. The bulk of the radioactivity (>80%) in thiophenes was observed in 5-(4-hydroxy-1-butinyl)-2,2{prime}-bithiophene (BBTOH) while the rest was in 5-(4-acetoxy-1-butinyl)-2-2{prime} -bithiophene (BBTOAc) and 5-(but-3-ene-1-ynyl)-2,2{prime}-bithiophene. Pulse-chase experiments, involving a 24 h-pulse with ({sup 35}S) sulfate, showed a constant level of radioactivity in BBT during the chase period while there was a shift in {sup 35}S-label from BBTOH to BBTOAc. Also, the specific activity of BBT was always lower than that of the other two while the specific activity of BBTOH was higher than that of BBTOAc. These results indicate that (a) BBT is not an obligatory intermediate in the biosynthesis of BBTOH and BBTOAc and (b) BBTOH may be the precursor for BBTOAc.

  4. Sphingolipids Are Dual Specific Drug Targets for the Management of Pulmonary Infections: Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lalita; Prakash, Hridayesh

    2017-01-01

    Sphingolipids are the major constituent of the mucus secreted by the cells of epithelial linings of lungs where they maintain the barrier functions and prevent microbial invasion. Sphingolipids are interconvertible, and their primary and secondary metabolites have both structural and functional roles. Out of several sphingolipid metabolites, sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) and ceramide are central molecules and decisive for sphingolipid signaling. These are produced by enzymatic activity of sphingosine kinase-1 (SK-1) upon the challenge with either biological or physiological stresses. S1P and ceramide rheostat are important for the progression of various pathologies, which are manifested by inflammatory cascade. S1P is a well-established secondary messenger and associated with various neuronal, metabolic, and inflammatory diseases other than respiratory infections such as Chlamydia pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These pathogens are known to exploit sphingolipid metabolism for their opportunistic survival. Decreased sphingosine kinase activity/S1P content in the lung and peripheral blood of tuberculosis patients clearly indicated a dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism during infection and suggest that sphingolipid metabolism is important for management of infection by the host. Our previous study has demonstrated that gain of SK-1 activity is important for the maturation of phagolysosomal compartment, innate activation of macrophages, and subsequent control of mycobacterial replication/growth in macrophages. Furthermore, S1P-mediated amelioration of lung pathology and disease severity in TB patients is believed to be mediated by the selective activation or rearrangement of various S1P receptors (S1PR) particularly S1PR2, which has been effective in controlling respiratory fungal pathogens. Therefore, such specificity of S1P–S1PR would be paramount for triggering inflammatory events, subsequent activation, and fostering

  5. Endocytosis of NBD-sphingolipids in neurons : Exclusion from degradative compartments and transport to the Golgi complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babia, T; Ledesma, MD; Saffrich, R; Kok, JW; Dotti, CG; Egea, G

    2001-01-01

    Sphingolipids are abundant constituents of neuronal membranes that have been implicated in intracellular signaling, neurite outgrowth and differentiation. Differential localization and trafficking of lipids to membrane domains contribute to the specialized functions. In non-neuronal cultured cell li

  6. Maternal and embryonic control of uterine sphingolipid-metabolizing enzymes during murine embryo implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko-Tarui, Tomoko; Zhang, Ling; Austin, Kathleen J; Henkes, Luiz E; Johnson, Joshua; Hansen, Thomas R; Pru, James K

    2007-10-01

    During early gestation in invasively implanting species, the uterine stromal compartment undergoes dramatic remodeling, defined by the differentiation of stromal fibroblast cells into decidual cells. Lipid signaling molecules from a number of pathways are well-established functional components of this decidualization reaction. Because of a correlation in the events that transpire in the uterus during early implantation with known functions of bioactive sphingolipid metabolites established from studies in other organ systems, we hypothesized that uterine sphingolipid metabolism would change during implantation. By a combination of Northern blot, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analyses, we establish that enzymes at each of the major catalytic steps in the sphingolipid cascade become transcriptionally up-regulated in the uterus during decidualization. Each of the enzymes analyzed was up-regulated from Days of Pregnancy (DOP) 4.5-7.5. When comparing embryo-induced decidualization (decidual) with mechanically induced decidualization (deciduomal), sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (Smpd1) mRNA and sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1) protein were shown to be dually regulated in the endometrium by both maternal and embryonic factors. As measured by the diacyl glycerol kinase assay, ceramide levels rose in parallel with Smpd1 gene expression, suggesting that elevated transcription of sphingolipid enzymes results in heightened catalytic activity of the pathway. Altogether, these findings place sphingolipids on a growing list of lipid signaling molecules that become increasingly present at the maternal-embryonic interface.

  7. Rice Brittleness Mutants: A Way to Open the 'Black Box' of Monocot Cell Wall Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baocai Zhang; Yihua Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Rice is a model organism for studying the mechanism of cell wall biosynthesis and remolding in Gramineae.Mechanical strength is an important agronomy trait of rice(Oryza sativa L.)plants that affects crop lodging and grain yield.As a prominent physical property of cell walls,mechanical strength reflects upon the structure of different wall polymers and how they interact.Studies on the mechanisms that regulate the mechanical strength therefore consequently results in uncovering the genes functioning in cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling.Our group focuses on the study of isolation of brittle culm(bc)mutants and characterization of their corresponding genes.To date,several bc mutants have been reported.The identified genes have covered several pathways of cell wall biosynthesis,revealing many secrets of monocot cell wall biosynthesis.Here,we review the progress achieved in this research field and also highlight the perspectives in expectancy.All of those lend new insights into mechanisms of cell wall formation and are helpful for harnessing the waste rice straws for biofuel production.

  8. PDMP blocks brefeldin A-induced retrograde membrane transport from Golgi to ER : Evidence for involvement of calcium homeostasis and dissociation from sphingolipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, JW; Babia, T; Filipeanu, CM; Nelemans, A; Egea, G; Hoekstra, D

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we show that an inhibitor of sphingolipid biosynthesis, D,L-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP), inhibits brefeldin A (BFA)-induced retrograde membrane transport from Golgi to endoplasmic reticulum (ER). If BFA treatment was combined with or preceded by PDMP

  9. Sphingolipids in High Fat Diet and Obesity-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songhwa Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient oversupply associated with a high fat diet (HFD significantly alters cellular metabolism, and specifically including sphingolipid metabolism. Sphingolipids are emerging as bioactive lipids that play key roles in regulating functions, in addition to their traditional roles as membrane structure. HFD enhances de novo sphingolipid synthesis and turnover of sphingolipids via the salvage pathway, resulting in the generation of ceramide, and more specifically long chain ceramide species. Additionally, HFD elevates sphingomyelin and sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P levels in several tissues including liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and cardiovascular tissues. HFD-stimulated sphingolipid generation contributes to systemic insulin resistance, dysregulated lipid accumulation, and cytokine expression and secretion from skeletal muscle and adipose tissues, exacerbating obesity-related conditions. Furthermore, altered sphingolipid levels, particularly ceramide and sphingomyelin, are involved in obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. In this review, HFD-mediated sphingolipid metabolism and its impact on HFD-induced biology and pathobiology will be discussed.

  10. Sphingolipid signalling domains floating on rafts or buried in caves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, R T

    2000-02-01

    Ceramide is a novel lipid mediator involved in regulating cell growth, cell differentiation and cell death. Many studies have focused on characterizing the stimulus-induced production of ceramide and identifying putative downstream molecular targets. However, little remains known about the localization of the regulated production of ceramide through sphingomyelin metabolism in the plasma membrane. Additionally, it is unclear whether a localized increase in ceramide concentration is necessary to facilitate downstream signalling events initiated by this lipid. Recent studies have suggested that detergent-insoluble plasma membrane domains may be highly localized sites for initiating signal transduction cascades by both tyrosine kinase and sphingolipid signalling pathways. These domains are typically enriched in both sphingolipids and cholesterol and have been proposed to form highly ordered lipid rafts floating in a sea of glycerophospholipids. Alternatively, upon integration of the cholesterol binding protein caveolin, these domains may also form small cave-like structures called caveolae. Emerging evidence suggests that the enhanced sphingomyelin content of these lipid domains make them potential substrate pools for sphingomyelinases to produce a high local concentration of ceramide. The subsequent formation of ceramide microdomains in the plasma membrane may be a critical factor in regulating downstream signalling through this lipid messenger.

  11. Sphingolipids and mitochondrial function, lessons learned from yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Spincemaille

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, but also of cancer, diabetes and rare diseases such as Wilson’s disease (WD and Niemann Pick type C1 (NPC. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying human pathologies has often been associated with an aberrant cellular sphingolipid metabolism. Sphingolipids (SLs are important membrane constituents that also act as signaling molecules. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been pivotal in unraveling mammalian SL metabolism, mainly due to the high degree of conservation of SL metabolic pathways. In this review we will first provide a brief overview of the major differences in SL metabolism between yeast and mammalian cells and the use of SL biosynthetic inhibitors to elucidate the contribution of specific parts of the SL metabolic pathway in response to for instance stress. Next, we will discuss recent findings in yeast SL research concerning a crucial signaling role for SLs in orchestrating mitochondrial function, and translate these findings to relevant disease settings such as WD and NPC. In summary, recent research shows that S. cerevisiae is an invaluable model to investigate SLs as signaling molecules in modulating mitochondrial function, but can also be used as a tool to further enhance our current knowledge on SLs and mitochondria in mammalian cells.

  12. Combining Deep Sequencing, Proteomics, Phosphoproteomics, and Functional Screens To Discover Novel Regulators of Sphingolipid Homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; Megyeri, Márton; Cristobal Gonzalez de Durana, Alba; Scholten, Arjen; Chuartzman, Silvia G; Voichek, Yoav; Scheltema, Richard A; Mohammed, Shabaz; Futerman, Anthony H; Schuldiner, Maya; Heck, Albert J R; Lemeer, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are essential components of cell membranes and are broad-range bioactive signaling molecules. SL levels must be tightly regulated as imbalances affect cellular function and contribute to pathologies ranging from neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders to cancer and aging. Decip

  13. Breakdown of the regulatory control of pyrimidine biosynthesis in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigoillot, Frederic D; Sigoillot, Severine M; Guy, Hedeel I

    2004-04-20

    The activity of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway in the MCF7 breast cancer cells was 4.4-fold higher than that in normal MCF10A breast cells. Moreover, while pyrimidine biosynthesis in MCF10A was tightly regulated, increasing as the culture matured and subsequently down-regulated in confluency, the biosynthetic rate in MCF7 cells remained elevated and invariant in all growth phases. The flux through the pathway is regulated by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, a component of the multifunctional protein, CAD. The intracellular CAD concentration was 3.5- to 4-fold higher in MCF7 cells, an observation that explains the high rate of pyrimidine biosynthesis but cannot account for the lack of growth-dependent regulation. In MCF10A cells, up-regulation of the pathway in the exponential growth phase resulted from MAP kinase phosphorylation of CAD Thr456. The pathway was subsequently down-regulated by dephosphorylation of P approximately Thr456 and the phosphorylation of CAD by PKA. In contrast, the CAD P approximately Thr456 was persistently phosphorylated in MCF7 cells, while the PKA site remained unphosphorylated and consequently the activity of the pathway was elevated in all growth phases. In support of this interpretation, inhibition of MAP kinase in MCF7 cells decreased CAD P approximately Thr456, increased PKA phosphorylation and decreased pyrimidine biosynthesis. Conversely, transfection of MCF10A with constructs that elevated MAP kinase activity increased CAD P approximately Thr456 and the pyrimidine biosynthetic rate. The differences in the CAD phosphorylation state responsible for unregulated pyrimidine biosynthesis in MCF7 cells are likely to be a consequence of the elevated MAP kinase activity and the antagonism between MAP kinase- and PKA-mediated phosphorylations.

  14. Alteration of complex sphingolipid composition and its physiological significance in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking vacuolar ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Motohiro; Toume, Moeko

    2015-12-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, complex sphingolipids have three types of polar head group and five types of ceramide; however, the physiological significance of the structural diversity is not fully understood. Here, we report that deletion of vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in yeast causes dramatic alteration of the complex sphingolipid composition, which includes decreases in hydroxylation at the C-4 position of long-chain bases and the C-2 position of fatty acids in the ceramide moiety, decreases in inositol phosphorylceramide (IPC) levels, and increases in mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide (MIPC) and mannosyldiinositol phosphorylceramide [M(IP)2C] levels. V-ATPase-deleted cells exhibited slow growth at pH 7.2, whereas the increase in MIPC levels was significantly enhanced when V-ATPase-deleted cells were incubated at pH 7.2. The protein expression levels of MIPC and M(IP)2C synthases were significantly increased in V-ATPase-deleted cells incubated at pH 7.2. Loss of MIPC synthesis or an increase in the hydroxylation level of the ceramide moiety of sphingolipids on overexpression of Scs7 and Sur2 sphingolipid hydroxylases enhanced the growth defect of V-ATPase-deleted cells at pH 7.2. On the contrary, the growth rate of V-ATPase-deleted cells was moderately increased on the deletion of SCS7 and SUR2. In addition, supersensitivities to Ca2+, Zn2+ and H2O2, which are typical phenotypes of V-ATPase-deleted cells, were enhanced by the loss of MIPC synthesis. These results indicate the possibility that alteration of the complex sphingolipid composition is an adaptation mechanism for a defect of V-ATPase.

  15. Two tomato GDP-D-mannose epimerase isoforms involved in ascorbate biosynthesis play specific roles in cell wall biosynthesis and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounet-Gilbert, Louise; Dumont, Marie; Ferrand, Carine; Bournonville, Céline; Monier, Antoine; Jorly, Joana; Lemaire-Chamley, Martine; Mori, Kentaro; Atienza, Isabelle; Hernould, Michel; Stevens, Rebecca; Lehner, Arnaud; Mollet, Jean Claude; Rothan, Christophe; Lerouge, Patrice; Baldet, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    GDP-D-mannose epimerase (GME, EC 5.1.3.18) converts GDP-D-mannose to GDP-L-galactose, and is considered to be a central enzyme connecting the major ascorbate biosynthesis pathway to primary cell wall metabolism in higher plants. Our previous work demonstrated that GME is crucial for both ascorbate and cell wall biosynthesis in tomato. The aim of the present study was to investigate the respective role in ascorbate and cell wall biosynthesis of the two SlGME genes present in tomato by targeting each of them through an RNAi-silencing approach. Taken individually SlGME1 and SlGME2 allowed normal ascorbate accumulation in the leaf and fruits, thus suggesting the same function regarding ascorbate. However, SlGME1 and SlGME2 were shown to play distinct roles in cell wall biosynthesis, depending on the tissue considered. The RNAi-SlGME1 plants harbored small and poorly seeded fruits resulting from alterations of pollen development and of pollination process. In contrast, the RNAi-SlGME2 plants exhibited vegetative growth delay while fruits remained unaffected. Analysis of SlGME1- and SlGME2-silenced seeds and seedlings further showed that the dimerization state of pectin rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) was altered only in the RNAi-SlGME2 lines. Taken together with the preferential expression of each SlGME gene in different tomato tissues, these results suggest sub-functionalization of SlGME1 and SlGME2 and their specialization for cell wall biosynthesis in specific tomato tissues.

  16. PECULIARITIES OF SECONDARY METABOLITES BIOSYNTHESIS IN PLANT CELL CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. NOSOV

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available metabolites formation in plant cell cultures of Panax spp., (ginsenosides; Dioscorea deltoidea (steroid glycosides; Ajuga reptans, Serratula coronata, Rhaponticum carthamoides (ecdisteroids; Polyscias spp., (triterpene glycosides, Taxus spp. (taxoids, Stevia rebaudiana (diterpene steviol-glycosides, Stephania glabra (alkaloids. They are some regular trends of secondary metabolites synthesis in the plant cell culture:It can be noted the stable synthesis of the compound promoting cell proliferation. Indeed, cell cultures of Dioscorea deltoidea were demonstrated to accumulate only furostanol glycosides, which promoted cell division. Furostanol glycoside content of Dioscorea strain DM-0.5 was up to 6 - 12% by dry biomass.Panax ginseng and P. japonicus plant cell cultures synthesize as minimum seven triterpene glycosides (ginsenosides, the productivity of these compounds was up to 6.0 - 8.0% on dry biomass.By contrast, the detectable synthesis of diterpene steviol-glycosides in cultivated cells of Stevia rebaudiana initiated in the mixotrophic cultures during chloroplast formation only.Despite these differences, or mainly due to them, plant cell cultures have become an attractive source of phytochemicals in alternative to collecting wild plants. It provides a guideline to bioreactor-based production of isoprenoids using undifferentiated plant cell cultures. 

  17. Hemicellulose biosynthesis and degradation in tobacco cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compier, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Natural fibres have a wide range of technological applications, such as in paper and textile industries. The basic properties and the quality of plant fibres are determined by the composition of the plant cell wall. Characteristic for fibres are thick secondary cell walls, which consist of cellulose

  18. Inborn errors of metabolism in the biosynthesis and remodelling of phospholipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortmann, S.B.; Espeel, M.; Almeida, L.; Reimer, A.; Bosboom, D.G.; Roels, F.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Wevers, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Since the proposal to define a separate subgroup of inborn errors of metabolism involved in the biosynthesis and remodelling of phospholipids, sphingolipids and long chain fatty acids in 2013, this group is rapidly expanding. This review focuses on the disorders involved in the biosynthesis of phosp

  19. Single cell subtractive transcriptomics for identification of cell-specifically expressed candidate genes of pyrrolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Christian; Beuerle, Till; Hollmann, Julien; Ober, Dietrich

    2015-09-01

    Progress has recently been made in the elucidation of pathways of secondary metabolism. However, because of its diversity, genetic information concerning biosynthetic details is still missing for many natural products. This is also the case for the biosynthesis of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. To close this gap, we tested strategies using tissues that express this pathway in comparison to tissues in which this pathway is not expressed. As many pathways of secondary metabolism are known to be induced by jasmonates, the pyrrolizidine alkaloid-producing species Heliotropium indicum, Symphytum officinale, and Cynoglossum officinale of the Boraginales order were treated with methyl jasmonate. An effect on pyrrolizidine alkaloid levels and on transcript levels of homospermidine synthase, the first specific enzyme of pyrrolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis, was not detectable. Therefore, a method was developed by making use of the often observed cell-specific production of secondary compounds. H. indicum produces pyrrolizidine alkaloids exclusively in the shoot. Homospermidine synthase is expressed only in the cells of the lower leaf epidermis and the epidermis of the stem. Suggesting that the whole pathway of pyrrolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis might be localized in these cells, we have isolated single cells of the upper and lower epidermis by laser-capture microdissection. The resulting cDNA preparations have been used in a subtractive transcriptomic approach. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction has shown that the resulting library is significantly enriched for homospermidine-synthase-coding transcripts providing a valuable source for the identification of further genes involved in pyrrolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis.

  20. Distribution of colored carotenoids between light-harvesting complexes in the process of recovering carotenoid biosynthesis in Ectothiorhodospira haloalkaliphila cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikhmin, Aleksandr; Makhneva, Zoya; Bolshakov, Maksim; Moskalenko, Andrey

    2014-12-01

    The processes of recovering colored-carotenoid (Car) biosynthesis in Car-less cells of the purple sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira haloalkaliphila grown with diphenylamine (DPA-cells) have been studied. It has been found that (1) the rate of recovering colored-Car biosynthesis in the lag-phase is far ahead of the growth rate of the cells themselves; (2) several Cars (ζ-carotene, neurosporene etc.) act as intermediates in Car biosynthesis; (3) because filling the "empty" Car pockets in the LH1-RC complexes is faster than in LH2, available spirilloxanthin is preferentially incorporated into the nascent LH1-RC core particles; (4) as a consequence of the resulting lack of spirilloxanthin availability, the biosynthetic intermediates (anhydrorhodovibrin, rhodopin and lycopene) fill the empty nascent LH2 Car pockets. In the present report, we further discuss the process of colored Car incorporation into LH complexes during the recovery of Car biosynthesis in the DPA-cells of Ect.haloalkaliphila.

  1. Sphingolipids: promising lipid-class molecules with potential applications for industry. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miazek, K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sphingolipids are a group of lipid molecules, the focus on which has been gradually increasing during recent years. This review presents sphingolipids, as valuable compounds with a high potential for industry. Literature. Structures of sphingolipids are described and their natural sources are presented. Different methods for extraction, purification and structural characterization of sphingolipids are evaluated. Activity of sphingolipids towards various microorganisms is discussed and methods for chemical modifications of natural sphingolipids to obtain novel properties are depicted. Finally, applications for implementing sphingolipid molecules in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical or medical industry are proposed. Conclusions. Sphingolipids are molecules of high impact and their importance will inevitably increase in the future.

  2. De novo purine biosynthesis by two pathways in Burkitt lymphoma cells and in human spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reem, G H

    1972-05-01

    This study was designed to answer the question whether human lymphocytes and spleen cells were capable of de novo purine biosynthesis. Experiments were carried out in cell-free extracts prepared from human spleen, and from a cell line established from Burkitt lymphoma. Burkitt lymphoma cells and human spleen cells could synthesize the first and second intermediates of the purine biosynthetic pathway. Cell-free extracts of all cell lines studied contained the enzyme systems which catalyze the synthesis of phosphoribosyl-1-amine, the first intermediate unique to the purine biosynthetic pathway and of phosphoribosyl glycinamide, the second intermediate of this pathway. Phosphoribosyl-1-amine could be synthesized in cell-free extracts from alpha-5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and glutamine, from PRPP and ammonia, and by an alternative pathway, directly from ribose-5-phosphate and ammonia. These findings suggest that extrahepatic tissues may be an important source for the de novo synthesis of purine ribonucleotide in man. They also indicate that ammonia may play an important role in purine biosynthesis. The alternative pathway for the synthesis of phosphoribosyl-1-amine from ribose-5-phosphate and ammonia was found to be subject to inhibition by the end products of the purine synthetic pathway, particularly by adenylic acid and to a lesser degree by guanylic acid. The alternative pathway for phosphoribosyl-1-amine synthesis from ribose-5-phosphate and ammonia may contribute significantly towards the regulation of the rate of de novo purine biosynthesis in the normal state, in metabolic disorders in which purines are excessively produced and in myeloproliferative diseases.

  3. Localization and biosynthesis of polyamines in insulin-producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, D M; Larsson, L I; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1986-01-01

    Two recently developed fluorescence cytochemical methods, specific for spermidine and spermine, were used to localize polyamines in the endocrine pancreas. The polyamines were restricted to the insulin-producing beta-cells and were mainly associated with the secretory granules. Chemical polyamine...

  4. Sterol and sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis during a growth cycle of tobacco cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, J; Von Lanken, C; Vögeli, U; Bhatt, P

    1989-05-01

    The accumulation and biosynthesis of sterols and fungal elicitor-inducible sesquiterpenoids by tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cell suspension cultures were examined as a function of a 10 day culture cycle. Sterols accumulated concomitantly with fresh weight gain. The rate of sterol biosynthesis, measured as the incorporation rate of [(14)C]acetate and [(3)H]mevalonate, was maximal when the cultures entered into their rapid phase of growth. Changes in squalene synthetase enzyme activity correlated more closely with thein vivo synthesis rate and accumulation of sterols than 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) enzyme activity. Cell cultures entering into the rapid phase of growth also responded maximally to fungal elicitor as measured by the production of capsidiol, an extracellular sesquiterpenoid. However, the rate of sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis, measured as the incorporation rate of [(14)C]acetate and [(3)H]mevalonate, could not be correlated with elicitor-inducible HMGR or sesquiterpene cyclase enzyme activities, nor elicitor-suppressible squalene synthetase enzyme activity.

  5. Biosynthesis of the neural cell adhesion molecule: characterization of polypeptide C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybroe, O; Albrechtsen, M; Dahlin, J;

    1985-01-01

    and a 115,000 Mr polypeptide C, whereas neurons expressed a 200,000 Mr polypeptide A as well as polypeptide B. Skeletal muscle cells produced polypeptide B. The polypeptides synthesized by the three cell types were immunochemically identical. The membrane association of polypeptide C was investigated......The biosynthesis of the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) was studied in primary cultures of rat cerebral glial cells, cerebellar granule neurons, and skeletal muscle cells. The three cell types produced different N-CAM polypeptide patterns. Glial cells synthesized a 135,000 Mr polypeptide B...... with methods that distinguish peripheral and integral membrane proteins. Polypeptide C was found to be a peripheral membrane protein, whereas polypeptides A and B were integral membrane proteins with cytoplasmic domains of approximately 50,000 and approximately 25,000 Mr, respectively. The affinity...

  6. Isoprenoid biosynthesis. Metabolite profiling of peppermint oil gland secretory cells and application to herbicide target analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, B M; Ketchum, R E; Croteau, R B

    2001-09-01

    Two independent pathways operate in plants for the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, the central intermediates in the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids. The mevalonate pathway is present in the cytosol, whereas the recently discovered mevalonate-independent pathway is localized to plastids. We have used isolated peppermint (Mentha piperita) oil gland secretory cells as an experimental model system to study the effects of the herbicides fosmidomycin, phosphonothrixin, methyl viologen, benzyl viologen, clomazone, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl diphosphate, alendronate, and pamidronate on the pools of metabolites related to monoterpene biosynthesis via the mevalonate-independent pathway. A newly developed isolation protocol for polar metabolites together with an improved separation and detection method based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry have allowed assessment of the enzyme targets for a number of these herbicides.

  7. Elucidating steroid alkaloid biosynthesis in Veratrum californicum: production of verazine in Sf9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Megan M; Ruzicka, Dan R; Shukla, Ashutosh K; Augustin, Jörg M; Starks, Courtney M; O'Neil-Johnson, Mark; McKain, Michael R; Evans, Bradley S; Barrett, Matt D; Smithson, Ann; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Deyholos, Michael K; Edger, Patrick P; Pires, J Chris; Leebens-Mack, James H; Mann, David A; Kutchan, Toni M

    2015-06-01

    Steroid alkaloids have been shown to elicit a wide range of pharmacological effects that include anticancer and antifungal activities. Understanding the biosynthesis of these molecules is essential to bioengineering for sustainable production. Herein, we investigate the biosynthetic pathway to cyclopamine, a steroid alkaloid that shows promising antineoplastic activities. Supply of cyclopamine is limited, as the current source is solely derived from wild collection of the plant Veratrum californicum. To elucidate the early stages of the pathway to cyclopamine, we interrogated a V. californicum RNA-seq dataset using the cyclopamine accumulation profile as a predefined model for gene expression with the pattern-matching algorithm Haystack. Refactoring candidate genes in Sf9 insect cells led to discovery of four enzymes that catalyze the first six steps in steroid alkaloid biosynthesis to produce verazine, a predicted precursor to cyclopamine. Three of the enzymes are cytochromes P450 while the fourth is a γ-aminobutyrate transaminase; together they produce verazine from cholesterol.

  8. Biosynthesis of psoralens. Psoralen 5-monooxygenase activity from elicitor-treated Ammi majus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerski, D; Matern, U

    1988-11-01

    Microsomes prepared from cultured Ammi majus cells that had been challenged for 14 h with an elicitor derived from the cell walls of Phytophthora megasperma f.sp. glycinea (Pmg) converted psoralen to bergaptol (5-hydroxypsoralen) in the presence of NADPH and oxygen. The enzymatic activity was characterized as an inducible cytochrome-P-450-dependent monooxygenase associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. All of the steps involved in bergapten (5-methoxypsoralen) biosynthesis in Ammi majus have now been demonstrated in vitro. The results suggest that bergaptol and not hydroxymarmesin in the precursor of bergapten.

  9. Green biosynthesis of biocompatible CdSe quantum dots in living Escherichia coli cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhengyu; Qian, Jing; Gu, Yueqing; Su, Yilong; Ai, Xiaoxia; Wu, Shengmei

    2014-03-01

    A green and efficient biosynthesis method to prepare fluorescence-tunable biocompatible cadmium selenide quantum dots using Escherichia coli cells as biological matrix was proposed. Decisive factors in biosynthesis of cadmium selenide quantum dots in a designed route in Escherichia coli cells were elaborately investigated, including the influence of the biological matrix growth stage, the working concentration of inorganic reactants, and the co-incubation duration of inorganic metals to biomatrix. Ultraviolet-visible, photoluminescence, and inverted fluorescence microscope analysis confirmed the unique optical properties of the biosynthesized cadmium selenide quantum dots. The size distribution of the nanocrystals extracted from cells and the location of nanocrystals foci in vivo were also detected seriously by transmission electron microscopy. A surface protein capping layer outside the nanocrystals was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements, which were supposed to contribute to reducing cytotoxicity and maintain a high viability of cells when incubating with quantum dots at concentrations as high as 2 μM. Cell morphology observation indicated an effective labeling of living cells by the biosynthesized quantum dots after a 48 h co-incubation. The present work demonstrated an economical and environmentally friendly approach to fabricating highly fluorescent quantum dots which were expected to be an excellent fluorescent dye for broad bio-imaging and labeling.

  10. Early evolution of polyisoprenol biosynthesis and the origin of cell walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Lombard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available After being a matter of hot debate for years, the presence of lipid membranes in the last common ancestor of extant organisms (i.e., the cenancestor now begins to be generally accepted. By contrast, cenancestral cell walls have attracted less attention, probably owing to the large diversity of cell walls that exist in the three domains of life. Many prokaryotic cell walls, however, are synthesized using glycosylation pathways with similar polyisoprenol lipid carriers and topology (i.e., orientation across the cell membranes. Here, we provide the first systematic phylogenomic report on the polyisoprenol biosynthesis pathways in the three domains of life. This study shows that, whereas the last steps of the polyisoprenol biosynthesis are unique to the respective domain of life of which they are characteristic, the enzymes required for basic unsaturated polyisoprenol synthesis can be traced back to the respective last common ancestor of each of the three domains of life. As a result, regardless of the topology of the tree of life that may be considered, the most parsimonious hypothesis is that these enzymes were inherited in modern lineages from the cenancestor. This observation supports the presence of an enzymatic mechanism to synthesize unsaturated polyisoprenols in the cenancestor and, since these molecules are notorious lipid carriers in glycosylation pathways involved in the synthesis of a wide diversity of prokaryotic cell walls, it provides the first indirect evidence of the existence of a hypothetical unknown cell wall synthesis mechanism in the cenancestor.

  11. Biosynthesis of sterols and triterpenes in cell suspension cultures of Uncaria tomentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Sánchez, Isvett J; Ortega-López, Jaime; del Carmen Montes-Horcasitas, María; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2002-12-01

    Pectin administered to Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures, was found to increase the production of triterpene acids (ursolic and oleanolic acid), however, neither growth nor sterol accumulation were affected. Cell cultures showed that pectin treatment caused a rapid threefold increase in the activities of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of C(5) and C(30 )isoprenoid, such as isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase and squalene synthase. The activity of a farnesyl diphosphatase, which could divert the flux of farnesyl diphosphate to farnesol, was two times lower in elicited than in control cells. Elicited cells also transformed more rapidly a higher percentage of [5-(3)H]mevalonic acid into triterpene acids. Interestingly, addition of terbinafine, an inhibitor of squalene epoxidase, to elicited cell cultures inhibited sterol accumulation while triterpene production was not inhibited. These results suggest that in U. tomentosa cells, both the previously mentioned enzymes and those involved in squalene 2,3-oxide formation play an important regulatory role in the biosynthesis of sterols and triterpenes.

  12. Pinoresinol reductase 1 impacts lignin distribution during secondary cell wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiao; Zeng, Yining; Yin, Yanbin; Pu, Yunqiao; Jackson, Lisa A; Engle, Nancy L; Martin, Madhavi Z; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Dixon, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Pinoresinol reductase (PrR) catalyzes the conversion of the lignan (-)-pinoresinol to (-)-lariciresinol in Arabidopsis thaliana, where it is encoded by two genes, PrR1 and PrR2, that appear to act redundantly. PrR1 is highly expressed in lignified inflorescence stem tissue, whereas PrR2 expression is barely detectable in stems. Co-expression analysis has indicated that PrR1 is co-expressed with many characterized genes involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis, whereas PrR2 expression clusters with a different set of genes. The promoter of the PrR1 gene is regulated by the secondary cell wall related transcription factors SND1 and MYB46. The loss-of-function mutant of PrR1 shows, in addition to elevated levels of pinoresinol, significantly decreased lignin content and a slightly altered lignin structure with lower abundance of cinnamyl alcohol end groups. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy analysis indicated that the lignin content of the prr1-1 loss-of-function mutant is similar to that of wild-type plants in xylem cells, which exhibit a normal phenotype, but is reduced in the fiber cells. Together, these data suggest an association of the lignan biosynthetic enzyme encoded by PrR1 with secondary cell wall biosynthesis in fiber cells.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Infection Reduces Nutrition Uptake and Nucleotide Biosynthesis in a Human Airway Epithelial Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Gierok

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Gram positive opportunistic human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus induces a variety of diseases including pneumonia. S. aureus is the second most isolated pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients and accounts for a large proportion of nosocomial pneumonia. Inside the lung, the human airway epithelium is the first line in defence with regard to microbial recognition and clearance as well as regulation of the immune response. The metabolic host response is, however, yet unknown. To address the question of whether the infection alters the metabolome and metabolic activity of airway epithelial cells, we used a metabolomics approach. The nutrition uptake by the human airway epithelial cell line A549 was monitored over time by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR and the intracellular metabolic fingerprints were investigated by gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (GC-MS and (HPLC-MS. To test the metabolic activity of the host cells, glutamine analogues and labelled precursors were applied after the infection. We found that A549 cells restrict uptake of essential nutrients from the medium after S. aureus infection. Moreover, the infection led to a shutdown of the purine and pyrimidine synthesis in the A549 host cell, whereas other metabolic routes such as the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway remained active. In summary, our data show that the infection with S. aureus negatively affects growth, alters the metabolic composition and specifically impacts the de novo nucleotide biosynthesis in this human airway epithelial cell model.

  14. Early evolution of polyisoprenol biosynthesis and the origin of cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    After being a matter of hot debate for years, the presence of lipid membranes in the last common ancestor of extant organisms (i.e., the cenancestor) now begins to be generally accepted. By contrast, cenancestral cell walls have attracted less attention, probably owing to the large diversity of cell walls that exist in the three domains of life. Many prokaryotic cell walls, however, are synthesized using glycosylation pathways with similar polyisoprenol lipid carriers and topology (i.e., orientation across the cell membranes). Here, we provide the first systematic phylogenomic report on the polyisoprenol biosynthesis pathways in the three domains of life. This study shows that, whereas the last steps of the polyisoprenol biosynthesis are unique to the respective domain of life of which they are characteristic, the enzymes required for basic unsaturated polyisoprenol synthesis can be traced back to the respective last common ancestor of each of the three domains of life. As a result, regardless of the topology of the tree of life that may be considered, the most parsimonious hypothesis is that these enzymes were inherited in modern lineages from the cenancestor. This observation supports the presence of an enzymatic mechanism to synthesize unsaturated polyisoprenols in the cenancestor and, since these molecules are notorious lipid carriers in glycosylation pathways involved in the synthesis of a wide diversity of prokaryotic cell walls, it provides the first indirect evidence of the existence of a hypothetical unknown cell wall synthesis mechanism in the cenancestor.

  15. Biosynthesis of amorphous mesoporous aluminophosphates using yeast cells as templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sifontes, Ángela B., E-mail: asifonte@ivic.gob.ve [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); González, Gema [Centro de Ingeniería de Materiales y Nanotecnología, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Tovar, Leidy M.; Méndez, Franklin J. [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Gomes, Maria E. [Centro de Ingeniería de Materiales y Nanotecnología, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Cañizales, Edgar [Área de Análisis Químico Inorgánico, PDVSA, INTEVEP, Los Teques 1070-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Niño-Vega, Gustavo; Villalobos, Hector [Centro de Microbiología y Biología Celular, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Brito, Joaquin L. [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Amorphous aluminophosphates can take place using yeast as template. ► A mesoporous material was obtained. ► The specific surface area after calcinations ranged between 176 and 214 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. -- Abstract: In this study aluminophosphates have been synthesized from aluminum isopropoxide and phosphoric acid solutions using yeast cells as template. The physicochemical characterization was carried out by thermogravimetric analysis; X-ray diffraction; Fourier transform infrared; N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms; scanning electron microscopy; transmission electron microscopy and potentiometric titration with N-butylamine for determination of: thermal stability; crystalline structure; textural properties; morphology and surface acidity, respectively. The calcined powders consisted of an intimate mixture of amorphous and crystallized AlPO particles with sizes between 23 and 30 nm. The average pore size observed is 13–16 nm and the specific surface area after calcinations (at 650 °C) ranged between 176 and 214 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}.

  16. Developmentally regulated sphingolipid degradation in Leishmania major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou Zhang

    Full Text Available Leishmania parasites alternate between extracellular promastigotes in sandflies and intracellular amastigotes in mammals. These protozoans acquire sphingolipids (SLs through de novo synthesis (to produce inositol phosphorylceramide and salvage (to obtain sphingomyelin from the host. A single ISCL (Inositol phosphoSphingolipid phospholipase C-Like enzyme is responsible for the degradation of both inositol phosphorylceramide (the IPC hydrolase or IPCase activity and sphingomyelin (the SMase activity. Recent studies of a L. major ISCL-null mutant (iscl(- indicate that SL degradation is required for promastigote survival in stationary phase, especially under acidic pH. ISCL is also essential for L. major proliferation in mammals. To further understand the role of ISCL in Leishmania growth and virulence, we introduced a sole IPCase or a sole SMase into the iscl(- mutant. Results showed that restoration of IPCase only complemented the acid resistance defect in iscl(- promastigotes and improved their survival in macrophages, but failed to recover virulence in mice. In contrast, a sole SMase fully restored parasite infectivity in mice but was unable to reverse the promastigote defects in iscl(-. These findings suggest that SL degradation in Leishmania possesses separate roles in different stages: while the IPCase activity is important for promastigote survival and acid tolerance, the SMase activity is required for amastigote proliferation in mammals. Consistent with these findings, ISCL was preferentially expressed in stationary phase promastigotes and amastigotes. Together, our results indicate that SL degradation by Leishmania is critical for parasites to establish and sustain infection in the mammalian host.

  17. Involvement of lipids in dimethoate-induced inhibition of testosterone biosynthesis in rat interstitial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astiz, Mariana; Hurtado de Catalfo, Graciela E; de Alaniz, María J T; Marra, Carlos Alberto

    2009-08-01

    The mechanism involved in the inhibition of testosterone (Te) biosynthesis after a sub-chronic exposure to low doses of dimethoate (D) was studied in rat interstitial cells (IC). Expression of COX-2 in IC isolated from D-treated rats increased by 44% over C data, while transcription of StAR decreased by approx. 50% and the expression of this protein was diminished by approximately 40%. PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) were increased by 61 and 78%, respectively. Te concentration decreased by 49% in IC homogenates. Concomitantly, plasma concentration of LH and FSH both increased. Araquidonate (ARA) and C(22) fatty acyl chains in phospholipids from IC mitochondrial fraction decreased by approx. 30% after D treatment. Protein carbonyls, lipoperoxides and nitrite content increased while alpha-tocopherol and the antioxidant capacity of the soluble cellular fraction decreased significantly. Stimulation with h-CG 10 nM overnight failed to overcome the inhibition caused by D on both Te biosynthesis and 3beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Decreased Te biosynthesis may be attributed to (1) inhibition of StAR protein activity due to the stimulation of COX-2 and the overproduction of PGF(2alpha), (2) decreased stimulatory effect of ARA on StAR with a subsequent reduction in the availability of CHO for the androgenic pathway, and/or (3) indirect inhibition of steroidogenic enzymes by a lower transcriptional rate caused by elevated PGF(2alpha). Rofecoxib administration prevents the deleterious effect(s) exerted by D.

  18. Identification of novel bacterial histidine biosynthesis inhibitors using docking, ensemble rescoring, and whole-cell assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, S T; Liu, J; Estiu, G; Oltvai, Z N; Wiest, O

    2010-07-15

    The rapid spread on multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus requires not just novel treatment options, but the development of faster methods for the identification of new hits for drug development. The exponentially increasing speed of computational methods makes a more extensive use in the early stages of drug discovery attractive if sufficient accuracy can be achieved. Computational target identification using systems-level methods suggested the histidine biosynthesis pathway as an attractive target against S. aureus. Potential inhibitors for the pathway were identified through docking, followed by ensemble rescoring, that is sufficiently accurate to justify immediate testing of the identified compounds by whole-cell assays, avoiding the need for time-consuming and often difficult intermediary enzyme assays. This novel strategy is demonstrated for three key enzymes of the S. aureus histidine biosynthesis pathway, which is predicted to be essential for bacterial biomass productions. Virtual screening of a library of approximately 10(6) compounds identified 49 potential inhibitors of three enzymes of this pathway. Eighteen representative compounds were directly tested on three S. aureus- and two Escherichia coli strains in standard disk inhibition assays. Thirteen compounds are inhibitors of some or all of the S. aureus strains, while 14 compounds weakly inhibit growth in one or both E. coli strains. The high hit rate obtained from a fast virtual screen demonstrates the applicability of this novel strategy to the histidine biosynthesis pathway.

  19. Mutations in the Lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis pathway interfere with crescentin-mediated cell curvature in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeen, Matthew T; Murolo, Michelle A; Briegel, Ariane; Bui, N Khai; Vollmer, Waldemar; Ausmees, Nora; Jensen, Grant J; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2010-07-01

    Bacterial cell morphogenesis requires coordination among multiple cellular systems, including the bacterial cytoskeleton and the cell wall. In the vibrioid bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the intermediate filament-like protein crescentin forms a cell envelope-associated cytoskeletal structure that controls cell wall growth to generate cell curvature. We undertook a genetic screen to find other cellular components important for cell curvature. Here we report that deletion of a gene (wbqL) involved in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis pathway abolishes cell curvature. Loss of WbqL function leads to the accumulation of an aberrant O-polysaccharide species and to the release of the S layer in the culture medium. Epistasis and microscopy experiments show that neither S-layer nor O-polysaccharide production is required for curved cell morphology per se but that production of the altered O-polysaccharide species abolishes cell curvature by apparently interfering with the ability of the crescentin structure to associate with the cell envelope. Our data suggest that perturbations in a cellular pathway that is itself fully dispensable for cell curvature can cause a disruption of cell morphogenesis, highlighting the delicate harmony among unrelated cellular systems. Using the wbqL mutant, we also show that the normal assembly and growth properties of the crescentin structure are independent of its association with the cell envelope. However, this envelope association is important for facilitating the local disruption of the stable crescentin structure at the division site during cytokinesis.

  20. Cholesterol, sphingolipids, and glycolipids: What do we know about their role in raft-like membranes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2014-01-01

    Lipids rafts are considered to be functional nanoscale membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, characteristic in particular of the external leaflet of cell membranes. Lipids, together with membrane-associated proteins, are therefore considered to form nanoscale units...... emerged based on recent atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation studies on the key lipid raft components, which include cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycolipids, and the proteins interacting with these classes of lipids. The simulation results are compared to experiments when possible...... with potential specific functions. Although the understanding of the structure of rafts in living cells is quite limited, the possible functions of rafts are widely discussed in the literature, highlighting their importance in cellular functions. In this review, we discuss the understanding of rafts that has...

  1. Engineering PQS biosynthesis pathway for enhancement of bioelectricity production in pseudomonas aeruginosa microbial fuel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Bochuan Wang

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis of the redox shuttle, phenazines, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an ubiquitous microorganism in wastewater microflora, is regulated by the 2-heptyl-3,4-dihydroxyquinoline (PQS quorum-sensing system. However, PQS inhibits anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa. We constructed a P. aeruginosa strain that produces higher concentrations of phenazines under anaerobic conditions by over-expressing the PqsE effector in a PQS negative ΔpqsC mutant. The engineered strain exhibited an improved electrical performance in microbial fuel cells (MFCs and potentiostat-controlled electrochemical cells with an approximate five-fold increase of maximum current density relative to the parent strain. Electrochemical analysis showed that the current increase correlates with an over-synthesis of phenazines. These results therefore demonstrate that targeting microbial cell-to-cell communication by genetic engineering is a suitable technique to improve power output of bioelectrochemical systems.

  2. Activities of genes controlling sphingolipid metabolism in human fibroblasts treated with flavonoids

    OpenAIRE

    Moskot, Marta; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Smolińska, Elwira; Banecki, Bogdan; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Natural flavonoids such as genistein, kaempferol and daidzein were previously found to be able to reduce efficiency of glycosaminoglycan synthesis in cells of patients suffering from mucopolysaccharidoses, inherited metabolic diseases with often brain disease symptoms. This feature was employed to test these compounds as potential drugs for treatment other neuronopathic lysosomal storage disorders, in which errors in sphingolipid metabolism occur. In this report, on the basis of DNA microarra...

  3. Target-based identification of whole-cell active inhibitors of biotin biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sae Woong; Casalena, Dominick E; Wilson, Daniel J; Dai, Ran; Nag, Partha P; Liu, Feng; Boyce, Jim P; Bittker, Joshua A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Finzel, Barry C; Schnappinger, Dirk; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-22

    Biotin biosynthesis is essential for survival and persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in vivo. The aminotransferase BioA, which catalyzes the antepenultimate step in the biotin pathway, has been established as a promising target due to its vulnerability to chemical inhibition. We performed high-throughput screening (HTS) employing a fluorescence displacement assay and identified a diverse set of potent inhibitors including many diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) scaffolds. To efficiently select only hits targeting biotin biosynthesis, we then deployed a whole-cell counterscreen in biotin-free and biotin-containing medium against wild-type Mtb and in parallel with isogenic bioA Mtb strains that possess differential levels of BioA expression. This counterscreen proved crucial to filter out compounds whose whole-cell activity was off target as well as identify hits with weak, but measurable whole-cell activity in BioA-depleted strains. Several of the most promising hits were cocrystallized with BioA to provide a framework for future structure-based drug design efforts.

  4. Biosynthesis of the biphenyl phytoalexin aucuparin in Sorbus aucuparia cell cultures treated with Venturia inaequalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed N A; Beuerle, Till; Müller, Andreas; Ernst, Ludger; Bhavanam, Vijaya B R; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2013-12-01

    Aucuparin is the most widely distributed biphenyl phytoalexin in the rosaceous subtribe Pyrinae, which includes the economically important fruit trees apple and pear. The biphenyl scaffold is formed by biphenyl synthase, which catalyzes biosynthesis of 3,5-dihydroxybiphenyl. Conversion of this precursor to aucuparin (3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybiphenyl) was studied in cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia after treatment with an elicitor preparation from the scab-causing fungus Venturia inaequalis. The sequence of the biosynthetic steps detected was O-methylation - 4-hydroxylation - O-methylation. The two alkylation reactions were catalyzed by distinct methyltransferases, which differed in pH and temperature optima as well as stability. Biphenyl 4-hydroxylase was a microsomal cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, whose activity was appreciably decreased by the addition of established P450 inhibitors. When fed to V. inaequalis-treated S. aucuparia cell cultures, radioactively labeled 3,5-dihydroxybiphenyl was not only incorporated into aucuparin but also into the dibenzofuran eriobofuran, the accumulation of which paralleled that of aucuparin. However, biphenyl 2'-hydroxylase activity proposed to be involved in dibenzofuran formation was detected in neither microsomes nor cell-free extracts in the presence of NADPH and 2-oxoglutarate, respectively. Nevertheless, a basis for studying biphenyl biosynthesis at the gene level is provided.

  5. Biosynthesis of heparin. Effects of n-butyrate on cultured mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsson, K.G.; Riesenfeld, J.; Lindahl, U.

    1985-10-05

    Murine mastocytoma cells were incubated in vitro with inorganic (TVS)sulfate, in the absence or presence of 2.5 mM n-butyrate, and labeled heparin was isolated. The polysaccharide produced in the presence of butyrate showed a lower charge density on anion exchange chromatography than did the control material and a 3-fold increased proportion of components with high affinity for antithrombin. Structural analysis of heparin labeled with (TH) glucosamine in the presence of butyrate showed that approximately 35% of the glucosamine units were N-acetylated, as compared to approximately 10% in the control material; the nonacetylated glucosamine residues were N-sulfated. The presence of butyrate thus leads to an inhibition of the N-deacetylation/N-sulfation process in heparin biosynthesis, along with an augmented formation of molecules with high affinity for antithrombin. Preincubation of the mastocytoma cells with butyrate was required for manifestation of either effect; when the preincubation period was reduced from 24 to 10 h the effects of butyrate were no longer observed. A polysaccharide formed on incubating mastocytoma microsomal fraction with UDP-(TH)glucuronic acid, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, and 3'-phosphoadenylylsulfate in the presence of 5 mM butyrate showed the same N-acetyl/N-sulfate ratio as did the corresponding control polysaccharide, produced in the absence of butyrate. These findings suggest that the effect of butyrate on heparin biosynthesis depends on the integrity of the cell.

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies novel loci associated with circulating phospho- and sphingolipid concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Demirkan

    Full Text Available Phospho- and sphingolipids are crucial cellular and intracellular compounds. These lipids are required for active transport, a number of enzymatic processes, membrane formation, and cell signalling. Disruption of their metabolism leads to several diseases, with diverse neurological, psychiatric, and metabolic consequences. A large number of phospholipid and sphingolipid species can be detected and measured in human plasma. We conducted a meta-analysis of five European family-based genome-wide association studies (N = 4034 on plasma levels of 24 sphingomyelins (SPM, 9 ceramides (CER, 57 phosphatidylcholines (PC, 20 lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC, 27 phosphatidylethanolamines (PE, and 16 PE-based plasmalogens (PLPE, as well as their proportions in each major class. This effort yielded 25 genome-wide significant loci for phospholipids (smallest P-value = 9.88×10(-204 and 10 loci for sphingolipids (smallest P-value = 3.10×10(-57. After a correction for multiple comparisons (P-value<2.2×10(-9, we observed four novel loci significantly associated with phospholipids (PAQR9, AGPAT1, PKD2L1, PDXDC1 and two with sphingolipids (PLD2 and APOE explaining up to 3.1% of the variance. Further analysis of the top findings with respect to within class molar proportions uncovered three additional loci for phospholipids (PNLIPRP2, PCDH20, and ABDH3 suggesting their involvement in either fatty acid elongation/saturation processes or fatty acid specific turnover mechanisms. Among those, 14 loci (KCNH7, AGPAT1, PNLIPRP2, SYT9, FADS1-2-3, DLG2, APOA1, ELOVL2, CDK17, LIPC, PDXDC1, PLD2, LASS4, and APOE mapped into the glycerophospholipid and 12 loci (ILKAP, ITGA9, AGPAT1, FADS1-2-3, APOA1, PCDH20, LIPC, PDXDC1, SGPP1, APOE, LASS4, and PLD2 to the sphingolipid pathways. In large meta-analyses, associations between FADS1-2-3 and carotid intima media thickness, AGPAT1 and type 2 diabetes, and APOA1 and coronary artery disease were observed. In conclusion, our

  7. Biosynthesis of the D2-cell adhesion molecule: post-translational modifications, intracellular transport, and developmental changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, J M; Linnemann, D; Bock, E

    1984-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications and intracellular transport of the D2-cell adhesion molecule (D2-CAM) were examined in cultured fetal rat neuronal cells. Developmental changes in biosynthesis were studied in rat forebrain explant cultures. Two D2-CAM polypeptides with Mr of 187,000-210,000 (A...

  8. Sphingolipid and cholesterol dependence of alphavirus membrane fusion - Lack of correlation with lipid raft formation in target liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarts, BL; Bittman, R; Wilschut, J

    2002-01-01

    Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus (SIN) are enveloped viruses that infect their host cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and subsequent fusion from within acidic endosomes. Fusion of the viral envelope requires the presence of both cholesterol and sphingolipids in the target membrane.

  9. The consequences of genetic and pharmacologic reduction in sphingolipid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmann, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    A new therapy based on substrate synthesis reduction in sphingolipidoses is showing promise. The consequences of decreasing sphingolipid synthesis depend on the level at which synthetic blockage occurs and on the extent of the blockage. Complete synthetic blockage may be lethal if it includes all sphingolipids, such as in a global knockout of serine palmitoyltransferase. Partial inhibition of sphingolipid synthetic pathways is usually benign and may have beneficial effects in a number of lysosomal diseases and in more common pathologies, as seen in animal models for atherosclerosis, polycystic kidney disease, diabetes, and asthma. Studies of various forms of sphingolipid synthesis reduction serve to highlight not only the cellular role of these lipids but also the potential risks and therapeutic benefits of pharmacological agents to be used in therapy for human diseases.

  10. Seladin-1/DHCR24: A key protein of cell homeostasis and cholesterol biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Drzewińska

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Seladin-1 is a multifunctional protein encoded by DHCR24 gene and due to its enzymatic, antioxidant, and anti-apoptotic activities, it is considered as neuroprotective agent. Seladin-1 was identified as a gene down-regulated in brain regions selectively degenerated in Alzheimer’s disease. Mutations of DHCR24 gene result in inhibition of the enzymatic activity of seladin-1, causing an accumulation of desmosterol and leading to a lethal disorder called desmosterolosis. As an enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis, seladin-1 enhances the formation of lipid rafts and caveoles. These membrane structures are involved in the maintenance of signaling pathways and metabolic processes, such as the degradation of amyloid precursor protein, which is especially significant in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease. Independently of its enzymatic activity in cholesterol biosynthesis, seladin-1 acts as a caspase-3 inhibitor, a mediator of response to oxidative and oncogenic stress, and a reactive oxygen species scavenger. However, the effects of these activities seem to be indirectly modulated by membrane cholesterol level, which in turn gives priority to seladin-1’s enzymatic function in cholesterol biosynthesis, among its other functions. Seladin-1 is ubiquitously expressed, with the highest expression level in the brain and adrenal glands. Differences in seladin-1 expression profile were reported in transformed cells originating from many tissue types. Although the mechanisms of the regulation of seladin-1 activity demand further elucidation, it has already been shown that DHCR24 gene was activated by LXRα/RXRα in skin, by ERα in neurons, and by AR in prostate. Apart from estrogens and androgens, thyroid hormones, and IGF-1 also take part in the stimulation of seladin-1 expression.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase: biochemical features of a crucial enzyme for mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna P Lucarelli

    Full Text Available The selection and soaring spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB and extensively drug-resistant strains (XDR-TB is a severe public health problem. Currently, there is an urgent need for new drugs for tuberculosis treatment, with novel mechanisms of action and, moreover, the necessity to identify new drug targets. Mycobacterial phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (MtbPRPPase is a crucial enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of decaprenylphosphoryl-arabinose, an essential precursor for the mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Moreover, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate, which is the product of the PRPPase catalyzed reaction, is the precursor for the biosynthesis of nucleotides and of some amino acids such as histidine and tryptophan. In this context, the elucidation of the molecular and functional features of MtbPRPPase is mandatory. MtbPRPPase was obtained as a recombinant form, purified to homogeneity and characterized. According to its hexameric form, substrate specificity and requirement of phosphate for activity, the enzyme proved to belong to the class I of PRPPases. Although the sulfate mimicked the phosphate, it was less effective and required higher concentrations for the enzyme activation. MtbPRPPase showed hyperbolic response to ribose 5-phosphate, but sigmoidal behaviour towards Mg-ATP. The enzyme resulted to be allosterically activated by Mg(2+ or Mn(2+ and inhibited by Ca(2+ and Cu(2+ but, differently from other characterized PRPPases, it showed a better affinity for the Mn(2+ and Cu(2+ ions, indicating a different cation binding site geometry. Moreover, the enzyme from M. tuberculosis was allosterically inhibited by ADP, but less sensitive to inhibition by GDP. The characterization of M. tuberculosis PRPPase provides the starting point for the development of inhibitors for antitubercular drug design.

  12. Untersuchungen zur Sphingolipid-Biosynthese in der Hefe Pichia ciferrii

    OpenAIRE

    Börgel, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Im Rahmen der vorliegenden Dissertation sollte der Sphingolipid-Biosyntheseweg der Hefe Pichia ciferrii näher charakterisiert werden, um die Entwicklung einer fermentativen Route zur Sphingosin-Produktion zu ermöglichen. Darüber hinaus galt es patentierbare Selektionssysteme für diese Hefe zu etablieren. Durch Sequenzvergleiche mit nahe verwandten Hefen und das Ableiten degenerierter Primer wurden elf für die Sphingolipid-Biosynthese von Pichia ciferrii relevante Gene isoliert und sequenziert...

  13. Marine Bifunctional Sphingolipids from the Sponge Oceanapia ramsayi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile M. Gaydou

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available During the course of our continuing studies on marine natural lipid products,two known sphingolipids have been isolated for the first time from a specimen of themarine sponge Oceanapia ramsayi collected at Itampolo on the west coast of Madagascarin the Indian Ocean. The structures were elucidated using NMR data and by comparisonwith literature data. The occurrence of these sphingolipids within other Oceanapia spp. isdiscussed.

  14. Structural insight into the transglycosylation step of bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovering, Andrew L; de Castro, Liza H; Lim, Daniel; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2007-03-09

    Peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases (GTs) catalyze the polymerization step of cell-wall biosynthesis, are membrane-bound, and are highly conserved across all bacteria. Long considered the "holy grail" of antibiotic research, they represent an essential and easily accessible drug target for antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We have determined the 2.8 angstrom structure of a bifunctional cell-wall cross-linking enzyme, including its transpeptidase and GT domains, both unliganded and complexed with the substrate analog moenomycin. The peptidoglycan GTs adopt a fold distinct from those of other GT classes. The structures give insight into critical features of the catalytic mechanism and key interactions required for enzyme inhibition.

  15. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billestrup, N.; Moeldrup, A.; Serup, P.; Nielsen, J.H. (Hagedorn Research Lab., Gentofte (Denmark)); Mathews, L.S.; Norstedt, G. (Karolinska Inst., Huddinge (Sweden))

    1990-09-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, the authors have transfected a GH receptor cDNA under the transcriptional control of the human metallothionein promoter into RIN5-AH cells. The transfected cells were found to exhibit an increased expression of GH receptors and to contain a specific GH receptor mRNA that was not expressed in the parent cell line. The expression of GH receptors in one clone (1.24) selected for detailed analysis was increased 2.6-fold compared to untransfected cells. The increased GH receptor expression was accompanied by an increased responsiveness to GH. Thus, the maximal GH-stimulated increase of insulin biosynthesis was 4.1-fold in 1.24 cells compared to 1.9-fold in the nontransfected RIN5-AH cells. The expression of the transfected receptor was stimulated 1.6- and 2.3-fold when cells were cultured in the presence of 25 or 50 {mu}M Zn{sup 2+} was associated with an increased magnitude of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis. A close stoichiometric relationship between the level of receptor expression and the level of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis was observed. They conclude from these results that the hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the effect of GH on insulin biosynthesis in RIN5-AH cells.

  16. Serum profiling of healthy aging identifies phospho- and sphingolipid species as markers of human longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoliu, Ivan; Scherer, Max; Beguelin, Fiona; DaSilva, Laeticia; Mari, Daniela; Salvioli, Stefano; Martin, Francois-Pierre J; Capri, Miriam; Bucci, Laura; Ostan, Rita; Garagnani, Paolo; Monti, Daniela; Biagi, Elena; Brigidi, Patrizia; Kussmann, Martin; Rezzi, Serge; Franceschi, Claudio; Collino, Sebastiano

    2014-01-01

    As centenarians well represent the model of healthy aging, there are many important implications in revealing the underlying molecular mechanisms behind such successful aging. By combining NMR metabonomics and shot-gun lipidomics in serum we analyzed metabolome and lipidome composition of a group of centenarians with respect to elderly individuals. Specifically, NMR metabonomics profiling of serum revealed that centenarians are characterized by a metabolic phenotype distinct from that of elderly subjects, in particular regarding amino acids and lipid species. Shot- gun lipidomics approach displays unique changes in lipids biosynthesis in centenarians, with 41 differently abundant lipid species with respect to elderly subjects. These findings reveal phospho/sphingolipids as putative markers and biological modulators of healthy aging, in humans. Considering the particular actions of these metabolites, these data are suggestive of a better counteractive antioxidant capacity and a well-developed membrane lipid remodelling process in the healthy aging phenotype.

  17. Biosynthesis of sphinganine-analog mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, L; Zhu, X; Gerber, R; Huffman, J; Lou, L; Jorgenson, J; Yu, F; Zaleta-Rivera, K; Wang, Q

    2008-06-01

    Sphinganine-analog mycotoxins (SAMT) are polyketide-derived natural products produced by a number of plant pathogenic fungi and are among the most economically important mycotoxins. The toxins are structurally similar to sphinganine, a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of ceramides and sphingolipids, and competitive inhibitors for ceramide synthase. The inhibition of ceramide and sphingolipid biosynthesis is associated with several fatal diseases in domestic animals and esophageal cancer and neural tube defects in humans. SAMT contains a highly reduced, acyclic polyketide carbon backbone, which is assembled by a single module polyketide synthase. The biosynthesis of SAMT involves a unique polyketide chain-releasing mechanism, in which a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme catalyzes the termination, offloading and elongation of the polyketide chain. This leads to the introduction of a new carbon-carbon bond and an amino group to the polyketide chain. The mechanism is fundamentally different from the thioesterase/cyclase-catalyzed polyketide chain releasing found in bacterial and other fungal polyketide biosynthesis. Genetic data suggest that the ketosynthase domain of the polyketide synthase and the chain-releasing enzyme are important for controlling the final product structure. In addition, several post-polyketide modifications have to take place before SAMT become mature toxins.

  18. Bio-synthesis of gold nanoparticles by human epithelial cells, in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larios-Rodriguez, E; Rangel-Ayon, C; Herrera-Urbina, R [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Metalurgia, Universidad de Sonora, Rosales y Luis Encinas S/N, Hermosillo, Sonora, C.P. 83000 (Mexico); Castillo, S J [Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Rosales y Luis Encinas S/N, Hermosillo, Sonora, C.P. 83000 (Mexico); Zavala, G, E-mail: elarios@polimeros.uson.mx [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2011-09-02

    Healthy epithelial cells, in vivo, have the ability to synthesize gold nanoparticles when aqueous tetrachloroauric acid is made to react with human skin. Neither a reducing agent nor a protecting chemical is needed for this bio-synthesis method. The first indication of gold nanoparticle formation is the staining of the skin, which turns deep purple. Stereoscopic optical micrographs of human skin tissue in contact with aqueous tetrachloroauric acid clearly show the staining of the epithelial cells. The UV-Vis spectrum of these epithelial cells shows an absorption band with a maximum at 553 nm. This absorption peak is within the wavelength region where the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of aqueous colloidal gold exhibits a maximum. Transmission electron micrographs show that gold nanoparticles synthesized by epithelial cells have sizes between 1 and 100 nm. The electron diffraction pattern of these nanoparticles reveals a crystalline structure whose interplanar distances correspond to fcc metallic gold. Transmission electron micrographs of ultra-thin (70 nm thick) slices of epithelial cells clearly and undoubtedly demonstrate that gold nanoparticles are inside the cell. According to high resolution transmission electron micrographs of intracellular single gold nanoparticles, they have the shape of a polyhedron.

  19. The ATP-binding cassette transporter-2 (ABCA2) regulates esterification of plasma membrane cholesterol by modulation of sphingolipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Warren

    2014-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters are a large family (~48 genes divided into seven families A-G) of proteins that utilize the energy of ATP-hydrolysis to pump substrates across lipid bilayers against a concentration gradient. The ABC "A" subfamily is comprised of 13 members and transport sterols, phospholipids and bile acids. ABCA2 is the most abundant ABC transporter in human and rodent brain with highest expression in oligodendrocytes, although it is also expressed in neurons. Several groups have studied a possible connection between ABCA2 and Alzheimer's disease as well as early atherosclerosis. ABCA2 expression levels have been associated with changes in cholesterol and sphingolipid metabolism. In this paper, we hypothesized that ABCA2 expression level may regulate esterification of plasma membrane-derived cholesterol by modulation of sphingolipid metabolism. ABCA2 overexpression in N2a neuroblastoma cells was associated with an altered bilayer distribution of the sphingolipid ceramide that inhibited acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity and cholesterol esterification. In contrast, depletion of endogenous ABCA2 in the rat schwannoma cell line D6P2T increased esterification of plasma membrane cholesterol following treatment with exogenous bacterial sphingomyelinase. These findings suggest that control of ABCA2 expression level may be a key locus of regulation for esterification of plasma membrane-derived cholesterol through modulation of sphingolipid metabolism.

  20. Systems Level Engineering of Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis to Improve Biofuel Feedstock Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Samuel

    2013-09-27

    Our new regulatory model of cell wall biosynthesis proposes original network architecture with several newly incorporated components. The mapped set of protein-DNA interactions will serve as a foundation for 1) understanding the regulation of a complex and integral plant component and 2) the manipulation of crop species for biofuel and biotechnology purposes. This study revealed interesting and novel aspects of grass growth and development and further enforce the importance of a grass model system. By functionally characterizing a suite of genes, we have begun to improve the sparse model for transcription regulation of biomass accumulation in grasses. In the process, we have advanced methodology and brachy molecular genetic tools that will serve as valuable community resource.

  1. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Møldrup, A; Serup, P;

    1990-01-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, we have transfected...

  2. Effect of Enzyme Inhibitors on Terpene Trilactones Biosynthesis and Gene Expression Profiling in Ginkgo biloba Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lijia; Tong, Hui; Wang, Mingxuan; Zhu, Jianhua; Zi, Jiachen; Song, Liyan; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-12-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of terpene trilactones of Ginkgo biloba is unclear. In this present study, suspension cultured cells of G. biloba were used to explore the regulation of the mevalonic acid (MVA) and methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathways in response to specific enzyme inhibitors (lovastatin and clomazone). The results showed that the biosynthesis of bilobalide was more highly correlated with the MVA pathway, and the biosynthesis of ginkgolides was more highly correlated with the MEP pathway. Meanwhile, according to the results, it could be speculated that bilobalide might be a product of ginkgolide metabolism.

  3. Pregna-5,17(20)-dien-21-oyl amides affecting sterol and triglyceride biosynthesis in Hep G2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulov, Sergey V; Mankevich, Olga V; Dugin, Nikita O; Novikov, Roman A; Timofeev, Vladimir P; Misharin, Alexander Yu

    2013-04-01

    Synthesis of series [17(20)Z]- and [17(20)E]-pregna-5,17(20)-dien-21-oyl amides, containing polar substituents in amide moiety, based on rearrangement of 17α-bromo-21-iodo-3β-acetoxypregn-5-en-20-one caused by amines, is presented. The titled compounds were evaluated for their potency to regulate sterol and triglyceride biosynthesis in human hepatoma Hep G2 cells in comparison with 25-hydroxycholesterol. Three [17(20)E]-pregna-5,17(20)-dien-21-oyl amides at a concentrations of 5 μM inhibited sterol biosynthesis and stimulated triglyceride biosynthesis; their regulatory potency was dependent on the structure of amide moiety; the isomeric [17(20)Z]-pregna-5,17(20)-dien-21-oyl amides were inactive.

  4. 8th Annual Glycoscience Symposium: Integrating Models of Plant Cell Wall Structure, Biosynthesis and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadi, Paratoo [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-09-24

    The Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (CCRC) of the University of Georgia holds a symposium yearly that highlights a broad range of carbohydrate research topics. The 8th Annual Georgia Glycoscience Symposium entitled “Integrating Models of Plant Cell Wall Structure, Biosynthesis and Assembly” was held on April 7, 2014 at the CCRC. The focus of symposium was on the role of glycans in plant cell wall structure and synthesis. The goal was to have world leaders in conjunction with graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and research scientists to propose the newest plant cell wall models. The symposium program closely followed the DOE’s mission and was specifically designed to highlight chemical and biochemical structures and processes important for the formation and modification of renewable plant cell walls which serve as the basis for biomaterial and biofuels. The symposium was attended by both senior investigators in the field as well as students including a total attendance of 103, which included 80 faculty/research scientists, 11 graduate students and 12 Postdoctoral students.

  5. Enzymes of creatine biosynthesis, arginine and methionine metabolism in normal and malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Soumen; Wallimann, Theo; Ray, Subhankar; Ray, Manju

    2008-12-01

    The creatine/creatine kinase system decreases drastically in sarcoma. In the present study, an investigation of catalytic activities, western blot and mRNA expression unambiguously demonstrates the prominent expression of the creatine-synthesizing enzymes l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and N-guanidinoacetate methyltransferase in sarcoma, Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells, whereas both enzymes were virtually undetectable in normal muscle. Compared to that of normal animals, these enzymes remained unaffected in the kidney or liver of sarcoma-bearing mice. High activity and expression of mitochondrial arginase II in sarcoma indicated increased ornithine formation. Slightly or moderately higher levels of ornithine, guanidinoacetate and creatinine were observed in sarcoma compared to muscle. Despite the intrinsically low level of creatine in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells, these cells could significantly take up and release creatine, suggesting a functional creatine transport, as verified by measuring mRNA levels of creatine transporter. Transcript levels of arginase II, ornithine-decarboxylase, S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase and methionine-synthase were significantly upregulated in sarcoma and in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells. Overall, the enzymes related to creatine and arginine/methionine metabolism were found to be significantly upregulated in malignant cells. However, the low levels of creatine kinase in the same malignant cells do not appear to be sufficient for the building up of an effective creatine/phosphocreatine pool. Instead of supporting creatine biosynthesis, l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and N-guanidinoacetate methyltransferase appear to be geared to support cancer cell metabolism in the direction of polyamine and methionine synthesis because both these compounds are in high demand in proliferating cancer cells.

  6. Regulation of collagen biosynthesis in cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepp, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Aortic smooth muscles cells have been implicated in the etiology of lesions which occur in atherosclerosis and hypertension. Both diseases involve proliferation of smooth muscle cells and accumulation of excessive amounts of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagen type I and type III produced by the smooth muscle cells. To better understand the sites of regulation of collagen biosynthesis and to correlate these with the growth rate of the cells, cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle cells were studied as a function of the number of days (3 to 14) in second passage. Cells grew rapidly up to day 6 when confluence was reached. The total incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-proline into proteins was highest at day 3 and decreased to a constant level after the cultures reached confluence. In contrast, collagen protein production was lowest before confluence and continued to increase over the entire time course of the experiments. cDNA clones for the ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2 chains of type I and the ..cap alpha..1 chain of type III collagen were used to quantitate the steady state level of collagen mRNAs. RNA was tested in a cell-free translation system. Changes in the translational activity of collagen mRNAs parallelled the observed increases in collagen protein production. Thus, at later time points, collagen mRNAs are more active in directing synthesis of preprocollagens, even though less collagen mRNA is present. The conclusion is that the site of regulation of the expression of collagen genes is a function of the growth rate of cultured smooth muscle cells.

  7. Methods of staining and visualization of sphingolipid enriched and non-enriched plasma membrane regions of Arabidopsis thaliana with fluorescent dyes and lipid analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blachutzik Jörg O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sterols and Sphingolipids form lipid clusters in the plasma membranes of cell types throughout the animal and plant kingdoms. These lipid domains provide a medium for protein signaling complexes at the plasma membrane and are also observed to be principal regions of membrane contact at the inception of infection. We visualized different specific fluorescent lipophilic stains of the both sphingolipid enriched and non-sphingolipid enriched regions in the plasma membranes of live protoplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Lipid staining protocols for several fluorescent lipid analogues in plants are presented. The most emphasis was placed on successful protocols for the single and dual staining of sphingolipid enriched regions and exclusion of sphingolipid enriched regions on the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts. A secondary focus was placed to ensure that these staining protocols presented still maintain cell viability. Furthermore, the protocols were successfully tested with the spectrally sensitive dye Laurdan. Conclusion Almost all existing staining procedures of the plasma membrane with fluorescent lipid analogues are specified for animal cells and tissues. In order to develop lipid staining protocols for plants, procedures were established with critical steps for the plasma membrane staining of Arabidopsis leaf tissue and protoplasts. The success of the plasma membrane staining protocols was additionally verified by measurements of lipid dynamics by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique and by the observation of new phenomena such as time dependent lipid polarization events in living protoplasts, for which a putative physiological relevance is suggested.

  8. Increase in sphingolipid catabolic enzyme activity during aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santosh J SACKET; Hae-young CHUNG; Fumikazu OKAJIMA; Dong-soon IM

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To understand the contribution of sphingolipid metabolism and its metabolites to development and aging.Methods: A systemic analysis on the changes in activity of sphingolipid metabolic enzymes in kidney, liver and brain tissues during development and aging was conducted. The study was conducted using tissues from 1-day-old to 720-day-old rats.Results: Catabolic enzyme activities as well as the level of sphingomyelinase (SMase) and ceramidase (CDase) were higher than that of anabolic enzyme activities, sphingomyelin synthase and ceramide synthase. This suggested an accumulation of ceramide and sphingosine during development and aging. The liver showed the highest neutral-SMase activity among the tested enzymes while the kidney and brain exhibited higher neutral-SMase and ceramidase activities, indicating a high production of ceramide in liver and ceramide/sphingosine in the kidney and brain. The activities of sphingolipid metabolic enzymes were significantly elevated in all tested tissues during development and aging, although the onset of significant increase in activity varied on the tissue and enzyme type. During aging, 18 out of 21 enzyme activities were further increased on day 720 compared to day 180.Conclusion: Differential increases in sphingolipid metabolic enzyme activities suggest that sphingolipids including ceramide and sphingosine might play important and dynamic roles in proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis during development and aging.

  9. Signal transduction and metabolic flux of beta-thujaplicin and monoterpene biosynthesis in elicited Cupressus lusitanica cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Matsunaga, Yoko; Fujita, Koki; Sakai, Kokki

    2006-01-01

    beta-Thujaplicin is an antimicrobial tropolone derived from geranyl pyrophosphate(GPP) and monoterpene intermediate. Yeast elicitor-treated Cupressus lusitanica cell cultures accumulate high levels of beta-thujaplicin at early stages and other monoterpenes at later stages post-elicitation. The different regulation of beta-thujaplicin and monoterpene biosynthesis and signal transduction directing metabolic flux to beta-thujaplicin firstly and then shifting metabolic flow from beta-thujaplicin to other monoterpene biosynthesis were investigated. The earlier rapid induction of beta-thujaplicin accumulation and a later stimulation of monoterpene biosynthesis by yeast elicitor are in well agreement with elicitor-induced changes in activity of three monoterpene biosynthetic enzymes including isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase, GPP synthase, and monoterpene synthase. Yeast elicitor induces an earlier and stronger beta-thujaplicin production and monoterpene biosynthetic enzyme activity than methyl jasmonate (MeJA) does. Profiling all monoterpenes produced by C. lusitanica cell cultures under different conditions reveals that beta-thujaplicin biosynthesis parallels with other monoterpenes and competes for common precursor pools. Yet beta-thujaplicin is produced pre-dominantly at early stage of elicitation whereas other monoterpenes are mainly accumulated at late stage while beta-thujaplicin is metabolized. It is suggested that yeast elicitor-treated C. lusitanica cells preferentially accumulate beta-thujaplicin as a primary defense and other monoterpenes as a secondary defense. Inhibitor treatments suggest that immediate production of beta-thujaplicin post-elicitation largely depends on pre-existing enzymes and translation of pre-existing transcripts as well as recruitment of precursor pools from both the cytosol and plastids. The later beta-thujaplicin and other monoterpene accumulation strictly depends on active transcription and translation. Induction of beta

  10. Histamine and histamine-receptor antagonists modify gene expression and biosynthesis of interferon gamma in peripheral human blood mononuclear cells and in CD19-depleted cell subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horváth, B V; Szalai, C; Mándi, Y; László, V; Radvány, Z; Darvas, Z; Falus, A

    1999-01-01

    The effect of histamine and histamine antagonists was examined on gene expression and biosynthesis of bacterial endotoxin (LPS) induced interferon gamma (IFNgamma) both in human peripheral mononuclear cells (PMBC) and in T-cell enriched fractions. We found, that histamine inhibited the LPS induced t

  11. Haem Biosynthesis and Antioxidant Enzymes in Circulating Cells of Acute Intermittent Porphyria Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Miguel D.; Mestre-Alfaro, Antonia; Martínez-Tomé, Magdalena; Carrera-Quintanar, Lucrecia; Capó, Xavier; Jiménez-Monreal, Antonia M.; García-Diz, Luis; Roche, Enrique; Murcia, María A.; Tur, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore the expression pattern of haem biosynthesis enzymes in circulating cells of patients affected by two types of porphyria (acute intermittent, AIP, and variegate porphyria, VP), together with the antioxidant enzyme pattern in AIP in order to identify a possible situation of oxidative stress. Sixteen and twelve patients affected by AIP and VP, respectively, were analysed with the same numbers of healthy matched controls. Erythrocytes, neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were purified from blood, and RNA and proteins were extracted for quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western-blot analysis, respectively. Porhobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) gene and protein expression was analysed. Antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression were additionally determined in blood cells, together with protein carbonyl content in plasma. PBMCs isolated from AIP patients presented low mRNA levels of PBGD when compared to controls, while PBMCs isolated from VP patients presented a decrease in PPOX mRNA. PPOX protein content was higher in AIP patients and lower in VP patients, compared to healthy controls. Regarding antioxidant enzymes, PBMCs and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) presented statistically significant higher activity in AIP patients compared to controls, while catalase activity tended to be lower in these patients. No differences were observed regarding antioxidant gene expression in white blood cells. Circulating cells in AIP and VP patients present altered expression of haem biosynthetic enzymes, which could be useful for the differential diagnosis of these two types of porphyria in certain difficult cases. AIP patients present a condition of potential oxidative stress similar to VP patients, evidenced by the post-transcriptional activation of SOD and possible catalase impairment. PMID:27788171

  12. Hypertension is associated with marked alterations in sphingolipid biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spijkers, Léon J A; van den Akker, Rob F P; Janssen, Ben J A

    2011-01-01

    SHR (42±4%; n = 7), but not in WKY (-12±10%; n = 6). Lipidomics analysis by mass spectrometry, revealed elevated levels of ceramide in arterial tissue of SHR compared to WKY (691±42 vs. 419±27 pmol, n = 3-5 respectively, pbiology are also....... n = 19 hypertensive patients, pbiology such as elevated ceramide levels and signaling, that contribute to increased vascular tone.......BACKGROUND: Hypertension is, amongst others, characterized by endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling. As sphingolipids have been implicated in both the regulation of vascular contractility and growth, we investigated whether sphingolipid biology is altered in hypertension and whether...

  13. Mechanisms and impact of ceramide phosphoethanolamine biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hentes Vacaru, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipids represent an essential class of membrane molecules in eukaryotic cells. They are primarily found in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane where they help create a rigid and impermeable barrier to the extracellular environment. While sphingomyelin (SM) is the most abundant sphingolip

  14. Identification of novel bacterial histidine biosynthesis inhibitors using docking, ensemble rescoring, and whole-cell assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Signe Teuber; Liu, J.; Estiu, G.;

    2010-01-01

    in the early stages of drug discovery attractive if sufficient accuracy can be achieved. Computational target identification using systems-level methods suggested the histidine biosynthesis pathway as an attractive target against S. aureus. Potential inhibitors for the pathway were identified through docking...... histidine biosynthesis pathway, which is predicted to be essential for bacterial biomass productions. Virtual screening of a library of similar to 10(6) compounds identified 49 potential inhibitors of three enzymes of this pathway. Eighteen representative compounds were directly tested on three S. aureus...... of this novel strategy to the histidine biosynthesis pathway....

  15. Extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity or lipid raft localization and efflux function of the ABC transporter MRP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klappe, Karin; Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Hummel, Ina; van Dam, Annie; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Milne, Stephen B.; Myers, David S.; Brown, H. Alex; Permentier, Hjalmar; Kok, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    We show that highly efficient depletion of sphingolipids in two different cell lines does not abrogate the ability to isolate Lubrol-based DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes) or detergent-free lipid rafts from these cells. Compared with control, DRM/detergent-free lipid raft fractions contain equal

  16. Permethrin may disrupt testosterone biosynthesis via mitochondrial membrane damage of Leydig cells in adult male mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Yun; Ito, Yuki; Yamanoshita, Osamu; Yanagiba, Yukie; Kobayashi, Miya; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Li, ChunMei; Okamura, Ai; Miyata, Maiko; Ueyama, Jun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kamijima, Michihiro; Nakajima, Tamie

    2007-08-01

    Permethrin, a popular synthetic pyrethroid insecticide used to control noxious insects in agriculture, forestry, households, horticulture, and public health throughout the world, poses risks of environmental exposure. Here we evaluate the reproductive toxicity of cis-permethrin in adult male ICR mice that were orally administered cis-permethrin (0, 35, or 70 mg/kg d) for 6 wk. Caudal epididymal sperm count and sperm motility in the treated groups were statistically reduced in a dose-dependent manner. Testicular testosterone production and plasma testosterone concentration were significantly and dose-dependently decreased with an increase in LH, and a significant regression was observed between testosterone levels and cis-permethrin residues in individual mice testes after exposure. However, no significant changes were observed in body weight, reproductive organ absolute and relative weights, sperm morphology, and plasma FSH concentration after cis-permethrin treatment. Moreover, cis-permethrin exposure significantly diminished the testicular mitochondrial mRNA expression levels of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), and cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc) and enzyme and protein expression levels of StAR and P450scc. At the electron microscopic level, mitochondrial membrane damage was found in Leydig cells of the exposed mouse testis. Our results suggest that the insecticide permethrin may cause mitochondrial membrane impairment in Leydig cells and disrupt testosterone biosynthesis by diminishing the delivery of cholesterol into the mitochondria and decreasing the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone in the cells, thus reducing subsequent testosterone production.

  17. Flavanols and procyanidins of cocoa and chocolate inhibit growth and polyamine biosynthesis of human colonic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnésecchi, Stéphanie; Schneider, Yann; Lazarus, Sheryl A; Coehlo, David; Gossé, Francine; Raul, Francis

    2002-01-25

    The effects of cocoa powder and extracts with different amounts of flavanols and related procyanidin oligomers were investigated on the growth of Caco-2 cells. Treatment of the cells with 50 microg/ml of procyanidin-enriched (PE) extracts caused a 70% growth inhibition with a blockade of the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. PE extracts caused a significant decrease of ornithine decarboxylase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activities, two key enzymes of polyamine biosynthesis. This led to a decrease in the intracellular pool of the polyamines. These observations indicate that polyamine metabolism might be an important target in the anti-proliferative effects of cocoa polyphenols.

  18. CD73 protein as a source of extracellular precursors for sustained NAD+ biosynthesis in FK866-treated tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozio, Alessia; Sociali, Giovanna; Sturla, Laura; Caffa, Irene; Soncini, Debora; Salis, Annalisa; Raffaelli, Nadia; De Flora, Antonio; Nencioni, Alessio; Bruzzone, Santina

    2013-09-06

    NAD(+) is mainly synthesized in human cells via the "salvage" pathways starting from nicotinamide, nicotinic acid, or nicotinamide riboside (NR). The inhibition with FK866 of the enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), catalyzing the first reaction in the "salvage" pathway from nicotinamide, showed potent antitumor activity in several preclinical models of solid and hematologic cancers. In the clinical studies performed with FK866, however, no tumor remission was observed. Here we demonstrate that low micromolar concentrations of extracellular NAD(+) or NAD(+) precursors, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and NR, can reverse the FK866-induced cell death, this representing a plausible explanation for the failure of NAMPT inhibition as an anti-cancer therapy. NMN is a substrate of both ectoenzymes CD38 and CD73, with generation of NAM and NR, respectively. In this study, we investigated the roles of CD38 and CD73 in providing ectocellular NAD(+) precursors for NAD(+) biosynthesis and in modulating cell susceptibility to FK866. By specifically silencing or overexpressing CD38 and CD73, we demonstrated that endogenous CD73 enables, whereas CD38 impairs, the conversion of extracellular NMN to NR as a precursor for intracellular NAD(+) biosynthesis in human cells. Moreover, cell viability in FK866-treated cells supplemented with extracellular NMN was strongly reduced in tumor cells, upon pharmacological inhibition or specific down-regulation of CD73. Thus, our study suggests that genetic or pharmacologic interventions interfering with CD73 activity may prove useful to increase cancer cell sensitivity to NAMPT inhibitors.

  19. Stimulatory Effects of Acibenzolar-S-methyl on Chlorogenic Acids Biosynthesis in Centella asiatica Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efficient N Ncube

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Centella asiatica is a perennial herb that grows in tropical regions with numerous medicinal properties, mostly attributed to the presence of pentacyclic triterpenoids. Interestingly, this plant also possess a significant amount of phenylpropanoid-derived chlorogenic acids (CGAs that have recently been reported to confer neuroprotective properties. In a biotechnological attempt to increase the biosynthesis of CGA-derivatives in cultured Centella cells, acibenzolar-S-methyl was applied as a xenobiotic inducer in combination with quinic acid and shikimic acid as precursor molecules. Applying a semi-targeted metabolomics-based approach, time and concentration studies were undertaken to evaluate the effect of the manipulation on cellular metabolism leading to CGA production. Phytochemical extracts were prepared using methanol and analysed using a UHPLC-qTOF-MS platform. Data was processed and analysed using multivariate data models. A total of four CGA-derivatives, annotated as trans-5-feruloylquinic acid, 3,5 di-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-O-dicaffeoyl-4-O-malonylquinic acid (irbic acid and 3-caffeoyl, 5-feruloylquinic acid, were found to be upregulated by the acibenzolar-S-methyl treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the induction of CGA derivatives in this species. Contrary to expectations, the precursor molecules had very little effects on the levels of the CGAs. However, a total of 16 metabolites, including CGA derivatives, were up-regulated by precursor treatment. Therefore, this study shows potential to biotechnologically manipulate C. asiatica cells to increase the production of these health beneficial CGAs.

  20. Revealing fosfomycin primary effect on Staphylococcus aureus transcriptome: modulation of cell envelope biosynthesis and phosphoenolpyruvate induced starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruden Kristina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a highly adaptable human pathogen and there is a constant search for effective antibiotics. Fosfomycin is a potent irreversible inhibitor of MurA, an enolpyruvyl transferase that uses phosphoenolpyruvate as substrate. The goal of this study was to identify the pathways and processes primarily affected by fosfomycin at the genome-wide transcriptome level to aid development of new drugs. Results S. aureus ATCC 29213 cells were treated with sub-MIC concentrations of fosfomycin and harvested at 10, 20 and 40 minutes after treatment. S. aureus GeneChip statistical data analysis was complemented by gene set enrichment analysis. A visualization tool for mapping gene expression data into biological pathways was developed in order to identify the metabolic processes affected by fosfomycin. We have shown that the number of significantly differentially expressed genes in treated cultures increased with time and with increasing fosfomycin concentration. The target pathway - peptidoglycan biosynthesis - was upregulated following fosfomycin treatment. Modulation of transport processes, cofactor biosynthesis, energy metabolism and nucleic acid biosynthesis was also observed. Conclusions Several pathways and genes downregulated by fosfomycin have been identified, in contrast to previously described cell wall active antibiotics, and was explained by starvation response induced by phosphoenolpyruvate accumulation. Transcriptomic profiling, in combination with meta-analysis, has been shown to be a valuable tool in determining bacterial response to a specific antibiotic.

  1. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis. Metabolite Profiling of Peppermint Oil Gland Secretory Cells and Application to Herbicide Target Analysis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, B. Markus; Ketchum, Raymond E.B.; Croteau, Rodney B.

    2001-01-01

    Two independent pathways operate in plants for the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, the central intermediates in the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids. The mevalonate pathway is present in the cytosol, whereas the recently discovered mevalonate-independent pathway is localized to plastids. We have used isolated peppermint (Mentha piperita) oil gland secretory cells as an experimental model system to study the effects of the herbicides fosmidomycin, phosphonothrixin, methyl viologen, benzyl viologen, clomazone, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl diphosphate, alendronate, and pamidronate on the pools of metabolites related to monoterpene biosynthesis via the mevalonate-independent pathway. A newly developed isolation protocol for polar metabolites together with an improved separation and detection method based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry have allowed assessment of the enzyme targets for a number of these herbicides. PMID:11553758

  2. Cell-Cell Communication in Yeast Using Auxin Biosynthesis and Auxin Responsive CRISPR Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakhar, Arjun; Bolten, Nicholas J; Nemhauser, Jennifer; Klavins, Eric

    2016-04-15

    An engineering framework for synthetic multicellular systems requires a programmable means of cell-cell communication. Such a communication system would enable complex behaviors, such as pattern formation, division of labor in synthetic microbial communities, and improved modularity in synthetic circuits. However, it remains challenging to build synthetic cellular communication systems in eukaryotes due to a lack of molecular modules that are orthogonal to the host machinery, easy to reconfigure, and scalable. Here, we present a novel cell-to-cell communication system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) based on CRISPR transcription factors and the plant hormone auxin that exhibits several of these features. Specifically, we engineered a sender strain of yeast that converts indole-3-acetamide (IAM) into auxin via the enzyme iaaH from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. To sense auxin and regulate transcription in a receiver strain, we engineered a reconfigurable library of auxin-degradable CRISPR transcription factors (ADCTFs). Auxin-induced degradation is achieved through fusion of an auxin-sensitive degron (from IAA corepressors) to the CRISPR TF and coexpression with an auxin F-box protein. Mirroring the tunability of auxin perception in plants, our family of ADCTFs exhibits a broad range of auxin sensitivities. We characterized the kinetics and steady-state behavior of the sender and receiver independently as well as in cocultures where both cell types were exposed to IAM. In the presence of IAM, auxin is produced by the sender cell and triggers deactivation of reporter expression in the receiver cell. The result is an orthogonal, rewireable, tunable, and, arguably, scalable cell-cell communication system for yeast and other eukaryotic cells.

  3. Fumonisin B₁ (FB₁) Induces Lamellar Separation and Alters Sphingolipid Metabolism of In Vitro Cultured Hoof Explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Nicole; Dohnal, Ilse; Nagl, Veronika; Schaumberger, Simone; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-03-24

    One of the most important hoof diseases is laminitis. Yet, the pathology of laminitis is not fully understood. Different bacterial toxins, e.g. endotoxins or exotoxins, seem to play an important role. Additionally, ingestion of mycotoxins, toxic secondary metabolites of fungi, might contribute to the onset of laminitis. In this respect, fumonsins are of special interest since horses are regarded as species most susceptible to this group of mycotoxins. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of fumonisin B₁ (FB₁) on primary isolated epidermal and dermal hoof cells, as well as on the lamellar tissue integrity and sphingolipid metabolism of hoof explants in vitro. There was no effect of FB₁ at any concentration on dermal or epidermal cells. However, FB₁ significantly reduced the separation force of explants after 24 h of incubation. The Sa/So ratio was significantly increased in supernatants of explants incubated with FB₁ (2.5-10 µg/mL) after 24 h. Observed effects on Sa/So ratio were linked to significantly increased sphinganine concentrations. Our study showed that FB₁ impairs the sphingolipid metabolism of explants and reduces lamellar integrity at non-cytotoxic concentrations. FB₁ might, therefore, affect hoof health. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are necessary to elucidate the effects of FB₁ on the equine hoof in more detail.

  4. The sphingolipid long-chain base-Pkh1/2-Ypk1/2 signaling pathway regulates eisosome assembly and turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guangzuo; Gruhler, Albrecht; Liu, Ying; Jensen, Ole N; Dickson, Robert C

    2008-04-18

    Eisosomes are recently described fungal structures that play roles in the organization of the plasma membrane and endocytosis. Their major protein components are Pil1 and Lsp1, and previous studies showed that these proteins are phosphorylated by the sphingolipid long-chain base-activated Pkh1 and Pkh2 protein kinases in vitro. We show that Pkh1 and Pkh2 phosphorylate Pil1 and Lsp1 in vivo to produce species B, and that heat stress, which activates Pkh1 and Pkh2, generates a more highly phosphorylated species, C. Cells with low Pkh activity lack species B and C and contain abnormally organized eisosomes. To verify that Pil1 phosphorylation is essential for correct eisosome organization, phosphorylated serine and threonine residues were identified and changed to alanines. A variant Pil1 protein lacking five phosphorylation sites did not form eisosomes during log phase growth, indicating that phosphorylation is critical for eisosome organization. We also found that eisosomes are dynamic structures and disassemble when the Ypk protein kinases, which are activated by the sphingolipid-Pkh signaling pathway, are inactivated or when the sphingolipid signal is pharmacologically blocked with myriocin. We conclude that eisosome formation and turnover are regulated by the sphingolipid-Pkh1/2-Ypk1/2 signaling pathway. These data and previous data showing that endocytosis is regulated by the sphingolipid-Pkh1/2-Ypk1/2 signaling pathway suggest that Pkh1 and -2 respond to changes in membrane sphingolipids and transmit this information to eisosomes via Pil1 phosphorylation. Eisosomes then control endocytosis to align the composition and function of the plasma membrane to match demand.

  5. Engineering Microbial Cells for the Biosynthesis of Natural Compounds of Pharmaceutical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Jeandet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbes constitute important platforms for the biosynthesis of numerous molecules of pharmaceutical interest such as antitumor, anticancer, antiviral, antihypertensive, antiparasitic, antioxidant, immunological agents, and antibiotics as well as hormones, belonging to various chemical families, for instance, terpenoids, alkaloids, polyphenols, polyketides, amines, and proteins. Engineering microbial factories offers rich opportunities for the production of natural products that are too complex for cost-effective chemical synthesis and whose extraction from their originating plants needs the use of many solvents. Recent progresses that have been made since the millennium beginning with metabolic engineering of microorganisms for the biosynthesis of natural products of pharmaceutical significance will be reviewed.

  6. Inhibition of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis increases cell wall digestibility, protoplast isolation, and facilitates sustained cell division in American elm (Ulmus americana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones A Maxwell P

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protoplast technologies offer unique opportunities for fundamental research and to develop novel germplasm through somatic hybridization, organelle transfer, protoclonal variation, and direct insertion of DNA. Applying protoplast technologies to develop Dutch elm disease resistant American elms (Ulmus americana L. was proposed over 30 years ago, but has not been achieved. A primary factor restricting protoplast technology to American elm is the resistance of the cell walls to enzymatic degradation and a long lag phase prior to cell wall re-synthesis and cell division. Results This study suggests that resistance to enzymatic degradation in American elm was due to water soluble phenylpropanoids. Incubating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. leaf tissue, an easily digestible species, in aqueous elm extract inhibits cell wall digestion in a dose dependent manner. This can be mimicked by p-coumaric or ferulic acid, phenylpropanoids known to re-enforce cell walls. Culturing American elm tissue in the presence of 2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid (AIP; 10-150 μM, an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, reduced flavonoid content, decreased tissue browning, and increased isolation rates significantly from 11.8% (±3.27 in controls to 65.3% (±4.60. Protoplasts isolated from callus grown in 100 μM AIP developed cell walls by day 2, had a division rate of 28.5% (±3.59 by day 6, and proliferated into callus by day 14. Heterokaryons were successfully produced using electrofusion and fused protoplasts remained viable when embedded in agarose. Conclusions This study describes a novel approach of modifying phenylpropanoid biosynthesis to facilitate efficient protoplast isolation which has historically been problematic for American elm. This isolation system has facilitated recovery of viable protoplasts capable of rapid cell wall re-synthesis and sustained cell division to form callus. Further, isolated protoplasts survived

  7. Sphingolipid-dependent fusion of Semliki Forest virus with cholesterol-containing liposomes requires both the 3-hydroxyl group and the double bond of the sphingolipid backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corver, J; Moesby, Lise; Erukulla, R K;

    1995-01-01

    , we demonstrate that sphingolipid-dependent fusion of SFV with cholesterol-containing liposomes exhibits remarkable molecular specificity, the 3-hydroxyl group and the 4,5-trans carbon-carbon double bond of the sphingosine backbone being critical for the sphingolipid to mediate the process...

  8. A method for analysis and design of metabolism using metabolomics data and kinetic models: Application on lipidomics using a novel kinetic model of sphingolipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoglidis, Georgios; da Silveira Dos Santos, Aline Xavier; Riezman, Isabelle; Angelino, Paolo; Riezman, Howard; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2016-09-01

    We present a model-based method, designated Inverse Metabolic Control Analysis (IMCA), which can be used in conjunction with classical Metabolic Control Analysis for the analysis and design of cellular metabolism. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method by first developing a comprehensively curated kinetic model of sphingolipid biosynthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Next we apply IMCA using the model and integrating lipidomics data. The combinatorial complexity of the synthesis of sphingolipid molecules, along with the operational complexity of the participating enzymes of the pathway, presents an excellent case study for testing the capabilities of the IMCA. The exceptional agreement of the predictions of the method with genome-wide data highlights the importance and value of a comprehensive and consistent engineering approach for the development of such methods and models. Based on the analysis, we identified the class of enzymes regulating the distribution of sphingolipids among species and hydroxylation states, with the D-phospholipase SPO14 being one of the most prominent. The method and the applications presented here can be used for a broader, model-based inverse metabolic engineering approach.

  9. Phage display-derived inhibitor of the essential cell wall biosynthesis enzyme MurF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blewett Ann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop antibacterial agents having novel modes of action against bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, we targeted the essential MurF enzyme of the antibiotic resistant pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MurF catalyzes the formation of a peptide bond between D-Alanyl-D-Alanine (D-Ala-D-Ala and the cell wall precursor uridine 5'-diphosphoryl N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid (UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm with the concomitant hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate, yielding UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide. As MurF acts on a dipeptide, we exploited a phage display approach to identify peptide ligands having high binding affinities for the enzyme. Results Screening of a phage display 12-mer library using purified P. aeruginosa MurF yielded to the identification of the MurFp1 peptide. The MurF substrate UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glumeso-A2pm was synthesized and used to develop a sensitive spectrophotometric assay to quantify MurF kinetics and inhibition. MurFp1 acted as a weak, time-dependent inhibitor of MurF activity but was a potent inhibitor when MurF was pre-incubated with UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm or ATP. In contrast, adding the substrate D-Ala-D-Ala during the pre-incubation nullified the inhibition. The IC50 value of MurFp1 was evaluated at 250 μM, and the Ki was established at 420 μM with respect to the mixed type of inhibition against D-Ala-D-Ala. Conclusion MurFp1 exerts its inhibitory action by interfering with the utilization of D-Ala-D-Ala by the MurF amide ligase enzyme. We propose that MurFp1 exploits UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm-induced structural changes for better interaction with the enzyme. We present the first peptide inhibitor of MurF, an enzyme that should be exploited as a target for antimicrobial drug development.

  10. Four novel cellulose synthase (CESA) genes from Birch (Betula platyphylla Suk.) involved in primary and secondary cell Wall biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Qiuyu; Chen, Pengfei; Song, Funan; Guan, Minxiao; Jin, Lihua; Wang, Yucheng; Yang, Chuanping

    2012-09-25

    Cellulose synthase (CESA), which is an essential catalyst for the generation of plant cell wall biomass, is mainly encoded by the CesA gene family that contains ten or more members. In this study; four full-length cDNAs encoding CESA were isolated from Betula platyphylla Suk., which is an important timber species, using RT-PCR combined with the RACE method and were named as BplCesA3, -4, -7 and -8. These deduced CESAs contained the same typical domains and regions as their Arabidopsis homologs. The cDNA lengths differed among these four genes, as did the locations of the various protein domains inferred from the deduced amino acid sequences, which shared amino acid sequence identities ranging from only 63.8% to 70.5%. Real-time RT-PCR showed that all four BplCesAs were expressed at different levels in diverse tissues. Results indicated that BplCESA8 might be involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis and floral development. BplCESA3 appeared in a unique expression pattern and was possibly involved in primary cell wall biosynthesis and seed development; it might also be related to the homogalacturonan synthesis. BplCESA7 and BplCESA4 may be related to the formation of a cellulose synthase complex and participate mainly in secondary cell wall biosynthesis. The extremely low expression abundance of the four BplCESAs in mature pollen suggested very little involvement of them in mature pollen formation in Betula. The distinct expression pattern of the four BplCesAs suggested they might participate in developments of various tissues and that they are possibly controlled by distinct mechanisms in Betula.

  11. Differential control of cholesterol and fatty acid biosynthesis in sensitive and multidrug-resistant LoVo tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Maria Teresa; Napolitano, Mariarosaria; Ferrante, Antonella; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Arancia, Giuseppe; Bravo, Elena

    2003-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) describes the decrease in sensitivity of tumor cells to a wide variety of cytotoxic compounds. Although a central role has been ascribed to the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) pump in MDR, lipids also appear to be extremely important. However, their precise role in MDR is not yet fully understood. It was the aim of the present paper to gain a deeper understanding of intracellular lipid equilibrium in both sensitive and MDR tumor cells. In particular, intracellular cholesterol biosynthesis and cholesterol esterification were examined in LoVo-sensitive and Pgp-overexpressing resistant cells. The data presented seem to suggest that the higher synthesis of cholesteryl ester and triglyceride observed in resistant with respect to wild-type cells is due to a greater production of fatty acids in these cells. The results are discussed in view of the possible roles of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins and Pgp in these phenomena.

  12. Nitric oxide mediates the fungal elicitor-induced puerarin biosynthesis in Pueraria thomsonii Benth. suspension cells through a salicylic acid (SA)-dependent and a jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent signal pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Maojun; DONG Jufang; ZHU Muyuan

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a key signaling molecule in plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis recently. In order to investigate the molecular basis of NO signaling in elicitor-induced secondary metabolite biosynthesis of plant cells, we determined the contents of NO, salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and puerarin in Pueraria thomsonii Benth. suspension cells treated with the elicitors prepared from cell walls of Penicillium citrinum. The results showed that the fungal elicitor induced NO burst, SA accumulation and puerarin production of P. thomsonii Benth. cells. The elicitor-induced SA accumulation and puerarin production was suppressed by nitric oxide specific scavenger cPITO, indicating that NO was essential for elicitor-induced SA and puerarin biosynthesis in P. thomsonii Benth. cells. In transgenic NahG P. thomsonii Benth. cells, the fungal elicitor also induced puerarin biosynthesis, NO burst, and JA accumulation, though the SA biosynthesis was impaired. The elicitor-induced JA accumulation in transgenic cells was blocked by cPITO, which suggested that JA acted downstream of NO and its biosynthesis was controlled by NO. External application of NO via its donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) enhanced puerarin biosynthesis in transgenic NahG P. thomsonii Benth. cells, and the NO-triggered puerarin biosynthesis was suppressed by JA inhibitors IBU and NDGA, which indicated that NO induced puerarin production through a JA-dependent signal pathway in the transgenic cells. Exogenous application of SA suppressed the elicitor-induced JA biosynthesis and reversed the inhibition of IBU and NDGA on elicitor-induced puerarin accumulation in transgenic cells, which indicated that SA inhibited JA biosynthesis in the cells and that SA might be used as a substitute for JA to mediate the elicitor- and NO-induced puerarin biosynthesis. It was, therefore, concluded that NO might mediate the elicitor-induced puerarin biosynthesis through SA- and JA-dependent signal

  13. Network-based analysis of the sphingolipid metabolism in hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Mogens; Linneberg, Allan; Jeppesen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    revealed that epistasis does not necessarily reflects the topology of the metabolic pathways i.e., the flow of metabolites. Rather, the enzymes and proteins are integrated in complex cellular substructures where communication flows between the components of the networks, which may be composite in structure......-step procedure is presented in which physiological heterogeneity is disentangled and genetic effects are analyzed by variance decomposition of genetic interactions and by an information theoretical approach including 162 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 84 genes in the sphingolipid metabolism and related...... networks in blood pressure regulation. As expected, almost no genetic main effects were detected. In contrast, two-gene interactions established the entire sphingolipid metabolic and related genetic network to be highly involved in the regulation of blood pressure. The pattern of interaction clearly...

  14. Triomics Analysis of Imatinib-Treated Myeloma Cells Connects Kinase Inhibition to RNA Processing and Decreased Lipid Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkopf, Susanne B; Yuan, Min; Helenius, Katja P; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Asara, John M

    2015-11-03

    The combination of metabolomics, lipidomics, and phosphoproteomics that incorporates triple stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) protein labeling, as well as (13)C in vivo metabolite labeling, was demonstrated on BCR-ABL-positive H929 multiple myeloma cells. From 11 880 phosphorylation sites, we confirm that H929 cells are primarily signaling through the BCR-ABL-ERK pathway, and we show that imatinib treatment not only downregulates phosphosites in this pathway but also upregulates phosphosites on proteins involved in RNA expression. Metabolomics analyses reveal that BCR-ABL-ERK signaling in H929 cells drives the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and RNA biosynthesis, where pathway inhibition via imatinib results in marked PPP impairment and an accumulation of RNA nucleotides and negative regulation of mRNA. Lipidomics data also show an overall reduction in lipid biosynthesis and fatty acid incorporation with a significant decrease in lysophospholipids. RNA immunoprecipitation studies confirm that RNA degradation is inhibited with short imatinib treatment and transcription is inhibited upon long imatinib treatment, validating the triomics results. These data show the utility of combining mass spectrometry-based "-omics" technologies and reveals that kinase inhibitors may not only downregulate phosphorylation of their targets but also induce metabolic events via increased phosphorylation of other cellular components.

  15. Biosynthesis of ascites sialoglycoprotein-1, the major O-linked glycoprotein of 13762 rat mammary adenocarcinoma ascites cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielman, J.

    1987-01-01

    The present studies were undertaken to determine the timing of the major events in biosynthesis, and to characterize the contributions of chain initiation and elongation in maturation of the glycoprotein. Initiation of the earliest O-linked chains was detected by analysis of conversion of {sup 3}H-thr to {sup 3}H 2-aminobutyrate following mild alkaline borohydride elimination of O-linked sugars from peanut lectin-precipitated ASGP-1. Initiation was detected within 5 min of translation; amino sugar analysis of GlcNH{sub 2}-labeled, trypsinized cells also showed that GalNAc was added as late as 5 min prior to arrival of ASGP-1 at the cell surface. Thus initiation occurs throughout biosynthesis. Maturation of the glycoprotein from a lightly-glycosylated immature form to the heavily-glycosylated mature from involved both continued initiation of new chains and chain elongation, and occurred with a half-time of about 30 min. Analysis of labeled ASGP-1 released from the cell surface by trypsinization showed that although some newly-synthesized ASGP-1 reached the cell surface within 70-80 min of protein synthesis, the half-time for appearance of mature glycoprotein was in excess of 4 hr, indicating that most molecules reside in an intracellular compartment(s) for a considerable time.

  16. RNA-binding proteins regulate cell respiration and coenzyme Q biosynthesis by post-transcriptional regulation of COQ7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascajo, María V; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Noh, Ji Heon; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J M; Willers, Imke M; Brea, Gloria; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Valenzuela-Villatoro, Marina; Cuezva, José M; Gorospe, Myriam; Siendones, Emilio; Navas, Plácido

    2016-07-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a key component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain carrying electrons from complexes I and II to complex III and it is an intrinsic component of the respirasome. CoQ concentration is highly regulated in cells in order to adapt the metabolism of the cell to challenges of nutrient availability and stress stimuli. At least 10 proteins have been shown to be required for CoQ biosynthesis in a multi-peptide complex and COQ7 is a central regulatory factor of this pathway. We found that the first 765 bp of the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of COQ7 mRNA contains cis-acting elements of interaction with RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) HuR and hnRNP C1/C2. Binding of hnRNP C1/C2 to COQ7 mRNA was found to require the presence of HuR, and hnRNP C1/C2 silencing appeared to stabilize COQ7 mRNA modestly. By contrast, lowering HuR levels by silencing or depriving cells of serum destabilized and reduced the half-life of COQ7 mRNA, thereby reducing COQ7 protein and CoQ biosynthesis rate. Accordingly, HuR knockdown decreased oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial production of ATP, and increased lactate levels. Taken together, our results indicate that a reduction in COQ7 mRNA levels by HuR depletion causes mitochondrial dysfunction and a switch toward an enhanced aerobic glycolysis, the characteristic phenotype exhibited by primary deficiency of CoQ10. Thus HuR contributes to efficient oxidative phosphorylation by regulating of CoQ10 biosynthesis.

  17. Critical importance of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway for Trypanosoma cruzi growth in the mammalian host cell cytoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki, E-mail: muneaki@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Morales, Jorge; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Inoue, Syou [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Inoue, Masayuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kita, Kiyoshi [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Harada, Shigeharu [Department of Applied Biology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Tanaka, Akiko [Systems and Structural Biology Center, RIKEN, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Aoki, Takashi [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Nara, Takeshi, E-mail: tnara@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established Trypanosoma cruzi lacking the gene for carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of the cpsII gene significantly reduced the growth of epimastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In particular, the CPSII-null mutant severely retarded intracellular growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The de novo pyrimidine pathway is critical for the parasite growth in the host cell. -- Abstract: The intracellular parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. In general, pyrimidine nucleotides are supplied by both de novo biosynthesis and salvage pathways. While epimastigotes-an insect form-possess both activities, amastigotes-an intracellular replicating form of T. cruzi-are unable to mediate the uptake of pyrimidine. However, the requirement of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis for parasite growth and survival has not yet been elucidated. Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo biosynthetic pathway, and increased CPSII activity is associated with the rapid proliferation of tumor cells. In the present study, we showed that disruption of the T. cruzicpsII gene significantly reduced parasite growth. In particular, the growth of amastigotes lacking the cpsII gene was severely suppressed. Thus, the de novo pyrimidine pathway is important for proliferation of T. cruzi in the host cell cytoplasm and represents a promising target for chemotherapy against Chagas disease.

  18. Disruption of sphingolipid metabolism augments ceramide-induced autophagy in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland-Smith, Megan; Ermini, Leonardo; Chauvin, Sarah; Craig-Barnes, Hayley; Tagliaferro, Andrea; Todros, Tullia; Post, Martin; Caniggia, Isabella

    2015-04-01

    Bioactive sphingolipids including ceramides are involved in a variety of pathophysiological processes by regulating cell death and survival. The objective of the current study was to examine ceramide metabolism in preeclampsia, a serious disorder of pregnancy characterized by oxidative stress, and increased trophoblast cell death and autophagy. Maternal circulating and placental ceramide levels quantified by tandem mass spectrometry were elevated in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. Placental ceramides were elevated due to greater de novo synthesis via high serine palmitoyltransferase activity and reduced lysosomal breakdown via diminished ASAH1 expression caused by TGFB3-induced E2F4 transcriptional repression. SMPD1 activity was reduced; hence, sphingomyelin degradation by SMPD1 did not contribute to elevated ceramide levels in preeclampsia. Oxidative stress triggered similar changes in ceramide levels and acid hydrolase expression in villous explants and trophoblast cells. MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry localized the ceramide increases to the trophophoblast layers and syncytial knots of placentae from pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. ASAH1 inhibition or ceramide treatment induced autophagy in human trophoblast cells via a shift of the BOK-MCL1 rheostat toward prodeath BOK. Pharmacological inhibition of ASAH1 activity in pregnant mice resulted in increased placental ceramide content, abnormal placentation, reduced fetal growth, and increased autophagy via a similar shift in the BOK-MCL1 system. Our results reveal that oxidative stress-induced reduction of lysosomal hydrolase activities in combination with elevated de novo synthesis leads to ceramide overload, resulting in increased trophoblast cell autophagy, and typifies preeclampsia as a sphingolipid storage disorder.

  19. A Cell-Based Approach for the Biosynthesis/Screening of Cyclic Peptide Libraries against Bacterial Toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Kimura, R; Woo, Y; Cantor, J; Steenblock, E

    2007-10-24

    Available methods for developing and screening small drug-like molecules able to knockout toxins or pathogenic microorganisms have some limitations. In order to be useful, these new methods must provide high-throughput analysis and identify specific binders in a short period of time. To meet this need, we are developing an approach that uses living cells to generate libraries of small biomolecules, which are then screened inside the cell for activity. Our group is using this new, combined approach to find highly specific ligands capable of disabling anthrax Lethal Factor (LF) as proof of principle. Key to our approach is the development of a method for the biosynthesis of libraries of cyclic peptides, and an efficient screening process that can be carried out inside the cell.

  20. Segregation of sphingolipids and sterols during formation of secretory vesicles at the trans-Golgi network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Robin W; Ejsing, Christer S.; Surma, Michal A

    2009-01-01

    The trans-Golgi network (TGN) is the major sorting station in the secretory pathway of all eukaryotic cells. How the TGN sorts proteins and lipids to generate the enrichment of sphingolipids and sterols at the plasma membrane is poorly understood. To address this fundamental question in membrane...... trafficking, we devised an immunoisolation procedure for specific recovery of post-Golgi secretory vesicles transporting a transmembrane raft protein from the TGN to the cell surface in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a novel quantitative shotgun lipidomics approach, we could demonstrate that TGN...... than the late Golgi membrane, as measured by C-Laurdan spectrophotometry, strongly suggests that lipid rafts play a role in the TGN-sorting machinery....

  1. Nitric oxide mediates the fungal elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of Taxus chinensis suspension cells through the reactive oxygen species-dependent and-independent signal pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Maojun; DONG Jufang

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are two important signal molecules that play key roles in plant defense responses. Nitric oxide generation and oxidative burst and accumulation of reactive oxygen species are the early reactions of Taxus chinensis suspension cells to fungal elicitor prepared from the cell walls of Penicillium citrinum. In order to investigate the relationship and/or interactions of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in the elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of T. chinensis suspension cells, we treated the cells with nitric oxide specific scavenger 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetra- methylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPITO), nitric oxide synthase inhibitor S,S(-1,3-phenylene-bis(1,2-eth- anediyl)-bis-isothiourea (PBITU), membrane NAD(P) H oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI), superoxide dismutases (SOD) and catalase. The results show that pretreatment of T. chinensis cells with cPITO and DPI inhibited not only the elicitor-induced nitric oxide biosynthesis and oxidative burst, but also the elicitor-induced Taxol production, suggesting that both nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are involved in elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis. Furthermore, pretreatment of the cells with cPITO and PBITU suppressed the elicitor-induced oxidative burst, indicating that the oxidative burst might be dependent on NO. Application of nitric oxide via its donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) triggered Taxol biosynthesis of T. chinensis cells. The nitric oxide-induced Taxol production was suppressed by DPI, showing that the oxidative burst is involved in NO-triggered Taxol biosynthesis. However, nitric oxide and the fungal elicitor induced Taxol biosynthesis even though the accumulation of reactive oxygen species wass completely abolished in T. chinensis cells. Our data show that nitric oxide may mediate the elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of T. chinensis suspension cells through both reactive oxygen species-dependent and -independent signal

  2. Dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis is induced by non-injurious mechanical stretch in a model of alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazi, Despoina; Kitsiouli, Eirini; Karkabounas, Athanasios; Trangas, Theoni; Nakos, George; Lekka, Marilena E

    2013-08-01

    Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, (DP-PtdCho), the major phospholipid component of lung surfactant is biosynthesized via a de novo pathway, the last step of which is catalyzed by CDP-choline:cholinephosphotransferase (CPT) and two remodeling steps: a deacylation and a reacylation one, catalyzed by an acidic, Ca²⁺-independent phospholipase A₂ (aiPLA₂) and a lyso-phosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT), respectively. The aim of our study was to investigate whether a low magnitude, non-injurious static mode of mechanical stretch can induce phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) biosynthesis and its remodeling to DP-PtdCho in the A549 cell-line, a model of alveolar type II cells. The deformation of A549 cells did not cause any release of lactate dehydrogenase, or phospholipids into the cell culture supernatants. An increase in PtdCho levels was observed after 1 h of static stretching, especially among the DP-PtdCho molecular species, as indicated by targeted lipidomics approach and site-directed fatty acyl-chain analysis. Moreover, although sphingomyelin (CerPCho) levels were unaffected, the DP-PtdCho/CerPCho ratio increased. Induction was observed in CPT, LPCAT and aiPLA₂ enzymatic activities and gene expression. Finally, incubation of the cells with MJ33 suppressed aiPLA₂ activity and DP-PtdCho production. Our data suggest that mild static mechanical stretch can promote the biosynthesis of PtdCho and its remodeling to DP-PtdCho in lung epithelial cells. Thus, low magnitude stretch could contribute to protective mechanisms rather than to injurious ones.

  3. Exploring the use of cDNA-AFLP with leaf protoplasts as a tool to study primary cell wall biosynthesis in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, R.J.F.J.; Bergervoet-van Deelen, J.E.M.; Bachem, C.W.B.; Visser, R.G.F.; Vincken, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    An RNA fingerprinting study of potato leaf protoplasts was performed to explore its suitability for identifying candidate genes involved in primary cell wall biosynthesis. Microscopic analysis, using calcofluor white to stain cellulose, showed that the protoplasts generated a new cell wall in the fi

  4. Jasmonate and ethylene signalling and their interaction are integral parts of the elicitor signalling pathway leading to beta-thujaplicin biosynthesis in Cupressus lusitanica cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Fujita, Koki; Sakai, Kokki

    2004-05-01

    Roles of jasmonate and ethylene signalling and their interaction in yeast elicitor-induced biosynthesis of a phytoalexin, beta-thujaplicin, were investigated in Cupressus lusitanica cell cultures. Yeast elicitor, methyl jasmonate, and ethylene all induce the production of beta-thujaplicin. Elicitor also stimulates the biosynthesis of jasmonate and ethylene before the induction of beta-thujaplicin accumulation. The elicitor-induced beta-thujaplicin accumulation can be partly blocked by inhibitors of jasmonate and ethylene biosynthesis or signal transduction. These results indicate that the jasmonate and ethylene signalling pathways are integral parts of the elicitor signal transduction leading to beta-thujaplicin accumulation. Methyl jasmonate treatment can induce ethylene production, whereas ethylene does not induce jasmonate biosynthesis; methyl jasmonate-induced beta-thujaplicin accumulation can be partly blocked by inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis and signalling, while blocking jasmonate biosynthesis inhibits almost all ethylene-induced beta-thujaplicin accumulation. These results indicate that the ethylene and jasmonate pathways interact in mediating beta-thujaplicin production, with the jasmonate pathway working as a main control and the ethylene pathway as a fine modulator for beta-thujaplicin accumulation. Both the ethylene and jasmonate signalling pathways can be regulated upstream by Ca(2+). Ca(2+) influx negatively regulates ethylene production, and differentially regulates elicitor- or methyl jasmonate-stimulated ethylene production.

  5. Autophagy in the light of sphingolipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvald, Eva Bang; Olsen, Anne Sofie Braun; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2015-01-01

    , has over the past decade been recognized as an essential part of metabolism. Autophagy not only rids the cell of excessive or damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and invading microorganisms, it also provides nutrients to maintain crucial cellular functions. Besides serving as essential structural......Maintenance of cellular homeostasis requires tight and coordinated control of numerous metabolic pathways, which are governed by interconnected networks of signaling pathways and energy-sensing regulators. Autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway by which the cell self-digests its own components...

  6. CCR1, an enzyme required for lignin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, mediates cell proliferation exit for leaf development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Jingshi; Luo, Dexian; Xu, Deyang;

    2015-01-01

    exit in leaves. CCR1 is expressed basipetally in the leaf, and ccr1 mutants exhibited multiple abnormalities, including increased cell proliferation. The ccr1 phenotypes are not due to the reduced lignin content, but instead are due to the dramatically increased level of ferulic acid (FeA......), an intermediate in lignin biosynthesis. FeA is known to have antioxidant activity, and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in ccr1 were markedly reduced. We also characterized another double mutant in CAFFEIC ACID O-METHYLTRANSFERASE (comt) and CAFFEOYL CoA 3-O-METHYLTRANSFERASE (ccoaomt), in which the FeA...... level was dramatically reduced. Cell proliferation in comt ccoaomt leaves was decreased, accompanied by elevated ROS levels, and the mutant phenotypes were partially rescued by treatment with FeA or another antioxidant (N-acetyl-L-cysteine). Taken together, our results suggest that CCR1, FeA and ROS...

  7. Characteristics of the rat cardiac sphingolipid pool in two mitochondrial subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monette, Jeffrey S; Gómez, Luis A; Moreau, Régis F; Bemer, Brett A; Taylor, Alan W; Hagen, Tory M

    2010-07-23

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary mitochondria (IFM) and subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (approximately 10,000 pmol/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (approximately 70 pmol/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16- to 24-carbon units in their acyl side chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmol/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other.

  8. Multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumors proteoma: protein biosynthesis and immune system as potential therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; Braga, Walter Moisés Tobias; de Lourdes Chauffaille, Maria; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Colleoni, Gisele Wally Braga

    2015-01-01

    Despite great advance in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment since 2000s, it is still an incurable disease and novel therapies are welcome. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore MM plasma cells' (MM-PC) proteome, in comparison with their normal counterparts (derived from palatine tonsils of normal donors, ND-PC), in order to find potential therapeutic targets expressed on the surface of these cells. We also aimed to evaluate the proteome of MM cell lines with different genetic alterations, to confirm findings obtained with primary tumor cells. Bone marrow (BM) samples from eight new cases of MM and palatine tonsils from seven unmatched controls were submitted to PC separation and, in addition to two MM cell lines (U266, RPMI-8226), were submitted to protein extraction for mass spectrometry analyses. A total of 81 proteins were differentially expressed between MM-PC and ND-PC - 72 upregulated and nine downregulated; U266 vs. RPMI 8226 cell lines presented 61 differentially expressed proteins - 51 upregulated and 10 downregulated. On primary tumors, bioinformatics analyses highlighted upregulation of protein biosynthesis machinery, as well as downregulation of immune response components, such as MHC class I and II, and complement receptors. We also provided comprehensive information about U266 and RPMI-8226 cell lines' proteome and could confirm some patients' findings. PMID:26807199

  9. Influenza Viral Manipulation of Sphingolipid Metabolism and Signaling to Modulate Host Defense System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuvanthi Vijayan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses attempt to create a distinctive cellular environment to favor viral replication and spread. Recent studies uncovered new functions of the sphingolipid signaling/metabolism during pathogenic virus infections. While sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and ceramide were reported to influence the entry step of several viruses, sphingolipid-metabolizing enzymes could directly alter viral replication processes. Influenza virus was shown to increase the level of sphingosine kinase (SK 1 to promote virus propagation. The mechanism involves regulation of intracellular signaling pathways, leading to the amplification of influenza viral RNA synthesis and nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex. However, bovine viral diarrhea virus inhibits SK1 to enhance the efficacy of virus replication, demonstrating the presence of virus-specific strategies for modulation of the sphingolipid system. Therefore, investigating the sphingolipid metabolism and signaling in the context of virus replication could help us design innovative therapeutic approaches to improve human health.

  10. Sphingolipids regulate telomere clustering by affecting the transcription of genes involved in telomere homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Atsuko; Muneoka, Tetsuya; Murakami, Suguru; Hirota, Ayaka; Yabuki, Yukari; Karashima, Takefumi; Nakazono, Kota; Tsuruno, Masahiro; Pichler, Harald; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Kodama, Yukiko; Shimamoto, Toshi; Mizuta, Keiko; Funato, Kouichi

    2015-07-15

    In eukaryotic organisms, including mammals, nematodes and yeasts, the ends of chromosomes, telomeres are clustered at the nuclear periphery. Telomere clustering is assumed to be functionally important because proper organization of chromosomes is necessary for proper genome function and stability. However, the mechanisms and physiological roles of telomere clustering remain poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate a role for sphingolipids in telomere clustering in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because abnormal sphingolipid metabolism causes downregulation of expression levels of genes involved in telomere organization, sphingolipids appear to control telomere clustering at the transcriptional level. In addition, the data presented here provide evidence that telomere clustering is required to protect chromosome ends from DNA-damage checkpoint signaling. As sphingolipids are found in all eukaryotes, we speculate that sphingolipid-based regulation of telomere clustering and the protective role of telomere clusters in maintaining genome stability might be conserved in eukaryotes.

  11. Multiple signalling pathways mediate fungal elicitor-induced beta-thujaplicin biosynthesis in Cupressus lusitanica cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Sakai, Kokki

    2003-02-01

    The biosynthesis of a phytoalexin, beta-thujaplicin, in Cupressus lusitanica cell cultures can be stimulated by a yeast elicitor, H(2)O(2), or methyl jasmonate. Lipoxygenase activity was also stimulated by these treatments, suggesting that the oxidative burst and jasmonate pathway may mediate the elicitor-induced accumulation of beta-thujaplicin. The elicitor signalling pathway involved in beta-thujaplicin induction was further investigated using pharmacological and biochemical approaches. Treatment of the cells with calcium ionophore A23187 alone stimulated the production of beta-thujaplicin. A23187 also enhanced the elicitor-induced production of beta-thujaplicin. EGTA, LaCl(3), and verapamil pretreatments partially blocked A23187- or yeast elicitor-induced accumulation of beta-thujaplicin. These results suggest that Ca(2+) influx is required for elicitor-induced production of beta-thujaplicin. Treatment of cell cultures with mastoparan, melittin or cholera toxin alone or in combination with the elicitor stimulated the production of beta-thujaplicin or enhanced the elicitor-induced production of beta-thujaplicin. The G-protein inhibitor suramin inhibited the elicitor-induced production of beta-thujaplicin, suggesting that receptor-coupled G-proteins are likely to be involved in the elicitor-induced biosynthesis of beta-thujaplicin. Indeed, both GTP-binding activity and GTPase activity of the plasma membrane were stimulated by elicitor, and suramin and cholera toxin affected G-protein activities. In addition, all inhibitors of G-proteins and Ca(2+) flux suppressed elicitor-induced increases in lipoxygenase activity whereas activators of G-proteins and the Ca(2+) signalling pathway increased lipoxygenase activity. These observations suggest that Ca(2+) and G-proteins may mediate elicitor signals to the jasmonate pathway, and the jasmonate signalling pathway may then lead to the production of beta-thujaplicin.

  12. The Tomato MIXTA-Like Transcription Factor Coordinates Fruit Epidermis Conical Cell Development and Cuticular Lipid Biosynthesis and Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashbrooke, Justin; Adato, Avital; Lotan, Orfa; Alkan, Noam; Tsimbalist, Tatiana; Rechav, Katya; Fernandez-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Widemann, Emilie; Grausem, Bernard; Pinot, Franck; Granell, Antonio; Costa, Fabrizio; Aharoni, Asaph

    2015-12-01

    The epidermis of aerial plant organs is the primary source of building blocks forming the outer surface cuticular layer. To examine the relationship between epidermal cell development and cuticle assembly in the context of fruit surface, we investigated the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MIXTA-like gene. MIXTA/MIXTA-like proteins, initially described in snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) petals, are known regulators of epidermal cell differentiation. Fruit of transgenically silenced SlMIXTA-like tomato plants displayed defects in patterning of conical epidermal cells. They also showed altered postharvest water loss and resistance to pathogens. Transcriptome and cuticular lipids profiling coupled with comprehensive microscopy revealed significant modifications to cuticle assembly and suggested SlMIXTA-like to regulate cutin biosynthesis. Candidate genes likely acting downstream of SlMIXTA-like included cytochrome P450s (CYPs) of the CYP77A and CYP86A subfamilies, LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE2, GLYCEROL-3-PHOSPHATE SN-2-ACYLTRANSFERASE4, and the ATP-BINDING CASSETTE11 cuticular lipids transporter. As part of a larger regulatory network of epidermal cell patterning and L1-layer identity, we found that SlMIXTA-like acts downstream of SlSHINE3 and possibly cooperates with homeodomain Leu zipper IV transcription factors. Hence, SlMIXTA-like is a positive regulator of both cuticle and conical epidermal cell formation in tomato fruit, acting as a mediator of the tight association between fruit cutin polymer formation, cuticle assembly, and epidermal cell patterning.

  13. Sphingolipid symmetry governs membrane lipid raft structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Lipid domain formation in membranes underlies the concept of rafts but their structure is controversial because the key role of cholesterol has been challenged. The configuration of glycosphingolipid receptors for agonists, bacterial toxins and enveloped viruses in plasma membrane rafts appears to be an important factor governing ligand binding and infectivity but the details are as yet unresolved. I have used X-ray diffraction methods to examine how cholesterol affects the distribution of glycosphingolipid in aqueous dispersions of an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and egg-sphingomyelin containing different proportions of glucosylceramide from human extracts. Three coexisting liquid-ordered bilayer structures are observed at 37°C in mixtures containing up to 20mol% glycosphingolipid. All the cholesterol was sequestered in one bilayer with the minimum amount of sphingomyelin (33mol%) to prevent formation of cholesterol crystals. The other two bilayers consisted of sphingomyelin and glucosylceramide. Asymmetric molecular species of glucosylceramide with N-acyl chains longer than 20 carbons form an equimolar complex with sphingomyelin in which the glycosidic residues are arranged in hexagonal array. Symmetric molecular species mix with sphingomyelin in proportions less than equimolar to form quasicrystalline bilayers. When the glycosphingolipid exceeds equimolar proportions with sphingomyelin cholesterol is incorporated into the structure and formation of a gel phase of glucosylceramide is prevented. The demonstration of particular structural features of ceramide molecular species combined with the diversity of sugar residues of glycosphingolipid classes paves the way for a rational approach to understanding the functional specificity of lipid rafts and how they are coupled across cell membranes.

  14. Sphingolipids: A Potential Molecular Approach to Treat Allergic Inflammation

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    Wai Y. Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic inflammation is an immune response to foreign antigens, which begins within minutes of exposure to the allergen followed by a late phase leading to chronic inflammation. Prolonged allergic inflammation manifests in diseases such as urticaria and rhino-conjunctivitis, as well as chronic asthma and life-threatening anaphylaxis. The prevalence of allergic diseases is profound with 25% of the worldwide population affected and a rising trend across all ages, gender, and racial groups. The identification and avoidance of allergens can manage this disease, but this is not always possible with triggers being common foods, prevalent air-borne particles and only extremely low levels of allergen exposure required for sensitization. Patients who are sensitive to multiple allergens require prophylactic and symptomatic treatments. Current treatments are often suboptimal and associated with adverse effects, such as the interruption of cognition, sleep cycles, and endocrine homeostasis, all of which affect quality of life and are a financial burden to society. Clearly, a better therapeutic approach for allergic diseases is required. Herein, we review the current knowledge of allergic inflammation and discuss the role of sphingolipids as potential targets to regulate inflammatory development in vivo and in humans. We also discuss the benefits and risks of using sphingolipid inhibitors.

  15. Regulation of microRNA biosynthesis and expression in 2102Ep embryonal carcinoma stem cells is mirrored in ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients

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    Gallagher Michael F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumours with high proportions of differentiated cells are considered to be of a lower grade to those containing high proportions of undifferentiated cells. This property may be linked to the differentiation properties of stem cell-like populations within malignancies. We aim to identify molecular mechanism associated with the generation of tumours with differing grades from malignant stem cell populations with different differentiation potentials. In this study we assessed microRNA (miRNA regulation in two populations of malignant Embryonal Carcinoma (EC stem cell, which differentiate (NTera2 or remain undifferentiated (2102Ep during tumourigenesis, and compared this to miRNA regulation in ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC patient samples. Methods miRNA expression was assessed in NTera2 and 2102Ep cells in the undifferentiated and differentiated states and compared to that of OSC samples using miRNA qPCR. Results Our analysis reveals a substantial overlap between miRNA regulation in 2102Ep cells and OSC samples in terms of miRNA biosynthesis and expression of mature miRNAs, particularly those of the miR-17/92 family and clustering to chromosomes 14 and 19. In the undifferentiated state 2102Ep cells expressed mature miRNAs at up to 15,000 fold increased levels despite decreased expression of miRNA biosynthesis genes Drosha and Dicer. 2102Ep cells avoid differentiation, which we show is associated with consistent levels of expression of miRNA biosynthesis genes and mature miRNAs while expression of miRNAs clustering to chromosomes 14 and 19 is deemphasised. OSC patient samples displayed decreased expression of miRNA biosynthesis genes, decreased expression of mature miRNAs and prominent clustering to chromosome 14 but not 19. This indicates that miRNA biosynthesis and levels of miRNA expression, particularly from chromosome 14, are tightly regulated both in progenitor cells and in tumour samples. Conclusion miRNA biosynthesis and

  16. Purification and characterization of the acyltransferase involved in biosynthesis of the major mycobacterial cell envelope glycolipid--monoacylated phosphatidylinositol dimannoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlíková, Zuzana; Baráth, Peter; Jackson, Mary; Korduláková, Jana; Mikušová, Katarína

    2014-08-01

    Phosphatidylinositol mannosides are essential structural components of the mycobacterial cell envelope. They are implicated in host-pathogen interactions during infection and serve as a basis for biosynthesis of other unique molecules with immunomodulatory properties - mycobacterial lipopolysaccharides lipoarabinomannan and lipomannan. Acyltransferase Rv2611 is involved in one of the initial steps in the assembly of these molecules in Mycobacterium tuberculosis - the attachment of an acyl group to position-6 of the 2-linked mannosyl residue of the phosphatidylinositol mannoside anchor. Although the function of this enzyme was annotated 10 years ago, it has never been completely biochemically characterized due to lack of the pure protein. We have successfully overexpressed and purified MSMEG_2934, the ortholog of Rv2611c from the non-pathogenic model organism Mycobacteriumsmegmatis mc(2)155 using mycobacterial pJAM2 expression system, which allowed confirmation of its in vitro acyltransferase activity, and establishment of its substrate specificity.

  17. Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Taxus yunnanensis Callus and Their Antibacterial Activity and Cytotoxicity in Human Cancer Cells

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    Qian Hua Xia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant constituents could act as chelating/reducing or capping agents for synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs. The green synthesis of AgNPs has been considered as an environmental friendly and cost-effective alternative to other fabrication methods. The present work described the biosynthesis of AgNPs using callus extracts from Taxus yunnanensis and evaluated their antibacterial activities in vitro and potential cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Callus extracts were able to reduce silver nitrate at 1 mM in 10 min. Transmission electron microscope (TEM indicated the synthesized AgNPs were spherical with the size range from 6.4 to 27.2 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD confirmed the AgNPs were in the form of nanocrystals. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR suggested phytochemicals in callus extracts were possible reducing and capping agents. The AgNPs exhibited effective inhibitory activity against all tested human pathogen bacteria and the inhibition against Gram-positive bacteria was stronger than that of Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, they exhibited stronger cytotoxic activity against human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells and induced noticeable apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells, but showed lower cytotoxic against normal human liver cells (HL-7702. Our results suggested that biosynthesized AgNPs could be an alternative measure in the field of antibacterial and anticancer therapeutics.

  18. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase on steroid hormone biosynthesis in adrenal NCI-H295R cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hirsch

    Full Text Available Regulation of human androgen biosynthesis is poorly understood. However, detailed knowledge is needed to eventually solve disorders with androgen dysbalance. We showed that starvation growth conditions shift steroidogenesis of human adrenal NCI-H295R cells towards androgen production attributable to decreased HSD3B2 expression and activity and increased CYP17A1 phosphorylation and 17,20-lyase activity. Generally, starvation induces stress and energy deprivation that need to be counteracted to maintain proper cell functions. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is a master energy sensor that regulates cellular energy balance. AMPK regulates steroidogenesis in the gonad. Therefore, we investigated whether AMPK is also a regulator of adrenal steroidogenesis. We hypothesized that starvation uses AMPK signaling to enhance androgen production in NCI-H295R cells. We found that AMPK subunits are expressed in NCI-H295 cells, normal adrenal tissue and human as well as pig ovary cells. Starvation growth conditions decreased phosphorylation, but not activity of AMPK in NCI-H295 cells. In contrast, the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR increased AMPKα phosphorylation and increased CYP17A1-17,20 lyase activity. Compound C (an AMPK inhibitor, directly inhibited CYP17A1 activities and can therefore not be used for AMPK signaling studies in steroidogenesis. HSD3B2 activity was neither altered by AICAR nor compound C. Starvation did not affect mitochondrial respiratory chain function in NCI-H295R cells suggesting that there is no indirect energy effect on AMPK through this avenue. In summary, starvation-mediated increase of androgen production in NCI-H295 cells does not seem to be mediated by AMPK signaling. But AMPK activation can enhance androgen production through a specific increase in CYP17A1-17,20 lyase activity.

  19. Biosynthesis of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) in a melanoma cell line and its metabolization by peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Melissa M; Coimbra, Janine B; Clara, Renan O; Dörr, Felipe A; Moreno, Ana Carolina R; Chagas, Jair R; Tufik, Sérgio; Pinto, Ernani; Catalani, Luiz H; Campa, Ana

    2014-04-01

    Tryptophan (TRP) is essential for many physiological processes, and its metabolism changes in some diseases such as infection and cancer. The most studied aspects of TRP metabolism are the kynurenine and serotonin pathways. A minor metabolic route, tryptamine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) biosynthesis, has received far less attention, probably because of the very low amounts of these compounds detected only in some tissues, which has led them to be collectively considered as trace amines. In a previous study, we showed a metabolic interrelationship for TRP in melanoma cell lines. Here, we identified DMT and N,N-dimethyl-N-formyl-kynuramine (DMFK) in the supernatant of cultured SK-Mel-147 cells. Furthermore, when we added DMT to the cell culture, we found hydroxy-DMT (OH-DMT) and indole acetic acid (IAA) in the cell supernatant at 24 h. We found that SK-Mel-147 cells expressed mRNA for myeloperoxidase (MPO) and also had peroxidase activity. We further found that DMT oxidation was catalyzed by peroxidases. DMT oxidation by horseradish peroxidase, H2O2 and MPO from PMA-activated neutrophils produced DMFK, N,N-dimethyl-kynuramine (DMK) and OH-DMT. Oxidation of DMT by peroxidases apparently uses the common peroxidase cycle involving the native enzyme, compound I and compound II. In conclusion, this study describes a possible alternative metabolic pathway for DMT involving peroxidases that has not previously been described in humans and identifies DMT and metabolites in a melanoma cell line. The extension of these findings to other cell types and the biological effects of DMT and its metabolites on cell proliferation and function are key questions for future studies.

  20. Quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia by using UHPLC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jing-Rong; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-02-12

    In the present study, 101 sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its five mycelia were quantitatively profiled by using a fully validated UHPLC-MS method. The results revealed that a general rank order for the abundance of different classes of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia is sphingoid bases/ceramides > phosphosphingolipids > glycosphingolipids. However, remarkable sphingolipid differences between wild Cordyceps and its mycelia were observed. One is that sphingoid base is the dominant sphingolipid in wild Cordyceps, whereas ceramide is the major sphingolipid in mycelia. Another difference is that the abundance of sphingomyelins in wild Cordyceps is almost 10-folds higher than those in most mycelia. The third one is that mycelia contain more inositol phosphorylceramides and glycosphingolipids than wild Cordyceps. Multivariate analysis was further employed to visualize the difference among wild Cordyceps and different mycelia, leading to the identification of respective sphingolipids as potential chemical markers for the differentiation of wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia. This study represents the first report on the quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia, which provided comprehensive chemical evidence for the quality control and rational utilization of wild Cordyceps and its mycelia.

  1. Effect of nomegestrol acetate on estrogen biosynthesis and transformation in MCF-7 and T47-D breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields-Botella, J; Chetrite, G; Meschi, S; Pasqualini, J R

    2005-01-01

    Although ovaries serve as the primary source of estrogen for pre-menopausal women, after menopause estrogen biosynthesis from circulating precursors occurs in peripheral tissues by the action of several enzymes, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (17beta-HSD1), aromatase and estrogen sulfatase. In the breast, both normal and tumoral tissues have been shown to be capable of synthesizing estrogens, and this local estrogen production can be implicated in the development of breast tumors. In these tissues, estradiol (E(2)) can be synthesized by three pathways: (1) estrone sulfatase transforms estrogen sulfates into bioactive estrogens, (2) 17beta-HSD1 converts estrone (E(1)) into E(2), (3) aromatase which converts androgens into estrogens is also present and contributes to the in situ synthesis of active estrogens but to a far lesser extent than estrone sulfatase. Quantitative assessment of E(2) formation in human breast tumors indicates that metabolism of estrone sulfate (E(1)S) via the sulfatase pathway produces 100-500 times more E(2) than androgen aromatization. Breast tissue also possesses the estrogen sulfotransferase involved in the conversion of estrogens into their sulfates that are biologically inactive. In the present review, we summarized the action of the 19-nor-progestin nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC) on the sulfatase, 17beta-HSD1 and sulfotransferase activities in the hormone-dependent MCF-7 and T47-D human breast cancer cell lines. Using physiological doses of substrates NOMAC blocks very significantly the conversion of E(1)S to E(2). It inhibits the transformation of E(1) to E(2). NOMAC has a stimulatory effect on sulfotransferase activity in both cell lines, with a strong stimulating effect at low doses but only a weak effect at high concentrations. The effects on the three enzymes are always stronger in the progesterone-receptor rich T47-D cell line as compared with the MCF-7 cell line. Besides, no effect is found for NOMAC on the transformation of

  2. Propiconazole-enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras farnesylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Lynea A.; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen, E-mail: nesnow.stephen@epa.gov

    2012-04-15

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic cholesterol metabolites and bile acids, and transcriptomic studies revealed that genes within the cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol metabolism and bile acid biosyntheses pathways were up-regulated. Hepatic cell proliferation was also increased by propiconazole. AML12 immortalized hepatocytes were used to study propiconazole's effects on cell proliferation focusing on the dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and resulting effects on Ras farnesylation and Erk1/2 activation as a primary pathway. Mevalonate, a key intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, increases cell proliferation in several cancer cell lines and tumors in vivo and serves as the precursor for isoprenoids (e.g. farnesyl pyrophosphate) which are crucial in the farnesylation of the Ras protein by farnesyl transferase. Farnesylation targets Ras to the cell membrane where it is involved in signal transduction, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In our studies, mevalonic acid lactone (MVAL), a source of mevalonic acid, increased cell proliferation in AML12 cells which was reduced by farnesyl transferase inhibitors (L-744,832 or manumycin) or simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, indicating that this cell system responded to alterations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Cell proliferation in AML12 cells was increased by propiconazole which was reversed by co-incubation with L-744,832 or simvastatin. Increasing concentrations of exogenous cholesterol muted the proliferative effects of propiconazole and the inhibitory effects of L-733,832, results ascribed to reduced stimulation of the endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Western blot analysis of subcellular

  3. Tackling the biophysical properties of sphingolipids to decipher their biological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Ana C; Ventura, Ana E; Varela, Ana R P; Silva, Liana C

    2015-06-01

    From the most simple sphingoid bases to their complex glycosylated derivatives, several sphingolipid species were shown to have a role in fundamental cellular events and/or disease. Increasing evidence places lipid-lipid interactions and membrane structural alterations as central mechanisms underlying the action of these lipids. Understanding how these molecules exert their biological roles by studying their impact in the physical properties and organization of membranes is currently one of the main challenges in sphingolipid research. Herein, we review the progress in the state-of-the-art on the biophysical properties of sphingolipid-containing membranes, focusing on sphingosine, ceramides, and glycosphingolipids.

  4. Altered (neo-) lacto series glycolipid biosynthesis impairs α2-6 sialylation on N-glycoproteins in ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shahidul; Anugraham, Merrina; Huang, Yen-Lin; Kohler, Reto S.; Hettich, Timm; Winkelbach, Katharina; Grether, Yasmin; López, Mónica Núñez; Khasbiullina, Nailia; Bovin, Nicolai V.; Schlotterbeck, Götz; Jacob, Francis

    2017-01-01

    The (neo-) lacto series glycosphingolipids (nsGSLs) comprise of glycan epitopes that are present as blood group antigens, act as primary receptors for human pathogens and are also increasingly associated with malignant diseases. Beta-1, 3-N-acetyl-glucosaminyl-transferase 5 (B3GNT5) is suggested as the key glycosyltransferase for the biosynthesis of nsGSLs. In this study, we investigated the impact of CRISPR-Cas9 -mediated gene disruption of B3GNT5 (∆B3GNT5) on the expression of glycosphingolipids and N-glycoproteins by utilizing immunostaining and glycomics-based PGC-UHPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS profiling. ∆B3GNT5 cells lost nsGSL expression coinciding with reduction of α2-6 sialylation on N-glycoproteins. In contrast, disruption of B4GALNT1, a glycosyltransferase for ganglio series GSLs did not affect α2-6 sialylation on N-glycoproteins. We further profiled all known α2-6 sialyltransferase-encoding genes and showed that the loss of α2-6 sialylation is due to silencing of ST6GAL1 expression in ∆B3GNT5 cells. These results demonstrate that nsGSLs are part of a complex network affecting N-glycosylation in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:28358117

  5. Pathways and subcellular compartmentation of NAD biosynthesis in human cells: from entry of extracellular precursors to mitochondrial NAD generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Ziegler, Mathias

    2011-06-17

    NAD is a vital redox carrier, and its degradation is a key element of important regulatory pathways. NAD-mediated functions are compartmentalized and have to be fueled by specific biosynthetic routes. However, little is known about the different pathways, their subcellular distribution, and regulation in human cells. In particular, the route(s) to generate mitochondrial NAD, the largest subcellular pool, is still unknown. To visualize organellar NAD changes in cells, we targeted poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity into the mitochondrial matrix. This activity synthesized immunodetectable poly(ADP-ribose) depending on mitochondrial NAD availability. Based on this novel detector system, detailed subcellular enzyme localizations, and pharmacological inhibitors, we identified extracellular NAD precursors, their cytosolic conversions, and the pathway of mitochondrial NAD generation. Our results demonstrate that, besides nicotinamide and nicotinic acid, only the corresponding nucleosides readily enter the cells. Nucleotides (e.g. NAD and NMN) undergo extracellular degradation resulting in the formation of permeable precursors. These precursors can all be converted to cytosolic and mitochondrial NAD. For mitochondrial NAD synthesis, precursors are converted to NMN in the cytosol. When taken up into the organelles, NMN (together with ATP) serves as substrate of NMNAT3 to form NAD. NMNAT3 was conclusively localized to the mitochondrial matrix and is the only known enzyme of NAD synthesis residing within these organelles. We thus present a comprehensive dissection of mammalian NAD biosynthesis, the groundwork to understand regulation of NAD-mediated processes, and the organismal homeostasis of this fundamental molecule.

  6. Identification of a novel arabinofuranosyltransferase (AftA) involved in cell wall arabinan biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderwick, Luke J; Seidel, Mathias; Sahm, Hermann; Besra, Gurdyal S; Eggeling, Lothar

    2006-06-09

    The cell wall mycolyl-arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan complex is essential in mycobacterial species, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and is the target of several anti-tubercular drugs. For instance, ethambutol targets arabinogalactan biosynthesis through inhibition of the arabinofuranosyltransferases Mt-EmbA and Mt-EmbB. Following a detailed bioinformatics analysis of genes surrounding the conserved emb locus, we present the identification and characterization of a novel arabinofuranosyltransferase AftA (Rv3792). The enzyme catalyzes the addition of the first key arabinofuranosyl residue from the sugar donor beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-1-monophosphoryldecaprenol to the galactan domain of the cell wall, thus "priming" the galactan for further elaboration by the arabinofuranosyltransferases. Because aftA is an essential gene in M. tuberculosis, we deleted its orthologue in Corynebacterium glutamicum to produce a slow growing but viable mutant. Analysis of its cell wall revealed the complete absence of arabinose resulting in a truncated cell wall structure possessing only a galactan core with a concomitant loss of cell wall-bound mycolates. Complementation of the mutant was fully restored to the wild type phenotype by Cg-aftA. In addition, by developing an in vitro assay using recombinant Escherichia coli expressing Mt-aftA and use of cell wall galactan as an acceptor, we demonstrated the transfer of arabinose from beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-1-monophosphoryldecaprenol to galactan, and unlike the Mt-Emb proteins, Mt-AftA was not inhibited by ethambutol. This newly discovered glycosyltransferase represents an attractive drug target for further exploitation by chemotherapeutic intervention.

  7. Network-based analysis of the sphingolipid metabolism in hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogens eFenger

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Common diseases like essential hypertension or diabetes mellitus are complex as they are polygenic in nature, such that each genetic variation only has a small influence on the disease. Genes operates in integrated networks providing the blue-print for all biological processes and conditional of the complex genotype determines the state and dynamics of any trait, which may be modified to various extent by non-genetic factors. Thus, diseases are heterogenous ensembles of conditions with a common endpoint. Numerous studies have been performed to define genes of importance for a trait or disease, but only a few genes with small effect have been identified. The major reasons for this modest progress is the unresolved heterogeneity of the regulation of blood pressure and the shortcomings of the prevailing monogenic approach to capture genetic effects in a polygenic condition. Here, a two-step procedure is presented in which physiological heterogeneity is disentangled and genetic effects are analysed by variance decomposition of genetic interactions and by an information theoretical approach including 162 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in 84 genes in the sphingolipid metabolism and related networks in blood pressure regulation. As expected, almost no genetic main effects were detected. In contrast, two-gene interactions established the entire sphingolipid metabolic and related genetic network to be highly involved in the regulation of blood pressure. The pattern of interaction clearly revealed that epistasis does not necessarily reflects the topology of the metabolic pathways i.e. the flow of metabolites. Rather, the enzymes and proteins are integrated in complex cellular substructures where communication flows between the components of the networks, which may be composite in structure. The heritabilities for diastolic and systolic blood pressure were estimated to be 0.63 +/- 0.01 , which may in fact be the maximum heritabilities of these traits.

  8. Plasma sphingolipids in HIV-associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Shane; Griffin, Timothy J; Reilly, Cavan; Harvey, Stephen; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Sandri, Brian J; Wendt, Chris H

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant cause of morbidity in persons living with HIV (PLWH) and HIV appears to uniquely cause COPD, independent of smoking. The mechanisms by which HIV leads to COPD are not clear. The objective of this study was to identify metabolomic biomarkers and potential mechanistic pathways of HIV-associated COPD (HIV-COPD). Methods We performed case–control metabolite profiling via mass spectrometry in plasma from 38 individuals with HIV-COPD (cases), comparing to matched controls with/without HIV and with/without COPD. Untargeted metabolites of interest were identified with liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/mass spectrometry (MS)), and targeted metabolomics for tryptophan (Trp) and kynurenine (Kyn) were measured by selective reaction monitoring (SRM) with LC-MS/MS. We used mixed-effects models to compare metabolite concentrations in cases compared with controls while controlling for relevant biological variables. Results We identified 1689 analytes associated with HIV-COPD at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 10%. In PLWH, we identified 263 analytes (10% FDR) between those with and without COPD. LC MS/MS identified Trp and 17 lipids, including sphingolipids and diacylglycerol. After adjusting for relevant covariates, the Kyn/Trp ratio measured by SRM was significantly higher in PLWH (p=0.022), but was not associated with COPD status (p=0.95). Conclusions There is a unique metabolite profile in HIV-COPD that includes sphingolipids. Trp metabolism is increased in HIV, but does not appear to independently contribute to HIV-COPD. Trial registration numbers NCT01810289, NCT01797367, NCT00608764.

  9. Cell wall composition and candidate biosynthesis gene expression during rice development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Fan; Manisseri, Chithra; Fagerström, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Cell walls of grasses, including cereal crops and biofuel grasses, comprise the majority of plant biomass and intimately influence plant growth, development and physiology. However, the functions of many cell wall synthesis genes, and the relationships among and the functions of cell wall compone...

  10. Xyloglucan and its biosynthesis

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    Olga A Zabotina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The hemicellulosic polysaccharide xyloglucan (XyG, found in the primary cell walls of most plant tissues, is important for structural organization of the cell wall and regulation of growth and development. Significant recent progress in structural characterization of XyGs from different plant species has shed light on the diversification of XyG during plant evolution. Also, identification of XyG biosynthetic enzymes and examination of their interactions suggests the involvement of a multiprotein complex in XyG biosynthesis. This mini-review presents an updated overview of the diversity of XyG structures in plant taxa and recent findings on XyG biosynthesis.

  11. Expression, biosynthesis and release of preadipocyte factor-1/ delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 in pancreatic -cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, B N; Carlsson, C; Møldrup, A;

    2003-01-01

    Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1)/delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 (FA1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like family. It is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, whereas in adults it is confined to the adrenal gland, the anterior pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, the testis and the ov......Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1)/delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 (FA1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like family. It is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, whereas in adults it is confined to the adrenal gland, the anterior pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, the testis...... and the ovaries. We have previously cloned Pref-1 from neonatal rat islets stimulated by GH. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the biosynthesis and release of Pref-1/FA1 in beta-cells and to determine if Pref-1/FA1 is mediating the mitogenic effect of GH in insulin-producing cells. First we studied...

  12. Modulatory effects of sesamin on dopamine biosynthesis and L-DOPA-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Lee, Hak Ju; Park, Keun Hong; Park, Hyun Jin; Choi, Hyun Sook; Lim, Sung Cil; Lee, Myung Koo

    2012-06-01

    The effects of sesamin on dopamine biosynthesis and L-DOPA-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells were investigated. Sesamin at concentration ranges of 20-75 μM exhibited a significant increase in intracellular dopamine levels at 24 h: 50 μM sesamin increased dopamine levels to 133% and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity to 128.2% of control levels. Sesamin at 20-100 μM rapidly increased the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP) to 158.3%-270.3% of control levels at 30 min. At 50 μM, sesamin combined with L-DOPA (50, 100 and 200 μM) further increased the intracellular dopamine levels for 24 h compared to L-DOPA alone. In the absence or presence of L-DOPA (100 and 200 μM), sesamin (50 μM) increased the phosphorylation of TH, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), as well as the mRNA levels of TH and CREB for 24 h, an effect which was reduced by L-DOPA (100 and 200 μM). In addition, 50 μM sesamin exhibited a protective effect against L-DOPA (100 and 200 μM)-induced cytotoxicity via the inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and superoxide dismutase reduction, induction of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and BadSer112 phosphorylation and Bcl-2 expression, and inhibition of cleaved-caspase-3 formation. These results suggested that sesamin enhanced dopamine biosynthesis and L-DOPA-induced increase in dopamine levels by inducing TH activity and TH gene expression, which was mediated by cAMP-PKA-CREB systems. Sesamin also protected against L-DOPA (100-200 μM)-induced cytotoxicity through the suppression of ROS activity via the modulation of ERK1/2, BadSer112, Bcl-2, and caspase-3 pathways in PC12 cells. Therefore, sesamin might serve as an adjuvant phytonutrient for neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Engineering PQS biosynthesis pathway for enhancement of bioelectricity production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa microbial fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Chua, Song-Lin; Cao, Bin;

    2013-01-01

    . aeruginosa strain that produces higher concentrations of phenazines under anaerobic conditions by over-expressing the PqsE effector in a PQS negative ΔpqsC mutant. The engineered strain exhibited an improved electrical performance in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and potentiostat-controlled electrochemical...... cells with an approximate five-fold increase of maximum current density relative to the parent strain. Electrochemical analysis showed that the current increase correlates with an over-synthesis of phenazines. These results therefore demonstrate that targeting microbial cell-to-cell communication...... by genetic engineering is a suitable technique to improve power output of bioelectrochemical systems....

  14. Regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis by poplar R2R3 MYB transcription factor PtrMYB152 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shucai; Li, Eryang; Porth, Ilga; Chen, Jin-Gui; Mansfield, Shawn D; Douglas, Carl J

    2014-05-23

    Poplar has 192 annotated R2R3 MYB genes, of which only three have been shown to play a role in the regulation of secondary cell wall formation. Here we report the characterization of PtrMYB152, a poplar homolog of the Arabidopsis R2R3 MYB transcription factor AtMYB43, in the regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis. The expression of PtrMYB152 in secondary xylem is about 18 times of that in phloem. When expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of either 35S or PtrCesA8 promoters, PtrMYB152 increased secondary cell wall thickness, which is likely caused by increased lignification. Accordingly, elevated expression of genes encoding sets of enzymes in secondary wall biosynthesis were observed in transgenic plants expressing PtrMYB152. Arabidopsis protoplast transfection assays suggested that PtrMYB152 functions as a transcriptional activator. Taken together, our results suggest that PtrMYB152 may be part of a regulatory network activating expression of discrete sets of secondary cell wall biosynthesis genes.

  15. Regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis by poplar R2R3 MYB transcription factor PtrMYB152 in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shucai [Northeast Normal Univ., Changchun (China); Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Li, Eryang [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Porth, Ilga [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Chen, Jin-Gui [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mansfield, Shawn D. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Douglas, Carl [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2014-05-23

    Poplar has 192 annotated R2R3 MYB genes, of which only three have been shown to play a role in the regulation of secondary cell wall formation. Here we report the characterization of PtrMYB152, a poplar homolog of the Arabidopsis R2R3 MYB transcription factor AtMYB43, in the regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis. The expression of PtrMYB152 in secondary xylem is about 18 times of that in phloem. When expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of either 35S or PtrCesA8 promoters, PtrMYB152 increased secondary cell wall thickness, which is likely caused by increased lignification. Accordingly, elevated expression of genes encoding sets of enzymes in secondary wall biosynthesis were observed in transgenic plants expressing PtrMYB152. Arabidopsis protoplast transfection assays suggested that PtrMYB152 functions as a transcriptional activator. Taken together, our results suggest that PtrMYB152 may be part of a regulatory network activating expression of discrete sets of secondary cell wall biosynthesis genes.

  16. Biosynthesis of Monascus pigments by resting cell submerged culture in nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Zhenqiang; Wang, Zhilong

    2016-08-01

    Growing cell submerged culture is usually applied for fermentative production of intracellular orange Monascus pigments, in which accumulation of Monascus pigments is at least partially associated to cell growth. In the present work, extractive fermentation in a nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution was utilized as a strategy for releasing of intracellular Monascus pigments. Those mycelia with low content of intracellular Monascus pigments were utilized as biocatalyst in resting cell submerged culture. By this means, resting cell submerged culture for production of orange Monascus pigments was carried out successfully in the nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution, which exhibited some advantages comparing with the corresponding conventional growing cell submerged culture, such as non-sterilization operation, high cell density (24 g/l DCW) leading to high productivity (14 AU of orange Monascus pigments at 470 nm per day), and recycling of cells as biocatalyst leading to high product yield (approximately 1 AU of orange Monascus pigments at 470 nm per gram of glucose) based on energy metabolism.

  17. Regulation of auxin on secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis in developing cotton fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fibers are unicellular trichomes that differentiate from epidermal cells of developing cotton ovules. Mature fibers exhibit thickened secondary walls composed of nearly pure cellulose. Cotton fiber development is divided into four overlapping phases, 1) initiation sta...

  18. New insights into Alzheimer's disease amyloid inhibition: nanosized metallo-supramolecular complexes suppress aβ-induced biosynthesis of heme and iron uptake in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Zhao, Chuanqi; Duan, Taicheng; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-06-01

    Nanosized metallo-supramolecular compounds, [Ni2 L3 ](4+) and [Fe2 L3 ](4+) , can not only strongly inhibit Aβ aggregation but also reduce the peroxidase activity of Aβ-heme. Further studies demonstrate that through blocking the heme-binding site, these two compounds can suppress Aβ-induced biosynthesis of heme and iron uptake in PC12 cells. This work provides new insights into molecular mechanisms of Aβ inhibitors on Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity.

  19. The sphingolipid receptor S1PR2 is a receptor for Nogo-a repressing synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anissa Kempf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nogo-A is a membrane protein of the central nervous system (CNS restricting neurite growth and synaptic plasticity via two extracellular domains: Nogo-66 and Nogo-A-Δ20. Receptors transducing Nogo-A-Δ20 signaling remained elusive so far. Here we identify the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2 as a Nogo-A-Δ20-specific receptor. Nogo-A-Δ20 binds S1PR2 on sites distinct from the pocket of the sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P and signals via the G protein G13, the Rho GEF LARG, and RhoA. Deleting or blocking S1PR2 counteracts Nogo-A-Δ20- and myelin-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth and cell spreading. Blockade of S1PR2 strongly enhances long-term potentiation (LTP in the hippocampus of wild-type but not Nogo-A(-/- mice, indicating a repressor function of the Nogo-A/S1PR2 axis in synaptic plasticity. A similar increase in LTP was also observed in the motor cortex after S1PR2 blockade. We propose a novel signaling model in which a GPCR functions as a receptor for two structurally unrelated ligands, a membrane protein and a sphingolipid. Elucidating Nogo-A/S1PR2 signaling platforms will provide new insights into regulation of synaptic plasticity.

  20. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulates crosstalk between Trk A tyrosine kinase and p75(NTR)-dependent sphingolipid signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilderback, T R; Gazula, V R; Dobrowsky, R T

    2001-03-01

    The mechanism of crosstalk between signaling pathways coupled to the Trk A and p75(NTR) neurotrophin receptors in PC12 cells was examined. In response to nerve growth factor (NGF), Trk A activation inhibited p75(NTR)-dependent sphingomyelin (SM) hydrolysis. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) inhibitor, LY294002, reversed this inhibition suggesting that Trk A activation of PI 3-kinase is necessary to inhibit sphingolipid signaling by p75(NTR). In contrast, SM hydrolysis induced by neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), which did not activate PI-3 kinase, was uneffected by LY294002. However, transient expression of a constituitively active PI 3-kinase inhibited p75(NTR)-dependent SM hydrolysis by both NGF and NT-3. Intriguingly, NGF induced an association of activated PI 3-kinase with acid sphingomyelinase (SMase). This interaction localized to caveolae-related domains and correlated with a 50% decrease in immunoprecipitated acid SMase activity. NGF-stimulated PI 3-kinase activity was necessary for inhibition of acid SMase but was not required for ligand-induced association of the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase with the phospholipase. Finally, this interaction was specific for NGF since EGF did not induce an association of PI 3-kinase with acid SMase. In summary, our data suggest that PI 3-kinase regulates the inhibitory crosstalk between Trk A tyrosine kinase and p75(NTR)-dependent sphingolipid signaling pathways and that this interaction localizes to caveolae-related domains.

  1. Comparison of glycerolipid biosynthesis in non-green plastids from sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells and cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alban, C; Joyard, J; Douce, R

    1989-05-01

    The availability of methods to fractionate non-green plastids and to prepare their limiting envelope membranes [Alban, Joyard & Douce (1988) Plant Physiol. 88, 709-717] allowed a detailed analysis of the biosynthesis of lysophosphatidic acid, phosphatidic acid, diacylglycerol and monogalactosyl-diacylglycerol (MGDG) in two different types of non-green starch-containing plastids: plastids isolated from cauliflower buds and amyloplasts isolated from sycamore cells. An enzyme [acyl-ACP (acyl carrier protein):sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase) recovered in the soluble fraction of non-green plastids transfers oleic acid from oleoyl-ACP to the sn-1 position of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate to form lysophosphatidic acid. Then a membrane-bound enzyme (acyl-ACP:monoacyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase), localized in the envelope membrane, catalyses the acylation of the available sn-2 position of 1-oleoyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate by palmitic acid from palmitoyl-ACP. Therefore both the soluble phase and the envelope membranes are necessary for acylation of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. The major difference between cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) membranes is the very low level of phosphatidate phosphatase activity in sycamore envelope membrane. Therefore, very little diacylglycerol is available for MGDG synthesis in sycamore, compared with cauliflower. These findings are consistent with the similarities and differences described in lipid metabolism of mature chloroplasts from 'C18:3' and 'C16:3' plants (those with MGDG containing C18:3 and C16:3 fatty acids). Sycamore contains only C18 fatty acids in MGDG, and the envelope membranes from sycamore amyloplasts have a low phosphatidate phosphatase activity and therefore the enzymes of the Kornberg-Pricer pathway have a low efficiency of incorporation of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate into MGDG. By contrast, cauliflower contains MGDG with C16:3 fatty acid, and the incorporation of sn-glycerol 3

  2. Chlorogenic Acids Biosynthesis in Centella asiatica Cells Is not Stimulated by Salicylic Acid Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncube, E N; Steenkamp, P A; Madala, N E; Dubery, I A

    2016-07-01

    Exogenous application of synthetic and natural elicitors of plant defence has been shown to result in mass production of secondary metabolites with nutraceuticals properties in cultured cells. In particular, salicylic acid (SA) treatment has been reported to induce the production of phenylpropanoids, including cinnamic acid derivatives bound to quinic acid (chlorogenic acids). Centella asiatica is an important medicinal plant with several therapeutic properties owing to its wide spectrum of secondary metabolites. We investigated the effect of SA on C. asiatica cells by monitoring perturbation of chlorogenic acids in particular. Different concentrations of SA were used to treat C. asiatica cells, and extracts from both treated and untreated cells were analysed using an optimised UHPLC-QTOF-MS/MS method. Semi-targeted multivariate data analyses with the aid of principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed a concentration-dependent metabolic response. Surprisingly, a range of chlorogenic acid derivatives were found to be downregulated as a consequence of SA treatment. Moreover, irbic acid (3,5-O-dicaffeoyl-4-O-malonilquinic acid) was found to be a dominant CGA in C. asiatica cells, although the SA treatment also had a negative effect on its concentration. Overall SA treatment was found to be an ineffective elicitor of CGA production in cultured C. asiatica cells.

  3. (p)ppGpp modulates cell size and the initiation of DNA replication in Caulobacter crescentus in response to a block in lipid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Kristina V; Wood, Shannon M; Blair, Jimmy A; Nguyen, Bao T; Herrera, Anabel; Mora, Yannet G Perez; Cuajungco, Math P; Murray, Sean R

    2015-03-01

    Stress conditions, such as a block in fatty acid synthesis, signal bacterial cells to exit the cell cycle. Caulobacter crescentus FabH is a cell-cycle-regulated β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase that initiates lipid biosynthesis and is essential for growth in rich media. To explore how C. crescentus responds to a block in lipid biosynthesis, we created a FabH-depletion strain. We found that FabH depletion blocks lipid biosynthesis in rich media and causes a cell cycle arrest that requires the alarmone (p)ppGpp for adaptation. Notably, basal levels of (p)ppGpp coordinate both a reduction in cell volume and a block in the over-initiation of DNA replication in response to FabH depletion. The gene ctrA encodes a master transcription factor that directly regulates 95 cell-cycle-controlled genes while also functioning to inhibit the initiation of DNA replication. Here, we demonstrate that ctrA transcription is (p)ppGpp-dependent during fatty acid starvation. CtrA fails to accumulate when FabH is depleted in the absence of (p)ppGpp due to a substantial reduction in ctrA transcription. The (p)ppGpp-dependent maintenance of ctrA transcription during fatty acid starvation initiated from only one of the two ctrA promoters. In the absence of (p)ppGpp, the majority of FabH-depleted cells enter a viable but non-culturable state, with multiple chromosomes, and are unable to recover from the miscoordination of cell cycle events. Thus, basal levels of (p)ppGpp facilitate C. crescentus' re-entry into the cell cycle after termination of fatty acid starvation.

  4. Large scale biosynthesis of ganglioside analogues by RERF-LC-AI cells cultured in HYPERFlask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Yumiko; Suzuki, Junya; Muraoka, Miho; Kasuya, Maria Carmelita Zulueta; Matsuoka, Koji; Hatanaka, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    The efficient production of ganglioside analogues was accomplished using RERF-LC-AI cells cultured in HYPERFlask (High Yield PERformance Flask). Eight kinds of ganglioside analogues (GM3, GM2, sialylparagloboside, GD3, di-sialylated lacto-N-tetraose, and another three kinds of analogues with intricate structures) were synthesized by the saccharide primer method using lung squamous-cell carcinoma line RERF-LC-AI and 12-azidododecyl β-lactoside primer. The yield for each analogue obtained using HYPERFlask was higher than yields obtained from 100-mm dishes.

  5. Manipulation of culture strategies to enhance capsaicin biosynthesis in suspension and immobilized cell cultures of Capsicum chinense Jacq. cv. Naga King Chili.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Tandon, Pramod

    2014-06-01

    Manipulation of culture strategies was adopted to study the influence of nutrient stress, pH stress and precursor feeding on the biosynthesis of capsaicin in suspension and immobilized cell cultures of C. chinense. Cells cultured in the absence of one of the four nutrients (ammonium and potassium nitrate for nitrate and potassium stress, potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate for phosphorus stress, and sucrose for sugar stress) influenced the accumulation of capsaicin. Among the stress factors studied, nitrate stress showed maximal capsaicin production on day 20 (505.9 ± 2.8 μg g(-1) f.wt) in immobilized cell, whereas in suspension cultures the maximum accumulation (345.5 ± 2.9 μg g(-1) f.wt) was obtained on day 10. Different pH affected capsaicin accumulation; enhanced accumulation of capsaicin (261.6 ± 3.4 μg g(-1) f.wt) was observed in suspension cultures at pH 6 on day 15, whereas in case of immobilized cultures the highest capsaicin content (433.3 ± 3.3 μg g(-1) f.wt) was obtained at pH 5 on day 10. Addition of capsaicin precursors and intermediates significantly enhanced the biosynthesis of capsaicin, incorporation of vanillin at 100 μM in both suspension and immobilized cell cultures resulted in maximum capsaicin content with 499.1 ± 5.5 μg g(-1) f.wt on day 20 and 1,315.3 ± 10 μg g(-1) f.wt on day 10, respectively. Among the different culture strategies adopted to enhance capsaicin biosynthesis in cell cultures of C. chinense, cells fed with vanillin resulted in the maximum capsaicin accumulation. The rate of capsaicin production was significantly higher in immobilized cells as compared to freely suspended cells.

  6. Human growth hormone binding and stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in cloned rat insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 125I labelled human growth hormone to cloned insulin producing RIN-5AH cells is described. Binding was specific for somatotropic hormones since both human and rat growth hormone could compete for binding sites, whereas much higher concentrations of lactogenic hormones were needed...

  7. Enzymology and Molecular Biology of Cell Wall Biosynthesis. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Peter M. Ray

    2000-04-01

    The following aspects of enzymology of cell wall synthesis were pursued under this cited grant: (1) Isolation of plasma membrane-localized glucan synthase II (GS-II) of pea; (2) Cloning of genes for possible plant GS-II components; (3) Golgi glucan synthase-I (GS-I); and (4) Golgi reversibly glycosylated protein 1 (RGP1).

  8. Identification of a New Class of Antifungals Targeting the Synthesis of Fungal Sphingolipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Visesato; Rella, Antonella; Farnoud, Amir M.; Singh, Ashutosh; Munshi, Mansa; Bryan, Arielle; Naseem, Shamoon; Konopka, James B.; Ojima, Iwao; Bullesbach, Erika; Ashbaugh, Alan; Linke, Michael J.; Cushion, Melanie; Collins, Margaret; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Sallans, Larry; Desai, Pankaj B.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Kirkpatrick, William R.; Patterson, Thomas; Wong, Lai Hong; Sinha, Sunita; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Flaherty, Patrick; Pan, Xuewen; Cesar, Gabriele Vargas; de Melo Tavares, Patricia; Frases, Susana; Miranda, Kildare; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Luberto, Chiara; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent estimates suggest that >300 million people are afflicted by serious fungal infections worldwide. Current antifungal drugs are static and toxic and/or have a narrow spectrum of activity. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of new antifungal drugs. The fungal sphingolipid glucosylceramide (GlcCer) is critical in promoting virulence of a variety of human-pathogenic fungi. In this study, we screened a synthetic drug library for compounds that target the synthesis of fungal, but not mammalian, GlcCer and found two compounds [N′-(3-bromo-4-hydroxybenzylidene)-2-methylbenzohydrazide (BHBM) and its derivative, 3-bromo-N′-(3-bromo-4-hydroxybenzylidene) benzohydrazide (D0)] that were highly effective in vitro and in vivo against several pathogenic fungi. BHBM and D0 were well tolerated in animals and are highly synergistic or additive to current antifungals. BHBM and D0 significantly affected fungal cell morphology and resulted in the accumulation of intracellular vesicles. Deep-sequencing analysis of drug-resistant mutants revealed that four protein products, encoded by genes APL5, COS111, MKK1, and STE2, which are involved in vesicular transport and cell cycle progression, are targeted by BHBM. PMID:26106079

  9. Biosynthesis of the osmoprotectant ectoine, but not glycine betaine, is critical for survival of osmotically stressed Vibrio parahaemolyticus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongagna-Yhombi, Serge Y; Boyd, E Fidelma

    2013-08-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a halophile present in marine and estuarine environments, ecosystems characterized by fluctuations in salinity and temperature. One strategy to thrive in such environments is the synthesis and/or uptake of compatible solutes. The V. parahaemolyticus genome contains biosynthesis systems for both ectoine and glycine betaine, which are known to act as compatible solutes in other species. We showed that V. parahaemolyticus had a 6% NaCl tolerance when grown in M9 minimal medium with 0.4% glucose (M9G) with a >5-h lag phase. By using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR) analysis, we determined that cells synthesized ectoine and glutamate in a NaCl-dependent manner. The most effective compatible solutes as measured by a reduction in lag-phase growth in M9G with 6% NaCl (M9G 6% NaCl) were in the order glycine betaine > choline > proline = glutamate > ectoine. However, V. parahaemolyticus could use glutamate or proline as the sole carbon source, but not ectoine or glycine betaine, which suggests that these are bona fide compatible solutes. Expression analysis showed that the ectA and betA genes were more highly expressed in log-phase cells, and expression of both genes was induced by NaCl up-shock. Under all conditions examined, the ectA gene was more highly expressed than the betA gene. Analysis of in-frame deletions in betA and ectB and in a double mutant showed that the ectB mutant was defective for growth, and this defect was rescued by the addition of glycine betaine, proline, ectoine, and glutamate, indicating that these compounds are compatible solutes for this species. The presence of both synthesis systems was the predominant distribution pattern among members of the Vibrionaceae family, suggesting this is the ancestral state.

  10. Cinnamate:CoA ligase initiates the biosynthesis of a benzoate-derived xanthone phytoalexin in Hypericum calycinum cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaid, Mariam M; Sircar, Debabrata; Müller, Andreas; Beuerle, Till; Liu, Benye; Ernst, Ludger; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-11-01

    Although a number of plant natural products are derived from benzoic acid, the biosynthesis of this structurally simple precursor is poorly understood. Hypericum calycinum cell cultures accumulate a benzoic acid-derived xanthone phytoalexin, hyperxanthone E, in response to elicitor treatment. Using a subtracted complementary DNA (cDNA) library and sequence information about conserved coenzyme A (CoA) ligase motifs, a cDNA encoding cinnamate:CoA ligase (CNL) was isolated. This enzyme channels metabolic flux from the general phenylpropanoid pathway into benzenoid metabolism. HcCNL preferred cinnamic acid as a substrate but failed to activate benzoic acid. Enzyme activity was strictly dependent on the presence of Mg²⁺ and K⁺ at optimum concentrations of 2.5 and 100 mM, respectively. Coordinated increases in the Phe ammonia-lyase and HcCNL transcript levels preceded the accumulation of hyperxanthone E in cell cultures of H. calycinum after the addition of the elicitor. HcCNL contained a carboxyl-terminal type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal made up by the tripeptide Ser-Arg-Leu, which directed an amino-terminal reporter fusion to the peroxisomes. Masking the targeting signal by carboxyl-terminal reporter fusion led to cytoplasmic localization. A phylogenetic tree consisted of two evolutionarily distinct clusters. One cluster was formed by CoA ligases related to benzenoid metabolism, including HcCNL. The other cluster comprised 4-coumarate:CoA ligases from spermatophytes, ferns, and mosses, indicating divergence of the two clades prior to the divergence of the higher plant lineages.

  11. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Sargassum swartzii and its cytotoxicity effect on HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhas, T Stalin; Kumar, V Ganesh; Karthick, V; Govindaraju, K; Shankara Narayana, T

    2014-12-10

    In this investigation, biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using Sargassum swartzii and its cytotoxicity against human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells is reported. The biological synthesis involved the reduction of chloroauric acid led to the formation of AuNPs within 5min at 60°C and the formation of AuNPs was confirmed using UV-vis spectrophotometer. The AuNPs were stable; spherical in shape with well-defined dimensions, and the average size of the particle is 35nm. A zeta potential value of -27.6mV revealed synthesized AuNPs were highly stable. The synthesized AuNPs exhibited a dose-dependent cytotoxicity against human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis was measured by DAPI (4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride) staining.

  12. Lithocholic acid disrupts phospholipid and sphingolipid homeostasis leading to cholestasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Naoki; Patterson, Andrew D.; Cho, Joo-Youn; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Lithocholic acid (LCA) is an endogenous compound associated with hepatic toxicity during cholestasis. LCA exposure in mice resulted in decreased serum lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and sphingomyelin levels due to elevated lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT) and sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase (SMPD) expression. Global metabolome analysis indicated significant decreases in serum palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, oleoyl- and linoleoyl-LPC levels after LCA exposure. LCA treatment also resulted in decreased serum sphingomyelin levels and increased hepatic ceramide levels, and induction of LPCAT and SMPD mRNAs. Transforming growth factor-β TGF-β) induced Lpcat2/4 and Smpd3 gene expression in primary hepatocytes and the induction was diminished by pretreatment with the SMAD3 inhibitor SIS3. Furthermore, alteration of the LPC metabolites and Lpcat1/2/4 and Smpd3 expression was attenuated in LCA-treated farnesoid X receptor-null mice that are resistant to LCA-induced intrahepatic cholestasis. This study revealed that LCA induced disruption of phospholipid/sphingolipid homeostasis through TGF-β signaling and that serum LPC is a biomarker for biliary injury. PMID:21480330

  13. Occurrence of bioactive sphingolipids in meat and fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellgren, Lars

    2001-01-01

    . Therefore we investigated the contents of sphingomyelin and neutral glycosphingolipids in commonly consumed meat and fish products. Sphingomyelin and glycosphingolipids were found in all foodstuffs studied. The total amount varied between 118 +/- 17 nmol/g (cod) to 589 +/- 39 nmol/g (chicken leg). Generally......, lower amounts of sphingolipids were determined in fish meat than in red meat and poultry, while poultry was the richest source of this class of lipids. However, fish meat contained a relatively high content of neutral glycolipids compared with other types of meat. Thus, in fish the ratio sphingomyelin....../neutral glycolipids varied from 1 to 2.9, while in poultry this ratio varied between 5.2 to 19.2 and in red meat it varied from 1.6 to 8.3. The fatty acid composition of sphingomyelin in fish was dominated by C24:1 (Delta (9)) or C22:1 (Delta (9)), while C16:0 and C18:0 were the dominating sphingomyelin species...

  14. Expression, biosynthesis and release of preadipocyte factor-1/ delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 in pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, B N; Carlsson, C; Møldrup, Annette

    2003-01-01

    and the ovaries. We have previously cloned Pref-1 from neonatal rat islets stimulated by GH. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the biosynthesis and release of Pref-1/FA1 in beta-cells and to determine if Pref-1/FA1 is mediating the mitogenic effect of GH in insulin-producing cells. First we studied...... the biosynthesis and processing of Pref-1 to the soluble form, FA1, in pancreatic islets and insulinoma cells transfected with Pref-1 cDNA. We measured the release of FA1 by ELISA and the possible effect of FA1 in GH-stimulated beta-cell proliferation by incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) in insulin...... that FA1 is regulated by glucose. Neither FA1 nor conditioned medium from GH-stimulated islets depleted for GH was able to increase beta-cell replication and overexpression of Pref-1 resulted in attenuated proliferation of the RINm5F cells. By immunocytochemistry of GH-stimulated islet cells...

  15. Towards an Understanding of How Protein Hydrolysates Stimulate More Efficient Biosynthesis in Cultured Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemensma, André; Babcock, James; Wilcox, Chris; Huttinga, Hans

    In the light of the growing demand for high quality plant-derived hydrolysates (i.e., HyPep™ and UltraPep™ series), Sheffield Bio-Science has developed a new hydrolysate platform that addresses the need for animal-free cell culture medium supplements while also minimizing variability concerns. The platform is based upon a novel approach to enzymatic digestion and more refined processing. At the heart of the platform is a rationally designed animal component-free (ACF) enzyme cocktail that includes both proteases and non-proteolytic enzymes (hydrolases) whose activities can also liberate primary components of the polymerized non-protein portion of the raw material. This enzyme system is added during a highly optimized process step that targets specific enzyme-substrate reactions to expand the range of beneficial nutritional factors made available to cells in culture. Such factors are fundamental to improving the bio-performance of the culture system, as they provide not merely growth-promoting peptides and amino acids, but also key carbohydrates, lipids, minerals, and vitamins that improve both rate and quality of protein expression, and serve to improve culture life due to osmo-protectant and anti-apoptotic properties. Also of significant note is that, compared to typical hydrolysates, the production process is greatly reduced and requires fewer steps, intrinsically yielding a better-controlled and therefore more reproducible product. Finally, the more sophisticated approach to enzymatic digestion renders hydrolysates more amenable to sterile filtration, allowing hydrolysate end users to experience streamlined media preparation and bioreactor supplementation activities. Current and future development activities will evolve from a better understanding of the complex interactions within a handful of key biochemical pathways that impact the growth and productivity of industrially relevant organisms. Presented in this chapter are some examples of the efforts that

  16. Salvianolic Acid A Inhibits PDGF-BB Induced Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Proliferation While Does Not Constrain Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Nitric Oxide Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Huang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are critical events in the initiation and development of restenosis upon percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA. Polyphenols have been suggested to ameliorate post-angioplasty restenosis. Salvianolic A (SalA is one of the most abundant polyphenols extracted from salvia. In this study, we investigated the effect of salvianolic A (SalA on the migration and proliferation of VSMCs. We found a preferential interaction of SalA with cellular systems that rely on the PDGF signal, but not on the EGF and bFGF signal. SalA inhibits PDGF-BB induced VSMC proliferation and migration in the concentration range from 0.01 to 0.1 μM. The inhibition of SalA on VSMC proliferation is associated with cell cycle arrest. We also found that SalA inhibits the PDGFRβ-ERK1/2 signaling cascade activated by PDGF-BB in VSMCs. In addition, SalA does not influence the proliferation of endothelial cells, the synthesis of NO and eNOS protein expression. Our results suggest that SalA inhibits migration and proliferation of VSMCs induced by PDGF-BB via the inhibition of the PDGFRβ-ERK1/2 cascade, but that it does not constrain endothelial cell proliferation and nitric oxide biosynthesis. Thus, the present study suggests a novel adjunct pharmacological strategy to prevent angioplasty-related restenosis.

  17. The localization within plant cells of enzymes involved in arginine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shargool, P D; Steeves, T; Weaver, M; Russell, M

    1978-04-01

    Studies were carried out to determine the distribution of the following: (1) carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (EC 2.7.2.9), (2) ornithine carbamoyltransferase (EC 2.1.3.3), (3) argininosuccinate synthetase (EC 6.3.4.5), and (4) argininosuccinate lyase (EC 4.3.2.1) in soybean cells grown in suspension culture. Protoplasts were produced from the soybean cells by treatment with cellulase (EC 3.2.1.4) and pectinase (EC 3.2.1.15); the protoplasts were then ruptured by osmotic shock with distilled water. This treatment was followed by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation to isolate various organelle fractions including mitochondria and plastids. Examination of these fractions using specific enzyme assays showed that carbamoylphosphate synthetase and ornithine carbamoyltransferase were localized in a fraction found to be composed primarily of plastids. Argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase appeared to be associated with either the cytosol or a membrane fraction in close association with the cytosol such as the endoplasmic reticulum or protoplast membrane.

  18. Eicosanoid biosynthesis during mucociliary and mucous metaplastic differentiation of bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakiela, Bogdan; Gielicz, Anna; Plutecka, Hanna; Hubalewska, Magdalena; Mastalerz, Lucyna; Bochenek, Grazyna; Soja, Jerzy; Januszek, Rafal; Musial, Jacek; Sanak, Marek

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the profile of eicosanoids secreted by human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) during their in vitro differentiation toward mucociliary or mucous metaplastic phenotype. Eicosanoids were measured in supernatants by mass spectrometry, and corresponding gene expression by real-time PCR. Primary HBEC produced mainly prostaglandins (PGE2, PGD2) and epoxides (e.g. 14,15-EET), but during further mucociliary differentiation we observed a gradual increase in secretion of lipoxygenase derived HETEs. Treatment with IL-13 and IL-4 induced mucous metaplasia and resulted in downregulation of PG pathway, and potent induction of 15-lipoxygenase (marked release of 15-HETE). The deficiency in PG production sustained during long term culture of mucous metaplastic epithelia. In conclusions, Th2-type cytokines induce changes in eicosanoid metabolism of airway epithelial cells, resulting in an immense induction of 15-lipoxygenase pathway, and inhibition of PG pathways. Deficient production of immunomodulatory PGs may promote chronic inflammation and airway remodeling.

  19. Ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1 inhibits apoptotic cell death in SCC17B human head and neck squamous carcinoma cells after Pc4 photosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppana, Nithin B; Kodiha, Mohamed; Stochaj, Ursula; Lin, Ho-sheng; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Divine, George W; Boyd, John A; Korbelik, Mladen; Separovic, Duska

    2014-11-01

    The sphingolipid ceramide modulates stress-induced cell death and apoptosis. We have shown that ceramide generated via de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis is required to initiate apoptosis after photodynamic therapy (PDT). The objective of this study was to define the role of ceramide synthase (CERS) in PDT-induced cell death and apoptosis using fumonisin B1 (FB), a CERS inhibitor. We used the silicon phthalocyanine Pc4 for PDT, and SCC17B cells, as a clinically-relevant model of human head and neck squamous carcinoma. zVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, as well as FB, protected cells from death after PDT. In contrast, ABT199, an inhibitor of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2, enhanced cell killing after PDT. PDT-induced accumulation of ceramide in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria was inhibited by FB. PDT-induced Bax translocation to the mitochondria and cytochrome c release were also inhibited by FB. These novel data suggest that PDT-induced cell death via apoptosis is CERS/ceramide-dependent.

  20. [Biosynthesis of cyclic GMP in plant cells - new insight into guanylate cyclases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świeżawska, Brygida; Marciniak, Katarzyna; Szmidt-Jaworska, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is involved in many physiological processes in plants. Concentration of this second messenger in plant cell is determined by guanylyl cyclases (GCs) responsible for cGMP synthesis and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) involved in cGMP inactivation. First discovered plant GCs were localized in cytosol, but few years ago a new family of plasma membrane proteins with guanylyl cyclase activity was identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. These proteins belong to the family of a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLK) with extracellular leucine-rich repeat domain, a transmembrane-spanning domain, and an intracellular kinase domain. A novel class of guanylyl cyclases contain the GC catalytic center encapsulated within the intracellular kinase domain. These molecules are different to animal GCs in that the GC catalytic center is nested within the kinase domain. In presented paper we summarized the most recent data concerning plant guanylyl cyclases.

  1. Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) brain cells respond to hyperosmotic challenge by inducing myo-inositol biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardell, Alison M; Yang, Jun; Sacchi, Romina; Fangue, Nann A; Hammock, Bruce D; Kültz, Dietmar

    2013-12-15

    This study aimed to determine the regulation of the de novo myo-inositol biosynthetic (MIB) pathway in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) brain following acute (25 ppt) and chronic (30, 60 and 90 ppt) salinity acclimations. The MIB pathway plays an important role in accumulating the compatible osmolyte, myo-inositol, in cells in response to hyperosmotic challenge and consists of two enzymes, myo-inositol phosphate synthase and inositol monophosphatase. In tilapia brain, MIB enzyme transcriptional regulation was found to robustly increase in a time (acute acclimation) or dose (chronic acclimation) dependent manner. Blood plasma osmolality and Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations were also measured and significantly increased in response to both acute and chronic salinity challenges. Interestingly, highly significant positive correlations were found between MIB enzyme mRNA and blood plasma osmolality in both acute and chronic salinity acclimations. Additionally, a mass spectrometry assay was established and used to quantify total myo-inositol concentration in tilapia brain, which closely mirrored the hyperosmotic MIB pathway induction. Thus, myo-inositol is a major compatible osmolyte that is accumulated in brain cells when exposed to acute and chronic hyperosmotic challenge. These data show that the MIB pathway is highly induced in response to environmental salinity challenge in tilapia brain and that this induction is likely prompted by increases in blood plasma osmolality. Because the MIB pathway uses glucose-6-phosphate as a substrate and large amounts of myo-inositol are being synthesized, our data also illustrate that the MIB pathway likely contributes to the high energetic demand posed by salinity challenge.

  2. Effects of progestins on local estradiol biosynthesis and action in the Z-12 endometriotic epithelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranič, Nataša; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2012-11-01

    Endometriosis is a common estrogen-dependent gynecological disease. In patients with endometriosis estradiol can be synthesized locally in the endometriotic lesions from inactive precursors of adrenal or ovarian origin, via the aromatase pathway. These increased estradiol levels stimulate proliferation of endometriotic tissue. The progestins have been used in the therapy of endometriosis for more than 40 years but their pharmacological action is still not understood in detail. In the present study we therefore aimed to evaluate the effects of three progestins most commonly used in the therapy of endometriosis; medroxyprogesterone acetate, dydrogesterone and dienogest on expression of all genes encoding enzymes of the aromatase pathway and estrogen receptors in the Z-12 model epithelial cell line of peritoneal endometriosis, by qPCR and Western blotting. Our results show that application of medroxyprogestrone acetate, dydrogesterone and dienogest significantly decreases HSD17B1 and CYP19A1 expression and significantly increases HSD17B2 expression. Dydrogesterone and dienogest also significantly suppress ESR1 and ESR2 transcription, whereas medroxyprogestrone acetate and dydrogesterone significantly reduce mRNA levels of GPER. Our results thus suggest that in peritoneal endometriosis the beneficial effects of these progestins can be explained by lower HSD17B1 and higher HSD17B2 mRNA and protein levels, which lead to reduced local E2 biosynthesis. Although progestins significantly decrease CYP19A1 mRNA levels, the protein itself was not detectable by Western blotting. As progestins down-regulate expression of ESR1, ESR2 and GPER, they might also prevent E2-mediated proliferation.

  3. Revisiting Plant Plasma Membrane Lipids in Tobacco: A Focus on Sphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacas, Jean-Luc; Buré, Corinne; Grosjean, Kevin; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia; Lherminier, Jeannine; Rombouts, Yoann; Maes, Emmanuel; Bossard, Claire; Gronnier, Julien; Furt, Fabienne; Fouillen, Laetitia; Germain, Véronique; Bayer, Emmanuelle; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Robert, Franck; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The lipid composition of plasma membrane (PM) and the corresponding detergent-insoluble membrane (DIM) fraction were analyzed with a specific focus on highly polar sphingolipids, so-called glycosyl inositol phosphorylceramides (GIPCs). Using tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) 'Bright Yellow 2' cell suspension and leaves, evidence is provided that GIPCs represent up to 40 mol % of the PM lipids. Comparative analysis of DIMs with the PM showed an enrichment of 2-hydroxylated very-long-chain fatty acid-containing GIPCs and polyglycosylated GIPCs in the DIMs. Purified antibodies raised against these GIPCs were further used for immunogold-electron microscopy strategy, revealing the distribution of polyglycosylated GIPCs in domains of 35 ± 7 nm in the plane of the PM. Biophysical studies also showed strong interactions between GIPCs and sterols and suggested a role for very-long-chain fatty acids in the interdigitation between the two PM-composing monolayers. The ins and outs of lipid asymmetry, raft formation, and interdigitation in plant membrane biology are finally discussed.

  4. The synthetic amphipathic peptidomimetic LTX109 is a potent fungicide that disturbs plasma membrane integrity in a sphingolipid dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojsen, Rasmus; Torbensen, Rasmus; Larsen, Camilla Eggert; Folkesson, Anders; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    The peptidomimetic LTX109 (arginine-tertbutyl tryptophan-arginine-phenylethan) was previously shown to have antibacterial properties. Here, we investigated the activity of this novel antimicrobial peptidomimetic on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that LTX109 was an efficient fungicide that killed all viable cells in an exponentially growing population as well as a large proportion of cells in biofilm formed on an abiotic surface. LTX109 had similar killing kinetics to the membrane-permeabilizing fungicide amphotericin B, which led us to investigate the ability of LTX109 to disrupt plasma membrane integrity. S. cerevisiae cells exposed to a high concentration of LTX109 showed rapid release of potassium and amino acids, suggesting that LTX109 acted by destabilizing the plasma membrane. This was supported by the finding that cells were permeable to the fluorescent nucleic acid stain SYTOX Green after a few minutes of LTX109 treatment. We screened a haploid S. cerevisiae gene deletion library for mutants resistant to LTX109 to uncover potential molecular targets. Eight genes conferred LTX109 resistance when deleted and six were involved in the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway (SUR1, SUR2, SKN1, IPT1, FEN1 and ORM2). The involvement of all of these genes in the biosynthetic pathway for the fungal-specific lipids mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide (MIPC) and mannosyl di-(inositol phosphoryl) ceramide (M(IP)2C) suggested that these lipids were essential for LTX109 sensitivity. Our observations are consistent with a model in which LTX109 kills S. cerevisiae by nonspecific destabilization of the plasma membrane through direct or indirect interaction with the sphingolipids.

  5. The synthetic amphipathic peptidomimetic LTX109 is a potent fungicide that disturbs plasma membrane integrity in a sphingolipid dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Bojsen

    Full Text Available The peptidomimetic LTX109 (arginine-tertbutyl tryptophan-arginine-phenylethan was previously shown to have antibacterial properties. Here, we investigated the activity of this novel antimicrobial peptidomimetic on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that LTX109 was an efficient fungicide that killed all viable cells in an exponentially growing population as well as a large proportion of cells in biofilm formed on an abiotic surface. LTX109 had similar killing kinetics to the membrane-permeabilizing fungicide amphotericin B, which led us to investigate the ability of LTX109 to disrupt plasma membrane integrity. S. cerevisiae cells exposed to a high concentration of LTX109 showed rapid release of potassium and amino acids, suggesting that LTX109 acted by destabilizing the plasma membrane. This was supported by the finding that cells were permeable to the fluorescent nucleic acid stain SYTOX Green after a few minutes of LTX109 treatment. We screened a haploid S. cerevisiae gene deletion library for mutants resistant to LTX109 to uncover potential molecular targets. Eight genes conferred LTX109 resistance when deleted and six were involved in the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway (SUR1, SUR2, SKN1, IPT1, FEN1 and ORM2. The involvement of all of these genes in the biosynthetic pathway for the fungal-specific lipids mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide (MIPC and mannosyl di-(inositol phosphoryl ceramide (M(IP2C suggested that these lipids were essential for LTX109 sensitivity. Our observations are consistent with a model in which LTX109 kills S. cerevisiae by nonspecific destabilization of the plasma membrane through direct or indirect interaction with the sphingolipids.

  6. MRP- and BCL-2-mediated drug resistance in human SCLC: effects of apoptotic sphingolipids in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadian, M; Leroux, M E; Auzenne, E; Ghosh, S C; Farquhar, D; Evans, R; Spohn, W; Zou, Y; Klostergaard, J

    2009-10-01

    Multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP) and BCL-2 contribute to drug resistance expressed in SCLC. To establish whether MRP-mediated drug resistance affects sphingolipid (SL)-induced apoptosis in SCLC, we first examined the human SCLC cell line, UMCC-1, and its MRP over-expressing, drug-resistant subline, UMCC-1/VP. Despite significantly decreased sensitivity to doxorubicin (Dox) and to the etoposide, VP-16, the drug-selected line was essentially equally as sensitive to treatment with exogenous ceramide (Cer), sphingosine (Sp) or dimethyl-sphingosine (DMSP) as the parental line. Next, we observed that high BCL-2-expressing human H69 SCLC cells, that were approximately 160-fold more sensitive to Dox than their combined BCL-2 and MRP-over-expressing (H69AR) counterparts, were only approximately 5-fold more resistant to DMSP. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of either UMCC cell line treated with DMSP-Coumarin revealed comparable extents and kinetics of SL uptake, further ruling out MRP-mediated effects on drug uptake. DMSP potentiated the cytotoxic activity of VP-16 and Taxol, but not Dox, in drug-resistant UMCC-1/VP cells. However, this sensitization did not appear to involve DMSP-mediated effects on the function of MRP in drug export; nor did DMSP strongly shift the balance of pro-apoptotic Sps and anti-apoptotic Sp-1-Ps in these cells. We conclude that SL-induced apoptosis markedly overcomes or bypasses MRP-mediated drug resistance relevant to SCLC and may suggest a novel therapeutic approach to chemotherapy for these tumors.

  7. Biosynthesis of copper nanoparticles and its effect on actively dividing cells of mitosis in Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaonkar, Dipali; Shende, Sudhir; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Nanobiotechnological application of copper nanoparticles has paved the way for advancement in agriculture owing to its bactericidal and fungicidal activities. Recently, researchers have focussed on bioinspired synthesis of copper nanoparticles as a viable alternative to existing physicochemical techniques. For the commercialization of nanocopper, the toxicity evaluation is a major issue. In this context, Citrus medica (L.) fruit extract-mediated copper nanoparticles were synthesized and its different concentrations (10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 µg mL(-1) ) were evaluated for its effect on actively dividing cells of Allium cepa. The study clearly revealed that copper nanoparticles increased mitotic index up to the concentration of 20 µg mL(-1) . In addition, a gradual decline in mitotic index and increase in abnormality index was observed as the concentration of copper nanoparticles and treatment duration were increased. Aberrations in chromosomal behavior such as sticky and disturbed chromosomes in metaphase and anaphase, c-metaphase, bridges, laggard, disturbed telophase, and vacuolated nucleus were also observed.

  8. Regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) subunit biosynthesis in cultured male anterior pituitary cells: effects of GnRH and testosterone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krummen, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the direct effects of testosterone (T) on LH subunit apoprotein synthesis, glycosylation and release by the male pituitary. Cells from 1 wk castrate rats were cultured for 48 h in steroid-free medium followed by 48h in media /+-/10nM T. The cells were then incubated for 2, 4, 6, 8, or 12h in media containing (/sup 35/S)-methionine (/sup 35/S-Met) or (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine (/sup 3/H-Gln), /+-/1nM GnRH (exp 1) or in media containing precursors /+-/ 10nM T and/or 1nM GnRH (exp 2). Radiolabeled precursor incorporation into LH subunits was determined by immunoprecipitation followed by SDS-PAGE. In experiment 1, precursor incorporation into total protein (TP) and LH subunits increased linearly with time for at least 8h. GnRH did not effect precursor incorporation in to TP or /sup 35/S-Met labeling of LH subunits, but stimulated a linear, time-dependent accumulation of /sup 3/H-Gln into total LH subunits and the release of RIA-LH and radiolabeled subunits into media. Based on these results, the effects of T on LH subunit biosynthesis were studied during an 8h incubation. In experiment 2, GnRH enhanced the total /sup 3/H-Gln incorporation (but not /sup 35/S-Met incorporation) into both LH subunits. GnRH stimulated the release of /sup 35/S-Met LH..cap alpha.. and /sup 3/H-Gln LH subunits into media and increased the relative glycosylation of secreted LH subunits without altering the relative glycosylation of intracellular LH subunits. T inhibited RIA-LH release and incorporation of both precursors into total and secreted LH subunits (/+-/GnRH). However, only the relative glycosylation of secreted LH..cap alpha.. was reduced by T (/+-/GnRh).

  9. GTP dysregulation in Bacillus subtilis cells lacking (p)ppGpp results in phenotypic amino acid auxotrophy and failure to adapt to nutrient downshift and regulate biosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriel, Allison; Brinsmade, Shaun R; Tse, Jessica L; Tehranchi, Ashley K; Bittner, Alycia N; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Wang, Jue D

    2014-01-01

    The nucleotide (p)ppGpp inhibits GTP biosynthesis in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Here we examined how this regulation allows cells to grow in the absence of amino acids. We showed that B. subtilis cells lacking (p)ppGpp, due to either deletions or point mutations in all three (p)ppGpp synthetase genes, yjbM, ywaC, and relA, strongly require supplementation of leucine, isoleucine, valine, methionine, and threonine and modestly require three additional amino acids. This polyauxotrophy is rescued by reducing GTP levels. Reduction of GTP levels activates transcription of genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the five strongly required amino acids by inactivating the transcription factor CodY, which represses the ybgE, ilvD, ilvBHC-leuABCD, ilvA, ywaA, and hom-thrCB operons, and by a CodY-independent activation of transcription of the ilvA, ywaA, hom-thrCB, and metE operons. Interestingly, providing the eight required amino acids does not allow for colony formation of (p)ppGpp(0) cells when transitioning from amino acid-replete medium to amino acid-limiting medium, and we found that this is due to an additional role that (p)ppGpp plays in protecting cells during nutrient downshifts. We conclude that (p)ppGpp allows adaptation to amino acid limitation by a combined effect of preventing death during metabolic transitions and sustaining growth by activating amino acid biosynthesis. This ability of (p)ppGpp to integrate a general stress response with a targeted reprogramming of gene regulation allows appropriate adaptation and is likely conserved among diverse bacteria.

  10. My journey into the world of sphingolipids and sphingolipidoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhoff, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of lipid storage in postmortem brains of patients with amaurotic idiocy led to the recognition of five lysosomal ganglioside storage diseases and identification of their inherited metabolic blocks. Purification of lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase and ceramidase and analysis of their gene structures were the prerequisites for the clarification of Niemann-Pick and Farber disease. For lipid catabolism, intraendosomal vesicles are formed during the endocytotic pathway. They are subjected to lipid sorting processes and were identified as luminal platforms for cellular lipid and membrane degradation. Lipid binding glycoproteins solubilize lipids from these cholesterol poor membranes and present them to water-soluble hydrolases for digestion. Biosynthesis and intracellular trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases (hexosaminidases, acid sphingomyelinase and ceramidase) and lipid binding and transfer proteins (GM2 activator, saposins) were analyzed to identify the molecular and metabolic basis of several sphingolipidoses. Studies on the biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids yielded the scheme of Combinatorial Ganglioside Biosynthesis involving promiscuous glycosyltransferases. Their defects in mutagenized mice impair brain development and function.

  11. [Role of a purified Sertoli cell protein (CMB-21) in the biosynthesis of Leydig cell testosterone in the immature rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujrad, N; Papadopoulos, V; Drosdowsky, M A; Carreau, S

    1989-09-01

    The existence of Sertoli cell factors which modulate the rat Leydig cell function prompted us to study the biological activity of selected proteins called CMB proteins and produced by immature rat Sertoli cells. Percoll purified Leydig cells (10(5)) from 20 days-old rats have been incubated 5 h at 32 degrees C in 1 ml Ham F12/DME medium with increasing concentrations of partially purified CMB proteins (0-1,000 ng/ml) either in presence or absence of oLH (25 ng/ml). Among the CMB proteins tested, only CMB-21 produces a dose related increase of testosterone production: from 2 to 500 pg/ml of CMB-21, testosterone output is unchanged (51 pg/10(5) cells) but 1 to 1,000 ng/ml of this protein produces a linear increase of testosterone productions (86 to 870 pg). In the presence of oLH which induces a 10-fold increase of testosterone production (499 pg), increasing doses of CMB-21 further stimulate testosterone output (775 to 2.272 pg/10(5) cells). Whatever the concentration of oLH used (0 to 50 ng/ml), CMB-21 (500 ng/ml) leads to a further 2 fold augmentation of testosterone synthesis; similarly, in the presence of dbcAMP (1 mM), CMB 21 increases the testosterone production but no effect is observed when Leydig cells are incubated in the presence of 22R-hydroxycholesterol (30 microM). The cAMP levels which are increased more than 4 fold by oLH, remain unchanged in the presence of CMB-21 either alone or with oLH, as observed when Sertoli cell culture medium is used.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Identification of a novel arabinofuranosyltransferase AftB involved in a terminal step of cell wall arabinan biosynthesis in Corynebacterianeae, such as Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Mathias; Alderwick, Luke J; Birch, Helen L; Sahm, Hermann; Eggeling, Lothar; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2007-05-18

    Arabinofuranosyltransferase enzymes, such as EmbA, EmbB, and AftA, play pivotal roles in the biosynthesis of arabinogalactan, and the anti-tuberculosis agent ethambutol (EMB) targets arabinogalactan biosynthesis through inhibition of Mt-EmbA and Mt-EmbB. Herein, we describe the identification and characterization of a novel arabinofuranosyltransferase, now termed AftB (Rv3805c), which is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Deletion of its orthologue NCgl2780 in the closely related species Corynebacterium glutamicum resulted in a viable mutant. Analysis of the cell wall-associated lipids from the deletion mutant revealed a decreased abundance of cell wall-bound mycolic acids, consistent with a partial loss of mycolylation sites. Subsequent glycosyl linkage analysis of arabinogalactan also revealed the complete absence of terminal beta(1 --> 2)-linked arabinofuranosyl residues. The deletion mutant biochemical phenotype was fully complemented by either Mt-AftB or Cg-AftB, but not with muteins of Mt-AftB, where the two adjacent aspartic acid residues, which have been suggested to be involved in glycosyltransferase activity, were replaced by alanine. In addition, the use of C. glutamicum and C. glutamicumDeltaaftB in an in vitro assay utilizing the sugar donor beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-1-monophosphoryl-decaprenol together with the neoglycolipid acceptor alpha-D-Araf-(1 --> 5)-alpha-D-Araf-O-C(8) as a substrate confirmed AftB as a terminal beta(1 --> 2) arabinofuranosyltransferase, which was also insensitive to EMB. Altogether, these studies have shed further light on the complexities of Corynebacterianeae cell wall biosynthesis, and Mt-AftB represents a potential new drug target.

  13. Releasing intracellular product to prepare whole cell biocatalyst for biosynthesis of Monascus pigments in water-edible oil two-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Minglue; Zhang, Xuehong; Wang, Zhilong

    2016-11-01

    Selective releasing intracellular product in Triton X-100 micelle aqueous solution to prepare whole cell biocatalyst is a novel strategy for biosynthesis of Monascus pigments, in which cell suspension culture exhibits some advantages comparing with the corresponding growing cell submerged culture. In the present work, the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 was successfully replaced by edible plant oils for releasing intracellular Monascus pigments. High concentration of Monascus pigments (with absorbance nearly 710 AU at 470 nm in the oil phase, normalized to the aqueous phase volume approximately 142 AU) was achieved by cell suspension culture in peanut oil-water two-phase system. Furthermore, the utilization of edible oil as extractant also fulfills the demand for application of Monascus pigments as natural food colorant.

  14. UV-B Exposure Affects the Biosynthesis of Microcystin in Toxic Microcystis aeruginosa Cells and Its Degradation in the Extracellular Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang

    2015-10-20

    Microcystins (MCs) are cyclic hepatotoxic heptapeptides produced by cyanobacteria that can be toxic to aquatic and terrestrial organisms. MC synthesis and degradation are thought to be influenced by several different physical and environmental parameters. In this study, the effects of different intensities of UV-B radiation on MC biosynthesis in Microcystis cells and on its extracellular degradation were investigated by mRNA analysis and degradation experiments. Exposure to UV-B at intensities of 1.02 and 1.45 W/m² not only remarkably inhibited the growth of Microcystis, but also led to a decrease in the MC concentration. In addition, mcyD transcription was decreased under the same UV-B intensities. These results demonstrated that the effects of UV-B exposure on the biosynthesis of MCs in Microcystis cells could be attributed to the regulation of mcy gene transcription. Moreover, the MC concentration was decreased significantly after exposure to different intensities of UV-B radiation. Of the three MC variants (MC-LR, -RR and -YR, L, R and Y are abbreviations of leucine, arginine and tyrosine), MC-LR and MC-YR were sensitive to UV-B radiation, whereas MC-RR was not. In summary, our results showed that UV-B radiation had a negative effect on MC production in Microcystis cells and MC persistence in the extracellular space.

  15. UV-B Exposure Affects the Biosynthesis of Microcystin in Toxic Microcystis aeruginosa Cells and Its Degradation in the Extracellular Space

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    Zhen Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are cyclic hepatotoxic heptapeptides produced by cyanobacteria that can be toxic to aquatic and terrestrial organisms. MC synthesis and degradation are thought to be influenced by several different physical and environmental parameters. In this study, the effects of different intensities of UV-B radiation on MC biosynthesis in Microcystis cells and on its extracellular degradation were investigated by mRNA analysis and degradation experiments. Exposure to UV-B at intensities of 1.02 and 1.45 W/m2 not only remarkably inhibited the growth of Microcystis, but also led to a decrease in the MC concentration. In addition, mcyD transcription was decreased under the same UV-B intensities. These results demonstrated that the effects of UV-B exposure on the biosynthesis of MCs in Microcystis cells could be attributed to the regulation of mcy gene transcription. Moreover, the MC concentration was decreased significantly after exposure to different intensities of UV-B radiation. Of the three MC variants (MC-LR, -RR and -YR, L, R and Y are abbreviations of leucine, arginine and tyrosine, MC-LR and MC-YR were sensitive to UV-B radiation, whereas MC-RR was not. In summary, our results showed that UV-B radiation had a negative effect on MC production in Microcystis cells and MC persistence in the extracellular space.

  16. Cell-specific expression of tryptophan decarboxylase and 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, key genes involved in camptothecin biosynthesis in Camptotheca acuminata Decne (Nyssaceae

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    Santamaria Anna

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camptotheca acuminata is a major natural source of the terpenoid indole alkaloid camptothecin (CPT. At present, little is known about the cellular distribution of the biosynthesis of CPT, which would be useful knowledge for developing new strategies and technologies for improving alkaloid production. Results The pattern of CPT accumulation was compared with the expression pattern of some genes involved in CPT biosynthesis in C. acuminata [i.e., Ca-TDC1 and Ca-TDC2 (encoding for tryptophan decarboxylase and Ca-HGO (encoding for 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase]. Both CPT accumulation and gene expression were investigated in plants at different degrees of development and in plantlets subjected to drought-stress. In all organs, CPT accumulation was detected in epidermal idioblasts, in some glandular trichomes, and in groups of idioblast cells localized in parenchyma tissues. Drought-stress caused an increase in CPT accumulation and in the number of glandular trichomes containing CPT, whereas no increase in epidermal or parenchymatous idioblasts was observed. In the leaf, Ca-TDC1 expression was detected in some epidermal cells and in groups of mesophyll cells but not in glandular trichomes; in the stem, it was observed in parenchyma cells of the vascular tissue; in the root, no expression was detected. Ca-TDC2 expression was observed exclusively in leaves of plantlets subjected to drought-stress, in the same sites described for Ca-TDC1. In the leaf, Ca-HGO was detected in all chlorenchyma cells; in the stem, it was observed in the same sites described for Ca-TDC1; in the root, no expression was detected. Conclusions The finding that the sites of CPT accumulation are not consistently the same as those in which the studied genes are expressed demonstrates an organ-to-organ and cell-to-cell translocation of CPT or its precursors.

  17. Inducing Effect of Dihydroartemisinic Acid in the Biosynthesis of Artemisinins with Cultured Cells of Artemisia annua by Enhancing the Expression of Genes

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    Jianhua Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Artemisinin has been used in the production of “artemisinin combination therapies” for the treatment of malaria. Feeding of precursors has been proven to be one of the most effective methods to enhance artemisinin production in plant cultured cells. At the current paper, the biosynthesis of artemisinin (ART and its four analogs from dihydroartemisinic acid (DHAA in suspension-cultured cells of Artemisia annua were investigated. ARTs were detected by HPLC/GC-MS and isolated by various chromatography methods. The structures of four DHAA metabolites, namely, dihydro-epi-deoxyarteannuin B, arteannuin I, arteannuin K, and 3-β-hydroxy-dihydro-epi-deoxyarteannuin B, were elucidated by physicochemical and spectroscopic analyses. The correlation between gene expression and ART content was investigated. The results of RT-PCR showed that DHAA could up-regulate expression of amorpha-4,11-diene synthase gene (ADS, amorpha-4,11-diene C-12 oxidase gene (CYP71AV1, and farnesyl diphosphate synthase gene (FPS (3.19-, 7.21-, and 2.04-fold higher than those of control group, resp., which indicated that biosynthesis processes from DHAA to ART were enzyme-mediated.

  18. Low serum sphingolipids in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder

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    Marcela Patricia Henríquez-Henríquez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is the most prevalent neuropsychiatric condition in childhood. ADHD is a multifactorial trait with a strong genetic component. One neurodevelopmental hypothesis is that ADHD is associated with a lag in brain maturation. Sphingolipids are essential for brain development and neuronal functioning, but their role in ADHD pathogenesis is unexplored. We hypothesized that serum sphingolipid levels distinguish ADHD patients from unaffected subjects. Methods: We characterized serum sphingolipid profiles of ADHD patients and two control groups: non-affected relatives and non-affected subjects without a family history of ADHD. Sphingolipids were measured by LC-MS/MS in 77 participants (28 ADHD patients, 28 related controls and 21 unrelated controls. ADHD diagnosis was based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV-TR. Diagnostic criteria were assessed by 2 independent observers. Groups were compared by parametrical statistics. Results: Serum sphingomyelins C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C24:1, ceramide C24:0 and deoxy-ceramide C24:1 were significantly decreased in ADHD patients at 20-30% relative reductions. In our sample, decreased serum sphingomyelin levels distinguished ADHD patients with 79% sensitivity and 78% specificity. Conclusions: Our results showed lower levels of all major serum sphingomyelins in ADHD. These findings may reflect brain maturation and affect neuro-functional pathways characteristic for ADHD.

  19. Skin ceramide alterations in first-episode schizophrenia indicate abnormal sphingolipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smesny, Stefan; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Hinder, Anke; Köhler, Alexandra; Schneider, Christiane; Rudzok, Maria; Schmidt, Ulrike; Milleit, Berko; Milleit, Christine; Nenadic, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-07-01

    There is considerable evidence for specific pathology of lipid metabolism in schizophrenia, affecting polyunsaturated fatty acids and in particular sphingolipids. These deficits are assumed to interfere with neuronal membrane functioning and the development and maintenance of myelin sheaths. Recent studies suggest that some of these lipid pathologies might also be detected in peripheral skin tests. In this study, we examined different skin lipids and their relation to schizophrenia. We assessed epidermal lipid profiles in 22 first-episode antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and 22 healthy controls matched for age and gender using a hexan/ethanol extraction technique and combined high-performance thin-layer chromatography/gas-chromatography. We found highly significant increase of ceramide AH and NH/AS classes in patients and decrease of EOS and NP ceramide classes. This is the first demonstration of specific peripheral sphingolipid alterations in schizophrenia. The results support recent models of systemic lipid pathology and in particular of specific sphingolipids, which are crucial in neuronal membrane integrity. Given recent findings showing amelioration of psychopathology using fatty acid supplementation, our findings also bear relevance for sphingolipids as potential biomarkers of the disease.

  20. Sphingosine Kinase 2 and Ceramide Transport as Key Targets of the Natural Flavonoid Luteolin to Induce Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cells.

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    Loubna Abdel Hadi

    Full Text Available The plant flavonoid luteolin exhibits different biological effects, including anticancer properties. Little is known on the molecular mechanisms underlying its actions in colorectal cancer (CRC. Here we investigated the effects of luteolin on colon cancer cells, focusing on the balance between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, two sphingoid mediators with opposite roles on cell fate. Using cultured cells, we found that physiological concentrations of luteolin induce the elevation of ceramide, followed by apoptotic death of colon cancer cells, but not of differentiated enterocytes. Pulse studies revealed that luteolin inhibits ceramide anabolism to complex sphingolipids. Further experiments led us to demonstrate that luteolin induces an alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER-Golgi flow of ceramide, pivotal to its metabolic processing to complex sphingolipids. We report that luteolin exerts its action by inhibiting both Akt activation, and sphingosine kinase (SphK 2, with the consequent reduction of S1P, an Akt stimulator. S1P administration protected colon cancer cells from luteolin-induced apoptosis, most likely by an intracellular, receptor-independent mechanism. Overall this study reveals for the first time that the dietary flavonoid luteolin exerts toxic effects on colon cancer cells by inhibiting both S1P biosynthesis and ceramide traffic, suggesting its dietary introduction/supplementation as a potential strategy to improve existing treatments in CRC.

  1. The Arabidopsis translatome cell-specific mRNA atlas: Mining suberin and cutin lipid monomer biosynthesis genes as an example for data application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustroph, Angelika; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2010-03-01

    Plants consist of distinct cell types distinguished by position, morphological features and metabolic activities. We recently developed a method to extract cell-type specific mRNA populations by immunopurification of ribosome-associated mRNAs. Microarray profiles of 21 cell-specific mRNA populations from seedling roots and shoots comprise the Arabidopsis Translatome dataset. This gene expression atlas provides a new tool for the study of cell-specific processes. Here we provide an example of how genes involved in a pathway limited to one or few cell-types can be further characterized and new candidate genes can be predicted. Cells of the root endodermis produce suberin as an inner barrier between the cortex and stele, whereas the shoot epidermal cells form cutin as a barrier to the external environment. Both polymers consist of fatty acid derivates, and share biosynthetic origins. We use the Arabidopsis Translatome dataset to demonstrate the significant cell-specific expression patterns of genes involved in those biosynthetic processes and suggest new candidate genes in the biosynthesis of suberin and cutin.

  2. Characterization of the action of S 21403 (mitiglinide) on insulin secretion and biosynthesis in normal and diabetic β-cells

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    S 21403 (mitiglinide) is a new drug for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Its action on insulin release and biosynthesis was investigated in several experimental systems utilizing pancreas from normal and T2DM animals.At high concentrations (10 μM), S 21403, like classical sulphonylurea, induced insulin release in the absence of glucose. In contrast, at therapeutic (0.1–1.0 μM) concentrations, S 21403 amplified insulin secretion glucose dose-dependently and with similar magnitude in normal and...

  3. [Overexpression of four fatty acid synthase genes elevated the efficiency of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis in mammalian cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guiming; Saleh, Abdulmomen Ali Mohammed; Bahwal, Said Ahmed; Wang, Kunfu; Wang, Mingfu; Wang, Didi; Ge, Tangdong; Sun, Jie

    2014-09-01

    Three long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4n-6), are the most biologically active polyunsaturated fatty acids in the body. They are important in developing and maintaining the brain function, and in preventing and treating many diseases such as cardiovascular disease, inflammation and cancer. Although mammals can biosynthesize these long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, the efficiency is very low and dietary intake is needed to meet the requirement. In this study, a multiple-genes expression vector carrying mammalian A6/A5 fatty acid desaturases and multiple-genes expression vector carrying mammalian Δ6/Δ5 fatty acid desaturases and Δ6/Δ5 fatty acid elongases coding genes was used to transfect HEK293T cells, then the overexpression of the target genes was detected. GC-MS analysis shows that the biosynthesis efficiency and level of DHA, EPA and ARA were significantly increased in cells transfected with the multiple-genes expression vector. Particularly, DHA level in these cells was 2.5 times higher than in the control cells. This study indicates mammal possess a certain mechanism for suppression of high level of biosynthesis of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the overexpression of Δ6/Δ5 fatty acid desaturases and Δ6/Δ5 fatty acid elongases broke this suppression mechanism so that the level of DHA, EPA and ARA was significantly increased. This study also provides a basis for potential applications of this gene construct in transgenic animal to produce high level of these long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid.

  4. Magnolol Affects Cellular Proliferation, Polyamine Biosynthesis and Catabolism-Linked Protein Expression and Associated Cellular Signaling Pathways in Human Prostate Cancer Cells in vitro

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    Brendan T. McKeown

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in men in Canada and the United States. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development and progression of many cancers, including prostate cancer. Context and purpose of this study: This study investigated the effects of magnolol, a compound found in the roots and bark of the magnolia tree Magnolia officinalis, on cellular proliferation and proliferation-linked activities of PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Results: PC3 cells exposed to magnolol at a concentration of 80 μM for 6 hours exhibited decreased protein expression of ornithine decarboxylase, a key regulator in polyamine biosynthesis, as well as affecting the expression of other proteins involved in polyamine biosynthesis and catabolism. Furthermore, protein expression of the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, a key regulatory protein associated with DNA synthesis, was significantly decreased. Finally, the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase, PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, NFκB (nuclear factor of kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and AP-1 (activator protein 1 cellular signaling pathways were assayed to determine which, if any, of these pathways magnolol exposure would alter. Protein expressions of p-JNK-1 and c-jun were significantly increased while p-p38, JNK-1/2, PI3Kp85, p-PI3Kp85, p-Akt, NFκBp65, p-IκBα and IκBα protein expressions were significantly decreased. Conclusions: These alterations further support the anti-proliferative effects of magnolol on PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro and suggest that magnolol may have potential as a novel anti-prostate cancer agent.

  5. Ganglioside biosynthesis in developing brains and apoptotic cancer cells: X. regulation of glyco-genes involved in GD3 and Sialyl-Lex/a syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Subhash; Ma, Rui; Moskal, Joseph R; Basu, Manju

    2012-06-01

    Gangliosides, the acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) containing N-acetylgalactosamine and sialic acid are ubiquitous in the central nervous system. At least six DSL-glycosyltransferase activities (GLTs Gangliosides, the acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) containing N-acetylgalactosamine and sialic acid (or NAc-Neuraminic acid) are ubiquitous in the central nervous system. At least six GSL-glycosyltransferase activities (GLTs) of Basu-Roseman pathway catalyzing the biosynthesis of these gangliosides have been characterized in developing chicken brains. Most of these glyco-genes are expressed in the early stages (7-17 days) of brain development and lowered in the adult stage, but the cause of reduction of enzymatic activities of these GLTs in the adult stages is not known. In order to study glyco-gene regulation we used four clonal metastatic cancer cells of colon and breast cancer tissue origin (Colo-205, SKBR-3, MDA-468, and MCF-3). The glyco-genes for synthesis of SA-LeX and SA-LeA (which contain N-acetylglucosamine, sialic acid and fucose) in these cells were modulated differently at different phases (between 2 and 48 h) of apoptotic inductions. L-PPMP, D-PDMP (inhibitor of glucosylceramide biosynthesis), Betulinic Acid (a triterpinoid isolated from bark of certain trees and used for cancer treatment in China), Tamoxifen a drug in use in the west for treatment of early stages of the disease in breast cancer patients), and cis-platin (an inhibitor of DNA biosynthesis used for testicular cancer patients) were used for induction of apoptosis in the above-mentioned cell lines. Within 2-6 h, transcriptional modulation of a number of glyco-genes was observed by DNA-micro-array (containing over 300 glyco genes attached to the glass cover slips) studies. Under long incubation time (24-48 h) almost all of the glyco-genes were downregulated. The cause of these glyco-gene regulations during apoptotic induction in metastatic carcinoma cells is unknown and needs future

  6. Diadenosine triphosphate is a novel factor which in combination with cyclodextrins synergistically enhances the biosynthesis of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera cv. Monastrell suspension cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrowska-Borek, Małgorzata; Czekała, Lukasz; Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Pedreño, María Angeles; Guranowski, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    Dinucleoside polyphosphates are considered as signal molecules that may evoke response of plant cells to stress. Other compounds whose biological effects have been recognized are cyclodextrins. They are cyclic oligosaccharides that chemically resemble the alkyl-derived pectic oligosaccharides naturally released from the cell walls during fungal attack, and they act as true elicitors, since, when added to plant cell culture, they induce the expression of genes involved in some secondary metabolism pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that some dinucleoside polyphosphates triggered the biosynthesis of enzymes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Vitis vinifera suspension cultured cells, cyclodextrins were shown to enhance the accumulation of trans-resveratrol, one of the basic units of the stilbenes derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Here, we show that diadenosine triphosphate, applied alone or in combination with cyclodextrins to the grapevine suspension-cultured cells, increased the transcript level of genes encoding key phenylpropanoid-pathway enzymes as well as the trans-resveratrol production inside cells and its secretion into the extracellular medium. In the latter case, these two compounds acted synergistically. However, the accumulation of trans-resveratrol and its glucoside trans-piceid inside cells were stimulated much better by diadenosine triphosphate than by cyclodextrins.

  7. mTORC1 Controls PNS Myelination along the mTORC1-RXRγ-SREBP-Lipid Biosynthesis Axis in Schwann Cells

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    Camilla Norrmén

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Myelin formation during peripheral nervous system (PNS development, and reformation after injury and in disease, requires multiple intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Akt/mTOR signaling has emerged as a major player involved, but the molecular mechanisms and downstream effectors are virtually unknown. Here, we have used Schwann-cell-specific conditional gene ablation of raptor and rictor, which encode essential components of the mTOR complexes 1 (mTORC1 and 2 (mTORC2, respectively, to demonstrate that mTORC1 controls PNS myelination during development. In this process, mTORC1 regulates lipid biosynthesis via sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs. This course of action is mediated by the nuclear receptor RXRγ, which transcriptionally regulates SREBP1c downstream of mTORC1. Absence of mTORC1 causes delayed myelination initiation as well as hypomyelination, together with abnormal lipid composition and decreased nerve conduction velocity. Thus, we have identified the mTORC1-RXRγ-SREBP axis controlling lipid biosynthesis as a major contributor to proper peripheral nerve function.

  8. Cotton GalT1 encoding a putative glycosyltransferase is involved in regulation of cell wall pectin biosynthesis during plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li-Xia; Rao, Yue; Li, Long; Huang, Jun-Feng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Li, Xue-Bao

    2013-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), are a group of highly glycosylated proteins that are found throughout the plant kingdom. To date, glycosyltransferases that glycosylate AGP backbone have remained largely unknown. In this study, a gene (GhGalT1) encoding a putative β-1,3-galactosyltransferase (GalT) was identified in cotton. GhGalT1, belonging to CAZy GT31 family, is the type II membrane protein that contains an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal galactosyltransferase functional domain. A subcellular localization assay demonstrated that GhGalT1 was localized in the Golgi apparatus. RT-PCR analysis revealed that GhGalT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in hypocotyls, roots, fibers and ovules. Overexpression of GhGalT1 in Arabidopsis promoted plant growth and metabolism. The transgenic seedlings had much longer primary roots, higher chlorophyll content, higher photosynthetic efficiency, the increased biomass, and the enhanced tolerance to exogenous D-arabinose and D-galactose. In addition, gas chromatography (GC) analysis of monosaccharide composition of cell wall fractions showed that pectin was changed in the transgenic plants, compared with that of wild type. Three genes (GAUT8, GAUT9 and xgd1) involved in pectin biosynthesis were dramatically up-regulated in the transgenic lines. These data suggested that GhGalT1 may be involved in regulation of pectin biosynthesis required for plant development.

  9. Co-option of the sphingolipid metabolism for the production of nitroalkene defensive chemicals in termite soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirošová, Anna; Jančařík, Andrej; Menezes, Riya C; Bazalová, Olga; Dolejšová, Klára; Vogel, Heiko; Jedlička, Pavel; Buček, Aleš; Brabcová, Jana; Majer, Pavel; Hanus, Robert; Svatoš, Aleš

    2017-01-23

    The aliphatic nitroalkene (E)-1-nitropentadec-1-ene (NPD), reported in early seventies in soldiers of the termite genus Prorhinotermes, was the first documented nitro compound produced by insects. Yet, its biosynthetic origin has long remained unknown. Here, we investigated in detail the biosynthesis of NPD in P. simplex soldiers. First, we track the dynamics in major metabolic pathways during soldier ontogeny, with emphasis on likely NPD precursors and intermediates. Second, we propose a hypothesis of NPD formation and verify its individual steps using in vivo incubations of putative precursors and intermediates. Third, we use a de novo assembled RNA-Seq profiles of workers and soldiers to identify putative enzymes underlying NPD formation. And fourth, we describe the caste- and age-specific expression dynamics of candidate initial genes of the proposed biosynthetic pathway. Our observations provide a strong support to the following biosynthetic scenario of NPD formation, representing an analogy of the sphingolipid pathway starting with the condensation of tetradecanoic acid with l-serine and leading to the formation of a C16 sphinganine. The C16 sphinganine is then oxidized at the terminal carbon to give rise to 2-amino-3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid, further oxidized to 2-amino-3-oxohexadecanoic acid. Subsequent decarboxylation yields 1-aminopentadecan-2-one, which then proceeds through six-electron oxidation of the amino moiety to give rise to 1-nitropentadecan-2-one. Keto group reduction and hydroxyl moiety elimination lead to NPD. The proposed biosynthetic sequence has been constructed from age-related quantitative dynamics of individual intermediates and confirmed by the detection of labeled products downstream of the administered labeled intermediates. Comparative RNA-Seq analyses followed by qRT-PCR validation identified orthologs of serine palmitoyltransferase and 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase genes as highly expressed in the NPD production site, i

  10. Mifepristone treatment results in differential regulation of glycerolipid biosynthesis in baby hamster kidney cells expressing a mifepristone-inducible ABCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauff, Kristin D; Mitchell, Ryan W; Xu, Fred Y; Dembinski, Thomas; Mymin, David; Zha, Xiaohui; Choy, Patrick C; Hatch, Grant M

    2011-09-01

    ATP binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) transports cholesterol, phospholipids and lipophilic molecules to and across cellular membranes. We examined if ABCA1 expression altered cellular de novo glycerolipid biosynthesis in growing Baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Mock BHK cells or cells expressing a mifepristone-inducible ABCA1 (ABCA1) were incubated plus or minus mifepristone and then with [(3)H]serine or [(3)H]inositol or [(3)H]ethanolamine or [methyl-(3)H]choline or [(3)H]glycerol or [(14)C]oleate and radioactivity incorporated into glycerolipids determined. Mifepristone did not affect [1,3-(3)H]glycerol or [(14)C]oleate or [(3)H]ethanolamine or [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake in BHK cells. In contrast, [(3)H]glycerol and [(14)C]oleate incorporated into phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) were elevated 2.4-fold (p < 0.05) and 54% (p < 0.05), respectively, upon ABCA1 induction confirming increased PtdSer biosynthesis from these precursors. However, mifepristone inhibited [(3)H]serine uptake and incorporation into PtdSer indicating that PtdSer synthesis from serine in BHK cells is dependent on serine uptake. Mifepristone stimulated [(3)H]inositol uptake in mock and ABCA1 cells but not its incorporation into phosphatidylinositol indicating that its synthesis from inositol is independent of inositol uptake in BHK cells. [(3)H]glycerol and [(14)C]oleate incorporated into triacylglycerol were reduced and into diacylglycerol elevated only in mifepristone-induced ABCA1 expressing cells due to a decrease in diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 (DGAT-1) activity. The presence of trichostatin A, a class I and II histone deacetylase inhibitor, reversed the ABCA1-mediated reduction in DGAT-1 activity but did not affect DGAT-1 mRNA expression. Thus, mifepristone has diverse effects on de novo glycerolipid synthesis. We suggest that caution should be exercised when using mifepristone-inducible systems for studies of glycerolipid metabolism in cells expressing glucocorticoid responsive receptors.

  11. The Synthetic Amphipathic Peptidomimetic LTX109 Is a Potent Fungicide That Disturbs Plasma Membrane Integrity in a Sphingolipid Dependent Manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus; Torbensen, Rasmus; Larsen, Camilla Eggert;

    2013-01-01

    The peptidomimetic LTX109 (arginine-tertbutyl tryptophan-arginine-phenylethan) was previously shown to have antibacterial properties. Here, we investigated the activity of this novel antimicrobial peptidomimetic on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that LTX109 was an efficient fungicid...... observations are consistent with a model in which LTX109 kills S. cerevisiae by nonspecific destabilization of the plasma membrane through direct or indirect interaction with the sphingolipids....... that killed all viable cells in an exponentially growing population as well as a large proportion of cells in biofilm formed on an abiotic surface. LTX109 had similar killing kinetics to the membrane-permeabilizing fungicide amphotericin B, which led us to investigate the ability of LTX109 to disrupt plasma...... membrane integrity. S. cerevisiae cells exposed to a high concentration of LTX109 showed rapid release of potassium and amino acids, suggesting that LTX109 acted by destabilizing the plasma membrane. This was supported by the finding that cells were permeable to the fluorescent nucleic acid stain SYTOX...

  12. Gibberellin biosynthesis in Gibberlla fujikuroi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, S.W.; Coolbaugh, R.C. (Iowa State Univ., Ames (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a group of plant growth hormones which were first isolated from the fungus Gibberella fujikuori. We have examined the biosynthesis of GAs in this fungus in liquid cultures using HPLC followed by GC-MS. Furthermore we have used cell-free enzyme extracts with {sup 14}C-labeled intermediates to examine the regulation of specific parts of the biosynthetic pathway. GA{sub 3} is the predominant GA in well aerated cultures. GA{sub 4} and GA{sub 7}, intermediates in GA{sub 3} biosynthesis, accumulate in cultures with low levels of dissolved oxygen, but are not detectable in more aerated cultures. Light stimulates GA production in G. fujikuroi cultures grown from young stock. Cell-free enzyme studies indicate that light has no effect on incorporation of mevalonic acid into kaurene, but does significantly stimulate the oxidation of kaurenoic acid.

  13. Endogenous hydrogen peroxide is a key factor in the yeast extract-induced activation of biphenyl biosynthesis in cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiaofang; Lei, Caiyan; Huang, Lili; Li, Xing; Hao, He; Du, Zhigao; Wang, Hong; Ye, Hechun; Beerhues, Ludger; Liu, Benye

    2012-01-01

    Biphenyls are unique phytoalexins produced by plants belonging to Pyrinae, a subtribe of the economically important Rosaceae family. The formation of aucuparin, a well-known biphenyl, is induced by yeast extract (YE) in cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia. However, the molecular mechanism underlying YE-induced activation of biphenyl biosynthesis remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that the addition of YE to the cell cultures results in a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS; H(2)O(2) and O(2) (-)), followed by transcriptional activation of the biphenyl synthase 1 gene (BIS1) encoding the key enzyme of the biphenyl biosynthetic pathway and aucuparin accumulation. Pretreatment of the cell cultures with ROS scavenger dihydrolipoic acid and NADPH oxidase-specific inhibitor diphenylene iodonium abolished all of the above YE-induced biological events. However, when the cell cultures was pretreated with superoxide dismutase specific inhibitor N,N-diethyldithiocarbamic acid, although O(2) (-) continued to be generated, the H(2)O(2) accumulation, BIS1 expression and aucuparin production were blocked. Interestingly, exogenous supply of H(2)O(2) in the range of 0.05-10 mM failed to induce aucuparin accumulation. These results indicate that endogenous generation of H(2)O(2) rather than that of O(2) (-) is a key factor in YE-induced accumulation of biphenyl phytoalexins in cell cultures of S. aucuparia.

  14. Preservation of Bacillus firmus Strain 37 and Optimization of Cyclodextrin Biosynthesis by Cells Immobilized on Loofa Sponge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Moriwaki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The preservation of Bacillus firmus strain 37 cells by lyophilization was evaluated and response surface methodology (RSM was used to optimize the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD production by cells immobilized on loofa sponge. Interactions were studied with the variables temperature, pH and dextrin concentration using a central composite design (CCD. Immobilization time influence on β-CD production was also investigated. B. firmus strain 37 cells remained viable after one year of storage, showing that the lyophilization is a suitable method for preservation of the microorganism. From the three-dimensional diagrams and contour plots, the best conditions for β-CD production were determined: temperature 60 °C, pH 8, and 18% dextrin. Considering that the amount of dextrin was high, a new assay was carried out, in which dextrin concentrations of 10, 15, and 18% were tested and the temperature of 60 °C and pH 8 were maintained. The results achieved showed very small differences and therefore, for economic reasons, the use of 10% dextrin is suggested. Increasing the immobilization time of cells immobilized on synthetic sponge the β-CD production decreased and did not change for cells immobilized on loofa sponge. The results of this research are important for microorganism preservation and essential in the optimization of the biosynthesis of CD.

  15. The mycobacterial acyltransferase PapA5 is required for biosynthesis of cell wall-associated phenolic glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavadi, Sivagami Sundaram; Onwueme, Kenolisa C; Edupuganti, Uthamaphani R; Jerome, Jeff; Chatterjee, Delphi; Soll, Clifford E; Quadri, Luis E N

    2012-05-01

    Phenolic glycolipids (PGLs) are non-covalently bound components of the outer membrane of many clinically relevant mycobacterial pathogens, and play important roles in pathogen biology. We report a mutational analysis that conclusively demonstrates that the conserved acyltransferase-encoding gene papA5 is essential for PGL production. In addition, we provide an in vitro acyltransferase activity analysis that establishes proof of principle for the competency of PapA5 to utilize diol-containing polyketide compounds of mycobacterial origin as acyl-acceptor substrates. Overall, the results reported herein are in line with a model in which PapA5 catalyses the acylation of diol-containing polyketides to form PGLs. These studies advance our understanding of the biosynthesis of an important group of mycobacterial glycolipids and suggest that PapA5 might be an attractive target for exploring the development of antivirulence drugs.

  16. Supplementation with linoleic acid-rich soybean oil stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via increased oxidative stress and diacylglycerol acyltransferase1-mediated triglyceride biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Oren; Jeries, Helana; Hayek, Tony; Aviram, Michael

    2017-01-02

    During the last decades there has been a staggering rise in human consumption of soybean oil (SO) and its major polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid (LA). The role of SO or LA in cardiovascular diseases is highly controversial, and their impact on macrophage foam cell formation, the hallmark of early atherogenesis, is unclear. To investigate the effects of high SO or LA intake on macrophage lipid metabolism and the related mechanisms of action, C57BL/6 mice were orally supplemented with increasing levels of SO-based emulsion or equivalent levels of purified LA for 1 month, followed by analyses of lipid accumulation and peroxidation in aortas, serum and in peritoneal macrophages (MPM) of the mice. Lipid peroxidation and triglyceride mass in aortas from SO or LA supplemented mice were dose-dependently and significantly increased. In MPM from SO or LA supplemented mice, lipid peroxides were significantly increased and a marked accumulation of cellular triglycerides was found in accordance with enhanced triglyceride biosynthesis rate and overexpression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 (DGAT1), the key enzyme in triglyceride biosynthesis. In cultured J774A.1 macrophages treated with SO or LA, triglyceride accumulated via increased oxidative stress and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated overexpression of DGAT1. Accordingly, anti-oxidants (pomegranate polyphenols), inhibition of p38 MAPK (by SB202190) or DGAT1 (by oleanolic acid), all significantly attenuated SO or LA-induced macrophage triglyceride accumulation. These findings reveal novel mechanisms by which supplementation with SO or LA stimulate macrophage foam cell formation, suggesting a pro-atherogenic role for overconsumption of SO or LA. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(1):100-116, 2017.

  17. The embAB genes of Mycobacterium avium encode an arabinosyl transferase involved in cell wall arabinan biosynthesis that is the target for the antimycobacterial drug ethambutol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, A E; Besra, G S; Ford, M E; Mikusová, K; Belisle, J T; Brennan, P J; Inamine, J M

    1996-10-15

    The antimycobacterial compound ethambutol [Emb; dextro-2,2'-(ethylenediimino)-di-1-butanol] is used to treat tuberculosis as well as disseminated infections caused by Mycobacterium avium. The critical target for Emb lies in the pathway for the biosynthesis of cell wall arabinogalactan, but the molecular mechanisms for drug action and resistance are unknown. The cellular target for Emb was sought using drug resistance, via target overexpression by a plasmid vector, as a selection tool. This strategy led to the cloning of the M. avium emb region which rendered the otherwise susceptible Mycobacterium smegmatis host resistant to Emb. This region contains three complete open reading frames (ORFs), embR, embA, and embB. The translationally coupled embA and embB genes are necessary and sufficient for an Emb-resistant phenotype which depends on gene copy number, and their putative novel membrane proteins are homologous to each other. The predicted protein encoded by embR, which is related to known transcriptional activators from Streptomyces, is expendable for the phenotypic expression of Emb resistance, but an intact divergent promoter region between embR and embAB is required. An Emb-sensitive cell-free assay for arabinan biosynthesis shows that overexpression of embAB is associated with high-level Emb-resistant arabinosyl transferase activity, and that embR appears to modulate the in vitro level of this activity. These data suggest that embAB encode the drug target of Emb, the arabinosyl transferase responsible for the polymerization of arabinose into the arabinan of arabinogalactan, and that overproduction of this Emb-sensitive target leads to Emb resistance.

  18. Biosynthesis and biodegradation of wood components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, T. (ed.)

    1985-01-01

    A textbook containing 22 chapters by various authors covers the structure of wood, the localization of polysaccharides and lignins in wood cell walls, metabolism and synthetic function of cambial tissue, cell organelles and their function in the biosynthesis of cell wall components, biosynthesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides, lignin, cutin, suberin and associated waxes, phenolic acids and monolignols, quinones, flavonoids, tannins, stilbenes and terpenoid wood extractives, the occurrence of extractives, the metabolism of phenolic acids, wood degradation by micro-organisms and fungi, and biodegradation of cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin, and aromatic extractives of wood. An index is included.

  19. Antimicrobial Activity of Sphingolipids Isolated from the Stems of Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Three antimicrobial sphingolipids were separated by bioassay-guided isolation from the chloroform fraction of the crude methanol extract of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. stems and identified as (2S,3S,4R,10E-2-[(2'R-2-hydroxytetra-cosanoylamino]-1,3,4-octadecanetriol-10-ene (1, 1-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(2S,3S,4R,10E-2-[(2'R-2-hydroxy-tetracosanoylamino]-1,3,4-octadecanetriol-10-ene (2 and soya-cerebroside I (3 by their physicochemical properties and spectroscopic analysis. They were evaluated to show antifungal and antibacterial activity on test microorganisms including four fungal and three bacterial species. Among them, compound 1, a relatively low polarity aglycone,  exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than its corresponding glycoside 2. The results indicated that sphingolipids could be the main antimicrobial compounds in the crude methanol extract of cucumber stems.

  20. Sphingolipid management by an orchestra of lipid transfer proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, S.; van Meer, G.

    2008-01-01

    The various membranes in eukaryotic cells have unique lipid compositions. Despite important discoveries in lipid research over recent decades, the basic principles by which cells define their membrane compositions are essentially unknown. Cells must sense the concentration of each lipid, integrate s

  1. Sphingolipid metabolism correlates with cerebrospinal fluid Beta amyloid levels in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred N Fonteh

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer's disease (AD is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but

  2. Examination of the Effects of a Sphingolipid-Enriched Lipid Fraction from Wheat Gluten on the Incidence of Diabetes in BBdp Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Wenjuan

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to examine if a sphingolipid-enriched lipid fraction from wheat gluten could affect the incidence of type I diabetes in BioBreeding diabetes prone (BBdp) rats. Wheat gluten was extracted with a chloroform-methanol (CM) mixture to isolate most of the lipids. Isolated lipids were subjected to silica gel column chromatography and saponification to remove most of neutral lipids and phospholipids, leaving behind a lipid fraction enriched in sphingolipids. This sphingolipid-...

  3. PtoMYB156 is involved in negative regulation of phenylpropanoid metabolism and secondary cell wall biosynthesis during wood formation in poplar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Zhao, Xin; Ran, Lingyu; Li, Chaofeng; Fan, Di; Luo, Keming

    2017-01-01

    Some R2R3 MYB transcription factors have been shown to be major regulators of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway and impact secondary wall formation in plants. In this study, we describe the functional characterization of PtoMYB156, encoding a R2R3-MYB transcription factor, from Populus tomentosa. Expression pattern analysis showed that PtoMYB156 is widely expressed in all tissues examined, but predominantly in leaves and developing wood cells. PtoMYB156 localized to the nucleus and acted as a transcriptional repressor. Overexpression of PtoMYB156 in poplar repressed phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes, leading to a reduction in the amounts of total phenolic and flavonoid compounds. Transgenic plants overexpressing PtoMYB156 also displayed a dramatic decrease in secondary wall thicknesses of xylem fibers and the content of cellulose, lignin and xylose compared with wild-type plants. Transcript accumulation of secondary wall biosynthetic genes was down-regulated by PtoMYB156 overexpression. Transcriptional activation assays revealed that PtoMYB156 was able to repress the promoter activities of poplar CESA17, C4H2 and GT43B. By contrast, knockout of PtoMYB156 by CRISPR/Cas9 in poplar resulted in ectopic deposition of lignin, xylan and cellulose during secondary cell wall formation. Taken together, these results show that PtoMYB156 may repress phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and negatively regulate secondary cell wall formation in poplar. PMID:28117379

  4. The rice dynamin-related protein DRP2B mediates membrane trafficking, and thereby plays a critical role in secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guangyan; Li, Rui; Qian, Qian; Song, Xueqin; Liu, Xiangling; Yu, Yanchun; Zeng, Dali; Wan, Jianmin; Li, Jiayang; Zhou, Yihua

    2010-10-01

    Membrane trafficking between the plasma membrane (PM) and intracellular compartments is an important process that regulates the deposition and metabolism of cell wall polysaccharides. Dynamin-related proteins (DRPs), which function in membrane tubulation and vesiculation are closely associated with cell wall biogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms by which DRPs participate in cell wall formation are poorly understood. Here, we report the functional characterization of Brittle Culm3 (BC3), a gene encoding OsDRP2B. Consistent with the expression of BC3 in mechanical tissues, the bc3 mutation reduces mechanical strength, which results from decreased cellulose content and altered secondary wall structure. OsDRP2B, one of three members of the DRP2 subfamily in rice (Oryza sativa L.), was identified as an authentic membrane-associated dynamin via in vitro biochemical analyses. Subcellular localization of fluorescence-tagged OsDRP2B and several compartment markers in protoplast cells showed that this protein not only lies at the PM and the clathrin-mediated vesicles, but also is targeted to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). An FM4-64 uptake assay in transgenic plants that express green fluorescent protein-tagged OsDRP2B verified its involvement in an endocytic pathway. BC3 mutation and overexpression altered the abundance of cellulose synthase catalytic subunit 4 (OsCESA4) in the PM and in the endomembrane systems. All of these findings lead us to conclude that OsDRP2B participates in the endocytic pathway, probably as well as in post-Golgi membrane trafficking. Mutation of OsDRP2B disturbs the membrane trafficking that is essential for normal cellulose biosynthesis of the secondary cell wall, thereby leading to inferior mechanical properties in rice plants.

  5. Knockdown of β3GnT8 reverses 5-fluorouracil resistance in human colorectal cancer cells via inhibition the biosynthesis of polylactosamine-type N-glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Yu, Meiyun; Xu, Xu; Gao, Liping; Ni, Jianlong; Luo, Zhiguo; Wu, Shiliang

    2014-12-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is known to be associated with cancer chemoresistance. β-1,3-N-acetyl-glucosaminyltransferase (β3GnT)8, which synthesizes polylactosamine on β1-6 branched N-glycans, is dramatically upregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC). 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance remains a major obstacle to the chemotherapy of CRC. However, little is known with regard to the correlation between 5‑FU resistance and the expression of β3GnT8 in CRC. In this study, a 5-FU‑resistant cell line (SW620/5-FU) was generated, and 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) of 5-FU was determined by MTT assay. Flow cytometry and lectin blot analysis were performed to detect the alteration of polylactosamine structures. Quantitative RT-‑PCR and western blot analysis were used to identify and evaluate candidate genes involved in the synthesis of polylactosamine in SW620/5-FU cells. We found polylactosamine chains were significantly increased in SW620/5-FU cells. Inhibition of the biosynthesis of polylactosamine by 3'-azidothymidine (AZT) was able to reduce 5-FU tolerance. Further studies showed that β3GnT8 expression was also upregulated in 5-FU‑resistant cancer cells, and knockdown of β3GnT8 by RNA interference reversed 5-FU resistance through, at least partly, by suppressing the formation of polylactosamine. In conclusion, the alteration of β3GnT8 in CRC cells correlates with tumor sensitivity to the chemotherapeutic drug and has significant implication for the development of new treatment strategies.

  6. Biosynthesis of magnetic nanoparticles by human mesenchymal stem cells following transfection with the magnetotactic bacterial gene mms6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfick, Alistair; Rischitor, Grigore; Mouras, Rabah; Azfer, Asim; Lungaro, Lisa; Uhlarz, Marc; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Lucocq, John; Gamal, Wesam; Bagnaninchi, Pierre; Semple, Scott; Salter, Donald M

    2017-01-04

    The use of stem cells to support tissue repair is facilitated by loading of the therapeutic cells with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enabling magnetic tracking and targeting. Current methods for magnetizing cells use artificial MNPs and have disadvantages of variable uptake, cellular cytotoxicity and loss of nanoparticles on cell division. Here we demonstrate a transgenic approach to magnetize human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs are genetically modified by transfection with the mms6 gene derived from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, a magnetotactic bacterium that synthesises single-magnetic domain crystals which are incorporated into magnetosomes. Following transfection of MSCs with the mms6 gene there is bio-assimilated synthesis of intracytoplasmic magnetic nanoparticles which can be imaged by MR and which have no deleterious effects on cell proliferation, migration or differentiation. The assimilation of magnetic nanoparticle synthesis into mammalian cells creates a real and compelling, cytocompatible, alternative to exogenous administration of MNPs.

  7. Biosynthesis of magnetic nanoparticles by human mesenchymal stem cells following transfection with the magnetotactic bacterial gene mms6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfick, Alistair; Rischitor, Grigore; Mouras, Rabah; Azfer, Asim; Lungaro, Lisa; Uhlarz, Marc; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Lucocq, John; Gamal, Wesam; Bagnaninchi, Pierre; Semple, Scott; Salter, Donald M

    2017-01-01

    The use of stem cells to support tissue repair is facilitated by loading of the therapeutic cells with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enabling magnetic tracking and targeting. Current methods for magnetizing cells use artificial MNPs and have disadvantages of variable uptake, cellular cytotoxicity and loss of nanoparticles on cell division. Here we demonstrate a transgenic approach to magnetize human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs are genetically modified by transfection with the mms6 gene derived from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, a magnetotactic bacterium that synthesises single-magnetic domain crystals which are incorporated into magnetosomes. Following transfection of MSCs with the mms6 gene there is bio-assimilated synthesis of intracytoplasmic magnetic nanoparticles which can be imaged by MR and which have no deleterious effects on cell proliferation, migration or differentiation. The assimilation of magnetic nanoparticle synthesis into mammalian cells creates a real and compelling, cytocompatible, alternative to exogenous administration of MNPs. PMID:28051139

  8. Chlamydia trachomatis intercepts Golgi-derived sphingolipids through a Rab14-mediated transport required for bacterial development and replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahí Capmany

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis are obligate intracellular bacteria that survive and replicate in a bacterial-modified phagosome called inclusion. As other intracellular parasites, these bacteria subvert the phagocytic pathway to avoid degradation in phagolysosomes and exploit trafficking pathways to acquire both energy and nutrients essential for their survival. Rabs are host proteins that control intracellular vesicular trafficking. Rab14, a Golgi-related Rab, controls Golgi to endosomes transport. Since Chlamydia establish a close relationship with the Golgi apparatus, the recruitment and participation of Rab14 on inclusion development and bacteria growth were analyzed. Time course analysis revealed that Rab14 associated with inclusions by 10 h post infection and was maintained throughout the entire developmental cycle. The recruitment was bacterial protein synthesis-dependent but independent of microtubules and Golgi integrity. Overexpression of Rab14 dominant negative mutants delayed inclusion enlargement, and impaired bacteria replication as determined by IFU. Silencing of Rab14 by siRNA also decreased bacteria multiplication and infectivity. By electron microscopy, aberrant bacteria were observed in cells overexpressing the cytosolic negative Rab14 mutant. Our results showed that Rab14 facilitates the delivery of sphingolipids required for bacterial development and replication from the Golgi to chlamydial inclusions. Novel anti-chlamydial therapies could be developed based on the knowledge of how bacteria subvert host vesicular transport events through Rabs manipulation.

  9. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and their interactions play different roles in Cupressus lusitanica cell death and phytoalexin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Fujita, Koki; Sakai, Kokki

    2007-01-01

    Beta-thujaplicin Is a natural troponoid with strong antifungal, antiviral, and anticancer activities. Beta-thujaplicin production in yeast elicitor-treated Cupressus lusitanica cell culture and its relationships with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production and hypersensitive cell death were investigated. Superoxide anion radical (O2*-) induced cell death and inhibited beta-thujaplicin accumulation, whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced beta-thujaplicin accumulation but did not significantly affect cell death. Both elicitor and O2*- induced programmed cell death, which can be blocked by protease inhibitors, protein kinase inhibitors, and Ca2+ chelators. Elicitor-induced NO generation was nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent. Inhibition of NO generation by NOS inhibitors and NO scavenger partly blocked the elicitor-induced beta-thujaplicin accumulation and cell death, and NO donors strongly induced cell death. Interaction among NO, H2O2, and O2*- shows that NO production and H2O2 production are interdependent, but NO and O2*- accumulation were negatively related because of coconsumption of NO and O2*-. NO- and O2*- -induced cell death required each other, and both were required for elicitor-induced cell death. A direct interaction between NO and O2*- was implicated in the production of a potent oxidant peroxynitrite, which might mediate the elicitor-induced cell death.

  10. Coupling of the p75 neurotrophin receptor to sphingolipid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, R T; Carter, B D

    1998-06-19

    The neurotrophins are a family of growth factors involved in the survival and differentiation of specific populations of neurons and glial cells. Many of the trophic signals elicited by neurotrophins are initiated by the binding of these molecules to various Trk tyrosine kinase receptors. In contrast, recent data suggest that neurotrophin-mediated death signals are generated through the interaction of nerve growth factor with the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor, p75NTR, Neurotrophins may signal through p75NTR by stimulating sphingomyelin hydrolysis and generating ceramide in primary cultures of neurons and glial cells as well as in fibroblasts heterologously expressing p75NTR. The biochemical characteristics of p75NTR-dependent ceramide generation are discussed relative to the role of ceramide in p75NTR-dependent apoptosis and the activation of NF-kappa B.

  11. Cholesterol and sphingolipids in alcohol-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Anna; Colell, Anna; Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernandez-Checa, José C

    2008-03-01

    The pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD) is still poorly understood. One of the clues to its progression relates to the alcohol-mediated susceptibility of hepatocytes to cell death by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory cytokines. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) has been considered a key ALD mediator with acidic sphingomyelinase (ASMase)-mediated ceramide generation playing a critical role. TNF receptor 1 and 2 knock-out mice or ASMase(-/-) mice exhibit resistance to alcohol-mediated fatty liver and cell death. Furthermore, alcohol feeding has been shown to sensitize hepatocytes to TNF due to the limitation of mitochondrial glutathione (mGSH) through impaired import of GSH from the cytosol due to altered membrane order parameter caused by mitochondrial cholesterol increase. Selective pharmacological depletion of mGSH sensitizes hepatocytes to TNF-mediated cell death, which reproduces the observations found with alcohol feeding. TNF signaling analyses in hepatocytes with or without mGSH depletion indicate that mGSH prevents cardiolipin peroxidation (CLOOH) formation by TNF-induced ROS via ASMase and that CLOOH cooperates with oligomerized Bax to cause mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization through destabilization of the lipid bilayer via increased bilayer-to-inverted hexagonal phase transitions. Thus, activation of ASMase and cholesterol-mediated mGSH depletion both collaborate to promote alcohol-induced TNF-mediated hepatocellular damage, suggesting novel therapeutic opportunities in ALD.

  12. The biosynthesis and wall-binding of hemicelluloses in cellulose-deficient maize cells:An example of metabolic plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mara de Castro; Janice G Miller; Jose Luis Acebes; Antonio Encina; Penelope Garca-Angulo; Stephen C Fry

    2015-01-01

    Cell-suspension cultures (Zea mays L., Black Mexican sweet corn) habituated to 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) survive with reduced cellulose owing to hemicellulose network modification. We aimed to define the hemicellulose metabolism modifications in DCB-habituated maize cells showing a mild reduction in cellulose at different stages in the culture cycle. Using pulse-chase radiolabeling, we fed habituated and non-habituated cultures with [3H]arabinose, and traced the distribution of 3H-pentose residues between xylans, xyloglucans and other polymers in several cellular compartments for 5 h. Habituated cells were slower taking up exogenous [3H]arabinose. Tritium was incorporated into polysaccharide-bound arabinose and xylose residues, but habituated cells diverted a higher proportion of their new [3H] xylose residues into (hetero) xylans at the expense of xyloglucan synthesis. During logarithmic growth, habituated cells showed slower vesicular trafficking of polymers, especially xylans. Moreover, habituated cells showed a decrease in the strong wall-binding of all pentose-containing polysaccharides studied; correspondingly, especially in log-phase cultures, habituation increased the proportion of 3H-hemicelluloses ([3H]xylans and [3H]xyloglucan) sloughed into the medium. These findings could be related to the cell walls’ cellulose-deficiency, and consequent reduction in binding sites for hemicelluloses; the data could also reflect the habituated cells’ reduced capacity to integrate arabinox-ylans by extra-protoplasmic phenolic cross-linking, as well as xyloglucans, during wall assembly.

  13. Preclinical development of a C6-ceramide NanoLiposome, a novel sphingolipid therapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, Mark; Bassler, Jocelyn; Fox, Todd E; Carter, Carly J; Davidson, Jeff A; Parette, Mylisa R

    2015-06-01

    Despite the therapeutic potential of sphingolipids, the ability to develop this class of compounds as active pharmaceutical ingredients has been hampered by issues of solubility and delivery. Beyond these technical hurdles, significant challenges in completing the necessary preclinical studies to support regulatory review are necessary for commercialization. This review seeks to identify the obstacles and potential solutions in the translation of a novel liposomal technology from the academic bench to investigational new drug (IND) stage by discussing the preclinical development of the Ceramide NanoLiposome (CNL), which is currently being developed as an anticancer drug for the initial indication of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

  14. Conjugated linoleic acid or omega 3 fatty acids increase mitochondrial biosynthesis and metabolism in skeletal muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan Roger A; Garcia-Smith Randi; Bisoffi Marco; Conn Carole A; Trujillo Kristina A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Polyunsaturated fatty acids are popular dietary supplements advertised to contribute to weight loss by increasing fat metabolism in liver, but the effects on overall muscle metabolism are less established. We evaluated the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) or combination omega 3 on metabolic characteristics in muscle cells. Methods Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells were treated with either DMSO control, or CLA or combination omega 3 for 24 or 48 hours. RNA was determine...

  15. Enhanced biosynthesis of withanolides by elicitation and precursor feeding in cell suspension culture of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal in shake-flask culture and bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Selvaraj, Natesan; Ganapathi, Andy; Manickavasagam, Markandan

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the biosynthesis of major and minor withanolides of Withania somnifera in cell suspension culture using shake-flask culture and bioreactor by exploiting elicitation and precursor feeding strategies. Elicitors like cadmium chloride, aluminium chloride and chitosan, precursors such as cholesterol, mevalonic acid and squalene were examined. Maximum total withanolides detected [withanolide A (7606.75 mg), withanolide B (4826.05 mg), withaferin A (3732.81 mg), withanone (6538.65 mg), 12 deoxy withanstramonolide (3176.63 mg), withanoside IV (2623.21 mg) and withanoside V (2861.18 mg)] were achieved in the combined treatment of chitosan (100 mg/l) and squalene (6 mM) along with 1 mg/l picloram, 0.5 mg/l KN, 200 mg/l L-glutamine and 5% sucrose in culture at 4 h and 48 h exposure times respectively on 28th day of culture in bioreactor. We obtained higher concentrations of total withanolides in shake-flask culture (2.13-fold) as well as bioreactor (1.66-fold) when compared to control treatments. This optimized protocol can be utilized for commercial level production of withanolides from suspension culture using industrial bioreactors in a short culture period.

  16. Rapid accumulation and metabolism of polyphosphoinositol and its possible role in phytoalexin biosynthesis in yeast elicitor-treated Cupressus lusitanica cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Guo, YingQing; Kosaihira, Atsushi; Sakai, Kokki

    2004-05-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P(3)] rapidly accumulates in elicited Cupressus lusitanica Mill. cultured cells by 4- to 5-fold over the control, and then it is metabolized. Correspondingly, phospholipase C (PLC) activity toward phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P(2)] is stimulated to high levels by the elicitor and then decreases whereas Ins(1,4,5)P(3) phosphatase activity declines at the beginning of elicitation and increases later. These observations indicate that elicitor-induced biosynthesis and dephosphorylation of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) occur simultaneously and that the Ins(1,4,5)P(3) level may be regulated by both PtdIns(4,5)P(2)-PLC and Ins(1,4,5)P(3) phosphatases. Studies on the properties of PLC and Ins(1,4,5)P(3) phosphatases indicate that PLC activity toward PtdIns(4,5)P(2) was optimal at a lower Ca(2+) concentration than activity toward phosphatidylinositol whereas Ins(1,4,5)P(3) phosphatase activity is inhibited by high Ca(2+) concentration. This suggests that Ins(1,4,5)P(3) biosynthesis and degradation may be regulated by free cytosolic Ca(2+). In addition, a relationship between Ins(1,4,5)P(3) signaling and accumulation of a phytoalexin (beta-thujaplicin) is suggested because inhibition or promotion of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) accumulation by neomycin or LiCl affects elicitor-induced production of beta-thujaplicin. Moreover, ruthenium red inhibits elicitor-induced accumulation of beta-thujaplicin while thapsigargin alone induces beta-thujaplicin accumulation. These results suggest that Ca(2+) released from intracellular calcium stores may mediate elicitor-induced accumulation of beta-thujaplicin via an Ins(1,4,5)P(3) signaling pathway, since it is widely accepted that Ins(1,4,5)P(3) can mobilize Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. This work demonstrates an elicitor-triggered Ins(1,4,5)P(3) turnover, defines its enzymatic basis and regulation, and suggests a role for Ins(1,4,5)P(3) in elicitor-induced phytoalexin accumulation via a Ca(2

  17. Effects of yeast extract and methyl jasmonate on the enhancement of solasodine biosynthesis in cell cultures of Solanum hainanense Hance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NGUYEN HOANG LOC

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of the elicitors methyl jasmonate (MeJA and yeast extract (YE on the growth and solasodine production of Solanum hainanense cells were investigated. The results showed that various concentrations of MeJA (50-250 µM and YE (1-4 g/L have different eliciting influences. The increase of solasodine content induced by the elicitation of 3 g/L of YE and 50 µM of MeJA at the beginning of cell culture was about 1.9- and 1.3-fold, respectively, as compared with that of the non-elicitated cells. In general, YE (biotic elicitor was more effective in enhancing solasodine production than MeJA (abiotic elicitor.

  18. Rapid Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Pepino (Solanum muricatum Leaf Extract and Their Cytotoxicity on HeLa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Gorbe

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Within nanotechnology, gold and silver nanostructures have unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties [1,2], which make them suitable for a number of applications. Moreover, biosynthetic methods are considered to be a safer alternative to conventional physicochemical procedures for both the environmental and biomedical applications, due to their eco-friendly nature and the avoidance of toxic chemicals in the synthesis. For this reason, employing bio routes in the synthesis of functionalized silver nanoparticles (FAgNP have gained importance recently in this field. In the present study, we report the rapid synthesis of FAgNP through the extract of pepino (Solanum muricatum leaves and employing microwave oven irradiation. The core-shell globular morphology and characterization of the different shaped and sized FAgNP, with a core of 20–50 nm of diameter is established using the UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-vis, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and Zeta potential and dynamic light scanning (DLS studies. Moreover, cytotoxic studies employing HeLa (human cervix carcinoma cells were undertaken to understand FAgNP interactions with cells. HeLa cells showed significant dose dependent antiproliferative activity in the presence of FAgNP at relatively low concentrations. The calculated IC50 value was 37.5 µg/mL, similar to others obtained for FAgNPs against HeLa cells.

  19. Compartmentation of hepatic fatty-acid-binding protein in liver cells and its effect on microsomal phosphatidic acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordewick, U; Heese, M; Börchers, T; Robenek, H; Spener, F

    1989-03-01

    Fatty-acid-binding proteins are known to occur in the cytosol of mammalian cells and to bind fatty acids and their CoA-esters. Application of the postembedding protein A-gold labeling method with antibody against the hepatic type fatty-acid-binding protein (hFABP) to cross-sections of liver cells and a newly developed gel-chromatographic immunofluorescence assay established qualitatively (1) that hFABP in mitochondria was confined to outer mitochondrial membranes, (2) the presence of this protein in microsomes and (3) that nuclei were also filled with hFABP. Quantitative data elaborated with a non-competitive ELISA confirmed these results. A significant difference to the distribution of cardiac FABP in heart muscle cells, where this type of protein was found in cytosol, matrix and nuclei, was observed (Börchers et al. (1989) Biochim. Biophys. Acta, in the press). hFABP-containing rat liver microsomes were incubated with long-chain acyl-CoAs in the presence of hFABP (isolated from rat liver cytosol) in a study on the acylation of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid. Both acyltransferases were stimulated by addition of hFABP to the incubation medium. The morphological, immunochemical as well as kinetic data infer a direct interaction of hFABP with microsomal membranes in liver cells.

  20. Cinnamate:CoA Ligase Initiates the Biosynthesis of a Benzoate-Derived Xanthone Phytoalexin in Hypericum calycinum Cell Cultures1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaid, Mariam M.; Sircar, Debabrata; Müller, Andreas; Beuerle, Till; Liu, Benye; Ernst, Ludger; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-01-01

    Although a number of plant natural products are derived from benzoic acid, the biosynthesis of this structurally simple precursor is poorly understood. Hypericum calycinum cell cultures accumulate a benzoic acid-derived xanthone phytoalexin, hyperxanthone E, in response to elicitor treatment. Using a subtracted complementary DNA (cDNA) library and sequence information about conserved coenzyme A (CoA) ligase motifs, a cDNA encoding cinnamate:CoA ligase (CNL) was isolated. This enzyme channels metabolic flux from the general phenylpropanoid pathway into benzenoid metabolism. HcCNL preferred cinnamic acid as a substrate but failed to activate benzoic acid. Enzyme activity was strictly dependent on the presence of Mg2+ and K+ at optimum concentrations of 2.5 and 100 mm, respectively. Coordinated increases in the Phe ammonia-lyase and HcCNL transcript levels preceded the accumulation of hyperxanthone E in cell cultures of H. calycinum after the addition of the elicitor. HcCNL contained a carboxyl-terminal type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal made up by the tripeptide Ser-Arg-Leu, which directed an amino-terminal reporter fusion to the peroxisomes. Masking the targeting signal by carboxyl-terminal reporter fusion led to cytoplasmic localization. A phylogenetic tree consisted of two evolutionarily distinct clusters. One cluster was formed by CoA ligases related to benzenoid metabolism, including HcCNL. The other cluster comprised 4-coumarate:CoA ligases from spermatophytes, ferns, and mosses, indicating divergence of the two clades prior to the divergence of the higher plant lineages. PMID:22992510

  1. Biosynthesis, Antibacterial Activity and Anticancer Effects Against Prostate Cancer (PC-3) Cells of Silver Nanoparticles Using Dimocarpus Longan Lour. Peel Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Du, Zhiyun; Ma, Shijing; Cheng, Shupeng; Jiang, Sen; Liu, Yue; Li, Dongli; Huang, Huarong; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Xi

    2016-06-01

    Metal nanoparticles, particularly silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), are developing more important roles as diagnostic and therapeutic agents for cancers with the improvement of eco-friendly synthesis methods. This study demonstrates the biosynthesis, antibacterial activity, and anticancer effects of silver nanoparticles using Dimocarpus Longan Lour. peel aqueous extract. The AgNPs were characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR). The bactericidal properties of the synthesized AgNPs were observed via the agar dilution method and the growth inhibition test. The cytotoxicity effect was explored on human prostate cancer PC-3 cells in vitro by trypan blue assay. The expressions of phosphorylated stat 3, bcl-2, survivin, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blot analysis. The longan peel extract acted as a strong reducing and stabilizing agent during the synthesis. Water-soluble AgNPs of size 9-32 nm was gathered with a face-centered cubic structure. The AgNPs had potent bactericidal activities against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria with a dose-related effect. AgNPs also showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity against PC-3 cells through a decrease of stat 3, bcl-2, and survivin, as well as an increase in caspase-3. These findings confirm the bactericidal properties and explored a potential anticancer application of AgNPs for prostate cancer therapy. Further research should be focused on the comprehensive study of molecular mechanism and in vivo effects on the prostate cancer.

  2. The transcriptional repressor TupA in Aspergillus niger is involved in controlling gene expression related to cell wall biosynthesis, development, and nitrogen source availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Schachtschabel

    Full Text Available The Tup1-Cyc8 (Ssn6 complex is a well characterized and conserved general transcriptional repressor complex in eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the identification of the Tup1 (TupA homolog in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger in a genetic screen for mutants with a constitutive expression of the agsA gene. The agsA gene encodes a putative alpha-glucan synthase, which is induced in response to cell wall stress in A. niger. Apart from the constitutive expression of agsA, the selected mutant was also found to produce an unknown pigment at high temperatures. Complementation analysis with a genomic library showed that the tupA gene could complement the phenotypes of the mutant. Screening of a collection of 240 mutants with constitutive expression of agsA identified sixteen additional pigment-secreting mutants, which were all mutated in the tupA gene. The phenotypes of the tupA mutants were very similar to the phenotypes of a tupA deletion strain. Further analysis of the tupA-17 mutant and the ΔtupA mutant revealed that TupA is also required for normal growth and morphogenesis. The production of the pigment at 37°C is nitrogen source-dependent and repressed by ammonium. Genome-wide expression analysis of the tupA mutant during exponential growth revealed derepression of a large group of diverse genes, including genes related to development and cell wall biosynthesis, and also protease-encoding genes that are normally repressed by ammonium. Comparison of the transcriptome of up-regulated genes in the tupA mutant showed limited overlap with the transcriptome of caspofungin-induced cell wall stress-related genes, suggesting that TupA is not a general suppressor of cell wall stress-induced genes. We propose that TupA is an important repressor of genes related to development and nitrogen metabolism.

  3. Aflatoxin biosynthesis: current frontiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze, Ludmila V; Hong, Sung-Yong; Linz, John E

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins are among the principal mycotoxins that contaminate economically important food and feed crops. Aflatoxin B1 is the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known and is also an immunosuppressant. Occurrence of aflatoxins in crops has vast economic and human health impacts worldwide. Thus, the study of aflatoxin biosynthesis has become a focal point in attempts to reduce human exposure to aflatoxins. This review highlights recent advances in the field of aflatoxin biosynthesis and explores the functional connection between aflatoxin biosynthesis, endomembrane trafficking, and response to oxidative stress. Dissection of the regulatory mechanisms involves a complete comprehension of the aflatoxin biosynthetic process and the dynamic network of transcription factors that orchestrates coordinated expression of the target genes. Despite advancements in the field, development of a safe and effective multifaceted approach to solve the aflatoxin food contamination problem is still required.

  4. A model for the biosynthesis and transport of plasma membrane-associated signaling receptors to the cell surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorina Claudia Popescu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular protein transport is emerging as critical in determining the outcome of receptor-activated signal transduction pathways. In plants, relatively little is known about the nature of the molecular components and mechanisms involved in coordinating receptor synthesis and transport to the cell surface. Recent advances in this field indicate that signaling pathways and intracellular transport machinery converge and coordinate to render receptors competent for signaling at their plasma membrane activity sites. The biogenesis and transport to the cell surface of signaling receptors appears to require both general trafficking and receptor-specific factors. Several molecular determinants, residing or associated with compartments of the secretory pathway and known to influence aspects in receptor biogenesis, are discussed and integrated into a predictive cooperative model for the functional expression of signaling receptors at the plasma membrane.

  5. A novel bioactive chalcone of Morus australis inhibits tyrosinase activity and melanin biosynthesis in B16 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Takara, Kensaku; Toyozato, Tomonao; Wada, Koji

    2012-01-01

    The methanol extract of Morus australis (shimaguwa) acts as a whitening agent due to the inhibition of tyrosinase activity. In order to explore the mechanism(s) of the whitening action, constituents of the 95% methanol extract from the dried stems of shimaguwa were isolated and their skin-whitening capacity was examined. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanol soluble extract of shimaguwa led to the isolation of 2, 4, 2', 4'-hydroxycalcone (chalcone 1) and three analogues of chalcone 1 with 3'-substituted resorcinol moieties (chalcones 2-4). Chalcone derivative 4 proved to be a novel compound and was fully characterized. Chalcones 1-4 were evaluated for inhibition activity on mushroom tyrosinase using L-tyrosine as the substrate. The parent chalcone 1 was a highly effective inhibitor of tyrosinase activity (IC₅₀ = 0.21 μM) compared to arbutin (IC₅₀ = 164 μM). Compared to chalcone 1, chalcones 2 and 3, which possess 3'-substituted isoprenyl or bulky 2-benzoylbiphenyl, showed significantly decreased tyrosinase activity, while chalcone 4, possessing 3'-substituted 2-hydroxy-1-pentene group, showed slightly increased activity.The effects of chalcones 1-4 on melanin synthesis, without affecting cell growth, were assayed in melanin-producing B16 murine melanoma cells. Chalcone 3 significantly reduced cell viability before reaching the IC₅₀ value for melanin synthesis. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of chalcones 1, 2 and 4 were more than 100-fold greater than that of arbutin, with little or no cytotoxicity. More significantly, chalcone 2, which exhibited less tyrosinase inhibitory activity compared to the parent chalcone 1, showed the highest inhibition of melanin synthesis in B16 cells among the chalcones tested. Accordingly, chalcones 1 and 2, and the novel chalcone 4 might be the active components responsible for the whitening ability of shimaguwa. Moreover, whitening ability was not exclusively due to tyrosinase inhibition.

  6. Training Enhances Immune Cells Mitochondrial Biosynthesis, Fission, Fusion, and Their Antioxidant Capabilities Synergistically with Dietary Docosahexaenoic Supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training induces adaptations in mitochondrial metabolism, dynamics, and oxidative protection. Omega-3 fatty acids change membrane lipid composition and modulate mitochondrial function. The aim was to investigate the effect of 8-week training and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation (1.14 g/day) on the mitochondria dynamics and antioxidant status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from sportsmen. Subjects were assigned to an intervention (N = 9) or placebo groups (N =...

  7. The Spatial Organization of Glucosinolate Biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nintemann, Sebastian

    . However, questions concerning the spatial arrangement of the glucosinolate biosynthetic machinery and the consequential distribution of the metabolites remain. Different types of glucosinolates require specialized enzymes for certain steps in their biosynthetic pathways and whether these act in the same...... cells is an open question. Likewise, it is not known how glucosinolate biosynthesis is orchestrated at the subcellular level. These open questions were addressed with several approaches in this project, with the aim of shedding light on the spatial organization of glucosinolate biosynthesis from...... between the individual classes of glucosinolates under constitutive and induced conditions and identified the source tissues of these defense compounds. Protein-protein interaction studies were carried out to investigate the subcellular organization of glucosinolate biosynthesis. We identified a family...

  8. Studies on the biosynthesis of lignins and their production in plant cell cultures. [Forsythia intermedia; Podophyllum hexandrum; Podophyllum peltatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul-Rahman, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Phytochemical analysis of Forsythia intermedia tissues has demonstrated the presence of lignins of the dibenzylbutyrolactone and dioxabicyclo(3,3,0)octane classes, together with their O-glucosides. Lignin distribution in different parts of the part, and variation with the season has been recorded. Cell suspension cultures from F. intermedia were developed. These also synthesized lignins, though not the full range as found in the fresh tissues. Culture lines synthesizing either matairesinol 4{prime}-O-glucoside and major lignin components were established. These cultures rapidly metabolized exogenous lignins without producing detectable lignin transformation products. The seasonal variation in aryltetralin lactone levels in young plants Podophyllum hexandrum and P. peltatum has been investigated. Cell cultures of the plants were established, but no lignins were detectable in them. However, a protocol for micropropagation via embryoid production was obtained. Feeding experiments in P. hexandrum plants showed that matairesinol was a precursor of both podophyllotoxin and 4{prime}-demethylpodophyllotoxin, thus indicating it to be a common precursor of the trimethoxy and hydroxydimethoxy series of lignins in this plant. Precursor feeding experiments with {sup 3}H/{sup 14}C-labeled coniferyl alcohol showed an unexpected increase in {sup 3}H/{sup 14}C ratio when incorporated into both Forsythia and Podophyllum lignins.

  9. Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) biosynthesis is inhibited by phenolic compounds in U-937 cells under inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachogianni, Ioanna C; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Stamatakis, George M; Kostakis, Ioannis K; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2015-09-01

    Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) induced platelet activating factor (PAF) synthesis in U-937 cells through stimulation of acetyl-CoA:lysoPAF-acetyltransferase (lyso PAF-AT) at 3 h and DTT-independentCDP-choline-1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol cholinophosphotransferase (PAF-CPT) at 0.5 h. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of tyrosol (T), resveratrol (R) and their acetylated derivatives(AcDs) which exhibit enhanced bioavailability, on PAF synthesis in U-937 after IL-1β stimulation. The specific activity of PAF enzymes and intracellular levels were measured in cell homogenates. T and R concentration capable of inducing 50% inhibition in IL-1β effect on lyso PAF-AT was 48 μΜ ± 11 and 157 μΜ ± 77, for PAF-CPT 246 μΜ ± 61 and 294 μΜ ± 102, respectively. The same order of concentration was also observed on inhibiting PAF levels produced by IL-1β. T was more potent inhibitor than R (pactivity, while in the case of R only two AcDs retain the activity. The observed inhibitory effect by T,R and their AcDs, may partly explain their already reported beneficial role.

  10. A Hyphenated Technique based on High-Performance Thin Layer Chromatography for Determining Neutral Sphingolipids: A Proof of Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Domínguez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyphenated HPTLC has been used to analyze several neutral sphingolipids acting as lysosomal storage disease (LSD biomarkers. Automated multiple development (AMD provides separation of lipid peaks, which are detected and quantified using fluorescence detection by intensity changes (FDIC after primuline post-impregnation. A final online transfer to a mass spectrometer by means of an elution-based interface allows their identification using electrospray ionization (ESI and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI.Given that the increases in fluorescent emission detected by FDIC are produced by non-specific, electrostatic interactions between the primuline and hydrocarbon chains in the ceramide backbones of sphingolipids, it is a non-destructive detection technique, allowing the precise location and transfer of biomarker peaks to a mass spectrometer using an elution interface. By using primuline as a fluorophore, the technique is also compatible with ESI-APCI and does not interfere with the MS of sphingolipids. APCI provides useful and complementary structural information to the ESI for sphingolipid identification. Moreover, FDIC emission can be used for quantitative purposes. Results include the determination of sphingomyelin (SM in human-plasma samples (RSD < 6% by means of a standard addition method with non-linear calibration, and the identification of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 in the plasma of a Fabry patient. Only one HPTLC plate is needed to perform the analysis.

  11. Identification and characterization of SMU.244 encoding a putative undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase protein required for cell wall biosynthesis and bacitracin resistance in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Naif; Tian, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Gaofeng; Upham, Jacqueline; Chen, Chao; Parcells, Madison; Li, Yung-Hua

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans in dental biofilms often faces life-threatening threats such as killing by antimicrobial molecules from competing species or from the host. The ability of S. mutans to cope with such threats is crucial for its survival and persistence in dental biofilms. By screening a transposon mutant library, we identified 11 transposon insertion mutants that were sensitive to bacitracin. Two of these mutants, XTn-01 and XTn-03, had an independent insertion in the same locus, SMU.244, which encoded a homologue of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase (UppP). In this study, we describe the genetic and phenotypic characterization of SMU.244 in antibiotic resistance. The results revealed that deletion of SMU.244 results in a mutant (XTΔ244) that is highly sensitive to bacitracin, but confers more resistance to lactococcin G, a class IIb bacteriocin. Introduction of the intact SMU.244 into XTΔ244 in trans completely restores its resistance to bacitracin and the susceptibility to lactococcin G. The XTΔ244 was also defective in forming the WT biofilm, although its growth was not significantly affected. Using recombinant protein technology, we demonstrated that the SMU.244-encoded protein displays enzyme activity to catalyse dephosphorylation of the substrate. The lux transcriptional reporter assays showed that S. mutans maintains a moderate level of expression of SMU.244 in the absence of bacitracin, but bacitracin at sub-MICs can further induce its expression. We concluded that SMU.244 encodes an UppP protein that plays important roles in cell wall biosynthesis and bacitracin resistance in S. mutans. The results described here may further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which S. mutans copes with antibiotics such as bacitracin.

  12. Training Enhances Immune Cells Mitochondrial Biosynthesis, Fission, Fusion, and Their Antioxidant Capabilities Synergistically with Dietary Docosahexaenoic Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets-Cortés, Carla; Capó, Xavier; Tur, Josep A.; Sureda, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training induces adaptations in mitochondrial metabolism, dynamics, and oxidative protection. Omega-3 fatty acids change membrane lipid composition and modulate mitochondrial function. The aim was to investigate the effect of 8-week training and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation (1.14 g/day) on the mitochondria dynamics and antioxidant status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from sportsmen. Subjects were assigned to an intervention (N = 9) or placebo groups (N = 7) in a randomized double-blind trial. Nutritional intervention significantly increased the DHA content in erythrocyte membranes from the experimental group. No significant differences were reported in terms of circulating PBMCs, Mn-superoxide dismutase protein levels, and their capability to produce reactive oxygen species. The proteins related to mitochondrial dynamics were, in general, increased after an 8-week training and this increase was enhanced by DHA supplementation. The content in mitofusins Mtf-1 and Mtf-2, optic atrophy protein-1 (Opa-1), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) were significantly higher in the DHA-supplemented group after intervention. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX-IV) activity and uncoupling proteins UCP-2 and UCP-3 protein levels were increased after training, with higher UCP-3 levels in the supplemented group. In conclusion, training induced mitochondrial adaptations which may contribute to improved mitochondrial function. This mitochondrial response was modulated by DHA supplementation. PMID:27698953

  13. Golgi-specific localization of transglycosylases engaged in glycoprotein biosynthesis in suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M S; Mitsui, T; Akazawa, T

    1986-12-01

    Golgi complex and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) were isolated from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) by stepwise sucrose density gradient centrifugation using protoplasts as starting material. The purity of the two organelle fractions isolated was assessed by measuring marker enzyme activities. Localization of glycolipid and glycoprotein glycosyltransferase activities in the isolated Golgi and ER fractions was examined; three glycosyltransferases, i.e., galactosyltransferase, fucosyltransferase, and xylosyltransferase, proved to be almost exclusively confined to the Golgi, whereas the ER fractions contained glycolipid glycosyltransferase. The Golgi complex was further subfractionated on a discontinuous sucrose density gradient into two components, migrating at densities of 1.118 and 1.127 g/cm3. The two fractions differed in their compositional polypeptide bands discernible from Na-dodecylsulfate gel electrophoresis. Galactosyltransferase distributed nearly equally between the two protein peaks and xylosyltransferase activities using the endogenous acceptor also appeared to be localized in the two subcompartments. By contrast, fucosyltransferase, engaged in the terminal stage of glycosylation, banded in the lower density fractions. Golgi-specific alpha-mannosidase, which is presumably engaged in the sugar trimming of Asn-N-linked glycoprotein carbohydrate core, was enriched fourfold in specific activity in the fractions of the higher density. The overall experimental results indicate that the cotranslational glycosylation of Asn-N-linked glycoproteins, e.g., polyphenol oxidase (laccase), takes place in the ER, while subsequent post-translational processing of the oligosaccharide moiety proceeds successively in the two physically separable compartments of the Golgi complex.

  14. Training Enhances Immune Cells Mitochondrial Biosynthesis, Fission, Fusion, and Their Antioxidant Capabilities Synergistically with Dietary Docosahexaenoic Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Busquets-Cortés

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise training induces adaptations in mitochondrial metabolism, dynamics, and oxidative protection. Omega-3 fatty acids change membrane lipid composition and modulate mitochondrial function. The aim was to investigate the effect of 8-week training and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA supplementation (1.14 g/day on the mitochondria dynamics and antioxidant status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from sportsmen. Subjects were assigned to an intervention (N=9 or placebo groups (N=7 in a randomized double-blind trial. Nutritional intervention significantly increased the DHA content in erythrocyte membranes from the experimental group. No significant differences were reported in terms of circulating PBMCs, Mn-superoxide dismutase protein levels, and their capability to produce reactive oxygen species. The proteins related to mitochondrial dynamics were, in general, increased after an 8-week training and this increase was enhanced by DHA supplementation. The content in mitofusins Mtf-1 and Mtf-2, optic atrophy protein-1 (Opa-1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam were significantly higher in the DHA-supplemented group after intervention. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX-IV activity and uncoupling proteins UCP-2 and UCP-3 protein levels were increased after training, with higher UCP-3 levels in the supplemented group. In conclusion, training induced mitochondrial adaptations which may contribute to improved mitochondrial function. This mitochondrial response was modulated by DHA supplementation.

  15. Acid ceramidase (AC)--a key enzyme of sphingolipid metabolism--correlates with better prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanker, Lars Christian; Karn, Thomas; Holtrich, Uwe; Gätje, Regine; Rody, Achim; Heinrich, Tomas; Ruckhäberle, Eugen; Engels, Knut

    2013-05-01

    Acid ceramidase (AC), a key enzyme of sphingolipid metabolism, seems to play an important role in cancer progression. The objective of this study was to explore the expression of AC in ovarian cancer and its impact on prognosis. Expression analysis of AC in n=112 ovarian cancer patients was performed by immunohistochemical analysis of primary paraffin-embedded tumor samples. The results were scored on the basis of the staining intensity and percentage of positive tumor cells, resulting in an immunoreactive score from 0 to 12. These results were correlated to clinical and pathologic characteristics and survival. AC expression correlated significantly only with FIGO stage (0.047). In serous carcinoma, low level of AC was independently associated with reduced progression-free survival and overall survival of 12.0 mo [95% confidence interval (CI), 5.78-18.23] versus 18.1 mo (95% CI, 11.61-24.59; P=0.008) and 35.7 mo (95% CI, 22.24-47.16) versus 58.7 mo (95% CI, 36.48-80.91; P=0.032), respectively. In multivariate analysis, AC presents as an independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival (hazard ratio 1.88; 95% CI, 1.13-3.11; P=0.015). AC is a prognostic factor in epithelial ovarian cancer. Low AC expression can be associated with tumor progression in carcinoma of the ovaries. These results are in contrast to the concept of AC as a promoter for cancer progression. Nevertheless, they are supported by the lately discovered tumor-suppressing function of sphingosine, the enzymatic product of AC.

  16. Concentrations of cyclosporin A and FK506 that inhibit IL-2 induction in human T cells do not affect TGF-beta1 biosynthesis, whereas higher doses of cyclosporin A trigger apoptosis and release of preformed TGF-beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguillón, Jordi; Morancho, Beatriz; Kim, Seong-Jin; López-Botet, Miguel; Aramburu, José

    2005-05-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506 suppress T cell activation by inhibiting calcineurin and the calcineurin-dependent transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc), which are central regulators of T cell function. It was reported that CsA up-regulated the transcription of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) in lymphocytes and other cells and activated its promoter in A549 lung carcinoma cells, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood, and it is unclear whether calcineurin plays any role. We have studied the regulation of TGF-beta1 in normal human lymphocytes and cell lines. In Jurkat T cells, the TGF-beta1 promoter was activated by calcineurin and NFATc and inhibited by CsA and FK506. However, the promoter was insensitive to both drugs in A549 cells. In human T cells preactivated with phytohemagglutinin, biosynthesis of TGF-beta1, induced by the T cell receptor (TCR) or the TGF-beta receptor, was not substantially affected by CsA and FK506 concentrations (< or = 1 microM) that effectively inhibited interleukin-2 production. However, pretreatment of fresh lymphocytes with CsA or FK506 during primary TCR stimulation reduced their production of TGF-beta1 during secondary TCR activation. Finally, high concentrations of CsA (10 microM), in the range attained in vivo in experiments in rodents, caused apoptosis in human T cells and the release of preformed, bioactive TGF-beta1. These effects are unlikely to owe to calcineurin inhibition, as they were not observed with FK506. Our results indicate that CsA and FK506 are not general inducers of TGF-beta1 biosynthesis but can cause different effects on TGF-beta1 depending on the cell type and concentrations used.

  17. Glucosinolate biosynthesis in Eruca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsarou, Dimitra; Omirou, Michalis; Liadaki, Kalliopi; Tsikou, Daniela; Delis, Costas; Garagounis, Constantine; Krokida, Afrodite; Zambounis, Antonis; Papadopoulou, Kalliope K

    2016-12-01

    Glucosinolates (GSLs) are a highly important group of secondary metabolites in the Caparalles order, both due to their significance in plant-biome interactions and to their chemoprotective properties. This study identified genes involved in all steps of aliphatic and indolic GSL biosynthesis in Eruca sativa, a cultivated plant closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana with agronomic and nutritional value. The impact of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) availability on GSL biosynthetic pathways at a transcriptional level, and on the final GSL content of plant leaf and root tissues, was investigated. N and S supply had a significant and interactive effect on the GSL content of leaves, in a structure-specific and tissue-dependent manner; the metabolites levels were significantly correlated with the relative expression of the genes involved in their biosynthesis. A more complex effect was observed in roots, where aliphatic and indolic GSLs and related biosynthetic genes responded differently to the various nutritional treatments suggesting that nitrogen and sulfur availability are important factors that control plant GSL content at a transcriptional level. The biological activity of extracts derived from these plants grown under the specific nutritional schemes was examined. N and S availability were found to significantly affect the cytotoxicity of E. sativa extracts on human cancer cells, supporting the notion that carefully designed nutritional schemes can promote the accumulation of chemoprotective substances in edible plants.

  18. The Impact of Cholesterol, DHA, and Sphingolipids on Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus O. W. Grimm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder currently affecting over 35 million people worldwide. Pathological hallmarks of AD are massive amyloidosis, extracellular senile plaques, and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles accompanied by an excessive loss of synapses. Major constituents of senile plaques are 40–42 amino acid long peptides termed β-amyloid (Aβ. Aβ is produced by sequential proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. APP processing and Aβ production have been one of the central scopes in AD research in the past. In the last years, lipids and lipid-related issues are more frequently discussed to contribute to the AD pathogenesis. This review summarizes lipid alterations found in AD postmortem brains, AD transgenic mouse models, and the current understanding of how lipids influence the molecular mechanisms leading to AD and Aβ generation, focusing especially on cholesterol, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, and sphingolipids/glycosphingolipids.

  19. Two natural products, trans-phytol and (22E)-ergosta-6,9,22-triene-3β,5α,8α-triol, inhibit the biosynthesis of estrogen in human ovarian granulosa cells by aromatase (CYP19)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiajia [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); Yuan, Yun [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); School of Life Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang (China); Lu, Danfeng; Du, Baowen [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); Xiong, Liang; Shi, Jiangong [State Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substance and Function of Natural Medicines, Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Yang, Lijuan [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); Liu, Wanli [MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Science, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yuan, Xiaohong [School of Life Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang (China); Zhang, Guolin, E-mail: zhanggl@cib.ac.cn [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences Sichuan Translational Medicine Research Hospital, Chengdu (China); Wang, Fei, E-mail: wangfei@cib.ac.cn [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences Sichuan Translational Medicine Research Hospital, Chengdu (China)

    2014-08-15

    Aromatase is the only enzyme in vertebrates to catalyze the biosynthesis of estrogens. Although inhibitors of aromatase have been developed for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer, the whole-body inhibition of aromatase causes severe adverse effects. Thus, tissue-selective aromatase inhibitors are important for the treatment of estrogen-dependent cancers. In this study, 63 natural products with diverse structures were examined for their effects on estrogen biosynthesis in human ovarian granulosa-like KGN cells. Two compounds—trans-phytol (SA-20) and (22E)-ergosta-6,9,22-triene-3β,5α,8α-triol (SA-48)—were found to potently inhibit estrogen biosynthesis (IC{sub 50}: 1 μM and 0.5 μM, respectively). Both compounds decreased aromatase mRNA and protein expression levels in KGN cells, but had no effect on the aromatase catalytic activity in aromatase-overexpressing HEK293A cells and recombinant expressed aromatase. The two compounds decreased the expression of aromatase promoter I.3/II. Neither compound affected intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels, but they inhibited the phosphorylation or protein expression of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). The effects of these two compounds on extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and AKT/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway were examined. Inhibition of p38 MAPK could be the mechanism underpinning the actions of these compounds. Our results suggests that natural products structurally similar to SA-20 and SA-48 may be a new source of tissue-selective aromatase modulators, and that p38 MAPK is important in the basal control of aromatase in ovarian granulosa cells. SA-20 and SA-48 warrant further investigation as new pharmaceutical tools for the prevention and treatment of estrogen-dependent cancers. - Highlights: • Two natural products inhibited estrogen biosynthesis in human ovarian granulosa cells. • They

  20. BIOSYNTHESIS OF YEAST CAROTENOIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kenneth L.; Nakayama, T. O. M.; Chichester, C. O.

    1964-01-01

    Simpson, Kenneth L. (University of California, Davis), T. O. M. Nakayama, and C. O. Chichester. Biosynthesis of yeast carotenoids. J. Bacteriol. 88:1688–1694. 1964.—The biosynthesis of carotenoids was followed in Rhodotorula glutinis and in a new strain, 62-506. The treatment of the growing cultures by methylheptenone, or ionone, vapors permitted observations of the intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway. On the basis of concentration changes and accumulation in blocked pathways, the sequence of carotenoid formation is postulated as phytoene, phytofluene, ζ-carotene, neurosporene, β-zeacarotene, γ-carotene, torulin, a C40 aldehyde, and torularhodin. Torulin and torularhodin were established as the main carotenoids of 62-506. PMID:14240958

  1. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  2. High-level production of tetraacetyl phytosphingosine (TAPS) by combined genetic engineering of sphingoid base biosynthesis and L-serine availability in the non-conventional yeast Pichia ciferrii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorsch, Christoph; Köhler, Tim; Andrea, Heiko; Boles, Eckhard

    2012-03-01

    The non-conventional yeast Pichia ciferrii is known to secrete the sphingoid long-chain base phytosphingosine in a tetraacetylated form (TAPS). Sphingolipids are important ingredients in cosmetic applications as they play important roles in human skin. Our work aimed to improve TAPS production by genetic engineering of P. ciferrii. In the first step we improved precursor availability by blocking degradation of L-serine, which is condensed with palmitoyl-CoA by serine palmitoyltransferase in the first committed step of sphingolipid biosynthesis. Successive deletion of two genes, SHM1 and SHM2, encoding L-serine hydroxymethyltransferases, and of CHA1 encoding L-serine deaminase, resulted in a strain producing 65 mg((TAPS))g(-1)((cdw)), which is a threefold increase in comparison with the parental strain. Attempts to increase the metabolic flux into and through the L-serine biosynthesis pathway did not improve TAPS production. However, genetic engineering of the sphingolipid pathway further increased secretion of TAPS. Blocking of sphingoid long-chain base phosphorylation by deletion of the LCB kinase gene PcLCB4 resulted in a further increase in TAPS production by 78% and significant secretion of the direct precursor of phytosphingosine, sphinganin, in a triacetylated form (TriASa). Overproduction of two serine palmitoyltransferase subunits, Lcb1 and Lcb2, together with a deletion of the gene ORM12 encoding a putative negative regulator of sphingolipid synthesis resulted in a strain producing 178 mg((TAPS))g(-1)((cdw)). Additional overproduction of the C4-hydroxylase Syr2 converting sphinganine to phytosphingosine reduced TriASa production and further improved TAPS production. The final recombinant P. ciferrii strain produced up to 199 mg((TAPS))g(-1)((cdw)) with a maximal production rate of 8.42 mg×OD(600nm)(-1)h(-1) and a titer of about 2 g L(-1), and should be applicable for industrial TAPS production.

  3. Microbial biosynthesis of nontoxic gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Swarup, E-mail: swaruproy@klyuniv.ac.in [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India); Das, Tapan Kumar [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India); Maiti, Guru Prasad [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India); Department of Anesthesiology, Texas Tech University Health science Center, 3601 4th Street, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Basu, Utpal [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India)

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The manuscript deals with the fungus mediated optimized biologically synthesized GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus and characterization of biosynthesized GNPs using various physico-chemical methods. The fairly stable synthesized nanoparticles have size in the range of 10–40 nm. Cytotoxicity study of biosynthesized GNPs on Human lung cancer cell line A549 showed no significant toxicity of GNPs. - Highlights: • A novel biosynthesis process of GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus. • Biosynthesized GNPs are in the range of 10–40 nm as observed from TEM. • This process of synthesis is an optimized biosynthesis process of GNPs. • Biosynthesized GNPs are noncytotoxic against A549 cell line. - Abstract: We study the extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using the fungal species Aspergillus foetidus. The formation of GNPs were initially monitored by visual observation and then characterized with the help of various characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed distinctive formation of face centered cubic crystalline GNPs. From field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) the morphology of the nanoparticles were found to be roughly spherical and within the size range of 30–50 nm. The spherical and polydispersed GNPs in the range of 10–40 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. It was established that alkaline pH, 1 mM gold salt concentration and 75 °C temperature were the respective optimum parameter for biosynthesis of GNPs. Cell cytotoxicity of GNP was compared with that of normal gold salt solution on A549 cell. The A549 cell growth in presence of GNPs was found to be comparatively less toxic than the gold ion.

  4. Transcellular biosynthesis of eicosanoid lipid mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, Valérie; Rovati, G Enrico; Mangano, Paolo; Buccellati, Carola; Murphy, Robert C; Sala, Angelo

    2015-04-01

    The synthesis of oxygenated eicosanoids is the result of the coordinated action of several enzymatic activities, from phospholipase A2 that releases the polyunsaturated fatty acids from membrane phospholipids, to primary oxidative enzymes, such as cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases, to isomerases, synthases and hydrolases that carry out the final synthesis of the biologically active metabolites. Cells possessing the entire enzymatic machinery have been studied as sources of bioactive eicosanoids, but early on evidence proved that biosynthetic intermediates, albeit unstable, could move from one cell type to another. The biosynthesis of bioactive compounds could therefore be the result of a coordinated effort by multiple cell types that has been named transcellular biosynthesis of the eicosanoids. In several cases cells not capable of carrying out the complete biosynthetic process, due to the lack of key enzymes, have been shown to efficiently contribute to the final production of prostaglandins, leukotrienes and lipoxins. We will review in vitro studies, complex functional models, and in vivo evidences of the transcellular biosynthesis of eicosanoids and the biological relevance of the metabolites resulting from this unique biosynthetic pathway. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance".

  5. Functional specialization in proline biosynthesis of melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica De Ingeniis

    Full Text Available Proline metabolism is linked to hyperprolinemia, schizophrenia, cutis laxa, and cancer. In the latter case, tumor cells tend to rely on proline biosynthesis rather than salvage. Proline is synthesized from either glutamate or ornithine; both are converted to pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C, and then to proline via pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductases (PYCRs. Here, the role of three isozymic versions of PYCR was addressed in human melanoma cells by tracking the fate of (13C-labeled precursors. Based on these studies we conclude that PYCR1 and PYCR2, which are localized in the mitochondria, are primarily involved in conversion of glutamate to proline. PYCRL, localized in the cytosol, is exclusively linked to the conversion of ornithine to proline. This analysis provides the first clarification of the role of PYCRs to proline biosynthesis.

  6. Functional Specialization in Proline Biosynthesis of Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Adam D.; Scott, David A.; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; De, Surya K.; Kazanov, Marat; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Ronai, Ze'ev; Osterman, Andrei L.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism is linked to hyperprolinemia, schizophrenia, cutis laxa, and cancer. In the latter case, tumor cells tend to rely on proline biosynthesis rather than salvage. Proline is synthesized from either glutamate or ornithine; both are converted to pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), and then to proline via pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductases (PYCRs). Here, the role of three isozymic versions of PYCR was addressed in human melanoma cells by tracking the fate of 13C-labeled precursors. Based on these studies we conclude that PYCR1 and PYCR2, which are localized in the mitochondria, are primarily involved in conversion of glutamate to proline. PYCRL, localized in the cytosol, is exclusively linked to the conversion of ornithine to proline. This analysis provides the first clarification of the role of PYCRs to proline biosynthesis. PMID:23024808

  7. New players in the regulation of ecdysone biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Insect ecdysone steroid hormone regulates major developmental transitions, such as molting and metamorphosis. The production of ecdysone correlates well with the timing of these transitions. Finding out how the ecdysone biosynthesis is regulated is crucial to fully understand these sophisticated developmental switches. Here we summarized recent findings in the regulation of ecdysone biosynthesis from the aspects of cell signaling, key biosynthetic enzymes and substrate cholesterol trafficking.

  8. Lipoteichoic acid induces surfactant protein-A biosynthesis in human alveolar type II epithelial cells through activating the MEK1/2-ERK1/2-NF-κB pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Feng-Lin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipoteichoic acid (LTA, a gram-positive bacterial outer membrane component, can cause septic shock. Our previous studies showed that the gram-negative endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, could induce surfactant protein-A (SP-A production in human alveolar epithelial (A549 cells. Objectives In this study, we further evaluated the effect of LTA on SP-A biosynthesis and its possible signal-transducing mechanisms. Methods A549 cells were exposed to LTA. Levels of SP-A, nuclear factor (NF-κB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, and mitogen-activated/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK1 were determined. Results Exposure of A549 cells to 10, 30, and 50 μg/ml LTA for 24 h did not affect cell viability. Meanwhile, when exposed to 30 μg/ml LTA for 1, 6, and 24 h, the biosynthesis of SP-A mRNA and protein in A549 cells significantly increased. As to the mechanism, LTA enhanced cytosolic and nuclear NF-κB levels in time-dependent manners. Pretreatment with BAY 11–7082, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation, significantly inhibited LTA-induced SP-A mRNA expression. Sequentially, LTA time-dependently augmented phosphorylation of ERK1/2. In addition, levels of phosphorylated MEK1 were augmented following treatment with LTA. Conclusions Therefore, this study showed that LTA can increase SP-A synthesis in human alveolar type II epithelial cells through sequentially activating the MEK1-ERK1/2-NF-κB-dependent pathway.

  9. Diverse endogenous antigens for mouse NKT cells: self-antigens that are not glycosphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Bo; Speak, Anneliese O; Shepherd, Dawn; Butters, Terry; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Platt, Frances M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2011-02-01

    NKT cells with an invariant Ag receptor (iNKT cells) represent a highly conserved and unique subset of T lymphocytes having properties of innate and adaptive immune cells. They have been reported to regulate a variety of immune responses, including the response to cancers and the development of autoimmunity. The development and activation of iNKT cells is dependent on self-Ags presented by the CD1d Ag-presenting molecule. It is widely believed that these self-Ags are glycosphingolipids (GSLs), molecules that contain ceramide as the lipid backbone. In this study, we used a variety of methods to show that mammalian Ags for mouse iNKT cells need not be GSLs, including the use of cell lines deficient in GSL biosynthesis and an inhibitor of GSL biosynthesis. Presentation of these Ags required the expression of CD1d molecules that could traffic to late endosomes, the site where self-Ag is acquired. Extracts of APCs contain a self-Ag that could stimulate iNKT cells when added to plates coated with soluble, rCD1d molecules. The Ag(s) in these extracts are resistant to sphingolipid-specific hydrolase digestion, consistent with the results using live APCs. Lyosphosphatidylcholine, a potential self-Ag that activated human iNKT cell lines, did not activate mouse iNKT cell hybridomas. Our data indicate that there may be more than one type of self-Ag for iNKT cells, that the self-Ags comparing mouse and human may not be conserved, and that the search to identify these molecules should not be confined to GSLs.

  10. Caffeic Acid Expands Anti-Tumor Effect of Metformin in Human Metastatic Cervical Carcinoma HTB-34 Cells: Implications of AMPK Activation and Impairment of Fatty Acids De Novo Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyszka-Czochara, Malgorzata; Konieczny, Pawel; Majka, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of cancer treatments is often limited and associated with substantial toxicity. Appropriate combination of drug targeting specific mechanisms may regulate metabolism of tumor cells to reduce cancer cell growth and to improve survival. Therefore, we investigated the effects of anti-diabetic drug Metformin (Met) and a natural compound caffeic acid (trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, CA) alone and in combination to treat an aggressive metastatic human cervical HTB-34 (ATCC CRL­1550) cancer cell line. CA at concentration of 100 µM, unlike Met at 10 mM, activated 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). What is more, CA contributed to the fueling of mitochondrial tricarboxylic acids (TCA) cycle with pyruvate by increasing Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex (PDH) activity, while Met promoted glucose catabolism to lactate. Met downregulated expression of enzymes of fatty acid de novo synthesis, such as ATP Citrate Lyase (ACLY), Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS), Fatty Acyl-CoA Elongase 6 (ELOVL6), and Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1 (SCD1) in cancer cells. In conclusion, CA mediated reprogramming of glucose processing through TCA cycle via oxidative decarboxylation. The increased oxidative stress, as a result of CA treatment, sensitized cancer cells and, acting on cell biosynthesis and bioenergetics, made HTB-34 cells more susceptible to Met and successfully inhibited neoplastic cells. The combination of Metformin and caffeic acid to suppress cervical carcinoma cells by two independent mechanisms may provide a promising approach to cancer treatment. PMID:28230778

  11. Upstream regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhayyat, Fahad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins are natural contaminants of food and feed products, posing a substantial health risk to humans and animals throughout the world. A plethora of filamentous fungi has been identified as mycotoxin producers and most of these fungal species belong to the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium. A number of studies have been conducted to better understand the molecular mechanisms of biosynthesis of key mycotoxins and the regulatory cascades controlling toxigenesis. In many cases, the mycotoxin biosynthetic genes are clustered and regulated by one or more pathway-specific transcription factor(s). In addition, as biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites is coordinated with fungal growth and development, there are a number of upstream regulators affecting biosynthesis of mycotoxins in fungi. This review presents a concise summary of the regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis, focusing on the roles of the upstream regulatory elements governing biosynthesis of aflatoxin and sterigmatocystin in Aspergillus.

  12. Plasma lipidomics reveal profound perturbation of glycerophospholipids, fatty acids, and sphingolipids in diet-induced hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hua; Chen, Hua; Pei, Songwen; Bai, Xu; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2015-02-25

    Hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease and has emerged as an important public health problem. Lipidomics is a powerful technology for assessment of global lipid metabolites in a biological system and for biomarker discovery. In the present study, hyperlipidemia was induced by feeding rats a high fat diet. A sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight synapt high-definition mass spectrometry method was used for the analysis of plasma lipids. Orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis, correlation analysis and heatmap analysis were performed to investigate the metabolic changes in rats with diet-induced hyperlipidemia. Potential biomarkers were detected using S-plot and were identified by accurate mass data, isotopic pattern and MS(E) fragments information. Significantly increased total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol as well as decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were observed in diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. Combined with standard serum biochemical results, significant differences in plasma lipid compounds including eleven glycerophospholipids, six fatty acids, two sphingolipids, one eicosanoid, one sterol lipid and one glycerolipid were observed, highlighting the perturbation of lipid metabolism in diet-induced hyperlipidemia. These findings provide further insights into the lipid profile across a wide range of biochemical pathways in diet-induced hyperlipidemia.

  13. Digestion of Ceramide 2-Aminoethylphosphonate, a Sphingolipid from the Jumbo Flying Squid Dosidicus gigas, in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomonaga, Nami; Manabe, Yuki; Sugawara, Tatsuya

    2017-04-01

    Ceramide 2-aminoethylphosphonate (CAEP), a sphingophosphonolipid containing a carbon-phosphorus bond, is frequently found in marine organisms and has a unique triene type of sphingoid base in its structure. CAEP has not been evaluated as a food ingredient, although it is generally contained in Mollusca organisms such as squids and shellfish, which are consumed worldwide. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects of CAEP as a food component by evaluating the digestion of CAEP extracted from the skin of the jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas. Our results revealed that dietary CAEP was digested to free sphingoid bases via ceramides by the mouse small intestinal mucosa. At pH 7.2, CAEP was hydrolyzed more rapidly than the major mammalian sphingolipid sphingomyelin; however, the hydrolysis of CAEP was similar to that of sphingomyelin at pH 9.0. Thus, the digestion of CAEP may be catalyzed by alkaline spingomyelinase and other enzymes. Our findings provide important insights into the digestion of the dietary sphingophosphonolipid CAEP in marine foods.

  14. Dysregulations in circulating sphingolipids associate with disease activity indices in female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, A; Idborg, H; Zandian, A; Sar, D Garcia; Surowiec, I; Trygg, J; Svenungsson, E; Jakobsson, P-J; Nilsson, P; Gunnarsson, I; Wheelock, C E

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the association of clinical and renal disease activity with circulating sphingolipids in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods We used liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure the levels of 27 sphingolipids in plasma from 107 female systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 23 controls selected using a design of experiment approach. We investigated the associations between sphingolipids and two disease activity indices, the Systemic Lupus Activity Measurement and the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index. Damage was scored according to the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics damage index. Renal activity was evaluated with the British Island Lupus Activity Group index. The effects of immunosuppressive treatment on sphingolipid levels were evaluated before and after treatment in 22 female systemic lupus erythematosus patients with active disease. Results Circulating sphingolipids from the ceramide and hexosylceramide families were increased, and sphingoid bases were decreased, in systemic lupus erythematosus patients compared to controls. The ratio of C16:0-ceramide to sphingosine-1-phosphate was the best discriminator between patients and controls, with an area under the receiver-operating curve of 0.77. The C16:0-ceramide to sphingosine-1-phosphate ratio was associated with ongoing disease activity according to the Systemic Lupus Activity Measurement and the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index, but not with accumulated damage according to the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index. Levels of C16:0- and C24:1-hexosylceramides were able to discriminate patients with current versus inactive/no renal involvement. All dysregulated sphingolipids were normalized after immunosuppressive treatment. Conclusion We provide evidence that sphingolipids are dysregulated in systemic lupus erythematosus and associated with

  15. Chemical genetics to examine cellulose biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth eDebolt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term efforts to decode plant cellulose biosynthesis via molecular genetics and biochemical strategies are being enhanced by the ever-expanding scale of omics technologies. An alternative approach to consider are the prospects for inducing change in plant metabolism using exogenously supplied chemical ligands. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors (CBI have been identified among known herbicides, during diverse combinatorial chemical libraries screens, and natural chemical screens from microbial agents. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the inhibitory effects of CBIs and further group them by how they influence fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase A (CESA proteins. Additional attention is paid to the continuing development of the CBI toolbox to explore the cell biology and genetic mechanisms underpinning effector molecule activity.

  16. Uptake of long chain fatty acids is regulated by dynamic interaction of FAT/CD36 with cholesterol/sphingolipid enriched microdomains (lipid rafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrmann Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms of long chain fatty acid uptake across the plasma membrane are important targets in treatment of many human diseases like obesity or hepatic steatosis. Long chain fatty acid translocation is achieved by a concert of co-existing mechanisms. These lipids can passively diffuse, but certain membrane proteins can also accelerate the transport. However, we now can provide further evidence that not only proteins but also lipid microdomains play an important part in the regulation of the facilitated uptake process. Methods Dynamic association of FAT/CD36 a candidate fatty acid transporter with lipid rafts was analysed by isolation of detergent resistant membranes (DRMs and by clustering of lipid rafts with antibodies on living cells. Lipid raft integrity was modulated by cholesterol depletion using methyl-β-cyclodextrin and sphingolipid depletion using myriocin and sphingomyelinase. Functional analyses were performed using an [3H]-oleate uptake assay. Results Overexpression of FAT/CD36 and FATP4 increased long chain fatty acid uptake. The uptake of long chain fatty acids was cholesterol and sphingolipid dependent. Floating experiments showed that there are two pools of FAT/CD36, one found in DRMs and another outside of these domains. FAT/CD36 co-localized with the lipid raft marker PLAP in antibody-clustered domains at the plasma membrane and segregated away from the non-raft marker GFP-TMD. Antibody cross-linking increased DRM association of FAT/CD36 and accelerated the overall fatty acid uptake in a cholesterol dependent manner. Another candidate transporter, FATP4, was neither present in DRMs nor co-localized with FAT/CD36 at the plasma membrane. Conclusion Our observations suggest the existence of two pools of FAT/CD36 within cellular membranes. As increased raft association of FAT/CD36 leads to an increased fatty acid uptake, dynamic association of FAT/CD36 with lipid rafts might regulate the process. There is no

  17. Four Novel Cellulose Synthase (CESA Genes from Birch (Betula platyphylla Suk. Involved in Primary and Secondary Cell Wall Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Liu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose synthase (CESA, which is an essential catalyst for the generation of plant cell wall biomass, is mainly encoded by the CesA gene family that contains ten or more members. In this study; four full-length cDNAs encoding CESA were isolated from Betula platyphylla Suk., which is an important timber species, using RT-PCR combined with the RACE method and were named as BplCesA3, −4, −7 and −8. These deduced CESAs contained the same typical domains and regions as their Arabidopsis homologs. The cDNA lengths differed among these four genes, as did the locations of the various protein domains inferred from the deduced amino acid sequences, which shared amino acid sequence identities ranging from only 63.8% to 70.5%. Real-time RT-PCR showed that all four BplCesAs were expressed at different levels in diverse tissues. Results indicated that BplCESA8 might be involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis and floral development. BplCESA3 appeared in a unique expression pattern and was possibly involved in primary cell wall biosynthesis and seed development; it might also be related to the homogalacturonan synthesis. BplCESA7 and BplCESA4 may be related to the formation of a cellulose synthase complex and participate mainly in secondary cell wall biosynthesis. The extremely low expression abundance of the four BplCESAs in mature pollen suggested very little involvement of them in mature pollen formation in Betula. The distinct expression pattern of the four BplCesAs suggested they might participate in developments of various tissues and that they are possibly controlled by distinct mechanisms in Betula.

  18. Microbial biosynthesis of alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Andreas; Rude, Mathew A; Li, Xuezhi; Popova, Emanuela; del Cardayre, Stephen B

    2010-07-30

    Alkanes, the major constituents of gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel, are naturally produced by diverse species; however, the genetics and biochemistry behind this biology have remained elusive. Here we describe the discovery of an alkane biosynthesis pathway from cyanobacteria. The pathway consists of an acyl-acyl carrier protein reductase and an aldehyde decarbonylase, which together convert intermediates of fatty acid metabolism to alkanes and alkenes. The aldehyde decarbonylase is related to the broadly functional nonheme diiron enzymes. Heterologous expression of the alkane operon in Escherichia coli leads to the production and secretion of C13 to C17 mixtures of alkanes and alkenes. These genes and enzymes can now be leveraged for the simple and direct conversion of renewable raw materials to fungible hydrocarbon fuels.

  19. Engineering of Glucosinolate Biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Morten Emil; Salomonsen, Bo; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2012-01-01

    -efficient methods for identification and validation of candidate genes are needed. This chapter covers the methodology we are using for gene discovery in glucosinolate engineering, namely, guilt-by-association-based in silico methods and fast proof-of-function screens by transient expression in Nicotiana...... of glucosinolate biosynthesis, although in planta validation of candidate gene function often is hampered by time-consuming generation of knockout and overexpression lines in Arabidopsis. To better exploit the increasing amount of data available from genomic sequencing, microarray database and RNAseq, time...... benthamiana. Moreover,the lessons learned in the rapid, transient tobacco system are readily translated to our robust, versatile yeast expression platform, where additional genes critical for large-scale microbial production of glucosinolates can be identified. We anticipate that the methodology presented...

  20. Glycosyltransferases Involved in Xylan Biosynthesis in Plant Cell Walls%参与植物细胞壁半纤维素木聚糖合成的糖基转移酶

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦丽霞; 张德静; 李龙; 李学宝; 许文亮

    2011-01-01

    Xylans are the major hemicelluloses in secondary cell walls of dicots and are critical for normal plant growth and development. Xylan-containing lignocellulosic secondary cell walls are the most abundant repository of biomass on earth and are widely used for energy, pulping, paper-making and textiles. However, the pen-tose composition of xylans makes them difficult to be used efficiently. Thus, understanding the detailed mechanism of xylan biosynthesis may lead to new strategies to manipulate the xylan composition in cell walls and to modify their structures. To date the characterization of various xylan-deficient Arabidopsis mutants has identified many genes encoding members of glycosyltransferase family GT43, GT8 and GT47 that are involved in biosynthesis of xylan backbone, reducing end sequence and side chains. In this review, we summarize the recent progress on glycosyltransferases involved in xylan biosynthesis.%木聚糖是双子叶植物次生细胞壁中最主要的半纤维素,合有木聚糖的次生壁是最丰富的植物生物质,广泛应用于能源、制浆、造纸和纺织业中,但其主要组分戊糖对细胞壁生物质利用具有较大影响.揭示木聚糖合成的分子机制,为遗传修饰细胞壁组成,更好地利用细胞壁生物质提供新的策略.近年来对模式植物拟南芥中多个木聚糖合成有缺陷的突变体的分析表明:GT43家族的IRX9、IRX9-L、IRX14、IRX14-L,GT47家族的FRA8、F8H、IRX10、IRX10-L,GT8家族的IRX8、PARVUS、QUA1、GUX1、GUX2等参与了木聚糖主链、还原末端序列和侧链的合成.本文主要对这些研究进展做一综述,并讨论了木聚糖合成的机制及亟待解决的问题,展望了其发展趋势.

  1. LC-MS Based Sphingolipidomic Study on A2780 Human Ovarian Cancer Cell Line and its Taxol-resistant Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Tong, Tian-Tian; Yau, Lee-Fong; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Mi, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jing-Rong; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance elicited by cancer cells continue to cause huge problems world-wide, for example, tens of thousands of patients are suffering from taxol-resistant human ovarian cancer. However, its biochemical mechanisms remain unclear. Sphingolipid metabolic dysregulation has been increasingly regarded as one of the drug-resistant mechanisms for various cancers, which in turn provides potential targets for overcoming the resistance. In the current study, a well-established LC-MS based sphingolipidomic approach was applied to investigate the sphingolipid metabolism of A2780 and taxol-resistant A2780 (A2780T) human ovarian cancer cell lines. 102 sphingolipids (SPLs) were identified based on accurate mass and characteristic fragment ions, among which 12 species have not been reported previously. 89 were further quantitatively analyzed by using multiple reaction monitoring technique. Multivariate analysis revealed that the levels of 52 sphingolipids significantly altered in A2780T cells comparing to those of A2780 cells. These alterations revealed an overall increase of sphingomyelin levels and significant decrease of ceramides, hexosylceramides and lactosylceramides, which concomitantly indicated a deviated SPL metabolism in A2780T. This is the most comprehensive sphingolipidomic analysis of A2780 and A2780T, which investigated significantly changed sphingolipid profile in taxol-resistant cancer cells. The aberrant sphingolipid metabolism in A2780T could be one of the mechanisms of taxol-resistance. PMID:27703266

  2. Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent DNase involvement in apoptotic effects in spermatozoa of sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius induced by two-headed sphingolipid rhizochalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibirtsev, Juriy T; Shastina, Valeria V; Menzorova, Natalia I; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Rasskazov, Valeriy A

    2011-06-01

    Previously, we have purified three distinct DNases from spermatozoa of sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius and we suppose the role of Ca(2+), Mg(2+)-dependent DNase (Ca, Mg-DNase) in apoptosis of spermatozoa. Two-headed sphingolipid rhizochalin (Rhz) induced characteristic apoptotic nuclear chromatin changes, internucleosomal DNA cleavage, and activation of caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 in spermatozoa as was shown by fluorescence Hoechst 33342/PI/FDA analysis, DNA fragmentation assay, and fluorescence caspase inhibitors FAM-LEHD-fmk, FAM-IETD-fmk, and FAM-DEVD-fmk, respectively. Inhibitor of caspase-3 z-DEVD-fmk subdued Rhz-induced internucleosomal ladder formation, which confirmed the major role of caspase-3 in apoptotic DNA cleavage probably through Ca, Mg-DNase activation. Participation of sea urchin Ca, Mg-DNase in apoptosis of spermatozoa was demonstrated by ions Zn(2+) blocking of Rhz-induced DNA fragmentation due to direct inhibition of the Ca, Mg-DNase and internucleosomal cleavage of HeLa S and Vero E6 cell nuclei chromatin by highly purified Ca, Mg-DNase.

  3. The regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulley, Sean; Laing, William

    2016-10-01

    We review the regulation of ascorbate (vitamin C) biosynthesis, focusing on the l-galactose pathway. We discuss the regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis at the level of gene transcription (both repression and enhancement) and translation (feedback inhibition of translation by ascorbate concentration) and discuss the eight proteins that have been demonstrated to date to affect ascorbate concentration in plant tissues. GDP-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) and GDP-mannose epimerase are critical steps that regulate ascorbate biosynthesis. These and other biosynthetic genes are controlled at the transcriptional level, while GGP is also controlled at the translational level. Ascorbate feedback on enzyme activity has not been observed unequivocally.

  4. Inborn errors of metabolism in the biosynthesis and remodelling of phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, Saskia B; Espeel, Marc; Almeida, Ligia; Reimer, Annette; Bosboom, Dennis; Roels, Frank; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Wevers, Ron A

    2015-01-01

    Since the proposal to define a separate subgroup of inborn errors of metabolism involved in the biosynthesis and remodelling of phospholipids, sphingolipids and long chain fatty acids in 2013, this group is rapidly expanding. This review focuses on the disorders involved in the biosynthesis of phospholipids. Phospholipids are involved in uncountable cellular processes, e.g. as structural components of membranes, by taking part in vesicle and mitochondrial fusion and fission or signal transduction. Here we provide an overview on both pathophysiology and the extremely heterogeneous clinical presentations of the disorders reported so far (Sengers syndrome (due to mutations in AGK), MEGDEL syndrome (or SERAC defect, SERAC1), Barth syndrome (or TAZ defect, TAZ), congenital muscular dystrophy due to CHKB deficiency (CHKB). Boucher-Neuhäuser/Gordon Holmes syndrome (PNPLA6), PHARC syndrome (ABHD12), hereditary spastic paraplegia type 28, 54 and 56 (HSP28, DDHD1; HSP54, DDHD2; HSP56, CYP2U1), Lenz Majewski syndrome (PTDSS1), spondylometaphyseal dysplasia with cone-rod dystrophy (PCYT1A), atypical haemolytic-uremic syndrome due to DGKE deficiency (DGKE).

  5. [Regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomycetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matseliukh, B P

    2006-01-01

    The review of literature presents the modern data about cascade regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomycetes including basal and global levels. The first regulatory level is presented by related proteins of SARP family playing the role of positive transcription factors of pathway-specific genes of clusters of antibiotic biosynthesis. In their turn these regulatory genes are under the control of higher regulatory level represented by bldA- and A-factor-dependent cascade regulation and two-component signal transduction system (AfsK-AfsR, AbsAl-AbsA2, AfsQ1-AfsQ2 and others), consisting of sensor protein kinase and response regulator protein.Streptomycetes, in contrast to other microorganisms, have dozens of protein kinases and related regulator proteins that testifies to the great importance of protein phosphorylation in regulation of secondary metabolism and morphogenesis in cell response to internal and external signals. The role of camp, ppGpp and other proteins in regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis was also considered in this review.

  6. Insulin biosynthesis and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permutt, A; Chirgwin, J; Giddings, S; Kakita, K; Rotwein, P

    1981-10-01

    This review reports the use of recombinant DNA techniques in the study of the structure and regulation of expression of insulin genes in man and experimental animals. Insulin biosynthesis by pancreatic islet cells is predominantly regulated by change in plasma glucose concentration. Using a cell-free protein synthesizing system as an assay of functional proinsulin messenger RNA (mRNA), and hybridization analysis with a cloned DNA complementary to proinsulin mRNA, it has been determined that through changes in proinsulin mRNA levels. Insulin genes of the rat, chicken and human have been isolated and sequenced. The 5' ends of the genes have similar sequences suggesting areas important for regulation of transcription. There are two non-allelic insulin genes in the rat, but only one in chickens and humans. Intervening sequences, areas of DNA transcribed into precursor mRNA but which do not appear in mature mRNA, have been described within insulin genes. The insulin gene resides on chromosome 11 of humans as determined by DNA hybridization analysis of mouse human hybrid cells. The structure of the insulin gene in genomic DNA of humans has been analyzed in diabetics and non-diabetics. Insertions of DNA between 1500 and 3400 base pairs have been detected near the transcription initiation site in 65% of type II diabetics, and 25-30% of non-diabetics (this difference is significant at the p less than 0.001 level). Limitation of these insertions to this potential promotor region of the insulin gene suggests that they may alter gene expression in type II diabetes. These insertions of DNA may prove to be useful genetic markers for diabetes.

  7. Diverse inhibitors of aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Robert A; Boston, Rebecca S; Payne, Gary A

    2008-03-01

    Pre-harvest and post-harvest contamination of maize, peanuts, cotton, and tree nuts by members of the genus Aspergillus and subsequent contamination with the mycotoxin aflatoxin pose a widespread food safety problem for which effective and inexpensive control strategies are lacking. Since the discovery of aflatoxin as a potently carcinogenic food contaminant, extensive research has been focused on identifying compounds that inhibit its biosynthesis. Numerous diverse compounds and extracts containing activity inhibitory to aflatoxin biosynthesis have been reported. Only recently, however, have tools been available to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which these inhibitors affect aflatoxin biosynthesis. Many inhibitors are plant-derived and a few may be amenable to pathway engineering for tissue-specific expression in susceptible host plants as a defense against aflatoxin contamination. Other compounds show promise as protectants during crop storage. Finally, inhibitors with different modes of action could be used in comparative transcriptional and metabolomic profiling experiments to identify regulatory networks controlling aflatoxin biosynthesis.

  8. The Synthetic Amphipathic Peptidomimetic LTX109 Is a Potent Fungicide That Disturbs Plasma Membrane Integrity in a Sphingolipid Dependent Manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus; Torbensen, Rasmus; Larsen, Camilla Eggert;

    2013-01-01

    Green after a few minutes of LTX109 treatment. We screened a haploid S. cerevisiae gene deletion library for mutants resistant to LTX109 to uncover potential molecular targets. Eight genes conferred LTX109 resistance when deleted and six were involved in the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway (SUR1, SUR2......, SKN1, IPT1, FEN1 and ORM2). The involvement of all of these genes in the biosynthetic pathway for the fungal-specific lipids mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide (MIPC) and mannosyl di-(inositol phosphoryl) ceramide (M(IP)2C) suggested that these lipids were essential for LTX109 sensitivity. Our...

  9. Green biosynthesis of floxuridine by immobilized microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Cintia W; Britos, Claudia N; Lozano, Mario E; Sinisterra, Jose V; Trelles, Jorge A

    2012-06-01

    This work describes an efficient, simple, and green bioprocess for obtaining 5-halogenated pyrimidine nucleosides from thymidine by transglycosylation using whole cells. Biosynthesis of 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (floxuridine) was achieved by free and immobilized Aeromonas salmonicida ATCC 27013 with an 80% and 65% conversion occurring in 1 h, respectively. The immobilized biocatalyst was stable for more than 4 months in storage conditions (4 °C) and could be reused at least 30 times without loss of its activity. This microorganism was able to biosynthesize 2.0 mg L(-1) min(-1) (60%) of 5-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine in 3 h. These halogenated pyrimidine 2'-deoxynucleosides are used as antitumoral agents.

  10. A combined fluorescence spectroscopy, confocal and 2-photon microscopy approach to re-evaluate the properties of sphingolipid domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Sandra N; Fernandes, Fábio; Fedorov, Alexander; Futerman, Anthony H; Silva, Liana C; Prieto, Manuel

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to provide further insight about the interplay between important signaling lipids and to characterize the properties of the lipid domains formed by those lipids in membranes containing distinct composition. To this end, we have used a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy, confocal and two-photon microscopy and a stepwise approach to re-evaluate the biophysical properties of sphingolipid domains, particularly lipid rafts and ceramide (Cer)-platforms. By using this strategy we were able to show that, in binary mixtures, sphingolipids (Cer and sphingomyelin, SM) form more tightly packed gel domains than those formed by phospholipids with similar acyl chain length. In more complex lipid mixtures, the interaction between the different lipids is intricate and is strongly dictated by the Cer-to-Chol ratio. The results show that in quaternary phospholipid/SM/Chol/Cer mixtures, Cer forms gel domains that become less packed as Chol is increased. Moreover, the extent of gel phase formation is strongly reduced in these mixtures, even though Cer molar fraction is increased. These results suggest that in biological membranes, lipid domains such as rafts and ceramide platforms, might display distinctive biophysical properties depending on the local lipid composition at the site of the membrane where they are formed, further highlighting the potential role of membrane biophysical properties as an underlying mechanism for mediating specific biological processes.

  11. Biosynthesis and Role of N-Linked Glycosylation in Cell Surface Structures of Archaea with a Focus on Flagella and S Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken F. Jarrell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetics and biochemistry of the N-linked glycosylation system of Archaea have been investigated over the past 5 years using flagellins and S layers as reporter proteins in the model organisms, Methanococcus voltae, Methanococcus maripaludis, and Haloferax volcanii. Structures of archaeal N-linked glycans have indicated a variety of linking sugars as well as unique sugar components. In M. voltae, M. maripaludis, and H. volcanii, a number of archaeal glycosylation genes (agl have been identified by deletion and complementation studies. These include many of the glycosyltransferases and the oligosaccharyltransferase needed to assemble the glycans as well as some of the genes encoding enzymes required for the biosynthesis of the sugars themselves. The N-linked glycosylation system is not essential for any of M. voltae, M. maripaludis, or H. volcanii, as demonstrated by the successful isolation of mutants carrying deletions in the oligosaccharyltransferase gene aglB (a homologue of the eukaryotic Stt3 subunit of the oligosaccharyltransferase complex. However, mutations that affect the glycan structure have serious effects on both flagellation and S layer function.

  12. Dairy Streptococcus thermophilus improves cell viability of Lactobacillus brevis NPS-QW-145 and its γ-aminobutyric acid biosynthesis ability in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinglong; Law, Yee-Song; Shah, Nagendra P

    2015-08-06

    Most high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producers are Lactobacillus brevis of plant origin, which may be not able to ferment milk well due to its poor proteolytic nature as evidenced by the absence of genes encoding extracellular proteinases in its genome. In the present study, two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes, gadA and gadB, were found in high GABA-producing L. brevis NPS-QW-145. Co-culturing of this organism with conventional dairy starters was carried out to manufacture GABA-rich fermented milk. It was observed that all the selected strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, but not Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, improved the viability of L. brevis NPS-QW-145 in milk. Only certain strains of S. thermophilus improved the gadA mRNA level in L. brevis NPS-QW-145, thus enhanced GABA biosynthesis by the latter. These results suggest that certain S. thermophilus strains are highly recommended to co-culture with high GABA producer for manufacturing GABA-rich fermented milk.

  13. Chlorogenic acid biosynthesis: characterization of a light-induced microsomal 5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase from carrot (Daucus carota L. ) cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehnl, T.K.; Koch, U.; Heller, W.; Wellmann, E.

    1987-10-01

    Microsomal preparations from carrot (Daucus carota L.) cell suspension cultures catalyze the formation of trans-5-O-caffeoyl-D-quinate (chlorogenate) from trans-5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate. trans-5-O-(4-Coumaroyl)shikimate is converted to about the same extent to trans-5-O-caffeoylshikimate. trans-4-O-(4-Coumaroyl)-D-quinate, trans-3-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate, trans-4-coumarate, and cis-5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate do not act as substrates. The reaction is strictly dependent on molecular oxygen and on NADPH as reducing cofactor. NADH and ascorbic acid cannot substitute for NADPH. Cytochrome c, Tetcyclacis, and carbon monoxide inhibit the reaction suggesting a cytochrome P-450-dependent mixed-function monooxygenase. Competition experiments as well as induction and inhibition phenomena indicate that there is only one enzyme species which is responsible for the hydroxylation of the 5-O-(4-coumaric) esters of both D-quinate and shikimate. The activity of this enzyme is greatly increased by in vivo irradiation of the cells with blue/uv light. We conclude that the biosynthesis of the predominant caffeic acid conjugates in carrot cells occurs via the corresponding 4-coumaric acid esters. Thus, in this system, 5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate can be seen as the final intermediate in the chlorogenic acid pathway.

  14. Comparative Proteomic Analysis Reveals Proteins Putatively Involved in Toxin Biosynthesis in the Marine Dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Zhi Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alexandrium is a neurotoxin-producing dinoflagellate genus resulting in paralytic shellfish poisonings around the world. However, little is known about the toxin biosynthesis mechanism in Alexandrium. This study compared protein profiles of A. catenella collected at different toxin biosynthesis stages (non-toxin synthesis, initial toxin synthesis and toxin synthesizing coupled with the cell cycle, and identified differentially expressed proteins using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. The results showed that toxin biosynthesis of A. catenella occurred within a defined time frame in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Proteomic analysis indicated that 102 protein spots altered significantly in abundance (P < 0.05, and 53 proteins were identified using database searching. These proteins were involved in a variety of biological processes, i.e., protein modification and biosynthesis, metabolism, cell division, oxidative stress, transport, signal transduction, and translation. Among them, nine proteins with known functions in paralytic shellfish toxin-producing cyanobacteria, i.e., methionine S-adenosyltransferase, chloroplast ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, S-adenosylhomocysteinase, adenosylhomocysteinase, ornithine carbamoyltransferase, inorganic pyrophosphatase, sulfotransferase (similar to, alcohol dehydrogenase and arginine deiminase, varied significantly at different toxin biosynthesis stages and formed an interaction network, indicating that they might be involved in toxin biosynthesis in A. catenella. This study is the first step in the dissection of the behavior of the A. catenella proteome during different toxin biosynthesis stages and provides new insights into toxin biosynthesis in dinoflagellates.

  15. Plasma membrane targeting by short chain sphingolipids inserted in liposomes improves anti-tumor activity of mitoxantrone in an orthotopic breast carcinoma xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro Pedrosa, Lília R; van Tellingen, Olaf; Soullié, Thomas; Seynhaeve, Ann L; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Verheij, Marcel; Koning, Gerben A

    2015-08-01

    Mitoxantrone (MTO) is clinically used for treatment of various types of cancers providing an alternative for similarly active, but more toxic chemotherapeutic drugs such as anthracyclines. To further decrease its toxicity MTO was encapsulated into liposomes. Although liposomal drugs can accumulate in target tumor tissue, they still face the plasma membrane barrier for effective intracellular delivery. Aiming to improve MTO tumor cell availability, we used short chain lipids to target and modulate the tumor cell membrane, promoting MTO plasma membrane traversal. MTO was encapsulated in liposomes containing the short chain sphingolipid (SCS), C8-Glucosylceramide (C8-GluCer) or C8-Galactosylceramide (C8-GalCer) in their bilayer. These new SCS-liposomes containing MTO (SCS-MTOL) were tested in vivo for tolerability, pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, tumor drug delivery by intravital microscopy and efficacy, and compared to standard MTO liposomes (MTOL) and free MTO. Liposomal encapsulation decreased MTO toxicity and allowed administration of higher drug doses. SCS-MTOL displayed increased clearance and lower skin accumulation compared to standard MTOL. Intratumoral liposomal drug delivery was heterogeneous and rather limited in hypoxic tumor areas, yet SCS-MTOL improved intracellular drug uptake in comparison with MTOL. The increased MTO availability correlated well with the improved antitumor activity of SCS-MTOL in a MDAMB-231 breast carcinoma model. Multiple dosing of liposomal MTO strongly delayed tumor growth compared to free MTO and prolonged mouse survival, whereas among the liposomal MTO treatments, C8-GluCer-MTOL was most effective. Targeting plasma membranes with SCS improved MTO tumor availability and thereby therapeutic activity and represents a promising approach to improve MTO-based chemotherapy.

  16. Phosphoregulation of the ceramide transport protein CERT at serine 315 in the interaction with VAMP-associated protein (VAP) for inter-organelle trafficking of ceramide in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Keigo; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2014-04-11

    The ceramide transport protein CERT mediates the inter-organelle transport of ceramide for the synthesis of sphingomyelin, presumably through endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi membrane contact sites. CERT has a short peptide motif named FFAT, which associates with the ER-resident membrane protein VAP. We show that the phosphorylation of CERT at serine 315, which is adjacent to the FFAT motif, markedly enhanced the interaction of CERT with VAP. The phosphomimetic CERT S315E mutant exhibited higher activity to support the ER-to-Golgi transport of ceramide than the wild-type control in a semi-intact cell system, and this enhanced activity was abrogated when its FFAT motif was deleted. The level of phosphorylation of CERT at Ser-315 increased in HeLa cells treated with a sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitor or exogenous sphingomyelinase. Expression of CERT S315E induced intracellular punctate structures, to which CERT and VAP were co-localized, and the occurrence of the structure was dependent on both phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate binding and VAP binding activities of CERT. Phosphorylation of another region (named a serine-rich motif) in CERT is known to down-regulate the activity of CERT. Analysis of various CERT mutant constructs showed that the de-phosphorylation of the serine-rich motif and the phosphorylation of Ser-315 likely have the additive contribution to enhance the activity of CERT. These results demonstrate that the phosphorylation of CERT at the FFAT motif-adjacent serine affected its affinity for VAP, which may regulate the inter-organelle trafficking of ceramide in response to the perturbation of cellular sphingomyelin and/or other sphingolipids.

  17. Phosphoregulation of the Ceramide Transport Protein CERT at Serine 315 in the Interaction with VAMP-associated Protein (VAP) for Inter-organelle Trafficking of Ceramide in Mammalian Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Keigo; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    The ceramide transport protein CERT mediates the inter-organelle transport of ceramide for the synthesis of sphingomyelin, presumably through endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi membrane contact sites. CERT has a short peptide motif named FFAT, which associates with the ER-resident membrane protein VAP. We show that the phosphorylation of CERT at serine 315, which is adjacent to the FFAT motif, markedly enhanced the interaction of CERT with VAP. The phosphomimetic CERT S315E mutant exhibited higher activity to support the ER-to-Golgi transport of ceramide than the wild-type control in a semi-intact cell system, and this enhanced activity was abrogated when its FFAT motif was deleted. The level of phosphorylation of CERT at Ser-315 increased in HeLa cells treated with a sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitor or exogenous sphingomyelinase. Expression of CERT S315E induced intracellular punctate structures, to which CERT and VAP were co-localized, and the occurrence of the structure was dependent on both phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate binding and VAP binding activities of CERT. Phosphorylation of another region (named a serine-rich motif) in CERT is known to down-regulate the activity of CERT. Analysis of various CERT mutant constructs showed that the de-phosphorylation of the serine-rich motif and the phosphorylation of Ser-315 likely have the additive contribution to enhance the activity of CERT. These results demonstrate that the phosphorylation of CERT at the FFAT motif-adjacent serine affected its affinity for VAP, which may regulate the inter-organelle trafficking of ceramide in response to the perturbation of cellular sphingomyelin and/or other sphingolipids. PMID:24569996

  18. Molecular Basis for Mycophenolic Acid Biosynthesis in Penicillium brevicompactum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueira, Torsten Ulrik Bak; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Hansen, Bjarne Gram;

    2011-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is the active ingredient in the increasingly important immunosuppressive pharmaceuticals CellCept (Roche) and Myfortic (Novartis). Despite the long history of MPA, the molecular basis for its biosynthesis has remained enigmatic. Here we report the discovery of a polyketide...

  19. Auxin biosynthesis and storage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korasick, David A; Enders, Tara A; Strader, Lucia C

    2013-06-01

    The plant hormone auxin drives plant growth and morphogenesis. The levels and distribution of the active auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) are tightly controlled through synthesis, inactivation, and transport. Many auxin precursors and modified auxin forms, used to regulate auxin homeostasis, have been identified; however, very little is known about the integration of multiple auxin biosynthesis and inactivation pathways. This review discusses the many ways auxin levels are regulated through biosynthesis, storage forms, and inactivation, and the potential roles modified auxins play in regulating the bioactive pool of auxin to affect plant growth and development.

  20. The sphingolipid long-chain base-Pkh1/2-Ypk1/2 signaling pathway regulates eisosome assembly and turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Guangzuo; Gruhler, Albrecht; Liu, Ying;

    2008-01-01

    Eisosomes are recently described fungal structures that play roles in the organization of the plasma membrane and endocytosis. Their major protein components are Pil1 and Lsp1, and previous studies showed that these proteins are phosphorylated by the sphingolipid long-chain base-activated Pkh1 an...

  1. Glycosaminoglycan Biosynthesis in Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Filipek-Górniok, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are composed of highly sulfated glycosaminoglycans chains (GAGs) attached to specific core proteins. They are present in extracellular matrices, on the cell surface and in storage granules of hematopoietic cells. Heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) GAGs play indispensable roles in a wide range of biological processes, where they can serve as protein carriers, be involved in growth factor or morphogen gradient formation and act as co-receptors in s...

  2. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticle and its application in cell wall disruption to release carbohydrate and lipid from C. vulgaris for biofuel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirajunnisa Abdul Razack

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are the fledging feedstocks yielding raw materials for the production of third generation biofuel. Assorted and conventional cell wall disruption techniques were helpful in extracting lipids and carbohydrates, nevertheless the disadvantages have led the biotechnologists to explore new process to lyse cell wall in a faster and an economical manner. Silver nanoparticles have the ability to break the cell wall of microalgae and release biomolecules effectively. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles was performed using a novel bacterial isolate of Bacillus subtilis. Characterisation of nanosilver and its effect on cell wall lysis of microalgae were extensively analysed. Cell wall damage was confirmed by lactate dehydrogenase assay and visually by SEM analysis. This first piece of research work on direct use of nanoparticles for cell wall lysis would potentially be advantageous over its conventional approaches and a greener, cost effective and non laborious method for the production of biodiesel.

  3. Queuosine biosynthesis is required for sinorhizobium meliloti-induced cytoskeletal modifications on HeLa Cells and symbiosis with Medicago truncatula

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Marchetti; Delphine Capela; Renaud Poincloux; Nacer Benmeradi; Marie-Christine Auriac; Aurélie Le Ru; Isabelle Maridonneau-Parini; Jacques Batut; Catherine Masson-Boivin

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobia are symbiotic soil bacteria able to intracellularly colonize legume nodule cells and form nitrogen-fixing symbiosomes therein. How the plant cell cytoskeleton reorganizes in response to rhizobium colonization has remained poorly understood especially because of the lack of an in vitro infection assay. Here, we report on the use of the heterologous HeLa cell model to experimentally tackle this question. We observed that the model rhizobium Sinorhizobium meliloti, and other rhizobia as...

  4. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  5. Biosynthesis and transport of terpenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ting, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Terpenoids are the largest class of natural product that are produced by plants, with functions that range from a role in plant development to direct defence against pathogens and indirect defence against insects through the attraction of natural enemies. While terpene biosynthesis genes have been w

  6. Biosynthesis of pectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Jensen, Jacob Krüger; Sørensen, Susanne Oxenbøll

    2007-01-01

    Pectin consists of a group of acidic polysaccharides that constitute a large part of the cell wall of plants. The pectic polysaccharides have a complex structure but can generally be divided into homogalacturonan, rhamnogalacturonan I, rhamnogalacturonan II (RGII) and xylogalacturonan (XGA......). These polysaccharides appear to be present in all cells but their relative abundance and structural details differ between cell types and species. Pectin is synthesized in the Golgi vesicles and its complexity dictates that a large number of enzymes must be involved in the process. The biosynthetic enzymes required...... are glycosyltransferases and decorating enzymes including methyltransferases, acetyltransferases and feruloyltransferases. Biochemical methods successfully led to the recent identification of a pectin biosynthetic galacturonosyltransferase (GAUT1), and recent functional genomics and mutant studies have allowed...

  7. The biosynthesis of phytoalexins in Dianthus caryophyllus L. cell cultures: induction of benzoyl-CoA:anthranilate N-benzoyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, K; Matern, U

    1989-11-15

    It has been shown that cell cultures of Dianthus caryophyllus L. c.v. Eleganz accumulate N-benzoyl-4-methoxyanthranilic acid, previously identified as the phytoalexin methoxydianthramide B, in response to treatment either with a crude elicitor isolated from the cell walls of Phytophthora megasperma f.sp. glycinea or with a commercial yeast extract. Cell-free extracts from the induced cells efficiently catalyzed the N-benzoylation of anthranilate in the presence of benzoyl-CoA. The partially purified transferase was shown to be specific for anthranilate with almost no activity toward 4-hydroxyanthranilate, whereas acyl donors other than benzoyl-CoA such as salicyloyl-, cinnamoyl-, or 4-coumaroyl-CoA were also accepted. Elicitor treatment of the cells additionally induced an S-adenosyl-L-methionine:N-benzoyl-4-hydroxyanthranilate 4-O-methyltransferase activity. We propose, therefore, that methoxydianthramide B is derived from N-benzoylanthranilic acid via N-benzoyl-4-hydroxyanthranilic acid. Dark-grown cells contained little N-benzoyltransferase activity (approx 8 mu kat/kg), which increased roughly ninefold within 6 h following the addition of the elicitor. In addition, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity of the cells increased about twofold under these conditions to a maximum (approx 40 mu kat/kg) at 5 h. The rapid induction of both enzyme activities suggests that the shikimate pathway is of crucial importance in the disease resistance response of carnation cells.

  8. LOCALIZATION OF THE PATHWAY OF THE PENICILLIN BIOSYNTHESIS IN PENICILLIUM-CHRYSOGENUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MULLER, WH; VANDERKRIFT, TP; KROUWER, AJJ; WOSTEN, HAB; VANDERVOORT, LHM; SMAAL, EB; VERKLEIJ, AJ

    1991-01-01

    The localization of the enzymes involved in penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum hyphae has been studied by immunological detection methods in combination with electron microscopy and cell fractionation. The results suggest a complicated pathway involving different intracellular locati

  9. Magnesium affects rubber biosynthesis and particle stability in Ficus elastica, Hevea brasiliensis and Parthenium argentatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural rubber biosynthesis occurs in laticifers of Ficus elastica and Hevea brasiliensis, and in parenchyma cells of Parthenium argentatum. Natural rubber is synthesized by rubber transferase using allylic pyrophosphates as initiators, isopentenyl pyrophosphate as monomeric substrate and magnesium ...

  10. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Davis, Edward M.; Ringer, Kerry L.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint ( Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4 S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general “allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction” scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1 R, 3 R, 4 S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil.

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Insulin Biosynthesis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Kyung Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell dysfunction are major contributors to the pathogenesis of diabetes. Various conditions play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and are correlated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Pancreatic beta cells are susceptible to ER stress. Many studies have shown that increased ER stress induces pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and diabetes mellitus using genetic models of ER stress and by various stimuli. There are many reports indicating that ER stress plays an important role in the impairment of insulin biosynthesis, suggesting that reduction of ER stress could be a therapeutic target for diabetes. In this paper, we reviewed the relationship between ER stress and diabetes and how ER stress controls insulin biosynthesis.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and insulin biosynthesis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Hye-Soon; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell dysfunction are major contributors to the pathogenesis of diabetes. Various conditions play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and are correlated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Pancreatic beta cells are susceptible to ER stress. Many studies have shown that increased ER stress induces pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and diabetes mellitus using genetic models of ER stress and by various stimuli. There are many reports indicating that ER stress plays an important role in the impairment of insulin biosynthesis, suggesting that reduction of ER stress could be a therapeutic target for diabetes. In this paper, we reviewed the relationship between ER stress and diabetes and how ER stress controls insulin biosynthesis.

  13. Final Report on Regulation of Guaiacyl and Syringyl Monolignol Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent L. Chiang

    2006-03-09

    The focus of this research is to understand syringyl monolignol biosynthesis that leads to the formation of syringyl lignin, a type of lignin that can be easily removed during biomass conversion. We have achieved the three originally proposed goals for this project. (1) SAD and CAD genes (enzyme catalytic and kinetic properties) and their functional relevance to CAld5H/AldOMT pathway, (2) spatiotemporal expression patterns of Cald5H, AldOMT, SAD and CAD genes, and (3) functions of CAld5H, AldOMT, and SAD genes in vivo using transgenic aspen. Furthermore, we also found that microRNA might be involved in the upstream regulatory network of lignin biosynthesis and wood formation. The achievements are as below. (1) Based on biochemical and molecular studies, we discovered a novel syringyl-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD) involved in monolignol biosynthesis in angiosperm trees. Through CAld5H/OMT/SAD mediation, syringyl monolignol biosynthesis branches out from guaiacyl pathway at coniferaldehyde; (2) The function of CAld5H gene in this syringyl monolignol biosynthesis pathway also was confirmed in vivo in transgenic Populus; (3) The proposed major monolignol biosynthesis pathways were further supported by the involving biochemical functions of CCR based on a detailed kinetic study; (4) Gene promoter activity analysis also supported the cell-type specific expression of SAD and CAD genes in xylem tissue, consistent with the cell-specific locations of SAD and CAD proteins and with the proposed pathways; (5) We have developed a novel small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated stable gene-silencing system in transgenic plants; (6) Using the siRNA and P. trichocarpa transformation/regeneration systems we are currently producing transgenic P. trichocarpa to investigate the interactive functions of CAD and SAD in regulating guaiacyl and syringyl lignin biosynthesis; (7) We have cloned for the first time from a tree species, P. trichocarpa, small regulatory RNAs termed micro

  14. Biosynthesis and biological action of pineal allopregnanolone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi eTsutsui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The pineal gland transduces photoperiodic changes to the neuroendocrine system by rhythmic secretion of melatonin. We recently provided new evidence that the pineal gland is a major neurosteroidogenic organ and actively produces a variety of neurosteroids de novo from cholesterol in birds. Notably, allopregnanolone is a major pineal neurosteroid that is far more actively produced in the pineal gland than the brain and secreted by the pineal gland in juvenile birds. Subsequently, we have demonstrated the biological action of pineal allopregnanolone on Purkinje cells in the cerebellum during development in juvenile birds. Pinealectomy (Px induces apoptosis of Purkinje cells, whereas allopregnanolone administration to Px chicks prevents cell death. Furthermore, Px increases the number of Purkinje cells that express active caspase-3, a crucial mediator of apoptosis, and allopregnanolone administration to Px chicks decreases the number of Purkinje cells expressing active caspase-3. It thus appears that pineal allopregnanolone prevents cell death of Purkinje cells by suppressing the activity of caspase-3 during development. This paper highlights new aspects of the biosynthesis and biological action of pineal allopregnanolone.

  15. EXPRESSED PROTEIN LIGATION. A NEW TOOL FOR THE BIOSYNTHESIS OF CYCLIC POLYPEPTIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, R; Camarero, J A

    2004-11-11

    The present paper reviews the use of expressed protein ligation for the biosynthesis of backbone cyclic polypeptides. This general method allows the in vivo and in vitro biosynthesis of cyclic polypeptides using recombinant DNA expression techniques. Biosynthetic access to backbone cyclic peptides opens the possibility to generate cell-based combinatorial libraries that can be screened inside living cells for their ability to attenuate or inhibit cellular processes.

  16. Essences in Metabolic Engineering of Lignan Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honoo Satake

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lignans are structurally and functionally diverse phytochemicals biosynthesized in diverse plant species and have received wide attentions as leading compounds of novel drugs for tumor treatment and healthy diets to reduce of the risks of lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases. However, the lineage-specific distribution and the low-amount of production in natural plants, some of which are endangered species, hinder the efficient and stable production of beneficial lignans. Accordingly, the development of new procedures for lignan production is of keen interest. Recent marked advances in the molecular and functional characterization of lignan biosynthetic enzymes and endogenous and exogenous factors for lignan biosynthesis have suggested new methods for the metabolic engineering of lignan biosynthesis cascades leading to the efficient, sustainable, and stable lignan production in plants, including plant cell/organ cultures. Optimization of light conditions, utilization of a wide range of elicitor treatments, and construction of transiently gene-transfected or transgenic lignan-biosynthesizing plants are mainly being attempted. This review will present the basic and latest knowledge regarding metabolic engineering of lignans based on their biosynthetic pathways and biological activities, and the perspectives in lignan production via metabolic engineering.

  17. BIOSYNTHESIS AND ACTION OF JASMONATES IN PLANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, Robert A.; Mullet, John E.

    1997-06-01

    Jasmonic acid and its derivatives can modulate aspects of fruit ripening, production of viable pollen, root growth, tendril coiling, and plant resistance to insects and pathogens. Jasmonate activates genes involved in pathogen and insect resistance, and genes encoding vegetative storage proteins, but represses genes encoding proteins involved in photosynthesis. Jasmonic acid is derived from linolenic acid, and most of the enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway have been extensively characterized. Modulation of lipoxygenase and allene oxide synthase gene expression in transgenic plants raises new questions about the compartmentation of the biosynthetic pathway and its regulation. The activation of jasmonic acid biosynthesis by cell wall elicitors, the peptide systemin, and other compounds will be related to the function of jasmonates in plants. Jasmonate modulates gene expression at the level of translation, RNA processing, and transcription. Promoter elements that mediate responses to jasmonate have been isolated. This review covers recent advances in our understanding of how jasmonate biosynthesis is regulated and relates this information to knowledge of jasmonate modulated gene expression.

  18. Mitochondrial lipid transport and biosynthesis: A complex balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how mitochondrial lipids reach inner membrane–localized metabolic enzymes for phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis. Aaltonen et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201602007) and Miyata et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201601082) now report roles for two mitochondrial complexes, Ups2–Mdm35 and mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system, in the biosynthesis and transport of mitochondrial lipids. PMID:27354376

  19. Biosynthesis of highly enriched 13C-lycopene for human metabolic studies using repeated batch tomato cell culturing with 13C-glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Nancy E.; Rogers, Randy B.; Lu, Chi-Hua; Conlon, Lauren E.; Lila, Mary Ann; Clinton, Steven K.; Erdman, John W

    2013-01-01

    While putative disease-preventing lycopene metabolites are found in both tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) products and in their consumers, mammalian lycopene metabolism is poorly understood. Advances in tomato cell culturing techniques offer an economical tool for generation of highly-enriched 13C-lycopene for human bioavailability and metabolism studies. To enhance the 13C-enrichment and yields of labeled lycopene from the hp-1 tomato cell line, cultures were first grown in 13C-glucose media fo...

  20. Screening of hyaluronic acid-poly(ethylene glycol) composite hydrogels to support intervertebral disc cell biosynthesis using artificial neural network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Claire G; Francisco, Aubrey T; Niu, Zhenbin; Mancino, Robert L; Craig, Stephen L; Setton, Lori A

    2014-08-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) composite hydrogels have been widely studied for both cell delivery and soft tissue regeneration applications. A very broad range of physical and biological properties have been engineered into HA-PEG hydrogels that may differentially affect cellular "outcomes" of survival, synthesis and metabolism. The objective of this study was to rapidly screen multiple HA-PEG composite hydrogel formulations for an effect on matrix synthesis and behaviors of nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) cells of the intervertebral disc (IVD). A secondary objective was to apply artificial neural network analysis to identify relationships between HA-PEG composite hydrogel formulation parameters and biological outcome measures for each cell type of the IVD. Eight different hydrogels were developed from preparations of thiolated HA (HA-SH) and PEG vinylsulfone (PEG-VS) macromers, and used as substrates for NP and AF cell culture in vitro. Hydrogel mechanical properties ranged from 70 to 489kPa depending on HA molecular weight, and measures of matrix synthesis, metabolite consumption and production and cell morphology were obtained to study relationships to hydrogel parameters. Results showed that NP and AF cell numbers were highest upon the HA-PEG hydrogels formed from the lower-molecular-weight HA, with evidence of higher sulfated glycosaminoglycan production also upon lower-HA-molecular-weight composite gels. All cells formed more multi-cell clusters upon any HA-PEG composite hydrogel as compared to gelatin substrates. Formulations were clustered into neurons based largely on their HA molecular weight, with few effects of PEG molecular weight observed on any measured parameters.

  1. Queuosine biosynthesis is required for sinorhizobium meliloti-induced cytoskeletal modifications on HeLa Cells and symbiosis with Medicago truncatula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Marchetti

    Full Text Available Rhizobia are symbiotic soil bacteria able to intracellularly colonize legume nodule cells and form nitrogen-fixing symbiosomes therein. How the plant cell cytoskeleton reorganizes in response to rhizobium colonization has remained poorly understood especially because of the lack of an in vitro infection assay. Here, we report on the use of the heterologous HeLa cell model to experimentally tackle this question. We observed that the model rhizobium Sinorhizobium meliloti, and other rhizobia as well, were able to trigger a major reorganization of actin cytoskeleton of cultured HeLa cells in vitro. Cell deformation was associated with an inhibition of the three major small RhoGTPases Cdc42, RhoA and Rac1. Bacterial entry, cytoskeleton rearrangements and modulation of RhoGTPase activity required an intact S. meliloti biosynthetic pathway for queuosine, a hypermodifed nucleoside regulating protein translation through tRNA, and possibly mRNA, modification. We showed that an intact bacterial queuosine biosynthetic pathway was also required for effective nitrogen-fixing symbiosis of S. meliloti with its host plant Medicago truncatula, thus indicating that one or several key symbiotic functions of S. meliloti are under queuosine control. We discuss whether the symbiotic defect of que mutants may originate, at least in part, from an altered capacity to modify plant cell actin cytoskeleton.

  2. Queuosine biosynthesis is required for sinorhizobium meliloti-induced cytoskeletal modifications on HeLa Cells and symbiosis with Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Marta; Capela, Delphine; Poincloux, Renaud; Benmeradi, Nacer; Auriac, Marie-Christine; Le Ru, Aurélie; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Batut, Jacques; Masson-Boivin, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobia are symbiotic soil bacteria able to intracellularly colonize legume nodule cells and form nitrogen-fixing symbiosomes therein. How the plant cell cytoskeleton reorganizes in response to rhizobium colonization has remained poorly understood especially because of the lack of an in vitro infection assay. Here, we report on the use of the heterologous HeLa cell model to experimentally tackle this question. We observed that the model rhizobium Sinorhizobium meliloti, and other rhizobia as well, were able to trigger a major reorganization of actin cytoskeleton of cultured HeLa cells in vitro. Cell deformation was associated with an inhibition of the three major small RhoGTPases Cdc42, RhoA and Rac1. Bacterial entry, cytoskeleton rearrangements and modulation of RhoGTPase activity required an intact S. meliloti biosynthetic pathway for queuosine, a hypermodifed nucleoside regulating protein translation through tRNA, and possibly mRNA, modification. We showed that an intact bacterial queuosine biosynthetic pathway was also required for effective nitrogen-fixing symbiosis of S. meliloti with its host plant Medicago truncatula, thus indicating that one or several key symbiotic functions of S. meliloti are under queuosine control. We discuss whether the symbiotic defect of que mutants may originate, at least in part, from an altered capacity to modify plant cell actin cytoskeleton.

  3. Structures and biosynthesis of the N- and O-glycans of recombinant human oviduct-specific glycoprotein expressed in human embryonic kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojing; Tao, Shujuan; Orlando, Ron; Brockhausen, Inka; Kan, Frederick W K

    2012-09-01

    Oviduct-specific glycoprotein (OVGP1) is a major mucin-like glycoprotein synthesized and secreted exclusively by non-ciliated secretory cells of mammalian oviduct. In vitro functional studies showed that OVGP1 plays important roles during fertilization and early embryo development. We have recently produced recombinant human oviduct-specific glycoprotein (rhOVGP1) in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. The present study was undertaken to characterize the structures and determine the biosynthetic pathways of the N- and O-glycans of rhOVGP1. Treatment of the stable rhOVGP1-expressing HEK293 cells with either GalNAcα-Bn to block O-glycan extension, tunicamycin to block N-glycosylation, or neuraminidase increased the electrophoretic mobility of rhOVGP1. A detailed analysis of O- and N-linked glycans of rhOVGP1 by mass spectrometry showed a broad range of many simple and complex glycan structures. In order to identify the enzymes involved in the glycosylation of rhOVGP1, we assayed glycosyltransferase activities involved in the assembly of O- and N-glycans in HEK293 cells, and compared these to those from the immortalized human oviductal cells (OE-E6/E7). Our results demonstrate that HEK293 and OE-E6/E7 cells exhibit a similar spectrum of glycosyltransferase activities that can synthesize elongated and sialylated O-glycans with core 1 and 2 structures, as well as complex multiantennary N-glycans. It is anticipated that the knowledge gained from the present study will facilitate future studies of the role of the glycans of human OVGP1 in fertilization and early embryo development.

  4. The Transcriptional Repressor TupA in Aspergillus niger Is Involved in Controlling Gene Expression Related to Cell Wall Biosynthesis, Development, and Nitrogen Source Availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schachtschabel, Doreen; Arentshorst, Mark; Nitsche, Benjamin M

    2013-01-01

    The Tup1-Cyc8 (Ssn6) complex is a well characterized and conserved general transcriptional repressor complex in eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the identification of the Tup1 (TupA) homolog in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger in a genetic screen for mutants with a constitutive expression...... of the agsA gene. The agsA gene encodes a putative alpha-glucan synthase, which is induced in response to cell wall stress in A. niger. Apart from the constitutive expression of agsA, the selected mutant was also found to produce an unknown pigment at high temperatures. Complementation analysis...

  5. The antimalarial drug quinine interferes with serotonin biosynthesis and action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islahudin, Farida; Tindall, Sarah M; Mellor, Ian R; Swift, Karen; Christensen, Hans E M; Fone, Kevin C F; Pleass, Richard J; Ting, Kang-Nee; Avery, Simon V

    2014-01-01

    The major antimalarial drug quinine perturbs uptake of the essential amino acid tryptophan, and patients with low plasma tryptophan are predisposed to adverse quinine reactions; symptoms of which are similar to indications of tryptophan depletion. As tryptophan is a precursor of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT), here we test the hypothesis that quinine disrupts serotonin function. Quinine inhibited serotonin-induced proliferation of yeast as well as human (SHSY5Y) cells. One possible cause of this effect is through inhibition of 5-HT receptor activation by quinine, as we observed here. Furthermore, cells exhibited marked decreases in serotonin production during incubation with quinine. By assaying activity and kinetics of the rate-limiting enzyme for serotonin biosynthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH2), we showed that quinine competitively inhibits TPH2 in the presence of the substrate tryptophan. The study shows that quinine disrupts both serotonin biosynthesis and function, giving important new insight to the action of quinine on mammalian cells.

  6. Specific binding of nisin to the peptidoglycan precursor lipid II combines pore formation and inhibition of cell wall biosynthesis for potent antibiotic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedemann, [No Value; Breukink, E; van Kraaij, C; Kuipers, OP; Bierbaum, G; de Kruijff, B; Sahl, HA

    2001-01-01

    Unlike numerous pore-forming amphiphilic peptide antibiotics, the lantibiotic nisin is active in nanomolar concentrations, which results from its ability to use the Lipid-bound cell wall precursor lipid II as a docking molecule for subsequent pore formation. Here we use genetically engineered nisin

  7. Down-regulation of UDP-glucuronic Acid Biosynthesis Leads to Swollen Plant Cell Walls and Severe Developmental Defects Associated with Changes in Pectic Polysaccharides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Rebecca; Geserick, Claudia; Pabst, Martin; Frey, Beat; Wittmann, Doris; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula; Léonard, Renaud; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2011-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGD) plays a key role in the nucleotide sugar biosynthetic pathway, as its product UDP-glucuronic acid is the common precursor for arabinose, xylose, galacturonic acid, and apiose residues found in the cell wall. In this study we characterize an Arabidopsis thaliana double mutant ugd2,3 that lacks two of the four UGD isoforms. This mutant was obtained from a cross of ugd2 and ugd3 single mutants, which do not show phenotypical differences compared with the WT. In contrast, ugd2,3 has a strong dwarfed phenotype and often develops seedlings with severe root defects suggesting that the UGD2 and UGD3 isoforms act in concert. Differences in its cell wall composition in comparison to the WT were determined using biochemical methods indicating a significant reduction in arabinose, xylose, apiose, and galacturonic acid residues. Xyloglucan is less substituted with xylose, and pectins have a reduced amount of arabinan side chains. In particular, the amount of the apiose containing side chains A and B of rhamnogalacturonan II is strongly reduced, resulting in a swollen cell wall. The alternative pathway to UDP-glucuronic acid with the key enzyme myo-inositol oxygenase is not up-regulated in ugd2,3. The pathway also does not complement the ugd2,3 mutation, likely because the supply of myo-inositol is limited. Taken together, the presented data underline the importance of UDP GlcA for plant primary cell wall formation. PMID:21949134

  8. Down-regulation of UDP-glucuronic acid biosynthesis leads to swollen plant cell walls and severe developmental defects associated with changes in pectic polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Rebecca; Geserick, Claudia; Pabst, Martin; Frey, Beat; Wittmann, Doris; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula; Léonard, Renaud; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2011-11-18

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGD) plays a key role in the nucleotide sugar biosynthetic pathway, as its product UDP-glucuronic acid is the common precursor for arabinose, xylose, galacturonic acid, and apiose residues found in the cell wall. In this study we characterize an Arabidopsis thaliana double mutant ugd2,3 that lacks two of the four UGD isoforms. This mutant was obtained from a cross of ugd2 and ugd3 single mutants, which do not show phenotypical differences compared with the WT. In contrast, ugd2,3 has a strong dwarfed phenotype and often develops seedlings with severe root defects suggesting that the UGD2 and UGD3 isoforms act in concert. Differences in its cell wall composition in comparison to the WT were determined using biochemical methods indicating a significant reduction in arabinose, xylose, apiose, and galacturonic acid residues. Xyloglucan is less substituted with xylose, and pectins have a reduced amount of arabinan side chains. In particular, the amount of the apiose containing side chains A and B of rhamnogalacturonan II is strongly reduced, resulting in a swollen cell wall. The alternative pathway to UDP-glucuronic acid with the key enzyme myo-inositol oxygenase is not up-regulated in ugd2,3. The pathway also does not complement the ugd2,3 mutation, likely because the supply of myo-inositol is limited. Taken together, the presented data underline the importance of UDP GlcA for plant primary cell wall formation.

  9. Biosynthesis of 10 kDa and 7.5 kDa insulin-like growth factor II in a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F C; Haselbacher, G; Christiansen, Jan;

    1993-01-01

    In the present study we have analysed the expression of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) in the human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line IN157.IN157 cells express high levels of three IGF-II mRNAs of 6.0 kb, 4.8 kb and 4.2 kb. In contrast, normal skeletal muscle expresses a negligible amount of IGF......-II mRNA. Two forms of IGF-II with molecular masses of 7.5 kDa and 10 kDa, corresponding to the mature IGF-II and IGF-II with a C-terminal extension of 21 amino acids (IGF-IIE21), were secreted into the culture medium at amounts of 17 ng/ml (2.3 nM) and 15 ng/ml (1.5 nM), respectively. IN157 cells also......-II and IGF-IIE21 with Kd values of 0.5 nM and 2 nM, respectively, and IGF-I with about 500 times lower affinity. IGF-II and IGF-IIE21 stimulated DNA synthesis via the IGF-I receptor, whereas the IGF-II/Man 6-P receptor mediated their rapid internalization and inactivation. During culture of IN157 cells about...

  10. ORMDL3 contributes to the risk of atherosclerosis in Chinese Han population and mediates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced autophagy in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaochun; Qiu, Rongfang; Dang, Jie; Li, Jiangxia; Hu, Qin; Shan, Shan; Xin, Qian; Pan, Wenying; Bian, Xianli; Yuan, Qianqian; Long, Feng; Liu, Na; Li, Yan; Gao, Fei; Zou, Chengwei; Gong, Yaoqin; Liu, Qiji

    2015-11-25

    ORMDL sphingolipid biosynthesis regulator 3 (ORMDL3) is a universally confirmed susceptibility gene for asthma and has recently emerged as a crucial modulator in lipid metabolism, inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-the mechanisms also closely involved in atherosclerosis (AS). Here we first presented the evidence of two single nucleotide polymorphisms regulating ORMDL3 expression (rs7216389 and rs9303277) significantly associated with AS risk and the evidence of increased ORMDL3 expression in AS cases compared to controls, in Chinese Han population. Following the detection of its statistical correlation with AS, we further explored the functional relevance of ORMDL3 and hypothesized a potential role mediating autophagy as autophagy is activated upon modified lipid, inflammation and ER stress. Our results demonstrated that in endothelial cells oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) up-regulated ORMDL3 expression and knockdown of ORMDL3 alleviated not only ox-LDL-induced but also basal autophagy. BECN1 is essential for autophagy initiation and silencing of ORMDL3 suppressed ox-LDL-induced as well as basal BECN1 expression. In addition, deletion of ORMDL3 resulted in greater sensitivity to ox-LDL-induced cell death. Taken together, ORMDL3 might represent a causal gene mediating autophagy in endothelial cells in the pathogenesis of AS.

  11. Plastidic Phosphoglucose Isomerase Is an Important Determinant of Starch Accumulation in Mesophyll Cells, Growth, Photosynthetic Capacity, and Biosynthesis of Plastidic Cytokinins in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Abdellatif Bahaji; Ángela M Sánchez-López; Nuria De Diego; Muñoz, Francisco J.; Edurne Baroja-Fernández; Jun Li; Adriana Ricarte-Bermejo; Marouane Baslam; Iker Aranjuelo; Goizeder Almagro; Humplík, Jan F.; Ondřej Novák; Lukáš Spíchal; Karel Doležal; Javier Pozueta-Romero

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) catalyzes the reversible isomerization of glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate. It is involved in glycolysis and in the regeneration of glucose-6-P molecules in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP). In chloroplasts of illuminated mesophyll cells PGI also connects the Calvin-Benson cycle with the starch biosynthetic pathway. In this work we isolated pgi1-3, a mutant totally lacking pPGI activity as a consequence of aberrant intron splicing of th...

  12. An ectopic ACTH-producing small cell lung carcinoma associated with enhanced corticosteroid biosynthesis in the peritumoral areas of adrenal metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hironori; Saito, Ryoko; Hisata, Shu; Shiihara, Jun; Taniuchi, Shinji; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Ebina, Masahito; Sasano, Hironobu

    2012-06-01

    A 60-year-old Japanese male presented with swelling of bilateral cervical lymph nodes was subsequently diagnosed as the late stage of primary small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). He was then treated with cisplatin and irinotecan as first-line chemotherapy, but hypokalemia with muscle weakness of the bilateral legs became gradually noticeable following two months of effective chemotherapy. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed enlargement of bilateral adrenal glands and abdominal and mediastinal lymph nodes, though primary lung tumor remained the same in size. An ectopic ACTH-producing syndrome (EAS) was subsequently revealed by the following endocrinological studies. Hypokalemia was clinically improved by the treatment with metyrapone and the second-line chemotherapy with amrubicin for SCLC was started, but the patient died 12 days after the second-line chemotherapy. Post-mortem examination revealed ACTH immunoreactivity in tumor cells of all the metastatic lesions. Non-neoplastic adrenal cortex demonstrated hyperplasia associated with lipid depletion and marked expression of steroidogenic enzymes, especially in cortical cells around tumor infiltration, suggestive of paracrine ACTH stimulation of cortisol production. This is the first report evaluating expression of steroidogenic enzymes in adrenal cortex especially adjacent to the adrenal metastasis in the patients with EAS due to SCLC. These findings suggest that ACTH producing adrenal metastasis can induce EAS more frequently and severely, and that the symptoms and examination of EAS should be monitored carefully in the patients with adrenal metastasis of SCLC.

  13. Effects of photoperiod regimes and ultraviolet-C radiations on biosynthesis of industrially important lignans and neolignans in cell cultures of Linum usitatissimum L. (Flax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Sumaira; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Doussot, Joël; Favre-Réguillon, Alain; Hano, Christophe

    2017-02-01

    Lignans and neolignans are principal bioactive components of Linum usitatissimum L. (Flax), having multiple pharmacological activities. In present study, we are reporting an authoritative abiotic elicitation strategy of photoperiod regimes along with UV-C radiations. Cell cultures were grown in different photoperiod regimes (24h-dark, 24h-light and 16L/8D h photoperiod) either alone or in combination with various doses (1.8-10.8kJ/m(2)) of ultraviolet-C (UV-C) radiations. Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), lariciresinol diglucoside (LDG), dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol glucoside (DCG), and guaiacylglycerol-β-coniferyl alcohol ether glucoside (GGCG) were quantified by using reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Results showed that the cultures exposed to UV-C radiations, accumulated higher levels of lignans, neolignans and other biochemical markers than cultures grown under different photoperiod regimes. 3.6kJ/m(2) dose of UV-C radiations resulted in 1.86-fold (7.1mg/g DW) increase in accumulation of SDG, 2.25-fold (21.6mg/g DW) in LDG, and 1.33-fold (9.2mg/g DW) in GGCG in cell cultures grown under UV+photoperiod than their respective controls. Furthermore, cell cultures grown under UV+dark showed 1.36-fold (60.0mg/g DW) increase in accumulation of DCG in response to 1.8kJ/m(2) dose of UV-C radiations. Smilar trends were observed in productivity of SDG, LDG and GGCG. Additionally, 3.6kJ/m(2) dose of UV-C radiations also resulted in 2.82-fold (195.65mg/l) increase in total phenolic production, 2.94-fold (98.9mg/l) in total flavonoid production and 1.04-fold (95%) in antioxidant activity of cell cultures grown under UV+photoperiod. These findings open new dimensions for feasible production of biologically active lignans and neolignans by Flax cell cultures.

  14. Lipid biosynthesis pathways as chemotherapeutic targets in kinetoplastid parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, J A

    1997-01-01

    Inhibitors of sterol and phospholipid biosynthesis in kinetoplastid parasites such as Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, and different species of Leishmania have potent and selective activity as chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo. Recent work with the sterol C14 alpha-demethylase inhibitor D0870, a bis triazole derivative, showed that this compound is capable of inducing radical parasitological cure in murine models of both acute and chronic Chagas' disease. Other inhibitors of this type, such as SCH 56592, have also shown curative, rather than suppressive, activity against T. cruzi in these models. Leishmania species have different susceptibilities to sterol biosynthesis inhibitors, both in vitro and in vivo. Leishmania braziliensis promastigotes, naturally resistant to C14 alpha-demethylase inhibitors such as ketoconazole and D0870, were susceptible to these drugs when used in combination with the squalene epoxidase inhibitor terbinafine. Inhibitors of delta 24(25) sterol methyl transferase have been shown to act as potent antiproliferative agents against Trypanosoma cruzi, both in vitro and in vivo. New inhibitors of this type which show enhanced activity and novel mechanisms of action have been synthesized. Recent work has also demonstrated that this type of enzyme inhibitors can block sterol biosynthesis and cell proliferation in Pneumocystis carinii, a fungal pathogen which had previously been found resistant to other sterol biosynthesis inhibitors. Ajoene, an antiplatelet compound derived from garlic, was shown to have potent antiproliferative activity against epimastigotes and amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro; this activity was associated with a significant alteration of the phospholipid composition of the cells with no significant effects on the sterol content. In addition, alkyllsophospholipids such as ilmofosine, miltefosine and edelfosine have been shown to block the proliferation of T. cruzi and Leishmania and

  15. Mandipropamid targets the cellulose synthase-like PiCesA3 to inhibit cell wall biosynthesis in the oomycete plant pathogen, Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Mathias; Boehler, Martine; Randall, Eva; Young, Vanessa; Csukai, Michael; Kraus, Sabrina; Moulin, Florence; Scalliet, Gabriel; Avrova, Anna O; Whisson, Stephen C; Fonne-Pfister, Raymonde

    2010-03-01

    Oomycete plant pathogens cause a wide variety of economically and environmentally important plant diseases. Mandipropamid (MPD) is a carboxylic acid amide (CAA) effective against downy mildews, such as Plasmopara viticola on grapes and potato late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans. Historically, the identification of the mode of action of oomycete-specific control agents has been problematic. Here, we describe how a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques has been utilized to identify the molecular target of MPD in P. infestans. Phytophthora infestans germinating cysts treated with MPD produced swelling symptoms typical of cell wall synthesis inhibitors, and these effects were reversible after washing with H(2)O. Uptake studies with (14)C-labelled MPD showed that this oomycete control agent acts on the cell wall and does not enter the cell. Furthermore, (14)C glucose incorporation into cellulose was perturbed in the presence of MPD which, taken together, suggests that the inhibition of cellulose synthesis is the primary effect of MPD. Laboratory mutants, insensitive to MPD, were raised by ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) mutagenesis, and gene sequence analysis of cellulose synthase genes in these mutants revealed two point mutations in the PiCesA3 gene, known to be involved in cellulose synthesis. Both mutations in the PiCesA3 gene result in a change to the same amino acid (glycine-1105) in the protein. The transformation and expression of a mutated PiCesA3 allele was carried out in a sensitive wild-type isolate to demonstrate that the mutations in PiCesA3 were responsible for the MPD insensitivity phenotype.

  16. Polyamine biosynthesis is critical for growth and differentiation of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, Teresa L; Robertson, Morgan A; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Anderson, Ryan M

    2015-08-24

    The pancreas, in most studied vertebrates, is a compound organ with both exocrine and endocrine functions. The exocrine compartment makes and secretes digestive enzymes, while the endocrine compartment, organized into islets of Langerhans, produces hormones that regulate blood glucose. High concentrations of polyamines, which are aliphatic amines, are reported in exocrine and endocrine cells, with insulin-producing β cells showing the highest concentrations. We utilized zebrafish as a model organism, together with pharmacological inhibition or genetic manipulation, to determine how polyamine biosynthesis functions in pancreatic organogenesis. We identified that inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis reduces exocrine pancreas and β cell mass, and that these reductions are at the level of differentiation. Moreover, we demonstrate that inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, phenocopies inhibition or knockdown of the enzyme deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS). These data identify that the pancreatic requirement for polyamine biosynthesis is largely mediated through a requirement for spermidine for the downstream posttranslational modification of eIF5A by its enzymatic activator DHS, which in turn impacts mRNA translation. Altogether, we have uncovered a role for polyamine biosynthesis in pancreatic organogenesis and identified that it may be possible to exploit polyamine biosynthesis to manipulate pancreatic cell differentiation.

  17. Biosynthesis of highly enriched 13C-lycopene for human metabolic studies using repeated batch tomato cell culturing with 13C-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nancy Engelmann; Rogers, Randy B; Lu, Chi-Hua; Conlon, Lauren E; Lila, Mary Ann; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2013-08-15

    While putative disease-preventing lycopene metabolites are found in both tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) products and in their consumers, mammalian lycopene metabolism is poorly understood. Advances in tomato cell culturing techniques offer an economical tool for generation of highly-enriched (13)C-lycopene for human bioavailability and metabolism studies. To enhance the (13)C-enrichment and yields of labelled lycopene from the hp-1 tomato cell line, cultures were first grown in (13)C-glucose media for three serial batches and produced increasing proportions of uniformly labelled lycopene (14.3±1.2%, 39.6±0.5%, and 48.9±1.5%) with consistent yields (from 5.8 to 9 mg/L). An optimised 9-day-long (13)C-loading and 18-day-long labelling strategy developed based on glucose utilisation and lycopene yields, yielded (13)C-lycopene with 93% (13)C isotopic purity, and 55% of isotopomers were uniformly labelled. Furthermore, an optimised acetone and hexane extraction led to a fourfold increase in lycopene recovery from cultures compared to a standard extraction.

  18. Plant cuticles: physicochemical characteristics and biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, P.J. [Dept. of Agricultural Sciences, Univ. of Bristol, AFRC Inst. of Arable Crops Research (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Cuticles are the thin continuous layers of predominantly lipid material deposited on the outer walls of epidermal cells and, thus, the interface between higher plants and their aerial environment. The main function of this extracellular, non-living layer, commonly referred to as a membrane, is to protect and waterproof the plant surface. Although not structurally or chemically homogeneous, cuticles are usually characterised by two specific classes of lipid substances. The insoluble high molecular weight polyester cutins constitute the framework of the membrane, the monomeric units of which are biosynthesised in the epidermal cells from C{sub 16} and C{sub 18} fatty acid precursors. The soluble long-chain wax constituents are also synthesised by these cells and are eventually deposited not only on the cuticular surface but also within the cutin matrix. Epicuticular waxes have a considerable influence on the wettability of a plant surface whereas the presence of intracuticular waxes governs cuticular permeability. The cuticles of some species also contain variable amounts of another aliphatic biopolymer, cutin, which is non-saponifiable and, consequently, extremely resistant to biodegradation. Because the cuticle is an integral part of the epidermal cell wall, polysaccharides and probably, phenolic compounds are also involved in its construction. The current status of our fundamental knowledge about the structure, chemical composition, and biosynthesis of plant cuticles will be reviewed in order to highlight the nature of potential sites for interaction with air pollutants. (orig.)

  19. Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA Mutants Implicate GAUT Genes in the Biosynthesis of Pectin and Xylan in Cell Walls and Seed Testa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kerry H. Caffall; Sivakumar Pattathil; Sarah E. Phillips; Michael G. Hahn; Debra Mohnen

    2009-01-01

    Galacturonosyltransferase 1 (GAUT1) is an α1,4-D-galacturonosyltransferase that transfers galacturonic acid from uridine 5'-diphosphogalacturonic acid onto the pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan (Sterling et al., 2006). The 25-member Arabidopsis thaliana GAUT1-related gene family encodes 15 GAUT and 10 GAUT-like (GATL) proteins with, respectively, 56-84 and 42-53% amino acid sequence similarity to GAUT1. Previous phylogenetic analyses of AtGAUTs indicated three clades: A through C. A comparative phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis, poplar and rice GAUT families has sub-classified the GAUTs into seven clades: clade A-1 (GAUTs 1 to 3); A-2 (GAUT4); A-3 (GAUTs 5 and 6); A-4 (GAUT7); B-1(GAUTs 8 and 9); B-2 (GAUTs 10 and 11); and clade C (GAUTs 12 to 15). The Arabidopsis GAUTs have a distribution com-parable to the poplar orthologs, with the exception of GAUT2, which is absent in poplar. Rice, however, has no orthologs of GAUTs 2 and 12 and has multiple apparent orthologs of GAUTs 1, 4, and 7 compared with eitherArabidopsis or poplar. The cell wall glycosyl residue compositions of 26 homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants for 13 of 15 Arabidopsis GAUTgenes reveal significantly and reproducibly different cell walls in specific tissues of gaut mutants 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 from that of wild-type Arabidopsis walls. Pectin and xylan polysaccharides are affected by the loss of GAUT function, as dem-onstrated by the altered galacturonic acid, xylose, rhamnose, galactose, and arabinose composition of distinct gaut mu-tant walls. The wall glycosyl residue compositional phenotypes observed among the gaut mutants suggest that at least six different biosynthetic linkages in pectins and/or xylans are affected by the lesions in these GAUTgenes. Evidence is also presented to support a role for GAUT11 in seed mucilage expansion and in seed wall and mucilage composition.

  20. Next-generation steroidogenesis inhibitors, dutasteride and abiraterone, attenuate but still do not eliminate androgen biosynthesis in 22RV1 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Steven; Deb, Subrata; Ming, Dong Sheng; Adomat, Hans; Hosseini-Beheshti, Elham; Zoubeidi, Amina; Gleave, Martin; Guns, Emma S Tomlinson

    2014-10-01

    Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is often lethal and inevitably develops after androgen ablation therapy. However, in the majority of cases it remains androgen dependent. CRPC tumors have the ability to synthesize their own androgens from cholesterol by engaging in de novo steroidogenesis. We investigated the potential of 22RV1 prostate cancer cells to convert the supplemented steroid precursors within this pathway under the effects of current clinical steroidogenesis inhibitors such as abiraterone and dutasteride, either alone or in combination. Under steroid starved conditions, enzymes responsible for de novo steroidogenesis were upregulated. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) were formed by using both dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and progesterone as substrates. Formation of testosterone and DHT was higher following incubation with DHEA compared to progesterone. Progesterone decreased the mRNA expression of enzymes responsible for steroidogenesis. Abiraterone treatment decreased testosterone production but increased several precursor steroids in both classical and backdoor pathways in the presence of progesterone. In contrast, the DHT levels were elevated following treatment with abiraterone when progesterone was absent. Dutasteride decreased the formation of testosterone, DHT and precursor steroids in the backdoor pathway but increased steroid precursors in the classical steroidogenesis pathway. The combination of abiraterone and dutasteride decreased testosterone and DHT in the presence of progesterone but increased DHT in the absence of progesterone. Abiraterone inhibited androgen receptor (AR) activation but not to the same extent as MDV3100. However, abiraterone and dutasteride treatment, either alone or in combination, were more effective in decreasing prostate specific antigen secretion into the media than MDV3100. Thus, while interventions with these drugs alone or in combination fail to completely inhibit steroidogenesis in the 22RV1

  1. Lignin biosynthesis and its molecular regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Lignin biosynthesis has become increasingly highlighted because it plays an important role in the growth and development of plant, in the systematic evolution of plant and in the human life. Due to the progress in the field of lignin studies in recent years, the lignin biosynthesis pathway has been 修订日期:. Here we discuss some genetic engineering approaches on lignin biosynthesis, and conceive strategy to regulate lignin biosynthesis in order to use lignin resource more efficiently in agricultural and industrial productions.

  2. Compartmentalization in penicillin G biosynthesis by Penicillium chrysogenum PQ-96.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzątkowski, Wiesław; Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Gębska-Kuczerowska, Anita

    2014-01-01

    The arrangement of organelles in the sub-apical productive non-growing vacuolated hyphal cells of the high- and the low-penicillin-pro- ducing strains Penicillium chrysogenum was compared using transmission electron microscopy. In the productive cells of the high-yielding strain the endoplasmic reticulum and the polyribosomes with associated peroxisomes are frequently arranged at the periphery of the cytoplasm and around the vacuoles. At the high activity of penicillin G biosynthesis the immuno-label of the cytosolic isopenicillin N synthase is concentrated at the polyribosomes arranged in the peripheral cytoplasm and along the tonoplast as well as around the peroxisomes. On the basis of the obtained results the compartmentalization of the pathway of penicillin G biosymthesis is discussed. The obtained results support the phenylacetic acid detoxification hypothesis of penicillin G biosynthesis.

  3. HPTLC-MALDI MS for (glyco)sphingolipid multiplexing in tissues and blood: A promising strategy for biomarker discovery and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torretta, Enrica; Fania, Chiara; Vasso, Michele; Gelfi, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Sphingolipids have hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties, different saturation and combination of the oligosaccharide chains and mass homology of species located in a narrow m/z region hampering their recognition. To target sphingolipids for diagnostic purposes, standardized methods for lipid extraction, quali- and quantitative assessments are required. In this study, HPTLC-MALDI MS was adopted to establish sphingolipid and glycosphingolipid profiles in muscle, brain and serum to create a database of molecules to be searched in the preclinical and clinical investigations. Specific protocols for lipid extraction were set up based on the characteristics of the tissue or/and fluids; this approach maximizes the HPTLC-MALDI MS analytical throughput both for lipids extracted in organic and aqueous phase. This study indicates that alkaline hydrolysis is necessary for the detection of low abundant species such as Gb3Cer and ceramides in serum and Gb4Cer, CerP and HexCer in muscle tissue. The high hydrophobicity of ceramides has been overcome by the development of HPTLC plate in chloroform:methanol/50:3.5, which increases the number and the intensity of low abundant Cer species. MS/MS analysis has been conducted directly on HPTLC plate allowing the molecular recognition; furthermore a dataset of spectra was acquired to create a database for future profiling of these molecules.

  4. Regulation of Sterol Biosynthesis in the Human Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus: Opportunities for Therapeutic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Sourabh; Cramer, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Sterols are a major component of eukaryotic cell membranes. For human fungal infections caused by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, antifungal drugs that target sterol biosynthesis and/or function remain the standard of care. Yet, an understanding of A. fumigatus sterol biosynthesis regulatory mechanisms remains an under developed therapeutic target. The critical role of sterol biosynthesis regulation and its interactions with clinically relevant azole drugs is highlighted by the basic helix loop helix (bHLH) class of transcription factors known as Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs). SREBPs regulate transcription of key ergosterol biosynthesis genes in fungi including A. fumigatus. In addition, other emerging regulatory pathways and target genes involved in sterol biosynthesis and drug interactions provide additional opportunities including the unfolded protein response, iron responsive transcriptional networks, and chaperone proteins such as Hsp90. Thus, targeting molecular pathways critical for sterol biosynthesis regulation presents an opportunity to improve therapeutic options for the collection of diseases termed aspergillosis. This mini-review summarizes our current understanding of sterol biosynthesis regulation with a focus on mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by the SREBP family of transcription factors. PMID:28203225

  5. Sulfur deficiency–induced repressor proteins optimize glucosinolate biosynthesis in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarabi, Fayezeh; Kusajima, Miyuki; Tohge, Takayuki; Konishi, Tomokazu; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Takamune, Makiko; Sasazaki, Yoko; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Nakashita, Hideo; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Hideki; Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Hoefgen, Rainer; Maruyama-Nakashita, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates (GSLs) in the plant order of the Brassicales are sulfur-rich secondary metabolites that harbor antipathogenic and antiherbivory plant-protective functions and have medicinal properties, such as carcinopreventive and antibiotic activities. Plants repress GSL biosynthesis upon sulfur deficiency (−S); hence, field performance and medicinal quality are impaired by inadequate sulfate supply. The molecular mechanism that links –S to GSL biosynthesis has remained understudied. We report here the identification of the –S marker genes sulfur deficiency induced 1 (SDI1) and SDI2 acting as major repressors controlling GSL biosynthesis in Arabidopsis under –S condition. SDI1 and SDI2 expression negatively correlated with GSL biosynthesis in both transcript and metabolite levels. Principal components analysis of transcriptome data indicated that SDI1 regulates aliphatic GSL biosynthesis as part of –S response. SDI1 was localized to the nucleus and interacted with MYB28, a major transcription factor that promotes aliphatic GSL biosynthesis, in both yeast and plant cells. SDI1 inhibited the transcription of aliphatic GSL biosynthetic genes by maintaining the DNA binding composition in the form of an SDI1-MYB28 complex, leading to down-regulation of GSL biosynthesis and prioritization of sulfate usage for primary metabolites under sulfur-deprived conditions.

  6. Alterations of myelin-specific proteins and sphingolipids characterize the brains of acid sphingomyelinase-deficient mice, an animal model of Niemann-Pick disease type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccinnà, Barbara; Piccinini, Marco; Prinetti, Alessandro; Scandroglio, Federica; Prioni, Simona; Valsecchi, Manuela; Votta, Barbara; Grifoni, Silvia; Lupino, Elisa; Ramondetti, Cristina; Schuchman, Edward H; Giordana, Maria Teresa; Sonnino, Sandro; Rinaudo, Maria Teresa

    2009-04-01

    Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) type A is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by sphingomyelin (SM) accumulation in lysosomes relying on reduced or absent acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activity. NPD-A patients develop progressive neurodegeneration including cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, relevant Purkinje cell and myelin deficiency with death within 3 years. ASM'knock-out' (ASMKO) mice, an animal model of NPD-A, develop a phenotype largely mimicking that of NPD-A. The mechanisms underlying myelin formation are poorly documented in ASMKO mice. In this study we determined the content of four myelin-specific proteins, myelin basic protein (MBP), 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP), myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) and proteolipid protein (PLP), and that of myelin-enriched sphingolipids in the brains of ASMKO and wild-type mice in early stages of post-natal (pn) life. Protein and mRNA analysis revealed that in ASMKO mice beginning from 4 post-natal weeks (wk-pn), the expression levels of MAG, CNP, and MBP were below those observed in wild-type mice and the same applied to PLP at 10 wk-pn. Moreover, at 4 wk-pn the expression of SOX10, one of the transcription factors involved in oligodendrocyte development and maintenance was lower in ASMKO mice. Lipid analysis showed that SM and the gangliosides GM3 and GM2 accumulated in the brains of ASMKO mice, as opposed to galactocerebroside and galactosulfocerebroside that, in parallel with the mRNAs of UDP-galactose ceramide galactosyltransferase and galactose-3-O-sulfotransferase 1, the two transferases involved in their synthesis, decreased. Myelin lipid analysis showed a progressive sphingomyelin accumulation in ASMKO mice; noteworthy, of the two sphingomyelin species known to be resolved by TLC, only that with the lower Rf accumulated. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that the reduced expression of myelin specific proteins in ASMKO mice at 10 wk-pn was not restricted to the Purkinje layer of the

  7. Anti-adherence and bactericidal activity of sphingolipids against Streptococcus mutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cukkemane, N.; Bikker, F.J.; Nazmi, K.; Brand, H.S.; Sotres, J.; Lindh, L.; Arnebrant, T.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the anti-biofilm activity of sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), and sphinganine for: (i) anti-adherence activity on hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces; and (ii) bactericidal activity on different Streptococcus mutans phenotypes (i.e. planktonic cells and cells from a disrupted biofi

  8. Structure and Nanomechanics of Model Membranes by Atomic Force Microscopy and Spectroscopy: Insights into the Role of Cholesterol and Sphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumí-Audenis, Berta; Costa, Luca; Carlá, Francesco; Comin, Fabio; Sanz, Fausto; Giannotti, Marina I

    2016-12-19

    Biological membranes mediate several biological processes that are directly associated with their physical properties but sometimes difficult to evaluate. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are model systems widely used to characterize the structure of biological membranes. Cholesterol (Chol) plays an essential role in the modulation of membrane physical properties. It directly influences the order and mechanical stability of the lipid bilayers, and it is known to laterally segregate in rafts in the outer leaflet of the membrane together with sphingolipids (SLs). Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool as it is capable to sense and apply forces with high accuracy, with distance and force resolution at the nanoscale, and in a controlled environment. AFM-based force spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has become a crucial technique to study the nanomechanical stability of SLBs by controlling the liquid media and the temperature variations. In this contribution, we review recent AFM and AFM-FS studies on the effect of Chol on the morphology and mechanical properties of model SLBs, including complex bilayers containing SLs. We also introduce a promising combination of AFM and X-ray (XR) techniques that allows for in situ characterization of dynamic processes, providing structural, morphological, and nanomechanical information.

  9. Structure and Nanomechanics of Model Membranes by Atomic Force Microscopy and Spectroscopy: Insights into the Role of Cholesterol and Sphingolipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumí-Audenis, Berta; Costa, Luca; Carlá, Francesco; Comin, Fabio; Sanz, Fausto; Giannotti, Marina I.

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes mediate several biological processes that are directly associated with their physical properties but sometimes difficult to evaluate. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are model systems widely used to characterize the structure of biological membranes. Cholesterol (Chol) plays an essential role in the modulation of membrane physical properties. It directly influences the order and mechanical stability of the lipid bilayers, and it is known to laterally segregate in rafts in the outer leaflet of the membrane together with sphingolipids (SLs). Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool as it is capable to sense and apply forces with high accuracy, with distance and force resolution at the nanoscale, and in a controlled environment. AFM-based force spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has become a crucial technique to study the nanomechanical stability of SLBs by controlling the liquid media and the temperature variations. In this contribution, we review recent AFM and AFM-FS studies on the effect of Chol on the morphology and mechanical properties of model SLBs, including complex bilayers containing SLs. We also introduce a promising combination of AFM and X-ray (XR) techniques that allows for in situ characterization of dynamic processes, providing structural, morphological, and nanomechanical information. PMID:27999368

  10. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Lei [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Xiao, Yongsheng [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Wang, Yinsheng, E-mail: yinsheng.wang@ucr.edu [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA

  11. Improving penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum by glyoxalase overproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheckhuber, Christian Q; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2013-07-01

    Genetic engineering of fungal cell factories mainly focuses on manipulating enzymes of the product pathway or primary metabolism. However, despite the use of strong promoters or strains containing the genes of interest in multiple copies, the desired strongly enhanced enzyme levels are often not obtained. Here we present a novel strategy to improve penicillin biosynthesis by Penicillium chrysogenum by reducing reactive and toxic metabolic by-products, 2-oxoaldehydes. This was achieved by overexpressing the genes encoding glyoxalase I and II, which resulted in a 10% increase in penicillin titers relative to the control strain. The protein levels of two key enzymes of penicillin biosynthesis, isopenicillin N synthase and isopenicillin N acyltransferase, were increased in the glyoxalase transformants, whereas their transcript levels remained unaltered. These results suggest that directed intracellular reduction of 2-oxoaldehydes prolongs the functional lifetime of these enzymes.

  12. 采用磁微粒分离酶联免疫法构建基于KGN细胞的雌激素生物合成筛选模型%Establishment of a Cell-based Screen Platform for Estrogen Biosynthesis Using Magnetic Particle-based Enzyme-linked immunosorbent Assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁丹枫; Azimova Bahtigul Jovliqizi; 张国林; 王飞

    2013-01-01

    Estrogens play important roles in the growth and development of human,and the disorders of estrogen biosynthesis and metabolism can lead to occurrence of many diseases such as breast cancer and osteoporosis. Currently, the cell-based screen models for estrogen biosynthesis need the use of radioactive substances, which cause environmental pollution and the cost for screening too high to be affordable,thus severely restrict the finding of new drugs to modulate estrogen biosynthesis in a tissue-specific manner. By using human granulosa-like KGN cells which express high amount of aromatase.we found that the 17β-estradiol magnetic particle-based enzyme-linked imminosorbent assay (ELISA) was more stable and sensitive than conventional polystyrene-based ELJSA in quantification of 17β-estradiol by comparing the cross-reactivity and sensitivity of the two different 17β-estradiol ELJSA methods. After further examining the effects of phenol red in cell culture medium and testosterone substance concentration on the quantitative detection of 17β-estradi-ol.we successfully established a human granulosa-like KGN cell-based screen platform for estrogen biosynthesis by using magnetic particle-based ELJSA.%雌激素在机体生长发育中发挥着重要作用,其合成代谢紊乱会导致乳腺癌和骨质疏松等疾病发生.目前,基于细胞的雌激素合成筛选模型需用到放射性底物,对环境污染大,成本较高,限制了具有组织特异性调控雌激素合成的药物筛选.我们以高表达芳香化酶的KGN细胞为检测对象,比较基于聚苯乙烯酶联免疫法和磁微粒分离酶联免疫法的雌二醇ELISA试剂盒的交叉反应和灵敏度,发现相对于聚苯乙烯酶联免疫法,磁微粒分离酶联免疫法能够稳定高效的检测雌激素合成.进一步比较培养基中酚红和底物睾酮对雌二醇检测的影响,成功建立通过磁微粒酶联免疫法检测KGN细胞雌二醇合成的筛选模型.

  13. Biosynthesis of fluorinated secondary metabolites by Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, K A; Hamilton, J T; Bowden, R D; O'Hagan, D; Dasaradhi, L; Amin, M R; Harper, D B

    1995-06-01

    The biosynthesis of organofluorine compounds by Streptomyces cattleya NRRL 8057 was examined using 19F NMR spectroscopy. The organism produced 1.2 mM fluoroacetate and 0.5 mM 4-fluorothreonine as secondary metabolites when cultured for 28 d on a chemically defined medium containing 2 mM fluoride. Cell suspensions from batch cultures harvested at the growth maximum of 4 d were not capable of fluoride uptake or fluorometabolite biosynthesis, but by 6 d had developed an efficient fluoride-uptake system and biosynthesized the two fluorometabolites in almost equal proportions. As the harvest age increased, the proportion of fluoroacetate to 4-fluorothreonine formed by cell suspensions rose progressively so that 16-d-old cells showed a ratio of 76:26 for the two compounds. Fluoride uptake and fluorometabolite production by cell suspensions were highly dependent on pH, with both processes showing a maximum rate at pH 6.0 but declining rapidly at higher pH values. This decrease was particularly marked in the case of fluoroacetate biosynthesis which was barely detectable at pH 7.5. Fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine showed only low levels of interconversion by cell suspensions, suggesting that the carbon skeleton of neither was derived by metabolism of the other. The limited interconversion observed is explicable in terms of a small degree of biological defluorination occurring with each compound, followed by reincorporation of the resulting fluoride ion into the organic form by the active fluorinating system, a phenomenon also noted on incubation of cell suspensions with a number of other fluorinated biochemical intermediates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Steroid biosynthesis in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Vihma, Veera

    2015-11-01

    Tissue-specific expression of steroidogenic enzymes allows the modulation of active steroid levels in a local manner. Thus, the measurement of local steroid concentrations, rather than the circulating levels, has been recognized as a more accurate indicator of the steroid action within a specific tissue. Adipose tissue, one of the largest endocrine tissues in the human body, has been established as an important site for steroid storage and metabolism. Locally produced steroids, through the enzymatic conversion from steroid precursors delivered to adipose tissue, have been proven to either functionally regulate adipose tissue metabolism, or quantitatively contribute to the whole body's steroid levels. Most recently, it has been suggested that adipose tissue may contain the steroidogenic machinery necessary for the initiation of steroid biosynthesis de novo from cholesterol. This review summarizes the evidence indicating the presence of the entire steroidogenic apparatus in adipose tissue and discusses the potential roles of local steroid products in modulating adipose tissue activity and other metabolic parameters.

  15. Inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis improves dyslipidemia in the diet-induced hamster model of insulin resistance: evidence for the role of sphingosine and sphinganine in hepatic VLDL-apoB100 overproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Mark J; Baker, Chris; Naples, Mark; Samsoondar, Josh; Zhang, Rianna; Qiu, Wei; Sacco, Jennifer; Adeli, Khosrow

    2013-05-01

    Sphingolipids have emerged as important bioactive lipid species involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, little is known of the regulatory role of sphingolipids in dyslipidemia of insulin-resistant states. We employed hamster models of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance to investigate the role of sphingolipids in hepatic VLDL overproduction, induction of insulin resistance, and inflammation. Hamsters were fed either a control chow diet, a high fructose diet, or a diet high in fat, fructose and cholesterol (FFC diet). They were then treated for 2 weeks with vehicle or 0.3 mg/kg myriocin, a potent inhibitor of de novo sphingolipid synthesis. Both fructose and FFC feeding induced significant increases in hepatic sphinganine, which was normalized to chow-fed levels with myriocin (P overproduction may be stimulated by ceramides and sphingosine and b) inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis can reduce circulating VLDL in hamsters and improve circulating lipids--an effect that is possibly due to improved insulin signaling and reduced lipogenesis but is independent of changes in inflammation.

  16. Very long-chain fatty acid-containing lipids rather than sphingolipids per se are required for raft association and stable surface transport of newly synthesized plasma membrane ATPase in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaigg, Barbara; Toulmay, Alexandre; Schneiter, Roger

    2006-11-10

    The proton-pumping H+-ATPase, Pma1p, is an abundant and very long lived polytopic protein of the yeast plasma membrane. Pma1p constitutes a major cargo of the secretory pathway and thus serves as a model to study plasma membrane biogenesis. Pma1p associates with detergent-resistant membrane domains (lipid "rafts") already in the ER, and a lack of raft association correlates with mistargeting of the protein to the vacuole, where it is degraded. We are analyzing the role of specific lipids in membrane domain formation and have previously shown that surface transport of Pma1p is independent of newly synthesized sterols but that sphingolipids with C26 very long chain fatty acid are crucial for raft association and surface transport of Pma1p (Gaigg, B., Timischl, B., Corbino, L., and Schneiter, R. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 22515-22522). We now describe a more detailed analysis of the function that sphingolipids play in this process. Using a yeast strain in which the essential function of sphingolipids is substituted by glycerophospholipids containing C26 very long chain fatty acids, we find that sphingolipids per se are dispensable for raft association and surface delivery of Pma1p but that the C26 fatty acid is crucial. We thus conclude that the essential function of sphingolipids for membrane domain formation and stable surface delivery of Pma1p is provided by the C26 fatty acid that forms part of the yeast ceramide.

  17. Acylphloroglucinol Biosynthesis in Strawberry Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chuankui; Ring, Ludwig; Hoffmann, Thomas; Huang, Fong-Chin; Slovin, Janet; Schwab, Wilfried

    2015-11-01

    Phenolics have health-promoting properties and are a major group of metabolites in fruit crops. Through reverse genetic analysis of the functions of four ripening-related genes in the octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), we discovered four acylphloroglucinol (APG)-glucosides as native Fragaria spp. fruit metabolites whose levels were differently regulated in the transgenic fruits. The biosynthesis of the APG aglycones was investigated by examination of the enzymatic properties of three recombinant Fragaria vesca chalcone synthase (FvCHS) proteins. CHS is involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis during ripening. The F. vesca enzymes readily catalyzed the condensation of two intermediates in branched-chain amino acid metabolism, isovaleryl-Coenzyme A (CoA) and isobutyryl-CoA, with three molecules of malonyl-CoA to form phlorisovalerophenone and phlorisobutyrophenone, respectively, and formed naringenin chalcone when 4-coumaroyl-CoA was used as starter molecule. Isovaleryl-CoA was the preferred starter substrate of FvCHS2-1. Suppression of CHS activity in both transient and stable CHS-silenced fruit resulted in a substantial decrease of APG glucosides and anthocyanins and enhanced levels of volatiles derived from branched-chain amino acids. The proposed APG pathway was confirmed by feeding isotopically labeled amino acids. Thus, Fragaria spp. plants have the capacity to synthesize pharmaceutically important APGs using dual functional CHS/(phloriso)valerophenone synthases that are expressed during fruit ripening. Duplication and adaptive evolution of CHS is the most probable scenario and might be generally applicable to other plants. The results highlight that important promiscuous gene function may be missed when annotation relies solely on in silico analysis.

  18. Molecular insights into amyloid regulation by membrane cholesterol and sphingolipids: common mechanisms in neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Fantini, Jacques; Yahi, Nouara

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer, Parkinson and other neurodegenerative diseases involve a series of brain proteins, referred to as ‘amyloidogenic proteins’, with exceptional conformational plasticity and a high propensity for self-aggregation. Although the mechanisms by which amyloidogenic proteins kill neural cells are not fully understood, a common feature is the concentration of unstructured amyloidogenic monomers on bidimensional membrane lattices. Membrane-bound monomers undergo a series of lipid-dependent co...

  19. Nfasc155H and MAG are specifically susceptible to detergent extraction in the absence of the myelin sphingolipid sulfatide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomicter, A D; Deloyht, J M; Hackett, A R; Purdie, N; Sato-Bigbee, C; Henderson, S C; Dupree, J L

    2013-12-01

    Mice incapable of synthesizing the myelin lipid sulfatide form paranodes that deteriorate with age. Similar instability also occurs in mice that lack contactin, contactin-associated protein or neurofascin155 (Nfasc155), the proteins that cluster in the paranode and form the junctional complex that mediates myelin-axon adhesion. In contrast to these proteins, sulfatide has not been shown to be enriched in the paranode nor has a sulfatide paranodal binding partner been identified; thus, it remains unclear how the absence of sulfatide results in compromised paranode integrity. Using an in situ extraction procedure, it has been reported that the absence of the myelin sphingolipids, galactocerebroside and sulfatide, increased the susceptibility of Nfasc155 to detergent extraction. Here, employing a similar approach, we demonstrate that in the presence of galactocerebroside but in the absence of sulfatide Nfasc155 is susceptible to detergent extraction. Furthermore, we use this in situ approach to show that stable association of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) with the myelin membrane is sulfatide dependent while the membrane associations of myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, myelin basic protein and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase are sulfatide independent. These findings indicate that myelin proteins maintain their membrane associations by different mechanisms. Moreover, the myelin proteins that cluster in the paranode and require sulfatide mediate myelin-axon adhesion. Additionally, the apparent dependency on sulfatide for maintaining Nfasc155 and MAG associations is intriguing since the fatty acid composition of sulfatide is altered and paranodal ultrastructure is compromised in multiple sclerosis. Thus, our findings present a potential link between sulfatide perturbation and myelin deterioration in multiple sclerosis.

  20. Animal source food intake and association with blood cholesterol, glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in a northern Swedish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmar Igl

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . The high intake of game meat in populations with a subsistence-based diet may affect their blood lipids and health status. Objective . To examine the association between diet and circulating levels of blood lipid levels in a northern Swedish population. Study design . We compared a group with traditional lifestyle (TLS based on reindeer herding (TLS group with those from the same area with a non-traditional lifestyle (NTLS typical of more industrialized regions of Sweden (NTLS group. The analysis was based on self-reported intake of animal source food (i.e. non-game meat, game meat, fish, dairy products and eggs and the serum blood level of a number of lipids [total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL, triglycerides (TG, glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids]. Results . The TLS group had higher cholesterol, LDL and HDL levels than the reference group. Of the TLS group, 65% had cholesterol levels above the threshold for increased risk of coronary heart disease (≥240 mg/dl, as compared to 38% of the NTLS group. Self-reported consumption of game meat was positively associated with TC and LDL. Conclusions . The high game meat consumption of the TLS group is associated with increased cholesterol levels. High intake of animal protein and fat and low fibre is known to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but other studies of the TLS in northern Sweden have shown comparable incidences of cardiovascular disease to the reference (NTLS group from the same geographical area. This indicates that factors other than TC influence disease risk. One such possible factor is dietary phospholipids, which are also found in high amounts specifically in game meat and have been shown to inhibit cholesterol absorption.

  1. Phosphoglycerate Mutase 1 Coordinates Glycolysis and Biosynthesis to Promote Tumor Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitosugi, Taro [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhou, Lu [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Elf, Shannon [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Fan, Jun [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kang, Hee-Bum [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Seo, Jae Ho [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shan, Changliang [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Dai, Qing [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Zhang, Liang [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Xie, Jianxin [Cell Signaling Technology, Inc., Danvers, MA (United States); Gu, Ting-Lei [Cell Signaling Technology, Inc., Danvers, MA (United States); Jin, Peng [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Alečković, Masa [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); LeRoy, Gary [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Kang, Yibin [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Sudderth, Jessica A. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); DeBerardinis, Ralph J. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Luan, Chi-Hao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chen, Georgia Z. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Muller, Susan [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shin, Dong M. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Owonikoko, Taofeek K. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lonial, Sagar [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Arellano, Martha L. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Khoury, Hanna J. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Khuri, Fadlo R. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Benjamin H. [Novartis Inst. for BioMedical Research, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ye, Keqiang [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Boggon, Titus J. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Kang, Sumin [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); He, Chuan [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Chen, Jing [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-11-12

    It is unclear how cancer cells coordinate glycolysis and biosynthesis to support rapidly growing tumors. We found that the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1), commonly upregulated in human cancers due to loss of TP53, contributes to biosynthesis regulation partially by controlling intracellular levels of its substrate, 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG), and product, 2-phosphoglycerate (2-PG). 3-PG binds to and inhibits 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), while 2-PG activates 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase to provide feedback control of 3-PG levels. Inhibition of PGAM1 by shRNA or a small molecule inhibitor PGMI-004A results in increased 3-PG and decreased 2-PG levels in cancer cells, leading to significantly decreased glycolysis, PPP flux and biosynthesis, as well as attenuated cell proliferation and tumor growth.

  2. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Reveals Acyl-Chain- and Region-Specific Sphingolipid Metabolism in the Kidneys of Sphingomyelin Synthase 2-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Sugimoto

    Full Text Available Obesity was reported to cause kidney injury by excessive accumulation of sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and ceramide. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2 is an important enzyme for hepatic sphingolipid homeostasis and its dysfunction is considered to result in fatty liver disease. The expression of SMS2 is also high in the kidneys. However, the contribution of SMS2 on renal sphingolipid metabolism remains unclear. Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to visualize the distribution and provide quantitative data on lipids in tissue sections. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the effects of SMS2 deficiency on the distribution and concentration of sphingomyelins in the liver and kidneys of mice fed with a normal-diet or a high-fat-diet using imaging mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Our study revealed that high-fat-diet increased C18-C22 sphingomyelins, but decreased C24-sphingomyelins, in the liver and kidneys of wild-type mice. By contrast, SMS2 deficiency decreased C18-C24 sphingomyelins in the liver. Although a similar trend was observed in the whole-kidneys, the effects were minor. Interestingly, imaging mass spectrometry revealed that sphingomyelin localization was specific to each acyl-chain length in the kidneys. Further, SMS2 deficiency mainly decreased C22-sphingomyelin in the renal medulla and C24-sphingomyelins in the renal cortex. Thus, imaging mass spectrometry can provide visual assessment of the contribution of SMS2 on acyl-chain- and region-specific sphingomyelin metabolism in the kidneys.

  3. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Reveals Acyl-Chain- and Region-Specific Sphingolipid Metabolism in the Kidneys of Sphingomyelin Synthase 2-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Wakabayashi, Masato; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Zhao, Songji; Sakai, Shota; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity was reported to cause kidney injury by excessive accumulation of sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and ceramide. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is an important enzyme for hepatic sphingolipid homeostasis and its dysfunction is considered to result in fatty liver disease. The expression of SMS2 is also high in the kidneys. However, the contribution of SMS2 on renal sphingolipid metabolism remains unclear. Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to visualize the distribution and provide quantitative data on lipids in tissue sections. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the effects of SMS2 deficiency on the distribution and concentration of sphingomyelins in the liver and kidneys of mice fed with a normal-diet or a high-fat-diet using imaging mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Our study revealed that high-fat-diet increased C18–C22 sphingomyelins, but decreased C24-sphingomyelins, in the liver and kidneys of wild-type mice. By contrast, SMS2 deficiency decreased C18–C24 sphingomyelins in the liver. Although a similar trend was observed in the whole-kidneys, the effects were minor. Interestingly, imaging mass spectrometry revealed that sphingomyelin localization was specific to each acyl-chain length in the kidneys. Further, SMS2 deficiency mainly decreased C22-sphingomyelin in the renal medulla and C24-sphingomyelins in the renal cortex. Thus, imaging mass spectrometry can provide visual assessment of the contribution of SMS2 on acyl-chain- and region-specific sphingomyelin metabolism in the kidneys. PMID:27010944

  4. Yeast sphingolipids do not need to contain very long chain fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerantola, Vanessa; Vionnet, Christine; Aebischer, Olivier F;

    2007-01-01

    , a mouse LAG1 homologue. Ceramide synthase activity of 4Delta.Lass5 cells only utilizes C16 and C18 fatty acids and does not require the help of Lip1p, an essential cofactor of Lag1p/Lac1p. HPLC-electrospray ionization-MS/MS analysis demonstrated that in IPCs (inositolphosphorylceramides) of 4Delta.Lass5......, the very long chain fatty acids (C26 and C24) account for 97%. Notwithstanding, IPCs incorporated into glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors of 4Delta.Lass5 show normal mobility on TLC and the ceramide- and raft-dependent traffic of Gas1p (glycophospholipid-anchored surface...

  5. Formation of Extracellular Sphingolipids by Microorganisms: IV. Pilot-Plant Production of Tetraacetylphytosphingosine by Hansenula ciferrii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maister, H G; Rogovin, S P; Stodola, F H; Wickerham, L J

    1962-09-01

    Tetraacetylphytosphingosine (TAPS) formation by the F-60-10 mating type strain of the yeast Hansenula ciferrii, previously observed on agar plates, has been shown to take place in submerged cultures. The optimal conditions for TAPS formation, and the correlation of TAPS production and sugar utilization under aerobic conditions, were studied in 10-liter fermentors. For each gram of glucose consumed, 5 mg of TAPS were formed; for each gram of yeast solids produced, 15 mg of TAPS were synthesized. A 750-liter pilot-plant run yielded 175 g of crude TAPS, which were obtained by hexane extraction of centrifuged yeast cells.

  6. Effect of Methyl Jasmonic Acid on Baccatin Ⅲ Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jianfeng; GUO Zhigang

    2006-01-01

    As baccatin Ⅲ is an immediate diterpenoid precursor of taxol, the increase of baccatin Ⅲ is beneficial to the biosynthesis of taxol. Addition of methyl jasmonic acid (M J) enhances the activity of 10- deaceyle baccatin (DAB) Ⅲ acetyl transferase which catalyzes the bioconversion from 10-DAB Ⅲ to beccatin Ⅲ. In this paper, the baccatin Ⅲ content was increased by 174% by the addition of 100 μmol/L MJ in suspension cultures of Taxus cuspidate. Induction by MJ also increased the expression of a 49.0-kDa protein. This paper describes the cell free acetylation of 10-DAB Ⅲ in crude extracts of enzyme from the suspension cultures of Taxus cuspidate. The reaction product was confirmed by high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC). About 25.0% of the 10-DAB Ⅲ was acetylized into baccatin Ⅲ on the 4th day with 100 μmol/L MJ.The 10-DAB Ⅲ acetyl transferase activity reached a peak on the 2nd day with 100 μmol/L M J, with 54.7% of the 10-DAB Ⅲ transformed into baccatin Ⅲ. The baccatin Ⅲ content increased with the increase of 10-DAB Ⅲ acetyl transferase activity, although the biosynthesis was delayed by more than 24 h. The remarkable induction of MJ on baccatin Ⅲ biosynthesis shows a promising way to increase the production of taxol.

  7. The regulation and biosynthesis of antimycins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan F. Seipke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimycins (>40 members were discovered nearly 65 years ago but the discovery of the gene cluster encoding antimycin biosynthesis in 2011 has facilitated rapid progress in understanding the unusual biosynthetic pathway. Antimycin A is widely used as a piscicide in the catfish farming industry and also has potent killing activity against insects, nematodes and fungi. The mode of action of antimycins is to inhibit cytochrome c reductase in the electron transport chain and halt respiration. However, more recently, antimycin A has attracted attention as a potent and selective inhibitor of the mitochondrial anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Remarkably, this inhibition is independent of the main mode of action of antimycins such that an artificial derivative named 2-methoxyantimycin A inhibits Bcl-xL but does not inhibit respiration. The Bcl-2/Bcl-xL family of proteins are over-produced in cancer cells that are resistant to apoptosis-inducing chemotherapy agents, so antimycins have great potential as anticancer drugs used in combination with existing chemotherapeutics. Here we review what is known about antimycins, the regulation of the ant gene cluster and the unusual biosynthetic pathway.

  8. Expanding ester biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Tashiro, Yohei; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-04-01

    To expand the capabilities of whole-cell biocatalysis, we have engineered Escherichia coli to produce various esters. The alcohol O-acyltransferase (ATF) class of enzyme uses acyl-CoA units for ester formation. The release of free CoA upon esterification with an alcohol provides the free energy to facilitate ester formation. The diversity of CoA molecules found in nature in combination with various alcohol biosynthetic pathways allows for the biosynthesis of a multitude of esters. Small to medium volatile esters have extensive applications in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, solvent, paint and coating industries. The present work enables the production of these compounds by designing several ester pathways in E. coli. The engineered pathways generated acetate esters of ethyl, propyl, isobutyl, 2-methyl-1-butyl, 3-methyl-1-butyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohols. In particular, we achieved high-level production of isobutyl acetate from glucose (17.2 g l(-1)). This strategy was expanded to realize pathways for tetradecyl acetate and several isobutyrate esters.

  9. Monoterpene biosynthesis potential of plant subcellular compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, L.; Jongedijk, E.J.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Krol, van der A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular monoterpene biosynthesis capacity based on local geranyl diphosphate (GDP) availability or locally boosted GDP production was determined for plastids, cytosol and mitochondria. A geraniol synthase (GES) was targeted to plastids, cytosol, or mitochondria. Transient expression in Nicotiana

  10. Biosynthesis and Genetic Engineering of Polyketides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xiang-Cheng; WANG Qiao-Mei; SHEN Yue-Mao; DU Liang-Cheng; HUFFMAN Justin; GERBER Ryan; LOU Li-Li; XIE Yun-Xuan; LIN Ting; JORGENSON Joel; MARESCH Andrew; VOGELER Chad

    2008-01-01

    Polyketides are one of the largest groups of natural products produced by bacteria, fungi, and plants. Many of these metabolites have highly complex chemical structures and very important biological activities, including antibiotic, anticancer, immunosuppressant, and anti-cholesterol activities. In the past two decades, extensive investigations have been carried out to understand the molecular mechanisms for polyketide biosynthesis. These efforts have led to the development of various rational approaches toward engineered biosynthesis of new polyketides. More recently, the research efforts have shifted to the elucidation of the three-dimentional structure of the complex enzyme machineries for polyketide biosynthesis and to the exploitation of new sources for polyketide production, such as filamentous fungi and marine microorganisms. This review summarizes our general understanding of the biosynthetic mechanisms and the progress in engineered biosynthesis of polyketides.

  11. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  12. Crude Extracts, Flavokawain B and Alpinetin Compounds from the Rhizome of Alpinia mutica Induce Cell Death via UCK2 Enzyme Inhibition and in Turn Reduce 18S rRNA Biosynthesis in HT-29 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Rasedee; Kassim, Nur Kartinee Bt; Rosli, Rozita; Yeap, Swee Keong; Waziri, Peter; Etti, Imaobong Christopher; Bello, Muhammad Bashir

    2017-01-01

    Uridine-cytidine kinase 2 is an enzyme that is overexpressed in abnormal cell growth and its implication is considered a hallmark of cancer. Due to the selective expression of UCK2 in cancer cells, a selective inhibition of this key enzyme necessitates the discovery of its potential inhibitors for cancer chemotherapy. The present study was carried out to demonstrate the potentials of natural phytochemicals from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica to inhibit UCK2 useful for colorectal cancer. Here, we employed the used of in vitro to investigate the effectiveness of natural UCK2 inhibitors to cause HT-29 cell death. Extracts, flavokawain B, and alpinetin compound from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica was used in the study. The study demonstrated that the expression of UCK2 mRNA were substantially reduced in treated HT-29 cells. In addition, downregulation in expression of 18S ribosomal RNA was also observed in all treated HT-29 cells. This was confirmed by fluorescence imaging to measure the level of expression of 18S ribosomal RNA in live cell images. The study suggests the possibility of MDM2 protein was downregulated and its suppression subsequently activates the expression of p53 during inhibition of UCK2 enzyme. The expression of p53 is directly linked to a blockage of cell cycle progression at G0/G1 phase and upregulates Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase 3 while Bcl2 was deregulated. In this respect, apoptosis induction and DNA fragmentation were observed in treated HT-29 cells. Initial results from in vitro studies have shown the ability of the bioactive compounds of flavokawain B and alpinetin to target UCK2 enzyme specifically, inducing cell cycle arrest and subsequently leading to cancer cell death, possibly through interfering the MDM2-p53 signalling pathway. These phenomena have proven that the bioactive compounds could be useful for future therapeutic use in colon cancer. PMID:28103302

  13. Life style-related diseases of the digestive system: cell culture system for the screening of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) reagents: suppression of HCV replication by statins and synergistic action with interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masanori; Kato, Nobuyuki

    2007-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection causes chronic hepatitis and leads to liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Pegylated-interferon and ribavirin is the current standard therapy for chronic hepatitis C. However, the therapy is only effective in 50% of the patients. To overcome this problem, we recently developed the HCV cell culture system (OR6 system) for the screening of anti-HCV reagents. In this OR6 system, the luciferase gene was introduced into the upstream portion of the HCV genome to facilitate the monitoring of HCV RNA replication. Recently lipid metabolism is reported to be involved in HCV RNA replication. Cholesterol and sphingolipid are the major components in lipid rafts, which seem to be the scaffold for HCV RNA replication. Statins inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and also have the pleiotropic effects by the inhibition of prenylation. We demonstrated different anti-HCV effects of statins (atorvastatin, simvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, and pitavastatin) using the OR6 system. Surprisingly, in contrast to the other statins, pravastatin exhibited no anti-HCV effect. Furthermore, statins enhanced the anti-HCV effect of interferon in combination. Statins may be a promising candidate for the adjuvant in interferon therapy and may improve the efficiency of the current interferon and ribavirin therapy.

  14. Inhibition of somatotroph growth and growth hormone biosynthesis by activin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; González-Manchón, C; Potter, E

    1990-01-01

    ]methionine-labeled cells, could be observed after 24 h of activin treatment, and maximal (70%) inhibition of GH biosynthesis was observed after 3 days. Activin inhibited basal as well as GH-releasing factor (GRF)-, glucocorticoid-, and thyroid hormone-stimulated GH biosynthesis. Inhibin, which is known to reverse...... the effect of activin on FSH secretion, did not reverse the effect of activin on GH biosynthesis. Treatment of somatotrophs with activin for 3 days completely inhibited the growth-promoting effect of GRF on somatotrophs. However, no effect of activin on GRF-stimulated expression of the c-fos protooncogene...... was observed. These data demonstrate that activin, in addition to its stimulatory effect on FSH secretion, is able to inhibit both expression of GH and growth of somatotropic cells....

  15. Ceramide formation is involved in Lactobacillus acidophilus-induced IFN-beta response in dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Eva; Henningsen, Louise; Frøkiær, Hanne

    The sphingolipid ceramide is known to play a role in lipid raft fusion and receptor clustering in the plasma membrane (PM). Upon bacterial encounter, dendritic cells (DCs) endocytose the bacteria and initiate a bacteria-specific downstream signaling event. We hypothesized that conversion...

  16. Ceramide in primary astrocytes from cerebellum: metabolism and role in cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboni, Laura; Tettamanti, Guido; Viani, Paola

    2002-04-01

    Cerebellar astrocytes are equipped with an efficient molecular machinery able to control the levels, and possibly the subcellular location, of ceramide. The major metabolic routes that contribute to the maintenance and variation of the cellular ceramide include ceramide biosynthesis, by de novo pathway or sphingosine recycling, ceramide formation from complex sphingolipids degradation and ceramide catabolism. In cerebellar astrocytes from rat cerebellum a peculiar metabolism of sphingomyelin occurs. This includes the preponderance of acidic sphingomyelinase, paralleled by a deficiency of the neutral Mg2+-dependent enzyme, as well as the presence of an extra-Golgi form of sphingomyelin synthase, which shares many characteristics with PC-PLC. Moreover these cells are characterized by a high efficiency in converting sphingosine to ceramide, possibly functional to the role played by astrocytes in the prevention of neuronal damage by high sphingosine concentration. Recent evidence demonstrates that a change of ceramide level is one of the key steps in the chain of reactions elicited by mitogenic stimuli. In fact, low cellular levels of ceramide characterize, and appear to be required for, the proliferation of cerebellar astrocytes. In particular mitogenic stimuli, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), rapidly down regulate the cellular levels of ceramide by stimulating sphingomyelin synthase. Ceramide acts as an intracellular physiological inhibitor of cell growth, being able to counteract the effect of bFGF by inhibiting the MAP kinase pathway. Although many questions remain in this field, the present knowledge strongly supports that ceramide represents a crucial member within lipid mediators, involved in the signaling pathways underlying cell proliferation in cerebellar astrocytes.

  17. Biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. França

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A set of genes related to secondary metabolism was extracted from the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database and was used to investigate both the gene expression pattern of key enzymes regulating the main biosynthetic secondary metabolism pathways and the major classes of metabolites involved in the response of sugarcane to environmental and developmental cues. The SUCEST database was constructed with tissues in different physiological conditions which had been collected under varied situation of environmental stress. This database allows researchers to identify and characterize the expressed genes of a wide range of putative enzymes able to catalyze steps in the phenylpropanoid, isoprenoid and other pathways of the special metabolic mechanisms involved in the response of sugarcane to environmental changes. Our results show that sugarcane cDNAs encoded putative ultra-violet induced sesquiterpene cyclases (SC; chalcone synthase (CHS, the first enzyme in the pathway branch for flavonoid biosynthesis; isoflavone synthase (IFS, involved in plant defense and root nodulation; isoflavone reductase (IFR, a key enzyme in phenylpropanoid phytoalexin biosynthesis; and caffeic acid-O-methyltransferase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of lignin cell wall precursors. High levels of CHS transcripts from plantlets infected with Herbaspirillum rubri or Gluconacetobacter diazotroficans suggests that agents of biotic stress can elicit flavonoid biosynthesis in sugarcane. From this data we have predicted the profile of isoprenoid and phenylpropanoid metabolism in sugarcane and pointed the branches of secondary metabolism activated during tissue-specific stages of development and the adaptive response of sugarcane to agents of biotic and abiotic stress, although our assignment of enzyme function should be confirmed by careful biochemical and genetic supporting evidence.Este trabalho foi realizado com os objetivos de gerar uma coleção de genes

  18. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: A green approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Annu; Ikram, Saiqa; Yudha S, Salprima

    2016-08-01

    Nanotechnology is an immensely developing field due to its extensive range of applications in different areas of technology and science. Different types of methods are employed for synthesis of nanoparticles due to their wide applications. The conventional chemical methods have certain limitations with them either in the form of chemical contaminations during their syntheses procedures or in later applications and use of higher energy. During the last decade research have been focussed on developing simple, clean, non-toxic, cost effective and eco-friendly protocols for synthesis of nanoparticles. In order to get this objective, biosynthesis methods have been developed in order to fill this gap. The biosynthesis of nanoparticles is simple, single step, eco-friendly and a green approach. The biochemical processes in biological agents reduce the dissolved metal ions into nano metals. The various biological agents like plant tissues, fungi, bacteria, etc. are used for biosynthesis for metal nanoparticles. In this review article, we summarised recent literature on biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles which have revolutionised technique of synthesis for their applications in different fields. Due to biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles, it has find its applications in biomedical applications. The protocol and mechanism of biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles along with various applications have also been discussed.

  19. Flavonoids: Biosynthesis, Biological functions and Biotechnological applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lorena eFalcone Ferreyra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are widely distributed secondary metabolites with different metabolic functions in plants. The elucidation of the biosynthetic pathways, as well as their regulation by MYB, bHLH and WD40-type transcription factors, has allowed metabolic engineering of plants through the manipulation of the different final products with valuable applications. The present review describes the regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis, as well as the biological functions of flavonoids in plants, such as in defense against UV-B radiation and pathogen infection, nodulation, pollen fertility. In addition, we discuss different strategies and achievements through the genetic engineering of flavonoid biosynthesis with implication in the industry and the combinatorial biosynthesis in microorganisms by the reconstruction of the pathway to obtain high amounts of specific compounds.

  20. The Terpenoid Biosynthesis Toolkit of Trichoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravindra; Mukherjee, Prasun Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The widely used biotechnologically important fungi belonging to the genus Trichoderma are rich sources of secondary metabolites. Even though the genomes of several Trichoderma spp. have been published, and data are available on the genes involved in biosynthesis of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases, no genome-wide data are available for the terpenoid biosynthesis machinery in these organisms. In the present study, we have identified the genes involved in terpene biosynthesis in the genomes of three Trichoderma spp., viz., T. virens, T. atroviride and T. reesei. While the genes involved in the condensation steps are highly conserved across the three species, these fungi differed in the number and organization of terpene cyclases. T. virens genome harbours eleven terpene cyclases, while T. atroviride harbours seven, and T. reeseisix in their genomes; seven, three and two being part of putative secondary metabolism related gene clusters.

  1. Regulation of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in the ribulose monophosphate cycle methylotroph Nocardia sp. 239

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, L. de; Vrijbloed, J.W.; Grobben, G.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in Nocardia sp. 239 was studied. In cell-free extracts 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase activity was inhibited in a cumulative manner by tryptophan, phenylalanine and tyrosine. Chorismate mutase was inhibited by both phenyl

  2. Triterpenoid biosynthesis in Euphorbia lathyris latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, D.R.

    1987-11-01

    The structures of triterpenols, not previously been known, from Euphorbia lathyris latex are reported. A method for quantifying very small amounts of these compounds was developed. Concerning the biochemistry of the latex, no exogenous cofactors were required for the biosynthesis and the addition of compounds such as NADPAH and ATP do not stimulate the biosynthesis. The addition of DTE or a similar anti-oxidant was found to help reduce the oxidation of the latex, thus increasing the length of time that the latex remains active. The requirement of a divalent cation and the preference for Mn in the pellet was observed. The effect of several inhibitors on the biosynthesis of the triterpenoids was examined. Mevinolin was found to inhibit the biosynthesis of the triterpenoids from acetate, but not mevalonate. A dixon plot of the inhibition of acetate incorporation showed an I/sub 50/ concentration of 3.2 ..mu..M. Fenpropimorph was found to have little or no effect on the biosynthesis. Tridemorph was found to inhibit the biosynthesis of all of the triterpenoids with an I/sub 50/ of 4 ..mu..M. It was also observed that the cyclopropyl containing triterpenols, cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol were inhibited much more strongly than those containing an 8-9 double bond, lanosterol and 24-methylenelanosterol. The evidence indicates, but does not definetely prove, that lanosterol and 24-methylenelanosterol are not made from cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol via a ring-opening enzyme such as cycloeucalenol-obtusifoliol isomerase. The possibilty that cycloartenol is made via lanosterol was investigated by synthesizing 4-R-4-/sup 3/H-mevalonic acid and incubating latex with a mixture of this and /sup 14/C-mevalonic acid. From the /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio it was shown that cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol are not made via an intermediate containing as 8-9 double bond. 88 refs., 15 figs., 30 tabs.

  3. Erythrocentaurin, Biosynthesis Postulation and Biomimetic Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI,Jun; YUAN,Xiang-Hui; LIU,Zhu-Lan; LIU,Jian-Li

    2004-01-01

    @@ Erythrocentaurin is a relatively simple nature product isolated from the root of Gentiana macrophylla Pall.[1] The co-existed of gentiopicroside from the same species led to speculation that erythrocentaurin is a biosynthesis product of gentiopicroside. The transformation of secologanin to carbocyclic aglycone under biomimetic condition has already known (Scheme 1).[2,3] The postulated biosynthesis pathway of erythrocentaurin may be in the same way. In the process the cyclic hemiacetal of the aglycone opened to the dialdehyde which then undergoes a vinylogous aldol reaction, and then dehydroxylation and double bond migration to the title compound (Scheme 2).

  4. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics.

  5. Gangliosides in the Nervous System: Biosynthesis and Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Robert K.; Ariga, Toshio; Yanagisawa, Makoto; Zeng, Guichao

    Gangliosides, abundant in the nervous system, are known to play crucial modulatory roles in cellular recognition, interaction, adhesion, and signal transduction, particularly during early developmental stages. The expression of gangliosides in the nervous system is developmentally regulated and is closely related to the differentiation state of the cell. Ganglioside biosynthesis occurs in intracellular organelles, from which gangliosides are transported to the plasma membrane. During brain development, the ganglioside composition of the nervous system undergoes remarkable changes and is strictly regulated by the activities of glycosyltransferases, which can occur at different levels of control, including glycosyltransferase gene transcription and posttranslational modification. Genes for glycosyltransferase involved in ganglioside biosynthesis have been cloned and classified into families of glycosyltransferases based on their amino acid sequence similarities. The donor and acceptor substrate specificities are determined by enzymatic analysis of the glycosyltransferase gene products. Cell-type specific regulation of these genes has also been studied. Gangliosides are degraded by lysosomal exoglycosidases. The action of these enzymes occurs frequently in cooperation with activator proteins. Several human diseases are caused by defects of degradative enzymes, resulting in massive accumulation of certain glycolipids, including gangliosides in the lysosomal compartment and other organelles in the brain and visceral organs. Some of the representative lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) caused by the accumulation of lipids in late endosomes and lysosomes will be discussed.

  6. Cellular oxido-reductive proteins of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii control the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barwal Indu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elucidation of molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticles (SNPs biosynthesis is important to control its size, shape and monodispersity. The evaluation of molecular mechanism of biosynthesis of SNPs is of prime importance for the commercialization and methodology development for controlling the shape and size (uniform distribution of SNPs. The unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was exploited as a model system to elucidate the role of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Results The C. reinhardtii cell free extract (in vitro and in vivo cells mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles reveals SNPs of size range 5 ± 1 to 15 ± 2 nm and 5 ± 1 to 35 ± 5 nm respectively. In vivo biosynthesized SNPs were localized in the peripheral cytoplasm and at one side of flagella root, the site of pathway of ATP transport and its synthesis related enzymes. This provides an evidence for the involvement of oxidoreductive proteins in biosynthesis and stabilization of SNPs. Alteration in size distribution and decrease of synthesis rate of SNPs in protein-depleted fractions confirmed the involvement of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Spectroscopic and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate the association of various proteins on C. reinhardtii mediated in vivo and in vitro biosynthesized SNPs. We have identified various cellular proteins associated with biosynthesized (in vivo and in vitro SNPs by using MALDI-MS-MS, like ATP synthase, superoxide dismutase, carbonic anhydrase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, histone etc. However, these proteins were not associated on the incubation of pre-synthesized silver nanoparticles in vitro. Conclusion Present study provides the indication of involvement of molecular machinery and various cellular proteins in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. In this report, the study is mainly focused towards understanding the role of diverse cellular protein in the synthesis and capping of silver

  7. Direct Ionic Regulation of the Activity of Myo-Inositol Biosynthesis Enzymes in Mozambique Tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Fernando D; Kültz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Myo-inositol (Ins) is a major compatible osmolyte in many cells, including those of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Ins biosynthesis is highly up-regulated in tilapia and other euryhaline fish exposed to hyperosmotic stress. In this study, enzymatic regulation of two enzymes of Ins biosynthesis, Ins phosphate synthase (MIPS) and inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), by direct ionic effects is analyzed. Specific MIPS and IMPase isoforms from Mozambique tilapia (MIPS-160 and IMPase 1) were selected based on experimental, phylogenetic, and structural evidence supporting their role for Ins biosynthesis during hyperosmotic stress. Recombinant tilapia IMPase 1 and MIPS-160 activity was assayed in vitro at ionic conditions that mimic changes in the intracellular milieu during hyperosmotic stress. The in vitro activities of MIPS-160 and IMPase 1 are highest at alkaline pH of 8.8. IMPase 1 catalytic efficiency is strongly increased during hyperosmolality (particularly for the substrate D-Ins-3-phosphate, Ins-3P), mainly as a result of [Na+] elevation. Furthermore, the substrate-specificity of IMPase 1 towards D-Ins-1-phosphate (Ins-1P) is lower than towards Ins-3P. Because MIPS catalysis results in Ins-3P this results represents additional evidence for IMPase 1 being the isoform that mediates Ins biosynthesis in tilapia. Our data collectively demonstrate that the Ins biosynthesis enzymes are activated under ionic conditions that cells are exposed to during hypertonicity, resulting in Ins accumulation, which, in turn, results in restoration of intracellular ion homeostasis. We propose that the unique and direct ionic regulation of the activities of Ins biosynthesis enzymes represents an efficient biochemical feedback loop for regulation of intracellular physiological ion homeostasis during hyperosmotic stress.

  8. Direct Ionic Regulation of the Activity of Myo-Inositol Biosynthesis Enzymes in Mozambique Tilapia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando D Villarreal

    Full Text Available Myo-inositol (Ins is a major compatible osmolyte in many cells, including those of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus. Ins biosynthesis is highly up-regulated in tilapia and other euryhaline fish exposed to hyperosmotic stress. In this study, enzymatic regulation of two enzymes of Ins biosynthesis, Ins phosphate synthase (MIPS and inositol monophosphatase (IMPase, by direct ionic effects is analyzed. Specific MIPS and IMPase isoforms from Mozambique tilapia (MIPS-160 and IMPase 1 were selected based on experimental, phylogenetic, and structural evidence supporting their role for Ins biosynthesis during hyperosmotic stress. Recombinant tilapia IMPase 1 and MIPS-160 activity was assayed in vitro at ionic conditions that mimic changes in the intracellular milieu during hyperosmotic stress. The in vitro activities of MIPS-160 and IMPase 1 are highest at alkaline pH of 8.8. IMPase 1 catalytic efficiency is strongly increased during hyperosmolality (particularly for the substrate D-Ins-3-phosphate, Ins-3P, mainly as a result of [Na+] elevation. Furthermore, the substrate-specificity of IMPase 1 towards D-Ins-1-phosphate (Ins-1P is lower than towards Ins-3P. Because MIPS catalysis results in Ins-3P this results represents additional evidence for IMPase 1 being the isoform that mediates Ins biosynthesis in tilapia. Our data collectively demonstrate that the Ins biosynthesis enzymes are activated under ionic conditions that cells are exposed to during hypertonicity, resulting in Ins accumulation, which, in turn, results in restoration of intracellular ion homeostasis. We propose that the unique and direct ionic regulation of the activities of Ins biosynthesis enzymes represents an efficient biochemical feedback loop for regulation of intracellular physiological ion homeostasis during hyperosmotic stress.

  9. [Salidroside biosynthesis pathway: the initial reaction and glycosylation of tyrosol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lanqing; Liu, Chunmei; Yu, Hansong; Zhang, Jixing; Gao, Dongyao; Li, Yanfang; Wang, Younian

    2012-03-01

    Salidroside, the 8-O-beta-D-glucoside of tyrosol, is a novel adaptogenic drug extracted from the medicinal plant Rhodiola sachalinensis A. Bor. Due to the scarcity of R. sachalinensis and its low yield of salidroside, there is great interest in enhancing the production of salidroside by biotechnological process. Glucosylation of tyrosol is thought to be the final step in salidroside biosynthesis. In our related works, three UGT clones were isolated from the roots and the cultured cells. Our intention was to combine the catalytic specificity of these UGTs in vitro in order to change the level of salidroside in vivo by over-expression of the above UGTs. However, as the aglycone substrate of salidroside, the biosynthetic pathway of tyrosol and its regulation are less well understood. The results of related studies revealed that there are two different possibilities for the tyrosol biosynthetic pathway. One possibility is that tyrosol is produced from a p-coumaric acid precursor, which is derived mainly from phenylalanine. The second possibility is that the precursor of tyrosol might be tyramine, which is synthesized from tyrosine. Our previous work demonstrated that over-expression of the endogenous phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene (PALrs1) and accumulation of p-coumaric acid did not facilitate tyrosol biosynthesis. In contrast, the data presented in our recent work provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that the tyrosine decarboxylase (RsTyrDC) is most likely to have an important function in the initial reaction of the salidroside biosynthesis pathway in R. Sachalinensis.

  10. Biosynthesis and translocation of unsulfated acyltrehaloses in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Jones, Victoria; Sorio de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro; McNeil, Michael R; Jackson, Mary

    2014-10-03

    A number of species-specific polymethyl-branched fatty acid-containing trehalose esters populate the outer membrane of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Among them, 2,3-diacyltrehaloses (DAT) and penta-acyltrehaloses (PAT) not only play a structural role in the cell envelope but also contribute to the ability of M. tuberculosis to multiply and persist in the infected host, promoting the intracellular survival of the bacterium and modulating host immune responses. The nature of the machinery, topology, and sequential order of the reactions leading to the biosynthesis, assembly, and export of these complex glycolipids to the cell surface are the object of the present study. Our genetic and biochemical evidence corroborates a model wherein the biosynthesis and translocation of DAT and PAT to the periplasmic space are coupled and topologically split across the plasma membrane. The formation of DAT occurs on the cytosolic face of the plasma membrane through the action of PapA3, FadD21, and Pks3/4; that of PAT occurs on the periplasmic face via transesterification reactions between DAT substrates catalyzed by the acyltransferase Chp2 (Rv1184c). The integral membrane transporter MmpL10 is essential for DAT to reach the cell surface, and its presence in the membrane is required for Chp2 to be active. Disruption of mmpL10 or chp2 leads to an important build-up of DAT inside the cells and to the formation of a novel form of unsulfated acyltrehalose esterified with polymethyl-branched fatty acids normally found in sulfolipids that is translocated to the cell surface.

  11. Bile acid biosynthesis and its regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areta Hebanowska

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bile acid biosynthesis is the main pathway of cholesterol catabolism. Bile acids are more soluble than cholesterol so are easier to excrete. As amphipathic molecules they participate in lipid digestion and absorption in the intestine and they help to excrete free cholesterol with bile. They are also ligands for nuclear receptors regulating the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Interconversion of cholesterol into bile acids is an important point of its homeostasis. Seventeen enzymes are engaged in this process and many of them are cytochromes P450. Bile acid synthesis initiation may proceed with the “classical” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C7α position or the “alternative” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C27 position. Two additional pathways are possible, though their quantitative significance is small (initiated with cholesterol hydroxylations of C24 and C25 positions. Oxysterols produced are not only intermediates of bile acid biosynthesis but also important regulators of metabolism. Bile acid biosynthesis takes place in the liver, but some enzymes are also present in other organs, where they participate in regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Those enzymes are potential targets for new drugs against cholesterol metabolism disturbances. This article is a brief description of the bile acid biosynthesis pathway and participating enzymes.

  12. Combinatorial biosynthesis of medicinal plant secondary metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julsing, Mattijs K.; Koulman, Albert; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Quax, Wim J.; Kayser, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Combinatorial biosynthesis is a new tool in the generation of novel natural products and for the production of rare and expensive natural products. The basic concept is combining metabolic pathways in different organisms on a genetic level. As a consequence heterologous organisms provide precursors

  13. Tailoring lignin biosynthesis for efficient and sustainable biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Jun; Cai, Yuanheng; Zhang, Xuebin; Gou, Mingyue; Yang, Huijun

    2014-12-01

    Increased global interest in a bio-based economy has reinvigorated the research on the cell wall structure and composition in plants. In particular, the study of plant lignification has become a central focus, with respect to its intractability and negative impact on the utilization of the cell wall biomass for producing biofuels and bio-based chemicals. Striking progress has been achieved in the last few years both on our fundamental understanding of lignin biosynthesis, deposition and assembly, and on the interplay of lignin synthesis with the plant growth and development. With the knowledge gleaned from basic studies, researchers are now able to invent and develop elegant biotechnological strategies to sophisticatedly manipulate the quantity and structure of lignin and thus to create economically viable bioenergy feedstocks. These concerted efforts open an avenue for the commercial production of cost-competitive biofuel to meet our energy needs.

  14. Production of anticancer polyenes through precursor-directed biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Benjamin R; O'Connor, Stephen; Fox, Deirdre; Leroy, Jacques; Murphy, Cormac D

    2011-09-21

    The biosynthesis of the pyrrolyl moiety of the fungal metabolite rumbrin originates from pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. In an effort to produce novel derivatives with enhanced biological activity a series of substituted pyrrole-2-carboxylates were synthesised and incubated with the producing organism, Auxarthron umbrinum. Several 4-halo-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acids were incorporated into the metabolite yielding three new derivatives: 3-fluoro-, 3-chloro- and 3-bromo-isorumbrin, which were generated in milligram quantities enabling cytotoxicity assays to be conducted. The 3-chloro- and 3-bromo-isorumbrins had improved activity against HeLa cells compared with rumbrin; 3-bromoisorumbrin also showed dramatically improved activity towards a lung cancer cell line (A549).

  15. Solving the puzzles of cutin and suberin polymer biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisson, Fred; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Pollard, Mike

    2012-06-01

    Cutin and suberin are insoluble lipid polymers that provide critical barrier functions to the cell wall of certain plant tissues, including the epidermis, endodermis and periderm. Genes that are specific to the biosynthesis of cutins and/or aliphatic suberins have been identified, mainly in Arabidopsis thaliana. They notably encode acyltransferases, oxidases and transporters, which may have either well-defined or more debatable biochemical functions. However, despite these advances, important aspects of cutin and suberin synthesis remain obscure. Central questions include whether fatty acyl monomers or oligomers are exported, and the extent of extracellular assembly and attachment to the cell wall. These issues are reviewed. Greater emphasis on chemistry and biochemistry will be required to solve these unknowns and link structure with function.

  16. Biosynthesis of promatrix metalloproteinase-9/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan heteromer involves a Rottlerin-sensitive pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabin Malla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previously we have shown that a fraction of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 synthesized by the macrophage cell line THP-1 was bound to a chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG core protein as a reduction sensitive heteromer. Several biochemical properties of the enzyme were changed when it was bound to the CSPG. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By use of affinity chromatography, zymography, and radioactive labelling, various macrophage stimulators were tested for their effect on the synthesis of the proMMP-9/CSPG heteromer and its components by THP-1 cells. Of the stimulators, only PMA largely increased the biosynthesis of the heteromer. As PMA is an activator of PKC, we determined which PKC isoenzymes were expressed by performing RT-PCR and Western Blotting. Subsequently specific inhibitors were used to investigate their involvement in the biosynthesis of the heteromer. Of the inhibitors, only Rottlerin repressed the biosynthesis of proMMP-9/CSPG and its two components. Much lower concentrations of Rottlerin were needed to reduce the amount of CSPG than what was needed to repress the synthesis of the heteromer and MMP-9. Furthermore, Rottlerin caused a minor reduction in the activation of the PKC isoenzymes δ, ε, θ and υ (PKD3 in both control and PMA exposed cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The biosynthesis of the proMMP-9/CSPG heteromer and proMMP-9 in THP-1 cells involves a Rottlerin-sensitive pathway that is different from the Rottlerin sensitive pathway involved in the CSPG biosynthesis. MMP-9 and CSPGs are known to be involved in various physiological and pathological processes. Formation of complexes may influence both the specificity and localization of the enzyme. Therefore, knowledge about biosynthetic pathways and factors involved in the formation of the MMP-9/CSPG heteromer may contribute to insight in the heteromers biological function as well as pointing to future targets for therapeutic agents.

  17. Inhibition of honokiol on the proliferation and melanin biosynthesis on B16 melanoma cells in vitro%和厚朴酚对小鼠黑色素瘤B16细胞增殖以及黑色素合成的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻丽红; 张超; 谭茵

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the inhibition of honokiol on proliferation and melanin biosynthesis in B16 melanoma cells in vitro. Methods B16 cells were cultured in vitro. MTT assay, DAPI and NaOH lysis test were applied for assessment of cell proliferation, cellular morphologic observation and cellular melanin content, respectively. Results B16 cells were treated with honokiol with different concentrations ( 5,10,20,40 and 80 μmol/L ) and durations ( 12,24 and 48 h ). The IC50 of honokiol on proliferation of B16 cells were 23. 4, 13. 1 and 11.4 μmol/L, respectively, with durations of 12,24 and 48 h. Apoptosis of B16 cells were induced with honokiol in DAPI staining. Furthermore, the melanin biosynthesis was inhibited with honokiol with concentration over 20 (xmol/L. Conclusion Honokiol effectively inhibits the proliferation of B16 in dose - and time - depend manners. Apoptotic bodies were observed in B16 cells treated with honokiol. Although melanin biosynthesis is also inhibited by honokiol, this effect is insignificant.%目的 探讨和厚朴酚对小鼠黑色素瘤B16细胞增殖以及细胞内黑色素合成的影响.方法 体外培养小鼠B16细胞,MTT法检测和厚朴酚对B16细胞增殖的影响;DAPI染色法观察和厚朴酚对B16细胞细胞形态的影响;NaOH裂解法检测和厚朴酚对黑色素含量的影响.结果 和厚朴酚浓度为5、10、20、40、80 μmol/L 作用B16细胞,在不同的用药时间12、24和48 h,和厚朴酚对B16细胞增殖的IC50分别为23.4、13.1和11.4 μmol/L;同时和厚朴酚作用B16细胞12 h后,经DAPI染色,B16细胞呈现典型的凋亡形态;另外采用20、40、80 μmol/L的和厚朴酚分别作用B16细胞,B16细胞内黑色素合成量也呈现降低的趋势.结论 和厚朴酚能有效地抑制B16细胞增殖,且其抑制作用具有时间和浓度依赖性;药物作用后的B16细胞呈现凋亡形态并出现凋亡小体;和厚朴酚对B16细胞内黑色素合成也呈现抑制作用但不明显.

  18. Inhibition of arenavirus by A3, a pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Ngo, Nhi; Devito, Stefanie; Eggink, Dirk; Munger, Joshua; Shaw, Megan L; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Arenaviruses merit significant interest as important human pathogens, since several of them cause severe hemorrhagic fever disease that is associated with high morbidity and significant mortality. Currently, there are no FDA-licensed arenavirus vaccines available, and current antiarenaviral therapy is limited to an off-labeled use of the nucleoside analog ribavirin, which has limited prophylactic efficacy. The pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitor A3, which was identified in a high-throughput screen for compounds that blocked influenza virus replication, exhibits a broad-spectrum antiviral activity against negative- and positive-sense RNA viruses, retroviruses, and DNA viruses. In this study, we evaluated the antiviral activity of A3 against representative Old World (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus) and New World (Junin virus) arenaviruses in rodent, monkey, and human cell lines. We show that A3 is significantly more efficient than ribavirin in controlling arenavirus multiplication and that the A3 inhibitory effect is in part due to its ability to interfere with viral RNA replication and transcription. We document an additive antiarenavirus effect of A3 and ribavirin, supporting the potential combination therapy of ribavirin and pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitors for the treatment of arenavirus infections.

  19. Rv0989c encodes a novel (E)-geranyl diphosphate synthase facilitating decaprenyl diphosphate biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Francis M; Thomas, Jill A; Peters, Reuben J

    2011-02-04

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has a highly complex cell wall, which is required for both bacterial survival and infection. Cell wall biosynthesis is dependent on decaprenyl diphosphate as a glyco-carrier, which is hence an essential metabolite in this pathogen. Previous biochemical studies indicated (E)-geranyl diphosphate (GPP) is required for the synthesis of decaprenyl diphosphate. Here we demonstrate that Rv0989c encodes the "missing" GPP synthase, representing the first such enzyme to be characterized from bacteria, and which presumably is involved in decaprenyl diphosphate biosynthesis in Mtb. Our investigation also has revealed previously unrecognized substrate plasticity of the farnesyl diphosphate synthases from Mtb, resolving previous discrepancies between biochemical and genetic studies of cell wall biosynthesis.

  20. Creatine biosynthesis and transport in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joncquel-Chevalier Curt, Marie; Voicu, Pia-Manuela; Fontaine, Monique; Dessein, Anne-Frédérique; Porchet, Nicole; Mention-Mulliez, Karine; Dobbelaere, Dries; Soto-Ares, Gustavo; Cheillan, David; Vamecq, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Creatine is physiologically provided equally by diet and by endogenous synthesis from arginine and glycine with successive involvements of arginine glycine amidinotransferase [AGAT] and guanidinoacetate methyl transferase [GAMT]. A specific plasma membrane transporter, creatine transporter [CRTR] (SLC6A8), further enables cells to incorporate creatine and through uptake of its precursor, guanidinoacetate, also directly contributes to creatine biosynthesis. Breakthrough in the role of creatine has arisen from studies on creatine deficiency disorders. Primary creatine disorders are inherited as autosomal recessive (mutations affecting GATM [for glycine-amidinotransferase, mitochondrial]) and GAMT genes) or X-linked (SLC6A8 gene) traits. They have highlighted the role of creatine in brain functions altered in patients (global developmental delay, intellectual disability, behavioral disorders). Creatine modulates GABAergic and glutamatergic cerebral pathways, presynaptic CRTR (SLC6A8) ensuring re-uptake of synaptic creatine. Secondary creatine disorders, addressing other genes, have stressed the extraordinary imbrication of creatine metabolism with many other cellular pathways. This high dependence on multiple pathways supports creatine as a cellular sensor, to cell methylation and energy status. Creatine biosynthesis consumes 40% of methyl groups produced as S-adenosylmethionine, and creatine uptake is controlled by AMP activated protein kinase, a ubiquitous sensor of energy depletion. Today, creatine is considered as a potential sensor of cell methylation and energy status, a neurotransmitter influencing key (GABAergic and glutamatergic) CNS neurotransmission, therapeutic agent with anaplerotic properties (towards creatine kinases [creatine-creatine phosphate cycle] and creatine neurotransmission), energetic and antioxidant compound (benefits in degenerative diseases through protection against energy depletion and oxidant species) with osmolyte behavior (retention of

  1. A mathematical model of N-linked glycoform biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaña, P; Bailey, J E

    1997-09-20

    Metabolic engineering of N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis to produce novel glycoforms or glycoform distributions of a recombinant glycoprotein can potentially lead to an improved therapeutic performance of the glycoprotein product. Effective engineering of this pathway to maximize the fractions of beneficial glycoforms within the glycoform population of a target glycoprotein can be aided by a mathematical model of the N-linked glycosylation process. A mathematical model is presented here, whose main function is to calculate the expected qualitative trends in the N-linked oligosaccharide distribution resulting from changes in the levels of one or more enzymes involved in the network of enzyme-catalyzed reactions that accomplish N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis. It consists of mass balances for 33 different oligosaccharide species N-linked to a specified protein that is being transported through the different compartments of the Golgi complex. Values of the model parameters describing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were estimated from literature information. A basal set of kinetic parameters for the enzyme-catalyzed reactions acting on free oligosaccharide substrates was also obtained from the literature. The solution of the system for this basal set of parameters gave a glycoform distribution consisting mainly of complex-galactosylated oligosaccharides distributed in structures with different numbers of antennae in a fashion similar to that observed for various recombinant proteins produced in CHO cells. Other simulations indicate that changes in the oligosaccharide distribution could easily result from alteration in glycoprotein productivity within the range currently attainable in industry. The overexpression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III in CHO cells was simulated under different conditions to test the main function of the model. These simulations allow a comparison of different strategies, such as simultaneous overexpression of several

  2. Biosynthesis and toxicological effects of patulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puel, Olivier; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2010-04-01

    Patulin is a toxic chemical contaminant produced by several species of mold, especially within Aspergillus, Penicillium and Byssochlamys. It is the most common mycotoxin found in apples and apple-derived products such as juice, cider, compotes and other food intended for young children. Exposure to this mycotoxin is associated with immunological, neurological and gastrointestinal outcomes. Assessment of the health risks due to patulin consumption by humans has led many countries to regulate the quantity in food. A full understanding of the molecular genetics of patulin biosynthesis is incomplete, unlike other regulated mycotoxins (aflatoxins, trichothecenes and fumonisins), although the chemical structures of patulin precursors are now known. The biosynthetic pathway consists of approximately 10 steps, as suggested by biochemical studies. Recently, a cluster of 15 genes involved in patulin biosynthesis was reported, containing characterized enzymes, a regulation factor and transporter genes. This review includes information on the current understanding of the mechanisms of patulin toxinogenesis and summarizes its toxicological effects.

  3. Complete biosynthesis of opioids in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanie, Stephanie; Thodey, Kate; Trenchard, Isis J; Filsinger Interrante, Maria; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-09-04

    Opioids are the primary drugs used in Western medicine for pain management and palliative care. Farming of opium poppies remains the sole source of these essential medicines, despite diverse market demands and uncertainty in crop yields due to weather, climate change, and pests. We engineered yeast to produce the selected opioid compounds thebaine and hydrocodone starting from sugar. All work was conducted in a laboratory that is permitted and secured for work with controlled substances. We combined enzyme discovery, enzyme engineering, and pathway and strain optimization to realize full opiate biosynthesis in yeast. The resulting opioid biosynthesis strains required the expression of 21 (thebaine) and 23 (hydrocodone) enzyme activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. This is a proof of principle, and major hurdles remain before optimization and scale-up could be achieved. Open discussions of options for governing this technology are also needed in order to responsibly realize alternative supplies for these medically relevant compounds.

  4. Microbial Exopolysaccharides: Biosynthesis and Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Madhuri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria synthesize extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs with commercially significant physiological and therapeutic activities. Microbial polysaccharides have also been reported to have potential therapeutic applications. Recently, much attention has been devoted to the microbial exopolysaccharides (EPSs due to their numerous health benefits.EPSs from lactic acid bacteria are reported to possess antitumor effects, immunostimulatory activity, and the ability to lower blood cholesterol. EPSs also offer an alternative class of biothickeners that are widely used in the food and dairy industries and have been proven to provide strong emulsifying activity, which is important in many food formulations. It is also important to understand the mechanism of microbial biosynthesis of EPSs in order to enhance their production by genetic alterations. The potential applications and the mode of microbial biosynthesis of the EPSs have been presented in this article.

  5. Carotenoid Metabolism: Biosynthesis, Regulation,and Beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Lu; Li Li

    2008-01-01

    Carotenoids are Indispensable to plants and play a critical role in human nutrition and health. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of carotenoid metabolism in plants. The biosynthetic pathway has been extensively studied.Nearly all the genes encoding the biosynthetic enzymes have been isolated and characterized from various organisms. In recent years, there is an increasing body of work on the signaling pathways and plastid development, which might provide global control of carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation. Herein, we will highlight recent progress on the biosynthesis,regulation, and metabolic engineering of carotenoids in plants, as well as the future research towards elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and metabolic network that control carotenoid metabolism.

  6. Circular bacteriocins: biosynthesis and mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Christina; Brede, Dag A; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2014-11-01

    Circular bacteriocins are a group of N-to-C-terminally linked antimicrobial peptides, produced by Gram-positive bacteria of the phylum Firmicutes. Circular bacteriocins generally exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, including against common food-borne pathogens, such as Clostridium and Listeria spp. These peptides are further known for their high pH and thermal stability, as well as for resistance to many proteolytic enzymes, properties which make this group of bacteriocins highly promising for potential industrial applications and their biosynthesis of particular interest as a possible model system for the synthesis of highly stable bioactive peptides. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on this group of bacteriocins, with emphasis on the recent progress in understanding circular bacteriocin genetics, biosynthesis, and mode of action; in addition, we highlight the current challenges and future perspectives for the application of these peptides.

  7. Natural rubber biosynthesis in plants: rubber transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Katrina; Xie, Wenshuang

    2012-01-01

    Rubber biosynthesis in plants is a fascinating biochemical system, which evolved at the dawn of the dicotyledoneae and is present in at least four of the dictolydonous superorders. Rubber biosynthesis is catalyzed by a membrane complex in a monolayer membrane envelope, requires two distinct substrates and a divalent cation cofactor, and produces a high-molecular-weight isoprenoid polymer. A solid understanding of this system underpins valuable papers in the literature. However, the published literature is rife with unreliable reports in which the investigators have fallen into traps created by the current incomplete understanding of the biochemistry of rubber synthesis. In this chapter, we attempt to guide both new and more established researchers around these pitfalls.

  8. Plant Terpenoids: Biosynthesis and Ecological Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Xia Cheng; Yong-Gen Lou; Ying-Bo Mao; Shan Lu; Ling-Jian Wang; Xiao-Ya Chen

    2007-01-01

    Among plant secondary metabolites terpenoids are a structurally most diverse group; they function as phytoalexins in plant direct defense, or as signals in indirect defense responses which involves herbivores and their natural enemies. In recent years, more and more attention has been paid to the investigation of the ecological role of plant terpenoids. The biosynthesis pathways of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes include the synthesis of C5 precursor isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its allylic isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), the synthesis of the immediate diphosphate precursors, and the formation of the diverse terpenoids. Terpene synthases (TPSs) play a key role in volatile terpene synthesis. By expression of the TPS genes, significant achievements have been made on metabolic engineering to increase terpenoid production. This review mainly summarizes the recent research progress in elucidating the ecological role of terpenoids and characterization of the enzymes involved in the terpenoid biosynthesis. Spatial and temporal regulations of terpenoids metabolism are also discussed.

  9. In situ recovery of lycopene during biosynthesis with recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ko-Woon; Doo, Eun-Hee; Kim, Seon-Won; Park, Jin-Byung

    2008-06-30

    Lycopene is produced by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing genes to encode for the lycopene biosynthesis. However, the productivity of lycopene seemed to be limited by many factors including product toxicity. In the present study, we have investigated physiology of recombinant E. coli during biosynthesis and in situ recovery of lycopene based on an organic/aqueous two-phase system. Lycopene, the 40-carbon molecule product, was little extracted from recombinant E. coli cells to octane or decane phase. However, partial digestion of cell walls with lysozyme promoted extraction of lycopene into the organic phases. Engineering of an organic/aqueous two-phase system allowed recombinant E. coli cells to produce ca. 40% larger amount of lycopene compared to that in a conventional aqueous single-phase system. Optimization of the in situ product recovery process will lead to further increase of product concentration and productivity.

  10. Composition of Cassia fistula oil and its antifungal activity by disrupting ergosterol biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Md; Ahmad, Aijaz; Zafaryab, Md; Ahmad, Farah; Manzoor, Nikhat; Singh, Man; Rizvi, M Moshahid A

    2013-02-01

    Cassia fistula oil was investigated for antifungal activities against standard and clinical isolates of Candida species. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of C. fistula oil revealed the presence of antimicrobial compounds like beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, ergosterol, betulinic acid, lupeol, fucosterol, alpha-amyrin and friedelin. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the pulp and seed oils ranged between 250-300 and 350-500 microg/mL respectively. Both oils also inhibited by > or = 63.8% ergosterol bio-synthesis in Candida cell wall {fluconazole (standard) > or = 89.1%)}. The MICs were significantly correlated with the ergosterol content decrease in the cell wall (Student's t test p Cassia fistula oil that primarily target ergosterol biosynthesis in Candida cell wall.

  11. Enzymology of the carnitine biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijbis, Karin; Vaz, Frédéric M; Distel, Ben

    2010-05-01

    The water-soluble zwitterion carnitine is an essential metabolite in eukaryotes required for fatty acid oxidation as it functions as a carrier during transfer of activated acyl and acetyl groups across intracellular membranes. Most eukaryotes are able to synthesize carnitine endogenously, besides their capacity to take up carnitine from the diet or extracellular medium through plasma membrane transporters. This review discusses the current knowledge on carnitine homeostasis with special emphasis on the enzymology of the four steps of the carnitine biosynthesis pathway.

  12. Biosynthesis of the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer pheromone

    OpenAIRE

    Butcher, Rebecca A.; Ragains, Justin R.; Li, Weiqing; RUVKUN, GARY; Clardy, Jon; Mak, Ho Yi

    2009-01-01

    To sense its population density and to trigger entry into the stress-resistant dauer larval stage, Caenorhabditis elegans uses the dauer pheromone, which consists of ascaroside derivatives with short, fatty acid-like side chains. Although the dauer pheromone has been studied for 25 years, its biosynthesis is completely uncharacterized. The daf-22 mutant is the only known mutant defective in dauer pheromone production. Here, we show that daf-22 encodes a homolog of human sterol carrier protein...

  13. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium.

  14. A mitochondrial pathway for biosynthesis of lipid mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Poloyac, Samuel M.; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Jiang, Jianfei; Anthonymuthu, Tamil Selvan; Kapralova, Valentina I.; Vikulina, Anna S.; Jung, Mi-Yeon; Epperly, Michael W.; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Jackson, Travis C.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Pitt, Bruce R.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Vladimirov, Yury A.; Bayır, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2014-06-01

    The central role of mitochondria in metabolic pathways and in cell-death mechanisms requires sophisticated signalling systems. Essential in this signalling process is an array of lipid mediators derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids. However, the molecular machinery for the production of oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids is localized in the cytosol and their biosynthesis has not been identified in mitochondria. Here we report that a range of diversified polyunsaturated molecular species derived from a mitochondria-specific phospholipid, cardiolipin (CL), is oxidized by the intermembrane-space haemoprotein, cytochrome c. We show that a number of oxygenated CL species undergo phospholipase A2-catalysed hydrolysis and thus generate multiple oxygenated fatty acids, including well-known lipid mediators. This represents a new biosynthetic pathway for lipid mediators. We demonstrate that this pathway, which includes the oxidation of polyunsaturated CLs and accumulation of their hydrolysis products (oxygenated linoleic, arachidonic acids and monolysocardiolipins), is activated in vivo after acute tissue injury.

  15. Egghead and brainiac are essential for glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Pizette, Sandrine; Pedersen, Johannes W

    2004-01-01

    glycosphingolipids and exhibit accumulation of the truncated precursor glycosphingolipids. Furthermore, we demonstrate that despite fundamental differences in the core structure of mammalian and Drosophila glycosphingolipids, the Drosophila egghead mutant can be rescued by introduction of the mammalian...... lactosylceramide glycosphingolipid biosynthetic pathway (Galbeta1-4Glcbeta1-Cer) using a human beta4-galactosyltransferase (beta4Gal-T6) transgene. Conversely, introduction of egghead in vertebrate cells (Chinese hamster ovary) resulted in near complete blockage of biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids...... and accumulation of Manbeta1-4Glcbeta1-Cer. The study demonstrates that glycosphingolipids are essential for development of complex organisms and suggests that the function of the Drosophila glycosphingolipids in development does not depend on the core structure....

  16. Building lipid barriers: biosynthesis of cutin and suberin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Mike; Beisson, Fred; Li, Yonghua; Ohlrogge, John B

    2008-05-01

    Cutin and suberin are the polymer matrices for lipophilic cell wall barriers. These barriers control the fluxes of gases, water and solutes, and also play roles in protecting plants from biotic and abiotic stresses and in controlling plant morphology. Although they are ubiquitous, cutin and suberin are the least understood of the major plant extracellular polymers. The use of forward and reverse genetic approaches in Arabidopsis has led to the identification of oxidoreductase and acyltransferase genes involved in the biosynthesis of these polymers. However, major questions about the underlying polymer structure, biochemistry, and intracellular versus extracellular assembly remain to be resolved. The analysis of plant lines with modified cutins and suberins has begun to reveal the inter-relationships between the composition and function of these polymers.

  17. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Required for Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Rong

    Full Text Available Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI is synthesized and transferred to proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. GPI-anchored proteins are then transported from the ER to the plasma membrane through the Golgi apparatus. To date, at least 17 steps have been identified to be required for the GPI biosynthetic pathway. Here, we aimed to establish a comprehensive screening method to identify genes involved in GPI biosynthesis using mammalian haploid screens. Human haploid cells were mutagenized by the integration of gene trap vectors into the genome. Mutagenized cells were then treated with a bacterial pore-forming toxin, aerolysin, which binds to GPI-anchored proteins for targeting to the cell membrane. Cells that showed low surface expression of CD59, a GPI-anchored protein, were further enriched for. Gene trap insertion sites in the non-selected population and in the enriched population were determined by deep sequencing. This screening enriched 23 gene regions among the 26 known GPI biosynthetic genes, which when mutated are expected to decrease the surface expression of GPI-anchored proteins. Our results indicate that the forward genetic approach using haploid cells is a useful and powerful technique to identify factors involved in phenotypes of interest.

  18. Characterization of an activation-tagged mutant uncovers a role of GLABRA2 in anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xianling; Hu, Qingnan; Dai, Xuemei; Tian, Hainan; Zheng, Kaijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Mao, Tonglin; Chen, Jin-Gui; Wang, Shucai

    2015-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, anthocyanin biosynthesis is controlled by a MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) transcriptional activator complex. The MBW complex activates the transcription of late biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway, leading to the production of anthocyanins. A similar MBW complex regulates epidermal cell fate by activating the transcription of GLABRA2 (GL2), a homeodomain transcription factor required for trichome formation in shoots and non-hair cell formation in roots. Here we provide experimental evidence to show that GL2 also plays a role in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. From an activation-tagged mutagenized population of Arabidopsis plants, we isolated a dominant, gain-of-function mutant with reduced anthocyanins. Molecular cloning revealed that this phenotype is caused by an elevated expression of GL2, thus the mutant was named gl2-1D. Consistent with the view that GL2 acts as a negative regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis, gl2-1D seedlings accumulated less whereas gl2-3 seedlings accumulated more anthocyanins in response to sucrose. Gene expression analysis indicated that expression of late, but not early, biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway was dramatically reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants. Further analysis showed that expression of some MBW component genes involved in the regulation of late biosynthesis genes was reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants, and chromatin immunoprecipitation results indicated that some MBW component genes are targets of GL2. We also showed that GL2 functions as a transcriptional repressor. Taken together, these results indicate that GL2 negatively regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by directly repressing the expression of some MBW component genes.

  19. Oxidative stress induces the biosynthesis of citrinin by Penicillium verrucosum at the expense of ochratoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Heydt, Markus; Stoll, Dominic; Schütz, Peter; Geisen, Rolf

    2015-01-02

    Penicillium verrucosum is a fungus that can produce ochratoxin A and citrinin, two structurally related nephrotoxic mycotoxins. P. verrucosum usually occurs on wheat but can occasionally also be found in NaCl rich habitats such as salted cheeses or olives, indicating that this fungus can adapt to different environments. The ratio of ochratoxin A to citrinin produced by P. verrucosum is shifted to one of either mycotoxin at the expense of the other dependent on the environmental conditions. High NaCl concentrations shift secondary metabolite biosynthesis towards ochratoxin A production. P. verrucosum copes with NaCl stress by increased ochratoxin A biosynthesis, ensuring chloride homeostasis. Ochratoxin A carries chlorine in its molecule and can excrete chlorine from the cell. It was further shown that the regulation of ochratoxin A by high NaCl conditions is mediated by the HOG MAP kinase signal transduction pathway. Here it is shown that high oxidative stress conditions, evoked for example by increasing concentrations of Cu(2+) cations in the growth medium, shift secondary metabolite biosynthesis of P. verrucosum from ochratoxin A to citrinin. The production of citrinin normalizes the oxidative status of the fungal cell under oxidative stress conditions leading to an adaptation to these environmental conditions and protects against increased oxidative stress caused by increased Cu(2+) concentrations. Moreover citrinin also protects against light of short wavelength, which may also increase the oxidative status of the environment. The biosynthesis of citrinin is apparently regulated by a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway, because increasing amounts of external cAMP reduce citrinin biosynthesis in a concentration dependent manner. These conditions lead to the cross-regulation of the ochratoxin A/citrinin secondary metabolite pair and support the adaptation of P. verrucosum to different environments.

  20. Peroxisomal polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis is a promising strategy for bioplastic production in high biomass crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilbrook, Kimberley; Gebbie, Leigh; Schenk, Peer M; Poirier, Yves; Brumbley, Stevens M

    2011-12-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are bacterial carbon storage polymers with diverse plastic-like properties. PHA biosynthesis in transgenic plants is being developed as a way to reduce the cost and increase the sustainability of industrial PHA production. The homopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is the simplest form of these biodegradable polyesters. Plant peroxisomes contain the substrate molecules and necessary reducing power for PHB biosynthesis, but peroxisomal PHB production has not been explored in whole soil-grown transgenic plants to date. We generated transgenic sugarcane (Saccharum sp.) with the three-enzyme Ralstonia eutropha PHA biosynthetic pathway targeted to peroxisomes. We also introduced the pathway into Arabidopsis thaliana, as a model system for studying and manipulating peroxisomal PHB production. PHB, at levels up to 1.6%-1.8% dry weight, accumulated in sugarcane leaves and A. thaliana seedlings, respectively. In sugarcane, PHB accumulated throughout most leaf cell types in both peroxisomes and vacuoles. A small percentage of total polymer was also identified as the copolymer poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) in both plant species. No obvious deleterious effect was observed on plant growth because of peroxisomal PHA biosynthesis at these levels. This study highlights how using peroxisomal metabolism for PHA biosynthesis could significantly contribute to reaching commercial production levels of PHAs in crop plants.

  1. A secreted Ustilago maydis effector promotes virulence by targeting anthocyanin biosynthesis in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shigeyuki; Brefort, Thomas; Neidig, Nina; Djamei, Armin; Kahnt, Jörg; Vermerris, Wilfred; Koenig, Stefanie; Feussner, Kirstin; Feussner, Ivo; Kahmann, Regine

    2014-01-01

    The biotrophic fungus Ustilago maydis causes smut disease in maize with characteristic tumor formation and anthocyanin induction. Here, we show that anthocyanin biosynthesis is induced by the virulence promoting secreted effector protein Tin2. Tin2 protein functions inside plant cells where it interacts with maize protein kinase ZmTTK1. Tin2 masks a ubiquitin-proteasome degradation motif in ZmTTK1, thus stabilizing the active kinase. Active ZmTTK1 controls activation of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. Without Tin2, enhanced lignin biosynthesis is observed in infected tissue and vascular bundles show strong lignification. This is presumably limiting access of fungal hyphae to nutrients needed for massive proliferation. Consistent with this assertion, we observe that maize brown midrib mutants affected in lignin biosynthesis are hypersensitive to U. maydis infection. We speculate that Tin2 rewires metabolites into the anthocyanin pathway to lower their availability for other defense responses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01355.001.

  2. Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway as Target for Anti-trypanosomatid Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderley de Souza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sterols are constituents of the cellular membranes that are essential for their normal structure and function. In mammalian cells, cholesterol is the main sterol found in the various membranes. However, other sterols predominate in eukaryotic microorganisms such as fungi and protozoa. It is now well established that an important metabolic pathway in fungi and in members of the Trypanosomatidae family is one that produces a special class of sterols, including ergosterol, and other 24-methyl sterols, which are required for parasitic growth and viability, but are absent from mammalian host cells. Currently, there are several drugs that interfere with sterol biosynthesis (SB that are in use to treat diseases such as high cholesterol in humans and fungal infections. In this review, we analyze the effects of drugs such as (a statins, which act on the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, (b bisphosphonates, which interfere with the isoprenoid pathway in the step catalyzed by farnesyl diphosphate synthase, (c zaragozic acids and quinuclidines, inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS, which catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, (d allylamines, inhibitors of squalene epoxidase, (e azoles, which inhibit C14α-demethylase, and (f azasterols, which inhibit Δ24(25-sterol methyltransferase (SMT. Inhibition of this last step appears to have high selectivity for fungi and trypanosomatids, since this enzyme is not found in mammalian cells. We review here the IC50 values of these various inhibitors, their effects on the growth of trypanosomatids (both in axenic cultures and in cell cultures, and their effects on protozoan structural organization (as evaluted by light and electron microscopy and lipid composition. The results show that the mitochondrial membrane as well as the membrane lining the protozoan cell body and flagellum are the main targets. Probably as a consequence of these primary effects, other important changes take

  3. Production of α-galactosylceramide by a prominent member of the human gut microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Wieland Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available While the human gut microbiota are suspected to produce diffusible small molecules that modulate host signaling pathways, few of these molecules have been identified. Species of Bacteroides and their relatives, which often comprise >50% of the gut community, are unusual among bacteria in that their membrane is rich in sphingolipids, a class of signaling molecules that play a key role in inducing apoptosis and modulating the host immune response. Although known for more than three decades, the full repertoire of Bacteroides sphingolipids has not been defined. Here, we use a combination of genetics and chemistry to identify the sphingolipids produced by Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 9343. We constructed a deletion mutant of BF2461, a putative serine palmitoyltransferase whose yeast homolog catalyzes the committed step in sphingolipid biosynthesis. We show that the Δ2461 mutant is sphingolipid deficient, enabling us to purify and solve the structures of three alkaline-stable lipids present in the wild-type strain but absent from the mutant. The first compound was the known sphingolipid ceramide phosphorylethanolamine, and the second was its corresponding dihydroceramide base. Unexpectedly, the third compound was the glycosphingolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer(Bf, which is structurally related to a sponge-derived sphingolipid (α-GalCer, KRN7000 that is the prototypical agonist of CD1d-restricted natural killer T (iNKT cells. We demonstrate that α-GalCer(Bf has similar immunological properties to KRN7000: it binds to CD1d and activates both mouse and human iNKT cells both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, our study reveals BF2461 as the first known member of the Bacteroides sphingolipid pathway, and it indicates that the committed steps of the Bacteroides and eukaryotic sphingolipid pathways are identical. Moreover, our data suggest that some Bacteroides sphingolipids might influence host immune homeostasis.

  4. Production of α-Galactosylceramide by a Prominent Member of the Human Gut Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Purna C.; Williams, Brianna B.; Clardy, Jon; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Sonnenburg, Justin L.; Comstock, Laurie E.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    While the human gut microbiota are suspected to produce diffusible small molecules that modulate host signaling pathways, few of these molecules have been identified. Species of Bacteroides and their relatives, which often comprise >50% of the gut community, are unusual among bacteria in that their membrane is rich in sphingolipids, a class of signaling molecules that play a key role in inducing apoptosis and modulating the host immune response. Although known for more than three decades, the full repertoire of Bacteroides sphingolipids has not been defined. Here, we use a combination of genetics and chemistry to identify the sphingolipids produced by Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 9343. We constructed a deletion mutant of BF2461, a putative serine palmitoyltransferase whose yeast homolog catalyzes the committed step in sphingolipid biosynthesis. We show that the Δ2461 mutant is sphingolipid deficient, enabling us to purify and solve the structures of three alkaline-stable lipids present in the wild-type strain but absent from the mutant. The first compound was the known sphingolipid ceramide phosphorylethanolamine, and the second was its corresponding dihydroceramide base. Unexpectedly, the third compound was the glycosphingolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCerBf), which is structurally related to a sponge-derived sphingolipid (α-GalCer, KRN7000) that is the prototypical agonist of CD1d-restricted natural killer T (iNKT) cells. We demonstrate that α-GalCerBf has similar immunological properties to KRN7000: it binds to CD1d and activates both mouse and human iNKT cells both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, our study reveals BF2461 as the first known member of the Bacteroides sphingolipid pathway, and it indicates that the committed steps of the Bacteroides and eukaryotic sphingolipid pathways are identical. Moreover, our data suggest that some Bacteroides sphingolipids might influence host immune homeostasis. PMID:23874157

  5. Effects of brassinazole, an inhibitor of brassinosteroid biosynthesis, on light- and dark-grown Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajguz, Andrzej; Asami, Tadao

    2004-03-01

    Treatment of cultured Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck cells with 0.1-10 microM brassinazole (Brz2001), an inhibitor of brassinosteroid (BR) biosynthesis, inhibits their growth during the first 48 h of cultivation in the light. This inhibition is prevented by the co-application of BR. This result suggests that the presence of endogenous BRs during the initial steps of the C. vulgaris cell cycle is indispensable for their normal growth in the light. In darkness, a treatment with 10 nM brassinolide (BL) promotes growth through the first 24 h of culture, but during the following 24 h the cells undergo complete stagnation. Treatment of dark-grown cells with either Brz2001 alone, or a mixture of 10 nM BL and 0.1/10 microM Brz2001, also stimulates their growth. The effects of treatment with 10 nM BL mixed with 0.1-10 microM of a mevalonate-pathway inhibitor (mevinolin), or a non-mevalonate-pathway inhibitor (clomazone), were also investigated. Mevinolin at these concentrations did not inhibit growth of C. vulgaris; however, clomazone did. Addition of BL overcame the inhibition. These results suggest that the mevalonate pathway does not function in C. vulgaris, and that the non-mevalonate pathway for isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthesis is responsible for the synthesis of one of the primary precursors in BR biosynthesis.

  6. Separation of impurities in diazinon preparations and their effect on porphyrin biosynthesis in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, A W; Elsbury, S; Elder, G H; Jackson, A H; Rao, K R

    1982-03-15

    The impurities present in commercial diazinon preparations have been examined by high performance liquid chromatography with particular reference to the ability of these compounds to cause porphyrin accumulation in cultures of chicken embryo liver cells. Diazinon and its impurities are readily separated on 10 micron Partisil using cyclohexane-dioxan mixtures. The main impurities are tetraethylpyrophosphate, sulphotetraethylpyrophosphate, 2-isopropyl-6-methylpyrimid-4-one, 2-isopropyl-6-methylpyrimidin-4-thione, and 2-isopropyl-4-ethylthio-6-methylpyrimidine. A previously unreported impurity, 2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-S-pyrimidinyl diethylthiophosphate (isodiazinon), was also detected. Both diazinon and isodiazinon cause accumulation of coproporphyrin in cultures of chicken embryo liver cells. Isodiazinon has a greater effect on porphyrin biosynthesis in the cultures than has diazinon. It is suggested that the point of interference with porphyrin biosynthesis is towards the end of the pathway.

  7. Acetamido sugar biosynthesis in the Euryarchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namboori, Seema C; Graham, David E

    2008-04-01

    Archaea and eukaryotes share a dolichol phosphate-dependent system for protein N-glycosylation. In both domains, the acetamido sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) forms part of the core oligosaccharide. However, the archaeal Methanococcales produce GlcNAc using the bacterial biosynthetic pathway. Key enzymes in this pathway belong to large families of proteins with diverse functions; therefore, the archaeal enzymes could not be identified solely using comparative sequence analysis. Genes encoding acetamido sugar-biosynthetic proteins were identified in Methanococcus maripaludis using phylogenetic and gene cluster analyses. Proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were purified and assayed for the predicted activities. The MMP1680 protein encodes a universally conserved glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase. The MMP1077 phosphomutase converted alpha-D-glucosamine-6-phosphate to alpha-D-glucosamine-1-phosphate, although this protein is more closely related to archaeal pentose and glucose phosphomutases than to bacterial glucosamine phosphomutases. The thermostable MJ1101 protein catalyzed both the acetylation of glucosamine-1-phosphate and the uridylyltransferase reaction with UTP to produce UDP-GlcNAc. The MMP0705 protein catalyzed the C-2 epimerization of UDP-GlcNAc, and the MMP0706 protein used NAD(+) to oxidize UDP-N-acetylmannosamine, forming UDP-N-acetylmannosaminuronate (ManNAcA). These two proteins are similar to enzymes used for proteobacterial lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and gram-positive bacterial capsule production, suggesting a common evolutionary origin and a widespread distribution of ManNAcA. UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAcA biosynthesis evolved early in the euryarchaeal lineage, because most of their genomes contain orthologs of the five genes characterized here. These UDP-acetamido sugars are predicted to be precursors for flagellin and S-layer protein modifications and for the biosynthesis of methanogenic coenzyme B.

  8. Effects of orally administered fumonisin B₁ (FB₁), partially hydrolysed FB₁, hydrolysed FB₁ and N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl) FB₁ on the sphingolipid metabolism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Irene; Nagl, Veronika; Schwartz-Zimmermann, Heidi Elisabeth; Varga, Elisabeth; Schwarz, Christiane; Slavik, Veronika; Reisinger, Nicole; Malachová, Alexandra; Cirlini, Martina; Generotti, Silvia; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Krska, Rudolf; Moll, Wulf-Dieter; Berthiller, Franz

    2015-02-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a Fusarium mycotoxin frequently occurring in maize-based food and feed. Alkaline processing like nixtamalisation of maize generates partially and fully hydrolysed FB1 (pHFB1 and HFB1) and thermal treatment in the presence of reducing sugars leads to formation of N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl) fumonisin B1 (NDF). The toxicity of these metabolites, in particular their effect on the sphingolipid metabolism, is either unknown or discussed controversially. We produced high purity FB1, pHFB1a+b, HFB1 and NDF and fed them to male Sprague Dawley rats for three weeks. Once a week, urine and faeces samples were collected over 24 h and analysed for fumonisin metabolites as well as for the sphinganine (Sa) to sphingosine (So) ratio by validated LC-MS/MS based methods. While the latter was significantly increased in the FB1 positive control group, the Sa/So ratios of the partially and fully hydrolysed fumonisins were indifferent from the negative control group. Although NDF was partly cleaved during digestion, the liberated amounts of FB1 did not raise the Sa/So ratio. These results show that the investigated alkaline and thermal processing products of FB1 were, at the tested concentrations, non-toxic for rats, and suggest that according food processing can reduce fumonisin toxicity for humans.

  9. Biosynthesis of Nitrogenase FeMoco

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W.

    2011-01-01

    Biosynthesis of nitrogenase FeMoco is a highly complex process that requires, minimally, the participation of nifS, nifU, nifB, nifE, nifN, nifV, nifH, nifD and nifK gene products. Previous genetic analyses have identified the essential factors for the assembly of FeMoco; however, the exact functions of these factors and the precise sequence of events during the assembly process had remained unclear until recently, when a number of the biosynthetic intermediates of FeMoco were identified and ...

  10. Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Biological Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Pyridoacridines are a class of strictly marine-derived alkaloids that constitute one of the largest chemical families of marine alkaloids. During the last few years, both natural pyridoacridines and their analogues have constituted excellent targets for synthetic works. They have been the subject of intense study due to their significant biological activities; cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, insecticidal, anti-HIV, and anti-parasitic activities. In the present review, 95 pyridoacridine alkaloids isolated from marine organisms are discussed in term of their occurrence, biosynthesis, biological activities, and structural assignment.

  11. Genes and enzymes of ectoine biosynthesis in halotolerant methanotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2011-01-01

    Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidine carboxylic acid) is a widely distributed compatible solute accumulated by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms to prevent osmotic stress in highly saline environments. Ectoine as a highly water keeping compound stabilizing biomolecules and whole cells can be used in scientific work, cosmetics, and medicine. Detailed understanding of the organization/regulation of the ectoine biosynthetic pathway in various producers is an active area of research. Here we review current knowledge on some genetic and enzymatic aspects of ectoine biosynthesis in halophilic and halotolerant methanotrophs. By using PCR methodology, the genes coding for the specific enzymes of ectoine biosynthesis, diaminobutyric acid (DABA) aminotransferase (EctB), DABA acetyltransferase (EctA), and ectoine synthase (EctC), were identified in several methanotrophic species. Organization of these genes in either ectABC or ectABC-ask operons, the latter additionally encoding aspartate kinase isozyme (Ask), correlated well with methanotroph halotolerance and intracellular ectoine level. A new gene, ectR1 encoding the MarR-like transcriptional regulatory protein EctR1, negatively controlling transcription of ectoine biosynthetic genes was found upstream of ectABC-ask operon in Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z. The ectR-like genes were also found in halotolerant methanol utilizers Methylophaga alcalica and Methylophaga thalassica as well as in several genomes of nonmethylotrophic species. The His(6)-tagged DABA acetyltransferases from Mm. alcaliphilum, M. alcalica, and M. thalassica were purified and the enzyme properties were found to correlate with the ecophysiologies of these bacteria. All these discoveries should be very helpful for better understanding the biosynthetic mechanism of this important natural compound, and for the targeted metabolic engineering of its producers.

  12. Integrin-like Protein Is Involved in the Osmotic Stress-induced Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Lü; Feng Chen; Zhong-Hua Gong; Hong Xie; Jian-Sheng Liang

    2007-01-01

    We studied the perception of plant cells to osmotic stress that leads to the accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA) in stressed Arabidopsis thaliana L. cells. A significant difference was found between protoplasts and cells in terms of their responses to osmotic stress and ABA biosynthesis, implying that cell wall and/or cell wall-plasma membrane interaction are essential in identifying osmotic stress. Western blotting and immunofluorescence localization experiments, using polyclonal antibody against human integrin β1, revealed the existence of a protein similar to the integrin protein of animals in the suspension-cultured cells located in the plasma membrane fraction.Treatment with a synthetic pentapeptide, Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS), which contains an RGD domain and interacts specifically with integrin protein and thus blocks the cell wall-plasma membrane interaction, significantly inhibited osmotic stress-induced ABA biosynthesis in cells, but not in protoplasts. These results demonstrate that cell wall and/or cell wall-plasma membrane interaction mediated by integrin-like proteins played important roles in osmotic stress-induced ABA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  13. Stimulant effect of nitric oxide generator and roxatidine on mucin biosynthesis of rat gastric oxyntic mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, T; Ishihara, K; Kusakabe, T; Kawakami, T; Hotta, K

    1999-01-01

    Although the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in an increasing gastric mucus metabolism has been reported, information on whether or not its activation is limited to the specific mucus-producing cells is lacking. In this paper, we report the effect of the exogenous NO-donor, isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN), and second-generation histamine H2 receptor antagonist roxatidine (2-acetoxy-N-(3-[m-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenoxy]propyl)acetamide hydrochloride) which is demonstrated to accelerate the mucin metabolism mediated by endogenous NO, on the mucin biosynthesis in distinct sites and layers of the rat gastric mucosa using an organ culture technique. Radiolabeled mucin was obtained from the tissue of full-thickness and the deep corpus layer, and the antrum of the rat stomach incubated for 5 hr with [3H]glucosamine(GlcN) in vitro. With the addition of ISDN to the culture medium, 3H-labeled mucin in the full-thickness corpus mucosa increased to 124-145% of the control (proxatidine stimulated the mucin biosynthesis in the full-thickness corpus mucosa, but not in the gland mucous cell layer. These results suggest that the stimulation of the mucin biosynthesis mediated by NO is restricted to the surface mucous cells of the rat gastric oxyntic mucosa.

  14. Regulation of squalene synthase, a key enzyme of sterol biosynthesis, in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarenne, Timothy P; Ghosh, Anirban; Chappell, Joe

    2002-07-01

    Squalene synthase (SS) represents a putative branch point in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway capable of diverting carbon flow specifically to the biosynthesis of sterols and, hence, is considered a potential regulatory point for sterol metabolism. For example, when plant cells grown in suspension culture are challenged with fungal elicitors, suppression of sterol biosynthesis has been correlated with a reduction in SS enzyme activity. The current study sought to correlate changes in SS enzyme activity with changes in the level of the corresponding protein and mRNA. Using an SS-specific antibody, the initial suppression of SS enzyme activity in elicitor-challenged cells was not reflected by changes in the absolute level of the corresponding polypeptide, implicating a post-translational control mechanism for this enzyme activity. In comparison, the absolute level of the SS mRNA did decrease approximately 5-fold in the elicitor-treated cells, which is suggestive of decreased transcription of the SS gene. Study of SS in intact plants was also initiated by measuring the level of SS enzyme activity, the level of the corresponding protein, and the expression of SS gene promoter-reporter gene constructs in transgenic plants. SS enzyme activity, polypeptide level, and gene expression were all localized predominately to the shoot apical meristem, with much lower levels observed in leaves and roots. These later results suggest that sterol biosynthesis is localized to the apical meristems and that apical meristems may be a source of sterols for other plant tissues.

  15. G