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Sample records for cell specific variable

  1. Technical specifications of variable speed motors for negative pressure control in hot cell area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Duk; Bang, H. S.; Cho, W. K

    2002-01-01

    Hot cells are the facilities for handling the high radioactive materials and various R and D activities are performed using hot cells. Therefore the control of air flow in hot cell area is very important technology and it is started with the variable speed motor(VSM) controlling the air handling system in that area. This report describes various technical aspects of VS motors and will be useful for understanding the practical technologies of VS motors and also for optimization of the negative pressure controls in hot cell area.

  2. Eternity Variables to Simulate Specifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, WH; Boiten, EA; Moller, B

    2002-01-01

    Simulation of specifications is introduced as a unification and generalization of refinement mappings, history variables, forward simulations, prophecy variables, and backward simulations. Eternity variables are introduced as a more powerful alternative for prophecy variables and backward

  3. Eternity Variables to Prove Simulation of Specifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Wim H.

    2005-01-01

    Simulations of specifications are introduced as a unification and generalization of refinement mappings, history variables, forward simulations, prophecy variables, and backward simulations. A specification implements another specification if and only if there is a simulation from the first one to

  4. Immortalisation with hTERT Impacts on Sulphated Glycosaminoglycan Secretion and Immunophenotype in a Variable and Cell Specific Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina P Dale

    differentiation potential, was affected in a variable manner. As such, these cells are not a direct substitute for primary cells in cartilage regeneration research.

  5. Variable Extent of Lineage-Specificity and Developmental Stage-Specificity of Cohesin and CCCTC-Binding Factor Binding Within the Immunoglobulin and T Cell Receptor Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Loguercio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF is largely responsible for the 3D architecture of the genome, in concert with the action of cohesin, through the creation of long-range chromatin loops. Cohesin is hypothesized to be the main driver of these long-range chromatin interactions by the process of loop extrusion. Here, we performed ChIP-seq for CTCF and cohesin in two stages each of T and B cell differentiation and examined the binding pattern in all six antigen receptor (AgR loci in these lymphocyte progenitors and in mature T and B cells, ES cells, and fibroblasts. The four large AgR loci have many bound CTCF sites, most of which are only occupied in lymphocytes, while only the CTCF sites at the end of each locus near the enhancers or J genes tend to be bound in non-lymphoid cells also. However, despite the generalized lymphocyte restriction of CTCF binding in AgR loci, the Igκ locus is the only locus that also shows significant lineage-specificity (T vs. B cells and developmental stage-specificity (pre-B vs. pro-B in CTCF binding. We show that cohesin binding shows greater lineage- and stage-specificity than CTCF at most AgR loci, providing more specificity to the loops. We also show that the culture of pro-B cells in IL7, a common practice to expand the number of cells before ChIP-seq, results in a CTCF-binding pattern resembling pre-B cells, as well as other epigenetic and transcriptional characteristics of pre-B cells. Analysis of the orientation of the CTCF sites show that all sites within the large V portions of the Igh and TCRβ loci have the same orientation. This suggests either a lack of requirement for convergent CTCF sites creating loops, or indicates an absence of any loops between CTCF sites within the V region portion of those loci but only loops to the convergent sites at the D-J-enhancer end of each locus. The V region portions of the Igκ and TCRα/δ loci, by contrast, have CTCF sites in both orientations, providing many options for

  6. Dysfunctional BLK in common variable immunodeficiency perturbs B-cell proliferation and ability to elicit antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell help

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compeer, E.B.; Janssen, Willemijn; van Royen-Kerkhof, A; van Gijn, Marielle; van Montfrans, JM; Boes, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most prevalent primary antibody deficiency, and characterized by defective generation of high-affinity antibodies. Patients have therefore increased risk to recurrent infections of the respiratory and intestinal tract. Development of high-affinity

  7. CCL22-specific T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinenaite, Evelina; Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating macrophages produce the chemokine CCL22, which attracts regulatory T cells (Tregs) into the tumor microenvironment, decreasing anticancer immunity. Here, we investigated the possibility of targeting CCL22-expressing cells by activating specific T cells. We...... analyzed the CCL22 protein signal sequence, identifying a human leukocyte antigen A2- (HLA-A2-) restricted peptide epitope, which we then used to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) to expand populations of CCL22-specific T cells in vitro. T cells recognizing an epitope derived from...... the signal-peptide of CCL22 will recognize CCL22-expressing cells even though CCL22 is secreted out of the cell. CCL22-specific T cells recognized and killed CCL22-expressing cancer cells. Furthermore, CCL22-specific T cells lysed acute monocytic leukemia cells in a CCL22 expression-dependent manner. Using...

  8. A module of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptional network containing primitive and differentiation markers is related to specific cardiovascular health variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leni Moldovan

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, including rare circulating stem and progenitor cells (CSPCs, have important yet poorly understood roles in the maintenance and repair of blood vessels and perfused organs. Our hypothesis was that the identities and functions of CSPCs in cardiovascular health could be ascertained by analyzing the patterns of their co-expressed markers in unselected PBMC samples. Because gene microarrays had failed to detect many stem cell-associated genes, we performed quantitative real-time PCR to measure the expression of 45 primitive and tissue differentiation markers in PBMCs from healthy and hypertensive human subjects. We compared these expression levels to the subjects' demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, including vascular stiffness. The tested marker genes were expressed in all of samples and organized in hierarchical transcriptional network modules, constructed by a bottom-up approach. An index of gene expression in one of these modules (metagene, defined as the average standardized relative copy numbers of 15 pluripotency and cardiovascular differentiation markers, was negatively correlated (all p<0.03 with age (R2 = -0.23, vascular stiffness (R2 = -0.24, and central aortic pressure (R2 = -0.19 and positively correlated with body mass index (R2 = 0.72, in women. The co-expression of three neovascular markers was validated at the single-cell level using mRNA in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. The overall gene expression in this cardiovascular module was reduced by 72±22% in the patients compared with controls. However, the compactness of both modules was increased in the patients' samples, which was reflected in reduced dispersion of their nodes' degrees of connectivity, suggesting a more primitive character of the patients' CSPCs. In conclusion, our results show that the relationship between CSPCs and vascular function is encoded in modules of the PBMCs transcriptional

  9. Daily affect variability and context-specific alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Cynthia D; Arpin, Sarah; McCabe, Cameron T

    2015-11-01

    Research explored the effects of variability in negative and positive affect on alcohol consumption, specifying daily fluctuation in affect as a critical form of emotion dysregulation. Using daily process methodology allows for a more objective calculation of affect variability relative to traditional self-reports. The present study models within-person negative and positive affect variabilities as predictors of context-specific consumption (i.e. solitary vs. social drinking), controlling for mean levels of affect. A community sample of moderate-to-heavy drinkers (n = 47; 49% women) from a US metropolitan area reported on affect and alcohol consumption thrice daily for 30 days via a handheld electronic interviewer. Within-person affect variability was calculated using daily standard deviations in positive and negative affect. Within person, greater negative and positive variabilities are related to greater daily solitary and social consumption. Across study days, mean levels of negative and positive affect variabilities related to greater social consumption between persons; yet, aggregated negative affect variability was related to less solitary consumption. Results affirm affect variability as a unique predictor of alcohol consumption, independent of mean affect levels. Yet, it is important to differentiate social context of consumption, as well as type of affect variability, particularly at the between-person level. These distinctions help clarify inconsistencies in the self-medication literature regarding associations between average levels of affect and consumption. Importantly, consistent within-person relationships for both variabilities support arguments that both negative and positive affect variabilities are detrimental and reflect an inability to regulate emotional experience. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  10. PD-L1-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Borch, Troels Holz; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    -specific T cells that recognize both PD-L1-expressing immune cells and malignant cells. Thus, PD-L1-specific T cells have the ability to modulate adaptive immune reactions by reacting to regulatory cells. Thus, utilization of PD-L1-derived T cell epitopes may represent an attractive vaccination strategy...... for targeting the tumor microenvironment and for boosting the clinical effects of additional anticancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes present information about PD-L1 as a T cell antigen, depicts the initial findings about the function of PD-L1-specific T cells in the adjustment of immune responses...

  11. Country-Specific Effects of Climate Variability on Human Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Clark; Wise, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Involuntary human migration is among the social outcomes of greatest concern in the current era of global climate change. Responding to this concern, a growing number of studies have investigated the consequences of short to medium-term climate variability for human migration using demographic and econometric approaches. These studies have provided important insights, but at the same time have been significantly limited by lack of expertise in the use of climate data, access to cross-national data on migration, and attention to model specification. To address these limitations, we link data on internal and international migration over a 6-year period from 9,812 origin households in Kenya, Uganda, Nigeria, Burkina Faso and Senegal to high-resolution gridded climate data from both station and satellite sources. Analyses of these data using several plausible specifications reveal that climate variability has country-specific effects on migration: Migration tends to increase with temperature anomalies in Uganda, tends to decrease with temperature anomalies in Kenya and Burkina Faso, and shows no consistent relationship with temperature in Nigeria and Senegal. Consistent with previous studies, precipitation shows weak and inconsistent relationships with migration across countries. These results challenge generalizing narratives that foresee a consistent migratory response to climate change across the globe. PMID:27092012

  12. Country-Specific Effects of Climate Variability on Human Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Clark; Wise, Erika

    2016-04-01

    Involuntary human migration is among the social outcomes of greatest concern in the current era of global climate change. Responding to this concern, a growing number of studies have investigated the consequences of short to medium-term climate variability for human migration using demographic and econometric approaches. These studies have provided important insights, but at the same time have been significantly limited by lack of expertise in the use of climate data, access to cross-national data on migration, and attention to model specification. To address these limitations, we link data on internal and international migration over a 6-year period from 9,812 origin households in Kenya, Uganda, Nigeria, Burkina Faso and Senegal to high-resolution gridded climate data from both station and satellite sources. Analyses of these data using several plausible specifications reveal that climate variability has country-specific effects on migration: Migration tends to increase with temperature anomalies in Uganda, tends to decrease with temperature anomalies in Kenya and Burkina Faso, and shows no consistent relationship with temperature in Nigeria and Senegal. Consistent with previous studies, precipitation shows weak and inconsistent relationships with migration across countries. These results challenge generalizing narratives that foresee a consistent migratory response to climate change across the globe.

  13. Cell-cycle phase specificity of chloroethylnitrosoureas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linfoot, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Although the cancer chemotherapeutic agent 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) is considered a non-cell cycle phase specific drug, it has been shown to produce differential cell killing in G 1 , S, and G 2 /M phase cells, with S phase cells appearing relatively resistant. Studies of cell cycle phase specific cell killing produced by nitrosoureas with different chemical reactivities, clearly indicated that the ability of compounds to cross-link DNA was important in determining their phase specificity. Cells that lacked guanine O 6 -alkytransferase activity showed similar patterns of BCNU phase specificity regardless of their intrinsic sensitivity to BCNU. DNA inter-strand cross-linking, as measured by alkaline elution, was similar in cells exposed to BCNU in G 1 or S phase. 3 H [1-chloroethyl-1nitrosourea] binding to DNA was the same in G 1 , S and G 2 /M phase cells indicating that phase-specific differences in drug uptake and intracellular drug dose were not responsible for phase specific cell kill. These studies suggest that cross-link lesions, other than DNA inter-strand cross-links, and/or effects on DNA repair, other than guanine O 6 -alkyltransferase, are additional important determinants of BCNU phase specific cell killing

  14. A study of variable thrust, variable specific impulse trajectories for solar system exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tadashi

    A study has been performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of variable thrust and variable Isp (specific impulse) trajectories for solar system exploration. There have been several numerical research efforts for variable thrust, variable Isp, power-limited trajectory optimization problems. All of these results conclude that variable thrust, variable Isp (variable specific impulse, or VSI) engines are superior to constant thrust, constant Isp (constant specific impulse; or CSI) engines. However, most of these research efforts assume a mission from Earth to Mars, and some of them further assume that these planets are circular and coplanar. Hence they still lack the generality. This research has been conducted to answer the following questions: (1) Is a VSI engine always better than a CSI engine or a high thrust engine for any mission to any planet with any time of flight considering lower propellant mass as the sole criterion? (2) If a planetary swing-by is used for a VSI trajectory, is the fuel savings of a VSI swing-by trajectory better than that of a CSI swing-by or high thrust swing-by trajectory? To support this research, an unique, new computer-based interplanetary trajectory calculation program has been created. This program utilizes a calculus of variations algorithm to perform overall optimization of thrust, Isp, and thrust vector direction along a trajectory that minimizes fuel consumption for interplanetary travel. It is assumed that the propulsion system is power-limited, and thus the compromise between thrust and Isp is a variable to be optimized along the flight path. This program is capable of optimizing not only variable thrust trajectories but also constant thrust trajectories in 3-D space using a planetary ephemeris database. It is also capable of conducting planetary swing-bys. Using this program, various Earth-originating trajectories have been investigated and the optimized results have been compared to traditional CSI and high

  15. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and later...... for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the Supplemental Data...

  16. RON kinase isoforms demonstrate variable cell motility in normal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Alissa; Rajput, Ashwani; Wan, Guanghua

    2016-09-01

    Aberrant RON (Recepteur d'Origine Nantais) tyrosine kinase activation causes the epithelial cell to evade normal growth pathways, resulting in unregulated cell proliferation, increased cell motility and decreased apoptosis. Wildtype (wt) RON has been shown to play a role in metastasis of epithelial malignancies. It presents an important potential therapeutic target for colorectal, breast, gastric and pancreatic cancer. Little is known about functional differences amongst RON isoforms RON155, RON160 and RON165. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of various RON kinase isoforms on cell motility. Cell lines with stable expression of wtRON were generated by inserting the coding region of RON in pTagRFP (tagged red fluorescence protein plasmid). The expression constructs of RON variants (RON155, RON160 and RON165) were generated by creating a mutagenesis-based wtRON-pTag RFP plasmid and stably transfected into HEK 293 cells. The wound closure scratch assay was used to investigate the effect on cell migratory capacity of wild type RON and its variants. RON transfected cells demonstrated increased cell motility compared to HEK293 control cells. RON165 cell motility was significantly increased compared to RON160 (mean percentage of wound covered 37.37% vs. 32.40%; p = 0.03). RON tyrosine kinase isoforms have variable cell motility. This may reflect a difference in the behavior of malignant epithelial cells and their capacity for metastasis.

  17. Cell-specific targeting by heterobivalent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josan, Jatinder S; Handl, Heather L; Sankaranarayanan, Rajesh; Xu, Liping; Lynch, Ronald M; Vagner, Josef; Mash, Eugene A; Hruby, Victor J; Gillies, Robert J

    2011-07-20

    Current cancer therapies exploit either differential metabolism or targeting to specific individual gene products that are overexpressed in aberrant cells. The work described herein proposes an alternative approach--to specifically target combinations of cell-surface receptors using heteromultivalent ligands ("receptor combination approach"). As a proof-of-concept that functionally unrelated receptors can be noncovalently cross-linked with high avidity and specificity, a series of heterobivalent ligands (htBVLs) were constructed from analogues of the melanocortin peptide ligand ([Nle(4), dPhe(7)]-α-MSH) and the cholecystokinin peptide ligand (CCK-8). Binding of these ligands to cells expressing the human Melanocortin-4 receptor and the Cholecystokinin-2 receptor was analyzed. The MSH(7) and CCK(6) were tethered with linkers of varying rigidity and length, constructed from natural and/or synthetic building blocks. Modeling data suggest that a linker length of 20-50 Å is needed to simultaneously bind these two different G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). These ligands exhibited up to 24-fold enhancement in binding affinity to cells that expressed both (bivalent binding), compared to cells with only one (monovalent binding) of the cognate receptors. The htBVLs had up to 50-fold higher affinity than that of a monomeric CCK ligand, i.e., Ac-CCK(6)-NH(2). Cell-surface targeting of these two cell types with labeled heteromultivalent ligand demonstrated high avidity and specificity, thereby validating the receptor combination approach. This ability to noncovalently cross-link heterologous receptors and target individual cells using a receptor combination approach opens up new possibilities for specific cell targeting in vivo for therapy or imaging.

  18. Changing T cell specificity by retroviral T cell receptor display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, H. W.; van den Boom, M. D.; Spits, H.; Hooijberg, E.; Schumacher, T. N.

    2000-01-01

    The diversity of the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is limited, because of the processes of positive and negative T cell selection. To obtain T cells with specificities beyond the immune system's capacity, we have developed a strategy for retroviral TCR display. In this approach, a library of T

  19. Learning LM Specificity for Ganglion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised learning models have been proposed based on experience (Ahumada and Mulligan, 1990;Wachtler, Doi, Lee and Sejnowski, 2007) that allow the cortex to develop units with LM specific color opponent receptive fields like the blob cells reported by Hubel and Wiesel on the basis of visual experience. These models used ganglion cells with LM indiscriminate wiring as inputs to the learning mechanism, which was presumed to occur at the cortical level.

  20. Cell-Specific Aptamers as Emerging Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Meyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short nucleic acids that bind to defined targets with high affinity and specificity. The first aptamers have been selected about two decades ago by an in vitro process named SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Since then, numerous aptamers with specificities for a variety of targets from small molecules to proteins or even whole cells have been selected. Their applications range from biosensing and diagnostics to therapy and target-oriented drug delivery. More recently, selections using complex targets such as live cells have become feasible. This paper summarizes progress in cell-SELEX techniques and highlights recent developments, particularly in the field of medically relevant aptamers with a focus on therapeutic and drug-delivery applications.

  1. Total Variability Modeling using Source-specific Priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepstone, Sven Ewan; Lee, Kong Aik; Li, Haizhou

    2016-01-01

    sequence of an utterance. In both cases the prior for the latent variable is assumed to be non-informative, since for homogeneous datasets there is no gain in generality in using an informative prior. This work shows in the heterogeneous case, that using informative priors for com- puting the posterior......, can lead to favorable results. We focus on modeling the priors using minimum divergence criterion or fac- tor analysis techniques. Tests on the NIST 2008 and 2010 Speaker Recognition Evaluation (SRE) dataset show that our proposed method beats four baselines: For i-vector extraction using an already...... trained matrix, for the short2-short3 task in SRE’08, five out of eight female and four out of eight male common conditions, were improved. For the core-extended task in SRE’10, four out of nine female and six out of nine male common conditions were improved. When incorporating prior information...

  2. Cell to Cell Variability of Radiation-Induced Foci: Relation between Observed Damage and Energy Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruel, Gaëtan; Villagrasa, Carmen; Voisin, Pascale; Clairand, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François; Barquinero, Joan Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Most studies that aim to understand the interactions between different types of photon radiation and cellular DNA assume homogeneous cell irradiation, with all cells receiving the same amount of energy. The level of DNA damage is therefore generally determined by averaging it over the entire population of exposed cells. However, evaluating the molecular consequences of a stochastic phenomenon such as energy deposition of ionizing radiation by measuring only an average effect may not be sufficient for understanding some aspects of the cellular response to this radiation. The variance among the cells associated with this average effect may also be important for the behaviour of irradiated tissue. In this study, we accurately estimated the distribution of the number of radiation-induced γH2AX foci (RIF) per cell nucleus in a large population of endothelial cells exposed to 3 macroscopic doses of gamma rays from 60Co. The number of RIF varied significantly and reproducibly from cell to cell, with its relative standard deviation ranging from 36% to 18% depending on the macroscopic dose delivered. Interestingly, this relative cell-to-cell variability increased as the dose decreased, contrary to the mean RIF count per cell. This result shows that the dose effect, in terms of the number of DNA lesions indicated by RIF is not as simple as a purely proportional relation in which relative SD is constant with dose. To analyse the origins of this observed variability, we calculated the spread of the specific energy distribution for the different target volumes and subvolumes in which RIF can be generated. Variances, standard deviations and relative standard deviations all changed similarly from dose to dose for biological and calculated microdosimetric values. This similarity is an important argument that supports the hypothesis of the conservation of the association between the number of RIF per nucleus and the specific energy per DNA molecule. This comparison allowed us to

  3. Cell to Cell Variability of Radiation-Induced Foci: Relation between Observed Damage and Energy Deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëtan Gruel

    Full Text Available Most studies that aim to understand the interactions between different types of photon radiation and cellular DNA assume homogeneous cell irradiation, with all cells receiving the same amount of energy. The level of DNA damage is therefore generally determined by averaging it over the entire population of exposed cells. However, evaluating the molecular consequences of a stochastic phenomenon such as energy deposition of ionizing radiation by measuring only an average effect may not be sufficient for understanding some aspects of the cellular response to this radiation. The variance among the cells associated with this average effect may also be important for the behaviour of irradiated tissue. In this study, we accurately estimated the distribution of the number of radiation-induced γH2AX foci (RIF per cell nucleus in a large population of endothelial cells exposed to 3 macroscopic doses of gamma rays from 60Co. The number of RIF varied significantly and reproducibly from cell to cell, with its relative standard deviation ranging from 36% to 18% depending on the macroscopic dose delivered. Interestingly, this relative cell-to-cell variability increased as the dose decreased, contrary to the mean RIF count per cell. This result shows that the dose effect, in terms of the number of DNA lesions indicated by RIF is not as simple as a purely proportional relation in which relative SD is constant with dose. To analyse the origins of this observed variability, we calculated the spread of the specific energy distribution for the different target volumes and subvolumes in which RIF can be generated. Variances, standard deviations and relative standard deviations all changed similarly from dose to dose for biological and calculated microdosimetric values. This similarity is an important argument that supports the hypothesis of the conservation of the association between the number of RIF per nucleus and the specific energy per DNA molecule. This

  4. Sex-specific selection for MHC variability in Alpine chamois

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaschl Helmut

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammals, males typically have shorter lives than females. This difference is thought to be due to behavioural traits which enhance competitive abilities, and hence male reproductive success, but impair survival. Furthermore, in many species males usually show higher parasite burden than females. Consequently, the intensity of selection for genetic factors which reduce susceptibility to pathogens may differ between sexes. High variability at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes is believed to be advantageous for detecting and combating the range of infectious agents present in the environment. Increased heterozygosity at these immune genes is expected to be important for individual longevity. However, whether males in natural populations benefit more from MHC heterozygosity than females has rarely been investigated. We investigated this question in a long-term study of free-living Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra, a polygynous mountain ungulate. Results Here we show that male chamois survive significantly (P = 0.022 longer if heterozygous at the MHC class II DRB locus, whereas females do not. Improved survival of males was not a result of heterozygote advantage per se, as background heterozygosity (estimated across twelve microsatellite loci did not change significantly with age. Furthermore, reproductively active males depleted their body fat reserves earlier than females leading to significantly impaired survival rates in this sex (P Conclusions Increased MHC class II DRB heterozygosity with age in males, suggests that MHC heterozygous males survive longer than homozygotes. Reproductively active males appear to be less likely to survive than females most likely because of the energetic challenge of the winter rut, accompanied by earlier depletion of their body fat stores, and a generally higher parasite burden. This scenario renders the MHC-mediated immune response more important for males than for females

  5. Unsteady Flow in a Supersonic Turbine with Variable Specific Heats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Huber, Frank; Sondak, Douglas L.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern high-work turbines can be compact, transonic, supersonic, counter-rotating, or use a dense drive gas. The vast majority of modern rocket turbine designs fall into these Categories. These turbines usually have large temperature variations across a given stage, and are characterized by large amounts of flow unsteadiness. The flow unsteadiness can have a major impact on the turbine performance and durability. For example, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) fuel turbine, a high work, transonic design, was found to have an unsteady inter-row shock which reduced efficiency by 2 points and increased dynamic loading by 24 percent. The Revolutionary Reusable Technology Turbopump (RRTT), which uses full flow oxygen for its drive gas, was found to shed vortices with such energy as to raise serious blade durability concerns. In both cases, the sources of the problems were uncovered (before turbopump testing) with the application of validated, unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the designs. In the case of the RRTT and the Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) turbines, the unsteady CFD codes have been used not just to identify problems, but to guide designs which mitigate problems due to unsteadiness. Using unsteady flow analyses as a part of the design process has led to turbine designs with higher performance (which affects temperature and mass flow rate) and fewer dynamics problems. One of the many assumptions made during the design and analysis of supersonic turbine stages is that the values of the specific heats are constant. In some analyses the value is based on an average of the expected upstream and downstream temperatures. In stages where the temperature can vary by 300 to 500 K, however, the assumption of constant fluid properties may lead to erroneous performance and durability predictions. In this study the suitability of assuming constant specific heats has been investigated by performing three-dimensional unsteady Navier

  6. Origins and implications of pluripotent stem cell variability and heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahan, Patrick; Daley, George Q.

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells constitute a platform to model disease and developmental processes and can potentially be used in regenerative medicine. However, not all pluripotent cell lines are equal in their capacity to differentiate into desired cell types in vitro. Genetic and epigenetic variations contribute to functional variability between cell lines and heterogeneity within clones. These genetic and epigenetic variations could ‘lock’ the pluripotency network resulting in residual pluripotent cells or alter the signalling response of developmental pathways leading to lineage bias. The molecular contributors to functional variability and heterogeneity in both embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are only beginning to emerge, yet they are crucial to the future of the stem cell field. PMID:23673969

  7. Analysis of individual cells identifies cell-to-cell variability following induction of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Christopher D; Flynn, James M; Morrissey, Christapher; Lebofsky, Ronald; Shuga, Joe; Dong, Xiao; Unger, Marc A; Vijg, Jan; Melov, Simon; Campisi, Judith

    2017-10-01

    Senescent cells play important roles in both physiological and pathological processes, including cancer and aging. In all cases, however, senescent cells comprise only a small fraction of tissues. Senescent phenotypes have been studied largely in relatively homogeneous populations of cultured cells. In vivo, senescent cells are generally identified by a small number of markers, but whether and how these markers vary among individual cells is unknown. We therefore utilized a combination of single-cell isolation and a nanofluidic PCR platform to determine the contributions of individual cells to the overall gene expression profile of senescent human fibroblast populations. Individual senescent cells were surprisingly heterogeneous in their gene expression signatures. This cell-to-cell variability resulted in a loss of correlation among the expression of several senescence-associated genes. Many genes encoding senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) factors, a major contributor to the effects of senescent cells in vivo, showed marked variability with a subset of highly induced genes accounting for the increases observed at the population level. Inflammatory genes in clustered genomic loci showed a greater correlation with senescence compared to nonclustered loci, suggesting that these genes are coregulated by genomic location. Together, these data offer new insights into how genes are regulated in senescent cells and suggest that single markers are inadequate to identify senescent cells in vivo. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Origins and implications of pluripotent stem cell variability and heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Cahan, Patrick; Daley, George Q.

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells constitute a platform to model disease and developmental processes and can potentially be used in regenerative medicine. However, not all pluripotent cell lines are equal in their capacity to differentiate into desired cell types in vitro. Genetic and epigenetic variations contribute to functional variability between cell lines and heterogeneity within clones. These genetic and epigenetic variations could ‘lock’ the pluripotency network resulting in residual pluripotent...

  9. Virus-Specific T Cells: Broadening Applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, A John; Prockop, Susan; Bollard, Catherine M

    2018-01-01

    Virus infection remains an appreciable cause of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Although pharmacotherapy and/or antibody therapy may help prevent or treat viral disease, these drugs are expensive, toxic, and often ineffective due to primary or secondary resistance. Further, effective treatments are limited for many infections (eg, adenovirus, BK virus), which are increasingly detected after alternative donor transplants. These deficiencies in conventional therapeutics have increased interest in an immunotherapeutic approach to viral disorders, leading to adoptive transfer of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (VSTs), which can rapidly reconstitute antiviral immunity post-transplantation without causing graft-versus-host disease. This review will explore how the VST field has improved outcomes for many patients with life-threatening viral infections after HSCT, and how to broaden applicability beyond the "patient-specific" products, as well as extending to other viral diseases even outside the context of HSCT. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  10. Variability and Order in Cytoskeletal Dynamics of Motile Amoeboid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Westendorf, Christian; Gholami, Azam; Pumir, Alain; Tarantola, Marco; Beta, Carsten

    2017-10-01

    The chemotactic motion of eukaryotic cells such as leukocytes or metastatic cancer cells relies on membrane protrusions driven by the polymerization and depolymerization of actin. Here we show that the response of the actin system to a receptor stimulus is subject to a threshold value that varies strongly from cell to cell. Above the threshold, we observe pronounced cell-to-cell variability in the response amplitude. The polymerization time, however, is almost constant over the entire range of response amplitudes, while the depolymerization time increases with increasing amplitude. We show that cell-to-cell variability in the response amplitude correlates with the amount of Arp2 /3 , a protein that enhances actin polymerization. A time-delayed feedback model for the cortical actin concentration is consistent with all our observations and confirms the role of Arp2 /3 in the observed cell-to-cell variability. Taken together, our observations highlight robust regulation of the actin response that enables a reliable timing of cell movement.

  11. Biomek Cell Workstation: A Variable System for Automated Cell Cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, R; Severitt, J C; Roddelkopf, T; Junginger, S; Thurow, K

    2016-06-01

    Automated cell cultivation is an important tool for simplifying routine laboratory work. Automated methods are independent of skill levels and daily constitution of laboratory staff in combination with a constant quality and performance of the methods. The Biomek Cell Workstation was configured as a flexible and compatible system. The modified Biomek Cell Workstation enables the cultivation of adherent and suspension cells. Until now, no commercially available systems enabled the automated handling of both types of cells in one system. In particular, the automated cultivation of suspension cells in this form has not been published. The cell counts and viabilities were nonsignificantly decreased for cells cultivated in AutoFlasks in automated handling. The proliferation of manual and automated bioscreening by the WST-1 assay showed a nonsignificant lower proliferation of automatically disseminated cells associated with a mostly lower standard error. The disseminated suspension cell lines showed different pronounced proliferations in descending order, starting with Jurkat cells followed by SEM, Molt4, and RS4 cells having the lowest proliferation. In this respect, we successfully disseminated and screened suspension cells in an automated way. The automated cultivation and dissemination of a variety of suspension cells can replace the manual method. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  12. Contributions of cell growth and biochemical reactions to nongenetic variability of cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwabe, A.; Bruggeman, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Cell-to-cell variability in the molecular composition of isogenic, steady-state growing cells arises spontaneously from the inherent stochasticity of intracellular biochemical reactions and cell growth. Here, we present a general decomposition of the total variance in the copy number per cell of a

  13. Evaluation of Antigen-Conjugated Fluorescent Beads to Identify Antigen-Specific B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Isabel; Ilieva, Kristina M; Crescioli, Silvia; Lombardi, Sara; Figini, Mariangela; Cheung, Anthony; Spicer, James F; Tutt, Andrew N J; Nestle, Frank O; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Lacy, Katie E; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2018-01-01

    Selection of single antigen-specific B cells to identify their expressed antibodies is of considerable interest for evaluating human immune responses. Here, we present a method to identify single antibody-expressing cells using antigen-conjugated fluorescent beads. To establish this, we selected Folate Receptor alpha (FRα) as a model antigen and a mouse B cell line, expressing both the soluble and the membrane-bound forms of a human/mouse chimeric antibody (MOv18 IgG1) specific for FRα, as test antibody-expressing cells. Beads were conjugated to FRα using streptavidin/avidin-biotin bridges and used to select single cells expressing the membrane-bound form of anti-FRα. Bead-bound cells were single cell-sorted and processed for single cell RNA retrotranscription and PCR to isolate antibody heavy and light chain variable regions. Variable regions were then cloned and expressed as human IgG1/k antibodies. Like the original clone, engineered antibodies from single cells recognized native FRα. To evaluate whether antigen-coated beads could identify specific antibody-expressing cells in mixed immune cell populations, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were spiked with test antibody-expressing cells. Antigen-specific cells could comprise up to 75% of cells selected with antigen-conjugated beads when the frequency of the antigen-positive cells was 1:100 or higher. In PBMC pools, beads conjugated to recombinant antigens FRα and HER2 bound antigen-specific anti-FRα MOv18 and anti-HER2 Trastuzumab antibody-expressing cells, respectively. From melanoma patient-derived B cells selected with melanoma cell line-derived protein-coated fluorescent beads, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognized melanoma antigen-coated beads. This approach may be further developed to facilitate analysis of B cells and their antibody profiles at the single cell level and to help unravel humoral immune repertoires.

  14. Evaluation of Antigen-Conjugated Fluorescent Beads to Identify Antigen-Specific B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Correa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Selection of single antigen-specific B cells to identify their expressed antibodies is of considerable interest for evaluating human immune responses. Here, we present a method to identify single antibody-expressing cells using antigen-conjugated fluorescent beads. To establish this, we selected Folate Receptor alpha (FRα as a model antigen and a mouse B cell line, expressing both the soluble and the membrane-bound forms of a human/mouse chimeric antibody (MOv18 IgG1 specific for FRα, as test antibody-expressing cells. Beads were conjugated to FRα using streptavidin/avidin-biotin bridges and used to select single cells expressing the membrane-bound form of anti-FRα. Bead-bound cells were single cell-sorted and processed for single cell RNA retrotranscription and PCR to isolate antibody heavy and light chain variable regions. Variable regions were then cloned and expressed as human IgG1/k antibodies. Like the original clone, engineered antibodies from single cells recognized native FRα. To evaluate whether antigen-coated beads could identify specific antibody-expressing cells in mixed immune cell populations, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were spiked with test antibody-expressing cells. Antigen-specific cells could comprise up to 75% of cells selected with antigen-conjugated beads when the frequency of the antigen-positive cells was 1:100 or higher. In PBMC pools, beads conjugated to recombinant antigens FRα and HER2 bound antigen-specific anti-FRα MOv18 and anti-HER2 Trastuzumab antibody-expressing cells, respectively. From melanoma patient-derived B cells selected with melanoma cell line-derived protein-coated fluorescent beads, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognized melanoma antigen-coated beads. This approach may be further developed to facilitate analysis of B cells and their antibody profiles at the single cell level and to help unravel humoral immune repertoires.

  15. Evaluation of Antigen-Conjugated Fluorescent Beads to Identify Antigen-Specific B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Isabel; Ilieva, Kristina M.; Crescioli, Silvia; Lombardi, Sara; Figini, Mariangela; Cheung, Anthony; Spicer, James F.; Tutt, Andrew N. J.; Nestle, Frank O.; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Lacy, Katie E.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2018-01-01

    Selection of single antigen-specific B cells to identify their expressed antibodies is of considerable interest for evaluating human immune responses. Here, we present a method to identify single antibody-expressing cells using antigen-conjugated fluorescent beads. To establish this, we selected Folate Receptor alpha (FRα) as a model antigen and a mouse B cell line, expressing both the soluble and the membrane-bound forms of a human/mouse chimeric antibody (MOv18 IgG1) specific for FRα, as test antibody-expressing cells. Beads were conjugated to FRα using streptavidin/avidin-biotin bridges and used to select single cells expressing the membrane-bound form of anti-FRα. Bead-bound cells were single cell-sorted and processed for single cell RNA retrotranscription and PCR to isolate antibody heavy and light chain variable regions. Variable regions were then cloned and expressed as human IgG1/k antibodies. Like the original clone, engineered antibodies from single cells recognized native FRα. To evaluate whether antigen-coated beads could identify specific antibody-expressing cells in mixed immune cell populations, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were spiked with test antibody-expressing cells. Antigen-specific cells could comprise up to 75% of cells selected with antigen-conjugated beads when the frequency of the antigen-positive cells was 1:100 or higher. In PBMC pools, beads conjugated to recombinant antigens FRα and HER2 bound antigen-specific anti-FRα MOv18 and anti-HER2 Trastuzumab antibody-expressing cells, respectively. From melanoma patient-derived B cells selected with melanoma cell line-derived protein-coated fluorescent beads, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognized melanoma antigen-coated beads. This approach may be further developed to facilitate analysis of B cells and their antibody profiles at the single cell level and to help unravel humoral immune repertoires. PMID:29628923

  16. Modulating cell-to-cell variability and sensitivity to death ligands by co-drugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flusberg, Deborah A; Sorger, Peter K

    2013-01-01

    TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) holds promise as an anti-cancer therapeutic but efficiently induces apoptosis in only a subset of tumor cell lines. Moreover, even in clonal populations of responsive lines, only a fraction of cells dies in response to TRAIL and individual cells exhibit cell-to-cell variability in the timing of cell death. Fractional killing in these cell populations appears to arise not from genetic differences among cells but rather from differences in gene expression states, fluctuations in protein levels and the extent to which TRAIL-induced death or survival pathways become activated. In this study, we ask how cell-to-cell variability manifests in cell types with different sensitivities to TRAIL, as well as how it changes when cells are exposed to combinations of drugs. We show that individual cells that survive treatment with TRAIL can regenerate the sensitivity and death-time distribution of the parental population, demonstrating that fractional killing is a stable property of cell populations. We also show that cell-to-cell variability in the timing and probability of apoptosis in response to treatment can be tuned using combinations of drugs that together increase apoptotic sensitivity compared to treatment with one drug alone. In the case of TRAIL, modulation of cell-to-cell variability by co-drugging appears to involve a reduction in the threshold for mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. (paper)

  17. Incorporation of gene-specific variability improves expression analysis using high-density DNA microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spitznagel Edward

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assessment of data reproducibility is essential for application of microarray technology to exploration of biological pathways and disease states. Technical variability in data analysis largely depends on signal intensity. Within that context, the reproducibility of individual probe sets has not been hitherto addressed. Results We used an extraordinarily large replicate data set derived from human placental trophoblast to analyze probe-specific contribution to variability of gene expression. We found that signal variability, in addition to being signal-intensity dependant, is probe set-specific. Importantly, we developed a novel method to quantify the contribution of this probe set-specific variability. Furthermore, we devised a formula that incorporates a priori-computed, replicate-based information on probe set- and intensity-specific variability in determination of expression changes even without technical replicates. Conclusion The strategy of incorporating probe set-specific variability is superior to analysis based on arbitrary fold-change thresholds. We recommend its incorporation to any computation of gene expression changes using high-density DNA microarrays. A Java application implementing our T-score is available at http://www.sadovsky.wustl.edu/tscore.html.

  18. Site-specific variability of loess and palaeosols (Ruma, Vojvodina, northern Serbia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenberghe, J.; Markovic, S.B.; Jovanovic, M.; Hambach, U.

    2013-01-01

    The study of temporal variations in soil intensity has mostly been limited to specific sites. However, it is important for correctly interpreting the stratigraphy and palaeoclimatic significance of loess and palaeosols series to understand the reasons for the spatial variability. More specifically,

  19. Olfactory map formation in the Drosophila brain: genetic specificity and neuronal variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochtrup, Anna; Hummel, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    The development of the Drosophila olfactory system is a striking example of how genetic programs specify a large number of different neuron types and assemble them into functional circuits. To ensure precise odorant perception, each sensory neuron has to not only select a single olfactory receptor (OR) type out of a large genomic repertoire but also segregate its synaptic connections in the brain according to the OR class identity. Specification and patterning of second-order interneurons in the olfactory brain center occur largely independent of sensory input, followed by a precise point-to-point matching of sensory and relay neurons. Here we describe recent progress in the understanding of how cell-intrinsic differentiation programs and context-dependent cellular interactions generate a stereotyped sensory map in the Drosophila brain. Recent findings revealed an astonishing morphological diversity among members of the same interneuron class, suggesting an unexpected variability in local microcircuits involved in insect sensory processing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Protein conservation and variation suggest mechanisms of cell type-specific modulation of signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin H Schaefer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins and signaling pathways are present in most cell types and tissues and yet perform specialized functions. To elucidate mechanisms by which these ubiquitous pathways are modulated, we overlaid information about cross-cell line protein abundance and variability, and evolutionary conservation onto functional pathway components and topological layers in the pathway hierarchy. We found that the input (receptors and the output (transcription factors layers evolve more rapidly than proteins in the intermediary transmission layer. In contrast, protein expression variability decreases from the input to the output layer. We observed that the differences in protein variability between the input and transmission layer can be attributed to both the network position and the tendency of variable proteins to physically interact with constitutively expressed proteins. Differences in protein expression variability and conservation are also accompanied by the tendency of conserved and constitutively expressed proteins to acquire somatic mutations, while germline mutations tend to occur in cell type-specific proteins. Thus, conserved core proteins in the transmission layer could perform a fundamental role in most cell types and are therefore less tolerant to germline mutations. In summary, we propose that the core signal transmission machinery is largely modulated by a variable input layer through physical protein interactions. We hypothesize that the bow-tie organization of cellular signaling on the level of protein abundance variability contributes to the specificity of the signal response in different cell types.

  1. Brain-specific enhancers for cell-based therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visel, Axel; Rubenstein, John L.R.; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Pennacchio, Len A.; Vogt, Daniel; Nicholas, Cory; Kriegstein, Arnold

    2018-04-24

    Herein are described a set of novel specific human enhancers for specific forebrain cell types used to study and select for human neural progenitor cells. This approach enables the ability to generate interneurons from human ES, iPS and iN cells, making them available for human transplantation and for molecular/cellular analyzes. These approaches are also directly applicable to generating other neuronal cell types, such as cortical and striatal projection neurons, which have implications for many human diseases.

  2. Single cell Hi-C reveals cell-to-cell variability in chromosome structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Yaffe, Eitan; Dean, Wendy; Laue, Ernest D.; Tanay, Amos; Fraser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale chromosome structure and spatial nuclear arrangement have been linked to control of gene expression and DNA replication and repair. Genomic techniques based on chromosome conformation capture assess contacts for millions of loci simultaneously, but do so by averaging chromosome conformations from millions of nuclei. Here we introduce single cell Hi-C, combined with genome-wide statistical analysis and structural modeling of single copy X chromosomes, to show that individual chromosomes maintain domain organisation at the megabase scale, but show variable cell-to-cell chromosome territory structures at larger scales. Despite this structural stochasticity, localisation of active gene domains to boundaries of territories is a hallmark of chromosomal conformation. Single cell Hi-C data bridge current gaps between genomics and microscopy studies of chromosomes, demonstrating how modular organisation underlies dynamic chromosome structure, and how this structure is probabilistically linked with genome activity patterns. PMID:24067610

  3. Programmed Death-1 expression on Epstein Barr virus specific CD8+ T cells varies by stage of infection, epitope specificity, and T-cell receptor usage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Greenough

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Programmed Death-1 (PD-1 is an inhibitory member of the CD28 family of molecules expressed on CD8+ T cells in response to antigenic stimulation. To better understand the role of PD-1 in antiviral immunity we examined the expression of PD-1 on Epstein-Barr virus (EBV epitope-specific CD8+ T cells during acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM and convalescence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using flow cytometry, we observed higher frequencies of EBV-specific CD8+ T cells and higher intensity of PD-1 expression on EBV-specific CD8+ T cells during AIM than during convalescence. PD-1 expression during AIM directly correlated with viral load and with the subsequent degree of CD8+ T cell contraction in convalescence. Consistent differences in PD-1 expression were observed between CD8+ T cells with specificity for two different EBV lytic antigen epitopes. Similar differences were observed in the degree to which PD-1 was upregulated on these epitope-specific CD8+ T cells following peptide stimulation in vitro. EBV epitope-specific CD8+ T cell proliferative responses to peptide stimulation were diminished during AIM regardless of PD-1 expression and were unaffected by blocking PD-1 interactions with PD-L1. Significant variability in PD-1 expression was observed on EBV epitope-specific CD8+ T cell subsets defined by V-beta usage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that PD-1 expression is not only dependent on the degree of antigen presentation, but also on undefined characteristics of the responding cell that segregate with epitope specificity and V-beta usage.

  4. Integration of aerial imaging and variable-rate technology for site-specific aerial herbicide application

    Science.gov (United States)

    As remote sensing and variable rate technology are becoming more available for aerial applicators, practical methodologies on effective integration of these technologies are needed for site-specific aerial applications of crop production and protection materials. The objectives of this study were to...

  5. Examining the sources of variability in cell culture media used for biopharmaceutical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillicuddy, Nicola; Floris, Patrick; Albrecht, Simone; Bones, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Raw materials, in particular cell culture media, represent a significant source of variability to biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes that can detrimentally affect cellular growth, viability and specific productivity or alter the quality profile of the expressed therapeutic protein. The continual expansion of the biopharmaceutical industry is creating an increasing demand on the production and supply chain consistency for cell culture media, especially as companies embrace intensive continuous processing. Here, we provide a historical perspective regarding the transition from serum containing to serum-free media, the development of chemically-defined cell culture media for biopharmaceutical production using industrial scale bioprocesses and review production mechanisms for liquid and powder culture media. An overview and critique of analytical approaches used for the characterisation of cell culture media and the identification of root causes of variability are also provided, including in-depth liquid phase separations, mass spectrometry and spectroscopic methods.

  6. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Potenza, L; Vallerini, D; Barozzi, P; Riva, G; Gilioli, A; Forghieri, F; Candoni, A; Cesaro, S; Quadrelli, C; Maertens, J; Rossi, G; Morselli, M; Codeluppi, M; Mussini, C; Colaci, E

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive mucormycosis (IM) is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients. Method...

  7. Cell Type-Specific Contributions to the TSC Neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0415 TITLE: Cell Type-Specific Contributions to the TSC Neuropathology PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gabriella D’Arcangelo...AND SUBTITLE Cell Type-Specific Contributions to the TSC Neuropathology 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0415 5c. PROGRAM...how heterozygous and homozygous Tsc2 mutations affect the development of mutant excitatory neurons as well as other surrounding brain cells , in vivo

  8. Tissue specific heterogeneity in effector immune cell response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba eTufail

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Post pathogen invasion, migration of effector T-cell subsets to specific tissue locations is of prime importance for generation of robust immune response. Effector T cells are imprinted with distinct ‘homing codes’ (adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors during activation which regulate their targeted trafficking to specific tissues. Internal cues in the lymph node microenvironment along with external stimuli from food (vitamin A and sunlight (vitamin D3 prime dendritic cells, imprinting them to play centrestage in the induction of tissue tropism in effector T cells. B cells as well, in a manner similar to effector T cells, exhibit tissue tropic migration. In this review, we have focused on the factors regulating the generation and migration of effector T cells to various tissues alongwith giving an overview of tissue tropism in B cells.

  9. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Leonardo; Vallerini, Daniela; Barozzi, Patrizia; Riva, Giovanni; Gilioli, Andrea; Forghieri, Fabio; Candoni, Anna; Cesaro, Simone; Quadrelli, Chiara; Maertens, Johan; Rossi, Giulio; Morselli, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Mussini, Cristina; Colaci, Elisabetta; Messerotti, Andrea; Paolini, Ambra; Maccaferri, Monica; Fantuzzi, Valeria; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Stefani, Alessandro; Morandi, Uliano; Maffei, Rossana; Marasca, Roberto; Narni, Franco; Fanin, Renato; Comoli, Patrizia; Romani, Luigina; Beauvais, Anne; Viale, Pier Luigi; Latgè, Jean Paul; Lewis, Russell E; Luppi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Invasive mucormycosis (IM) is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients. By using an enzyme linked immunospot assay, the presence of Mucorales-specific T cells in peripheral blood (PB) samples has been investigated at three time points during high-dose chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-γ, interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 were analysed in order to detect a correlation between the immune response and the clinical picture. Twenty-one (10.3%) of 204 patients, accounting for 32 (5.3%) of 598 PB samples, tested positive for Mucorales-specific T cells. Two groups could be identified. Group 1, including 15 patients without signs or symptoms of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), showed a predominance of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-gamma. Group 2 included 6 patients with a clinical picture consistent with invasive fungal disease (IFD): 2 cases of proven IM and 4 cases of possible IFD. The proven patients had significantly higher number of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 and higher rates of positive samples by using derived diagnostic cut-offs when compared with the 15 patients without IFD. Mucorales-specific T cells can be detected and monitored in patients with hematologic malignancies at risk for IM. Mucorales-specific T cells polarized to the production of T helper type 2 cytokines are associated with proven IM and may be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker for IM.

  10. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Potenza

    Full Text Available Invasive mucormycosis (IM is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients.By using an enzyme linked immunospot assay, the presence of Mucorales-specific T cells in peripheral blood (PB samples has been investigated at three time points during high-dose chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-γ, interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 were analysed in order to detect a correlation between the immune response and the clinical picture. Twenty-one (10.3% of 204 patients, accounting for 32 (5.3% of 598 PB samples, tested positive for Mucorales-specific T cells. Two groups could be identified. Group 1, including 15 patients without signs or symptoms of invasive fungal diseases (IFD, showed a predominance of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-gamma. Group 2 included 6 patients with a clinical picture consistent with invasive fungal disease (IFD: 2 cases of proven IM and 4 cases of possible IFD. The proven patients had significantly higher number of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 and higher rates of positive samples by using derived diagnostic cut-offs when compared with the 15 patients without IFD.Mucorales-specific T cells can be detected and monitored in patients with hematologic malignancies at risk for IM. Mucorales-specific T cells polarized to the production of T helper type 2 cytokines are associated with proven IM and may be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker for IM.

  11. Induction of specific suppressor T cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eardley, D.D.; Gershon, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    We describe conditions for generating sheep red blood cell-specific suppressor T cells in Mishell-Dutton cultures. The production of specific suppressor cells is favored by increasing antigen dose in the initial culture but can be produced by transferring more cells when lower doses of antigen are used. Transfer of small numbers of cells cultured with low doses of antigen leads to a specific helper effect. Transfer of large numbers of educated cells leads to nonspecific suppression. Suppression can be effected by the effluent cells from nylon wool columns which do not make detectable PFC. A fraction of these cells become resistant to treatment with anti-T cell sera and complement after culture. The suppressor cells are radiation sensitive and must be able to synthesize protein to suppress. They take 2 to 3 days of education to reach maximum suppressive efficiency and will not suppress cultures if added 2 to 3 days after culture initiation. Their production is favored by the absence of mercaptoethanol, suggesting that the observed suppression is not ''too much help.'' The ability to generate specific suppressor cells in vitro should be of great benefit in determining the factors that regulate their appearance in vivo

  12. RNAi screen reveals host cell kinases specifically involved in Listeria monocytogenes spread from cell to cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Chong

    Full Text Available Intracellular bacterial pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes and Rickettsia conorii display actin-based motility in the cytosol of infected cells and spread from cell to cell through the formation of membrane protrusions at the cell cortex. Whereas the mechanisms supporting cytosolic actin-based motility are fairly well understood, it is unclear whether specific host factors may be required for supporting the formation and resolution of membrane protrusions. To address this gap in knowledge, we have developed high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and computer-assisted image analysis procedures to quantify pathogen spread in human epithelial cells. We used the approach to screen a siRNA library covering the human kinome and identified 7 candidate kinases whose depletion led to severe spreading defects in cells infected with L. monocytogenes. We conducted systematic validation procedures with redundant silencing reagents and confirmed the involvement of the serine/threonine kinases, CSNK1A1 and CSNK2B. We conducted secondary assays showing that, in contrast with the situation observed in CSNK2B-depleted cells, L. monocytogenes formed wild-type cytosolic tails and displayed wild-type actin-based motility in the cytosol of CSNK1A1-depleted cells. Furthermore, we developed a protrusion formation assay and showed that the spreading defect observed in CSNK1A1-depleted cells correlated with the formation of protrusion that did not resolve into double-membrane vacuoles. Moreover, we developed sending and receiving cell-specific RNAi procedures and showed that CSNK1A was required in the sending cells, but was dispensable in the receiving cells, for protrusion resolution. Finally, we showed that the observed defects were specific to Listeria monocytogenes, as Rickettsia conorii displayed wild-type cell-to-cell spread in CSNK1A1- and CSNK2B-depleted cells. We conclude that, in addition to the specific host factors supporting cytosolic actin

  13. Aging increases cell-to-cell transcriptional variability upon immune stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Jimenez, Celia Pilar; Eling, Nils; Chen, Hung-Chang; Vallejos, Catalina A; Kolodziejczyk, Aleksandra A; Connor, Frances; Stojic, Lovorka; Rayner, Timothy F; Stubbington, Michael J T; Teichmann, Sarah A; de la Roche, Maike; Marioni, John C; Odom, Duncan T

    2017-03-31

    Aging is characterized by progressive loss of physiological and cellular functions, but the molecular basis of this decline remains unclear. We explored how aging affects transcriptional dynamics using single-cell RNA sequencing of unstimulated and stimulated naïve and effector memory CD4 + T cells from young and old mice from two divergent species. In young animals, immunological activation drives a conserved transcriptomic switch, resulting in tightly controlled gene expression characterized by a strong up-regulation of a core activation program, coupled with a decrease in cell-to-cell variability. Aging perturbed the activation of this core program and increased expression heterogeneity across populations of cells in both species. These discoveries suggest that increased cell-to-cell transcriptional variability will be a hallmark feature of aging across most, if not all, mammalian tissues. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Saporin-conjugated tetramers identify efficacious anti-HIV CD8+ T-cell specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitman, Ellen M.; Palmer, Christine D.; Buus, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Antigen-specific T-cells are highly variable, spanning potent antiviral efficacy and damaging auto-reactivity. In virus infections, identifying the most efficacious responses is critical to vaccine design. However, current methods depend on indirect measures or on ex vivo expanded CTL clones. We...

  15. The association of heavy and light chain variable domains in antibodies: implications for antigen specificity.

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-06-28

    The antigen-binding site of immunoglobulins is formed by six regions, three from the light and three from the heavy chain variable domains, which, on association of the two chains, form the conventional antigen-binding site of the antibody. The mode of interaction between the heavy and light chain variable domains affects the relative position of the antigen-binding loops and therefore has an effect on the overall conformation of the binding site. In this article, we analyze the structure of the interface between the heavy and light chain variable domains and show that there are essentially two different modes for their interaction that can be identified by the presence of key amino acids in specific positions of the antibody sequences. We also show that the different packing modes are related to the type of recognized antigen.

  16. Angiocrine functions of organ-specific endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Shahin; Butler, Jason M; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Preface Endothelial cells lining blood vessel capillaries are not just passive conduits for delivering blood. Tissue-specific endothelium establish specialized vascular niches that deploy specific sets of growth factors, known as angiocrine factors, which actively participate in inducing, specifying, patterning, and guiding organ regeneration and maintaining homeostasis and metabolism. Angiocrine factors upregulated in response to injury orchestrates self-renewal and differentiation of tissue-specific repopulating resident stem and progenitor cells into functional organs. Uncovering the precise mechanisms whereby physiological-levels of angiocrine factors are spatially and temporally produced, and distributed by organotypic endothelium to repopulating cells, will lay the foundation for driving organ repair without scarring. PMID:26791722

  17. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  18. Stimulation of adult oligodendrogenesis by myelin-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted Nielsen, Helle; Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2011-01-01

    of calretinergic associational/commissural fibers within the dentate gyrus. These results have implications for the perception of MS pathogenesis because they show that infiltrating myelin-specific T cells can stimulate oligodendrogenesis in the adult central nervous system....

  19. Osteocalcin and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase in Sickle cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    specific alkaline phosphatase (b-AP) total protein levels were evaluated as indicators of bone turnover in twenty patients with sickle cell haemoglobinopathies and in twenty normal healthy individuals. The serum bonespecific alkaline phosphatase ...

  20. Target-specific delivery of doxorubicin to human glioblastoma cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdullah Tahir Bayraç

    2018-01-29

    Jan 29, 2018 ... was previously selected for specific recognition of glioblastoma and represented many advantageous ... antigens, receptors or any 3-D structure on the target cells ..... both PSMA (?) and PSMA (-) prostate cancers.

  1. Birthdating studies reshape models for pituitary gland cell specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Shannon W; Mortensen, Amanda H; Camper, Sally A

    2011-04-15

    The intermediate and anterior lobes of the pituitary gland are derived from an invagination of oral ectoderm that forms Rathke's pouch. During gestation proliferating cells are enriched around the pouch lumen, and they appear to delaminate as they exit the cell cycle and differentiate. During late mouse gestation and the postnatal period, anterior lobe progenitors re-enter the cell cycle and expand the populations of specialized, hormone-producing cells. At birth, all cell types are present, and their localization appears stratified based on cell type. We conducted a birth dating study of Rathke's pouch derivatives to determine whether the location of specialized cells at birth is correlated with the timing of cell cycle exit. We find that all of the anterior lobe cell types initiate differentiation concurrently with a peak between e11.5 and e13.5. Differentiation of intermediate lobe melanotropes is delayed relative to anterior lobe cell types. We discovered that specialized cell types are not grouped together based on birth date and are dispersed throughout the anterior lobe. Thus, the apparent stratification of specialized cells at birth is not correlated with cell cycle exit. Thus, the currently popular model of cell specification, dependent upon timing of extrinsic, directional gradients of signaling molecules, needs revision. We propose that signals intrinsic to Rathke's pouch are necessary for cell specification between e11.5 and e13.5 and that cell-cell communication likely plays an important role in regulating this process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mitochondria and the non-genetic origins of cell-to-cell variability: More is different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guantes, Raúl; Díaz-Colunga, Juan; Iborra, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression activity is heterogeneous in a population of isogenic cells. Identifying the molecular basis of this variability will improve our understanding of phenomena like tumor resistance to drugs, virus infection, or cell fate choice. The complexity of the molecular steps and machines involved in transcription and translation could introduce sources of randomness at many levels, but a common constraint to most of these processes is its energy dependence. In eukaryotic cells, most of this energy is provided by mitochondria. A clonal population of cells may show a large variability in the number and functionality of mitochondria. Here, we discuss how differences in the mitochondrial content of each cell contribute to heterogeneity in gene products. Changes in the amount of mitochondria can also entail drastic alterations of a cell's gene expression program, which ultimately leads to phenotypic diversity. Also watch the Video Abstract. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Dissection of T-cell antigen specificity in human melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Albæk Thrue, Charlotte; Junker, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) isolated from melanoma patients and expanded in vitro by interleukin (IL)-2 treatment can elicit therapeutic response after adoptive transfer, but the antigen specificities of the T cells transferred have not been determined. By compiling all known melanoma-as...... from different fragments of resected melanoma lesions. In summary, our findings provide an initial definition of T-cell populations contributing to tumor recognition in TILs although the specificity of many tumor-reactive TILs remains undefined....

  4. [Specification of cell destiny in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierenberg, E

    1997-02-01

    Embryogenesis of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been described completely on a cell-by-cell basis and found to be essentially invariant. With this knowledge in hands, micromanipulated embryos and mutants have been analyzed for cell lineage defects and the distribution of specific gene products. The results challenge the classical view of cell-autonomous development in nematodes and indicate that the early embryo of C. elegans is a highly dynamic system. A network of inductive events between neighboring cells is being revealed, which is necessary to assign different developmental programs to blastomeres. In those cases where molecules involved in these cell-cell interactions have been identified, homologies to cell surface receptors, ligands and transcription factors found in other systems have become obvious.

  5. Determining T-cell specificity to understand and treat disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Sine Reker; Newell, Evan W.

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses and immunopathogeneses are based on the ability of T cells to respond to specific antigens. Consequently, understanding T-cell recognition patterns in health and disease involves studying the complexity and genetic heterogeneity of the antigen recognition pathway, which...

  6. Determinants of cell-to-cell variability in protein kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Matthias; Baumgärtner, Stephan; Legewie, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Cells reliably sense environmental changes despite internal and external fluctuations, but the mechanisms underlying robustness remain unclear. We analyzed how fluctuations in signaling protein concentrations give rise to cell-to-cell variability in protein kinase signaling using analytical theory and numerical simulations. We characterized the dose-response behavior of signaling cascades by calculating the stimulus level at which a pathway responds ('pathway sensitivity') and the maximal activation level upon strong stimulation. Minimal kinase cascades with gradual dose-response behavior show strong variability, because the pathway sensitivity and the maximal activation level cannot be simultaneously invariant. Negative feedback regulation resolves this trade-off and coordinately reduces fluctuations in the pathway sensitivity and maximal activation. Feedbacks acting at different levels in the cascade control different aspects of the dose-response curve, thereby synergistically reducing the variability. We also investigated more complex, ultrasensitive signaling cascades capable of switch-like decision making, and found that these can be inherently robust to protein concentration fluctuations. We describe how the cell-to-cell variability of ultrasensitive signaling systems can be actively regulated, e.g., by altering the expression of phosphatase(s) or by feedback/feedforward loops. Our calculations reveal that slow transcriptional negative feedback loops allow for variability suppression while maintaining switch-like decision making. Taken together, we describe design principles of signaling cascades that promote robustness. Our results may explain why certain signaling cascades like the yeast pheromone pathway show switch-like decision making with little cell-to-cell variability.

  7. Determinants of cell-to-cell variability in protein kinase signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Jeschke

    Full Text Available Cells reliably sense environmental changes despite internal and external fluctuations, but the mechanisms underlying robustness remain unclear. We analyzed how fluctuations in signaling protein concentrations give rise to cell-to-cell variability in protein kinase signaling using analytical theory and numerical simulations. We characterized the dose-response behavior of signaling cascades by calculating the stimulus level at which a pathway responds ('pathway sensitivity' and the maximal activation level upon strong stimulation. Minimal kinase cascades with gradual dose-response behavior show strong variability, because the pathway sensitivity and the maximal activation level cannot be simultaneously invariant. Negative feedback regulation resolves this trade-off and coordinately reduces fluctuations in the pathway sensitivity and maximal activation. Feedbacks acting at different levels in the cascade control different aspects of the dose-response curve, thereby synergistically reducing the variability. We also investigated more complex, ultrasensitive signaling cascades capable of switch-like decision making, and found that these can be inherently robust to protein concentration fluctuations. We describe how the cell-to-cell variability of ultrasensitive signaling systems can be actively regulated, e.g., by altering the expression of phosphatase(s or by feedback/feedforward loops. Our calculations reveal that slow transcriptional negative feedback loops allow for variability suppression while maintaining switch-like decision making. Taken together, we describe design principles of signaling cascades that promote robustness. Our results may explain why certain signaling cascades like the yeast pheromone pathway show switch-like decision making with little cell-to-cell variability.

  8. Adoptive immunotherapy using PRAME-specific T cells in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Domenico; Miele, Evelina; De Angelis, Biagio; Guercio, Marika; Boffa, Iolanda; Sinibaldi, Matilde; Po, Agnese; Caruana, Ignazio; Abballe, Luana; Carai, Andrea; Caruso, Simona; Camera, Antonio; Moseley, Annemarie; Hagedoorn, Renate S; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Giangaspero, Felice; Mastronuzzi, Angela; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Locatelli, Franco; Quintarelli, Concetta

    2018-04-03

    Medulloblastoma is the most frequent malignant childhood brain tumor with a high morbidity. Identification of new therapeutic targets would be instrumental in improving patient outcomes. We evaluated the expression of the tumor-associated antigen PRAME in biopsies from 60 medulloblastoma patients. PRAME expression was detectable in 82% of tissues independent of molecular and histopathologic subgroups. High PRAME expression also correlated with worse overall survival. We next investigated the relevance of PRAME as a target for immunotherapy. Medulloblastoma cells were targeted using genetically modified T cells with a PRAME-specific TCR (SLL TCR T cells). SLL TCR T cells efficiently killed medulloblastoma HLA-A*02+ DAOY cells as well as primary HLA-A*02+ medulloblastoma cells. Moreover, SLL TCR T cells controlled tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model of medulloblastoma. To prevent unexpected T cell-related toxicity,an inducible caspase 9 (iC9) gene was introduced in frame with the SLL TCR; this safety switch triggered prompt elimination of genetically-modified T cells. Altogether, these data indicate that T cells genetically modified with a high-affinity, PRAME-specific TCR and iC9 may represent a promising innovative approach for treating HLA-A*02+ medulloblastoma patients. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Effect of antigen on localization of immunologically specific B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzio, N.M.; Chapman, J.M.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were conducted to demonstrate homing of memory B cells to sites of antigen localization in lymph nodes, using functional criteria to detect local presence of memory cells at varying intervals after intravenous injection. Cell suspensions were prepared from spleens of donor mice injected with complete Freund's adjuvant. Recipient mice were injected with Escherichia coli endotoxin and immune or normal spleen cells and were gamma-irradiated. Results indicated that passively transferred unilateral B cell memory was established. The development over a period of several days of this difference between left and right lymph nodes suggests that recirculating memory B cells are being progressively selected by antigen in the lymph node, rather than that this difference is due to a specific exit of cells from the circulation towards the antigen

  10. Programmed Cell-to-Cell Variability in Ras Activity Triggers Emergent Behaviors during Mammary Epithelial Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Variability in signaling pathway activation between neighboring epithelial cells can arise from local differences in the microenvironment, noisy gene expression, or acquired genetic changes. To investigate the consequences of this cell-to-cell variability in signaling pathway activation on coordinated multicellular processes such as morphogenesis, we use DNA-programmed assembly to construct three-dimensional MCF10A microtissues that are mosaic for low-level expression of activated H-Ras. We find two emergent behaviors in mosaic microtissues: cells with activated H-Ras are basally extruded or lead motile multicellular protrusions that direct the collective motility of their wild-type neighbors. Remarkably, these behaviors are not observed in homogeneous microtissues in which all cells express the activated Ras protein, indicating that heterogeneity in Ras activity, rather than the total amount of Ras activity, is critical for these processes. Our results directly demonstrate that cell-to-cell variability in pathway activation within local populations of epithelial cells can drive emergent behaviors during epithelial morphogenesis.

  11. Dysregulation of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J; Cols, Montserrat; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2017-10-05

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most prevalent symptomatic primary immune deficiency. With widespread use of immunoglobulin replacement therapy, non-infectious complications, such as autoimmunity, chronic intestinal inflammation, and lung disease, have replaced infections as the major cause of morbidity and mortality in this immune deficiency. The pathogenic mechanisms that underlie the development of these complications in CVID are not known; however, there have been numerous associated laboratory findings. Among the most intriguing of these associations is elevation of interferon signature genes in CVID patients with inflammatory/autoimmune complications, as a similar gene expression profile is found in systemic lupus erythematosus and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Linked with this heightened interferon signature in CVID is an expansion of circulating IFN-γ-producing innate lymphoid cells. Innate lymphoid cells are key regulators of both protective and pathogenic immune responses that have been extensively studied in recent years. Further exploration of innate lymphoid cell biology in CVID may uncover key mechanisms underlying the development of inflammatory complications in these patients and may inspire much needed novel therapeutic approaches.

  12. Freedom of expression: cell-type-specific gene profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Leo; Cheetham, Seth W; Brand, Andrea H

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate and behavior are results of differential gene regulation, making techniques to profile gene expression in specific cell types highly desirable. Many methods now enable investigation at the DNA, RNA and protein level. This review introduces the most recent and popular techniques, and discusses key issues influencing the choice between these such as ease, cost and applicability of information gained. Interdisciplinary collaborations will no doubt contribute further advances, including not just in single cell type but single-cell expression profiling. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Targeted DNA vaccines for enhanced induction of idiotype-specific B and T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredriksen, Agnete B.; Sandlie, Inger; Bogen, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    Background: Idiotypes (Id) are antigenic determinants localized in variable (V) regions of Ig. Id-specific T and B cells (antibodies) play a role in immunotherapy of Id + tumors. However, vaccine strategies that enhance Id-specific responses are needed. Methods: Id + single-chain fragment variable (scFv) from multiple myelomas and B cell lymphomas were prepared in a fusion format that bivalently target surface molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APC). APC-specific targeting units were either scFv from APC-specific mAb (anti-MHC II, anti-CD40) or chemokines (MIP-1α, RANTES). Homodimeric Id-vaccines were injected intramuscularly or intradermally as plasmids in mice, combined with electroporation. Results: (i) Transfected cells secreted plasmid-encoded Id + fusion proteins to extracellular fluid followed by binding of vaccine molecules to APC. (ii) Targeted vaccine molecules increased Id-specific B and T cell responses. (iii) Bivalency and xenogeneic sequences both contributed to enhanced responses. (iv) Targeted Id DNA vaccines induced tumor resistance against challenges with Id + tumors. (v) Human MIP-1α targeting units enhanced Id-specific responses in mice, due to a cross reaction with murine chemokine receptors. Thus, targeted vaccines designed for humans can be quality tested in mice. (vi) Human Id + scFv from four multiple myeloma patients were inserted into the vaccine format and were successfully tested in mice. (vii) Human MIP-1α vaccine proteins enhanced human T cell responses in vitro. (viii) A hypothetical model for how the APC-targeted vaccine molecules enhance Id-specific T and B cells is presented. Conclusion: Targeted DNA Id-vaccines show promising results in preclinical studies, paving the way for testing in patients.

  14. Targeted DNA vaccines for enhanced induction of idiotype-specific B and T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredriksen, Agnete B.; Sandlie, Inger; Bogen, Bjarne, E-mail: bjarne.bogen@medisin.uio.no [Centre for Immune Regulation, Institute of Immunology, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-10-30

    Background: Idiotypes (Id) are antigenic determinants localized in variable (V) regions of Ig. Id-specific T and B cells (antibodies) play a role in immunotherapy of Id{sup +} tumors. However, vaccine strategies that enhance Id-specific responses are needed. Methods: Id{sup +} single-chain fragment variable (scFv) from multiple myelomas and B cell lymphomas were prepared in a fusion format that bivalently target surface molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APC). APC-specific targeting units were either scFv from APC-specific mAb (anti-MHC II, anti-CD40) or chemokines (MIP-1α, RANTES). Homodimeric Id-vaccines were injected intramuscularly or intradermally as plasmids in mice, combined with electroporation. Results: (i) Transfected cells secreted plasmid-encoded Id{sup +} fusion proteins to extracellular fluid followed by binding of vaccine molecules to APC. (ii) Targeted vaccine molecules increased Id-specific B and T cell responses. (iii) Bivalency and xenogeneic sequences both contributed to enhanced responses. (iv) Targeted Id DNA vaccines induced tumor resistance against challenges with Id{sup +} tumors. (v) Human MIP-1α targeting units enhanced Id-specific responses in mice, due to a cross reaction with murine chemokine receptors. Thus, targeted vaccines designed for humans can be quality tested in mice. (vi) Human Id{sup +} scFv from four multiple myeloma patients were inserted into the vaccine format and were successfully tested in mice. (vii) Human MIP-1α vaccine proteins enhanced human T cell responses in vitro. (viii) A hypothetical model for how the APC-targeted vaccine molecules enhance Id-specific T and B cells is presented. Conclusion: Targeted DNA Id-vaccines show promising results in preclinical studies, paving the way for testing in patients.

  15. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  16. Specific proliferation rates of human osteoblasts on calcium phosphate surfaces with variable concentrations of α-TCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Euler A. dos; Farina, Marcos; Soares, Gloria A.

    2007-01-01

    Ideally, ceramics used in the repair of bone defects need to be resorbed and replaced by newly formed bone in vivo. Tricalcium phosphate (TCP) has been widely used in association with hydroxyapatite (HA) due to its higher resorption kinetics when compared with HA alone. The aim of our study was to quantitatively investigate the effect of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) on human osteoblasts' adhesion and proliferation. Ceramic samples with variable concentrations of α-TCP and HA were produced by the calcination of calcium-deficient and stoichiometric HA. Human osteoblasts were cultured on the materials in three distinct experiments with different concentrations of cells. Numerical evaluation of cellular growth along time in culture was performed for each condition. The quantity of cells seeded onto the ceramics seems to influence the osteoblast behavior once proliferation was lower when more cells were seeded onto the samples. However, a smaller content of α-TCP in relation to that of HA did not significantly modify the specific proliferation rates of the osteoblasts. Only after a long time in culture, the increasing of the α-TCP content seems to change the cells' behavior

  17. Cell-specific monitoring of protein synthesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Kourtis

    Full Text Available Analysis of general and specific protein synthesis provides important information, relevant to cellular physiology and function. However, existing methodologies, involving metabolic labelling by incorporation of radioactive amino acids into nascent polypeptides, cannot be applied to monitor protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in live specimens. We have developed a novel approach for monitoring protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in vivo. Fluorescent reporter proteins such as GFP are expressed in specific cells and tissues of interest or throughout animals using appropriate promoters. Protein synthesis rates are assessed by following fluorescence recovery after partial photobleaching of the fluorophore at targeted sites. We evaluate the method by examining protein synthesis rates in diverse cell types of live, wild type or mRNA translation-defective Caenorhabditis elegans animals. Because it is non-invasive, our approach allows monitoring of protein synthesis in single cells or tissues with intrinsically different protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, it can be readily implemented in other organisms or cell culture systems.

  18. Cell-type specific four-component hydrogel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Aberle

    Full Text Available In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel, an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering.

  19. Sensitivity, Specificity and Predictive Value of Heart Rate Variability Indices in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kastelianne França da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Heart rate variability (HRV indices may detect autonomic changes with good diagnostic accuracy. Type diabetes mellitus (DM individuals may have changes in autonomic modulation; however, studies of this nature in this population are still scarce. Objective: To compare HRV indices between and assess their prognostic value by measurements of sensitivity, specificity and predictive values in young individuals with type 1 DM and healthy volunteers. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, physical and clinical assessment was performed in 39 young patients with type 1 DM and 43 young healthy controls. For HRV analysis, beat-to-beat heart rate variability was measured in dorsal decubitus, using a Polar S810i heart rate monitor, for 30 minutes. The following indices were calculated: SDNN, RMSSD, PNN50, TINN, RRTri, LF ms2, HF ms2, LF un, HF un, LF/HF, SD1, SD2, SD1/SD2, and ApEn. Results: Type 1 DM subjects showed a decrease in sympathetic and parasympathetic activities, and overall variability of autonomic nervous system. The RMSSD, SDNN, PNN50, LF ms2, HF ms2, RRTri, SD1 and SD2 indices showed greater diagnostic accuracy in discriminating diabetic from healthy individuals. Conclusion: Type 1 DM individuals have changes in autonomic modulation. The SDNN, RMSSD, PNN50, RRtri, LF ms2, HF ms2, SD1 and SD2 indices may be alternative tools to discriminate individuals with type 1 DM.

  20. Leaf area index from litter collection: impact of specific leaf area variability within a beech stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouriaud, O. [Inst. National de la Recherche Agronomique, Centre de Recherches Forestieres de Nancy, Champenoux (France); Soudani, K. [Univ. Paris-Sud XI, Dept. d' Ecophysiologie Vegetale, Lab. Ecologie Systematique et Evolution, Orsay Cedex (France); Breda, N. [Inst. National de la Recherche Agronomique, Centre de Recherches Forestieres de Nancy, Champenoux (France)

    2003-06-01

    Litter fall collection is a direct method widely used to estimate leaf area index (LAI) in broad-leaved forest stands. Indirect measurements using radiation transmittance and gap fraction theory are often compared and calibrated against litter fall, which is considered as a reference method, but few studies address the question of litter specific leaf area (SLA) measurement and variability. SLA (leaf area per unit of dry weight, m{sup 2}{center_dot}g{sup -1}) is used to convert dry leaf litter biomass (g .m{sup -}2) into leaf area per ground unit area (m{sup 2}{center_dot}m{sup -2}). We paid special attention to this parameter in two young beech stands (dense and thinned) in northeastern France. The variability of both canopy (closure, LAI) and site conditions (soil properties, vegetation) was investigated as potential contributing factors to beech SLA variability. A systematic description of soil and floristic composition was performed and three types of soil were identified. Ellenberg's indicator values were averaged for each plot to assess nitrogen soil content. SLA of beech litter was measured three times during the fall in 23 plots in the stands (40 ha). Litter was collected bimonthly in square-shaped traps (0.5 m{sup 2}) and dried. Before drying, 30 leaves per plot and for each date were sampled, and leaf length, width, and area were measured with the help of a LI-COR areameter. SLA was calculated as the ratio of cumulated leaf area to total dry weight of the 30 leaves. Leaves characteristics per plot were averaged for the three dates of litter collection. Plant area index (PAI), estimated using the LAI-2000 plant canopy analyser and considering only the upper three rings, ranged from 2.9 to 8.1. Specific leaf area of beech litter was also highly different from one plot to the other, ranging from 150 to 320 cm{sup 2}{center_dot}g{sup -1}. Nevertheless, no relationship was found between SLA and stand canopy closure or PAI On the contrary, a significant

  1. Leaf area index from litter collection: impact of specific leaf area variability within a beech stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouriaud, O.; Soudani, K.; Breda, N.

    2003-01-01

    Litter fall collection is a direct method widely used to estimate leaf area index (LAI) in broad-leaved forest stands. Indirect measurements using radiation transmittance and gap fraction theory are often compared and calibrated against litter fall, which is considered as a reference method, but few studies address the question of litter specific leaf area (SLA) measurement and variability. SLA (leaf area per unit of dry weight, m 2 ·g -1 ) is used to convert dry leaf litter biomass (g .m - 2) into leaf area per ground unit area (m 2 ·m -2 ). We paid special attention to this parameter in two young beech stands (dense and thinned) in northeastern France. The variability of both canopy (closure, LAI) and site conditions (soil properties, vegetation) was investigated as potential contributing factors to beech SLA variability. A systematic description of soil and floristic composition was performed and three types of soil were identified. Ellenberg's indicator values were averaged for each plot to assess nitrogen soil content. SLA of beech litter was measured three times during the fall in 23 plots in the stands (40 ha). Litter was collected bimonthly in square-shaped traps (0.5 m 2 ) and dried. Before drying, 30 leaves per plot and for each date were sampled, and leaf length, width, and area were measured with the help of a LI-COR areameter. SLA was calculated as the ratio of cumulated leaf area to total dry weight of the 30 leaves. Leaves characteristics per plot were averaged for the three dates of litter collection. Plant area index (PAI), estimated using the LAI-2000 plant canopy analyser and considering only the upper three rings, ranged from 2.9 to 8.1. Specific leaf area of beech litter was also highly different from one plot to the other, ranging from 150 to 320 cm 2 ·g -1 . Nevertheless, no relationship was found between SLA and stand canopy closure or PAI On the contrary, a significant relationship between SLA and soil properties was observed. Both SLA

  2. Cell-Specific PEAR1 Methylation Studies Reveal a Locus that Coordinates Expression of Multiple Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Izzi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal interactions connect distant enhancers and promoters on the same chromosome, activating or repressing gene expression. PEAR1 encodes the Platelet-Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1, a contact receptor involved in platelet function and megakaryocyte and endothelial cell proliferation. PEAR1 expression during megakaryocyte differentiation is controlled by DNA methylation at its first CpG island. We identified a PEAR1 cell-specific methylation sensitive region in endothelial cells and megakaryocytes that showed strong chromosomal interactions with ISGL20L2, RRNAD1, MRLP24, HDGF and PRCC, using available promoter capture Hi-C datasets. These genes are involved in ribosome processing, protein synthesis, cell cycle and cell proliferation. We next studied the methylation and expression profile of these five genes in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs and megakaryocyte precursors. While cell-specific PEAR1 methylation corresponded to variability in expression for four out of five genes, no methylation change was observed in their promoter regions across cell types. Our data suggest that PEAR1 cell-type specific methylation changes may control long distance interactions with other genes. Further studies are needed to show whether such interaction data might be relevant for the genome-wide association data that showed a role for non-coding PEAR1 variants in the same region and platelet function, platelet count and cardiovascular risk.

  3. Specific Protein Markers for Stem Cell Cross-Talk with Neighboring Cells in the Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Kyung Soo; Shin, Seung Won; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Um, Soong Ho

    2013-01-01

    A stem cell interacts with the neighboring cells in its environment. To maintain a living organism’s metabolism, either cell-cell or cell-environment interactions may be significant. Usually, these cells communicate with each other through biological signaling by interactive behaviors of primary proteins or complementary chemicals. The signaling intermediates offer the stem cell’s functionality on its metabolism. With the rapid advent of omics technologies, various specific markers by which s...

  4. Cancer Patient T Cells Genetically Targeted to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Specifically Lyse Prostate Cancer Cells and Release Cytokines in Response to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Gong

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The expression of immunoglobulin-based artificial receptors in normal T lymphocytes provides a means to target lymphocytes to cell surface antigens independently of major histocompatibility complex restriction. Such artificial receptors have been previously shown to confer antigen-specific tumoricidal properties in murine T cells. We constructed a novel ζ chain fusion receptor specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA termed Pz-1. PSMA is a cell-surface glycoprotein expressed on prostate cancer cells and the neovascular endothelium of multiple carcinomas. We show that primary T cells harvested from five of five patients with different stages of prostate cancer and transduced with the Pz-1 receptor readily lyse prostate cancer cells. Having established a culture system using fibroblasts that express PSMA, we next show that T cells expressing the Pz-1 receptor release cytokines in response to cell-bound PSMA. Furthermore, we show that the cytokine release is greatly augmented by B7.1-mediated costimulation. Thus, our findings support the feasibility of adoptive cell therapy by using genetically engineered T cells in prostate cancer patients and suggest that both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte functions can be synergistically targeted against tumor cells.

  5. Countermovement jump height: gender and sport-specific differences in the force-time variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffaye, Guillaume; Wagner, Phillip P; Tombleson, Tom I L

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess (a) the eccentric rate of force development, the concentric force, and selected time variables on vertical performance during countermovement jump, (b) the existence of gender differences in these variables, and (c) the sport-specific differences. The sample was composed of 189 males and 84 females, all elite athletes involved in college and professional sports (primarily football, basketball, baseball, and volleyball). The subjects performed a series of 6 countermovement jumps on a force plate (500 Hz). Average eccentric rate of force development (ECC-RFD), total time (TIME), eccentric time (ECC-T), Ratio between eccentric and total time (ECC-T:T) and average force (CON-F) were extracted from force-time curves and the vertical jumping performance, measured by impulse momentum. Results show that CON-F (r = 0.57; p differ between both sexes (p differ, showing a similar temporal structure. The best way to jump high is to increase CON-F and ECC-RFD thus minimizing the ECC-T. Principal component analysis (PCA) accounted for 76.8% of the JH variance and revealed that JH is predicted by a temporal and a force component. Furthermore, the PCA comparison made among athletes revealed sport-specific signatures: volleyball players revealed a temporal-prevailing profile, a weak-force with large ECC-T:T for basketball players and explosive and powerful profiles for football and baseball players.

  6. Gaussian graphical modeling reveals specific lipid correlations in glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nikola S.; Krumsiek, Jan; Theis, Fabian J.; Böhm, Christian; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2011-06-01

    Advances in high-throughput measurements of biological specimens necessitate the development of biologically driven computational techniques. To understand the molecular level of many human diseases, such as cancer, lipid quantifications have been shown to offer an excellent opportunity to reveal disease-specific regulations. The data analysis of the cell lipidome, however, remains a challenging task and cannot be accomplished solely based on intuitive reasoning. We have developed a method to identify a lipid correlation network which is entirely disease-specific. A powerful method to correlate experimentally measured lipid levels across the various samples is a Gaussian Graphical Model (GGM), which is based on partial correlation coefficients. In contrast to regular Pearson correlations, partial correlations aim to identify only direct correlations while eliminating indirect associations. Conventional GGM calculations on the entire dataset can, however, not provide information on whether a correlation is truly disease-specific with respect to the disease samples and not a correlation of control samples. Thus, we implemented a novel differential GGM approach unraveling only the disease-specific correlations, and applied it to the lipidome of immortal Glioblastoma tumor cells. A large set of lipid species were measured by mass spectrometry in order to evaluate lipid remodeling as a result to a combination of perturbation of cells inducing programmed cell death, while the other perturbations served solely as biological controls. With the differential GGM, we were able to reveal Glioblastoma-specific lipid correlations to advance biomedical research on novel gene therapies.

  7. Engineering Specificity and Function of Therapeutic Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny L. McGovern

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy with polyclonal regulatory T cells (Tregs has shown efficacy in suppressing detrimental immune responses in experimental models of autoimmunity and transplantation. The lack of specificity is a potential limitation of Treg therapy, as studies in mice have demonstrated that specificity can enhance the therapeutic potency of Treg. We will discuss that vectors encoding T cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors provide an efficient gene-transfer platform to reliably produce Tregs of defined antigen specificity, thus overcoming the considerable difficulties of isolating low-frequency, antigen-specific cells that may be present in the natural Treg repertoire. The recent observations that Tregs can polarize into distinct lineages similar to the Th1, Th2, and Th17 subsets described for conventional T helper cells raise the possibility that Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-driven pathology may require matching Treg subsets for optimal therapeutic efficacy. In the future, genetic engineering may serve not only to enforce FoxP3 expression and a stable Treg phenotype but it may also enable the expression of particular transcription factors that drive differentiation into defined Treg subsets. Together, established and recently developed gene transfer and editing tools provide exciting opportunities to produce tailor-made antigen-specific Treg products with defined functional activities.

  8. Acetylation site specificities of lysine deacetylase inhibitors in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schölz, Christian; Weinert, Brian Tate; Wagner, Sebastian A

    2015-01-01

    Lysine deacetylases inhibitors (KDACIs) are used in basic research, and many are being investigated in clinical trials for treatment of cancer and other diseases. However, their specificities in cells are incompletely characterized. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) to obtain acety......1-α, providing a possible mechanistic explanation of its adverse, pro-inflammatory effects. Our results offer a systems view of KDACI specificities, providing a framework for studying function of acetylation and deacetylases....

  9. Specific Cell (Re-)Programming: Approaches and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausburg, Frauke; Jung, Julia Jeannine; David, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Many disorders are manifested by dysfunction of key cell types or their disturbed integration in complex organs. Thereby, adult organ systems often bear restricted self-renewal potential and are incapable of achieving functional regeneration. This underlies the need for novel strategies in the field of cell (re-)programming-based regenerative medicine as well as for drug development in vitro. The regenerative field has been hampered by restricted availability of adult stem cells and the potentially hazardous features of pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Moreover, ethical concerns and legal restrictions regarding the generation and use of ESCs still exist. The establishment of direct reprogramming protocols for various therapeutically valuable somatic cell types has overcome some of these limitations. Meanwhile, new perspectives for safe and efficient generation of different specified somatic cell types have emerged from numerous approaches relying on exogenous expression of lineage-specific transcription factors, coding and noncoding RNAs, and chemical compounds.It should be of highest priority to develop protocols for the production of mature and physiologically functional cells with properties ideally matching those of their endogenous counterparts. Their availability can bring together basic research, drug screening, safety testing, and ultimately clinical trials. Here, we highlight the remarkable successes in cellular (re-)programming, which have greatly advanced the field of regenerative medicine in recent years. In particular, we review recent progress on the generation of cardiomyocyte subtypes, with a focus on cardiac pacemaker cells. Graphical Abstract.

  10. Robustness of MEK-ERK Dynamics and Origins of Cell-to-Cell Variability in MAPK Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Filippi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling processes can exhibit pronounced cell-to-cell variability in genetically identical cells. This affects how individual cells respond differentially to the same environmental stimulus. However, the origins of cell-to-cell variability in cellular signaling systems remain poorly understood. Here, we measure the dynamics of phosphorylated MEK and ERK across cell populations and quantify the levels of population heterogeneity over time using high-throughput image cytometry. We use a statistical modeling framework to show that extrinsic noise, particularly that from upstream MEK, is the dominant factor causing cell-to-cell variability in ERK phosphorylation, rather than stochasticity in the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of ERK. We furthermore show that without extrinsic noise in the core module, variable (including noisy signals would be faithfully reproduced downstream, but the within-module extrinsic variability distorts these signals and leads to a drastic reduction in the mutual information between incoming signal and ERK activity.

  11. Effects of variable specific heat on energy transfer in a high-temperature supersonic channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Xiaopeng; Dou, Hua-Shu; Zhu, Zuchao

    2018-05-01

    An energy transfer mechanism in high-temperature supersonic turbulent flow for variable specific heat (VSH) condition through turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), mean kinetic energy (MKE), turbulent internal energy (TIE) and mean internal energy (MIE) is proposed. The similarities of energy budgets between VSH and constant specific heat (CSH) conditions are investigated by introducing a vibrational energy excited degree and considering the effects of fluctuating specific heat. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of temporally evolving high-temperature supersonic turbulent channel flow is conducted at Mach number 3.0 and Reynolds number 4800 combined with a constant dimensional wall temperature 1192.60 K for VSH and CSH conditions to validate the proposed energy transfer mechanism. The differences between the terms in the two kinetic energy budgets for VSH and CSH conditions are small; however, the magnitude of molecular diffusion term for VSH condition is significantly smaller than that for CSH condition. The non-negligible energy transfer is obtained after neglecting several small terms of diffusion, dissipation and compressibility related. The non-negligible energy transfer involving TIE includes three processes, in which energy can be gained from TKE and MIE and lost to MIE. The same non-negligible energy transfer through TKE, MKE and MIE is observed for both the conditions.

  12. Cardiac Glycoside Glucoevatromonoside Induces Cancer Type-Specific Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira F. Z. Schneider

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides (CGs are natural compounds used traditionally to treat congestive heart diseases. Recent investigations repositioned CGs as potential anticancer agents. To discover novel cytotoxic CG scaffolds, we selected the cardenolide glucoevatromonoside (GEV out of 46 CGs for its low nanomolar anti-lung cancer activity. GEV presented reduced toxicity toward non-cancerous cell types (lung MRC-5 and PBMC and high-affinity binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase α subunit, assessed by computational docking. GEV-induced cell death was caspase-independent, as investigated by a multiparametric approach, and culminates in severe morphological alterations in A549 cells, monitored by transmission electron microscopy, live cell imaging and flow cytometry. This non-canonical cell death was not preceded or accompanied by exacerbation of autophagy. In the presence of GEV, markers of autophagic flux (e.g. LC3I-II conversion were impacted, even in presence of bafilomycin A1. Cell death induction remained unaffected by calpain, cathepsin, parthanatos, or necroptosis inhibitors. Interestingly, GEV triggered caspase-dependent apoptosis in U937 acute myeloid leukemia cells, witnessing cancer-type specific cell death induction. Differential cell cycle modulation by this CG led to a G2/M arrest, cyclin B1 and p53 downregulation in A549, but not in U937 cells. We further extended the anti-cancer potential of GEV to 3D cell culture using clonogenic and spheroid formation assays and validated our findings in vivo by zebrafish xenografts. Altogether, GEV shows an interesting anticancer profile with the ability to exert cytotoxic effects via induction of different cell death modalities.

  13. Specification of primordial germ cells in medaka (Oryzias latipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raz Erez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primordial germ cells (PGCs give rise to gametes that are responsible for the development of a new organism in the next generation. Two modes of germ line specification have been described: the inheritance of asymmetrically-localized maternally provided cytoplasmic determinants and the induction of the PGC fate by other cell types. PGCs specification in zebrafish appears to depend on inheritance of germ plasm in which several RNA molecules such as vasa and nanos reside. Whether the specification mode of PGCs found in zebrafish is general for other fish species was brought into question upon analysis of olvas expression – the vasa homologue in another teleost, medaka (Oryzias latipes. Here, in contrast to the findings in zebrafish, the PGCs are found in a predictable position relative to a somatic structure, the embryonic shield. This finding, coupled with the fact that vasa mRNA, which is localized to the germ plasm of zebrafish but does not label a similar structure in medaka opened the possibility of fundamentally different mechanisms governing PGC specification in these two fish species. Results In this study we addressed the question concerning the mode of PGC specification in medaka using embryological experiments, analysis of RNA stability in the PGCs and electron microscopy observations. Dramatic alterations in the somatic environment, i.e. induction of a secondary axis or mesoderm formation alteration, did not affect the PGC number. Furthermore, the PGCs of medaka are capable of protecting specific RNA molecules from degradation and could therefore exhibit a specific mRNA expression pattern controlled by posttrancriptional mechanisms. Subsequent analysis of 4-cell stage medaka embryos using electron microscopy revealed germ plasm-like structures located at a region corresponding to that of zebrafish germ plasm. Conclusion Taken together, these results are consistent with the idea that in medaka the inheritance of

  14. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative

  15. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivetal, Jérémy, E-mail: jeremy.piv@netcmail.com [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Royet, David [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Ciuta, Georgeta [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Frenea-Robin, Marie [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Haddour, Naoufel [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Dempsey, Nora M. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric [Univ Limoges, CNRS, SPCTS UMR 7513, 12 Rue Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges (France); Simonet, Pascal [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France)

    2015-04-15

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications. - Highlights: 1.We report a new approach to selectively micropattern bacterial cells individually upon micro-magnet arrays. 2.Permanent micro-magnets of a size approaching that of bacteria could be fabricated using a Thermo-Magnetic Patterning process. 3.Bacterial cells were labeled using two different magnetic labeling strategies providing flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology.

  16. Asymmetric cell division requires specific mechanisms for adjusting global transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Adriana; Medina, Daniel A; García-Martínez, José; Begley, Victoria; Singh, Abhyudai; Chávez, Sebastián; Muñoz-Centeno, Mari C; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2017-12-01

    Most cells divide symmetrically into two approximately identical cells. There are many examples, however, of asymmetric cell division that can generate sibling cell size differences. Whereas physical asymmetric division mechanisms and cell fate consequences have been investigated, the specific problem caused by asymmetric division at the transcription level has not yet been addressed. In symmetrically dividing cells the nascent transcription rate increases in parallel to cell volume to compensate it by keeping the actual mRNA synthesis rate constant. This cannot apply to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where this mechanism would provoke a never-ending increasing mRNA synthesis rate in smaller daughter cells. We show here that, contrarily to other eukaryotes with symmetric division, budding yeast keeps the nascent transcription rates of its RNA polymerases constant and increases mRNA stability. This control on RNA pol II-dependent transcription rate is obtained by controlling the cellular concentration of this enzyme. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. A Plasma Diagnostic Set for the Study of a Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J. P.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Bengtson Bussell, R., Jr.; Jacobson, V. T.; Wootton, A. J.; Bering, E. A.; Jack, T.; Rabeau, A.

    1997-11-01

    The Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL) is developing a Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) using an RF heated magnetic mirror operated asymmetrically. We will describe the initial set of plasma diagnostics and data acquisition system being developed and installed on the VASIMR experiment. A U.T. Austin team is installing two fast reciprocating probes: a quadruple Langmuir and a Mach probe. These measure electron density and temperature profiles, electrostatic plasma fluctuations, and plasma flow profiles. The University of Houston is developing an array of 20 highly directional Retarding Potential Analyzers (RPA) for measuring ion energy distribution function profiles in the rocket plume, giving a measurement of total thrust. We have also developed a CAMAC based data acquisition system using LabView running on a Power Macintosh communicating through a 2 MB/s serial highway. We will present data from initial plasma operations and discuss future diagnostic development.

  18. Specific transfer effects following variable priority dual-task training in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussier, Maxime; Bugaiska, Aurélia; Bherer, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Past divided attention training studies in older adults have suggested that variable priority training (VPT) tends to show larger improvement than fixed priority training (FPT). However, it remains unclear whether VPT leads to larger transfer effects. In this study, eighty-three older adults aged between 55 and 65 received five 1-hour sessions of VPT, FPT or of an active placebo. VPT and FPT subjects trained on a complex dual-task condition with variable stimulus timings in order to promote more flexible and self-guided strategies with regard to attentional priority devoted to the concurrent tasks. Real-time individualized feedback was provided to encourage improvement. The active placebo group attended computer classes. Near and far modality transfer tasks were used to assess the generalization of transfer effects. Results showed that VPT induced significantly larger transfer effects than FPT on a near modality transfer task. Evidence for larger transfer effects in VPT than FPT on a far modality transfer task was also observed. Furthermore, the superiority of VPT on FPT in transfer effects was specific to the ability to coordinate two concurrent tasks. Results of this study help better understand the benefits of VPT attentional training on transfer effects, which is an essential outcome for cognitive training effectiveness and relevancy.

  19. Site-Specific Variability in the Chemical Diversity of the Antarctic Red Alga Plocamium cartilagineum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Young

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plocamium cartilagineum is a common red alga on the benthos of Antarctica and can be a dominant understory species along the western Antarctic Peninsula. Algae from this region have been studied chemically, and like “P. cartilagineum” from other worldwide locations where it is common, it is rich in halogenated monoterpenes, some of which have been implicated as feeding deterrents toward sympatric algal predators. Secondary metabolites are highly variable in this alga, both qualitatively and quantitatively, leading us to probe individual plants to track the possible link of variability to genetic or other factors. Using cox1 and rbcL gene sequencing, we find that the Antarctic alga divides into two closely related phylogroups, but not species, each of which is further divided into one of five chemogroups. The chemogroups themselves, defined on the basis of Bray-Curtis similarity profiling of GC/QqQ chromatographic analyses, are largely site specific within a 10 km2 area. Thus, on the limited geographical range of this analysis, P. cartilagineum displays only modest genetic radiation, but its secondary metabolome was found to have experienced more extensive radiation. Such metabogenomic divergence demonstrated on the larger geographical scale of the Antarctic Peninsula, or perhaps even continent-wide, may contribute to the discovery of cryptic speciation.

  20. Common themes and cell type specific variations of higher order chromatin arrangements in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cremer Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Similarities as well as differences in higher order chromatin arrangements of human cell types were previously reported. For an evolutionary comparison, we now studied the arrangements of chromosome territories and centromere regions in six mouse cell types (lymphocytes, embryonic stem cells, macrophages, fibroblasts, myoblasts and myotubes with fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both species evolved pronounced differences in karyotypes after their last common ancestors lived about 87 million years ago and thus seem particularly suited to elucidate common and cell type specific themes of higher order chromatin arrangements in mammals. Results All mouse cell types showed non-random correlations of radial chromosome territory positions with gene density as well as with chromosome size. The distribution of chromosome territories and pericentromeric heterochromatin changed during differentiation, leading to distinct cell type specific distribution patterns. We exclude a strict dependence of these differences on nuclear shape. Positional differences in mouse cell nuclei were less pronounced compared to human cell nuclei in agreement with smaller differences in chromosome size and gene density. Notably, the position of chromosome territories relative to each other was very variable. Conclusion Chromosome territory arrangements according to chromosome size and gene density provide common, evolutionary conserved themes in both, human and mouse cell types. Our findings are incompatible with a previously reported model of parental genome separation.

  1. Evaluating Variability and Uncertainty of Geological Strength Index at a Specific Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Aladejare, Adeyemi Emman

    2016-09-01

    Geological Strength Index (GSI) is an important parameter for estimating rock mass properties. GSI can be estimated from quantitative GSI chart, as an alternative to the direct observational method which requires vast geological experience of rock. GSI chart was developed from past observations and engineering experience, with either empiricism or some theoretical simplifications. The GSI chart thereby contains model uncertainty which arises from its development. The presence of such model uncertainty affects the GSI estimated from GSI chart at a specific site; it is, therefore, imperative to quantify and incorporate the model uncertainty during GSI estimation from the GSI chart. A major challenge for quantifying the GSI chart model uncertainty is a lack of the original datasets that have been used to develop the GSI chart, since the GSI chart was developed from past experience without referring to specific datasets. This paper intends to tackle this problem by developing a Bayesian approach for quantifying the model uncertainty in GSI chart when using it to estimate GSI at a specific site. The model uncertainty in the GSI chart and the inherent spatial variability in GSI are modeled explicitly in the Bayesian approach. The Bayesian approach generates equivalent samples of GSI from the integrated knowledge of GSI chart, prior knowledge and observation data available from site investigation. Equations are derived for the Bayesian approach, and the proposed approach is illustrated using data from a drill and blast tunnel project. The proposed approach effectively tackles the problem of how to quantify the model uncertainty that arises from using GSI chart for characterization of site-specific GSI in a transparent manner.

  2. The functions of the variable lipoprotein family of Mycoplasma hyorhinis in adherence to host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qiyan; Wang, Jia; Ji, Yan; Ni, Bo; Zhang, Bixiong; Ma, Qinghong; Wei, Yanna; Xiao, Shaobo; Feng, Zhixin; Liu, Maojun; Shao, Guoqing

    2016-04-15

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis) is a swine pathogen that is associated with various human cancers and contamination in cell cultures. However, no studies on the adhesion molecules of this pathogen have yet been reported. The variable lipoprotein (Vlp) family is an important surface component of M. hyorhinis. Herein, we performed several experiments to identify the function of the Vlp family in adherence to host cells. Seven recombinant Vlp (rVlp) proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. The potential role of rVlp adherence to pig kidney (PK-15) and swine tracheal epithelial (STEC) cells was then studied by indirect immunofluorescence assay and microtiter plate adherence assay. Adhesion of M. hyorhinis to PK-15 and STEC cells was specifically inhibited by the addition of a cocktail of rVlp proteins. The rVlp protein mixture was shown to bind to both PK-15 and STEC cells. The binding increased in a dose-dependent manner and could be blocked by antisera against the rVlp proteins. Most of the rVlp proteins could bind individually to both PK-15 and STEC cells except for rVlpD and rVlpF, which bound only to STEC cells. Because Vlp members vary in size among different strains and generations, they may vary in their cytoadhesion capabilities in various strains. In summary, the present results indicate that the Vlp family functions as adhesins of M. hyorhinis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED adj ). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED adj between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED adj that differed by up to 44% from effective dose estimates that were not

  4. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan [Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose

  5. Electron microbeam specifications for use in cell irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.-H.; Choi, M.-C.; Lee, D.-H.; Chang, M.; Kang, C.-S.

    2003-01-01

    The microbeam irradiation system was devised originally to identify the hit and unhit cells by confining the beam within the target cell. The major achievement through the microbeam experiment studies has turned out to be the discovery of the 'bystander effect'. Microbeam experiments have been performed with alpha and proton beams in major and with soft x-rays in minor. The study with electron microbeam has been deferred mainly due to the difficulty in confining the electron tracks within a single target cell. In this paper, the electron microbeam irradiation system under development in Korea is introduced in terms of the beam specifications. The KIRAMS electron microbeam irradiation system consists of an electron gun, a vacuum chamber for beam collimation into 5 μm in diameter and a biology stage. The beam characteristics in terms of current and energy spectrum of the electrons entering a target cell and its neighbor cells were investigated by Monte Carlo simulation for the electron source energies of 25, 50, 75 and 100 keV. Energy depositions in the target cell and the neighbor cells were also calculated. The beam attenuation in current and energy occurs while electrons pass through the 2 μm-thick Mylar vacuum window, 100 μm-thick air gap and the 2 μm-thick Mylar bottom of cell dish. With 25 keV electron source, 80 % of decrease in current and 30 % of decrease in average energy were estimated before entering the target cell. With 75 keV electron source, on the other hand, 55 % of decrease in current and less than 1 % of decrease in average energy were estimated. Average dose per single collimated electron emission was 0.067 cGy to the target cell nucleus of 5 μm in diameter and 0.030 cGy to the cytoplasm of 2.5 μm in thickness with 25 keV electron source while they were 0.15 cGy and 0.019 cGy, respectively, with 75 keV electron source. The multiple scattering of electrons resulted in energy deposition in the neighbor cells as well. Dose to the first

  6. Generation of Transplantable Beta Cells for Patient-Specific Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation offers a potential cure for type 1 diabetes, but it is challenged by insufficient donor tissue and side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, alternative sources of insulin-producing cells and isletfriendly immunosuppression are required to increase the efficiency and safety of this procedure. Beta cells can be transdifferentiated from precursors or another heterologous (non-beta-cell source. Recent advances in beta cell regeneration from somatic cells such as fibroblasts could circumvent the usage of immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, generation of patient-specific beta cells provides the potential of an evolutionary treatment for patients with diabetes.

  7. Temporal and sex-specific variability in Rhinoceros Auklet diet in the central California Current system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carle, Ryan D.; Beck, Jessie N.; Calleri, David M.; Hester, Michelle M.

    2015-06-01

    We used stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) and compared prey provided to chicks by each sex to evaluate seasonal and sex-specific diets in Rhinoceros Auklets (Cerorhinca monocerata) in the central California Current system during 2012-2013. Mixing models indicated northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax) were important prey for adults during fall/winter and juvenile rockfishes (Sebastes spp.) were important prey during incubation both years. Adult trophic level increased between incubation and chick-rearing periods in both years. During 2012, δ15N and δ13C of chick-rearing males and females differed significantly; mixing models indicated that females ate more Pacific saury (Cololabis saira) and less market squid (Doryteuthis opalescens) than males. Likewise, females delivered significantly more Pacific saury and less market squid to chicks than males during 2012. Chick growth (g d- 1) and chick survival to fledging were significantly lower during 2012 than 2013, likely because chicks were fed lesser quality prey or fed less frequently in 2012. Lesser body mass of females during incubation in 2012 indicated sex-specific diet differences may have been related to female energetic constraints. The observed variability in Rhinoceros Auklet diet underscores the importance of managing multiple prey populations in this system so that generalist predators have sufficient resources through changing conditions.

  8. Specific insulin binding in bovine chromaffin cells; demonstration of preferential binding to adrenalin-storing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serck-Hanssen, G.; Soevik, O.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin binding was studied in subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells enriched in adrenalin-producing cells (A-cells) or noradrenalin-producing cells (NA-cells). Binding of 125 I-insulin was carried out at 15 0 C for 3 hrs in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled hormone. Four fractions of cells were obtained by centrifugation on a stepwise bovine serum albumin gradient. The four fractions were all shown to bind insulin in a specific manner and the highest binding was measured in the cell layers of higher densities, containing mainly A-cells. The difference in binding of insulin to the four subpopulations of chromaffin cells seemed to be related to differences in numbers of receptors as opposed to receptor affinities. The authors conclude that bovine chromaffin cells possess high affinity binding sites for insulin and that these binding sites are mainly confined to A-cells. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  9. Secondary immunization generates clonally related antigen-specific plasma cells and memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Daniela; Giesecke, Claudia; Mei, Henrik E; Reiter, Karin; Daridon, Capucine; Lipsky, Peter E; Dörner, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Rechallenge with T cell-dependent Ags induces memory B cells to re-enter germinal centers (GCs) and undergo further expansion and differentiation into plasma cells (PCs) and secondary memory B cells. It is currently not known whether the expanded population of memory B cells and PCs generated in secondary GCs are clonally related, nor has the extent of proliferation and somatic hypermutation of their precursors been delineated. In this study, after secondary tetanus toxoid (TT) immunization, TT-specific PCs increased 17- to 80-fold on days 6-7, whereas TT-specific memory B cells peaked (delayed) on day 14 with a 2- to 22-fold increase. Molecular analyses of V(H)DJ(H) rearrangements of individual cells revealed no major differences of gene usage and CDR3 length between TT-specific PCs and memory B cells, and both contained extensive evidence of somatic hypermutation with a pattern consistent with GC reactions. This analysis identified clonally related TT-specific memory B cells and PCs. Within clusters of clonally related cells, sequences shared a number of mutations but also could contain additional base pair changes. The data indicate that although following secondary immunization PCs can derive from memory B cells without further somatic hypermutation, in some circumstances, likely within GC reactions, asymmetric mutation can occur. These results suggest that after the fate decision to differentiate into secondary memory B cells or PCs, some committed precursors continue to proliferate and mutate their V(H) genes.

  10. Identifying States along the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation Hierarchy with Single Cell Specificity via Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilin, Yelena; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A C; Kraft, Mary L

    2015-11-17

    A major challenge for expanding specific types of hematopoietic cells ex vivo for the treatment of blood cell pathologies is identifying the combinations of cellular and matrix cues that direct hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to self-renew or differentiate into cell populations ex vivo. Microscale screening platforms enable minimizing the number of rare HSCs required to screen the effects of numerous cues on HSC fate decisions. These platforms create a strong demand for label-free methods that accurately identify the fate decisions of individual hematopoietic cells at specific locations on the platform. We demonstrate the capacity to identify discrete cells along the HSC differentiation hierarchy via multivariate analysis of Raman spectra. Notably, cell state identification is accurate for individual cells and independent of the biophysical properties of the functionalized polyacrylamide gels upon which these cells are cultured. We report partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models of single cell Raman spectra enable identifying four dissimilar hematopoietic cell populations across the HSC lineage specification. Successful discrimination was obtained for a population enriched for long-term repopulating HSCs (LT-HSCs) versus their more differentiated progeny, including closely related short-term repopulating HSCs (ST-HSCs) and fully differentiated lymphoid (B cells) and myeloid (granulocytes) cells. The lineage-specific differentiation states of cells from these four subpopulations were accurately identified independent of the stiffness of the underlying biomaterial substrate, indicating subtle spectral variations that discriminated these populations were not masked by features from the culture substrate. This approach enables identifying the lineage-specific differentiation stages of hematopoietic cells on biomaterial substrates of differing composition and may facilitate correlating hematopoietic cell fate decisions with the extrinsic cues that

  11. Ubiquitin-specific protease 14 regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangyun; Wu, Jingjing; Chen, Yitian; Ye, Dongxia; Lei, Hu; Xu, Hanzhang; Yang, Li; Wu, Yingli; Gu, Wenli

    2016-10-01

    Ubiquitin-specific protease 14, a deubiquitinating enzyme, has been implicated in the tumorigenesis and progression of several cancers, but its role in oral squamous cell carcinoma remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore the expression pattern and roles of Ubiquitin-specific protease 14 in the occurrence and development of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Interestingly, Ubiquitin-specific protease 14 was overexpressed in oral cancer tissues and cell lines at both mRNA and protein levels. b-AP15, a specific inhibitor of Ubiquitin-specific protease 14, significantly inhibited the growth of cancer cells and increased cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, knockdown of Ubiquitin-specific protease 14 by shRNA significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of cancer cells in vitro. Finally, using a xenograft mouse model of oral squamous cell carcinoma, knockdown of Ubiquitin-specific protease 14 markedly inhibited tumor growth and triggered the cancer cell apoptosis in vivo, supporting previous results. In conclusion, for the first time we have demonstrated the expression pattern of Ubiquitin-specific protease 14 in oral squamous cell carcinoma and verified a relationship with tumor growth and metastasis. These results may highlight new therapeutic strategies for tumor treatment, application of Ubiquitin-specific protease 14 selective inhibitor, such as b-AP15, or knockdown by shRNA. Collectively, Ubiquitin-specific protease 14 could be a potential therapeutic target for oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ex vivo detection of adenovirus specific CD4+ T-cell responses to HLA-DR-epitopes of the Hexon protein show a contracted specificity of THELPER cells following stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serangeli, Celine; Bicanic, Oliver; Scheible, Michael H.; Wernet, Dorothee; Lang, Peter; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanovic, Stefan; Handgretinger, Rupert; Feuchtinger, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, especially after stem cell transplantation (SCT). Viral clearance has been attributed to CD4 + T-cell responses against the Hexon-protein, but the frequency of specific T HELPER cells is extremely low or not detectable ex vivo and preference for different CD4 + T-cell epitopes is variable among individuals. We therefore analyzed 44 healthy donors and 6 SCT-recipients for Hexon-specific CD4 + -responses ex vivo, to identify epitopes which would be broadly applicable. We selected 19 candidate epitopes with predicted restriction to HLA-DR1/DR3/DR4/DR7; 16 were located within the highly conserved regions, indicating cross-reactivity of T cells among HAdV-subspecies. Ten epitopes induced CD4 + -proliferation in >50% of individuals, confirmed by intracellular IFN-γ detection. Three SCT recipients who recovered from an infection with HAdV displayed reactivity towards only a single hexon epitope, whereas healthy individuals were responsive to two to eight epitopes (median 3). The ex vivo detection of Hexon-specific CD4 + T-cells, without any long-term culture in vitro, enables the detection and generation of HAdV-specific CD4 + T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer against HAdV-infection post SCT.

  13. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-06-24

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies.

  14. On the Interpretation of Instrumental Variables in the Presence of Specification Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.A.V.B. Swamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of instrumental variables (IV and the generalized method of moments (GMM, and their applications to the estimation of errors-in-variables and simultaneous equations models in econometrics, require data on a sufficient number of instrumental variables that are both exogenous and relevant. We argue that, in general, such instruments (weak or strong cannot exist.

  15. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  16. Correlation between maximum isometric strength variables and specific performance of Brazilian military judokas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Moraes Gonçalves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It was our objective to correlate specific performance in the Special Judo Fitness Test (SJFT and the maximum isometric handgrip (HGSMax, scapular traction (STSMax and lumbar traction (LTSMax strength tests in military judo athletes. Twenty-two military athletes from the judo team of the Brazilian Navy Almirante Alexandrino Instruction Centre, with average age of 26.14 ± 3.31 years old, and average body mass of 83.23 ± 14.14 kg participated in the study. Electronic dynamometry tests for HGSMax, STSMax and LTSMax were conducted. Then, after approximately 1 hour-interval, the SJFT protocol was applied. All variables were adjusted to the body mass of the athletes. Pearson correlation coefficient for statistical analysis was used. The results showed moderate negative correlation between the SJFT index and STSMax (r= -0.550, p= 0.008, strong negative correlations between the SJFT index and HGSMax (r= -0.706, p< 0.001, SJFT index and LTSMax (r= -0.721; p= 0.001, besides the correlation between the sum of the three maximum isometric strength tests and the SJFT index (r= -0.786, p< 0.001. This study concludes that negative correlations occur between the SJFT index and maximum isometric handgrip, shoulder and lumbar traction strength and the sum of the three maximum isometric strength tests in military judokas.

  17. MAPA distinguishes genotype-specific variability of highly similar regulatory protein isoforms in potato tuber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Hummel, Jan; Egelhofer, Volker; Selbig, Joachim; van Dongen, Joost T; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2011-07-01

    Mass Accuracy Precursor Alignment is a fast and flexible method for comparative proteome analysis that allows the comparison of unprecedented numbers of shotgun proteomics analyses on a personal computer in a matter of hours. We compared 183 LC-MS analyses and more than 2 million MS/MS spectra and could define and separate the proteomic phenotypes of field grown tubers of 12 tetraploid cultivars of the crop plant Solanum tuberosum. Protein isoforms of patatin as well as other major gene families such as lipoxygenase and cysteine protease inhibitor that regulate tuber development were found to be the primary source of variability between the cultivars. This suggests that differentially expressed protein isoforms modulate genotype specific tuber development and the plant phenotype. We properly assigned the measured abundance of tryptic peptides to different protein isoforms that share extensive stretches of primary structure and thus inferred their abundance. Peptides unique to different protein isoforms were used to classify the remaining peptides assigned to the entire subset of isoforms based on a common abundance profile using multivariate statistical procedures. We identified nearly 4000 proteins which we used for quantitative functional annotation making this the most extensive study of the tuber proteome to date.

  18. Design of a High Temperature Radiator for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Ungar, Eugene K.; Chambliss, Joe P.

    2012-01-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR), currently under development by Ad Astra Rocket Company (Webster, TX), is a unique propulsion system that could change the way space propulsion is performed. VASIMR's efficiency, when compared to that of a conventional chemical rocket, reduces the propellant needed for exploration missions by a factor of 10. Currently plans include flight tests of a 200 kW VASIMR system, titled VF-200, on the International Space Station (ISS). The VF-200 will consist of two 100 kW thruster units packaged together in one engine bus. Each thruster core generates 27 kW of waste heat during its 15 minute firing time. The rocket core will be maintained between 283 and 573 K by a pumped thermal control loop. The design of a high temperature radiator is a unique challenge for the vehicle design. This paper will discuss the path taken to develop a steady state and transient-based radiator design. The paper will describe the radiator design option selected for the VASIMR thermal control system for use on ISS, and how the system relates to future exploration vehicles.

  19. Design Analysis of a High Temperature Radiator for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Ungar, Eugene K.; Chambliss, Joe P.; Cassady, Leonard D.

    2011-01-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR), currently under development by Ad Astra Rocket Company, is a unique propulsion system that can potentially change the way space propulsion is performed. VASIMR's efficiency, when compared to that of a conventional chemical rocket, reduce propellant needed for exploration missions by a factor of 10. Currently plans include flight tests of a 200 kW VASIMR system, titled VF-200, on the International Space Station. The VF-200 will consist of two 100 kW thruster units packaged together in one engine bus. Each thruster unit has a unique heat rejection requirement of about 27 kW over a firing time of 15 minutes. In order to control rocket core temperatures, peak operating temperatures of about 300 C are expected within the thermal control loop. Design of a high temperature radiator is a unique challenge for the vehicle design. This paper will discuss the path taken to develop a steady state and transient based radiator design. The paper will describe radiator design options for the VASIMR thermal control system for use on ISS as well as future exploration vehicles.

  20. Detection and specifity of class specific antibodies to whole bacteria cells using a solid phase radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerkinsky, C.; Rees, A.S.; Bergimeier, L.A.; Challacombe, S.J. (Guy' s Hospital Medical and Dental Schools, London (UK))

    1983-07-01

    A solid phase radioimmunoassay has been developed which can be used for the detection of isotype specific antibodies to whole bacteria and other particulate antigens, and is applicable to a variety of species. Bacteria are bound to the solid phase by the use either of antibodies, or of methyl glyoxal. Both methods result in a sensitive and reproducible assay, and bacteria do not appear to desorb from the solid phase. The specificity of antibodies to whole bacteria was examined by absorption of antisera with various species of bacteria and retesting, or by determining the binding of antisera to various bacteria bound to the solid phase. Both methods revealed specificity for the bacteria examined. Inhibition studies showed that antibodies to Streptococcus mutans whole cells could be inhibited by purified cell surface antigens glucosyltransferase and antigen I/II, but only minimally by lipoteichoic acid, c polysaccharide or dextran. In murine antisera antibodies of the IgG, IgM, and IgA classes could be detected at amounts of less than 1 ng/ml.

  1. A Comprehensive, Ethnically Diverse Library of Sickle Cell Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonmi Park

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Sickle cell anemia affects millions of people worldwide and is an emerging global health burden. As part of a large NIH-funded NextGen Consortium, we generated a diverse, comprehensive, and fully characterized library of sickle-cell-disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patients of different ethnicities, β-globin gene (HBB haplotypes, and fetal hemoglobin (HbF levels. iPSCs stand to revolutionize the way we study human development, model disease, and perhaps eventually, treat patients. Here, we describe this unique resource for the study of sickle cell disease, including novel haplotype-specific polymorphisms that affect disease severity, as well as for the development of patient-specific therapeutics for this phenotypically diverse disorder. As a complement to this library, and as proof of principle for future cell- and gene-based therapies, we also designed and employed CRISPR/Cas gene editing tools to correct the sickle hemoglobin (HbS mutation. : In this resource article, Mostoslavsky, Murphy, and colleagues of the NextGen consortium describe a diverse, comprehensive, and characterized library of sickle cell disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patients of different ethnicities, β-globin gene (HBB haplotypes and fetal hemoglobin (HbF levels. This bank is readily available and accessible to all investigators. Keywords: induced pluripotent stem cells, iPSCs, sickle cell disease, disease modeling, directed differentiation, gene correction

  2. CELLISA: reporter cell-based immunization and screening of hybridomas specific for cell surface antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peter; Mesci, Aruz; Carlyle, James R

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for cell surface antigens are an invaluable tool to study immune receptor expression and function. Here, we outline a generalized reporter cell-based approach to the generation and high-throughput screening of mAbs specific for cell surface antigens. Termed CELLISA, this technology hinges upon the capture of hybridoma supernatants in mAb arrays that facilitate ligation of an antigen of interest displayed on BWZ reporter cells in the form of a CD3ζ-fusion chimeric antigen receptor (zCAR); in turn, specific mAb-mediated cross-linking of zCAR on BWZ cells results in the production of β-galactosidase enzyme (β-gal), which can be assayed colorimetrically. Importantly, the BWZ reporter cells bearing the zCAR of interest may be used for immunization as well as screening. In addition, serial immunizations employing additional zCAR- or native antigen-bearing cell lines can be used to increase the frequency of the desired antigen-specific hybridomas. Finally, the use of a cohort of epitope-tagged zCAR (e.g., zCAR(FLAG)) variants allows visualization of the cell surface antigen prior to immunization, and coimmunization using these variants can be used to enhance the immunogenicity of the target antigen. Employing the CELLISA strategy, we herein describe the generation of mAb directed against an uncharacterized natural killer cell receptor protein.

  3. Salmonella enterica serovar-specific transcriptional reprogramming of infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannemann, Sebastian; Galán, Jorge E

    2017-07-01

    Despite their high degree of genomic similarity, different Salmonella enterica serovars are often associated with very different clinical presentations. In humans, for example, the typhoidal S. enterica serovar Typhi causes typhoid fever, a life-threatening systemic disease. In contrast, the non-typhoidal S. enterica serovar Typhimurium causes self-limiting gastroenteritis. The molecular bases for these different clinical presentations are incompletely understood. The ability to re-program gene expression in host cells is an essential virulence factor for typhoidal and non-typhoidal S. enterica serovars. Here, we have compared the transcriptional profile of cultured epithelial cells infected with S. Typhimurium or S. Typhi. We found that both serovars stimulated distinct transcriptional responses in infected cells that are associated with the stimulation of specific signal transduction pathways. These specific responses were associated with the presence of a distinct repertoire of type III secretion effector proteins. These observations provide major insight into the molecular bases for potential differences in the pathogenic mechanisms of typhoidal and non-typhoidal S. enterica serovars.

  4. Salmonella enterica serovar-specific transcriptional reprogramming of infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Hannemann

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite their high degree of genomic similarity, different Salmonella enterica serovars are often associated with very different clinical presentations. In humans, for example, the typhoidal S. enterica serovar Typhi causes typhoid fever, a life-threatening systemic disease. In contrast, the non-typhoidal S. enterica serovar Typhimurium causes self-limiting gastroenteritis. The molecular bases for these different clinical presentations are incompletely understood. The ability to re-program gene expression in host cells is an essential virulence factor for typhoidal and non-typhoidal S. enterica serovars. Here, we have compared the transcriptional profile of cultured epithelial cells infected with S. Typhimurium or S. Typhi. We found that both serovars stimulated distinct transcriptional responses in infected cells that are associated with the stimulation of specific signal transduction pathways. These specific responses were associated with the presence of a distinct repertoire of type III secretion effector proteins. These observations provide major insight into the molecular bases for potential differences in the pathogenic mechanisms of typhoidal and non-typhoidal S. enterica serovars.

  5. Gene-specific cell labeling using MiMIC transposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnerer, Joshua P; Venken, Koen J T; Dierick, Herman A

    2015-04-30

    Binary expression systems such as GAL4/UAS, LexA/LexAop and QF/QUAS have greatly enhanced the power of Drosophila as a model organism by allowing spatio-temporal manipulation of gene function as well as cell and neural circuit function. Tissue-specific expression of these heterologous transcription factors relies on random transposon integration near enhancers or promoters that drive the binary transcription factor embedded in the transposon. Alternatively, gene-specific promoter elements are directly fused to the binary factor within the transposon followed by random or site-specific integration. However, such insertions do not consistently recapitulate endogenous expression. We used Minos-Mediated Integration Cassette (MiMIC) transposons to convert host loci into reliable gene-specific binary effectors. MiMIC transposons allow recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to modify the transposon content. We developed novel exchange cassettes to convert coding intronic MiMIC insertions into gene-specific binary factor protein-traps. In addition, we expanded the set of binary factor exchange cassettes available for non-coding intronic MiMIC insertions. We show that binary factor conversions of different insertions in the same locus have indistinguishable expression patterns, suggesting that they reliably reflect endogenous gene expression. We show the efficacy and broad applicability of these new tools by dissecting the cellular expression patterns of the Drosophila serotonin receptor gene family. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Natural killer cells facilitate PRAME-specific T-cell reactivity against neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap-Jan; van der Steen, Dirk M.; Blokland, Nina J.G.; van Noesel, Max M.; Molenaar, Jan J.; Heemskerk, Mirjam H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children with an estimated 5-year progression free survival of 20–40% in stage 4 disease. Neuroblastoma actively avoids recognition by natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although immunotherapy has gained traction for neuroblastoma treatment, these immune escape mechanisms restrain clinical results. Therefore, we aimed to improve neuroblastoma immunogenicity to further the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against neuroblastoma. We found that neuroblastoma cells significantly increase surface expression of MHC I upon exposure to active NK cells which thereby readily sensitize neuroblastoma cells for recognition by CTLs. We show that oncoprotein PRAME serves as an immunodominant antigen for neuroblastoma as NK-modulated neuroblastoma cells are recognized by PRAMESLLQHLIGL/A2-specific CTL clones. Furthermore, NK cells induce MHC I upregulation in neuroblastoma through contact-dependent secretion of IFNγ. Our results demonstrate remarkable plasticity in the peptide/MHC I surface expression of neuroblastoma cells, which is reversed when neuroblastoma cells experience innate immune attack by sensitized NK cells. These findings support the exploration of NK cells as adjuvant therapy to enforce neuroblastoma-specific CTL responses. PMID:26452036

  7. Comparing measured and modelled soil carbon: which site-specific variables are linked to high stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andy; Schipanski, Meagan; Ma, Liwang; Ahuja, Lajpat; McNamara, Niall; Smith, Pete; Davies, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Changes in soil carbon (C) stocks have been studied in depth over the last two decades, as net greenhouse gas (GHG) sinks are highlighted to be a partial solution to the causes of climate change. However, the stability of this soil C is often overlooked when measuring these changes. Ultimately a net sequestration in soils is far less beneficial if labile C is replacing more stable forms. To date there is no accepted framework for measuring soil C stability, and as a result there is considerable uncertainty associated with the simulated impacts of land management and land use change when using process-based systems models. However, a recent effort to equate measurable soil C fractions to model pools has generated data that help to assess the impacts of land management, and can ultimately help to reduce the uncertainty of model predictions. Our research compiles this existing fractionation data along with site metadata to create a simplistic statistical model able to quantify the relative importance of different site-specific conditions. Data was mined from 23 published studies and combined with original data to generate a dataset of 100+ land use change sites across Europe. For sites to be included they required soil C fractions isolated using the Zimmermann et al. (2007) method and specific site metadata (mean annual precipitation, MAP; mean annual temperature, MAT; soil pH; land use; altitude). Of the sites, 75% were used to develop a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) to create coefficients where site parameters can be used to predict influence on the measured soil fraction C stocks. The remaining 25% of sites were used to evaluate uncertainty and validate this empirical model. Further, four of the aforementioned sites were used to simulate soil C dynamics using the RothC, DayCent and RZWQM2 models. A sensitivity analysis (4096 model runs for each variable applying Latin hypercube random sampling techniques) was then used to observe whether these models place

  8. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbe, Yvette; Klier, Ulrike; Linnebacher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4 + , activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested) could be observed. Cellular fusions of MSI + carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These hybrid cells may have great potential for cellular immunotherapy and

  9. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  10. Reprint of: Virus-Specific T Cells: Broadening Applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, A John; Prockop, Susan; Bollard, Catherine M

    2018-03-01

    Virus infection remains an appreciable cause of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Although pharmacotherapy and/or antibody therapy may help prevent or treat viral disease, these drugs are expensive, toxic, and often ineffective due to primary or secondary resistance. Further, effective treatments are limited for many infections (eg, adenovirus, BK virus), which are increasingly detected after alternative donor transplants. These deficiencies in conventional therapeutics have increased interest in an immunotherapeutic approach to viral disorders, leading to adoptive transfer of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (VSTs), which can rapidly reconstitute antiviral immunity post-transplantation without causing graft-versus-host disease. This review will explore how the VST field has improved outcomes for many patients with life-threatening viral infections after HSCT, and how to broaden applicability beyond the "patient-specific" products, as well as extending to other viral diseases even outside the context of HSCT. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Bioaccumulation of photoprotective compounds in copepods: environmental triggers and sources of intra-specific variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagarese, H. E.; García, P.; Diéguez, M. D.; Ferraro, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and temperature are two globally important abiotic factors affecting freshwater ecosystems. Planktonic organisms have developed a battery of counteracting mechanisms to minimize the risk of being damaged by UVR, which respond to three basic principles: avoid, protect, repair. Copepods are among the most successful zooplankton groups. They are highly adaptable animals, capable of displaying flexible behaviors, physiologies, and life strategies. In particular, they are well equipped to cope with harmful UVR. Their arsenal includes vertical migration, accumulation of photoprotective compounds, and photorepair. The preference for a particular strategy is affected by a plethora of environmental (extrinsic) parameters, such as the existence of a depth refuge, the risk of visual predation, and temperature. Temperature modifies the environment (e.g. the lake thermal structure), and animal metabolism (e.g., swimming speed, bioaccumulation of photoprotective compounds). In addition, the relative weight of UVR-coping strategies is also influenced by the organism (intrinsic) characteristics (e.g., inter- and intra-specific variability). The UV absorbing compounds, mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), are widely distributed among freshwater copepods. Animals are unable to synthesize MAAs, and therefore depend on external sources for accumulating these compounds. Although copepods may acquire MAAs from their food, for the few centropagic species investigated so far, the main source of MAAs are microbial (most likely prokaryotic) organisms living in close association with the copepods. Boeckella gracilipes is a common centropagic copepod in Patagonian lakes. We suspected that its occurrence in different types of lakes, hydrologically unconnected, but within close geographical proximity, could have resulted in different microbial-copepod associations (i.e., different MAAs sources) that could translate into intra-specific differences in the accumulation

  12. Efficient generation of lens progenitor cells from cataract patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodi Qiu

    Full Text Available The development of a technique to induce the transformation of somatic cells to a pluripotent state via the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors was a transformational event in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of this technique also impacted ophthalmology, as patient-specific induced pluripotent stemcells (iPSCs may be useful resources for some ophthalmological diseases. The lens is a key refractive element in the eye that focuses images of the visual world onto the retina. To establish a new model for drug screening to treat lens diseases and investigating lens aging and development, we examined whether human lens epithelial cells (HLECs could be induced into iPSCs and if lens-specific differentiation of these cells could be achieved under defined chemical conditions. We first efficiently reprogrammed HLECs from age-related cataract patients to iPSCs with OCT-4, SOX-2, and KLF-4. The resulting HLEC-derived iPS (HLE-iPS colonies were indistinguishable from human ES cells with respect to morphology, gene expression, pluripotent marker expression and their ability to generate all embryonic germ-cell layers. Next, we performed a 3-step induction procedure: HLE-iPS cells were differentiated into large numbers of lens progenitor-like cells with defined factors (Noggin, BMP and FGF2, and we determined that these cells expressed lens-specific markers (PAX6, SOX2, SIX3, CRYAB, CRYAA, BFSP1, and MIP. In addition, HLE-iPS-derived lens cells exhibited reduced expression of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT markers compared with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Our study describes a highly efficient procedure for generating lens progenitor cells from cataract patient HLEC-derived iPSCs. These patient-derived pluripotent cells provide a valuable model for studying the developmental and molecular biological mechanisms that underlie cell determination in lens development and cataract

  13. Effects of heat transfer, friction and variable specific heats of working fluid on performance of an irreversible dual cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lingen; Ge Yanlin; Sun Fengrui; Wu Chih

    2006-01-01

    The thermodynamic performance of an air standard dual cycle with heat transfer loss, friction like term loss and variable specific heats of working fluid is analyzed. The relations between the power output and the compression ratio, between the thermal efficiency and the compression ratio, as well as the optimal relation between power output and the efficiency of the cycle, are derived by detailed numerical examples. Moreover, the effects of variable specific heats of the working fluid and the friction like term loss on the irreversible cycle performance are analyzed. The results show that the effects of variable specific heats of working fluid and friction like term loss on the cycle performance are obvious, and they should be considered in practical cycle analysis. The results obtained in this paper may provide guidance for the design of practical internal combustion engines

  14. Performance of an Atkinson cycle with heat transfer, friction and variable specific-heats of the working fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Yanlin; Chen Lingen; Sun, Fengrui; Wu Chih

    2006-01-01

    The performance of an air standard Atkinson cycle with heat-transfer loss, friction-like term loss and variable specific-heats of the working fluid is analyzed using finite-time thermodynamics. The relations between the power output and the compression ratio, between the thermal efficiency and the compression ratio, as well as the optimal relation between the power output and the efficiency of the cycle are derived by detailed numerical examples. Moreover, the effects of variable specific-heats of the working fluid and the friction-like term loss on the irreversible cycle performance are analyzed. The results show that the effects of variable specific-heats of working fluid and friction-like term loss on the irreversible cycle performance should be considered in cycle analysis. The results obtained in this paper provide guidance for the design of Atkinson engines

  15. Cell-type-specific gene delivery into neuronal cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parveen, Zahida; Mukhtar, Muhammad; Rafi, Mohammed; Wenger, David A.; Siddiqui, Khwaja M.; Siler, Catherine A.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Pomerantz, Roger J.; Schnell, Matthias J.; Dornburg, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    The avian retroviruses reticuloendotheliosis virus strain A (REV-A) and spleen necrosis virus (SNV) are not naturally infectious in human cells. However, REV-A-derived viral vectors efficiently infect human cells when they are pseudotyped with envelope proteins displaying targeting ligands specific for human cell-surface receptors. Here we report that vectors containing the gag region of REV-A and pol of SNV can be pseudotyped with the envelope protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the glycoproteins of different rabies virus (RV) strains. Vectors pseudotyped with the envelope protein of the highly neurotropic RV strain CVS-N2c facilitated cell type-specific gene delivery into mouse and human neurons, but did not infect other human cell types. Moreover, when such vector particles were injected into the brain of newborn mice, only neuronal cells were infected in vivo. Cell-type-specific gene delivery into neurons may present quite specific gene therapy approaches for many degenerative diseases of the brain

  16. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  17. Cell-Type-Specific Splicing of Piezo2 Regulates Mechanotransduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Szczot

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Piezo2 is a mechanically activated ion channel required for touch discrimination, vibration detection, and proprioception. Here, we discovered that Piezo2 is extensively spliced, producing different Piezo2 isoforms with distinct properties. Sensory neurons from both mice and humans express a large repertoire of Piezo2 variants, whereas non-neuronal tissues express predominantly a single isoform. Notably, even within sensory ganglia, we demonstrate the splicing of Piezo2 to be cell type specific. Biophysical characterization revealed substantial differences in ion permeability, sensitivity to calcium modulation, and inactivation kinetics among Piezo2 splice variants. Together, our results describe, at the molecular level, a potential mechanism by which transduction is tuned, permitting the detection of a variety of mechanosensory stimuli. : Szczot et al. find that the mechanoreceptor Piezo2 is extensively alternatively spliced, generating multiple distinct isoforms. Their findings indicate that these splice products have specific tissue and cell type expression patterns and exhibit differences in receptor properties. Keywords: Piezo, touch, sensation, ion-channel, splicing

  18. Priming anticancer active specific immunotherapy with dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone

    2005-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) probably represent the most powerful naturally occurring immunological adjuvant for anticancer vaccines. However, the initial enthusiasm for DC-based vaccines is being tempered by clinical results not meeting expectations. The partial failure of current vaccine formulations is explained by the extraordinary complexity of the immune system, which makes the task of exploiting the potential of such a biotherapeutic approach highly challenging. Clinical findings obtained in humans so far indicate that the immune system can be actively polarized against malignant cells by means of DC-based active specific immunotherapy, and that in some cases this is associated with tumor regression. This implies that under some unique circumstances, the naturally 'dormant' immune effectors can actually be employed as endogenous weapons against malignant cells. Only the thorough understanding of DC biology and tumor-host immune system interactions will allow researchers to reproduce, in a larger set of patients, the cellular/molecular conditions leading to an effective immune-mediated eradication of cancer.

  19. Rare earth fluorescent nanoparticles for specific cancer cell targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanakis, Dimitrios; Ghanotakis, Demetrios F.

    2016-01-01

    Terbium layered hydroxide nanoparticles (Tb_2(OH)_5NO_3) were synthesized by a one-pot coprecipitation method. The characterization of this preparation revealed highly oriented fluorescent nanoparticles. An attempt to improve the properties of Tb_2(OH)_5NO_3 resulted in the preparation of two optimized nanoparticles. In particular, Tb_2(OH)_5NO_3:Eu and Tb_2(OH)_5NO_3-FA were prepared when Tb_2(OH)_5NO_3 was doped with Europium and when the surface was modified with folic acid (FA), respectively. The size of the above nanoparticles was below 100 nm, and thus they have the potential to be used for biomedical applications. The interaction of nanoparticles with human cells was studied using confocal microscopy. This study revealed that only the nanoparticles modified with folic acid have the ability to be targeted to HeLa cells. This specific identification of cancer cells, in combination with the fluorescent properties of Tb_2(OH)_5NO_3, could render these nanoparticles appropriate for biomedical applications.

  20. Rare earth fluorescent nanoparticles for specific cancer cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanakis, Dimitrios; Ghanotakis, Demetrios F., E-mail: ghanotakis@uoc.gr [University of Crete, Department of Chemistry (Greece)

    2016-07-15

    Terbium layered hydroxide nanoparticles (Tb{sub 2}(OH){sub 5}NO{sub 3}) were synthesized by a one-pot coprecipitation method. The characterization of this preparation revealed highly oriented fluorescent nanoparticles. An attempt to improve the properties of Tb{sub 2}(OH){sub 5}NO{sub 3} resulted in the preparation of two optimized nanoparticles. In particular, Tb{sub 2}(OH){sub 5}NO{sub 3}:Eu and Tb{sub 2}(OH){sub 5}NO{sub 3}-FA were prepared when Tb{sub 2}(OH){sub 5}NO{sub 3} was doped with Europium and when the surface was modified with folic acid (FA), respectively. The size of the above nanoparticles was below 100 nm, and thus they have the potential to be used for biomedical applications. The interaction of nanoparticles with human cells was studied using confocal microscopy. This study revealed that only the nanoparticles modified with folic acid have the ability to be targeted to HeLa cells. This specific identification of cancer cells, in combination with the fluorescent properties of Tb{sub 2}(OH){sub 5}NO{sub 3}, could render these nanoparticles appropriate for biomedical applications.

  1. Retinal Ganglion Cell Diversity and Subtype Specification from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin B. Langer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs are the projection neurons of the retina and transmit visual information to postsynaptic targets in the brain. While this function is shared among nearly all RGCs, this class of cell is remarkably diverse, comprised of multiple subtypes. Previous efforts have identified numerous RGC subtypes in animal models, but less attention has been paid to human RGCs. Thus, efforts of this study examined the diversity of RGCs differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs and characterized defined subtypes through the expression of subtype-specific markers. Further investigation of these subtypes was achieved using single-cell transcriptomics, confirming the combinatorial expression of molecular markers associated with these subtypes, and also provided insight into more subtype-specific markers. Thus, the results of this study describe the derivation of RGC subtypes from hPSCs and will support the future exploration of phenotypic and functional diversity within human RGCs. : In this article, Langer and colleagues present extensive characterization of RGC subtypes derived from human pluripotent stem cells, with multiple subtypes identified by subtype-specific molecular markers. Their results present a more detailed analysis of RGC diversity in human cells and yield the use of different markers to identify RGC subtypes. Keywords: iPSC, retina, retinal ganglion cell, RGC subtype, stem cell, ipRGC, alpha RGC, direction selective RGC, RNA-seq

  2. Virus-Specific T Cells for the Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Houghtelin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available While progress has been made in the treatment of both hematologic cancers and solid tumors, chemorefractory or relapsed disease often portends a dismal prognosis, and salvage chemotherapy or radiation expose patients to intolerable toxicities and may not be effective. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant offers the promise of cure for many patients, and while mismatched, unrelated or haploidentical donors are increasingly available, the recipients are at higher risk of severe immunosuppression and immune dysregulation due to graft versus host disease. Viral infections remain a primary cause of severe morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Again, many therapeutic options for viral disease are toxic, may be ineffective or generate resistance, or fail to convey long-term protection. Adoptive cell therapy with virus-specific T cells (VSTs is a targeted therapy that is efficacious and has minimal toxicity in immunocompromised patients with CMV and EBV infections in particular. Products have since been generated specific for multiple viral antigens (multi-VST, which are not only effective but also confer protection in 70–90% of recipients when used as prophylaxis. Notably, these products can be generated from either virus-naive or virus-experienced autologous or allogeneic sources, including partially matched HLA-matched third-party donors. Obstacles to effective VST treatment are donor availability and product generation time. Banking of third-party VST is an attractive way to overcome these constraints and provide products on an as-needed basis. Other developments include epitope discovery to broaden the number of viral antigens targets in a single product, the optimization of VST generation from naive donor sources, and the modification of VSTs to enhance persistence and efficacy in vivo.

  3. Virus-Specific T Cells for the Immunocompromised Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghtelin, Amy; Bollard, Catherine M

    2017-01-01

    While progress has been made in the treatment of both hematologic cancers and solid tumors, chemorefractory or relapsed disease often portends a dismal prognosis, and salvage chemotherapy or radiation expose patients to intolerable toxicities and may not be effective. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant offers the promise of cure for many patients, and while mismatched, unrelated or haploidentical donors are increasingly available, the recipients are at higher risk of severe immunosuppression and immune dysregulation due to graft versus host disease. Viral infections remain a primary cause of severe morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Again, many therapeutic options for viral disease are toxic, may be ineffective or generate resistance, or fail to convey long-term protection. Adoptive cell therapy with virus-specific T cells (VSTs) is a targeted therapy that is efficacious and has minimal toxicity in immunocompromised patients with CMV and EBV infections in particular. Products have since been generated specific for multiple viral antigens (multi-VST), which are not only effective but also confer protection in 70-90% of recipients when used as prophylaxis. Notably, these products can be generated from either virus-naive or virus-experienced autologous or allogeneic sources, including partially matched HLA-matched third-party donors. Obstacles to effective VST treatment are donor availability and product generation time. Banking of third-party VST is an attractive way to overcome these constraints and provide products on an as-needed basis. Other developments include epitope discovery to broaden the number of viral antigens targets in a single product, the optimization of VST generation from naive donor sources, and the modification of VSTs to enhance persistence and efficacy in vivo .

  4. A cancer specific cell-penetrating peptide, BR2, for the efficient delivery of an scFv into cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Jung Lim

    Full Text Available Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs have proven very effective as intracellular delivery vehicles for various therapeutics. However, there are some concerns about non-specific penetration and cytotoxicity of CPPs for effective cancer treatments. Herein, based on the cell-penetrating motif of an anticancer peptide, buforin IIb, we designed several CPP derivatives with cancer cell specificity. Among the derivatives, a 17-amino acid peptide (BR2 was found to have cancer-specificity without toxicity to normal cells. After specifically targeting cancer cells through interaction with gangliosides, BR2 entered cells via lipid-mediated macropinocytosis. Moreover, BR2 showed higher membrane translocation efficiency than the well-known CPP Tat (49-57. The capability of BR2 as a cancer-specific drug carrier was demonstrated by fusion of BR2 to a single-chain variable fragment (scFv directed toward a mutated K-ras (G12V. BR2-fused scFv induced a higher degree of apoptosis than Tat-fused scFv in K-ras mutated HCT116 cells. These results suggest that the novel cell-penetrating peptide BR2 has great potential as a useful drug delivery carrier with cancer cell specificity.

  5. A cancer specific cell-penetrating peptide, BR2, for the efficient delivery of an scFv into cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ki Jung; Sung, Bong Hyun; Shin, Ju Ri; Lee, Young Woong; Kim, Da Jung; Yang, Kyung Seok; Kim, Sun Chang

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have proven very effective as intracellular delivery vehicles for various therapeutics. However, there are some concerns about non-specific penetration and cytotoxicity of CPPs for effective cancer treatments. Herein, based on the cell-penetrating motif of an anticancer peptide, buforin IIb, we designed several CPP derivatives with cancer cell specificity. Among the derivatives, a 17-amino acid peptide (BR2) was found to have cancer-specificity without toxicity to normal cells. After specifically targeting cancer cells through interaction with gangliosides, BR2 entered cells via lipid-mediated macropinocytosis. Moreover, BR2 showed higher membrane translocation efficiency than the well-known CPP Tat (49-57). The capability of BR2 as a cancer-specific drug carrier was demonstrated by fusion of BR2 to a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) directed toward a mutated K-ras (G12V). BR2-fused scFv induced a higher degree of apoptosis than Tat-fused scFv in K-ras mutated HCT116 cells. These results suggest that the novel cell-penetrating peptide BR2 has great potential as a useful drug delivery carrier with cancer cell specificity.

  6. Assessing somatic hypermutation in Ramos B cells after overexpression or knockdown of specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dana C; Unniraman, Shyam

    2011-11-01

    B cells start their life with low affinity antibodies generated by V(D)J recombination. However, upon detecting a pathogen, the variable (V) region of an immunoglobulin (Ig) gene is mutated approximately 100,000-fold more than the rest of the genome through somatic hypermutation (SHM), resulting in high affinity antibodies. In addition, class switch recombination (CSR) produces antibodies with different effector functions depending on the kind of immune response that is needed for a particular pathogen. Both CSR and SHM are initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), which deaminates cytosine residues in DNA to produce uracils. These uracils are processed by error-prone forms of repair pathways, eventually leading to mutations and recombination. Our current understanding of the molecular details of SHM and CSR come from a combination of studies in mice, primary cells, cell lines, and cell-free experiments. Mouse models remain the gold standard with genetic knockouts showing critical roles for many repair factors (e.g. Ung, Msh2, Msh6, Exo1, and polymerase η). However, not all genes are amenable for knockout studies. For example, knockouts of several double-strand break repair proteins are embryonically lethal or impair B-cell development. Moreover, sometimes the specific function of a protein in SHM or CSR may be masked by more global defects caused by the knockout. In addition, since experiments in mice can be lengthy, altering expression of individual genes in cell lines has become an increasingly popular first step to identifying and characterizing candidate genes. Ramos - a Burkitt lymphoma cell line that constitutively undergoes SHM - has been a popular cell-line model to study SHM. One advantage of Ramos cells is that they have a built-in convenient semi-quantitative measure of SHM. Wild type cells express IgM and, as they pick up mutations, some of the mutations knock out IgM expression. Therefore, assaying IgM loss by fluorescence

  7. A recombinant antibody with the antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity of T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Stryhn, A; Hansen, B E

    1996-01-01

    Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might ...

  8. Kinetics of antigen specific and non-specific polyclonal B-cell responses during lethal Plasmodium yoelii malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Rolland

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the kinetics and composition of the polyclonal B-cell activation associated to malaria infection, antigen-specific and non-specific B-cell responses were evaluated in the spleens of mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii 17 XL or injected with lysed erythrocytes or plasma from P. yoelii infected mice or with P. falciparum culture supernatants. Spleen/body weigth ratio, numbers of nucleated spleen cells and Immunoglobulin-containing and Immunoglobulin-secreting cells increased progressively during the course of infection,in parallel to the parasitemia. A different pattern of kinetics was observed when anti-sheep red blood cell and anti-trinitrophenylated-sheep red blood cell plaque forming cells response were studied: maximum values were observed at early stages of infection, whereas the number of total Immunoglobulin-containing and Immunoglobulin-secreting cells were not yet altered. Conversely, at the end of infection, when these latter values reached their maximum, the anti-sheep red blood cell and anti-trinitrophenylated-sheep red blood cell specific responses were normal or even infranormal. In mice injected with Plasmodium-derived material, a higher increase in antigen-specific PFC was observed, as compared to the increase of Immunoglobulin-containing and Immunoglobulin-secreting cell numbers. This suggested a "preferential" (antigen-plus mitogen-induced stimulation of antigen-specific cells rather than a generalized non-specific (mitogen-induced triggering of B-lymphocytes. On the basis of these and previous results, it is suggested that polyclonal B-cell activation that takes place during the course of infection appears as a result of successive waves of antigen-specific B-cell activation.

  9. Cell-Type-Specific Gene Programs of the Normal Human Nephron Define Kidney Cancer Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, David; Eriksson, Pontus; Krawczyk, Krzysztof; Nilsson, Helén; Hansson, Jennifer; Veerla, Srinivas; Sjölund, Jonas; Höglund, Mattias; Johansson, Martin E; Axelson, Håkan

    2017-08-08

    Comprehensive transcriptome studies of cancers often rely on corresponding normal tissue samples to serve as a transcriptional reference. In this study, we performed in-depth analyses of normal kidney tissue transcriptomes from the TCGA and demonstrate that the histological variability in cellularity, inherent in the kidney architecture, lead to considerable transcriptional differences between samples. This should be considered when comparing expression profiles of normal and cancerous kidney tissues. We exploited these differences to define renal-cell-specific gene signatures and used these as a framework to analyze renal cell carcinoma (RCC) ontogeny. Chromophobe RCCs express FOXI1-driven genes that define collecting duct intercalated cells, whereas HNF-regulated genes, specific for proximal tubule cells, are an integral part of clear cell and papillary RCC transcriptomes. These networks may be used as a framework for understanding the interplay between genomic changes in RCC subtypes and the lineage-defining regulatory machinery of their non-neoplastic counterparts. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The T alpha 2 nuclear protein binding site from the human T cell receptor alpha enhancer functions as both a T cell-specific transcriptional activator and repressor

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    T cell-specific expression of the human T cell receptor alpha (TCR- alpha) gene is regulated by the interaction of variable region promoter elements with a transcriptional enhancer that is located 4.5 kb 3' of the TCR-alpha constant region (C alpha) gene segment. The minimal TCR- alpha enhancer is composed of two nuclear protein binding sites, T alpha 1 and T alpha 2, that are both required for the T cell-specific activity of the enhancer. The T alpha 1 binding site contains a consensus cAMP ...

  11. Enteroendocrine cells are specifically marked by cell surface expression of claudin-4 in mouse small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Nagatake

    Full Text Available Enteroendocrine cells are solitary epithelial cells scattered throughout the gastrointestinal tract and produce various types of hormones, constituting one of the largest endocrine systems in the body. The study of these rare epithelial cells has been hampered by the difficulty in isolating them because of the lack of specific cell surface markers. Here, we report that enteroendocrine cells selectively express a tight junction membrane protein, claudin-4 (Cld4, and are efficiently isolated with the use of an antibody specific for the Cld4 extracellular domain and flow cytometry. Sorted Cld4+ epithelial cells in the small intestine exclusively expressed a chromogranin A gene (Chga and other enteroendocrine cell-related genes (Ffar1, Ffar4, Gpr119, and the population was divided into two subpopulations based on the activity of binding to Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1. A Cld4+UEA-1- cell population almost exclusively expressed glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide gene (Gip, thus representing K cells, whereas a Cld4+UEA-1+ cell population expressed other gut hormone genes, including glucagon-like peptide 1 (Gcg, pancreatic polypeptide-like peptide with N-terminal tyrosine amide (Pyy, cholecystokinin (Cck, secretin (Sct, and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1. In addition, we found that orally administered luminal antigens were taken up by the solitary Cld4+ cells in the small intestinal villi, raising the possibility that enteroendocrine cells might also play a role in initiation of mucosal immunity. Our results provide a useful tool for the cellular and functional characterization of enteroendocrine cells.

  12. A Recombinant Antibody with the Antigen-Specific, Major Histocompatibility Complex-Restricted Specificity of T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Peter S.; Stryhn, Anette; Hansen, Bjarke E.; Fugger, Lars; Engberg, Jan; Buus, Soren

    1996-03-01

    Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might lead to novel approaches in immunotherapy. However, it has proven difficult to generate antibodies with the specificity of T cells by conventional hybridoma techniques. Here we report that the phage display technology is a feasible alternative to generate antibodies recognizing specific, predetermined peptide/MHC complexes.

  13. Analysis of mammary specific gene locus regulation in differentiated cells derived by somatic cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Claire; Kolb, Andreas F.

    2009-01-01

    The transcriptional regulation of a gene is best analysed in the context of its normal chromatin surroundings. However, most somatic cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, are refractory to accurate modification by homologous recombination. We show here that it is possible to introduce precise genomic modifications in ES cells and to analyse the phenotypic consequences in differentiated cells by using a combination of gene targeting, site-specific recombination and somatic cell fusion. To provide a proof of principle, we have analysed the regulation of the casein gene locus in mammary gland cells derived from modified murine ES cells by somatic cell fusion. A β-galactosidase reporter gene was inserted in place of the β-casein gene and the modified ES cells, which do not express the reporter gene, were fused with the mouse mammary gland cell line HC11. The resulting cell clones expressed the β-galactosidase gene to a similar extent and with similar hormone responsiveness as the endogenous gene. However, a reporter gene under the control of a minimal β-casein promoter (encompassing the two consensus STAT5 binding sites which mediate the hormone response of the casein genes) was unable to replicate expression levels or hormone responsiveness of the endogenous gene when inserted into the same site of the casein locus. As expected, these results implicate sequences other than the STAT5 sites in the regulation of the β-casein gene

  14. Distinguishing between stochasticity and determinism: Examples from cell cycle duration variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl Mizrahi, Sivan; Sandler, Oded; Lande-Diner, Laura; Balaban, Nathalie Q; Simon, Itamar

    2016-01-01

    We describe a recent approach for distinguishing between stochastic and deterministic sources of variability, focusing on the mammalian cell cycle. Variability between cells is often attributed to stochastic noise, although it may be generated by deterministic components. Interestingly, lineage information can be used to distinguish between variability and determinism. Analysis of correlations within a lineage of the mammalian cell cycle duration revealed its deterministic nature. Here, we discuss the sources of such variability and the possibility that the underlying deterministic process is due to the circadian clock. Finally, we discuss the "kicked cell cycle" model and its implication on the study of the cell cycle in healthy and cancerous tissues. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A Nonlinear Mixed Effects Approach for Modeling the Cell-To-Cell Variability of Mig1 Dynamics in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Almquist

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen a rapid development of experimental techniques that allow data collection from individual cells. These techniques have enabled the discovery and characterization of variability within a population of genetically identical cells. Nonlinear mixed effects (NLME modeling is an established framework for studying variability between individuals in a population, frequently used in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but its potential for studies of cell-to-cell variability in molecular cell biology is yet to be exploited. Here we take advantage of this novel application of NLME modeling to study cell-to-cell variability in the dynamic behavior of the yeast transcription repressor Mig1. In particular, we investigate a recently discovered phenomenon where Mig1 during a short and transient period exits the nucleus when cells experience a shift from high to intermediate levels of extracellular glucose. A phenomenological model based on ordinary differential equations describing the transient dynamics of nuclear Mig1 is introduced, and according to the NLME methodology the parameters of this model are in turn modeled by a multivariate probability distribution. Using time-lapse microscopy data from nearly 200 cells, we estimate this parameter distribution according to the approach of maximizing the population likelihood. Based on the estimated distribution, parameter values for individual cells are furthermore characterized and the resulting Mig1 dynamics are compared to the single cell times-series data. The proposed NLME framework is also compared to the intuitive but limited standard two-stage (STS approach. We demonstrate that the latter may overestimate variabilities by up to almost five fold. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of the inferred population model are used to predict the distribution of key characteristics of the Mig1 transient response. We find that with decreasing levels of post-shift glucose, the transient

  16. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  17. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher; Waldron, Levi

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression...... changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein...... interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two...

  18. Antigen-Specific Polyclonal Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Induced by Fusions of Dendritic Cells and Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Koido

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of cancer vaccines is induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs that can reduce the tumor mass. Dendritic cells (DCs are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Thus, DCs-based vaccination represents a potentially powerful strategy for induction of antigen-specific CTLs. Fusions of DCs and whole tumor cells represent an alternative approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad spectrum of antigens, including those known and unidentified, in the context of costimulatory molecules. Once DCs/tumor fusions have been infused back into patient, they migrate to secondary lymphoid organs, where the generation of antigen-specific polyclonal CTL responses occurs. We will discuss perspectives for future development of DCs/tumor fusions for CTL induction.

  19. Short-term variability in bacterial abundance, cell properties, and incorporation of leucine and thymidine in subarctic sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaartokallio, H.; Sogaard, D. H.; Norman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Sea ice is a biome of immense size and provides a range of habitats for diverse microbial communities, many of which are adapted to living at low temperatures and high salinities in brines. We measured simultaneous incorporation of thymidine (TdR) and leucine (Leu), bacterial cell abundance...... and cell population properties (by flow cytometry) in subarctic sea ice in SW Greenland. Short-term temporal variability was moderate, and steep environmental gradients, typical for sea ice, were the main drivers of the variability in bacterial cell properties and activity. Low nucleic acid (LNA) bacteria...... and marine biofilm systems. Leu: TdR ratios were high (up to >300) in lowermost ice layers, and when compared to published respiration measurements, these results suggest non-specific Leu incorporation. There was evidence of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-containing bacteria in the sea ice, shown by brightly...

  20. B-1 cell immunoglobulin directed against oxidation-specific epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios eTsiantoulas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural antibodies (NAbs are pre-existing antibodies with germline origin that arise in the absence of previous exposure to foreign antigens. NAbs are produced by B-1 lymphocytes and are primarily of the IgM isotype. There is accumulating evidence that - in addition to their role in antimicrobial host defense - NAbs exhibit important housekeeping functions by facilitating the non-immunogenic clearance of apoptotic cells as well as the removal of (neo-self antigens. These properties are largely mediated by the ability of NAbs to recognize highly conserved and endogenously generated structures, which are exemplified by so-called oxidation-specific epitopes (OSEs that are products of lipid peroxidation. The generation of OSEs as well as their interaction with the immune system have been studied extensively in the context of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the vascular wall that is characterized by the accumulation of cellular debris and oxidized low-density lipoproteins (OxLDL. Both apoptotic cells as well as OxLDL carry OSEs that are targeted by NAbs. Therefore, OSEs represent stress-induced neo-self structures that mediate recognition of metabolic waste (e.g. cellular debris by NAbs, allowing its safe disposal, which has fundamental implications in health and disease.

  1. Specific Visualization of Tumor Cells Using Upconversion Nanophosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenik, E. A.; Generalova, A. N.; Nechaev, A. V.; Khaydukov, E.V.; Mironova, K. E.; Stremovskiy, O. A.; Lebedenko, E.N.; Zvyagin, A. V.; Deyev, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The development of targeted constructs on the basis of photoluminescent nanoparticles with a high photo- and chemical stability and absorption/emission spectra in the “transparency window” of biological tissues is an important focus area of present-day medical diagnostics. In this work, a targeted two-component construct on the basis of upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) and anti-tumor 4D5 scFv was developed for selective labeling of tumor cells overexpressing the HER2 tumor marker characteristic of a number of human malignant tumors. A high affinity barnase : barstar (Bn : Bs) protein pair, which exhibits high stability in a wide range of pH and temperatures, was exploited as a molecular adapter providing self-assembly of the two-component construct. High selectivity for the binding of the two-component 4D5 scFv-Bn : UCNP-Bs construct to human breast adenocarcinoma SK-BR-3 cells overexpressing HER2 was demonstrated. This approach provides an opportunity to produce similar constructs for the visualization of different specific markers in pathogenic tissues, including malignant tumors. PMID:25558394

  2. Influenza virus and endothelial cells: a species specific relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Renfree Short

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus infection is an important cause of respiratory disease in humans. The original reservoirs of influenza A virus are wild waterfowl and shorebirds, where virus infection causes limited, if any, disease. Both in humans and in wild waterbirds, epithelial cells are the main target of infection. However, influenza virus can spread from wild bird species to terrestrial poultry. Here, the virus can evolve into highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI. Part of this evolution involves increased viral tropism for endothelial cells. HPAI virus infections not only cause severe disease in chickens and other terrestrial poultry species but can also spread to humans and back to wild bird populations. Here, we review the role of the endothelium in the pathogenesis of influenza virus infection in wild birds, terrestrial poultry and humans with a particular focus on HPAI viruses. We demonstrate that whilst the endothelium is an important target of virus infection in terrestrial poultry and some wild bird species, in humans the endothelium is more important in controlling the local inflammatory milieu. Thus, the endothelium plays an important, but species-specific, role in the pathogenesis of influenza virus infection.

  3. Primer sets for cloning the human repertoire of T cell Receptor Variable regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoro Claudio

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amplification and cloning of naïve T cell Receptor (TR repertoires or antigen-specific TR is crucial to shape immune response and to develop immuno-based therapies. TR variable (V regions are encoded by several genes that recombine during T cell development. The cloning of expressed genes as large diverse libraries from natural sources relies upon the availability of primers able to amplify as many V genes as possible. Results Here, we present a list of primers computationally designed on all functional TR V and J genes listed in the IMGT®, the ImMunoGeneTics information system®. The list consists of unambiguous or degenerate primers suitable to theoretically amplify and clone the entire TR repertoire. We show that it is possible to selectively amplify and clone expressed TR V genes in one single RT-PCR step and from as little as 1000 cells. Conclusion This new primer set will facilitate the creation of more diverse TR libraries than has been possible using currently available primer sets.

  4. Primer sets for cloning the human repertoire of T cell Receptor Variable regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boria, Ilenia; Cotella, Diego; Dianzani, Irma; Santoro, Claudio; Sblattero, Daniele

    2008-08-29

    Amplification and cloning of naïve T cell Receptor (TR) repertoires or antigen-specific TR is crucial to shape immune response and to develop immuno-based therapies. TR variable (V) regions are encoded by several genes that recombine during T cell development. The cloning of expressed genes as large diverse libraries from natural sources relies upon the availability of primers able to amplify as many V genes as possible. Here, we present a list of primers computationally designed on all functional TR V and J genes listed in the IMGT, the ImMunoGeneTics information system. The list consists of unambiguous or degenerate primers suitable to theoretically amplify and clone the entire TR repertoire. We show that it is possible to selectively amplify and clone expressed TR V genes in one single RT-PCR step and from as little as 1000 cells. This new primer set will facilitate the creation of more diverse TR libraries than has been possible using currently available primer sets.

  5. The association of heavy and light chain variable domains in antibodies: implications for antigen specificity.

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2011-01-01

    of interaction between the heavy and light chain variable domains affects the relative position of the antigen-binding loops and therefore has an effect on the overall conformation of the binding site. In this article, we analyze the structure of the interface

  6. Variable rate application of nematicides on cotton fields: A promising site-specific management strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field tests were conducted to determine if differences in response to nematicide application (i.e., root-knot nematode (RKN) population levels, cotton yield, and profitability) occurred among RKN management zones (MZ). The MZ were delineated using variables related to soil texture, including appare...

  7. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highsmith, R.F.; Gallaher, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive 125 I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface

  8. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Highsmith, R.F.; Gallaher, M.J.

    1986-03-05

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive /sup 125/I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface.

  9. Use of a small molecule cell cycle inhibitor to control cell growth and improve specific productivity and product quality of recombinant proteins in CHO cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhimei; Treiber, David; McCarter, John D; Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Saleem, Ramsey A; McCoy, Rebecca E; Zhang, Yuling; Tharmalingam, Tharmala; Leith, Matthew; Follstad, Brian D; Dell, Brad; Grisim, Brent; Zupke, Craig; Heath, Carole; Morris, Arvia E; Reddy, Pranhitha

    2015-01-01

    The continued need to improve therapeutic recombinant protein productivity has led to ongoing assessment of appropriate strategies in the biopharmaceutical industry to establish robust processes with optimized critical variables, that is, viable cell density (VCD) and specific productivity (product per cell, qP). Even though high VCD is a positive factor for titer, uncontrolled proliferation beyond a certain cell mass is also undesirable. To enable efficient process development to achieve consistent and predictable growth arrest while maintaining VCD, as well as improving qP, without negative impacts on product quality from clone to clone, we identified an approach that directly targets the cell cycle G1-checkpoint by selectively inhibiting the function of cyclin dependent kinases (CDK) 4/6 with a small molecule compound. Results from studies on multiple recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines demonstrate that the selective inhibitor can mediate a complete and sustained G0/G1 arrest without impacting G2/M phase. Cell proliferation is consistently and rapidly controlled in all recombinant cell lines at one concentration of this inhibitor throughout the production processes with specific productivities increased up to 110 pg/cell/day. Additionally, the product quality attributes of the mAb, with regard to high molecular weight (HMW) and glycan profile, are not negatively impacted. In fact, high mannose is decreased after treatment, which is in contrast to other established growth control methods such as reducing culture temperature. Microarray analysis showed major differences in expression of regulatory genes of the glycosylation and cell cycle signaling pathways between these different growth control methods. Overall, our observations showed that cell cycle arrest by directly targeting CDK4/6 using selective inhibitor compound can be utilized consistently and rapidly to optimize process parameters, such as cell growth, qP, and glycosylation profile in

  10. Improving sensitivity of linear regression-based cell type-specific differential expression deconvolution with per-gene vs. global significance threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Edmund R; Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2016-10-06

    The goal of many human disease-oriented studies is to detect molecular mechanisms different between healthy controls and patients. Yet, commonly used gene expression measurements from blood samples suffer from variability of cell composition. This variability hinders the detection of differentially expressed genes and is often ignored. Combined with cell counts, heterogeneous gene expression may provide deeper insights into the gene expression differences on the cell type-specific level. Published computational methods use linear regression to estimate cell type-specific differential expression, and a global cutoff to judge significance, such as False Discovery Rate (FDR). Yet, they do not consider many artifacts hidden in high-dimensional gene expression data that may negatively affect linear regression. In this paper we quantify the parameter space affecting the performance of linear regression (sensitivity of cell type-specific differential expression detection) on a per-gene basis. We evaluated the effect of sample sizes, cell type-specific proportion variability, and mean squared error on sensitivity of cell type-specific differential expression detection using linear regression. Each parameter affected variability of cell type-specific expression estimates and, subsequently, the sensitivity of differential expression detection. We provide the R package, LRCDE, which performs linear regression-based cell type-specific differential expression (deconvolution) detection on a gene-by-gene basis. Accounting for variability around cell type-specific gene expression estimates, it computes per-gene t-statistics of differential detection, p-values, t-statistic-based sensitivity, group-specific mean squared error, and several gene-specific diagnostic metrics. The sensitivity of linear regression-based cell type-specific differential expression detection differed for each gene as a function of mean squared error, per group sample sizes, and variability of the proportions

  11. Specific immunotherapy modifies allergen-specific CD4+ T cell responses in an epitope-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambre, Erik; DeLong, Jonathan H.; James, Eddie A.; Torres-Chinn, Nadia; Pfützner, Wolfgang; Möbs, Christian; Durham, Stephen R.; Till, Stephen J.; Robinson, David; Kwok, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system induces and controls allergic inflammation at the T cell epitope level is critical for the design of new allergy vaccine strategies. Objective To characterize allergen-specific T cell responses linked with allergy or peripheral tolerance and to determine how CD4+ T cell responses to individual allergen-derived epitopes change over allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT). Methods Timothy grass pollen (TGP) allergy was used as a model for studying grass pollen allergies. The breadth, magnitude, epitope hierarchy and phenotype of the DR04:01-restricted TGP-specific T cell responses in ten grass pollen allergic, five non-atopic and six allergy vaccine-treated individuals was determined using an ex vivo pMHCII-tetramer approach. Results CD4+ T cells in allergic individuals are directed to a broad range of TGP epitopes characterized by defined immunodominance hierarchy patterns and with distinct functional profiles that depend on the epitope recognized. Epitopes that are restricted specifically to either TH2 or TH1/TR1 responses were identified. ASIT was associated with preferential deletion of allergen-specific TH2 cells and without significant change in frequency of TH1/TR1 cells. Conclusions Preferential allergen-specific TH2-cells deletion after repeated high doses antigen stimulation can be another independent mechanism to restore tolerance to allergen during immunotherapy. PMID:24373351

  12. Targeting and tracing of specific DNA sequences with dTALEs in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanisch, Katharina; Schneider, Katrin; Morbitzer, Robert; Solovei, Irina; Lahaye, Thomas; Bultmann, Sebastian; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression involves, besides DNA and histone modifications, the relative positioning of DNA sequences within the nucleus. To trace specific DNA sequences in living cells, we used programmable sequence-specific DNA binding of designer transcription activator-like effectors (dTALEs). We designed a recombinant dTALE (msTALE) with variable repeat domains to specifically bind a 19-bp target sequence of major satellite DNA. The msTALE was fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and stably expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells. Hybridization with a major satellite probe (3D-fluorescent in situ hybridization) and co-staining for known cellular structures confirmed in vivo binding of the GFP-msTALE to major satellite DNA present at nuclear chromocenters. Dual tracing of major satellite DNA and the replication machinery throughout S-phase showed co-localization during mid to late S-phase, directly demonstrating the late replication timing of major satellite DNA. Fluorescence bleaching experiments indicated a relatively stable but still dynamic binding, with mean residence times in the range of minutes. Fluorescently labeled dTALEs open new perspectives to target and trace DNA sequences and to monitor dynamic changes in subnuclear positioning as well as interactions with functional nuclear structures during cell cycle progression and cellular differentiation. PMID:24371265

  13. Targeting and tracing of specific DNA sequences with dTALEs in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanisch, Katharina; Schneider, Katrin; Morbitzer, Robert; Solovei, Irina; Lahaye, Thomas; Bultmann, Sebastian; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2014-04-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression involves, besides DNA and histone modifications, the relative positioning of DNA sequences within the nucleus. To trace specific DNA sequences in living cells, we used programmable sequence-specific DNA binding of designer transcription activator-like effectors (dTALEs). We designed a recombinant dTALE (msTALE) with variable repeat domains to specifically bind a 19-bp target sequence of major satellite DNA. The msTALE was fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and stably expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells. Hybridization with a major satellite probe (3D-fluorescent in situ hybridization) and co-staining for known cellular structures confirmed in vivo binding of the GFP-msTALE to major satellite DNA present at nuclear chromocenters. Dual tracing of major satellite DNA and the replication machinery throughout S-phase showed co-localization during mid to late S-phase, directly demonstrating the late replication timing of major satellite DNA. Fluorescence bleaching experiments indicated a relatively stable but still dynamic binding, with mean residence times in the range of minutes. Fluorescently labeled dTALEs open new perspectives to target and trace DNA sequences and to monitor dynamic changes in subnuclear positioning as well as interactions with functional nuclear structures during cell cycle progression and cellular differentiation.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of differential transcriptional and epigenetic variability across human immune cell types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ecker, Simone; Chen, Lu; Pancaldi, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Background: A healthy immune system requires immune cells that adapt rapidly to environmental challenges. This phenotypic plasticity can be mediated by transcriptional and epigenetic variability. Results: We apply a novel analytical approach to measure and compare transcriptional and epigenetic v...

  15. A residue-specific shift in stability and amyloidogenicity of antibody variable domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokwe, Cardine N; Zacharias, Martin; Yagi, Hisashi; Hora, Manuel; Reif, Bernd; Goto, Yuji; Buchner, Johannes

    2014-09-26

    Variable (V) domains of antibodies are essential for antigen recognition by our adaptive immune system. However, some variants of the light chain V domains (VL) form pathogenic amyloid fibrils in patients. It is so far unclear which residues play a key role in governing these processes. Here, we show that the conserved residue 2 of VL domains is crucial for controlling its thermodynamic stability and fibril formation. Hydrophobic side chains at position 2 stabilize the domain, whereas charged residues destabilize and lead to amyloid fibril formation. NMR experiments identified several segments within the core of the VL domain to be affected by changes in residue 2. Furthermore, molecular dynamic simulations showed that hydrophobic side chains at position 2 remain buried in a hydrophobic pocket, and charged side chains show a high flexibility. This results in a predicted difference in the dissociation free energy of ∼10 kJ mol(-1), which is in excellent agreement with our experimental values. Interestingly, this switch point is found only in VL domains of the κ family and not in VLλ or in VH domains, despite a highly similar domain architecture. Our results reveal novel insight into the architecture of variable domains and the prerequisites for formation of amyloid fibrils. This might also contribute to the rational design of stable variable antibody domains. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models: Generation and Characterization of Cardiac Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Fabian; Sheikh, Farah

    2016-01-01

    The generation of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes has been of utmost interest for the study of cardiac development, cardiac disease modeling, and evaluation of cardiotoxic effects of novel candidate drugs. Several protocols have been developed to guide human stem cells toward the cardiogenic path. Pioneering work used serum to promote cardiogenesis; however, low cardiogenic throughputs, lack of chemical definition, and batch-to-batch variability of serum lots constituted a considerable impediment to the implementation of those protocols to large-scale cell biology. Further work focused on the manipulation of pathways that mouse genetics indicated to be fundamental in cardiac development to promote cardiac differentiation in stem cells. Although extremely elegant, those serum-free protocols involved the use of human recombinant cytokines that tend to be quite costly and which can also be variable between lots. The latest generation of cardiogenic protocols aimed for a more cost-effective and reproducible definition of the conditions driving cardiac differentiation, using small molecules to manipulate cardiogenic pathways overriding the need for cytokines. This chapter details methods based on currently available cardiac differentiation protocols for the generation and characterization of robust numbers of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes under chemically defined conditions.

  17. A Comprehensive, Ethnically Diverse Library of Sickle Cell Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seonmi; Gianotti-Sommer, Andreia; Molina-Estevez, Francisco Javier; Vanuytsel, Kim; Skvir, Nick; Leung, Amy; Rozelle, Sarah S; Shaikho, Elmutaz Mohammed; Weir, Isabelle; Jiang, Zhihua; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Chui, David H K; Figueiredo, Maria Stella; Alsultan, Abdulraham; Al-Ali, Amein; Sebastiani, Paola; Steinberg, Martin H; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Murphy, George J

    2017-04-11

    Sickle cell anemia affects millions of people worldwide and is an emerging global health burden. As part of a large NIH-funded NextGen Consortium, we generated a diverse, comprehensive, and fully characterized library of sickle-cell-disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients of different ethnicities, β-globin gene (HBB) haplotypes, and fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels. iPSCs stand to revolutionize the way we study human development, model disease, and perhaps eventually, treat patients. Here, we describe this unique resource for the study of sickle cell disease, including novel haplotype-specific polymorphisms that affect disease severity, as well as for the development of patient-specific therapeutics for this phenotypically diverse disorder. As a complement to this library, and as proof of principle for future cell- and gene-based therapies, we also designed and employed CRISPR/Cas gene editing tools to correct the sickle hemoglobin (HbS) mutation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  19. Long-term nonprogression and broad HIV-1-specific proliferative T-cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrina eImami

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex mechanisms underlying the maintenance of fully functional, proliferative, HIV-1-specific T-cell responses involve processes from early T-cell development through to the final stages of T-cell differentiation and antigen recognition. Virus-specific proliferative CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses, important for the control of infection, are observed in some HIV-1+ patients during early stages of disease, and are maintained in long-term nonprogressing subjects. In the vast majority of HIV-1+ patients, full immune functionality is lost when proliferative HIV-1-specific T-cell responses undergo a variable progressive decline throughout the course of chronic infection. This appears irreparable despite administration of potent combination antiretroviral therapy, which to date is non-curative, necessitating life-long administration and the development of effective, novel, therapeutic interventions. While a sterilising cure, involving clearance of virus from the host, remains a primary aim, a functional cure may be a more feasible goal with considerable impact on worldwide HIV-1 infection. Such an approach would enable long-term co-existence of host and virus in the absence of toxic and costly drugs. Effective immune homeostasis coupled with a balanced response appropriately targeting conserved viral antigens, in a manner that avoids hyperactivation and exhaustion, may prove to be the strongest correlate of durable viral control. This review describes novel concepts underlying full immune functionality in the context of HIV-1 infection, which may be utilised in future strategies designed to improve upon existing therapy. The aim will be to induce long-term nonprogressor or elite controller status in every infected host, through immune-mediated control of viraemia and reduction of viral reservoirs, leading to lower HIV-1 transmission rates.

  20. Regulatory domain selectivity in the cell-type specific PKN-dependence of cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Lachmann

    Full Text Available The mammalian protein kinase N (PKN family of Serine/Threonine kinases comprises three isoforms, which are targets for Rho family GTPases. Small GTPases are major regulators of the cellular cytoskeleton, generating interest in the role(s of specific PKN isoforms in processes such as cell migration and invasion. It has been reported that PKN3 is required for prostate tumour cell invasion but not PKN1 or 2. Here we employ a cell model, the 5637 bladder tumour cell line where PKN2 is relatively highly expressed, to assess the potential redundancy of these isoforms in migratory responses. It is established that PKN2 has a critical role in the migration and invasion of these cells. Furthermore, using a PKN wild-type and chimera rescue strategy, it is shown that PKN isoforms are not simply redundant in supporting migration, but appear to be linked through isoform specific regulatory domain properties to selective upstream signals. It is concluded that intervention in PKNs may need to be directed at multiple isoforms to be effective in different cell types.

  1. Regulatory domain selectivity in the cell-type specific PKN-dependence of cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, Sylvie; Jevons, Amy; De Rycker, Manu; Casamassima, Adele; Radtke, Simone; Collazos, Alejandra; Parker, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian protein kinase N (PKN) family of Serine/Threonine kinases comprises three isoforms, which are targets for Rho family GTPases. Small GTPases are major regulators of the cellular cytoskeleton, generating interest in the role(s) of specific PKN isoforms in processes such as cell migration and invasion. It has been reported that PKN3 is required for prostate tumour cell invasion but not PKN1 or 2. Here we employ a cell model, the 5637 bladder tumour cell line where PKN2 is relatively highly expressed, to assess the potential redundancy of these isoforms in migratory responses. It is established that PKN2 has a critical role in the migration and invasion of these cells. Furthermore, using a PKN wild-type and chimera rescue strategy, it is shown that PKN isoforms are not simply redundant in supporting migration, but appear to be linked through isoform specific regulatory domain properties to selective upstream signals. It is concluded that intervention in PKNs may need to be directed at multiple isoforms to be effective in different cell types.

  2. Sex-Specific Effects of Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress: Implications for Mammalian Developmental Programming During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talyansky, Y.; Moyer, E. L.; Oijala, E.; Baer, L. A.; Ronca, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    During adaptation to the microgravity environment, adult mammals experience stress mediated by the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis. In our previous studies of pregnant rats exposed to 2-g hypergravity via centrifugation, we reported decreased corticosterone and increased body mass and leptin in adult male, but not female, offspring. In this study, we utilized Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress to simulate the stressors of spaceflight by exposing dams to different stressors. Stress response modulation occurs via both positive and negative feedback in the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary gland, and adrenal cortex resulting in the differential release of corticosterone (CORT), a murine analog to human cortisol.

  3. Personalized Medicine: Cell and Gene Therapy Based on Patient-Specific iPSC-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Chan, Lawrence; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Interest in generating human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for stem cell modeling of diseases has overtaken that of patient-specific human embryonic stem cells due to the ethical, technical, and political concerns associated with the latter. In ophthalmology, researchers are currently using iPS cells to explore various applications, including: (1) modeling of retinal diseases using patient-specific iPS cells; (2) autologous transplantation of differentiated retinal cells that undergo gene correction at the iPS cell stage via gene editing tools (e.g., CRISPR/Cas9, TALENs and ZFNs); and (3) autologous transplantation of patient-specific iPS-derived retinal cells treated with gene therapy. In this review, we will discuss the uses of patient-specific iPS cells for differentiating into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, uncovering disease pathophysiology, and developing new treatments such as gene therapy and cell replacement therapy via autologous transplantation.

  4. Ionizing radiation enhances immunogenicity of cells expressing a tumor-specific T-cell epitope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciernik, Ilja F.; Romero, Pedro; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Carbone, David P.

    1999-01-01

    Background: p53 point mutations represent potential tumor-specific cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes. Whether ionizing radiation (IR) alters the immunological properties of cells expressing mutant p53 in respect of the CTL epitope generated by a defined point mutation has not been evaluated. Methods: Mutant p53-expressing syngeneic, nontumor forming BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts, tumor forming ras-transfected BALB/c 3T3 sarcomas, and DBA/2-derived P815 mastocytoma cells, which differ at the level of minor histocompatibility antigens, were used as cellular vaccines. Cells were either injected with or without prior IR into naive BALB/c mice. Cellular cytotoxicity was assessed after secondary restimulation of effector spleen cells in vitro. Results: Injection of P815 mastocytoma cells expressing the mutant p53 induced mutation-specific CTL in BALB/c mice irrespective of prior irradiation. However, syngeneic fibroblasts or fibrosarcomas endogenously expressing mutant p53 were able to induce significant mutation-specific CTL only when irradiated prior to injection into BALB/c mice. IR of fibroblasts did not detectably alter the expression of cell surface molecules involved in immune response induction, nor did it alter the short-term in vitro viability of the fibroblasts. Interestingly, radioactively-labeled fibroblasts injected into mice after irradiation showed altered organ distribution, suggesting that the in vivo fate of these cells may play a crucial role in their immunogenicity. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IR can alter the immunogenicity of syngeneic normal as well as tumor forming fibroblasts in vivo, and support the view that ionizing radiation enhances immunogenicity of cellular tumor vaccines

  5. Retroviral vectors encoding ADA regulatory locus control region provide enhanced T-cell-specific transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Alice T; Ball, Bret G; Weber, Erin; Gallaher, Timothy K; Gluzman-Poltorak, Zoya; Anderson, French; Basile, Lena A

    2009-12-30

    Murine retroviral vectors have been used in several hundred gene therapy clinical trials, but have fallen out of favor for a number of reasons. One issue is that gene expression from viral or internal promoters is highly variable and essentially unregulated. Moreover, with retroviral vectors, gene expression is usually silenced over time. Mammalian genes, in contrast, are characterized by highly regulated, precise levels of expression in both a temporal and a cell-specific manner. To ascertain if recapitulation of endogenous adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression can be achieved in a vector construct we created a new series of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) based retroviral vector that carry human regulatory elements including combinations of the ADA promoter, the ADA locus control region (LCR), ADA introns and human polyadenylation sequences in a self-inactivating vector backbone. A MuLV-based retroviral vector with a self-inactivating (SIN) backbone, the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter (PGK) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), as a reporter gene, was generated. Subsequent vectors were constructed from this basic vector by deletion or addition of certain elements. The added elements that were assessed are the human ADA promoter, human ADA locus control region (LCR), introns 7, 8, and 11 from the human ADA gene, and human growth hormone polyadenylation signal. Retroviral vector particles were produced by transient three-plasmid transfection of 293T cells. Retroviral vectors encoding eGFP were titered by transducing 293A cells, and then the proportion of GFP-positive cells was determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Non T-cell and T-cell lines were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1 and the yield of eGFP transgene expression was evaluated by FACS analysis using mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) detection. Vectors that contained the ADA LCR were preferentially expressed in T-cell lines. Further improvements

  6. Retroviral vectors encoding ADA regulatory locus control region provide enhanced T-cell-specific transgene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Murine retroviral vectors have been used in several hundred gene therapy clinical trials, but have fallen out of favor for a number of reasons. One issue is that gene expression from viral or internal promoters is highly variable and essentially unregulated. Moreover, with retroviral vectors, gene expression is usually silenced over time. Mammalian genes, in contrast, are characterized by highly regulated, precise levels of expression in both a temporal and a cell-specific manner. To ascertain if recapitulation of endogenous adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression can be achieved in a vector construct we created a new series of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) based retroviral vector that carry human regulatory elements including combinations of the ADA promoter, the ADA locus control region (LCR), ADA introns and human polyadenylation sequences in a self-inactivating vector backbone. Methods A MuLV-based retroviral vector with a self-inactivating (SIN) backbone, the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter (PGK) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), as a reporter gene, was generated. Subsequent vectors were constructed from this basic vector by deletion or addition of certain elements. The added elements that were assessed are the human ADA promoter, human ADA locus control region (LCR), introns 7, 8, and 11 from the human ADA gene, and human growth hormone polyadenylation signal. Retroviral vector particles were produced by transient three-plasmid transfection of 293T cells. Retroviral vectors encoding eGFP were titered by transducing 293A cells, and then the proportion of GFP-positive cells was determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Non T-cell and T-cell lines were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1 and the yield of eGFP transgene expression was evaluated by FACS analysis using mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) detection. Results Vectors that contained the ADA LCR were preferentially expressed in T-cell

  7. Intra-individual gait pattern variability in specific situations: Implications for forensic gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Oliver; Dillinger, Steffen; Marschall, Franz

    2016-07-01

    In this study, inter- and intra-individual gait pattern differences are examined in various gait situations by means of phase diagrams of the extremity angles (cyclograms). 8 test subjects walked along a walking distance of 6m under different conditions three times each: barefoot, wearing sneakers, wearing combat boots, after muscular fatigue, and wearing a full-face motorcycle helmet restricting vision. The joint angles of foot, knee, and hip were recorded in the sagittal plane. The coupling of movements was represented by time-adjusted cyclograms, and the inter- and intra-individual differences were captured by calculating the similarity between different gait patterns. Gait pattern variability was often greater between the defined test situations than between the individual test subjects. The results have been interpreted considering neurophysiological regulation mechanisms. Footwear, masking, and fatigue were interpreted as disturbance parameters, each being a cause for gait pattern variability and complicating the inference of identity of persons in video recordings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Vitamin A effects on UMR 106 osteosarcoma cells are not mediated by specific cytosolic receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Oreffo, R O; Francis, J A; Triffitt, J T

    1985-01-01

    Retinol and retinoic acid at 20 microM altered cell morphology and inhibited cell proliferation of UMR 106 osteosarcoma cells in culture. No specific cytosolic binding proteins for retinol could be detected.

  9. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean D. Owens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89% were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection.

  10. Parallel arrangements of positive feedback loops limit cell-to-cell variability in differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Dey

    Full Text Available Cellular differentiations are often regulated by bistable switches resulting from specific arrangements of multiple positive feedback loops (PFL fused to one another. Although bistability generates digital responses at the cellular level, stochasticity in chemical reactions causes population heterogeneity in terms of its differentiated states. We hypothesized that the specific arrangements of PFLs may have evolved to minimize the cellular heterogeneity in differentiation. In order to test this we investigated variability in cellular differentiation controlled either by parallel or serial arrangements of multiple PFLs having similar average properties under extrinsic and intrinsic noises. We find that motifs with PFLs fused in parallel to one another around a central regulator are less susceptible to noise as compared to the motifs with PFLs arranged serially. Our calculations suggest that the increased resistance to noise in parallel motifs originate from the less sensitivity of bifurcation points to the extrinsic noise. Whereas estimation of mean residence times indicate that stable branches of bifurcations are robust to intrinsic noise in parallel motifs as compared to serial motifs. Model conclusions are consistent both in AND- and OR-gate input signal configurations and also with two different modeling strategies. Our investigations provide some insight into recent findings that differentiation of preadipocyte to mature adipocyte is controlled by network of parallel PFLs.

  11. Parallel arrangements of positive feedback loops limit cell-to-cell variability in differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Anupam; Barik, Debashis

    2017-01-01

    Cellular differentiations are often regulated by bistable switches resulting from specific arrangements of multiple positive feedback loops (PFL) fused to one another. Although bistability generates digital responses at the cellular level, stochasticity in chemical reactions causes population heterogeneity in terms of its differentiated states. We hypothesized that the specific arrangements of PFLs may have evolved to minimize the cellular heterogeneity in differentiation. In order to test this we investigated variability in cellular differentiation controlled either by parallel or serial arrangements of multiple PFLs having similar average properties under extrinsic and intrinsic noises. We find that motifs with PFLs fused in parallel to one another around a central regulator are less susceptible to noise as compared to the motifs with PFLs arranged serially. Our calculations suggest that the increased resistance to noise in parallel motifs originate from the less sensitivity of bifurcation points to the extrinsic noise. Whereas estimation of mean residence times indicate that stable branches of bifurcations are robust to intrinsic noise in parallel motifs as compared to serial motifs. Model conclusions are consistent both in AND- and OR-gate input signal configurations and also with two different modeling strategies. Our investigations provide some insight into recent findings that differentiation of preadipocyte to mature adipocyte is controlled by network of parallel PFLs.

  12. Patterns and processes of habitat-specific demographic variability in exploited marine species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos, R.P.; Eggleston, D.B.; Pape, le O.; Tulp, I.Y.M.

    2014-01-01

    Population dynamics are governed by four demographic rates: births, deaths, immigration, and emigration. Variation in these rates and processes underlying such variation can be used to prioritize habitat conservation and restoration as well as to parameterize models that predict habitat-specific

  13. Synovium-derived stem cells: a tissue-specific stem cell for cartilage engineering and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brendan A; Pei, Ming

    2012-08-01

    Articular cartilage is difficult to heal once injury or disease occurs. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation is a biological treatment with good prognosis, but donor site morbidity and limited cell source are disadvantages. Currently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising approach for cartilage regeneration. Despite there being various sources, the best candidate for cartilage regeneration is the one with the greatest chondrogenic potential and the least hypertrophic differentiation. These properties are able to insure that the regenerated tissue is hyaline cartilage of high quality. This review article will summarize relevant literature to justify synovium-derived stem cells (SDSCs) as a tissue-specific stem cell for chondrogenesis by comparing synovium and cartilage with respect to anatomical location and functional structure, comparing the growth characterization and chondrogenic capacity of SDSCs and MSCs, evaluating the application of SDSCs in regenerative medicine and diseases, and discussing potential future directions.

  14. Cell Type-Specific Chromatin Signatures Underline Regulatory DNA Elements in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Somatic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming-Tao; Shao, Ning-Yi; Hu, Shijun; Ma, Ning; Srinivasan, Rajini; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Lee, Jaecheol; Zhang, Sophia L; Snyder, Michael P; Wu, Joseph C

    2017-11-10

    Regulatory DNA elements in the human genome play important roles in determining the transcriptional abundance and spatiotemporal gene expression during embryonic heart development and somatic cell reprogramming. It is not well known how chromatin marks in regulatory DNA elements are modulated to establish cell type-specific gene expression in the human heart. We aimed to decipher the cell type-specific epigenetic signatures in regulatory DNA elements and how they modulate heart-specific gene expression. We profiled genome-wide transcriptional activity and a variety of epigenetic marks in the regulatory DNA elements using massive RNA-seq (n=12) and ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing; n=84) in human endothelial cells (CD31 + CD144 + ), cardiac progenitor cells (Sca-1 + ), fibroblasts (DDR2 + ), and their respective induced pluripotent stem cells. We uncovered 2 classes of regulatory DNA elements: class I was identified with ubiquitous enhancer (H3K4me1) and promoter (H3K4me3) marks in all cell types, whereas class II was enriched with H3K4me1 and H3K4me3 in a cell type-specific manner. Both class I and class II regulatory elements exhibited stimulatory roles in nearby gene expression in a given cell type. However, class I promoters displayed more dominant regulatory effects on transcriptional abundance regardless of distal enhancers. Transcription factor network analysis indicated that human induced pluripotent stem cells and somatic cells from the heart selected their preferential regulatory elements to maintain cell type-specific gene expression. In addition, we validated the function of these enhancer elements in transgenic mouse embryos and human cells and identified a few enhancers that could possibly regulate the cardiac-specific gene expression. Given that a large number of genetic variants associated with human diseases are located in regulatory DNA elements, our study provides valuable resources for deciphering

  15. MOS current gain cells with electronically variable gain and constant bandwidth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Seevinck, Evert

    1989-01-01

    Two MOS current gain cells are proposed that provide linear amplification of currents supplied by several linear MOS V-I converters. The gain is electronically variable by a voltage or a current and can be made insensitive to temperature and IC processing. The gain cells have a constant

  16. Reporting of sex as a variable in cardiovascular studies using cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal complement, including that provided by the sex chromosomes, influences expression of proteins and molecular signaling in every cell. However, less than 50% of the scientific studies published in 2009 using experimental animals reported sex as a biological variable. Because every cell has a sex, we conducted a literature review to determine the extent to which sex is reported as a variable in cardiovascular studies on cultured cells. Methods Articles from 10 cardiovascular journals with high impact factors (Circulation, J Am Coll Cardiol, Eur Heart J, Circ Res, Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol, Cardiovasc Res, J Mol Cell Cardiol, Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, J Heart Lung Transplant and J Cardiovasc Pharmacol and published in 2010 were searched using terms 'cultured' and 'cells' in any order to determine if the sex of those cells was reported. Studies using established cell lines were excluded. Results Using two separate search strategies, we found that only 25 of 90 articles (28% and 20 of 101 articles (19.8% reported the sex of cells. Of those reporting the sex of cells, most (68.9%; n = 31 used only male cells and none used exclusively female cells. In studies reporting the sex of cells of cardiovascular origin, 40% used vascular smooth-muscle cells, and 30% used stem/progenitor cells. In studies using cells of human origin, 35% did not report the sex of those cells. None of the studies using neonatal cardiac myocytes reported the sex of those cells. Conclusions The complement of sex chromosomes in cells studied in culture has the potential to affect expression of proteins and 'mechanistic' signaling pathways. Therefore, consistent with scientific excellence, editorial policies should require reporting sex of cells used in in vitro experiments.

  17. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E

    2014-01-01

    of differentiation on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations(n = 128) spanning 11 different epitope targets. RESULTS: Expression levels of PD-1, but not CD244 or LAG-3, varied substantially across epitope specificities both within and between individuals. Differential expression of PD-1 on T-cell receptor (TCR...

  18. Orbital diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with combined variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Vishal S; Jagadeesh, Deepa; Fernandez, James M; Hsi, Eric D; Singh, Arun D

    2017-10-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency manifesting as a reduction in the level of total immunoglobulin (Ig) G, a reduction in the level of either IgA or IgM, poor response to polysaccharide vaccine, and usually frequent infections. The association of CVID with an increased risk of malignancy, specifically lymphoma, is well known. A 63-year-old female with a past medical history significant for CVID presented with a 1-month history of dull, left eye pain with proptosis, hypoglobus, and left upper lid fullness without a discrete palpable mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the orbits revealed a diffuse infiltrating orbital mass superonasally with extension into the superior rectus muscle, medial rectus muscle, and optic nerve up to the orbital apex and ethmoid sinus. A superonasal orbital biopsy with a caruncular approach was performed and demonstrated a sparse lymphoid infiltrate that was suggestive for a large B-cell neoplasm. Positron emission tomography (PET) scan demonstrated a hypermetabolic right lymph node, anterior to the right submandibular gland, which was biopsied and histopathology confirmed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Our patient achieved a very good response to chemotherapy with minimal residual disease on PET scan at the end of treatment. She attained a complete remission after radiation therapy. In conclusion, patients with new orbital and adnexa masses in the setting of a primary immunodeficiency can have an aggressive malignancy such as DLBCL and early diagnosis and systemic treatment carries a good prognosis.

  19. Specific immune cell and cytokine characteristics of human testicular germ cell neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Britta; Haggeney, Thomas; Fietz, Daniela; Indumathy, Sivanjah; Loveland, Kate L; Hedger, Mark; Kliesch, Sabine; Weidner, Wolfgang; Bergmann, Martin; Schuppe, Hans-Christian

    2016-10-01

    Which immune cells and cytokine profiles are characteristic for testicular germ cell neoplasia and what consequences does this have for the understanding of the related testicular immunopathology? The unique immune environment of testicular germ cell neoplasia comprises B cells and dendritic cells as well as high transcript levels of IL-6 and other B cell supporting or T helper cell type 1 (Th1)-driven cytokines and thus differs profoundly from normal testis or inflammatory lesions associated with hypospermatogenesis. T cells are known to be the major component of inflammatory infiltrates associated with either hypospermatogenesis or testicular cancer. It has previously been reported that B cells are only involved within infiltrates of seminoma samples, but this has not been investigated further. Immunohistochemical characterisation (IHC) of infiltrating immune cells and RT-qPCR-based analysis of corresponding cytokine microenvironments was performed on different testicular pathologies. Testicular biopsies, obtained from men undergoing andrological work-up of infertility or taken during surgery for testicular cancer, were used in this study. Samples were grouped as follows: (i) normal spermatogenesis (n = 18), (ii) hypospermatogenesis associated with lymphocytic infiltrates (n = 10), (iii) samples showing neoplasia [germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS, n = 26) and seminoma, n = 18]. IHC was performed using antibodies against T cells (CD3+), B cells (CD20cy+), dendritic cells (CD11c+), macrophages (CD68+) and mast cells (mast cell tryptase+). Degree and compartmental localisation of immune cells throughout all groups analysed was evaluated semi-quantitatively. RT-qPCR on RNA extracted from cryo-preserved tissue samples was performed to analyse mRNA cytokine expression, specifically levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17a, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α (pro-inflammatory), IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 (anti-inflammatory), IL-2, IL-12a, IL-12b

  20. Interindividual variability in the dose-specific effect of dopamine on carotid chemoreceptor sensitivity to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Johnson, Blair D.; Holbein, Walter W.; Ranadive, Sushant M.; Mozer, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Human studies use varying levels of low-dose (1-4 μg·kg−1·min−1) dopamine to examine peripheral chemosensitivity, based on its known ability to blunt carotid body responsiveness to hypoxia. However, the effect of dopamine on the ventilatory responses to hypoxia is highly variable between individuals. Thus we sought to determine 1) the dose response relationship between dopamine and peripheral chemosensitivity as assessed by the ventilatory response to hypoxia in a cohort of healthy adults, and 2) potential confounding cardiovascular responses at variable low doses of dopamine. Young, healthy adults (n = 30, age = 32 ± 1, 24 male/6 female) were given intravenous (iv) saline and a range of iv dopamine doses (1–4 μg·kg−1·min−1) prior to and throughout five hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) tests. Subjects initially received iv saline, and after each HVR the dopamine infusion rate was increased by 1 μg·kg−1·min−1. Tidal volume, respiratory rate, heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were continuously measured. Dopamine significantly reduced HVR at all doses (P HVR in the high group only (P HVR in the low group (P > 0.05). Dopamine infusion also resulted in a reduction in blood pressure (3 μg·kg−1·min−1) and total peripheral resistance (1–4 μg·kg−1·min−1), driven primarily by subjects with low baseline chemosensitivity. In conclusion, we did not find a single dose of dopamine that elicited a nadir HVR in all subjects. Additionally, potential confounding cardiovascular responses occur with dopamine infusion, which may limit its usage. PMID:26586909

  1. Interindividual variability in the dose-specific effect of dopamine on carotid chemoreceptor sensitivity to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Johnson, Blair D; Holbein, Walter W; Ranadive, Sushant M; Mozer, Michael T; Joyner, Michael J

    2016-01-15

    Human studies use varying levels of low-dose (1-4 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) dopamine to examine peripheral chemosensitivity, based on its known ability to blunt carotid body responsiveness to hypoxia. However, the effect of dopamine on the ventilatory responses to hypoxia is highly variable between individuals. Thus we sought to determine 1) the dose response relationship between dopamine and peripheral chemosensitivity as assessed by the ventilatory response to hypoxia in a cohort of healthy adults, and 2) potential confounding cardiovascular responses at variable low doses of dopamine. Young, healthy adults (n = 30, age = 32 ± 1, 24 male/6 female) were given intravenous (iv) saline and a range of iv dopamine doses (1-4 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) prior to and throughout five hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) tests. Subjects initially received iv saline, and after each HVR the dopamine infusion rate was increased by 1 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1). Tidal volume, respiratory rate, heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were continuously measured. Dopamine significantly reduced HVR at all doses (P HVR in the high group only (P HVR in the low group (P > 0.05). Dopamine infusion also resulted in a reduction in blood pressure (3 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and total peripheral resistance (1-4 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)), driven primarily by subjects with low baseline chemosensitivity. In conclusion, we did not find a single dose of dopamine that elicited a nadir HVR in all subjects. Additionally, potential confounding cardiovascular responses occur with dopamine infusion, which may limit its usage. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Cell type-specific responses to salinity - the epidermal bladder cell transcriptome of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dong-Ha; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Pantoja, Omar; Lee, Sang-Yeol; Bohnert, Hans J; Dassanayake, Maheshi

    2015-08-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (ice plant) exhibits extreme tolerance to salt. Epidermal bladder cells (EBCs), developing on the surface of aerial tissues and specialized in sodium sequestration and other protective functions, are critical for the plant's stress adaptation. We present the first transcriptome analysis of EBCs isolated from intact plants, to investigate cell type-specific responses during plant salt adaptation. We developed a de novo assembled, nonredundant EBC reference transcriptome. Using RNAseq, we compared the expression patterns of the EBC-specific transcriptome between control and salt-treated plants. The EBC reference transcriptome consists of 37 341 transcript-contigs, of which 7% showed significantly different expression between salt-treated and control samples. We identified significant changes in ion transport, metabolism related to energy generation and osmolyte accumulation, stress signalling, and organelle functions, as well as a number of lineage-specific genes of unknown function, in response to salt treatment. The salinity-induced EBC transcriptome includes active transcript clusters, refuting the view of EBCs as passive storage compartments in the whole-plant stress response. EBC transcriptomes, differing from those of whole plants or leaf tissue, exemplify the importance of cell type-specific resolution in understanding stress adaptive mechanisms. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Stimulus-specific variability in color working memory with delayed estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Gi-Yeul; Olkkonen, Maria; Allred, Sarah R; Wilson, Colin; Flombaum, Jonathan I

    2014-04-08

    Working memory for color has been the central focus in an ongoing debate concerning the structure and limits of visual working memory. Within this area, the delayed estimation task has played a key role. An implicit assumption in color working memory research generally, and delayed estimation in particular, is that the fidelity of memory does not depend on color value (and, relatedly, that experimental colors have been sampled homogeneously with respect to discriminability). This assumption is reflected in the common practice of collapsing across trials with different target colors when estimating memory precision and other model parameters. Here we investigated whether or not this assumption is secure. To do so, we conducted delayed estimation experiments following standard practice with a memory load of one. We discovered that different target colors evoked response distributions that differed widely in dispersion and that these stimulus-specific response properties were correlated across observers. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that stimulus-specific responses persist under higher memory loads and that at least part of the specificity arises in perception and is eventually propagated to working memory. Posthoc stimulus measurement revealed that rendered stimuli differed from nominal stimuli in both chromaticity and luminance. We discuss the implications of these deviations for both our results and those from other working memory studies.

  4. Polymer-Mediated Delivery of siRNAs to Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Variables Affecting Specificity and Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Farra

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advances in anticancer therapies, their effectiveness for many human tumors is still far from being optimal. Significant improvements in treatment efficacy can come from the enhancement of drug specificity. This goal may be achieved by combining the use of therapeutic molecules with tumor specific effects and delivery carriers with tumor targeting ability. In this regard, nucleic acid-based drug (NABD and particularly small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are attractive molecules due to the possibility to be engineered to target specific tumor genes. On the other hand, polymeric-based delivery systems are emerging as versatile carriers to generate tumor-targeted delivery systems. Here we will focus on the most recent findings in the selection of siRNA/polymeric targeted delivery systems for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, a human tumor for which currently available therapeutic approaches are poorly effective. In addition, we will discuss the most attracting and, in our opinion, promising siRNA-polymer combinations for HCC in relation to the biological features of HCC tissue. Attention will be also put on the mathematical description of the mechanisms ruling siRNA-carrier delivery, this being an important aspect to improve effectiveness reducing the experimental work.

  5. ERE environment- and cell type-specific transcriptional effects of estrogen in normal endometrial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascombe, I; Sallot, M; Vuillermoz, C; Weisz, A; Adessi, G L; Jouvenot, M

    1998-04-30

    Our previous results have suggested a repression of E2 (17beta-estradiol) effect on the c-fos gene of cultured guinea-pig endometrial cells. To investigate this repression, the expression of three human c-fos gene recombinants, pFC1-BL (-2250/+41), pFC2-BL (-1400/+41) and pFC2E (-1300/-1050 and -230/+41), known to be E2-responsive in Hela cells, was studied in stromal (SC) and glandular epithelial cells (GEC). In both cellular types, pFC1-BL was not induced by E2, even in the presence of growth factors or co-transfected estrogen receptor. The pattern of pFC2-BL and pFC2E expression was strikingly different and depended on the cellular type: pFC2-BL and pFC2E induction was restricted to the glandular epithelial cells and did not occur in the SCs. We argue for a repression of E2 action which is dependent on the estrogen-responsive cis-acting element (ERE) environment and also cell type-specific involving DNA/protein and/or protein/protein interactions with cellular type-specific factors.

  6. Tissue-specific designs of stem cell hierarchies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visvader, Jane E.; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the field of stem cell biology suggests that there is no single design for an adult tissue stem cell hierarchy, and that different tissues employ distinct strategies to meet their self-renewal and repair requirements. Stem cells may be multipotent or unipotent, and can exist in

  7. Tissue-specific designs of stem cell hierarchies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visvader, Jane E; Clevers, Hans

    Recent work in the field of stem cell biology suggests that there is no single design for an adult tissue stem cell hierarchy, and that different tissues employ distinct strategies to meet their self-renewal and repair requirements. Stem cells may be multipotent or unipotent, and can exist in

  8. A Stochastic Model of the Yeast Cell Cycle Reveals Roles for Feedback Regulation in Limiting Cellular Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Debashis; Ball, David A; Peccoud, Jean; Tyson, John J

    2016-12-01

    The cell division cycle of eukaryotes is governed by a complex network of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) and auxiliary proteins that govern CDK activities. The control system must function reliably in the context of molecular noise that is inevitable in tiny yeast cells, because mistakes in sequencing cell cycle events are detrimental or fatal to the cell or its progeny. To assess the effects of noise on cell cycle progression requires not only extensive, quantitative, experimental measurements of cellular heterogeneity but also comprehensive, accurate, mathematical models of stochastic fluctuations in the CDK control system. In this paper we provide a stochastic model of the budding yeast cell cycle that accurately accounts for the variable phenotypes of wild-type cells and more than 20 mutant yeast strains simulated in different growth conditions. We specifically tested the role of feedback regulations mediated by G1- and SG2M-phase cyclins to minimize the noise in cell cycle progression. Details of the model are informed and tested by quantitative measurements (by fluorescence in situ hybridization) of the joint distributions of mRNA populations in yeast cells. We use the model to predict the phenotypes of ~30 mutant yeast strains that have not yet been characterized experimentally.

  9. A Stochastic Model of the Yeast Cell Cycle Reveals Roles for Feedback Regulation in Limiting Cellular Variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Barik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The cell division cycle of eukaryotes is governed by a complex network of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs and auxiliary proteins that govern CDK activities. The control system must function reliably in the context of molecular noise that is inevitable in tiny yeast cells, because mistakes in sequencing cell cycle events are detrimental or fatal to the cell or its progeny. To assess the effects of noise on cell cycle progression requires not only extensive, quantitative, experimental measurements of cellular heterogeneity but also comprehensive, accurate, mathematical models of stochastic fluctuations in the CDK control system. In this paper we provide a stochastic model of the budding yeast cell cycle that accurately accounts for the variable phenotypes of wild-type cells and more than 20 mutant yeast strains simulated in different growth conditions. We specifically tested the role of feedback regulations mediated by G1- and SG2M-phase cyclins to minimize the noise in cell cycle progression. Details of the model are informed and tested by quantitative measurements (by fluorescence in situ hybridization of the joint distributions of mRNA populations in yeast cells. We use the model to predict the phenotypes of ~30 mutant yeast strains that have not yet been characterized experimentally.

  10. Live cell imaging reveals marked variability in myoblast proliferation and fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background During the process of muscle regeneration, activated stem cells termed satellite cells proliferate, and then differentiate to form new myofibers that restore the injured area. Yet not all satellite cells contribute to muscle repair. Some continue to proliferate, others die, and others become quiescent and are available for regeneration following subsequent injury. The mechanisms that regulate the adoption of different cell fates in a muscle cell precursor population remain unclear. Methods We have used live cell imaging and lineage tracing to study cell fate in the C2 myoblast line. Results Analyzing the behavior of individual myoblasts revealed marked variability in both cell cycle duration and viability, but similarities between cells derived from the same parental lineage. As a consequence, lineage sizes and outcomes differed dramatically, and individual lineages made uneven contributions toward the terminally differentiated population. Thus, the cohort of myoblasts undergoing differentiation at the end of an experiment differed dramatically from the lineages present at the beginning. Treatment with IGF-I increased myoblast number by maintaining viability and by stimulating a fraction of cells to complete one additional cell cycle in differentiation medium, and as a consequence reduced the variability of the terminal population compared with controls. Conclusion Our results reveal that heterogeneity of responses to external cues is an intrinsic property of cultured myoblasts that may be explained in part by parental lineage, and demonstrate the power of live cell imaging for understanding how muscle differentiation is regulated. PMID:23638706

  11. Spontaneous presence of FOXO3-specific T cells in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stine Kiaer; Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Idorn, Manja

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we describe forkhead box O3 (FOXO3)-specific, cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells existent among peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cancer patients. FOXO3 immunogenicity appears specific, as we did not detect reactivity toward FOXO3 among T cells in healthy individuals. FOXO3...... may naturally serve as a target antigen for tumor-reactive T cells as it is frequently over-expressed in cancer cells. In addition, expression of FOXO3 plays a critical role in immunosuppression mediated by tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs). Indeed, FOXO3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs......) were able to specifically recognize and kill both FOXO3-expressing cancer cells as well as dendritic cells. Thus, FOXO3 was processed and presented by HLA-A2 on the cell surface of both immune cells and cancer cells. As FOXO3 programs TADCs to become tolerogenic, FOXO3 signaling thereby comprises...

  12. Amino acid sequence preferences to control cell-specific organization of endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanie, Kei; Kato, Ryuji; Zhao, Yingzi; Narita, Yuji; Okochi, Mina; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2011-06-01

    Effective surface modification with biocompatible molecules is known to be effective in reducing the life-threatening risks related to artificial cardiovascular implants. In recent strategies in regenerative medicine, the enhancement and support of natural repair systems at the site of injury by designed biocompatible molecules have succeeded in rapid and effective injury repair. Therefore, such a strategy could also be effective for rapid endothelialization of cardiovascular implants to lower the risk of thrombosis and stenosis. To achieve this enhancement of the natural repair system, a biomimetic molecule that mimics proper cellular organization at the implant location is required. In spite of the fact that many reported peptides have cell-attracting properties on material surfaces, there have been few peptides that could control cell-specific adhesion. For the advanced cardiovascular implants, peptides that can mimic the natural mechanism that controls cell-specific organization have been strongly anticipated. To obtain such peptides, we hypothesized the cellular bias toward certain varieties of amino acids and examined the cell preference (in terms of adhesion, proliferation, and protein attraction) of varieties and of repeat length on SPOT peptide arrays. To investigate the role of specific peptides in controlling the organization of various cardiovascular-related cells, we compared endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and fibroblasts (FBs). A clear, cell-specific preference was found for amino acids (longer than 5-mer) using three types of cells, and the combinational effect of the physicochemical properties of the residues was analyzed to interpret the mechanism. Copyright © 2011 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Immunomodulatory Nature and Site Specific Affinity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: a Hope in Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Lotfinegad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunosuppressive ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, their differentiation properties to various specialized tissue types, ease of in vitro and in vivo expansion and specific migration capacity, make them to be tested in different clinical trials for the treatment of various diseases. The immunomodulatory effects of MSCs are less identified which probably has high clinically significance. The clinical trials based on primary research will cause better understanding the ability of MSCs in immunomodulatory applications and site specific migration in the optimization of therapy. So, this review focus on MSCs functional role in modulating immune responses, their ability in homing to tumor, their potency as delivery vehicle and their medical importance.

  14. Immunomodulatory Nature and Site Specific Affinity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: a Hope in Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfinegad, Parisa; Shamsasenjan, karim; Movassaghpour, Aliakbar; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppressive ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), their differentiation properties to various specialized tissue types, ease of in vitro and in vivo expansion and specific migration capacity, make them to be tested in different clinical trials for the treatment of various diseases. The immunomodulatory effects of MSCs are less identified which probably has high clinically significance. The clinical trials based on primary research will cause better understanding the ability of MSCs in immunomodulatory applications and site specific migration in the optimization of therapy. So, this review focus on MSCs functional role in modulating immune responses, their ability in homing to tumor, their potency as delivery vehicle and their medical importance. PMID:24409403

  15. Fruit specific variability in capsaicinoid accumulation and transcription of structural and regulatory genes in Capsicum fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyhaninejad, Neda; Curry, Jeanne; Romero, Joslynn; O'Connell, Mary A

    2014-02-01

    Accumulation of capsaicinoids in the placental tissue of ripening chile (Capsicum spp.) fruit follows the coordinated expression of multiple biosynthetic enzymes producing the substrates for capsaicin synthase. Transcription factors are likely agents to regulate expression of these biosynthetic genes. Placental RNAs from habanero fruit (Capsicum chinense) were screened for expression of candidate transcription factors; with two candidate genes identified, both in the ERF family of transcription factors. Characterization of these transcription factors, Erf and Jerf, in nine chile cultivars with distinct capsaicinoid contents demonstrated a correlation of expression with pungency. Amino acid variants were observed in both ERF and JERF from different chile cultivars; none of these changes involved the DNA binding domains. Little to no transcription of Erf was detected in non-pungent Capsium annuum or C. chinense mutants. This correlation was characterized at an individual fruit level in a set of jalapeño (C. annuum) lines again with distinct and variable capsaicinoid contents. Both Erf and Jerf are expressed early in fruit development, 16-20 days post-anthesis, at times prior to the accumulation of capsaicinoids in the placental tissues. These data support the hypothesis that these two members of the complex ERF family participate in regulation of the pungency phenotype in chile. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. The Specific Nature of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevins, Donald J.; English, Patricia D.; Albersheim, Peter

    1967-01-01

    Polysaccharide compositions of cell walls were assessed by quantitative analyses of the component sugars. Cell walls were hydrolyzed in 2 n trifluoroacetic acid and the liberated sugars reduced to their respective alditols. The alditols were acetylated and the resulting alditol acetates separated by gas chromatography. Quantitative assay of the alditol acetates was accomplished by electronically integrating the detector output of the gas chromatograph. Myo-inositol, introduced into the sample prior to hydrolysis, served as an internal standard. The cell wall polysaccharide compositions of plant varieties within a given species are essentially identical. However, differences in the sugar composition were observed in cell walls prepared from different species of the same as well as of different genera. The fact that the wall compositions of different varieties of the same species are the same indicates that the biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides is genetically regulated. The cell walls of various morphological parts (roots, hypocotyls, first internodes and primary leaves) of bean plants were each found to have a characteristic sugar composition. It was found that the cell wall sugar composition of suspension-cultured sycamore cells could be altered by growing the cells on different carbon sources. This demonstrates that the biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides can be manipulated without fatal consequences. PMID:16656594

  17. Immunomodulatory Nature and Site Specific Affinity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: a Hope in Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lotfinegad, Parisa; Shamsasenjan, karim; Movassaghpour, Aliakbar; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    Immunosuppressive ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), their differentiation properties to various specialized tissue types, ease of in vitro and in vivo expansion and specific migration capacity, make them to be tested in different clinical trials for the treatment of various diseases. The immunomodulatory effects of MSCs are less identified which probably has high clinically significance. The clinical trials based on primary research will cause better understanding the ability of MSCs ...

  18. Characterization of germ cell-specific expression of the orphan nuclear receptor, germ cell nuclear factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, D; Niederberger, C; Slaughter, G R; Cooney, A J

    1997-10-01

    Nuclear receptors, such as those for androgens, estrogens, and progesterones, control many reproductive processes. Proteins with structures similar to these receptors, but for which ligands have not yet been identified, have been termed orphan nuclear receptors. One of these orphans, germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF), has been shown to be germ cell specific in the adult and, therefore, may also participate in the regulation of reproductive functions. In this paper, we examine more closely the expression patterns of GCNF in germ cells to begin to define spatio-temporal domains of its activity. In situ hybridization showed that GCNF messenger RNA (mRNA) is lacking in the testis of hypogonadal mutant mice, which lack developed spermatids, but is present in the wild-type testis. Thus, GCNF is, indeed, germ cell specific in the adult male. Quantitation of the specific in situ hybridization signal in wild-type testis reveals that GCNF mRNA is most abundant in stage VII round spermatids. Similarly, Northern analysis and specific in situ hybridization show that GCNF expression first occurs in testis of 20-day-old mice, when round spermatids first emerge. Therefore, in the male, GCNF expression occurs postmeiotically and may participate in the morphological changes of the maturing spermatids. In contrast, female expression of GCNF is shown in growing oocytes that have not completed the first meiotic division. Thus, GCNF in the female is expressed before the completion of meiosis. Finally, the nature of the two different mRNAs that hybridize to the GCNF complementary DNA was studied. Although both messages contain the DNA binding domain, only the larger message is recognized by a probe from the extreme 3' untranslated region. In situ hybridization with these differential probes demonstrates that both messages are present in growing oocytes. In addition, the coding region and portions of the 3' untranslated region of the GCNF complementary DNA are conserved in the rat.

  19. Economics of site-specific and variable-dose herbicide application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Jens Erik; Kudsk, Per; Jensen, Peter Kryger

    2017-01-01

    Site-specific application of pesticides has so far focused mainly on herbicides. The purpose of precision farming technologies in relation to herbicide use is to reduce herbicide cost and environmental impact from spraying, but at the same time to achieve acceptable weed control. Another purpose...... is to increase the spraying capacity, to reduce the number of sprayer refills, and finally to minimize time spent on weed monitoring. In this chapter the relevance and profitability of four precision herbicide application technologies, two weed detection technologies and a low dose decision support system (DSS......) is analysed. With a low dose herbicide, cost can be reduced by 20–50%. It requires, however, proper monitoring of weeds, which can be a time-consuming task that again requires that the farmer is able to identify the dominant weed species. The current development of high-speed camera and software systems can...

  20. Cell specificity of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ response to tolbutamide is impaired in beta-cells from hyperglycemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Larsson-Nyrén, Gerd; Lindström, Per

    2006-01-01

    We recently reported that the timing and magnitude of the nutrient-induced Ca(2+) response are specific and reproducible for each isolated beta-cell. We have now used tolbutamide and arginine to test if the cell specificity exists also for the response to non-nutrient stimulation of beta-cells an...

  1. Body mass index and other anthropometric variables in children with sickle cell anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odetunde, Odutola Israel; Chinawa, Josephat Maduabuchi; Achigbu, Kingsley Ihedioha; Achigbu, Eberechukwu O

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the anthropometric variables of children with sickle cell anaemia and comparing it with those with normal haemoglobin genotype. A cross sectional study of anthropometric measurements was conducted over a period of six months. Children with sickle cell anaemia in steady state aged between 6-20 years were recruited. Nutritional assessment was done using anthropometrical variables. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences program (SPSS), version 20. The sickle cell patients comprised of 20 males and 20 females. There were an equal number of controls with an equal male to female ratio of 1:1. Forty eight percent (19) of the children with sickle cell anemia were underweight (sickle cell anemia were low when compared with children with normal Haemoglobin genotype.

  2. In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T-Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    player in the activation of lymphoid , myeloid and mast cells , indicating MALT1’s crucial role in innate and adaptive signaling. Therefore, MALT1 is...for RA (IFRA) Program Session 7: Adaptive immunity vs. innate immunity and mesenchymal functions in RA Genetics, T cell specificity and T cell ...Program Session 7: Adaptive immunity vs. innate immunity and mesenchymal functions in RA Genetics, T cell specificity and T cell regulation in RA

  3. In Depth Analysis of Citrulline Specific CD4 T Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    activation of lymphoid , myeloid and mast cells , indicating MALT1’s crucial role in innate and adaptive signaling. Therefore, MALT1 is regarded a...Session 7: Adaptive immunity vs. innate immunity and mesenchymal functions in RA Genetics, T cell specificity and T cell regulation in RA Jane Buckner...IFRA) Program Session 7: Adaptive immunity vs. innate immunity and mesenchymal functions in RA Genetics, T cell specificity and T cell regulation in

  4. Massively parallel amplicon sequencing reveals isotype-specific variability of antimicrobial peptide transcripts in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Rosani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effective innate responses against potential pathogens are essential in the living world and possibly contributed to the evolutionary success of invertebrates. Taken together, antimicrobial peptide (AMP precursors of defensin, mytilin, myticin and mytimycin can represent about 40% of the hemocyte transcriptome in mussels injected with viral-like and bacterial preparations, and unique profiles of myticin C variants are expressed in single mussels. Based on amplicon pyrosequencing, we have ascertained and compared the natural and Vibrio-induced diversity of AMP transcripts in mussel hemocytes from three European regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hemolymph was collected from mussels farmed in the coastal regions of Palavas (France, Vigo (Spain and Venice (Italy. To represent the AMP families known in M. galloprovincialis, nine transcript sequences have been selected, amplified from hemocyte RNA and subjected to pyrosequencing. Hemolymph from farmed (offshore and wild (lagoon Venice mussels, both injected with 10(7 Vibrio cells, were similarly processed. Amplicon pyrosequencing emphasized the AMP transcript diversity, with Single Nucleotide Changes (SNC minimal for mytilin B/C and maximal for arthropod-like defensin and myticin C. Ratio of non-synonymous vs. synonymous changes also greatly differed between AMP isotypes. Overall, each amplicon revealed similar levels of nucleotidic variation across geographical regions, with two main sequence patterns confirmed for mytimycin and no substantial changes after immunostimulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Barcoding and bidirectional pyrosequencing allowed us to map and compare the transcript diversity of known mussel AMPs. Though most of the genuine cds variation was common to the analyzed samples we could estimate from 9 to 106 peptide variants in hemolymph pools representing 100 mussels, depending on the AMP isoform and sampling site. In this study, no prevailing SNC patterns related

  5. High specific energy Lithium Sulfur cell for space application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaniego Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Airbus DS has been testing and characterizing prototype Li-S cells manufactured by OXIS Energy Ltd. since 2014, demonstrating the potential and fast evolution of the cells performance. This paper presents the last test results on a set of different batches provided by OXIS and performed at Airbus DS premises in the frame of an ESA Innovation Triangle Initiative (ITI.

  6. Dissection and manipulation of antigen-specific T cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Koen

    2006-01-01

    T cells recognize pathogen-derived antigens and are crucial for fighting pathogens such as viruses and bacteria. In addition, T cells are able to recognize and attack certain types of tumors, in particular virally induced tumors. In this thesis we aimed 1) to obtain more insight into

  7. Antigen-specific and non-specific CD4+ T cell recruitment and proliferation during influenza infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Timothy J.; Castrucci, Maria R.; Padrick, Ryan C.; Bradley, Linda M.; Topham, David J.

    2005-01-01

    To track epitope-specific CD4 + T cells at a single-cell level during influenza infection, the MHC class II-restricted OVA 323-339 epitope was engineered into the neuraminidase stalk of influenza/A/WSN, creating a surrogate viral antigen. The recombinant virus, influenza A/WSN/OVA II , replicated well, was cleared normally, and stimulated both wild-type and DO11.10 or OT-II TCR transgenic OVA-specific CD4 + T cells. OVA-specific CD4 T cells proliferated during infection only when the OVA epitope was present. However, previously primed (but not naive) transgenic CD4 + T cells were recruited to the infected lung both in the presence and absence of the OVA 323-339 epitope. These data show that, when primed, CD4 + T cells may traffic to the lung in the absence of antigen, but do not proliferate. These results also document a useful tool for the study of CD4 T cells in influenza infection

  8. Quantitative imaging of epithelial cell scattering identifies specific inhibitors of cell motility and cell-cell dissociation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loerke, D.; le Duc, Q.; Blonk, I.; Kerstens, A.; Spanjaard, E.; Machacek, M.; Danuser, G.; de Rooij, J.

    2012-01-01

    The scattering of cultured epithelial cells in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a model system that recapitulates key features of metastatic cell behavior in vitro, including disruption of cell-cell adhesions and induction of cell migration. We have developed image analysis tools that

  9. Cells determine cell density using a small protein bound to a unique tissue-specific phospholipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Petzold

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell density is the critical parameter controlling tendon morphogenesis. Knowing its neighbors allows a cell to regulate correctly its proliferation and collagen production. A missing link to understanding this process is a molecular description of the sensing mechanism. Previously, this mechanism was shown in cell culture to rely on a diffusible factor (SNZR [sensor] with an affinity for the cell layer. This led to purifying conditioned medium over 4 columns and analyzing the final column fractions for band intensity on SDS gels versus biological activity – a 16 kD band strongly correlated between assays. N-terminal sequencing – EPLAVVDL – identified a large gene (424 AA, extremely conserved between chicken and human. In this paper we probe whether this is the correct gene. Can the predicted large protein be cleaved to a smaller protein? EPLAVVDL occurs towards the C-terminus and cleavage would create a small 94 AA protein. This protein would run at ∼10 kD, so what modifications or cofactor binding accounts for its running at 16 kD on SDS gels? This protein has no prominent hydrophobic regions, so can it be secreted? To validate its role, the chicken cDNA for this gene was tagged with myc and his and transfected into a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS. U2OS cells expressed the gene but not passively: differentiating into structures resembling spongy bone and expressing alkaline phosphatase, an early bone marker. Intracellularly, two bands were observed by Western blotting: the full length protein and a smaller form (26 kD. Outside the cell, a small band (28 kD was detected, although it was 40% larger than expected, as well as multiple larger bands. These larger forms could be converted to the predicted smaller protein (94 AA + tags by changing salt concentrations and ultrafiltering – releasing a cofactor to the filtrate while leaving a protein factor in the retentate. Using specific degradative enzymes and mass spectrometry, the

  10. Colony-specific investigations reveal highly variable responses among individual corals to ocean acidification and warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavousi, Javid; Reimer, James Davis; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    As anthropogenic climate change is an ongoing concern, scientific investigations on its impacts on coral reefs are increasing. Although impacts of combined ocean acidification (OA) and temperature stress (T) on reef-building scleractinian corals have been studied at the genus, species and population levels, there are little data available on how individual corals respond to combined OA and anomalous temperatures. In this study, we exposed individual colonies of Acropora digitifera, Montipora digitata and Porites cylindrica to four pCO2-temperature treatments including 400 μatm-28 °C, 400 μatm-31 °C, 1000 μatm-28 °C and 1000 μatm-31 °C for 26 days. Physiological parameters including calcification, protein content, maximum photosynthetic efficiency, Symbiodinium density, and chlorophyll content along with Symbiodinium type of each colony were examined. Along with intercolonial responses, responses of individual colonies versus pooled data to the treatments were investigated. The main results were: 1) responses to either OA or T or their combination were different between individual colonies when considering physiological functions; 2) tolerance to either OA or T was not synonymous with tolerance to the other parameter; 3) tolerance to both OA and T did not necessarily lead to tolerance of OA and T combined (OAT) at the same time; 4) OAT had negative, positive or no impacts on physiological functions of coral colonies; and 5) pooled data were not representative of responses of all individual colonies. Indeed, the pooled data obscured actual responses of individual colonies or presented a response that was not observed in any individual. From the results of this study we recommend improving experimental designs of studies investigating physiological responses of corals to climate change by complementing them with colony-specific examinations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Variable Domain N-Linked Glycans Acquired During Antigen-Specific Immune Responses Can Contribute to Immunoglobulin G Antibody Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur S. van de Bovenkamp

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G (IgG can contain N-linked glycans in the variable domains, the so-called Fab glycans, in addition to the Fc glycans in the CH2 domains. These Fab glycans are acquired following introduction of N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation and contribute to antibody diversification. We investigated whether Fab glycans may—in addition to affecting antigen binding—contribute to antibody stability. By analyzing thermal unfolding profiles of antibodies with or without Fab glycans, we demonstrate that introduction of Fab glycans can improve antibody stability. Strikingly, removal of Fab glycans naturally acquired during antigen-specific immune responses can deteriorate antibody stability, suggesting in vivo selection of stable, glycosylated antibodies. Collectively, our data show that variable domain N-linked glycans acquired during somatic hypermutation can contribute to IgG antibody stability. These findings indicate that introducing Fab glycans may represent a mechanism to improve therapeutic/diagnostic antibody stability.

  12. Single cell adhesion strength assessed with variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelina Cardoso Dos Santos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new strategy to evaluate adhesion strength at the single cell level. This approach involves variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor in real time the topography of cell membranes, i.e. a map of the membrane/substrate separation distance. According to the Boltzmann distribution, both potential energy profile and dissociation energy related to the interactions between the cell membrane and the substrate were determined from the membrane topography. We have highlighted on glass substrates coated with poly-L-lysine and fibronectin, that the dissociation energy is a reliable parameter to quantify the adhesion strength of MDA-MB-231 motile cells.

  13. Antiviral T cell competence and restriction specificity of mixed allogeneic (P1 + P2----P1) irradiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueedi, E.S.; Sykes, M.; Ildstad, S.T.; Chester, C.H.; Althage, A.; Hengartner, H.; Sachs, D.H.; Zinkernagel, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Mixed irradiation bone marrow chimeras were prepared by reconstituting lethally irradiated C57BL/10 (B10) or B10.D2 mice with T cell-depleted bone marrow cells of B10 plus B10.D2 origin. These chimeras were healthy and survived well under conventional housing conditions and after experimental laboratory infections. Of a total of 17 chimeras tested, 2 died spontaneously or from the injected virus. Twelve of fifteen chimeras mounted a measurable cytotoxic T cell response to virus. Despite approximately equal percentages of B10 and B10.D2 lymphocytes in chimeras, cytotoxic T cell responses to vaccinia virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus were mediated variably by either syngeneic or allogeneic donor lymphocytes; thus the H-2 type of effector T cells frequently did not correspond to the 50:50 distribution of spleen or peripheral blood lymphocytes. Cytotoxic responses were restricted exclusively to recipient H-2 type. All mixed chimeras examined were able to mount a good IgG response to vesicular stomatitis virus. These results confirm previous data suggesting that such mixed chimeras are healthy and immunocompetent and demonstrate strict recipient-determined restriction specificity of effector T cells; they also suggest that if T help is necessary for induction of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells, it does not require host-restricted interactions between helper T cells and precursor cytotoxic T cells

  14. Monovalent engagement of the BCR activates ovalbumin-specific transnuclear B cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avalos, Ana M.; Bilate, Angelina M.; Witte, Martin D.; Tai, Albert K.; He, Jiang; Frushicheva, Maria P.; Thill, Peter D.; Meyer-Wentrup, Friederike; Theile, Christopher S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2014-01-01

    Valency requirements for B cell activation upon antigen encounter are poorly understood. OB1 transnuclear B cells express an IgG1 B cell receptor (BCR) specific for ovalbumin (OVA), the epitope of which can be mimicked using short synthetic peptides to allow antigen-specific engagement of the BCR.

  15. Phase I trials using Sleeping Beauty to generate CD19-specific CAR T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kebriaei, Partow; Singh, Harjeet; Huls, M. Helen; Figliola, Matthew J.; Bassett, Roland; Olivares, Simon; Jena, Bipulendu; Dawson, Margaret J.; Kumaresan, Pappanaicken R.; Su, Shihuang; Maiti, Sourindra; Dai, Jianliang; Moriarity, Branden; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Senyukov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. T cells expressing antigen-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) improve outcomes for CD19-expressing B cell malignancies. We evaluated a human application of T cells that were genetically modified using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express a CD19-specific CAR.

  16. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells mediate intestinal selection of commensal bacteria-specific CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Matthew R.; Fung, Thomas C.; Masur, Samuel H.; Kelsen, Judith R.; McConnell, Fiona M.; Dubrot, Juan; Withers, David R.; Hugues, Stephanie; Farrar, Michael A.; Reith, Walter; Eberl, Gerard; Baldassano, Robert N.; Laufer, Terri M.; Elson, Charles O.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory CD4+ T cell responses to self or commensal bacteria underlie the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), respectively. While selection of self-specific T cells in the thymus limits responses to tissue antigens, the mechanisms that control selection of commensal bacteria-specific T cells remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that group 3 innate lymphoid cell (ILC3)-intrinsic expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) is regulated similarly to thymic epithelial cells, and that MHCII+ ILC3s directly induce cell death of activated commensal bacteria-specific T cells. Further, MHCII on human colonic ILC3s was reduced in pediatric IBD patients. Collectively, these results define a selection pathway for commensal bacteria-specific CD4+ T cells in the intestine, and suggest that this process is dysregulated in human IBD. PMID:25908663

  17. Variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of intact cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Myung K

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM is a powerful tool for observing fluorescently labeled molecules on the plasma membrane surface of animal cells. However, the utility of TIRFM in plant cell studies has been limited by the fact that plants have cell walls, thick peripheral layers surrounding the plasma membrane. Recently, a new technique known as variable-angle epifluorescence microscopy (VAEM was developed to circumvent this problem. However, the lack of a detailed analysis of the optical principles underlying VAEM has limited its applications in plant-cell biology. Results Here, we present theoretical and experimental evidence supporting the use of variable-angle TIRFM in observations of intact plant cells. We show that when total internal reflection occurs at the cell wall/cytosol interface with an appropriate angle of incidence, an evanescent wave field of constant depth is produced inside the cytosol. Results of experimental TIRFM observations of the dynamic behaviors of phototropin 1 (a membrane receptor protein and clathrin light chain (a vesicle coat protein support our theoretical analysis. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that variable-angle TIRFM is appropriate for quantitative live imaging of cells in intact tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  18. The diversity of nanos expression in echinoderm embryos supports different mechanisms in germ cell specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresques, Tara; Swartz, Steven Zachary; Juliano, Celina; Morino, Yoshiaki; Kikuchi, Mani; Akasaka, Koji; Wada, Hiroshi; Yajima, Mamiko; Wessel, Gary M

    2016-07-01

    Specification of the germ cell lineage is required for sexual reproduction in all animals. However, the timing and mechanisms of germ cell specification is remarkably diverse in animal development. Echinoderms, such as sea urchins and sea stars, are excellent model systems to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms that contribute to germ cell specification. In several echinoderm embryos tested, the germ cell factor Vasa accumulates broadly during early development and is restricted after gastrulation to cells that contribute to the germ cell lineage. In the sea urchin, however, the germ cell factor Vasa is restricted to a specific lineage by the 32-cell stage. We therefore hypothesized that the germ cell specification program in the sea urchin/Euechinoid lineage has evolved to an earlier developmental time point. To test this hypothesis we determined the expression pattern of a second germ cell factor, Nanos, in four out of five extant echinoderm clades. Here we find that Nanos mRNA does not accumulate until the blastula stage or later during the development of all other echinoderm embryos except those that belong to the Echinoid lineage. Instead, Nanos is expressed in a restricted domain at the 32-128 cell stage in Echinoid embryos. Our results support the model that the germ cell specification program underwent a heterochronic shift in the Echinoid lineage. A comparison of Echinoid and non-Echinoid germ cell specification mechanisms will contribute to our understanding of how these mechanisms have changed during animal evolution. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Population of computational rabbit-specific ventricular action potential models for investigating sources of variability in cellular repolarisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Gemmell

    Full Text Available Variability is observed at all levels of cardiac electrophysiology. Yet, the underlying causes and importance of this variability are generally unknown, and difficult to investigate with current experimental techniques. The aim of the present study was to generate populations of computational ventricular action potential models that reproduce experimentally observed intercellular variability of repolarisation (represented by action potential duration and to identify its potential causes. A systematic exploration of the effects of simultaneously varying the magnitude of six transmembrane current conductances (transient outward, rapid and slow delayed rectifier K(+, inward rectifying K(+, L-type Ca(2+, and Na(+/K(+ pump currents in two rabbit-specific ventricular action potential models (Shannon et al. and Mahajan et al. at multiple cycle lengths (400, 600, 1,000 ms was performed. This was accomplished with distributed computing software specialised for multi-dimensional parameter sweeps and grid execution. An initial population of 15,625 parameter sets was generated for both models at each cycle length. Action potential durations of these populations were compared to experimentally derived ranges for rabbit ventricular myocytes. 1,352 parameter sets for the Shannon model and 779 parameter sets for the Mahajan model yielded action potential duration within the experimental range, demonstrating that a wide array of ionic conductance values can be used to simulate a physiological rabbit ventricular action potential. Furthermore, by using clutter-based dimension reordering, a technique that allows visualisation of multi-dimensional spaces in two dimensions, the interaction of current conductances and their relative importance to the ventricular action potential at different cycle lengths were revealed. Overall, this work represents an important step towards a better understanding of the role that variability in current conductances may play in

  20. Population of computational rabbit-specific ventricular action potential models for investigating sources of variability in cellular repolarisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Philip; Burrage, Kevin; Rodriguez, Blanca; Quinn, T Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Variability is observed at all levels of cardiac electrophysiology. Yet, the underlying causes and importance of this variability are generally unknown, and difficult to investigate with current experimental techniques. The aim of the present study was to generate populations of computational ventricular action potential models that reproduce experimentally observed intercellular variability of repolarisation (represented by action potential duration) and to identify its potential causes. A systematic exploration of the effects of simultaneously varying the magnitude of six transmembrane current conductances (transient outward, rapid and slow delayed rectifier K(+), inward rectifying K(+), L-type Ca(2+), and Na(+)/K(+) pump currents) in two rabbit-specific ventricular action potential models (Shannon et al. and Mahajan et al.) at multiple cycle lengths (400, 600, 1,000 ms) was performed. This was accomplished with distributed computing software specialised for multi-dimensional parameter sweeps and grid execution. An initial population of 15,625 parameter sets was generated for both models at each cycle length. Action potential durations of these populations were compared to experimentally derived ranges for rabbit ventricular myocytes. 1,352 parameter sets for the Shannon model and 779 parameter sets for the Mahajan model yielded action potential duration within the experimental range, demonstrating that a wide array of ionic conductance values can be used to simulate a physiological rabbit ventricular action potential. Furthermore, by using clutter-based dimension reordering, a technique that allows visualisation of multi-dimensional spaces in two dimensions, the interaction of current conductances and their relative importance to the ventricular action potential at different cycle lengths were revealed. Overall, this work represents an important step towards a better understanding of the role that variability in current conductances may play in experimentally

  1. Cell-type-specific predictive network yields novel insights into mouse embryonic stem cell self-renewal and cell fate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen G Dowell

    Full Text Available Self-renewal, the ability of a stem cell to divide repeatedly while maintaining an undifferentiated state, is a defining characteristic of all stem cells. Here, we clarify the molecular foundations of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC self-renewal by applying a proven Bayesian network machine learning approach to integrate high-throughput data for protein function discovery. By focusing on a single stem-cell system, at a specific developmental stage, within the context of well-defined biological processes known to be active in that cell type, we produce a consensus predictive network that reflects biological reality more closely than those made by prior efforts using more generalized, context-independent methods. In addition, we show how machine learning efforts may be misled if the tissue specific role of mammalian proteins is not defined in the training set and circumscribed in the evidential data. For this study, we assembled an extensive compendium of mESC data: ∼2.2 million data points, collected from 60 different studies, under 992 conditions. We then integrated these data into a consensus mESC functional relationship network focused on biological processes associated with embryonic stem cell self-renewal and cell fate determination. Computational evaluations, literature validation, and analyses of predicted functional linkages show that our results are highly accurate and biologically relevant. Our mESC network predicts many novel players involved in self-renewal and serves as the foundation for future pluripotent stem cell studies. This network can be used by stem cell researchers (at http://StemSight.org to explore hypotheses about gene function in the context of self-renewal and to prioritize genes of interest for experimental validation.

  2. Performance of 12Ah aerospace nickel-cadmium cells of design variable groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanth, K. L.

    1985-01-01

    The design variable program of NASA is a systematic approach to evaluate the performance of 12Ah aerospace nickel-cadmium cells of 9 important cell designs. These cells were life cycled in a Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) regime for 3 to 4 years. Representative cells taken from the design variable groups after different cycling periods have been examined. The results show that: (1) positive swelling and carbonate content in the electrolyte increases as a function of the number of cycles, (2) electrolyte distribution follows the order NEG greater than POS greater than SEP, 3) control and no PQ groups outperformed the rest of the groups and (4) the polypropylene group shows very heavy cadmium migration and poor performance.

  3. Insights in Behavior of Variably Formulated Alginate-Based Microcapsules for Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Montanucci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alginate-based microencapsulation of live cells may offer the opportunity to treat chronic and degenerative disorders. So far, a thorough assessment of physical-chemical behavior of alginate-based microbeads remains cloudy. A disputed issue is which divalent cation to choose for a high performing alginate gelling process. Having selected, in our system, high mannuronic (M enriched alginates, we studied different gelling cations and their combinations to determine their eventual influence on physical-chemical properties of the final microcapsules preparation, in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that used of ultrapure alginate allows for high biocompatibility of the formed microcapsules, regardless of gelation agents, while use of different gelling cations is associated with corresponding variable effects on the capsules’ basic architecture, as originally reported in this work. However, only the final application which the capsules are destined to will ultimately guide the selection of the ideal, specific gelling divalent cations, since in principle there are no capsules that are better than others.

  4. Automated Cell Enrichment of Cytomegalovirus-specific T cells for Clinical Applications using the Cytokine-capture System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaresan, Pappanaicken; Figliola, Mathew; Moyes, Judy S; Huls, M Helen; Tewari, Priti; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2015-10-05

    The adoptive transfer of pathogen-specific T cells can be used to prevent and treat opportunistic infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Viral-specific T cells from allogeneic donors, including third party donors, can be propagated ex vivo in compliance with current good manufacturing practice (cGMP), employing repeated rounds of antigen-driven stimulation to selectively propagate desired T cells. The identification and isolation of antigen-specific T cells can also be undertaken based upon the cytokine capture system of T cells that have been activated to secrete gamma-interferon (IFN-γ). However, widespread human application of the cytokine capture system (CCS) to help restore immunity has been limited as the production process is time-consuming and requires a skilled operator. The development of a second-generation cell enrichment device such as CliniMACS Prodigy now enables investigators to generate viral-specific T cells using an automated, less labor-intensive system. This device separates magnetically labeled cells from unlabeled cells using magnetic activated cell sorting technology to generate clinical-grade products, is engineered as a closed system and can be accessed and operated on the benchtop. We demonstrate the operation of this new automated cell enrichment device to manufacture CMV pp65-specific T cells obtained from a steady-state apheresis product obtained from a CMV seropositive donor. These isolated T cells can then be directly infused into a patient under institutional and federal regulatory supervision. All the bio-processing steps including removal of red blood cells, stimulation of T cells, separation of antigen-specific T cells, purification, and washing are fully automated. Devices such as this raise the possibility that T cells for human application can be manufactured outside of dedicated good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities and instead be produced

  5. Longitudinal multiparameter single-cell analysis of macaques immunized with pneumococcal protein-conjugated or unconjugated polysaccharide vaccines reveals distinct antigen specific memory B cell repertoires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Jia

    Full Text Available The efficacy of protein-conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines has been well characterized for children. The level of protection conferred by unconjugated polysaccharide vaccines remains less clear, particularly for elderly individuals who have had prior antigenic experience through immunization with unconjugated polysaccharide vaccines or natural exposure to Streptococcus pneumoniae.We compared the magnitude, diversity and genetic biases of antigen-specific memory B cells in two groups of adult cynomolgus macaques that were immunized with a 7-valent conjugated vaccine and boosted after five years with either a 13-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine (13vPnC or a 23-valent unconjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (23vPS using microengraving (a single-cell analysis method and single-cell RT-PCR.Seven days after boosting, the mean frequency of antigen-specific memory B cells was significantly increased in macaques vaccinated with 13vPnC compared to those receiving 23vPS. The 13vPnC-vaccinated macaques also exhibited a more even distribution of antibody specificities to four polysaccharides in the vaccine (PS4, 6B, 14, 23F that were examined. However, single-cell analysis of the antibody variable region sequences from antigen-specific B cells elicited by unconjugated and conjugated vaccines indicated that both the germline gene segments forming the heavy chains and the average lengths of the Complementary Determining Region 3 (CDR3 were similar.Our results confirm that distinctive differences can manifest between antigen-specific memory B cell repertoires in nonhuman primates immunized with conjugated and unconjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines. The study also supports the notion that the conjugated vaccines have a favorable profile in terms of both the frequency and breadth of the anamnestic response among antigen-specific memory B cells.

  6. Role of T cell receptor affinity in the efficacy and specificity of adoptive T cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Stone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, there has been considerable progress in the treatment of cancer using gene modified adoptive T cell therapies. Two approaches have been used, one involving the introduction of a conventional alpha-beta T cell receptor (TCR against a pepMHC cancer antigen, and the second involving introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR consisting of a single-chain antibody as an Fv fragment (scFv linked to transmembrane and signaling domains. In this review, we focus on one aspect of TCR-mediated adoptive T cell therapies, the impact of the affinity of the alpha-beta TCR for the pepMHC cancer antigen on both efficacy and specificity. We discuss the advantages of higher affinity TCRs in mediating potent activity of CD4 T cells. This is balanced with the potential disadvantage of higher affinity TCRs in mediating greater self-reactivity against a wider range of structurally similar antigenic peptides, especially in synergy with the CD8 co-receptor. Both TCR affinity and target selection will influence potential safety issues. We suggest pre-clinical strategies that might be used to examine each TCR for possible on-target and off-target side effects due to self-reactivities, and to adjust TCR affinities accordingly.

  7. Cell type-specific neuroprotective activity of untranslocated prion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Restelli

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A key pathogenic role in prion diseases was proposed for a cytosolic form of the prion protein (PrP. However, it is not clear how cytosolic PrP localization influences neuronal viability, with either cytotoxic or anti-apoptotic effects reported in different studies. The cellular mechanism by which PrP is delivered to the cytosol of neurons is also debated, and either retrograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum or inefficient translocation during biosynthesis has been proposed. We investigated cytosolic PrP biogenesis and effect on cell viability in primary neuronal cultures from different mouse brain regions.Mild proteasome inhibition induced accumulation of an untranslocated form of cytosolic PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, but not in cerebellar granules. A cyclopeptolide that interferes with the correct insertion of the PrP signal sequence into the translocon increased the amount of untranslocated PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, and induced its synthesis in cerebellar neurons. Untranslocated PrP boosted the resistance of cortical and hippocampal neurons to apoptotic insults but had no effect on cerebellar cells.These results indicate cell type-dependent differences in the efficiency of PrP translocation, and argue that cytosolic PrP targeting might serve a physiological neuroprotective function.

  8. Antigen-specific murine T cell clones produce soluble interleukin 2 receptor on stimulation with specific antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.K.; York-Jolley, J.; Malek, T.R.; Berzofsky, J.A.; Nelson, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, monoclonal antibodies were used to the murine IL 2 receptor (IL 2R) termed 3C7 and 7D4, which bind to different epitopes on the murine IL 2R, to develop an ELISA to measure soluble murine IL 2R. Surprisingly, stimulated murine spleen cells not only expressed cell-associated IL 2R, but also produced a considerable level of cellfree IL 2R in the culture supernatant fluid. To assess the fine specificity of this response, myoglobin-immune murine T cell clones were stimulated with appropriate or inappropriate antigen and syngeneic or allogeneic presenting cells. Proliferation, measured by [ 3 H] thymidine incorporation, and levels of soluble IL 2R were determined at day 4. The production of soluble IL2R displayed the same epitope fine specificity, genetic restriction, and antigen dose-response as the proliferative response. Indeed, in some cases there was sharper discrimination of epitope specificity and genetic restriction with the soluble IL 2R levels. There was also reproducible clone-to-clone variation in the amount of soluble receptor produced in response to antigen among 12 T cell clones and lines tested. In time course experiments, proliferation was greatest at day 3, whereas soluble IL 2R levels continued to rise in subsequent days. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first demonstration of release of secretion of soluble IL 2R by murine T cells, and the first demonstration of the fine specificity and genetic restriction of the induction of soluble IL 2R by specific antigen

  9. New frontier in regenerative medicine: site-specific gene correction in patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate, Zita; Davis, Brian R; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Segovia, Jose C

    2013-06-01

    Advances in cell and gene therapy are opening up new avenues for regenerative medicine. Because of their acquired pluripotency, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a promising source of autologous cells for regenerative medicine. They show unlimited self-renewal while retaining the ability, in principle, to differentiate into any cell type of the human body. Since Yamanaka and colleagues first reported the generation of hiPSCs in 2007, significant efforts have been made to understand the reprogramming process and to generate hiPSCs with potential for clinical use. On the other hand, the development of gene-editing platforms to increase homologous recombination efficiency, namely DNA nucleases (zinc finger nucleases, TAL effector nucleases, and meganucleases), is making the application of locus-specific gene therapy in human cells an achievable goal. The generation of patient-specific hiPSC, together with gene correction by homologous recombination, will potentially allow for their clinical application in the near future. In fact, reports have shown targeted gene correction through DNA-Nucleases in patient-specific hiPSCs. Various technologies have been described to reprogram patient cells and to correct these patient hiPSCs. However, no approach has been clearly more efficient and safer than the others. In addition, there are still significant challenges for the clinical application of these technologies, such as inefficient differentiation protocols, genetic instability resulting from the reprogramming process and hiPSC culture itself, the efficacy and specificity of the engineered DNA nucleases, and the overall homologous recombination efficiency. To summarize advances in the generation of gene corrected patient-specific hiPSCs, this review focuses on the available technological platforms, including their strengths and limitations regarding future therapeutic use of gene-corrected hiPSCs.

  10. Mirror-drawing skill in children with specific language impairment: Improving generalization by incorporating variability into the practice session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmottes, Lise; Maillart, Christelle; Meulemans, Thierry

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the procedural deficit hypothesis (PDH) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) by using a mirror-drawing task, a sensorimotor adaptation paradigm that does not involve sequence learning and has never before been used in SLI. A total of 30 school-aged children with SLI matched to 30 typically developing (TD) control children had to trace several figures seen only in mirror-reversed view in two practice sessions separated by a one-week interval. Two practice conditions were compared: a constant condition in which children had to trace the same figure throughout the learning trials, and a variable one in which they had to trace different figures in each trial. The results revealed a similar learning pattern between SLI and TD children in both practice conditions, suggesting that initial learning for a non-sequential procedural task is preserved in SLI. However, the children with SLI generalized the mirror-drawing skill in the same way as the TD children only if there was variability in the way the material was trained (variable practice). No significant schedule effects were observed in the control group.

  11. Phage exposure causes dynamic shifts in the expression states of specific phase-variable genes of Campylobacter jejuni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aidley, Jack; Holst Sørensen, Martine C.; Bayliss, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    Phase variation (PV) creates phenotypic heterogeneity at high frequencies and in a reversible manner. This phenomenon allows bacteria to adapt to a variety of different environments and selective pressures. In Campylobacter jejuni this reversible adaptive process is mediated by mutations in homop......Phase variation (PV) creates phenotypic heterogeneity at high frequencies and in a reversible manner. This phenomenon allows bacteria to adapt to a variety of different environments and selective pressures. In Campylobacter jejuni this reversible adaptive process is mediated by mutations...... in homopolymeric G/C tracts. Many C. jejuni-specific phages are dependent on phase-variable surface structures for successful infection. We previously identified the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) moiety, MeOPN-GalfNAc, as a receptor for phage F336 and showed that phase-variable expression of the transferase...... for this CPS modification, cj1421, and two other phase-variable CPS genes generated phage resistance in C. jejuni. Here we investigate the population dynamics of C. jejuni NCTC11168 when exposed to phage F336 in vitro using a newly described method - the 28-locus-CJ11168 PV analysis. Dynamic switching...

  12. Synergistic Effects of Cabozantinib and EGFR-Specific CAR-NK-92 Cells in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chimeric antigen receptor-modified immune effector cell (CAR-T and CAR-NK therapies are newly developed adoptive treatments of cancers. However, their therapeutic efficacy against solid tumors is limited. Combining CAR-T or CAR-NK cells with chemotherapeutic drugs to treat solid tumor may be a promising strategy. We developed an epidermal growth factor- (EGFR- specific third-generation CAR. NK-92 cells were modified with the CAR by lentivirus infection. The specific killing ability of the CAR-modified NK-92 cells (CAR-NK-92 against renal cell carcinoma (RCC cell lines was confirmed in vitro. The synergistic effects of cabozantinib and EGFR-specific CAR-NK-92 cells were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that the CAR-NK-92 cells lyse RCC cells in an EGFR-specific manner. Treatment with cabozantinib could increase EGFR and decrease PD-L1 membrane surface expression in RCC cells and enhance the killing ability of CAR-NK-92 cells against the RCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, the CAR-NK-92 cells show synergistic therapeutic efficacy with cabozantinib against human RCC xenograft models. Our results provided the basis for combination with chemotherapy as a novel strategy for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of CAR-modified immune effector cells for solid tumors.

  13. Antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell and antigen-specific proliferating T cell clones can be induced to cytolytic activity by monoclonal antibodies against T3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.; Yssel, H.; Leeuwenberg, J.; de Vries, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    T3 is a human differentiation antigen expressed exclusively on mature T cells. In this study it is shown that anti-T3 monoclonal antibodies, in addition to their capacity to induce T cells to proliferate, are able to induce antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones to mediate antigen

  14. Heterogeneity of osteosarcoma cell lines led to variable responses in reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Pei Feng; Teh, Hui Xin; Teoh, Hoon Koon; Ong, Han Kiat; Choo, Kong Bung; Sugii, Shigeki; Cheong, Soon Keng; Kamarul, Tunku

    2014-01-01

    Four osteosarcoma cell lines, Saos-2, MG-63, G-292 and U-2 OS, were reprogrammed to pluripotent state using Yamanaka factors retroviral transduction method. Embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like clusters started to appear between 15 to 20 days post transduction. Morphology of the colonies resembled that of ESC colonies with defined border and tightly-packed cells. The reprogrammed sarcomas expressed alkaline phosphatase and pluripotency markers, OCT4, SSEA4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81, as in ESC up to Passage 15. All reprogrammed sarcomas could form embryoid body-like spheres when cultured in suspension in a low attachment dish for up to 10 days. Further testing on the directed differentiation capacity of the reprogrammed sarcomas showed all four reprogrammed sarcoma lines could differentiate into adipocytes while reprogrammed Saos-2-REP, MG-63-REP and G-292-REP could differentiate into osteocytes. Among the 4 osteosarcoma cell lines, U-2 OS reported the highest transduction efficiency but recorded the lowest reprogramming stability under long term culture. Thus, there may be intrinsic differences governing the variable responses of osteosarcoma cell lines towards reprogramming and long term culture effect of the reprogrammed cells. This is a first report to associate intrinsic factors in different osteosarcoma cell lines with variable reprogramming responses and effects on the reprogrammed cells after prolonged culture.

  15. Heterogeneity of Osteosarcoma Cell Lines Led to Variable Responses in Reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Pei Feng; Teh, Hui Xin; Teoh, Hoon Koon; Ong, Han Kiat; Choo, Kong Bung; Sugii, Shigeki; Cheong, Soon Keng; Kamarul, Tunku

    2014-01-01

    Four osteosarcoma cell lines, Saos-2, MG-63, G-292 and U-2 OS, were reprogrammed to pluripotent state using Yamanaka factors retroviral transduction method. Embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like clusters started to appear between 15 to 20 days post transduction. Morphology of the colonies resembled that of ESC colonies with defined border and tightly-packed cells. The reprogrammed sarcomas expressed alkaline phosphatase and pluripotency markers, OCT4, SSEA4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81, as in ESC up to Passage 15. All reprogrammed sarcomas could form embryoid body-like spheres when cultured in suspension in a low attachment dish for up to 10 days. Further testing on the directed differentiation capacity of the reprogrammed sarcomas showed all four reprogrammed sarcoma lines could differentiate into adipocytes while reprogrammed Saos-2-REP, MG-63-REP and G-292-REP could differentiate into osteocytes. Among the 4 osteosarcoma cell lines, U-2 OS reported the highest transduction efficiency but recorded the lowest reprogramming stability under long term culture. Thus, there may be intrinsic differences governing the variable responses of osteosarcoma cell lines towards reprogramming and long term culture effect of the reprogrammed cells. This is a first report to associate intrinsic factors in different osteosarcoma cell lines with variable reprogramming responses and effects on the reprogrammed cells after prolonged culture. PMID:25170299

  16. Selection of restriction specificities of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells in the thymus: no evidence for a crucial role of antigen-presenting cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkernagel, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    The proposal was tested that (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressed predominantly P1-restricted T cells because donor derived stem cells were exposed to recipient derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus. Because P1 recipient-derived antigen-presenting cells are replaced only slowly after 6-8 wk by (P1 X P2) donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus and because replenished pools of mature T cells may by then prevent substantial numbers of P2-restricted T cells to be generated, a large portion of thymus cells and mature T cells were eliminated using the following treatments of 12-20-wk-old (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras: (a) cortisone plus antilymphocyte serum, (b) Cytoxan, (c) three doses of sublethal irradiation (300 rad) 2d apart, and (d) lethal irradiation (850 rad) and reconstitution with T cell-depleted (P1 X P2) F1 stem cells. 12-20 wk after this second treatment, (P1 X P2) leads to P1 chimeras were infected with vaccinia-virus. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cell reactivity was expressed by chimeric T cells of (P1 X P[2) F1 origin and was restricted predominantly to P1. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cells, therefore, do not seem to be selected to measurable extent by the immigrating donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus; their selection depends apparently from the recipient-derived radioresistant thymus cells

  17. Virus specific antigens in mammalian cells infected with herpes simplex virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, D. H.; Shedden, W. I. H.; Elliot, A.; Tetsuka, T.; Wildy, P.; Bourgaux-Ramoisy, D.; Gold, E.

    1966-01-01

    Antisera to specific proteins in herpes simplex infected cells were produced by immunization of rabbits with infected rabbit kidney cells. These antisera were highly virus specific and produced up to twelve lines in immunodiffusion tests against infected cell extracts. Acrylamide electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis revealed up to ten virus specific proteins of varying size. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4288648

  18. Telomere length dynamics in human memory T cells specific for viruses causing acute or latent infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Joel M; Woda, Marcia; Co, Mary; Mathew, Anuja; Rothman, Alan L

    2013-08-26

    Declining telomere length (TL) is associated with T cell senescence. While TL in naïve and memory T cells declines with increasing age, there is limited data on TL dynamics in virus-specific memory CD4+ T cells in healthy adults. We combined BrdU-labeling of virus-stimulated T cells followed with flow cytometry-fluorescent in situ hybridization for TL determination. We analyzed TL in T cells specific for several virus infections: non-recurring acute (vaccinia virus, VACV), recurring-acute (influenza A virus, IAV), and reactivating viruses (varicella-zoster virus, VZV, and cytomegalovirus, CMV) in 10 healthy subjects. Additionally, five subjects provided multiple blood samples separated by up to 10 years. VACV- and CMV-specific T cells had longer average TL than IAV-specific CD4+ T cells. Although most virus-specific cells were CD45RA-, we observed a minor population of BrdU+ CD45RA+ T cells characterized by long telomeres. Longitudinal analysis demonstrated a slow decline in average TL in virus-specific T cells. However, in one subject, VZV reactivation led to an increase in average TL in VZV-specific memory T cells, suggesting a conversion of longer TL cells from the naïve T cell repertoire. TLs in memory CD4+ T cells in otherwise healthy adults are heterogeneous and follow distinct virus-specific kinetics. These findings suggests that the distribution of TL and the creation and maintenance of long TL memory T cells could be important for the persistence of long-lived T cell memory.

  19. A universal system for highly efficient cardiac differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells that eliminates interline variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W Burridge

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The production of cardiomyocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC holds great promise for patient-specific cardiotoxicity drug testing, disease modeling, and cardiac regeneration. However, existing protocols for the differentiation of hiPSC to the cardiac lineage are inefficient and highly variable. We describe a highly efficient system for differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC and hiPSC to the cardiac lineage. This system eliminated the variability in cardiac differentiation capacity of a variety of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC, including hiPSC generated from CD34(+ cord blood using non-viral, non-integrating methods.We systematically and rigorously optimized >45 experimental variables to develop a universal cardiac differentiation system that produced contracting human embryoid bodies (hEB with an improved efficiency of 94.7±2.4% in an accelerated nine days from four hESC and seven hiPSC lines tested, including hiPSC derived from neonatal CD34(+ cord blood and adult fibroblasts using non-integrating episomal plasmids. This cost-effective differentiation method employed forced aggregation hEB formation in a chemically defined medium, along with staged exposure to physiological (5% oxygen, and optimized concentrations of mesodermal morphogens BMP4 and FGF2, polyvinyl alcohol, serum, and insulin. The contracting hEB derived using these methods were composed of high percentages (64-89% of cardiac troponin I(+ cells that displayed ultrastructural properties of functional cardiomyocytes and uniform electrophysiological profiles responsive to cardioactive drugs.This efficient and cost-effective universal system for cardiac differentiation of hiPSC allows a potentially unlimited production of functional cardiomyocytes suitable for application to hPSC-based drug development, cardiac disease modeling, and the future generation of clinically-safe nonviral human cardiac cells for regenerative medicine.

  20. Safe, High Specific Energy & Power Li-ion Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Today’s best, safe commercial Li-ion cell designs achieve ~180 Wh/kg, ~500 Wh/L, and 400 W/kg. When accounting for the lightest (1.35) parasitic mass and smallest...

  1. Targeting inflammation with autoantigen-specific T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, T.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic autoimmune diseases are driven by cells that respond to tissue components of the body. Inflammation in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes or multiple sclerosis, can be suppressed by drug therapy. However, the broad range of immunosuppressive action of these drugs often does not

  2. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  3. Control of sporulation-specific cell division in Streptomyces coelicolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noens, Elke

    2007-01-01

    During developmental cell division in sporulation-committed aerial hyphae of streptomycetes, up to a hundred septa are simultaneously produced, in close harmony with synchromous chromosome condensation and segregation. Several unique protein families are involved in the control of this process,

  4. Frequency and specificity of red blood cell alloantibodies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood transfusion usually results in production of alloantibody against one or more foreign red blood cell antigens which may complicate subsequent transfusions. The probability of alloimmunization depends on number and frequency of transfusion, antigen immunogenicity, recipient immune response and ...

  5. Influenza virus and endothelial cells: A species specific relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.R. Short (Kirsty); E.J.B. Veldhuis Kroeze (Edwin); L.A. Reperant (Leslie); M. Richard (Mathilde); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInfluenza A virus (IAV) infection is an important cause of respiratory disease in humans. The original reservoirs of IAV are wild waterfowl and shorebirds, where virus infection causes limited, if any, disease. Both in humans and in wild waterbirds, epithelial cells are the main target

  6. HLA-DR-specific suppressor cells after repeated allogeneic sensitizations of human lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasportes, M.; Fradelizi, D.; Dausset, J.

    1978-01-01

    In conclusion, DR-specific suppressor cells can be induced by repeated in vitro sensitizations. They were able to decrease a secondary proliferation, to suppress consistently, in a primary proliferative assay, when added as third cells (primed twice against a DR antigen [PLT II] and γ-irradiated), the response of unprimed cells towards stimulating cells, which share a DR specificity with the priming cell of the PLT II. The suppression follows the D part of the recombinant haplotype within an HLA-B/D recombinant family and is specific for the DR antigen used twice as stimulator for production of the PLT II

  7. Read margin analysis of crossbar arrays using the cell-variability-aware simulation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wookyung; Choi, Sujin; Shin, Hyungsoon

    2018-02-01

    This paper proposes a new concept of read margin analysis of crossbar arrays using cell-variability-aware simulation. The size of the crossbar array should be considered to predict the read margin characteristic of the crossbar array because the read margin depends on the number of word lines and bit lines. However, an excessively high-CPU time is required to simulate large arrays using a commercial circuit simulator. A variability-aware MATLAB simulator that considers independent variability sources is developed to analyze the characteristics of the read margin according to the array size. The developed MATLAB simulator provides an effective method for reducing the simulation time while maintaining the accuracy of the read margin estimation in the crossbar array. The simulation is also highly efficient in analyzing the characteristic of the crossbar memory array considering the statistical variations in the cell characteristics.

  8. Long-term in vitro, cell-type-specific genome-wide reprogramming of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakelien, Anne-Mari; Gaustad, Kristine G.; Taranger, Christel K.; Skalhegg, Bjorn S.; Kuentziger, Thomas; Collas, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate a cell extract-based, genome-wide and heritable reprogramming of gene expression in vitro. Kidney epithelial 293T cells have previously been shown to take on T cell properties following a brief treatment with an extract of Jurkat T cells. We show here that 293T cells exposed for 1 h to a Jurkat cell extract undergo genome-wide, target cell-type-specific and long-lasting transcriptional changes. Microarray analyses indicate that on any given week after extract treatment, ∼2500 genes are upregulated >3-fold, of which ∼900 are also expressed in Jurkat cells. Concomitantly, ∼1500 genes are downregulated or repressed, of which ∼500 are also downregulated in Jurkat cells. Gene expression changes persist for over 30 passages (∼80 population doublings) in culture. Target cell-type specificity of these changes is shown by the lack of activation or repression of Jurkat-specific genes by extracts of 293T cells or carcinoma cells. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirms the long-term transcriptional activation of genes involved in key T cell functions. Additionally, growth of cells in suspended aggregates, expression of CD3 and CD28 T cell surface markers, and interleukin-2 secretion by 293T cells treated with extract of adult peripheral blood T cells illustrate a functional nuclear reprogramming. Therefore, target cell-type-specific and heritable changes in gene expression, and alterations in cell function, can be promoted by extracts derived from transformed cells as well as from adult primary cells

  9. Target-specific activation of mast cells by immunoglobulin E reactive with a renal cell carcinoma-associated antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Fleuren, G. J.; Warnaar, S. O.; Litvinov, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) that specifically binds to antigens present on carcinoma cells may represent a useful tool to combat carcinomas. Induction of an inflammatory response at the tumor site by tumor-specific IgE may result in reduced tumor growth and tumor regression. Local mast cells may be

  10. CD117 immunoexpression in canine mast cell tumours: correlations with pathological variables and proliferation markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pires Maria A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous mast cell tumours are one of the most common neoplasms in dogs and show a highly variable biologic behaviour. Several prognosis tools have been proposed for canine mast cell tumours, including histological grading and cell proliferation markers. CD117 is a receptor tyrosine kinase thought to play a key role in human and canine mast cell neoplasms. Normal (membrane-associated and aberrant (cytoplasmic, focal or diffuse CD117 immunoexpression patterns have been identified in canine mast cell tumours. Cytoplasmic CD117 expression has been found to correlate with higher histological grade and with a worsened post-surgical prognosis. This study addresses the role of CD117 in canine mast cell tumours by studying the correlations between CD117 immunoexpression patterns, two proliferation markers (Ki67 and AgNORs histological grade, and several other pathological variables. Results Highly significant (p Conclusion These findings highlight the key role of CD117 in the biopathology of canine MCTs and confirm the relationship between aberrant CD117 expression and increased cell proliferation and higher histological grade. Further studies are needed to unravel the cellular mechanisms underlying focal and diffuse cytoplasmic CD117 staining patterns, and their respective biopathologic relevance.

  11. A xylogalacturonan epitope is specifically associated with plant cell detachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; McCartney, L.; Steele-King, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (LM8) was generated with specificity for xyloglacturonan (XGA) isolated from pea (Pisum sativum L.) testae. Characterization of the LM8 epitope indicates that it is a region of XGA that is highly substituted with xylose. Immunocytochemical analysis indicates that this epitop...

  12. Variable processing and cross-presentation of HIV by dendritic cells and macrophages shapes CTL immunodominance and immune escape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Dinter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages (Møs internalize and process exogenous HIV-derived antigens for cross-presentation by MHC-I to cytotoxic CD8⁺ T cells (CTL. However, how degradation patterns of HIV antigens in the cross-presentation pathways affect immunodominance and immune escape is poorly defined. Here, we studied the processing and cross-presentation of dominant and subdominant HIV-1 Gag-derived epitopes and HLA-restricted mutants by monocyte-derived DCs and Møs. The cross-presentation of HIV proteins by both DCs and Møs led to higher CTL responses specific for immunodominant epitopes. The low CTL responses to subdominant epitopes were increased by pretreatment of target cells with peptidase inhibitors, suggestive of higher intracellular degradation of the corresponding peptides. Using DC and Mø cell extracts as a source of cytosolic, endosomal or lysosomal proteases to degrade long HIV peptides, we identified by mass spectrometry cell-specific and compartment-specific degradation patterns, which favored the production of peptides containing immunodominant epitopes in all compartments. The intracellular stability of optimal HIV-1 epitopes prior to loading onto MHC was highly variable and sequence-dependent in all compartments, and followed CTL hierarchy with immunodominant epitopes presenting higher stability rates. Common HLA-associated mutations in a dominant epitope appearing during acute HIV infection modified the degradation patterns of long HIV peptides, reduced intracellular stability and epitope production in cross-presentation-competent cell compartments, showing that impaired epitope production in the cross-presentation pathway contributes to immune escape. These findings highlight the contribution of degradation patterns in the cross-presentation pathway to HIV immunodominance and provide the first demonstration of immune escape affecting epitope cross-presentation.

  13. Specificity of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) for Biomedical Cell Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulina, M A; Pyatigorskaya, N V

    2018-03-01

    The article describes special aspects of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) for biomedical cell products (BMCP) that imply high standards of aseptics throughout the entire productio process, strict requirements to donors and to the procedure of biomaterial isolation, guaranty of tracing BMCP products, defining processing procedures which allow to identify BMCP as minimally manipulated; continuous quality control and automation of the control process at all stages of manufacturing, which will ensure product release simultaneously with completion of technological operations.

  14. Salmonella serovar-specific interaction with jejunal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzuoli, Elisabetta; Amadori, Massimo; Lazzara, Fabrizio; Bilato, Dania; Ferraris, Monica; Vito, Guendalina; Ferrari, Angelo

    2017-08-01

    Gut is often a receptacle for many different pathogens in feed and/or the environment, such as Salmonella spp. The current knowledge about pathogenicity of Salmonella is restricted to few serotypes, whereas other important ones like S. Coeln, S. Thompson, S. Veneziana, have not been investigated yet in human and animal models. Therefore, the aim of our work was to verify the ability of widespread environmental Salmonella strains to penetrate and modulate innate immunity in pig intestinal IPEC-J2 cells. Our results outline the different ability of Salmonella strains to modulate innate immunity; the expression of the IFN-β gene was increased by S. Typhimurium, S. Ablogame and S. Diarizonae 2, that also caused an inflammatory response in terms of Interleukin (IL)-1β and/or IL-8 gene espression. In particular, IL-8 gene expression and protein release were significantly modulated by 5 Salmonella strains out of 7. Interestingly, S. Typhimurium, S. Coeln and S. Thompson strains, characterized by a peculiar ability to penetrate into IPEC-J2 cells, up-regulated both IL-8 and TNF-α gene expression. Accordingly, blocking IL-8 was shown to decrease the penetration of S. Typhimurium. On the contrary, S. Diarizonae strain 1, showing lesser invasion of IPEC-J2 cells, down-regulated the p38-MAPK pathway, and it did not induce an inflammatory response. Our results confirm that IPEC-J2 cells are a useful model to evaluate host-gut pathogen interaction and indicate IL-8 and TNF-α as possible predictive markers of invasiveness of Salmonella strains in enterocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. CURCUMIN DECREASES SPECIFICITY PROTEIN (Sp) EXPRESSION IN BLADDER CANCER CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Jutooru, Indira; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Papineni, Sabitha; Smith, Roger; Li, Xiangrong; Safe, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Curcumin is the active component of tumeric, and this polyphenolic compound has been extensively investigated as an anticancer drug that modulates multiple pathways and genes. In this study, 10 – 25 µM curcumin inhibited 253JB-V and KU7 bladder cancer cell growth, and this was accompanied by induction of apoptosis and decreased expression of the proapoptotic protein survivin and the angiogenic proteins vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1). Since expression of...

  16. Ionizing radiation affects generation of MART-1-specific cytotoxic T cell responses by dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Y.P.; Wang, C.-C.; McBride, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The human MART-1/Melan-A (MART-1) melanoma tumor antigen is known to be recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and several groups are using this target for clinical immunotherapy. Most approaches use dendritic cells (DCs) that are potent antigen presentation cells for initiating CTL responses. In order for CTL recognition to occur, DCs must display 9-residue antigenic peptides on MHC class I molecules. These peptides are generated by proteasome degradation and then transported through the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface where they stabilize MHC class I expression. Our previous data showed that irradiation inhibits proteasome function and, therefore, we hypothesized that irradiation may inhibit antigen processing and CTL activation, as has been shown for proteasome inhibitors. To study the importance of irradiation effects on DCs, we studied the generation MART-1-specific CTL responses. Preliminary data showed that irradiation of murine bone marrow derived DCs did not affect expression of MHC class I, II, CD80, or CD86, as assessed by flow cytometric analyses 24-hour after irradiation. The effect of irradiation on MART-1 antigen processing by DCs was evaluated using DC transduced with adenovirus MART-1 (AdVMART1). C57BL/6 mice were immunized with AdVMART1 transduced DCs, with and without prior irradiation. IFN-γ production was measured by ELISPOT assays after 10-14 days of immunization. Prior radiation treatment resulted in a significant decrease in MART-1-specific T cell responses. The ability of irradiated and non-irradiated AdVMART1/DC vaccines to protect mice against growth of murine B16 tumors, which endogenously express murine MART-1, was also examined. AdVMART1/DC vaccination protected C57BL/6 mice against challenge with viable B16 melanoma cells while DCs irradiated (10 Gy) prior to AdVMART1 transduction abrogated protection. These results suggest that proteasome inhibition in DCs by irradiation may be a possible pathway in

  17. Evaluation of tools for highly variable gene discovery from single-cell RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Shun H; Sham, Pak Chung; Wang, Junwen

    2018-02-21

    Traditional RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) allows the detection of gene expression variations between two or more cell populations through differentially expressed gene (DEG) analysis. However, genes that contribute to cell-to-cell differences are not discoverable with RNA-seq because RNA-seq samples are obtained from a mixture of cells. Single-cell RNA-seq (scRNA-seq) allows the detection of gene expression in each cell. With scRNA-seq, highly variable gene (HVG) discovery allows the detection of genes that contribute strongly to cell-to-cell variation within a homogeneous cell population, such as a population of embryonic stem cells. This analysis is implemented in many software packages. In this study, we compare seven HVG methods from six software packages, including BASiCS, Brennecke, scLVM, scran, scVEGs and Seurat. Our results demonstrate that reproducibility in HVG analysis requires a larger sample size than DEG analysis. Discrepancies between methods and potential issues in these tools are discussed and recommendations are made.

  18. Modification of surface/neuron interfaces for neural cell-type specific responses: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Cen; Kong, Xiangdong; Lee, In-Seop

    2016-01-01

    Surface/neuron interfaces have played an important role in neural repair including neural prostheses and tissue engineered scaffolds. This comprehensive literature review covers recent studies on the modification of surface/neuron interfaces. These interfaces are identified in cases both where the surfaces of substrates or scaffolds were in direct contact with cells and where the surfaces were modified to facilitate cell adhesion and controlling cell-type specific responses. Different sources of cells for neural repair are described, such as pheochromocytoma neuronal-like cell, neural stem cell (NSC), embryonic stem cell (ESC), mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS). Commonly modified methods are discussed including patterned surfaces at micro- or nano-scale, surface modification with conducting coatings, and functionalized surfaces with immobilized bioactive molecules. These approaches to control cell-type specific responses have enormous potential implications in neural repair. (paper)

  19. Development of Augmented Leukemia/Lymphoma-Specific T-Cell Immunotherapy for Deployment with Haploidentical, Hematompoietic Progenitor-Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    cells exhibited redirected specific lysis of a genetically modified EL4 target expressing 92% human CD19 (Figure 6a). T cells not genetically modified...but propagated by crosslinking CD3 using g-irradiated aAPC loaded with OKT3 did not appreciably lyse CD19 EL4 cells (Figure 6b). DISCUSSION We and...by genetically modified T cells. Lysis by chromium release assay of CD19+ EL4 tumor cells compared with CD19 parental EL4 cells by (a) T cells

  20. Cooperativity of HIV-Specific Cytolytic CD4 T Cells and CD8 T Cells in Control of HIV Viremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan; Eller, Michael; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Maloveste, Sebastien M.; Schultz, Bruce T.; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Lu, Richard; Oster, Alexander F.; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alter, Galit; Dittmer, Ulf; Marovich, Mary; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Bolton, Diane

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD4+ T cells play a pivotal role in the control of chronic viral infections. Recently, nontraditional CD4+ T cell functions beyond helper effects have been described, and a role for cytolytic CD4+ T cells in the control of HIV infection has been suggested. We define here the transcriptional, phenotypic, and functional profiles of HIV-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells. Fluidigm BioMark and multiparameter flow cytometric analysis of HIV-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells revealed a distinct transcriptional signature compared to Th1 CD4+ cells but shared similar features with HIV-specific cytolytic CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, HIV-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells showed comparable killing activity relative to HIV-specific CD8+ T cells and worked cooperatively in the elimination of virally infected cells. Interestingly, we found that cytolytic CD4+ T cells emerge early during acute HIV infection and tightly follow acute viral load trajectory. This emergence was associated to the early viral set point, suggesting an involvement in early control, in spite of CD4 T cell susceptibility to HIV infection. Our data suggest cytolytic CD4+ T cells as an independent subset distinct from Th1 cells that show combined activity with CD8+ T cells in the long-term control of HIV infection. IMPORTANCE The ability of the immune system to control chronic HIV infection is of critical interest to both vaccine design and therapeutic approaches. Much research has focused on the effect of the ability of CD8+ T cells to control the virus, while CD4+ T cells have been overlooked as effectors in HIV control due to the fact that they are preferentially infected. We show here that a subset of HIV-specific CD4+ T cells cooperate in the cytolytic control of HIV replication. Moreover, these cells represent a distinct subset of CD4+ T cells showing significant transcriptional and phenotypic differences compared to HIV-specific Th1 cells but with similarities to CD8+ T cells. These findings are

  1. Interaction of rotavirus with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: plasmacytoid dendritic cells play a role in stimulating memory rotavirus specific T cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Martha C; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Franco, Manuel A; Angel, Juana

    2007-09-15

    We studied the interaction of RV with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from adult volunteers. After exposure of PBMC to rhesus RV (RRV), T and B lymphocytes, NK cells, monocytes, and myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells expressed RV non-structural proteins, at variable levels. Expression of these RV proteins was abolished if infection was done in the presence of anti-VP7 neutralizing antibodies or 10% autologous serum. Supernatants of RRV exposed PBMC contained TNF-alpha, IL-6, IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-2 and IL-10. Plasmacytoid DC were found to be the main source of IFN-alpha production, and in their absence the production of IFN-gamma and the frequency of RV specific T cells that secrete IFN-gamma diminished. Finally, we could not detect RV-antigen associated with the PBMC or expression of RV non-structural proteins in PBMC of acutely RV-infected children. Thus, although PBMC are susceptible to the initial steps of RV infection, most PBMC of children with RV-gastroenteritis are not infected.

  2. Use of Multicolor Flow Cytometry for Isolation of Specific Cell Populations Deriving from Differentiated Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengarelli, Isabella; Fryga, Andrew; Barberi, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Flow Cytometry-Sorting (FCM-Sorting) is a technique commonly used to identify and isolate specific types of cells from a heterogeneous population of live cells. Here we describe a multicolor flow cytometry technique that uses five distinct cell surface antigens to isolate four live populations with

  3. Using Merkel cell polyomavirus specific TCR gene therapy for treatment of Merkel cellcarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte; Pedersen, Natasja Wulff; Linnemann, C.

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor gene-therapy has entered the clinic and shown potential for successful cancer treatment. However, the clinical evaluation has also highlighted the need for selection of truly cancerspecific targets. Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly aggressive skin cancer associated with Mer......T cell receptor gene-therapy has entered the clinic and shown potential for successful cancer treatment. However, the clinical evaluation has also highlighted the need for selection of truly cancerspecific targets. Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly aggressive skin cancer associated...... with Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). Due to the clear viral correlation CD8+ T cells specific for viral epitopes could potentially form cancer-specific targets in MCC patients. We have identified MCPyV specific T cells using a high-throughput platform for T-cell enrichment and combinatorial encoding...

  4. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence reveals stage specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells during Arabidopsis embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RICARDO I TEJOS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic body plan of a plant is established early in embryogenesis when cells differentiate, giving rise to the apical and basal regions of the embryo. Using chlorophyll fluorescence as a marker for chloroplasts, we have detected specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells at specific stages of embryogenesis. Non-randomly distributed chloroplast-containing cells are seen as early as the globular stage of embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. In the heart stage of embryogenesis, chloroplast containing cells are detected in epidermal cells as well as a central region of the heart stage embryo, forming a triangular septum of chloroplast-containing cells that divides the embryo into three equal sectors. Torpedo stage embryos have chloroplast-containing epidermal cells and a central band of chloroplast-containing cells in the cortex layer, just below the shoot apical meristem. In the walking-stick stage of embryogenesis, chloroplasts are present in the epidermal, cortex and endodermal cells. The chloroplasts appear reduced or absent from the provascular and columella cells of walking-stick stage embryos. These results suggest that there is a tight regulation of plastid differentiation during embryogenesis that generates specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells in specific cell layers at specific stages of embryogenesis.

  5. Generation of Patient-Specific induced Pluripotent Stem Cell from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Sendai Reprogramming Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Segovia, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) technology has changed preclinical research since their generation was described by Shinya Yamanaka in 2006. iPSCs are derived from somatic cells after being reprogrammed back to an embryonic state by specific combination of reprogramming factors. These reprogrammed cells resemble all the characteristic of embryonic stem cells (ESC). The reprogramming technology is even more valuable to research diseases biology and treatment by opening gene and cell therapies in own patient's iPSC. Patient-specific iPSC can be generated from a large variety of patient cells by any of the myriad of reprogramming platforms described. Here, we describe the generation of patient-specific iPSC from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells by Sendai Reprogramming vectors.

  6. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sandalova

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR, proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV. CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  7. Antigen specific T-cell responses against tumor antigens are controlled by regulatory T cells in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaschik, Boris; Su, Yun; Huter, Eva; Ge, Yingzi; Hohenfellner, Markus; Beckhove, Philipp

    2012-04-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising approach in an effort to control castration resistant prostate cancer. We characterized tumor antigen reactive T cells in patients with prostate cancer and analyzed the suppression of antitumor responses by regulatory T cells. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 57 patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer, 8 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 16 healthy donors. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and antigen specific interferon-γ secretion of isolated T cells was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. T cells were functionally characterized and T-cell responses before and after regulatory T-cell depletion were compared. As test tumor antigens, a panel of 11 long synthetic peptides derived from a total of 8 tumor antigens was used, including prostate specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase. In patients with prostate cancer we noted a 74.5% effector T-cell response rate compared with only 25% in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 31% in healthy donors. In most patients 2 or 3 tumor antigens were recognized. Comparing various disease stages there was a clear increase in the immune response against prostate specific antigens from intermediate to high risk tumors and castration resistant disease. Regulatory T-cell depletion led to a significant boost in effector T-cell responses against prostate specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase. Tumor specific effector T cells were detected in most patients with prostate cancer, especially those with castration resistant prostate cancer. Since effector T-cell responses against prostate specific antigens strongly increased after regulatory T-cell depletion, our results indicate that immunotherapy efficacy could be enhanced by decreasing regulatory T cells. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Patient-specific cardiovascular progenitor cells derived from integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells for vascular tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiang; Wang, Yongyu; Jiao, Jiao; Liu, Zhongning; Zhao, Chao; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Zhanpeng; Forde, Kaitlynn; Wang, Lunchang; Wang, Jiangang; Baylink, David J; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Gao, Shaorong; Yang, Bo; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) are promising in regenerating a live vascular replacement. However, the vascular cell source is limited, and it is crucial to develop a scaffold that accommodates new type of vascular progenitor cells and facilitates in vivo lineage specification of the cells into functional vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to regenerate vascular tissue. In the present study, integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were established from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells through episomal vector nucleofection of reprogramming factors. The established hiPSCs were then induced into mesoderm-originated cardiovascular progenitor cells (CVPCs) with a highly efficient directed lineage specification method. The derived CVPCs were demonstrated to be able to differentiate into functional VSMCs. Subcutaneous implantation of CVPCs seeded on macroporous nanofibrous poly(l-lactide) scaffolds led to in vivo VSMC lineage specification and matrix deposition inside the scaffolds. In summary, we established integration-free patient-specific hiPSCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, derived CVPCs through directed lineage specification, and developed an advanced scaffold for these progenitor cells to further differentiate in vivo into VSMCs and regenerate vascular tissue in a subcutaneous implantation model. This study has established an efficient patient-specific approach towards in vivo regeneration of vascular tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Regularity, variability and bi-stability in the activity of cerebellar purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokni, Dan; Tal, Zohar; Byk, Hananel; Yarom, Yosef

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the membrane potential of Purkinje cells is bi-stable and that this phenomenon underlies bi-modal simple spike firing. Membrane potential alternates between a depolarized state, that is associated with spontaneous simple spike firing (up state), and a quiescent hyperpolarized state (down state). A controversy has emerged regarding the relevance of bi-stability to the awake animal, yet recordings made from behaving cat Purkinje cells have demonstrated that at least 50% of the cells exhibit bi-modal firing. The robustness of the phenomenon in vitro or in anaesthetized systems on the one hand, and the controversy regarding its expression in behaving animals on the other hand suggest that state transitions are under neuronal control. Indeed, we have recently demonstrated that synaptic inputs can induce transitions between the states and suggested that the role of granule cell input is to control the states of Purkinje cells rather than increase or decrease firing rate gradually. We have also shown that the state of a Purkinje cell does not only affect its firing but also the waveform of climbing fiber-driven complex spikes and the associated calcium influx. These findings call for a reconsideration of the role of Purkinje cells in cerebellar function. In this manuscript we review the recent findings on Purkinje cell bi-stability and add some analyses of its effect on the regularity and variability of Purkinje cell activity.

  10. Adaptation of endothelial cells to physiologically-modeled, variable shear stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S Uzarski

    Full Text Available Endothelial cell (EC function is mediated by variable hemodynamic shear stress patterns at the vascular wall, where complex shear stress profiles directly correlate with blood flow conditions that vary temporally based on metabolic demand. The interactions of these more complex and variable shear fields with EC have not been represented in hemodynamic flow models. We hypothesized that EC exposed to pulsatile shear stress that changes in magnitude and duration, modeled directly from real-time physiological variations in heart rate, would elicit phenotypic changes as relevant to their critical roles in thrombosis, hemostasis, and inflammation. Here we designed a physiological flow (PF model based on short-term temporal changes in blood flow observed in vivo and compared it to static culture and steady flow (SF at a fixed pulse frequency of 1.3 Hz. Results show significant changes in gene regulation as a function of temporally variable flow, indicating a reduced wound phenotype more representative of quiescence. EC cultured under PF exhibited significantly higher endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activity (PF: 176.0±11.9 nmol/10(5 EC; SF: 115.0±12.5 nmol/10(5 EC, p = 0.002 and lower TNF-a-induced HL-60 leukocyte adhesion (PF: 37±6 HL-60 cells/mm(2; SF: 111±18 HL-60/mm(2, p = 0.003 than cells cultured under SF which is consistent with a more quiescent anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic phenotype. In vitro models have become increasingly adept at mimicking natural physiology and in doing so have clarified the importance of both chemical and physical cues that drive cell function. These data illustrate that the variability in metabolic demand and subsequent changes in perfusion resulting in constantly variable shear stress plays a key role in EC function that has not previously been described.

  11. Multi-region and single-cell sequencing reveal variable genomic heterogeneity in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingshan; Liu, Yang; Di, Jiabo; Su, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Beihai; Wang, Zaozao; Zhuang, Meng; Bai, Fan; Su, Xiangqian

    2017-11-23

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous group of malignancies with complex molecular subtypes. While colon cancer has been widely investigated, studies on rectal cancer are very limited. Here, we performed multi-region whole-exome sequencing and single-cell whole-genome sequencing to examine the genomic intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) of rectal tumors. We sequenced nine tumor regions and 88 single cells from two rectal cancer patients with tumors of the same molecular classification and characterized their mutation profiles and somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) at the multi-region and the single-cell levels. A variable extent of genomic heterogeneity was observed between the two patients, and the degree of ITH increased when analyzed on the single-cell level. We found that major SCNAs were early events in cancer development and inherited steadily. Single-cell sequencing revealed mutations and SCNAs which were hidden in bulk sequencing. In summary, we studied the ITH of rectal cancer at regional and single-cell resolution and demonstrated that variable heterogeneity existed in two patients. The mutational scenarios and SCNA profiles of two patients with treatment naïve from the same molecular subtype are quite different. Our results suggest each tumor possesses its own architecture, which may result in different diagnosis, prognosis, and drug responses. Remarkable ITH exists in the two patients we have studied, providing a preliminary impression of ITH in rectal cancer.

  12. Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Talia, Stefano; Wang, Hongyin; Skotheim, Jan M; Rosebrock, Adam P; Futcher, Bruce; Cross, Frederick R

    2009-10-01

    In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle.

  13. Daughter-Specific Transcription Factors Regulate Cell Size Control in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Talia, Stefano; Wang, Hongyin; Skotheim, Jan M.; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Futcher, Bruce; Cross, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle. PMID:19841732

  14. Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Di Talia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle.

  15. Cardiomyocyte expression and cell-specific processing of procholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens P.; Johnsen, Anders H.; Kistorp, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    has only been suggested using transcriptional measures or methods, with the post-translational phase of gene expression unaddressed. In this study, we examined the cardiac expression of the CCK gene in adult mammals and its expression at the protein level. Using quantitative PCR, a library of sequence......-specific pro-CCK assays, peptide purification, and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that the mammalian heart expresses pro-CCK in amounts comparable to natriuretic prohormones and processes it to a unique, triple-sulfated, and N-terminally truncated product distinct from intestinal and cerebral CCK peptides...

  16. Association of Seasonal Climate Variability and Age-Specific Mortality in Northern Sweden before the Onset of Industrialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joacim Rocklöv

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Little is known about health impacts of climate in pre-industrial societies. We used historical data to investigate the association of temperature and precipitation with total and age-specific mortality in Skellefteå, northern Sweden, between 1749 and 1859. Methods: We retrieved digitized aggregated population data of the Skellefteå parish, and monthly temperature and precipitation measures. A generalized linear model was established for year to year variability in deaths by annual and seasonal average temperature and cumulative precipitation using a negative binomial function, accounting for long-term trends in population size. The final full model included temperature and precipitation of all four seasons simultaneously. Relative risks (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated for total, sex- and age-specific mortality. Results: In the full model, only autumn precipitation proved statistically significant (RR 1.02; CI 1.00–1.03, per 1cm increase of autumn precipitation, while winter temperature (RR 0.98; CI 0.95–1.00, per 1 °C increase in temperature and spring precipitation (RR 0.98; CI 0.97–1.00 per 1 cm increase in precipitation approached significance. Similar effects were observed for men and women. The impact of climate variability on mortality was strongest in children aged 3–9, and partly also in older children. Infants, on the other hand, appeared to be less affected by unfavourable climate conditions. Conclusions: In this pre-industrial rural region in northern Sweden, higher levels of rain during the autumn increased the annual number of deaths. Harvest quality might be one critical factor in the causal pathway, affecting nutritional status and susceptibility to infectious diseases. Autumn rain probably also contributed to the spread of air-borne diseases in crowded living conditions. Children beyond infancy appeared most vulnerable to climate impacts.

  17. Antigen-specific T cell activation independently of the MHC: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrich eAbken

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy has recently shown powerful in initiating a lasting anti-tumor response with spectacular therapeutic success in some cases. Specific T cell therapy, however, is limited since a number of cancer cells are not recognized by T cells due to various mechanisms including the limited availability of tumor-specific T cells and deficiencies in antigen processing or major histocompatibility complex (MHC expression of cancer cells. To make adoptive cell therapy applicable for the broad variety of cancer entities, patient's T cells are engineered ex vivo with pre-defined specificity by a recombinant chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which consists in the extracellular part of an antibody-derived domain for binding with a tumor-associated antigen and in the intracellular part of a TCR-derived signaling moiety for T cell activation. The specificity of CAR mediated T cell recognition is defined by the antibody domain, is independent of MHC presentation and can be extended to any target for which an antibody is available. We discuss the advantages and limitations of MHC-independent T cell targeting by an engineered CAR and review most significant progress recently made in early stage clinical trials to treat cancer.

  18. Activation of specific cellular immunity toward murine leukemia in mice rejecting syngeneic somatic hybrid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, W.; Cohen, E.P.

    1977-01-01

    ASL-1 x LM(TK) - somatic hybrid cells form both H-2/sup a/ and H-2/sup k/ antigen complexes. After forming a localized tumor in syngeneic (A/J x C 3 H/HeJ)F 1 mice, they are rejected. Such mice are resistant to otherwise invariably lethal injections of ASL-1 cells, surviving for prolonged and, in some instances, indefinite periods. To examine the basis of immunity, the capacity of spleen cells from mice rejecting hybrid cells to stimulate the release of 51 Cr from labeled ASL-1 cells was investigated. Cells from the spleens of mice rejecting ASL-1 x LM(TK) - cells stimulated the release of 51 Cr from labeled ASL-1 cells, but not from Ehrlich ascites or P815 cells. Cells from mice injected with mitomycin-C-treated ASL-1 cells led to the release of 51 Cr from labeled ASL-1 cells as well, but the extent of 51 Cr release was approximately one-third as occurred in the presence of cells from hybrid cell-injected mice. Cells from noninjected mice or from mice injected with LM(TK) - cells failed to lead to the specific release of 51 Cr from ASL-1 cells. The presence of unlabeled ASL-1 cells, but not Ehrlich ascites cells, competitively inhibited the spleen cell-stimulated release of 51 Cr from labeled ASL-1 cells. Sera from A/J mice injected with mitomycin-C-treated ASL-1 cells contained antibodies specific for the tumor-associated antigen of ASL-1 cells

  19. Specification of fast neutron radiation quality from cell transformation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppola, M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data on the neoplastic transformation of C3H 10T1/2 cells measured at Casaccia after neutron and X-ray irradiation were used to determine neutron RBE values for the RSV-Tapiro fast reactor energy spectrum and for monoenergetic neutrons of 0.5, 1, and 6 MeV. In parallel, micro-dosimetric measurements provided the actual lineal energy distributions and related mean parameters for the reactor radiation. From these experiments, values of the neutron quality factor were derived for the reactor neutron energy spectrum and, in turn, for the other neutron energies tested. A mathematical expression giving a smooth dependence on neutron energy was also determined for the effective quality factor in the entire energy range examined. The results were compared with other proposals

  20. Cell-type-specific responses of RT4 neural cell lines to dibutyryl-cAMP: branch determination versus maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droms, K.; Sueoka, N.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the induction of cell-type-specific maturation, by dibutyryl-cAMP and testololactone, of neuronal and glial properties in a family of cell lines derived from a rat peripheral neurotumor, RT4. This maturation allows further understanding of the process of determination because of the close lineage relationship between the cell types of the RT4 family. The RT4 family is characterized by the spontaneous conversion of one of the cell types, RT4-AC (stem-cell type), to any of three derivative cell types, RT4-B, RT4-D, or RT4-E, with a frequency of about 10(-5). The RT4-AC cells express some properties characteristic of both neuronal and glial cells. Of these neural properties expressed by RT4-AC cells, only the neuronal properties are expressed by the RT4-B and RT4-E cells, and only the glial properties are expressed by the RT4-D cells. This in vitro cell-type conversion of RT4-AC to three derivative cell types is a branch point for the coordinate regulation of several properties and seems to resemble determination in vivo. In our standard culture conditions, several other neuronal and glial properties are not expressed by these cell types. However, addition of dibutyryl-cAMP induces expression of additional properties, in a cell-type-specific manner: formation of long cellular processes in the RT4-B8 and RT4-E5 cell lines and expression of high-affinity uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid, by a glial-cell-specific mechanism, in the RT4-D6-2 cell line. These new properties are maximally expressed 2-3 days after addition of dibutyryl-cAMP

  1. Complete suppression of in vivo growth of human leukemia cells by specific immunotoxins: nude mouse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, H.; Seon, B.K.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, immunotoxins containing monoclonal anti-human T-cell leukemia antibodies are shown to be capable of completely suppressing the tumor growth of human T-cell leukemia cells in vivo without any overt undersirable toxicity. These immunotoxins were prepared by conjugating ricin A chain (RA) with our monoclonal antibodies, SN1 and SN2, directed specifically to the human T-cell leukemia cell surface antigens TALLA and GP37, respectively. The authors have shown that these monoclonal antibodies are highly specific for human T-cell leukemia cells and do not react with various normal cells including normal T and B cells, thymocytes, and bone marrow cells. Ascitic and solid human T-cell leukemia cell tumors were generated in nude mice. The ascitic tumor was generated by transplanting Ichikawa cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell) i.p. into nude mice, whereas the solid tumor was generated by transplanting s.c. MOLT-4 cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell line) and x-irradiated human fibrosarcoma cells into x-irradiated nude mice. To investigate the efficacy of specific immunotoxins in suppression the in vivo growth of the ascitic tumor, they divided 40 nude mice that were injected with Ichikawa cells into four groups. None of the mice in group 4 that were treated with SN1-RA and SN2-RA showed any signs of a tumor or undesirable toxic effects for the 20 weeks that they were followed after the transplantation. Treatment with SN1-RA plus SN2-RA completely suppressed solid tumor growth in 4 of 10 nude mice carrying solid tumors and partially suppressed the tumor growth in the remaining 6 nude mice. These results strongly suggest that SN1-RA and SN2-RA may be useful for clinical treatment

  2. Adhesion of living cells revealed by variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-02-01

    Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) is a widespread technique to study cellular process occurring near the contact region with the glass substrate. In this field, determination of the accurate distance from the surface to the plasma membrane constitutes a crucial issue to investigate the physical basis of cellular adhesion process. However, quantitative interpretation of TIRF pictures regarding the distance z between a labeled membrane and the substrate is not trivial. Indeed, the contrast of TIRF images depends on several parameters more and less well known (local concentration of dyes, absorption cross section, angular emission pattern…). The strategy to get around this problem is to exploit a series of TIRF pictures recorded at different incident angles in evanescent regime. This technique called variable-angle TIRF microscopy (vaTIRFM), allowing to map the membrane-substrate separation distance with a nanometric resolution (10-20 nm). vaTIRFM was developed by Burmeister, Truskey and Reichert in the early 1990s with a prism-based TIRF setup [Journal of Microscopy 173, 39-51 (1994)]. We propose a more convenient prismless setup, which uses only a rotatable mirror to adjust precisely the laser beam on the back focal plane of the oil immersion objective (no azimuthal scanning is needed). The series of TIRF images permit us to calculate accurately membrane-surface distances in each pixel. We demonstrate that vaTIRFM are useful to quantify the adhesion of living cells for specific and unspecific membrane-surface interactions, achieved on various functionalized substrates with polymers (BSA, poly-L-lysin) or extracellular matrix proteins (collagen and fibronectin).

  3. Can Selective MHC Downregulation Explain the Specificity and Genetic Diversity of NK Cell Receptors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Kesmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express inhibiting receptors (iNKRs), which specifically bind MHC-I molecules on the surface of healthy cells. When the expression of MHC-I on the cell surface decreases, which might occur during certain viral infections and cancer, iNKRs lose inhibiting signals and the

  4. Proliferation requirements of cytomegalovirus-specific, effector-type human CD8+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Ester M.; Gamadia, Laila E.; Baars, Paul A.; Remmerswaal, Ester B.; ten Berge, Ineke J.; van Lier, René A.

    2002-01-01

    Two prototypic types of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells can be found in latently infected individuals: CD45R0(+)CD27(+)CCR7(-) effector-memory, and CD45RA(+)CD27(-)CCR7(-) effector-type cells. It has recently been implied that CD45RA(+)CD27(-)CCR7(-) T cells are terminally differentiated effector

  5. Strategies to overcome HBV-specific T cell exhaustion: checkpoint inhibitors and metabolic re-programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisicaro, Paola; Boni, Carolina; Barili, Valeria; Laccabue, Diletta; Ferrari, Carlo

    2018-01-29

    HBV-specific T cells play a key role in antiviral protection and failure to control HBV is associated with severely dysfunctional T cell responses. Therefore, functional T cell reconstitution represents a potential way to treat chronically infected patients. The growing understanding of the dysregulated transcriptional/epigenetic and metabolic programs underlying T cell exhaustion allows to envisage functional T cell reconstitution strategies based on the combined/sequential use of compounds able to induce decline of antigen load, checkpoint modulation, metabolic and epigenetic reprogramming with possible boosting of functionally restored responses by specific vaccines. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Differentiation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Lentoid Bodies Expressing a Lens Cell-Specific Fluorescent Reporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taruna Anand

    Full Text Available Curative approaches for eye cataracts and other eye abnormalities, such as myopia and hyperopia currently suffer from a lack of appropriate models. Here, we present a new approach for in vitro growth of lentoid bodies from induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells as a tool for ophthalmological research. We generated a transgenic mouse line with lens-specific expression of a fluorescent reporter driven by the alphaA crystallin promoter. Fetal fibroblasts were isolated from transgenic fetuses, reprogrammed to iPS cells, and differentiated to lentoid bodies exploiting the specific fluorescence of the lens cell-specific reporter. The employment of cell type-specific reporters for establishing and optimizing differentiation in vitro seems to be an efficient and generally applicable approach for developing differentiation protocols for desired cell populations.

  7. Cellular Interrogation: Exploiting Cell-to-Cell Variability to Discriminate Regulatory Mechanisms in Oscillatory Signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Javier; Andrew, Natalie; Gibson, Daniel; Chang, Frederick; Gnad, Florian; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2016-07-01

    The molecular complexity within a cell may be seen as an evolutionary response to the external complexity of the cell's environment. This suggests that the external environment may be harnessed to interrogate the cell's internal molecular architecture. Cells, however, are not only nonlinear and non-stationary, but also exhibit heterogeneous responses within a clonal, isogenic population. In effect, each cell undertakes its own experiment. Here, we develop a method of cellular interrogation using programmable microfluidic devices which exploits the additional information present in cell-to-cell variation, without requiring model parameters to be fitted to data. We focussed on Ca2+ signalling in response to hormone stimulation, which exhibits oscillatory spiking in many cell types and chose eight models of Ca2+ signalling networks which exhibit similar behaviour in simulation. We developed a nonlinear frequency analysis for non-stationary responses, which could classify models into groups under parameter variation, but found that this question alone was unable to distinguish critical feedback loops. We further developed a nonlinear amplitude analysis and found that the combination of both questions ruled out six of the models as inconsistent with the experimentally-observed dynamics and heterogeneity. The two models that survived the double interrogation were mathematically different but schematically identical and yielded the same unexpected predictions that we confirmed experimentally. Further analysis showed that subtle mathematical details can markedly influence non-stationary responses under parameter variation, emphasising the difficulty of finding a "correct" model. By developing questions for the pathway being studied, and designing more versatile microfluidics, cellular interrogation holds promise as a systematic strategy that can complement direct intervention by genetics or pharmacology.

  8. Vaccination Expands Antigen-Specific CD4+ Memory T Cells and Mobilizes Bystander Central Memory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Causi, Eleonora; Parikh, Suraj C.; Chudley, Lindsey; Layfield, David M.; Ottensmeier, Christian H.; Stevenson, Freda K.; Di Genova, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T helper memory (Thmem) cells influence both natural and vaccine-boosted immunity, but mechanisms for their maintenance remain unclear. Pro-survival signals from the common gamma-chain cytokines, in particular IL-7, appear important. Previously we showed in healthy volunteers that a booster vaccination with tetanus toxoid (TT) expanded peripheral blood TT-specific Thmem cells as expected, but was accompanied by parallel increase of Thmem cells specific for two unrelated and non cross-reactive common recall antigens. Here, in a new cohort of healthy human subjects, we compare blood vaccine-specific and bystander Thmem cells in terms of differentiation stage, function, activation and proliferative status. Both responses peaked 1 week post-vaccination. Vaccine-specific cytokine-producing Thmem cells were predominantly effector memory, whereas bystander cells were mainly of central memory phenotype. Importantly, TT-specific Thmem cells were activated (CD38High HLA-DR+), cycling or recently divided (Ki-67+), and apparently vulnerable to death (IL-7RαLow and Bcl-2 Low). In contrast, bystander Thmem cells were resting (CD38Low HLA-DR- Ki-67-) with high expression of IL-7Rα and Bcl-2. These findings allow a clear distinction between vaccine-specific and bystander Thmem cells, suggesting the latter do not derive from recent proliferation but from cells mobilized from as yet undefined reservoirs. Furthermore, they reveal the interdependent dynamics of specific and bystander T-cell responses which will inform assessments of responses to vaccines. PMID:26332995

  9. Human rotavirus specific T cells: quantification by ELISPOT and expression of homing receptors on CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Olga Lucia; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Gonzalez, Rosabel; Perez-Schael, Irene; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.; Angel, Juana

    2003-01-01

    Using an intracellular cytokine assay, we recently showed that the frequencies of rotavirus (RV)-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cells secreting INFγ, circulating in RV infected and healthy adults, are very low compared to the frequencies of circulating cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactive T cells in comparable individuals. In children with acute RV infection, these T cells were barely or not detectable. In the present study, an ELISPOT assay enabled detection of circulating RV-specific INFγ-secreting cells in children with RV diarrhea but not in children with non-RV diarrhea without evidence of a previous RV infection. Using microbead-enriched CD4 + and CD8 + T cell subsets, IFNγ-secreting RV-specific CD8 + but not CD4 + T cells were detected in recently infected children. Using the same approach, both CD4 + and CD8 + RV-specific T cells were detected in healthy adults. Furthermore, stimulation of purified subsets of PBMC that express lymphocyte homing receptors demonstrated that RV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells from adult volunteers preferentially express the intestinal homing receptor α4β7, but not the peripheral lymph node homing receptor L-selectin. In contrast, CMV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells preferentially express L-selectin but not α4β7. These results suggest that the expression of homing receptors on virus-specific T cells depends on the organ where these cells were originally stimulated and that their capacity to secrete INFγ is independent of the expression of these homing receptors

  10. Tissue-specific B-cell dysfunction and generalized memory B-cell loss during acute SIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Peruchon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary HIV-infected patients display severe and irreversible damage to different blood B-cell subsets which is not restored by highly efficient anti-retroviral therapy (HAART. Because longitudinal investigations of primary HIV-infection is limited by the availability of lymphoid organs, we studied the tissue-specific B-cell dysfunctions in acutely simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV mac251-infected Cynomolgus macaques. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Experiments were performed on three groups of macaques infected for 14, 21 or 28 days and on three groups of animals treated with HAART for two-weeks either initiated at 4 h, 7 or 14 days post-infection (p.i.. We have simultaneously compared changes in B-cell phenotypes and functions and tissue organization of B-cell areas in various lymphoid organs. We showed that SIV induced a steady decline in SIgG-expressing memory (SIgD(-CD27(+ B-cells in spleen and lymph nodes during the first 4 weeks of infection, concomitant to selective homing/sequestration of B-cells to the small intestine and spleen. SIV non-specific Ig production was transiently increased before D14p.i., whereas SIV-specific Ig production was only detectable after D14p.i., coinciding with the presence of CD8(+ T-cells and IgG-expressing plasma cells within germinal centres. Transient B-cell apoptosis on D14p.i. and commitment to terminal differentiation contributed to memory B-cell loss. HAART abrogated B-cell apoptosis, homing to the small intestine and SIV-specific Ig production but had minimal effect on early Ig production, increased B-cell proportions in spleen and loss of memory B-cells. Therefore, virus-B-cell interactions and SIV-induced inflammatory cytokines may differently contribute to early B-cell dysfunction and impaired SIV/HIV-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish tissue-specific impairments in B-cell trafficking and functions and a generalized and steady memory B-cell loss in secondary lymphoid

  11. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  13. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the [ 3 H]thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% [SD]) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition

  14. Electrodeposition of nickel onto steel, using a thermostatic cell and movable anode by a variable current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega G, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, metallic coatings of nickel was made over carbon steel using two different electrolytic solutions: The Watts's bath and the nickel sulfamate bath, using a pulse variable current. The method use was the traditional method, its means a thermostatic cell and one movable anode, which is a few know technique nowadays, it allow realize depositions away from any laboratory or special workshop, it has the advantage to be a portable dispositive. At last of all the electro depositions the coatings quality was valuable by them physical properties like: adhesion, hardness, wrinkled and thickness. The best results was obtain by the Nickel sulfamate bath and movable anode, less in the thickness, which has higher on the thermostatic cell. The variable current was obtain by a Pulse Generator and a Cathodic galvanometer. (Author)

  15. Homophilic and Heterophilic Interactions of Type II Cadherins Identify Specificity Groups Underlying Cell-Adhesive Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Brasch

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Type II cadherins are cell-cell adhesion proteins critical for tissue patterning and neuronal targeting but whose molecular binding code remains poorly understood. Here, we delineate binding preferences for type II cadherin cell-adhesive regions, revealing extensive heterophilic interactions between specific pairs, in addition to homophilic interactions. Three distinct specificity groups emerge from our analysis with members that share highly similar heterophilic binding patterns and favor binding to one another. Structures of adhesive fragments from each specificity group confirm near-identical dimer topology conserved throughout the family, allowing interface residues whose conservation corresponds to specificity preferences to be identified. We show that targeted mutation of these residues converts binding preferences between specificity groups in biophysical and co-culture assays. Our results provide a detailed understanding of the type II cadherin interaction map and a basis for defining their role in tissue patterning and for the emerging importance of their heterophilic interactions in neural connectivity. : Type II cadherins are a family of vertebrate cell adhesion proteins expressed primarily in the CNS. Brasch et al. measure binding between adhesive fragments, revealing homophilic and extensive selective heterophilic binding with specificities that define groups of similar cadherins. Structures reveal common adhesive dimers, with residues governing cell-adhesive specificity. Keywords: cell adhesion, crystal structure, hemophilic specificity, heterophilic specificity, neural patterning, synaptic targeting, cadherin

  16. TNP-specific Lyt-2+ cytolytic T cell clones preferentially respond to TNP-conjugated epidermal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, S.; Katz, S.I.

    1985-01-01

    A most effective method for the induction of hapten-specific allergic contact sensitivity (CS) is via epicutaneous application of the hapten. Another effective method is by the administration of haptenated epidermal cells (EC) subcutaneously. The latter method induces more intense and longer lasting CS than does the subcutaneous administration of haptenated spleen cells (SC). Thus, there may be something unique about EC which, when haptenated, allows them to generate effector cells more effectively than do SC. The authors therefore, attempted to generate T cell clones that were both hapten- and epidermal-specific. Four days after painting mice with 7% trinitrochlorobenzene, draining lymph node cells were obtained and T cells were purified. These cells were co-cultured with trinitrophenylated (TNP) Langerhans cell-enriched EC. After 4 days, cells were harvested and rested on non-TNP-conjugated EC. The cells were restimulated and rested three times, and were then cloned by limiting dilution with added interleukin 2, which was then continually added. Proliferation of T cells was assessed by [ 3 H]-thymidine incorporation. Cytotoxicity assays utilized TNP-conjugated concanavalin A SC blasts or EC as targets. Clones A-2 and E-4 are Thy-1+, Lyt-2+, and L3T4-, and TNP-specific. In contrast to noncloned TNP-specific T cells, the clones proliferate preferentially in response to TNP-EC rather than TNP-SC. Also in contrast to noncloned T cells, the clones were preferentially cytotoxic for TNP-EC; compared to TNP-SC, there was an eight- to 32-fold increase in killing when TNP-EC were used as targets. Clones A-2 and E-4 therefore exhibit hapten and epidermal specificity

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific CD8(+ T cells rapidly decline with antituberculosis treatment.

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    Melissa R Nyendak

    Full Text Available Biomarkers associated with response to therapy in tuberculosis could have broad clinical utility. We postulated that the frequency of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb specific CD8(+ T cells, by virtue of detecting intracellular infection, could be a surrogate marker of response to therapy and would decrease during effective antituberculosis treatment.We sought to determine the relationship of Mtb specific CD4(+ T cells and CD8(+ T cells with duration of antituberculosis treatment.We performed a prospective cohort study, enrolling between June 2008 and August 2010, of HIV-uninfected Ugandan adults (n = 50 with acid-fast bacillus smear-positive, culture confirmed pulmonary TB at the onset of antituberculosis treatment and the Mtb specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses to ESAT-6 and CFP-10 were measured by IFN-γ ELISPOT at enrollment, week 8 and 24.There was a significant difference in the Mtb specific CD8(+ T response, but not the CD4(+ T cell response, over 24 weeks of antituberculosis treatment (p<0.0001, with an early difference observed at 8 weeks of therapy (p = 0.023. At 24 weeks, the estimated Mtb specific CD8(+ T cell response decreased by 58%. In contrast, there was no significant difference in the Mtb specific CD4(+ T cell during the treatment. The Mtb specific CD4(+ T cell response, but not the CD8(+ response, was negatively impacted by the body mass index.Our data provide evidence that the Mtb specific CD8(+ T cell response declines with antituberculosis treatment and could be a surrogate marker of response to therapy. Additional research is needed to determine if the Mtb specific CD8(+ T cell response can detect early treatment failure, relapse, or to predict disease progression.

  18. T helper cell subsets specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa in healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis.

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    Hannah K Bayes

    Full Text Available We set out to determine the magnitude of antigen-specific memory T helper cell responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in healthy humans and patients with cystic fibrosis.Peripheral blood human memory CD4(+ T cells were co-cultured with dendritic cells that had been infected with different strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The T helper response was determined by measuring proliferation, immunoassay of cytokine output, and immunostaining of intracellular cytokines.Healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis had robust antigen-specific memory CD4(+ T cell responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa that not only contained a Th1 and Th17 component but also Th22 cells. In contrast to previous descriptions of human Th22 cells, these Pseudomonal-specific Th22 cells lacked the skin homing markers CCR4 or CCR10, although were CCR6(+. Healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis had similar levels of Th22 cells, but the patient group had significantly fewer Th17 cells in peripheral blood.Th22 cells specific to Pseudomonas aeruginosa are induced in both healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis. Along with Th17 cells, they may play an important role in the pulmonary response to this microbe in patients with cystic fibrosis and other conditions.

  19. Patient-Specific Tailored Intervention Improves INR Time in Therapeutic Range and INR Variability in Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsman, Israel; Ezra, Orly; Hirsh Raccah, Bruria; Admon, Dan; Lotan, Chaim; Dekeyser Ganz, Freda

    2017-08-01

    Many patients with heart failure need anticoagulants, including warfarin. Good control is particularly challenging in heart failure patients, with range, thereby increasing the risk of complications. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a patient-specific tailored intervention on anticoagulation control in patients with heart failure. Patients with heart failure taking warfarin therapy (n = 145) were randomized to either standard care or a 1-time intervention assessing potential risk factors for lability of INR, in which they received patient-specific instructions. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) using Rosendaal's linear model was assessed 3 months before and after the intervention. The patient-tailored intervention significantly increased anticoagulation control. The median TTR levels before intervention were suboptimal in the interventional and control groups (53% vs 45%, P = .14). After intervention the median TTR increased significantly in the interventional group compared with the control group (80% [interquartile range, 62%-93%] vs 44% [29%-61%], P <.0001). The intervention resulted in a significant improvement in the interventional group before versus after intervention (53% vs 80%, P <.0001) but not in the control group (45% vs 44%, P = .95). The percentage of patients with a TTR ≥60%, considered therapeutic, was substantially higher in the interventional group: 79% versus 25% (P <.0001). The INR variability (standard deviation of each patient's INR measurements) decreased significantly in the interventional group, from 0.53 to 0.32 (P <.0001) after intervention but not in the control group. Patient-specific tailored intervention significantly improves anticoagulation therapy in patients with heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on silk hydrogels with variable stiffness and growth factor differentiate into mature smooth muscle cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floren, Michael; Bonani, Walter; Dharmarajan, Anirudh; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claudio; Tan, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Cell-matrix and cell-biomolecule interactions play critical roles in a diversity of biological events including cell adhesion, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Evidence suggests that a concise crosstalk of these environmental factors may be required to direct stem cell differentiation toward matured cell type and function. However, the culmination of these complex interactions to direct stem cells into highly specific phenotypes in vitro is still widely unknown, particularly in the context of implantable biomaterials. In this study, we utilized tunable hydrogels based on a simple high pressure CO2 method and silk fibroin (SF) the structural protein of Bombyx mori silk fibers. Modification of SF protein starting water solution concentration results in hydrogels of variable stiffness while retaining key structural parameters such as matrix pore size and β-sheet crystallinity. To further resolve the complex crosstalk of chemical signals with matrix properties, we chose to investigate the role of 3D hydrogel stiffness and transforming growth factor (TGF-β1), with the aim of correlating the effects on the vascular commitment of human mesenchymal stem cells. Our data revealed the potential to upregulate matured vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype (myosin heavy chain expression) of hMSCs by employing appropriate matrix stiffness and growth factor (within 72h). Overall, our observations suggest that chemical and physical stimuli within the cellular microenvironment are tightly coupled systems involved in the fate decisions of hMSCs. The production of tunable scaffold materials that are biocompatible and further specialized to mimic tissue-specific niche environments will be of considerable value to future tissue engineering platforms. This article investigates the role of silk fibroin hydrogel stiffness and transforming growth factor (TGF-β1), with the aim of correlating the effects on the vascular commitment of human mesenchymal stem cells. Specifically, we

  1. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    of more sensitive methods including real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry with mutation-specific antibodies might be a promising detection method. We evaluated 210 samples with NSCLC from an unselected Caucasian population. Extracted DNA was analyzed for EGFR mutations by RT-PCR (Therascreen EGFR......, and staining score (multipum of intensity (graded 0-3) and percentages (0-100%) of stained tumor cells) was calculated. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Specificity of exon19 antibody was 98.8% (95% confidence interval=95.9-99.9%) and of exon21 antibody 97.8% (95% confidence interval=94...... was demonstrated. However, sensitivity was low, especially for exon19 deletions, and thus these antibodies cannot yet be used as screening method for EGFR mutations in NSCLC. Refinement of sensitivity for the mutation-specific antibodies is warranted to improve molecular diagnosis using EGFR immunohistochemistry....

  2. Abbreviation as a Reflection of Terms Variability in Language for Specific Purposes: Translational Features (Terminology Case Study in German, English, Kazakh, and Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisembayeva, Gulshat Z.; Yeskindirova, Manshuk Z.; Tulebayeva, Samal A.

    2016-01-01

    The range of modern dynamic social changes, globalization of world powers' economic cooperation, acceleration of technocratic processes have widespread impact on term systems' variability in language, in particular, on terminological variability for specific purposes. This globalized extra-linguistic factor provokes avalanche growth of…

  3. Functional, Antigen-Specific Stem Cell Memory (TSCM CD4+ T Cells Are Induced by Human Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheleka A. M. Mpande

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMaintenance of long-lasting immunity is thought to depend on stem cell memory T cells (TSCM, which have superior self-renewing capacity, longevity and proliferative potential compared with central memory (TCM or effector (TEFF T cells. Our knowledge of TSCM derives primarily from studies of virus-specific CD8+ TSCM. We aimed to determine if infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb, the etiological agent of tuberculosis, generates antigen-specific CD4+ TSCM and to characterize their functional ontology.MethodsWe studied T cell responses to natural M. tb infection in a longitudinal adolescent cohort of recent QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT converters and three cross-sectional QFT+ adult cohorts; and to bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG vaccination in infants. M. tb and/or BCG-specific CD4 T cells were detected by flow cytometry using major histocompatibility complex class II tetramers bearing Ag85, CFP-10, or ESAT-6 peptides, or by intracellular cytokine staining. Transcriptomic analyses of M. tb-specific tetramer+ CD4+ TSCM (CD45RA+ CCR7+ CD27+ were performed by microfluidic qRT-PCR, and functional and phenotypic characteristics were confirmed by measuring expression of chemokine receptors, cytotoxic molecules and cytokines using flow cytometry.ResultsM. tb-specific TSCM were not detected in QFT-negative persons. After QFT conversion frequencies of TSCM increased to measurable levels and remained detectable thereafter, suggesting that primary M. tb infection induces TSCM cells. Gene expression (GE profiling of tetramer+ TSCM showed that these cells were distinct from bulk CD4+ naïve T cells (TN and shared features of bulk TSCM and M. tb-specific tetramer+ TCM and TEFF cells. These TSCM were predominantly CD95+ and CXCR3+, markers typical of CD8+ TSCM. Tetramer+ TSCM expressed significantly higher protein levels of CCR5, CCR6, CXCR3, granzyme A, granzyme K, and granulysin than bulk TN and TSCM cells. M. tb-specific TSCM were also

  4. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hong

    Full Text Available New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R, which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer.

  5. Successful generation of primary virus-specific and anti-tumor T-cell responses from the naive donor T-cell repertoire is determined by the balance between antigen-specific precursor T cells and regulatory T cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jedema, I.; Meent, M. van de; Pots, J.M.; Kester, M.G.; Beek, M.T. van der; Falkenburg, J.H.F.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the major challenges in allogeneic stem cell transplantation is to find a balance between the harmful induction of graft-versus-host disease and the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia and pathogen-specific immune responses. Adoptive transfer of in-vitro generated donor T cells with

  6. OptMAVEn--a new framework for the de novo design of antibody variable region models targeting specific antigen epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    Full Text Available Antibody-based therapeutics provides novel and efficacious treatments for a number of diseases. Traditional experimental approaches for designing therapeutic antibodies rely on raising antibodies against a target antigen in an immunized animal or directed evolution of antibodies with low affinity for the desired antigen. However, these methods remain time consuming, cannot target a specific epitope and do not lead to broad design principles informing other studies. Computational design methods can overcome some of these limitations by using biophysics models to rationally select antibody parts that maximize affinity for a target antigen epitope. This has been addressed to some extend by OptCDR for the design of complementary determining regions. Here, we extend this earlier contribution by addressing the de novo design of a model of the entire antibody variable region against a given antigen epitope while safeguarding for immunogenicity (Optimal Method for Antibody Variable region Engineering, OptMAVEn. OptMAVEn simulates in silico the in vivo steps of antibody generation and evolution, and is capable of capturing the critical structural features responsible for affinity maturation of antibodies. In addition, a humanization procedure was developed and incorporated into OptMAVEn to minimize the potential immunogenicity of the designed antibody models. As case studies, OptMAVEn was applied to design models of neutralizing antibodies targeting influenza hemagglutinin and HIV gp120. For both HA and gp120, novel computational antibody models with numerous interactions with their target epitopes were generated. The observed rates of mutations and types of amino acid changes during in silico affinity maturation are consistent with what has been observed during in vivo affinity maturation. The results demonstrate that OptMAVEn can efficiently generate diverse computational antibody models with both optimized binding affinity to antigens and reduced

  7. SPECIES-SPECIFIC FOREST VARIABLE ESTIMATION USING NON-PARAMETRIC MODELING OF MULTI-SPECTRAL PHOTOGRAMMETRIC POINT CLOUD DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bohlin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent development in software for automatic photogrammetric processing of multispectral aerial imagery, and the growing nation-wide availability of Digital Elevation Model (DEM data, are about to revolutionize data capture for forest management planning in Scandinavia. Using only already available aerial imagery and ALS-assessed DEM data, raster estimates of the forest variables mean tree height, basal area, total stem volume, and species-specific stem volumes were produced and evaluated. The study was conducted at a coniferous hemi-boreal test site in southern Sweden (lat. 58° N, long. 13° E. Digital aerial images from the Zeiss/Intergraph Digital Mapping Camera system were used to produce 3D point-cloud data with spectral information. Metrics were calculated for 696 field plots (10 m radius from point-cloud data and used in k-MSN to estimate forest variables. For these stands, the tree height ranged from 1.4 to 33.0 m (18.1 m mean, stem volume from 0 to 829 m3 ha-1 (249 m3 ha-1 mean and basal area from 0 to 62.2 m2 ha-1 (26.1 m2 ha-1 mean, with mean stand size of 2.8 ha. Estimates made using digital aerial images corresponding to the standard acquisition of the Swedish National Land Survey (Lantmäteriet showed RMSEs (in percent of the surveyed stand mean of 7.5% for tree height, 11.4% for basal area, 13.2% for total stem volume, 90.6% for pine stem volume, 26.4 for spruce stem volume, and 72.6% for deciduous stem volume. The results imply that photogrammetric matching of digital aerial images has significant potential for operational use in forestry.

  8. Preparation of antisera specific for human B cells by immunization of rabbits with immune complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, K.I.; Turner, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    Three rabbit antisera are described which are specific without absorption (titer 1:100) for separated human B cells, as measured by complement and non-complement fixing assays. The method of production of these sera involved injections of rabbits with precipitin lines formed between 10μ1 of three separate detergent solubilized membrane preparations and 4μ1 aliquots of rabbit antisera to human B cells. In addition to being B cell specific, the three sera block the MLC reaction, inhibit aggregated IgG binding to B cells, and show differential degrees of B cell lysis when tested on a panel of separated B and T cells. These and other properties suggest that the target specificities of the antibodies are the human equivalent of the murine Ia antigens. (author)

  9. Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Norbeck, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen, causing erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, transient aplastic crisis, and intrauterine fetal death. The phenotype of CD8+ T cells in acute B19 infection has not been studied previously. METHODS AND FINDINGS......: The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA-peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of viraemia......, with T cell populations specific for individual epitopes comprising up to 4% of CD8+ T cells. B19-specific T cells developed and maintained an activated CD38+ phenotype, with strong expression of perforin and CD57 and downregulation of CD28 and CD27. These cells possessed strong effector function...

  10. Effect of partial and complete variable loop deletions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein on the breadth of gp160-specific immune responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gzyl, Jaroslaw; Bolesta, Elizabeth; Wierzbicki, Andrew; Kmieciak, Dariusz; Naito, Toshio; Honda, Mitsuo; Komuro, Katsutoshi; Kaneko, Yutaro; Kozbor, Danuta

    2004-01-01

    Induction of cross-reactive cellular and humoral responses to the HIV-1 envelope (env) glycoprotein was examined after DNA immunization of BALB/c mice with gp140 89.6 -derived constructs exhibiting partial or complete deletions of the V1, V2, and V3 domains. It was demonstrated that specific modification of the V3 loop (mV3) in combination with the V2-modified (mV2) or V1/V2-deleted (ΔV1/V2) region elicited increased levels of cross-reactive CD8 + T cell responses. Mice immunized with the mV2/mV3 or ΔV1/V2/mV3 gp140 89.6 plasmid DNA were greater than 50-fold more resistant to challenge with recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) expressing heterologous env gene products than animals immunized with the wild-type (WT) counterpart. Sera from mV2/mV3- and ΔV1/V2/mV3-immunized mice exhibited the highest cross-neutralizing activity and displayed intermediate antibody avidity values which were further enhanced by challenge with rVV expressing the homologous gp160 glycoprotein. In contrast, complete deletion of the variable regions had little or no effect on the cross-reactive antibody responses. The results of these experiments indicate that the breadth of antibody responses to the HIV-1 env glycoprotein may not be increased by removal of the variable domains. Instead, partial deletions within these regions may redirect specific responses toward conserved epitopes and facilitate approaches for boosting cross-reactive cellular and antibody responses to the env glycoprotein

  11. Improved Activation toward Primary Colorectal Cancer Cells by Antigen-Specific Targeting Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schlimper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells showed promise in a number of trials; the activation of CIK cells from cancer patients towards their autologous cancer cells still needs to be improved. Here, we generated CIK cells ex vivo from blood lymphocytes of colorectal cancer patients and engineered those cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with an antibody-defined specificity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. CIK cells thereby gained a new specificity as defined by the CAR and showed increase in activation towards CEA+ colon carcinoma cells, but less in presence of CEA− cells, indicated by increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Redirected CIK activation was superior by CAR-mediated CD28-CD3ζ than CD3ζ signaling only. CAR-engineered CIK cells from colon carcinoma patients showed improved activation against their autologous, primary carcinoma cells from biopsies resulting in more efficient tumour cell lysis. We assume that adoptive therapy with CAR-modified CIK cells shows improved selectivity in targeting autologous tumour lesions.

  12. A critical examination of the numerology of antigen-binding cells: evidence for multiple receptor specificities on single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A

    1977-01-01

    The data available from other laboratories as well as our own on the frequency of cells recognizing major histocompatibility antigens or conventional protein and hapten antigens is critically evaluated. The frequency of specific binding for a large number of antigens is sufficiently high to support the idea that at least part of the antigen-binding cell population must have multiple specificities. Our results suggest that these multiple specific cells result from single cells synthesizing and displaying as many as 50-100 species of receptor, each at a frequency of 10(4) per cell. A model involving gene expansion of constant-region genes is suggested and some auxilliary evidence consistent with such C-gene expansion is presented.

  13. HIV-1 Vif's Capacity To Manipulate the Cell Cycle Is Species Specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Edward L; Becker, Jordan T; Fricke, Stephanie L; Patel, Kishan; Sherer, Nathan M

    2018-04-01

    Cells derived from mice and other rodents exhibit profound blocks to HIV-1 virion production, reflecting species-specific incompatibilities between viral Tat and Rev proteins and essential host factors cyclin T1 (CCNT1) and exportin-1 (XPO1, also known as CRM1), respectively. To determine if mouse cell blocks other than CCNT1 and XPO1 affect HIV's postintegration stages, we studied HIV-1 NL4-3 gene expression in mouse NIH 3T3 cells modified to constitutively express HIV-1-compatible versions of CCNT1 and XPO1 (3T3.CX cells). 3T3.CX cells supported both Rev-independent and Rev-dependent viral gene expression and produced relatively robust levels of virus particles, confirming that CCNT1 and XPO1 represent the predominant blocks to these stages. Unexpectedly, however, 3T3.CX cells were remarkably resistant to virus-induced cytopathic effects observed in human cell lines, which we mapped to the viral protein Vif and its apparent species-specific capacity to induce G 2 /M cell cycle arrest. Vif was able to mediate rapid degradation of human APOBEC3G and the PPP2R5D regulatory B56 subunit of the PP2A phosphatase holoenzyme in mouse cells, thus demonstrating that Vif NL4-3 's modulation of the cell cycle can be functionally uncoupled from some of its other defined roles in CUL5-dependent protein degradation. Vif was also unable to induce G 2 /M cell cycle arrest in other nonhuman cell types, including cells derived from nonhuman primates, leading us to propose that one or more human-specific cofactors underpin Vif's ability to modulate the cell cycle. IMPORTANCE Cells derived from mice and other rodents exhibit profound blocks to HIV-1 replication, thus hindering the development of a low-cost small-animal model for studying HIV/AIDS. Here, we engineered otherwise-nonpermissive mouse cells to express HIV-1-compatible versions of two species-specific host dependency factors, cyclin T1 (CCNT1) and exportin-1 (XPO1) (3T3.CX cells). We show that 3T3.CX cells rescue HIV-1

  14. T cell clones which share T cell receptor epitopes differ in phenotype, function and specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yssel, H.; Blanchard, D.; Boylston, A.; de Vries, J. E.; Spits, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, we described a monoclonal antibody (3D6) that reacts with the T cell receptor (Ti) of the T leukemic cell line HPB-ALL and that cross-reacts with 2-10% of the T cells of normal healthy individuals. In this study we report the establishment of T cell clones that are 3D6+ but that differ in

  15. Changes in reward contingency modulate the trial-to-trial variability of hippocampal place cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikenheiser, Andrew M; Redish, A David

    2011-08-01

    Pyramidal cells in the rodent hippocampus often exhibit clear spatial tuning. Theories of hippocampal function suggest that these "place cells" implement multiple, independent neural representations of position (maps), based on different reference frames or environmental features. Consistent with the "multiple maps" theory, previous studies have shown that manipulating spatial factors related to task performance modulates the within-session variability (overdispersion) of cells in the hippocampus. However, the influence of changes in reward contingency on overdispersion has not been examined. To test this, we first trained rats to collect food from three feeders positioned around a circular track (task(1)). When subjects were proficient, the reward contingency was altered such that every other feeder delivered food (task(2)). We recorded ensembles of hippocampal neurons as rats performed both tasks. Place cell overdispersion was high during task(1) but decreased significantly during task(2), and this increased reliability could not be accounted for by changes in running speed or familiarity with the task. Intuitively, decreased variability might be expected to improve neural representations of position. To test this, we used Bayesian decoding of hippocampal spike trains to estimate subjects' location. Neither the amount of probability decoded to subjects' position (local probability) nor the difference between estimated position and true location (decoding accuracy) differed between tasks. However, we found that hippocampal ensembles were significantly more self-consistent during task(2) performance. These results suggest that changes in task demands can affect the firing statistics of hippocampal neurons, leading to changes in the properties of decoded neural representations.

  16. In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline Specific CD4 T-Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0004 TITLE: In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T - Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project is to test the hypothesis that cit-specific CD4 T cells present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients

  17. Detection of Avian Antigen-Specific T Cells Induced by Viral Vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen. There is ......Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen...

  18. HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Min-kyung; Yao Hequan; Rao Jianghong

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dots emerge as an attractive alternative to small molecule fluorophores as fluorescent tags for in vivo cell labeling and imaging. This communication presents a method for specific labeling of live cells using quantum dots. The labeling is mediated by HaloTag protein expressed at the cell surface which forms a stable covalent adduct with its ligand (HaloTag ligand). The labeling can be performed in one single step with quantum dot conjugates that are functionalized with HaloTag ligand, or in two steps with biotinylated HaloTag ligand first and followed by streptavidin coated quantum dots. Live cell fluorescence imaging indicates that the labeling is specific and takes place at the cell surface. This HaloTag protein-mediated cell labeling method should facilitate the application of quantum dots for live cell imaging

  19. Specifically activated memory T cell subsets from cancer patients recognize and reject xenotransplanted autologous tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckhove, Philipp; Feuerer, Markus; Dolenc, Mathias; Schuetz, Florian; Choi, Carmen; Sommerfeldt, Nora; Schwendemann, Jochen; Ehlert, Katrin; Altevogt, Peter; Bastert, Gunther; Schirrmacher, Volker; Umansky, Viktor

    2004-01-01

    Bone marrow of breast cancer patients was found to contain CD8+ T cells specific for peptides derived from breast cancer–associated proteins MUC1 and Her-2/neu. Most of these cells had a central or effector memory phenotype (CD45RA–CD62L+ or CD45RA–CD62L–, respectively). To test their in vivo function, we separated bone marrow–derived CD45RA+ naive or CD45RA–CD45RO+ memory T cells, stimulated them with autologous dendritic cells pulsed with tumor lysate, and transferred them into NOD/SCID mice bearing autologous breast tumors and normal skin transplants. CD45RA– memory but not CD45RA+ naive T cells infiltrated autologous tumor but not skin tissues after the transfer. These tumor-infiltrating cells had a central or effector memory phenotype and produced perforin. Many of them expressed the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 and were found around P-selectin+ tumor endothelium. Tumor infiltration included cluster formation in tumor tissue by memory T cells with cotransferred dendritic cells. It was associated with the induction of tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor reduction. We thus demonstrate selective homing of memory T cells to human tumors and suggest that tumor rejection is based on the recognition of tumor-associated antigens on tumor cells and dendritic cells by autologous specifically activated central and effector memory T cells. PMID:15232613

  20. Analysis of antigen-specific B-cell memory directly ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHeyzer-Williams, Louise J; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G

    2004-01-01

    Helper T-cell-regulated B-cell memory develops in response to initial antigen priming as a cellular product of the germinal center (GC) reaction. On antigen recall, memory response precursors expand rapidly with exaggerated differentiation into plasma cells to produce the high-titer, high-affinity antibody(Ab) that typifies the memory B-cell response in vivo. We have devised a high-resolution flow cytometric strategy to quantify the emergence and maintenance of antigen-specific memory B cells directly ex vivo. Extended cell surface phenotype establishes a level of cellular diversity not previously appreciated for the memory B-cell compartment. Using an "exclusion transfer" strategy, we ascertain the capacity of two distinct memory B-cell populations to transfer antigen-specific memory into naive adoptive hosts. Finally, we sequence expressed messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) from single cells within the population to estimate the level of somatic hypermutation as the best molecular indicator of B-cell memory. In this chapter, we describe the methods used in each of these four sections that serve to provide high-resolution quantification of antigen-specific B-cell memory responses directly ex vivo.

  1. The detection and specifity of class specific antibodies to whole bacteria cells using a solid phase radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerkinsky, C.; Rees, A.S.; Bergimeier, L.A.; Challacombe, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    A solid phase radioimmunoassay has been developed which can be used for the detection of isotype specific antibodies to whole bacteria and other particulate antigens, and is applicable to a variety of species. Bacteria are bound to the solid phase by the use either of antibodies, or of methyl glyoxal. Both methods result in a sensitive and reproducible assay, and bacteria do not appear to desorb from the solid phase. The specificity of antibodies to whole bacteria was examined by absorption of antisera with various species of bacteria and retesting, or by determining the binding of antisera to various bacteria bound to the solid phase. Both methods revealed specificity for the bacteria examined. Inhibition studies showed that antibodies to Streptococcus mutans whole cells could be inhibited by purified cell surface antigens glucosyltransferase and antigen I/II, but only minimally by lipoteichoic acid, c polysaccharide or dextran. In murine antisera antibodies of the IgG, IgM, and IgA classes could be detected at amounts of less than 1 ng/ml. (author)

  2. Antigen-Specific Th17 Cells Are Primed by Distinct and Complementary Dendritic Cell Subsets in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Trautwein-Weidner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. can cause severe and chronic mucocutaneous and systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals. Protection from mucocutaneous candidiasis depends on T helper cells, in particular those secreting IL-17. The events regulating T cell activation and differentiation toward effector fates in response to fungal invasion in different tissues are poorly understood. Here we generated a Candida-specific TCR transgenic mouse reactive to a novel endogenous antigen that is conserved in multiple distant species of Candida, including the clinically highly relevant C. albicans and C. glabrata. Using TCR transgenic T cells in combination with an experimental model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC we investigated antigen presentation and Th17 priming by different subsets of dendritic cells (DCs present in the infected oral mucosa. Candida-derived endogenous antigen accesses the draining lymph nodes and is directly presented by migratory DCs. Tissue-resident Flt3L-dependent DCs and CCR2-dependent monocyte-derived DCs collaborate in antigen presentation and T cell priming during OPC. In contrast, Langerhans cells, which are also present in the oral mucosa and have been shown to prime Th17 cells in the skin, are not required for induction of the Candida-specific T cell response upon oral challenge. This highlights the functional compartmentalization of specific DC subsets in different tissues. These data provide important new insights to our understanding of tissue-specific antifungal immunity.

  3. HIV-specific CD8+ T cells: serial killers condemned to die?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovas, Constantinos; Mueller, Yvonne M; Katsikis, Peter D

    2004-04-01

    An increasing body of evidence supports a key role for cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTL) in controlling HIV infection. Although a vigorous HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response is raised during the primary infection, these cells ultimately fail to control virus and prevent disease progression. The failure of CTL to control HIV infection has been attributed to a number of strategies HIV employs to evade the immune system. Recently, intrinsic defects in the CTL themselves have been proposed to contribute to the failure of CTL to control HIV. HIV-specific CD8+ T cells differ in their effector/memory phenotype from other virus-specific CD8+ T cells indicating that their differentiation status differs. This altered differentiation may affect effector functions as well as homing properties of these cells. Other studies have indicated that activation of HIV-specific CTL may be impaired and this contributes to their dysfunction. The effector function of these CTL may also be affected. There are conflicting reports about their ability to kill, whereas IFNgamma production does not appear to be impaired in these cells. In this review we focus on recent work indicating that apoptosis may be an important mechanism through which HIV evades the CTL response. In particular, HIV-specific CD8+ T cells are highly susceptible to CD95/Fas-induced apoptosis. This leads to the hypothesis that virus-specific cytotoxic T cells can be eliminated upon binding CD95L/FasL on HIV-infected cells. Understanding the intrinsic defects of CTL in HIV infection could lead to new therapeutic strategies and optimized vaccination protocols that enhance the HIV-specific cytotoxic response.

  4. T-cell receptor variable genes and genetic susceptibility to celiac disease: an association and linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschmann, E; Wienker, T F; Gerok, W; Volk, B A

    1993-12-01

    Genetic susceptibility of celiac disease is primarily associated with a particular combination of and HLA-DQA1/DQB1 gene; however, this does not fully account for the genetic predisposition. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether T-cell receptor (TCR) genes may be susceptibility genes in celiac disease. HLA class II typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification in combination with sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridization. TCR alpha (TCRA), TCR gamma (TCRG), and TCR beta (TCRB) loci were investigated by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Allelic frequencies of TCRA, TCRG, and TCRB variable genes were compared between patients with celiac disease (n = 53) and control patients (n = 67), and relative risk (RR) estimates were calculated. The RR was 1.67 for allele C1 at TCRA1, 3.35 for allele D2 at TCRA2, 1.66 for allele B2 at TCRG, and 1.35 for allele B at TCRB, showing no significant association. Additionally, linkage analysis was performed in 23 families. The logarithm of odd scores for celiac disease vs. the TCR variable genes at TCRA, TCRG, and TCRB showed no significant linkage. These data suggest that the analyzed TCR variable gene segments V alpha 1.2, V gamma 11, and V beta 8 do not play a major role in susceptibility to celiac disease.

  5. Dendritic cells recognize tumor-specific glycosylation of carcinoembryonic antigen on colorectal cancer cells through dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Aarnoudse, Corlien A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Immature dendritic cells are located intratumorally within colorectal cancer and intimately interact with tumor cells, whereas mature dendritic cells are present peripheral to the tumor. The majority of colorectal

  6. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Epitope-Specific CD4+ T Cells Are Inflated in HIV+ CMV+ Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abana, Chike O; Pilkinton, Mark A; Gaudieri, Silvana; Chopra, Abha; McDonnell, Wyatt J; Wanjalla, Celestine; Barnett, Louise; Gangula, Rama; Hager, Cindy; Jung, Dae K; Engelhardt, Brian G; Jagasia, Madan H; Klenerman, Paul; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Koelle, David M; Kalams, Spyros A; Mallal, Simon A

    2017-11-01

    Select CMV epitopes drive life-long CD8 + T cell memory inflation, but the extent of CD4 memory inflation is poorly studied. CD4 + T cells specific for human CMV (HCMV) are elevated in HIV + HCMV + subjects. To determine whether HCMV epitope-specific CD4 + T cell memory inflation occurs during HIV infection, we used HLA-DR7 (DRB1*07:01) tetramers loaded with the glycoprotein B DYSNTHSTRYV (DYS) epitope to characterize circulating CD4 + T cells in coinfected HLA-DR7 + long-term nonprogressor HIV subjects with undetectable HCMV plasma viremia. DYS-specific CD4 + T cells were inflated among these HIV + subjects compared with those from an HIV - HCMV + HLA-DR7 + cohort or with HLA-DR7-restricted CD4 + T cells from the HIV-coinfected cohort that were specific for epitopes of HCMV phosphoprotein-65, tetanus toxoid precursor, EBV nuclear Ag 2, or HIV gag protein. Inflated DYS-specific CD4 + T cells consisted of effector memory or effector memory-RA + subsets with restricted TCRβ usage and nearly monoclonal CDR3 containing novel conserved amino acids. Expression of this near-monoclonal TCR in a Jurkat cell-transfection system validated fine DYS specificity. Inflated cells were polyfunctional, not senescent, and displayed high ex vivo levels of granzyme B, CX 3 CR1, CD38, or HLA-DR but less often coexpressed CD38 + and HLA-DR + The inflation mechanism did not involve apoptosis suppression, increased proliferation, or HIV gag cross-reactivity. Instead, the findings suggest that intermittent or chronic expression of epitopes, such as DYS, drive inflation of activated CD4 + T cells that home to endothelial cells and have the potential to mediate cytotoxicity and vascular disease. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Dual-specificity anti-sigma factor reinforces control of cell-type specific gene expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Serrano

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression during spore development in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors. σFand σE control early stages of development in the forespore and the mother cell, respectively. When, at an intermediate stage in development, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, σF is replaced by σG and σE is replaced by σK. The anti-sigma factor CsfB is produced under the control of σF and binds to and inhibits the auto-regulatory σG, but not σF. A position in region 2.1, occupied by an asparagine in σG and by a glutamate in οF, is sufficient for CsfB discrimination of the two sigmas, and allows it to delay the early to late switch in forespore gene expression. We now show that following engulfment completion, csfB is switched on in the mother cell under the control of σK and that CsfB binds to and inhibits σE but not σK, possibly to facilitate the switch from early to late gene expression. We show that a position in region 2.3 occupied by a conserved asparagine in σE and by a conserved glutamate in σK suffices for discrimination by CsfB. We also show that CsfB prevents activation of σG in the mother cell and the premature σG-dependent activation of σK. Thus, CsfB establishes negative feedback loops that curtail the activity of σE and prevent the ectopic activation of σG in the mother cell. The capacity of CsfB to directly block σE activity may also explain how CsfB plays a role as one of the several mechanisms that prevent σE activation in the forespore. Thus the capacity of CsfB to differentiate between the highly similar σF/σG and σE/σK pairs allows it to rinforce the cell-type specificity of these sigma factors and the transition from early to late development in B. subtilis, and possibly in all sporeformers that encode a CsfB orthologue.

  8. Identification of Cell Type-Specific Differences in Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling in Primary Erythroid and Lung Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Merkle

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer, with its most prevalent form non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is commonly treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin. Lung cancer patients frequently suffer from chemotherapy-induced anemia, which can be treated with erythropoietin (EPO. However, studies have indicated that EPO not only promotes erythropoiesis in hematopoietic cells, but may also enhance survival of NSCLC cells. Here, we verified that the NSCLC cell line H838 expresses functional erythropoietin receptors (EPOR and that treatment with EPO reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis. To pinpoint differences in EPO-induced survival signaling in erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E, colony forming unit-erythroid and H838 cells, we combined mathematical modeling with a method for feature selection, the L1 regularization. Utilizing an example model and simulated data, we demonstrated that this approach enables the accurate identification and quantification of cell type-specific parameters. We applied our strategy to quantitative time-resolved data of EPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling generated by quantitative immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR in CFU-E and H838 cells as well as H838 cells overexpressing human EPOR (H838-HA-hEPOR. The established parsimonious mathematical model was able to simultaneously describe the data sets of CFU-E, H838 and H838-HA-hEPOR cells. Seven cell type-specific parameters were identified that included for example parameters for nuclear translocation of STAT5 and target gene induction. Cell type-specific differences in target gene induction were experimentally validated by qRT-PCR experiments. The systematic identification of pathway differences and sensitivities of EPOR signaling in CFU-E and H838 cells revealed potential targets for intervention to selectively inhibit EPO-induced signaling in the tumor cells but leave the responses in

  9. Pregnancy Loss in Dairy Cattle: Relationship of Ultrasound, Blood Pregnancy-Specific Protein B, Progesterone and Production Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gábor, G; Kastelic, J P; Abonyi-Tóth, Z; Gábor, P; Endrődi, T; Balogh, O G

    2016-08-01

    Objectives were to determine associations between percentage pregnancy loss (PPL) in dairy cattle and: (i) pregnancy diagnosis by ultrasonography; (ii) pregnancy diagnosis by serum pregnancy-specific protein B (PSPB) concentrations, with or without serum progesterone concentrations; and (iii) production and environmental factors. This study included 149 822 pregnancy diagnoses conducted over 13 years in Holstein-Friesian cows in Hungarian dairy herds. The following were determined: PPL in cows diagnosed pregnant by transrectal ultrasonography 29-42 days after artificial insemination (AI; n = 11 457); PPL in cows diagnosed pregnant by serum PSPB 29-35 days after AI (n = 138 365); and PPL and its association with serum progesterone concentrations, PSPB and production/environmental variables. The definition of PPL was percentage of cows initially diagnosed pregnant based on ultrasonography or PSPB, but not pregnant when examined by transrectal palpation 60 -70 days after AI. The PPL was lower (p 1.1 ng/ml) was lowest (15.0%), whereas cows with low concentrations of both PSPB and progesterone (0.6-1.1 and production, when ambient temperatures were high, although body condition score (BCS) had no effect on PPL. Finally, there were no significant associations between serum PSPB and environmental temperatures or number of post-partum uterine treatments. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Computational study to investigate effect of tonometer geometry and patient-specific variability on radial artery tonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pranjal; Choudhury, Mohammed Ikbal; Roy, Sitikantha; Prasad, Anamika

    2017-06-14

    Tonometry-based devices are valuable method for vascular function assessment and for measurement of blood pressure. However current design and calibration methods rely on simple models, neglecting key geometrical features, and anthropometric and property variability among patients. Understanding impact of these influences on tonometer measurement is thus essential for improving outcomes of current devices, and for proposing improved design. Towards this goal, we present a realistic computational model for tissue-device interaction using complete wrist section with hyperelastic material and frictional contact. Three different tonometry geometries were considered including a new design, and patient-specific influences incorporated via anthropometric and age-dependent tissue stiffness variations. The results indicated that the new design showed stable surface contact stress with minimum influence of the parameters analyzed. The computational predictions were validated with experimental data from a prototype based on the new design. Finally, we showed that the underlying mechanics of vascular unloading in tonometry to be fundamentally different from that of oscillatory method. Due to directional loading in tonometry, pulse amplitude maxima was observed to occur at a significantly lower compression level (around 31%) than previously reported, which can impact blood pressure calibration approaches based on maximum pulse pressure recordings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recruitment of Mediator Complex by Cell Type and Stage-Specific Factors Required for Tissue-Specific TAF Dependent Gene Activation in an Adult Stem Cell Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chenggang; Fuller, Margaret T

    2015-12-01

    Onset of terminal differentiation in adult stem cell lineages is commonly marked by robust activation of new transcriptional programs required to make the appropriate differentiated cell type(s). In the Drosophila male germ line stem cell lineage, the switch from proliferating spermatogonia to spermatocyte is accompanied by one of the most dramatic transcriptional changes in the fly, as over 1000 new transcripts turn on in preparation for meiosis and spermatid differentiation. Here we show that function of the coactivator complex Mediator is required for activation of hundreds of new transcripts in the spermatocyte program. Mediator appears to act in a sequential hierarchy, with the testis activating Complex (tMAC), a cell type specific form of the Mip/dREAM general repressor, required to recruit Mediator subunits to the chromatin, and Mediator function required to recruit the testis TAFs (tTAFs), spermatocyte specific homologs of subunits of TFIID. Mediator, tMAC and the tTAFs co-regulate expression of a major set of spermatid differentiation genes. The Mediator subunit Med22 binds the tMAC component Topi when the two are coexpressed in S2 cells, suggesting direct recruitment. Loss of Med22 function in spermatocytes causes meiosis I maturation arrest male infertility, similar to loss of function of the tMAC subunits or the tTAFs. Our results illuminate how cell type specific versions of the Mip/dREAM complex and the general transcription machinery cooperate to drive selective gene activation during differentiation in stem cell lineages.

  12. Recruitment of Mediator Complex by Cell Type and Stage-Specific Factors Required for Tissue-Specific TAF Dependent Gene Activation in an Adult Stem Cell Lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenggang Lu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Onset of terminal differentiation in adult stem cell lineages is commonly marked by robust activation of new transcriptional programs required to make the appropriate differentiated cell type(s. In the Drosophila male germ line stem cell lineage, the switch from proliferating spermatogonia to spermatocyte is accompanied by one of the most dramatic transcriptional changes in the fly, as over 1000 new transcripts turn on in preparation for meiosis and spermatid differentiation. Here we show that function of the coactivator complex Mediator is required for activation of hundreds of new transcripts in the spermatocyte program. Mediator appears to act in a sequential hierarchy, with the testis activating Complex (tMAC, a cell type specific form of the Mip/dREAM general repressor, required to recruit Mediator subunits to the chromatin, and Mediator function required to recruit the testis TAFs (tTAFs, spermatocyte specific homologs of subunits of TFIID. Mediator, tMAC and the tTAFs co-regulate expression of a major set of spermatid differentiation genes. The Mediator subunit Med22 binds the tMAC component Topi when the two are coexpressed in S2 cells, suggesting direct recruitment. Loss of Med22 function in spermatocytes causes meiosis I maturation arrest male infertility, similar to loss of function of the tMAC subunits or the tTAFs. Our results illuminate how cell type specific versions of the Mip/dREAM complex and the general transcription machinery cooperate to drive selective gene activation during differentiation in stem cell lineages.

  13. Cloning of B cell-specific membrane tetraspanning molecule BTS possessing B cell proliferation-inhibitory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Arase, Hisashi; Yamasaki, Sho; Kohno, Masayuki; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Arata; Hattori, Takamichi; Saito, Takashi

    2007-11-01

    Lymphocyte proliferation is regulated by signals through antigen receptors, co-stimulatory receptors, and other positive and negative modulators. Several membrane tetraspanning molecules are also involved in the regulation of lymphocyte growth and death. We cloned a new B cell-specific tetraspanning (BTS) membrane molecule, which is similar to CD20 in terms of expression, structure and function. BTS is specifically expressed in the B cell line and its expression is increased after the pre-B cell stage. BTS is expressed in intracellular granules and on the cell surface. Overexpression of BTS in immature B cell lines induces growth retardation through inhibition of cell cycle progression and cell size increase without inducing apoptosis. This inhibitory function is mediated predominantly by the N terminus of BTS. The development of mature B cells is inhibited in transgenic mice expressing BTS, suggesting that BTS is involved in the in vivo regulation of B cells. These results indicate that BTS plays a role in the regulation of cell division and B cell growth.

  14. White blood cell counts mediate the effects of physical activity on prostate-specific antigen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Richart, Sarah M

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether white blood cell (WBC) level mediated the relationship between physical activity and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used; 1,726 U.S. adult men (aged 40 years or older) provided complete data on the study variables. Participants wore an ActiGraph 7164 accelerometer for a 7-day period to measure their physical activity behavior, and PSA and WBC levels were obtained from a blood sample. After adjustments, results showed that moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was inversely associated with WBC count (b = - .03; 95% CI [ - 0.04, - 0.006; p = .01), and WBC count (b = .10; 95% CI [0.009, 0.18; p = .04) was positively associated with PSA. Both the Sobel (coef. = - .004, SE = .002; z = - 2.0; p = .03) and the Aroian (coef. = - .004, SE = .002; z = - 1.9; p = .03) tests demonstrated that WBC mediated the relationship between physical activity and PSA. Additionally, among 107 participants with prostate cancer, survivors engaging in more MVPA had lower levels of WBC (b = - .04; 95% CI [ - 0.09, - 0.0009; p = .04). Conclusion Physical activity may influence PSA levels through WBC modulation; however, future research is needed to determine the direction of causality. Additionally, prostate cancer survivors engaging in higher levels of MVPA had lower levels of WBC, underscoring the importance of promoting physical activity among prostate cancer survivors.

  15. Designs of precoding for LTE TDD using cell specific reference signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Fan; Lu, Lu; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard

    2010-01-01

    We design non-codebook-based Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) precoding schemes using multiple cell-specific reference signals patterns for the time division duplex (TDD) mode of LTE, where channel reciprocity can be exploited. Previously proposed non-codebookbased precoding schemes typically...... use UE specific reference signals for demodulation. Cell specific reference signals are however always allocated for the transmission of common control signalling, mobility measurements and downlink channel quality measurements. In order to save the resources occupied by UE specific reference signals...

  16. Standardized orthotopic xenografts in zebrafish reveal glioma cell-line-specific characteristics and tumor cell heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. Welker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is a deadly brain cancer, for which few effective drug treatments are available. Several studies have used zebrafish models to study GBM, but a standardized approach to modeling GBM in zebrafish was lacking to date, preventing comparison of data across studies. Here, we describe a new, standardized orthotopic xenotransplant model of GBM in zebrafish. Dose-response survival assays were used to define the optimal number of cells for tumor formation. Techniques to measure tumor burden and cell spread within the brain over real time were optimized using mouse neural stem cells as control transplants. Applying this standardized approach, we transplanted two patient-derived GBM cell lines, serum-grown adherent cells and neurospheres, into the midbrain region of embryonic zebrafish and analyzed transplanted larvae over time. Progressive brain tumor growth and premature larval death were observed using both cell lines; however, fewer transplanted neurosphere cells were needed for tumor growth and lethality. Tumors were heterogeneous, containing both cells expressing stem cell markers and cells expressing markers of differentiation. A small proportion of transplanted neurosphere cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP or vimentin, markers of more differentiated cells, but this number increased significantly during tumor growth, indicating that these cells undergo differentiation in vivo. By contrast, most serum-grown adherent cells expressed GFAP and vimentin at the earliest times examined post-transplant. Both cell types produced brain tumors that contained Sox2+ cells, indicative of tumor stem cells. Transplanted larvae were treated with currently used GBM therapeutics, temozolomide or bortezomib, and this resulted in a reduction in tumor volume in vivo and an increase in survival. The standardized model reported here facilitates robust and reproducible analysis of glioblastoma tumor cells in real time and provides a

  17. Accessing complexity: the dynamics of virus-specific T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doherty, P C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2000-01-01

    -specific CD8(+ )T cells. Analysis to date with both naturally acquired and experimentally induced infections has established that the numbers of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells present during both the acute and memory phases of the host response are more than tenfold in excess of previously suspected values....... The levels are such that the virus-specific CD8(+) set is readily detected in the human peripheral blood lymphocyte compartment, particularly during persistent infections. Experimentally, it is now possible to measure the extent of cycling for tetramer (+)CD8(+) T cells during the acute and memory phases...... of the host response to viruses. Dissection of the phenotypic, functional, and molecular diversity of CD8(+) T cell populations has been greatly facilitated. It is hoped it will also soon be possible to analyze CD4(+) T cell populations in this way. Though these are early days and there is an enormous amount...

  18. Real-time monitoring of specific oxygen uptake rates of embryonic stem cells in a microfluidic cell culture device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Super, Alexandre; Jaccard, Nicolas; Cardoso Marques, Marco Paulo; Macown, Rhys Jarred; Griffin, Lewis Donald; Veraitch, Farlan Singh; Szita, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Oxygen plays a key role in stem cell biology as a signaling molecule and as an indicator of cell energy metabolism. Quantification of cellular oxygen kinetics, i.e. the determination of specific oxygen uptake rates (sOURs), is routinely used to understand metabolic shifts. However current methods to determine sOUR in adherent cell cultures rely on cell sampling, which impacts on cellular phenotype. We present real-time monitoring of cell growth from phase contrast microscopy images, and of respiration using optical sensors for dissolved oxygen. Time-course data for bulk and peri-cellular oxygen concentrations obtained for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and mouse embryonic stem cell (mESCs) cultures successfully demonstrated this non-invasive and label-free approach. Additionally, we confirmed non-invasive detection of cellular responses to rapidly changing culture conditions by exposing the cells to mitochondrial inhibiting and uncoupling agents. For the CHO and mESCs, sOUR values between 8 and 60 amol cell(-1) s(-1) , and 5 and 35 amol cell(-1) s(-1) were obtained, respectively. These values compare favorably with literature data. The capability to monitor oxygen tensions, cell growth, and sOUR, of adherent stem cell cultures, non-invasively and in real time, will be of significant benefit for future studies in stem cell biology and stem cell-based therapies. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Cloning analysis of HBV-specific CD8 T cell receptor gene in patients with acute hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning DING

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the molecular mechanism of T cell receptor(TCR in CD8 T cell-mediated immune response to HBV in patients with acute hepatitis B(AHB.Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMCs were collected from HLA-A2-positive AHB patients.To determine HBsAg183-191 and HBsAg335-343-specific CD8 T cell frequencies,the PBMCs were stained by fluorescence-labeled anti-CD3,anti-CD8 and pentamers,and analyzed by flow cytometry.PBMCs from 6 patients were stimulated with epitopic peptide HBsAg335-343 in vitro for 3 to 4 weeks.HBV-specific CD8 T cells were isolated by magnetic activated cell sorting followed by flow florescence activated cell sorting.The mRNA of sorted cells was extracted after expanding by IL-2,anti-CD3 and anti-CD8.The full-length gene fragments of variable region of TCR α and β chains were gained by 5’-RACE,and then cloned and sequenced(≥50 clones for single chain of each sample.The gene families of TCR α and β chains were identified and the sequence characters of CDR3 were compared.Results Analysis of more than 600 cloned gene sequences of TCR α and β chains showed that the proliferated HBV-specific CD8 T cells from 6 AHB patients presented a predominant expression in TCR α and chains,with 2-4 α chain families and 1-4 chain families in each case.The α2,α14,α15,β3,β13 and 23 families were detected in more than one case.The chain genes were all 13 for all tested clones in one case.For the same α chain or-chain family,CDR3 sequences tended to be identical in one case but different among cases.Conclusions HBV-specific CD8 T cells with antigenic peptide-induced proliferation present predominance in the usage of TCR α and β chains.This property might be one of the important molecular factors influencing anti-HBV immunity.

  20. Specific gravity of hybrid poplars in the north-central region, USA: within-tree variability and site × genotype effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    William L. Headlee; Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny; Richard B. Hall; Edmund O. Bauer; Bradford Bender; Bruce A. Birr; Raymond O. Miller; Jesse A. Randall; Adam H. Wiese

    2013-01-01

    Specific gravity is an important consideration for traditional uses of hybrid poplars for pulp and solid wood products, as well as for biofuels and bioenergy production. While specific gravity has been shown to be under strong genetic control and subject to within-tree variability, the role of genotype × environment interactions is poorly understood. Most...

  1. Site-Specific Bioorthogonal Labeling for Fluorescence Imaging of Intracellular Proteins in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tao; Hang, Howard C

    2016-11-02

    Over the past years, fluorescent proteins (e.g., green fluorescent proteins) have been widely utilized to visualize recombinant protein expression and localization in live cells. Although powerful, fluorescent protein tags are limited by their relatively large sizes and potential perturbation to protein function. Alternatively, site-specific labeling of proteins with small-molecule organic fluorophores using bioorthogonal chemistry may provide a more precise and less perturbing method. This approach involves site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) into proteins via genetic code expansion, followed by bioorthogonal chemical labeling with small organic fluorophores in living cells. While this approach has been used to label extracellular proteins for live cell imaging studies, site-specific bioorthogonal labeling and fluorescence imaging of intracellular proteins in live cells is still challenging. Herein, we systematically evaluate site-specific incorporation of diastereomerically pure bioorthogonal UAAs bearing stained alkynes or alkenes into intracellular proteins for inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions with tetrazine-functionalized fluorophores for live cell labeling and imaging in mammalian cells. Our studies show that site-specific incorporation of axial diastereomer of trans-cyclooct-2-ene-lysine robustly affords highly efficient and specific bioorthogonal labeling with monosubstituted tetrazine fluorophores in live mammalian cells, which enabled us to image the intracellular localization and real-time dynamic trafficking of IFITM3, a small membrane-associated protein with only 137 amino acids, for the first time. Our optimized UAA incorporation and bioorthogonal labeling conditions also enabled efficient site-specific fluorescence labeling of other intracellular proteins for live cell imaging studies in mammalian cells.

  2. In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T-Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    be used to identify and characterize CD4+T cells specific for influenza A, West Nile, Yellow fever , Dengue and Japanese Encephalitis viruses. The...four difference species of Flavivirus using the TGEM approach. These will include: Yellow Fever Virus, West Nile Virus, Dengue Virus and Japanese...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0004 TITLE: In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T-Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  3. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated

  4. Hematopoietic stem cells transplant in patients with common variable immunodeficiency. Is a therapeutic option?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Cambray-Gutiérrez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with common variable immunodeficiency show higher incidence of sinopulmonary and gastrointestinal infections, as well as lymphoproliferative and autoimmune diseases. The treatment of choice is replacement therapy with human gamma-globulin. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a non-conventional therapeutic modality. Clinical case: Twenty-six-year old woman with no family or hereditary history of primary immune deficiencies or consanguinity, with repeated episodes of otitis, sinusitis, gastroenteritis and bronchitis since childhood. At adolescence, she was diagnosed with common variable immunodeficiency; she was prescribed intravenous gamma-globulin, broad-spectrum antimicrobials and macrolides. At 22 years of age, she underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation owing to continued severe infections. At 4 months, post-transplantation she was diagnosed with hypothyroidism and ovarian insufficiency. During the following 3 years, she had no infections, but at 25 years of age she had immune thrombocytopenic purpura diagnosed, which persists together with Raynaud’s disease and upper respiratory tract persistent infections. At the moment of this report she is being treated with intravenous gamma-globulin and receiving prophylaxis with clarithromycin, without steroids or danazol. Conclusions: Given the high rate of morbidity and mortality associated and immune reconstitution failure, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation should be carefully evaluated in patients with treatment-unresponsive infections or lymphoproliferative disorders.

  5. An algorithm for the design and tuning of RF accelerating structures with variable cell lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.

    2018-05-01

    An algorithm is proposed for the design of a π mode standing wave buncher structure with variable cell lengths. It employs a two-parameter, multi-step approach for the design of the structure with desired resonant frequency and field flatness. The algorithm, along with analytical scaling laws for the design of the RF power coupling slot, makes it possible to accurately design the structure employing a freely available electromagnetic code like SUPERFISH. To compensate for machining errors, a tuning method has been devised to achieve desired RF parameters for the structure, which has been qualified by the successful tuning of a 7-cell buncher to π mode frequency of 2856 MHz with field flatness algorithm and tuning method have demonstrated the feasibility of developing an S-band accelerating structure for desired RF parameters with a relatively relaxed machining tolerance of ∼ 25 μm. This paper discusses the algorithm for the design and tuning of an RF accelerating structure with variable cell lengths.

  6. Neutrophil trails guide influenza-specific CD8⁺ T cells in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kihong; Hyun, Young-Min; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Capece, Tara; Bae, Seyeon; Miller, Richard; Topham, David J; Kim, Minsoo

    2015-09-04

    During viral infections, chemokines guide activated effector T cells to infection sites. However, the cells responsible for producing these chemokines and how such chemokines recruit T cells are unknown. Here, we show that the early recruitment of neutrophils into influenza-infected trachea is essential for CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune protection in mice. We observed that migrating neutrophils leave behind long-lasting trails that are enriched in the chemokine CXCL12. Experiments with granulocyte-specific CXCL12 conditionally depleted mice and a CXCR4 antagonist revealed that CXCL12 derived from neutrophil trails is critical for virus-specific CD8(+) T cell recruitment and effector functions. Collectively, these results suggest that neutrophils deposit long-lasting, chemokine-containing trails, which may provide both chemotactic and haptotactic cues for efficient CD8(+) T cell migration and localization in influenza-infected tissues. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Neutrophil trails guide influenza-specific CD8+ T cells in the airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kihong; Hyun, Young-Min; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Capece, Tara; Bae, Seyeon; Miller, Richard; Topham, David J.; Kim, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    During viral infections, chemokines guide activated effector T cells to infection sites. However, the cells responsible for producing these chemokines and how such chemokines recruit T cells is unknown. Here, we show that the early recruitment of neutrophils into influenza-infected trachea is essential for CD8+ T cell-mediated immune protection in mice. We observed that migrating neutrophils leave behind long-lasting trails that are enriched in the chemokine CXCL12. Experiments with granulocyte-specific CXCL12 conditional knock-out mice and a CXCR4 antagonist revealed that CXCL12 derived from neutrophil trails is critical for virus-specific CD8+ T cell recruitment and effector functions. Collectively, these results suggest neutrophils deposit long-lasting, chemokine-containing trails, which may provide both chemotactic and haptotactic cues for efficient CD8+ T cell migration and localization in influenza-infected tissues. PMID:26339033

  8. Single-cell mRNA cytometry via sequence-specific nanoparticle clustering and trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Mahmoud; Mohamadi, Reza M.; Poudineh, Mahla; Ahmed, Sharif U.; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Huang, Ching-Lung; Moosavi, Maral; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2018-05-01

    Cell-to-cell variation in gene expression creates a need for techniques that can characterize expression at the level of individual cells. This is particularly true for rare circulating tumour cells, in which subtyping and drug resistance are of intense interest. Here we describe a method for cell analysis—single-cell mRNA cytometry—that enables the isolation of rare cells from whole blood as a function of target mRNA sequences. This approach uses two classes of magnetic particles that are labelled to selectively hybridize with different regions of the target mRNA. Hybridization leads to the formation of large magnetic clusters that remain localized within the cells of interest, thereby enabling the cells to be magnetically separated. Targeting specific intracellular mRNAs enablescirculating tumour cells to be distinguished from normal haematopoietic cells. No polymerase chain reaction amplification is required to determine RNA expression levels and genotype at the single-cell level, and minimal cell manipulation is required. To demonstrate this approach we use single-cell mRNA cytometry to detect clinically important sequences in prostate cancer specimens.

  9. Circulating rotavirus-specific T cells have a poor functional profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Miguel; Herrera, Daniel; Jácome, María Fernanda; Mesa, Martha C.; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Guzmán, Carolina; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Frequencies of circulating T cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, and percentages of T cells proliferating after stimulation with rotavirus (RV), tetanus toxoid, and influenza were evaluated in PBMC derived from healthy adults and children. In addition, the potential anergic state of RV-specific T cells was analyzed by stimulation of PBMC with RV antigen in the presence of three anergy inhibitors (rIL-2, rIL-12, or DGKα-i). The quality and magnitude of RV-T cell responses were significantly lower than those of tetanus toxoid and influenza antigens. RV-CD4 T cell response was enriched in monofunctional IFN-γ + cells, while influenza-CD4 and tetanus toxoid-CD4 T cell responses were enriched in multifunctional T cells. Moreover, rIL-2 – unlike rIL-12 or DGKα-i – increased the frequencies of RV-CD4 TNF-α + , CD4 IFN-γ + , and CD8 IFN-γ + cells. Thus, circulating RV-T cells seem to have a relatively poor functional profile that may be partially reversed in vitro by the addition of rIL-2. - Highlights: • The quality and magnitude of circulating RV-T cell responses are relatively poor. • Circulating RV-CD4 T cells are enriched in monofunctional IFN-γ+ cells. • Treatment with rIL-2 increased the frequencies of cytokine secreting RV-T cells

  10. Identification of proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6-infected human T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, N.; Amelse, R.E.; Zhou, W.W.; Chang, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-infected human T cells (HSB-2) were examined by using polyclonal rabbit antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against HHV-6-infected cells and human sera. More than 20 proteins and six glycoproteins specific for HHV-6-infected cells were identified from [ 35 S]methionine- and [ 3 H]glucosamine-labeled total-cell extracts. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies immunoprecipitated 33 [ 35 S]methionine-labeled HHV-6-specific polypeptides with approximate molecular weights ranging from 180,000 to 31,000. In immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblot reactions, a patient's serum also recognized more than 30 HHV-6-specific proteins and seven glycoproteins. In contrast, sera from individuals with high-titered antibodies against other human herpesviruses reacted with fewer HHV-6-infected cell proteins, and only a 135,000-M r polypeptide was prominent. Monoclonal antibodies to HHV-6-infected cells reacted with single and multiple polypeptides specific for virus-infected cells and immunoprecipitated three distinct sets of glycoproteins, which were designated gp105k and gp82k, gp116k, gp64k, and gp54k, and gp102k

  11. Identification of proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6-infected human T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, N.; Amelse, R.E.; Zhou, W.W.; Chang, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-infected human T cells (HSB-2) were examined by using polyclonal rabbit antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against HHV-6-infected cells and human sera. More than 20 proteins and six glycoproteins specific for HHV-6-infected cells were identified from [ 35 S]methionine- and [ 3 H]glucosamine-labeled total-cell extracts. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies immunoprecipitated 33 [ 35 S]methionine-labeled HHV-6-specific polypeptides with approximate molecular weights ranging from 180,000 to 31,000. In immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblot reactions, a patient's serum also recognized more than 30 HHV-6-specific proteins and seven glycoproteins. In contrast, sera from individuals with high-titered antibodies against other human herpes viruses reacted with few HHV-6-infected cell proteins, and only a 135,000-M/sub r/ polypeptide was prominent. Monoclonal antibodies to HHV-6-infected cells reacted with single and multiple polypeptides specific for virus-infected cells and immunoprecipitated three distinct sets of glycoproteins, which were designated gp105K and gp92k, gp116k, gp64k, and gp54k, and gp102k

  12. Endometrial natural killer (NK) cells reveal a tissue-specific receptor repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyaerts, D; Kuret, T; van Cranenbroek, B; van der Zeeuw-Hingrez, S; van der Heijden, O W H; van der Meer, A; Joosten, I; van der Molen, R G

    2018-02-13

    Is the natural killer (NK) cell receptor repertoire of endometrial NK (eNK) cells tissue-specific? The NK cell receptor (NKR) expression profile in pre-pregnancy endometrium appears to have a unique tissue-specific phenotype, different from that found in NK cells in peripheral blood, suggesting that these cells are finely tuned towards the reception of an allogeneic fetus. NK cells are important for successful pregnancy. After implantation, NK cells encounter extravillous trophoblast cells and regulate trophoblast invasion. NK cell activity is amongst others regulated by C-type lectin heterodimer (CD94/NKG2) and killer cell immunoglobulin-like (KIR) receptors. KIR expression on decidual NK cells is affected by the presence of maternal HLA-C and biased towards KIR2D expression. However, little is known about NKR expression on eNK cells prior to pregnancy. In this study, matched peripheral and menstrual blood (a source of endometrial cells) was obtained from 25 healthy females with regular menstrual cycles. Menstrual blood was collected during the first 36 h of menstruation using a menstrual cup, a non-invasive technique to obtain endometrial cells. KIR and NKG2 receptor expression on eNK cells was characterized by 10-color flow cytometry, and compared to matched pbNK cells of the same female. KIR and HLA-C genotypes were determined by PCR-SSOP techniques. Anti-CMV IgG antibodies in plasma were measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay. KIR expression patterns of eNK cells collected from the same female do not differ over consecutive menstrual cycles. The percentage of NK cells expressing KIR2DL2/L3/S2, KIR2DL3, KIR2DL1, LILRB1 and/or NKG2A was significantly higher in eNK cells compared to pbNK cells, while no significant difference was observed for NKG2C, KIR2DL1/S1, and KIR3DL1. The NKR repertoire of eNK cells was clearly different from pbNK cells, with eNK cells co-expressing more than three NKR simultaneously. In addition, outlier analysis revealed 8 and 15 NKR

  13. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepatitis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology modelling and docked it with the ...

  14. Cell type-specific characterization of nuclear DNA contents within complex tissues and organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambert Georgina M

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic organisms are defined by the presence of a nucleus, which encloses the chromosomal DNA, and is characterized by its DNA content (C-value. Complex eukaryotic organisms contain organs and tissues that comprise interspersions of different cell types, within which polysomaty, endoreduplication, and cell cycle arrest is frequently observed. Little is known about the distribution of C-values across different cell types within these organs and tissues. Results We have developed, and describe here, a method to precisely define the C-value status within any specific cell type within complex organs and tissues of plants. We illustrate the application of this method to Arabidopsis thaliana, specifically focusing on the different cell types found within the root. Conclusion The method accurately and conveniently charts C-value within specific cell types, and provides novel insight into developmental processes. The method is, in principle, applicable to any transformable organism, including mammals, within which cell type specificity of regulation of endoreduplication, of polysomaty, and of cell cycle arrest is suspected.

  15. Simple and high yielding method for preparing tissue specific extracellular matrix coatings for cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeQuach, Jessica A; Mezzano, Valeria; Miglani, Amar; Lange, Stephan; Keller, Gordon M; Sheikh, Farah; Christman, Karen L

    2010-09-27

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of a highly complex, tissue-specific network of proteins and polysaccharides, which help regulate many cellular functions. Despite the complex nature of the ECM, in vitro cell-based studies traditionally assess cell behavior on single ECM component substrates, which do not adequately mimic the in vivo extracellular milieu. We present a simple approach for developing naturally derived ECM coatings for cell culture that provide important tissue-specific cues unlike traditional cell culture coatings, thereby enabling the maturation of committed C2C12 skeletal myoblast progenitors and human embryonic stem cells differentiated into cardiomyocytes. Here we show that natural muscle-specific coatings can (i) be derived from decellularized, solubilized adult porcine muscle, (ii) contain a complex mixture of ECM components including polysaccharides, (iii) adsorb onto tissue culture plastic and (iv) promote cell maturation of committed muscle progenitor and stem cells. This versatile method can create tissue-specific ECM coatings, which offer a promising platform for cell culture to more closely mimic the mature in vivo ECM microenvironment.

  16. Genetic associations for pathogen-specific clinical mastitis and patterns of peaks in somatic cell count

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de Y.; Barkema, H.W.; Schukken, Y.H.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2003-01-01

    Genetic associations were estimated between pathogen-specific cases of clinical mastitis (CM), lactational average somatic cell score (LACSCS), and patterns of peaks in somatic cell count (SCC) which were based on deviations from the typical lactation curve for SCC. The dataset contained test-day

  17. Mycobacterium leprae-specific protein antigens defined by cloned human helper T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottenhoff, T. H.; Klatser, P. R.; Ivanyi, J.; Elferink, D. G.; de Wit, M. Y.; de Vries, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    Leprosy displays a remarkable spectrum of symptoms correlating with the T-cell-mediated immune reactivity of the host against the causative organism, Mycobacterium leprae. At one pole of this spectrum are lepromatous leprosy patients showing a M. leprae-specific T-cell unresponsiveness; at the other

  18. The new numerology of immunity mediated by virus-specific CD8(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, P C

    1998-08-01

    Our understanding of virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses is currently being revolutionized by peptide-based assay systems that allow flow cytometric analysis of effector and memory cytotoxic T lymphocyte populations. These techniques are, for the first time, putting the analysis of T-cell-mediated immunity on a quantitative basis.

  19. DC-ATLAS: a systems biology resource to dissect receptor specific signal transduction in dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalieri, D.; Rivero, D.; Beltrame, L.; Buschow, S.I.; Calura, E.; Rizzetto, L.; Gessani, S.; Gauzzi, M.C.; Reith, W.; Baur, A.; Bonaiuti, R.; Brandizi, M.; Filippo, C. De; D'Oro, U.; Draghici, S.; Dunand-Sauthier, I.; Gatti, E.; Granucci, F.; Gundel, M.; Kramer, M.; Kuka, M.; Lanyi, A.; Melief, C.J.; Montfoort, N. van; Ostuni, R.; Pierre, P.; Popovici, R.; Rajnavolgyi, E.; Schierer, S.; Schuler, G.; Soumelis, V.; Splendiani, A.; Stefanini, I.; Torcia, M.G.; Zanoni, I.; Zollinger, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Austyn, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The advent of Systems Biology has been accompanied by the blooming of pathway databases. Currently pathways are defined generically with respect to the organ or cell type where a reaction takes place. The cell type specificity of the reactions is the foundation of immunological research,

  20. Structure and organ specificity of an anionic peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Abelskov, A K; Mattsson, O

    1996-01-01

    The predominant peroxidase (pI 3.5) (E.C. 1.11.1.7) of an Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was purified and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotides were designed and a specific probe was obtained. A cDNA clone was isolated from an Arabidopsis cell suspension cDNA library and completely ...

  1. Acquired transcriptional programming in functional and exhausted virus-specific CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Ben; Wherry, E John; Ahmed, Rafi

    2012-01-01

    Failure to control viral infections such as HIV results in T-cell receptor (TCR) and inhibitory receptor driven exhaustion of antigen-specific T cells. Persistent signaling by these receptors during chronic viral infection sculpts the transcriptional regulatory programs of virus-specific T cells. The resulting gene expression profile is tailored to temper the potentially damaging effector functions of cytotoxic T cells and adapt them to an antigen-rich and inflammation-rich environment. Here we review recent studies investigating mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of effector, functional memory, and exhausted T-cell functions during acute versus chronic infections. Patterns of gene expression in virus-specific CD8 T cells are a result of a combination of pro and inhibitory signals from antigen presentation (TCR-mediated) and co-inhibitory receptor ligation (PD-1, 2B4). Further, memory-specific transcriptional regulation of 2B4 expression and signaling impose a self-limiting secondary effector response to a prolonged viral infection. Additionally, differentiation of functional memory CD8 T cells is coupled with acquisition of a repressive epigenetic program for PD-1 expression. However, chronic infection provides a signal that blocks the acquisition of these epigenetic modifications reinforcing the suppression of cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) functions in exhausted cells. Current findings suggest that the mechanism(s) that delineate functional memory versus exhaustion are coupled with acquisition of transcriptional programs at the effector stage of differentiation, reinforced by cessation or persistence of TCR signaling.

  2. TCR down-regulation controls virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Haks, Mariëlle; Nielsen, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    in mice with a mutated CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif. The CD3gamma mutation did not impair early TCR signaling, nor did it compromise recruitment or proliferation of virus-specific T cells, but it increased the apoptosis rate of the activated T cells by increasing down-regulation of the antiapoptotic...

  3. Concanavalin A-induced activation of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus memory lymphocytes into specifically cytotoxic T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Andersen, G T

    1977-01-01

    When spleen cells, which have been primed to Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis (LCM) virus during a primary infection several months previously, are stimulated in vitro with Con A. highly specific secondary cytotoxic effector cells are generated. The degree of cytotoxicity revealed by such Con A...

  4. Refractive Index Imaging of Cells with Variable-Angle Near-Total Internal Reflection (TIR) Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Kevin P; Holz, Ronald W; Axelrod, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    The refractive index in the interior of single cells affects the evanescent field depth in quantitative studies using total internal reflection (TIR) fluorescence, but often that index is not well known. We here present method to measure and spatially map the absolute index of refraction in a microscopic sample, by imaging a collimated light beam reflected from the substrate/buffer/cell interference at variable angles of incidence. Above the TIR critical angle (which is a strong function of refractive index), the reflection is 100%, but in the immediate sub-critical angle zone, the reflection intensity is a very strong ascending function of incidence angle. By analyzing the angular position of that edge at each location in the field of view, the local refractive index can be estimated. In addition, by analyzing the steepness of the edge, the distance-to-substrate can be determined. We apply the technique to liquid calibration samples, silica beads, cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, and primary culture chromaffin cells. The optical technique suffers from decremented lateral resolution, scattering, and interference artifacts. However, it still provides reasonable results for both refractive index (~1.38) and for distance-to-substrate (~150 nm) for the cells, as well as a lateral resolution to about 1 µm.

  5. Single-cell 5hmC sequencing reveals chromosome-wide cell-to-cell variability and enables lineage reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman, Dylan; Dey, Siddharth S; Boisset, Jean-Charles; Crosetto, Nicola; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic DNA modification 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has crucial roles in development and gene regulation. Quantifying the abundance of this epigenetic mark at the single-cell level could enable us to understand its roles. We present a single-cell, genome-wide and strand-specific 5hmC

  6. Controlled cell morphology and liver-specific function of engineered primary hepatocytes by fibroblast layer cell densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yusuke; Koike, Makiko; Kawahara, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Hideko; Murai, Tomomi; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Fujita, Fumihiko; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2018-03-05

    Engineered primary hepatocytes, including co-cultured hepatocyte sheets, are an attractive to basic scientific and clinical researchers because they maintain liver-specific functions, have reconstructed cell polarity, and have high transplantation efficiency. However, co-culture conditions regarding engineered primary hepatocytes were suboptimal in promoting these advantages. Here we report that the hepatocyte morphology and liver-specific function levels are controlled by the normal human diploid fibroblast (TIG-118 cell) layer cell density. Primary rat hepatocytes were plated onto TIG-118 cells, previously plated 3 days before at 1.04, 5.21, and 26.1×10 3  cells/cm 2 . Hepatocytes plated onto lower TIG-118 cell densities expanded better during the early culture period. The hepatocytes gathered as colonies and only exhibited small adhesion areas because of the pushing force from proliferating TIG-118 cells. The smaller areas of each hepatocyte result in the development of bile canaliculi. The highest density of TIG-118 cells downregulated albumin synthesis activity of hepatocytes. The hepatocytes may have undergone apoptosis associated with high TGF-β1 concentration and necrosis due to a lack of oxygen. These occurrences were supported by apoptotic chromatin condensation and high expression of both proteins HIF-1a and HIF-1b. Three types of engineered hepatocyte/fibroblast sheets comprising different TIG-118 cell densities were harvested after 4 days of hepatocyte culture and showed a complete cell sheet format without any holes. Hepatocyte morphology and liver-specific function levels are controlled by TIG-118 cell density, which helps to design better engineered hepatocytes for future applications such as in vitro cell-based assays and transplantable hepatocyte tissues. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Alveolar epithelial type II cells induce T cell tolerance to specific antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Bernice; Hansen, Søren; Evans, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    The lungs face the immunologic challenge of rapidly eliminating inhaled pathogens while maintaining tolerance to innocuous Ags. A break in this immune homeostasis may result in pulmonary inflammatory diseases, such as allergies or asthma. The observation that alveolar epithelial type II cells (Type...... II) constitutively express the class II MHC led us to hypothesize that Type II cells play a role in the adaptive immune response. Because Type II cells do not express detectable levels of the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, we propose that Type II cells suppress activation of naive T cells...

  8. Tissue-specific stem cells: Lessons from the skeletal muscle satellite cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Andrew S.; Rando, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    In 1961, the satellite cell was first identified when electron microscopic examination of skeletal muscle demonstrated a cell wedged between the plasma membrane of the muscle fiber and the basement membrane. In recent years it has been conclusively demonstrated that the satellite cell is the primary cellular source for muscle regeneration and is equipped with the potential to self renew, thus functioning as a bone fide skeletal muscle stem cell (MuSC). As we move past the 50th anniversary of the satellite cell, we take this opportunity to discuss the current state of the art and dissect the unknowns in the MuSC field. PMID:22560074

  9. Granzyme B mediated function of Parvovirus B19-specific CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Perdomo, Maria F; Kantele, Anu; Hedman, Lea; Hedman, Klaus; Franssila, Rauli

    2015-01-01

    A novel conception of CD4+ T cells with cytolytic potential (CD4+ CTL) is emerging. These cells appear to have a part in controlling malignancies and chronic infections. Human parvovirus B19 can cause a persistent infection, yet no data exist on the presence of B19-specific CD4+ CTLs. Such cells could have a role in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune disorders reported to be associated with B19. We explored the cytolytic potential of human parvovirus B19-specific T cells by stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) with recombinant B19-VP2 virus-like particles. The cytolytic potential was determined by enzyme immunoassay-based quantitation of granzyme B (GrB) and perforin from the tissue culture supernatants, by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) and by detecting direct cytotoxicity. GrB and perforin responses with the B19 antigen were readily detectable in B19-seropositive individuals. T-cell depletion, HLA blocking and ICS experiments showed GrB and perforin to be secreted by CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T cells with strong GrB responses were found to exhibit direct cytotoxicity. As anticipated, ICS of B19-specific CD4+ T cells showed expected co-expression of GrB, perforin and interferon gamma (IFN-γ). Unexpectedly, also a strong co-expression of GrB and interleukin 17 (IL-17) was detected. These cells expressed natural killer (NK) cell surface marker CD56, together with the CD4 surface marker. To our knowledge, this is the first report on virus-specific CD4+ CTLs co-expressing CD56 antigen. Our results suggest a role for CD4+ CTL in B19 immunity. Such cells could function within both immune regulation and triggering of autoimmune phenomena such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26246896

  10. CD6 and Linker of Activated T Cells are Potential Interaction Partners for T Cell-Specific Adaptor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, C D; Ekornhol, M; Granum, S; Sundvold-Gjerstad, V; Spurkland, A

    2017-02-01

    The T cell-specific adaptor protein (TSAd) contains several protein interaction domains, and is merging as a modulator of T cell activation. Several interaction partners for the TSAd proline-rich region and phosphotyrosines have been identified, including the Src and Tec family kinases lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase and interleukin 2-inducible T cell kinase. Via its Src homology 2 (SH2) domain, TSAd may thus function as a link between these enzymes and other signalling molecules. However, few binding partners to the TSAd SH2 domain in T cells are hitherto known. Through the use of in silico ligand prediction, peptide spot arrays, pull-down and immunoprecipitation experiments, we here report novel interactions between the TSAd SH2 domain and CD6 phosphotyrosine (pTyr) 629 and linker of activated T cells (LAT) pTyr 171 , pTyr 191 and pTyr 226 . © 2016 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  11. Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells develop cytotoxic activity and eliminate virus-induced tumor cells in the absence of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetzyanova, Ilseyar; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy; Schimmer, Simone; Brandau, Sven; Altenhoff, Petra; Sparwasser, Tim; Dittmer, Ulf

    2013-02-01

    The important role of tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells is well defined in the immune control of the tumors, but the role of effector CD4(+) T cells is poorly understood. In the current research, we have used a murine retrovirus-induced tumor cell line of C57BL/6 mouse origin, namely FBL-3 cells, as a model to study basic mechanisms of immunological control and escape during tumor formation. This study shows that tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells are able to protect against virus-induced tumor cells. We show here that there is an expansion of tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells producing cytokines and cytotoxic molecule granzyme B (GzmB) in the early phase of tumor growth. Importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo depletion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD8(+) T cells in FBL-3-bearing DEREG transgenic mice augments IL-2 and GzmB production by CD4(+) T cells and increases FV-specific CD4(+) T-cell effector and cytotoxic responses leading to the complete tumor regression. Therefore, the capacity to reject tumor acquired by tumor-reactive CD4(+) T cells largely depends on the direct suppressive activity of Tregs. We suggest that a cytotoxic CD4(+) T-cell immune response may be induced to enhance resistance against oncovirus-associated tumors.

  12. Mutation Pattern of Paired Immunoglobulin Heavy and Light Variable Domains in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiotto, Fabio; Marcatili, Paolo; Tenca, Claudya; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Albesiano, Emilia; Bagnara, Davide; Colombo, Monica; Cutrona, Giovanna; Chu, Charles C; Morabito, Fortunato; Bruno, Silvia; Ferrarini, Manlio; Tramontano, Anna; Fais, Franco; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients display leukemic clones bearing either germline or somatically mutated immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV ) genes. Most information on CLL immunoglobulins (Igs), such as the definition of stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCRs), was derived from germline unmutated Igs. In particular, detailed studies on the distribution and nature of mutations in paired heavy- and light-chain domains of CLL clones bearing mutated Igs are lacking. To address the somatic hyper-mutation dynamics of CLL Igs, we analyzed the mutation pattern of paired IGHV–diversity-joining (IGHV-D-J ) and immunoglobulin kappa/lambda variable-joining (IGK/LV-J ) rearrangements of 193 leukemic clones that displayed ≥2% mutations in at least one of the two immunoglobulin variable (IGV ) genes (IGHV and/or IGK/LV ). The relationship between the mutation frequency in IGHV and IGK/LV complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and framework regions (FRs) was evaluated by correlation analysis. Replacement (R) mutation frequency within IGK/LV chain CDRs correlated significantly with mutation frequency of paired IGHV CDRs in λ but not κ isotype CLL clones. CDRs of IGKV-J rearrangements displayed a lower percentage of R mutations than IGHVs. The frequency/pattern of mutations in kappa CLL Igs differed also from that in κ-expressing normal B cells described in the literature. Instead, the mutation frequency within the FRs of IGHV and either IGKV or IGLV was correlated. Notably, the amount of diversity introduced by replaced amino acids was comparable between IGHVs and IGKVs. The data indicate a different mutation pattern between κ and λ isotype CLL clones and suggest an antigenic selection that, in κ samples, operates against CDR variation. PMID:21785810

  13. Mutation Pattern of Paired Immunoglobulin Heavy and Light Variable Domains in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ghiotto, Fabio; Marcatili, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients display leukemic clones bearing either germline or somatically mutated immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV ) genes. Most information on CLL immunoglobulins (Igs), such as the definition of stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCRs), was derived from germline unmutated Igs. In particular, detailed studies on the distribution and nature of mutations in paired heavy- and light-chain domains of CLL clones bearing mutated Igs are lacking. To address the somatic hyper-mutation dynamics of CLL Igs, we analyzed the mutation pattern of paired IGHV-diversity-joining (IGHV-D-J ) and immunoglobulin kappa/lambda variable-joining (IGK/LV-J ) rearrangements of 193 leukemic clones that displayed ≥ 2% mutations in at least one of the two immunoglobulin variable (IGV ) genes (IGHV and/or IGK/LV ). The relationship between the mutation frequency in IGHV and IGK/LV complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and framework regions (FRs) was evaluated by correlation analysis. Replacement (R) mutation frequency within IGK/LV chain CDRs correlated significantly with mutation frequency of paired IGHV CDRs in λ but not κ isotype CLL clones. CDRs of IGKV-J rearrangements displayed a lower percentage of R mutations than IGHVs. The frequency/pattern of mutations in kappa CLL Igs differed also from that in κ-expressing normal B cells described in the literature. Instead, the mutation frequency within the FRs of IGHV and either IGKV or IGLV was correlated. Notably, the amount of diversity introduced by replaced amino acids was comparable between IGHVs and IGKVs. The data indicate a different mutation pattern between κ and λ isotype CLL clones and suggest an antigenic selection that, in κ samples, operates against CDR variation.

  14. cell- and tissue-specific transcriptome analyses of Medicago truncatula root nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Limpens

    Full Text Available Legumes have the unique ability to host nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria as symbiosomes inside root nodule cells. To get insight into this key process, which forms the heart of the endosymbiosis, we isolated specific cells/tissues at different stages of symbiosome formation from nodules of the model legume Medicago truncatula using laser-capture microdissection. Next, we determined their associated expression profiles using Affymetrix Medicago GeneChips. Cells were collected from the nodule infection zone divided into a distal (where symbiosome formation and division occur and proximal region (where symbiosomes are mainly differentiating, as well as infected cells from the fixation zone containing mature nitrogen fixing symbiosomes. As non-infected cells/tissue we included nodule meristem cells and uninfected cells from the fixation zone. Here, we present a comprehensive gene expression map of an indeterminate Medicago nodule and selected genes that show specific enriched expression in the different cells or tissues. Validation of the obtained expression profiles, by comparison to published gene expression profiles and experimental verification, indicates that the data can be used as digital "in situ". This digital "in situ" offers a genome-wide insight into genes specifically associated with subsequent stages of symbiosome and nodule cell development, and can serve to guide future functional studies.

  15. Modeling retinal degeneration using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Bing Jin

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is the most common inherited human eye disease resulting in night blindness and visual defects. It is well known that the disease is caused by rod photoreceptor degeneration; however, it remains incurable, due to the unavailability of disease-specific human photoreceptor cells for use in mechanistic studies and drug screening. We obtained fibroblast cells from five RP patients with distinct mutations in the RP1, RP9, PRPH2 or RHO gene, and generated patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells by ectopic expression of four key reprogramming factors. We differentiated the iPS cells into rod photoreceptor cells, which had been lost in the patients, and found that they exhibited suitable immunocytochemical features and electrophysiological properties. Interestingly, the number of the patient-derived rod cells with distinct mutations decreased in vitro; cells derived from patients with a specific mutation expressed markers for oxidation or endoplasmic reticulum stress, and exhibited different responses to vitamin E than had been observed in clinical trials. Overall, patient-derived rod cells recapitulated the disease phenotype and expressed markers of cellular stresses. Our results demonstrate that the use of patient-derived iPS cells will help to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms caused by genetic mutations in RP.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of normal human mammary cell type-specific miRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrba, Lukas [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center; Inst. of Plant Molecular Biology, Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic). Biology Centre ASCR; Garbe, James C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Center; Stampfer, Martha R. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Center; Futscher, Bernard W. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center and Dept. of Pharmacology & Toxicology

    2011-08-26

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important regulators of cell type–specific genes, including miRNAs. In order to identify cell type-specific miRNAs regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, we undertook a global analysis of miRNA expression and epigenetic states in three isogenic pairs of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human mammary fibroblasts (HMF), which represent two differentiated cell types typically present within a given organ, each with a distinct phenotype and a distinct epigenotype. While miRNA expression and epigenetic states showed strong interindividual concordance within a given cell type, almost 10% of the expressed miRNA showed a cell type–specific pattern of expression that was linked to the epigenetic state of their promoter. The tissue-specific miRNA genes were epigenetically repressed in nonexpressing cells by DNA methylation (38%) and H3K27me3 (58%), with only a small set of miRNAs (21%) showing a dual epigenetic repression where both DNA methylation and H3K27me3 were present at their promoters, such as MIR10A and MIR10B. Individual miRNA clusters of closely related miRNA gene families can each display cell type–specific repression by the same or complementary epigenetic mechanisms, such as the MIR200 family, and MIR205, where fibroblasts repress MIR200C/141 by DNA methylation, MIR200A/200B/429 by H3K27me3, and MIR205 by both DNA methylation and H3K27me3. Since deregulation of many of the epigenetically regulated miRNAs that we identified have been linked to disease processes such as cancer, it is predicted that compromise of the epigenetic control mechanisms is important for this process. Overall, these results highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in the control of normal cell type–specific miRNA expression.

  17. Aborted germinal center reactions and B cell memory by follicular T cells specific for a B cell receptor V region peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Ryan A; Snyder, Christopher M; St Clair, James; Wysocki, Lawrence J

    2011-07-01

    A fundamental problem in immunoregulation is how CD4(+) T cells react to immunogenic peptides derived from the V region of the BCR that are created by somatic mechanisms, presented in MHC II, and amplified to abundance by B cell clonal expansion during immunity. BCR neo Ags open a potentially dangerous avenue of T cell help in violation of the principle of linked Ag recognition. To analyze this issue, we developed a murine adoptive transfer model using paired donor B cells and CD4 T cells specific for a BCR-derived peptide. BCR peptide-specific T cells aborted ongoing germinal center reactions and impeded the secondary immune response. Instead, they induced the B cells to differentiate into short-lived extrafollicular plasmablasts that secreted modest quantities of Ig. These results uncover an immunoregulatory process that restricts the memory pathway to B cells that communicate with CD4 T cells via exogenous foreign Ag.

  18. Production of prostate-specific antigen by a breast cancer cell line, Sk-Br-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamali Sarvestani, E.; Ghaderi, A.

    2002-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen is a 33-KDa serine protease that is produced predominantly by prostate epithelium. However, it has been shown that about 30-40% of female breast tumors produce prostate-specific antigen and its production is associated with the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors. We have now developed a new tissue culture system to study prostate-specific antigen production in breast cancer and its association with prognostic factors such as progesterone receptor and c-erbB-2. For this purpose we investigated the ability of prostate-specific antigen production in five different cell lines, including two breast cancer cell lines, Sk-Br-3 and MDA-MB-453. The prostate-specific antigen in tissue culture supernatant and cytoplasm of the Sk-Br-3 cell line was detected by western blotting and immunoperoxidase, respectively. Furthermore, we found lower expression of c-erbB-2 in Sk-Br-3 than non-prostate-specific antigen producer breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-453. Progesterone receptor was expressed by both prostate-specific antigen-positive and -negative cell lines and only the intensity of staining and the number of positive cells in Sk-Br-3 population was higher than MDA-MB-453. According to our findings prostate-specific antigen can be considered as a good prognostic factor in breast cancer and we suggest that these two cell lines are a good in vitro model to study the relationship of different breast cancer prognostic factors and their regulations

  19. Increased sequence diversity coverage improves detection of HIV-Specific T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frahm, N.; Kaufmann, D.E.; Yusim, K.

    2007-01-01

    The accurate identification of HIV-specific T cell responses is important for determining the relationship between immune response, viral control, and disease progression. HIV-specific immune responses are usually measured using peptide sets based on consensus sequences, which frequently miss res...

  20. Associations between pathogen-specific clinical mastitis and somatic cell count patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de Y.; Veerkamp, R.F.; Barkema, H.W.; Gröhn, Y.T.; Schukken, Y.H.

    2004-01-01

    Associations were estimated between pathogen-specific cases of clinical mastitis (CM) and somatic cell count (SCC) patterns based on deviations from the typical curve for SCC during lactation and compared with associations between pathogen-specific CM and lactation average SCC. Data from 274 Dutch

  1. Epithelial cell specific properties and genetic complementation in a delta F508 cystic fibrosis nasal polyp cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzelmann, K; Lei, D C; Eng, K; Escobar, L C; Koslowsky, T; Gruenert, D C

    1995-09-01

    Analysis of vectorial ion transport and protein trafficking in transformed cystic fibrosis (CF) epithelial cells has been limited because the cells tend to lose their tight junctions with multiple subcultures. To elucidate ion transport and protein trafficking in CF epithelial cells, a polar cell line with apical and basolateral compartments will facilitate analysis of the efficacy of different gene therapy strategies in a "tight epithelium" in vitro. This study investigates the genotypic and phenotypic properties of a CF nasal polyp epithelial, delta F508 homozygote, cell line that has tight junctions pre-crisis. The cells (sigma CFNPE14o-) were transformed with an origin-of-replication defective SV40 plasmid. They develop transepithelial resistance in Ussing chambers and are defective in cAMP-dependent Cl- transport as measured by efflux of radioactive Cl-, short circuit current (Isc), or whole-cell patch clamp. Stimulation of the cells by bradykinin, histamine, or ATP seems to activate both K(+)- and Ca(+2)-dependent Cl- transport. Measurement of 36Cl- efflux following stimulation with A23187 and ionomycin indicate a Ca(+2)-dependent Cl- transport. Volume regulatory capacity of the cells is indicated by cell swelling conductance. Expression of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator mRNA was indicated by RT-PCR amplification. When cells are grown at 26 degrees C for 48 h there is no indication of cAMP-dependent Cl- as has been previously indicated in heterologous expression systems. Antibodies specific for secretory cell antigens indicate the presence of antigens found in goblet, serous, and mucous cells; in goblet and serous cells; or in goblet and mucous cells; but not antigens found exclusively in mucous or serous cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Autologous CLL cell vaccination early after transplant induces leukemia-specific T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Ute E; Hainz, Ursula; Stevenson, Kristen; Goldstein, Natalie R; Pasek, Mildred; Naito, Masayasu; Wu, Di; Ho, Vincent T; Alonso, Anselmo; Hammond, Naa Norkor; Wong, Jessica; Sievers, Quinlan L; Brusic, Ana; McDonough, Sean M; Zeng, Wanyong; Perrin, Ann; Brown, Jennifer R; Canning, Christine M; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey; Armand, Philippe; Neuberg, Donna; Lee, Jeng-Shin; Antin, Joseph H; Mulligan, Richard C; Sasada, Tetsuro; Ritz, Jerome; Soiffer, Robert J; Dranoff, Glenn; Alyea, Edwin P; Wu, Catherine J

    2013-09-01

    Patients with advanced hematologic malignancies remain at risk for relapse following reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We conducted a prospective clinical trial to test whether vaccination with whole leukemia cells early after transplantation facilitates the expansion of leukemia-reactive T cells and thereby enhances antitumor immunity. We enrolled 22 patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 18 of whom received up to 6 vaccines initiated between days 30 and 45 after transplantation. Each vaccine consisted of irradiated autologous tumor cells admixed with GM-CSF-secreting bystander cells. Serial patient PBMC samples following transplantation were collected, and the impact of vaccination on T cell activity was evaluated. At a median follow-up of 2.9 (range, 1-4) years, the estimated 2-year progression-free and overall survival rates of vaccinated subjects were 82% (95% CI, 54%-94%) and 88% (95% CI, 59%-97%), respectively. Although vaccination only had a modest impact on recovering T cell numbers, CD8+ T cells from vaccinated patients consistently reacted against autologous tumor, but not alloantigen-bearing recipient cells with increased secretion of the effector cytokine IFN-γ, unlike T cells from nonvaccinated CLL patients undergoing allo-HSCT. Further analysis confirmed that 17% (range, 13%-33%) of CD8+ T cell clones isolated from 4 vaccinated patients by limiting dilution of bulk tumor-reactive T cells solely reacted against CLL-associated antigens. Our studies suggest that autologous tumor cell vaccination is an effective strategy to advance long-term leukemia control following allo-HSCT. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00442130. NCI (5R21CA115043-2), NHLBI (5R01HL103532-03), and Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Translational Research Program.

  3. At the crossroads of fate - somatic cell lineage specification in the fetal gonad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotgers, Emmi; Jørgensen, Anne; Yao, Humphrey Hung-Chang

    2018-01-01

    The reproductive endocrine systems are vastly different between male and female. This sexual dimorphism of endocrine milieu originates from sex-specific differentiation of the somatic cells in the gonads during fetal life. The majority of gonadal somatic cells arise from the adrenogonadal...... of the reproductive tracts. Impairment of lineage specification and function of gonadal somatic cells can lead to disorders of sexual development (DSDs) in humans. Human DSDs and processes for gonadal development have been successfully modelled using genetically modified mouse models. In this review, we focus...

  4. HBV-specific CD4+ cytotoxic T cells in hepatocellular carcinoma are less cytolytic toward tumor cells and suppress CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanzhi; Zhen, Shoumei; Song, Bin

    2017-08-01

    In East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, chronic infection is the main cause of the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, an aggressive cancer with low survival rate. Cytotoxic T cell-based immunotherapy is a promising treatment strategy. Here, we investigated the possibility of using HBV-specific CD4 + cytotoxic T cells to eliminate tumor cells. The naturally occurring HBV-specific cytotoxic CD4 + and CD8 + T cells were identified by HBV peptide pool stimulation. We found that in HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the HBV-specific cytotoxic CD4 + T cells and cytotoxic CD8 + T cells were present at similar numbers. But compared to the CD8 + cytotoxic T cells, the CD4 + cytotoxic T cells secreted less cytolytic factors granzyme A (GzmA) and granzyme B (GzmB), and were less effective at eliminating tumor cells. In addition, despite being able to secrete cytolytic factors, CD4 + T cells suppressed the cytotoxicity mediated by CD8 + T cells, even when CD4 + CD25 + regulator T cells were absent. Interestingly, we found that interleukin 10 (IL-10)-secreting Tr1 cells were enriched in the cytotoxic CD4 + T cells. Neutralization of IL-10 abrogated the suppression of CD8 + T cells by CD4 + CD25 - T cells. Neither the frequency nor the absolute number of HBV-specific CD4 + cytotoxic T cells were correlated with the clinical outcome of advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Together, this study demonstrated that in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma, CD4 + T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was present naturally in the host and had the potential to exert antitumor immunity, but its capacity was limited and was associated with immunoregulatory properties. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Cell-specific cre recombinase expression allows selective ablation of glutamate receptors from mouse horizontal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Ströh

    Full Text Available In the mouse retina, horizontal cells form an electrically coupled network and provide feedback signals to photoreceptors and feedforward signals to bipolar cells. Thereby, horizontal cells contribute to gain control at the first visual synapse and to the antagonistic organization of bipolar and ganglion cell receptive fields. However, the nature of horizontal cell output remains a matter of debate, just as the exact contribution of horizontal cells to center-surround antagonism. To facilitate studying horizontal cell function, we developed a knockin mouse line which allows ablating genes exclusively in horizontal cells. This knockin line expresses a Cre recombinase under the promoter of connexin57 (Cx57, a gap junction protein only expressed in horizontal cells. Consistently, in Cx57+/Cre mice, Cre recombinase is expressed in almost all horizontal cells (>99% and no other retinal neurons. To test Cre activity, we crossbred Cx57+/Cre mice with a mouse line in which exon 11 of the coding sequence for the ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluA4 was flanked by two loxP sites (GluA4fl/fl. In GluA4fl/fl:Cx57+/Cre mice, GluA4 immunoreactivity was significantly reduced (∼ 50% in the outer retina where horizontal cells receive photoreceptor inputs, confirming the functionality of the Cre/loxP system. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from isolated horizontal cell somata showed a reduction of glutamate-induced inward currents by ∼ 75%, suggesting that the GluA4 subunit plays a major role in mediating photoreceptor inputs. The persistent current in GluA4-deficient cells is mostly driven by AMPA and to a very small extent by kainate receptors as revealed by application of the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI52466 and concanavalin A, a potentiator of kainate receptor-mediated currents. In summary, the Cx57+/Cre mouse line provides a versatile tool for studying horizontal cell function. GluA4fl/fl:Cx57+/Cre mice, in which horizontal cells receive less

  6. Cell-Specific Cre Recombinase Expression Allows Selective Ablation of Glutamate Receptors from Mouse Horizontal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Schultz, Konrad; Cimiotti, Kerstin; Weiler, Reto; Willecke, Klaus; Dedek, Karin

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse retina, horizontal cells form an electrically coupled network and provide feedback signals to photoreceptors and feedforward signals to bipolar cells. Thereby, horizontal cells contribute to gain control at the first visual synapse and to the antagonistic organization of bipolar and ganglion cell receptive fields. However, the nature of horizontal cell output remains a matter of debate, just as the exact contribution of horizontal cells to center-surround antagonism. To facilitate studying horizontal cell function, we developed a knockin mouse line which allows ablating genes exclusively in horizontal cells. This knockin line expresses a Cre recombinase under the promoter of connexin57 (Cx57), a gap junction protein only expressed in horizontal cells. Consistently, in Cx57+/Cre mice, Cre recombinase is expressed in almost all horizontal cells (>99%) and no other retinal neurons. To test Cre activity, we crossbred Cx57+/Cre mice with a mouse line in which exon 11 of the coding sequence for the ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluA4 was flanked by two loxP sites (GluA4fl/fl). In GluA4fl/fl:Cx57+/Cre mice, GluA4 immunoreactivity was significantly reduced (∼50%) in the outer retina where horizontal cells receive photoreceptor inputs, confirming the functionality of the Cre/loxP system. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from isolated horizontal cell somata showed a reduction of glutamate-induced inward currents by ∼75%, suggesting that the GluA4 subunit plays a major role in mediating photoreceptor inputs. The persistent current in GluA4-deficient cells is mostly driven by AMPA and to a very small extent by kainate receptors as revealed by application of the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI52466 and concanavalin A, a potentiator of kainate receptor-mediated currents. In summary, the Cx57+/Cre mouse line provides a versatile tool for studying horizontal cell function. GluA4fl/fl:Cx57+/Cre mice, in which horizontal cells receive less excitatory input

  7. Antigen-specific T8+ human clone of cells with a nonspecific augmenting function on the T4 cell-B cell helper interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brines, R.D.; Sia, D.Y.; Lehner, T.

    1987-01-01

    The authors isolated a T8 + T3 + Ia + clone of cells from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy subject. The clone was expanded and maintained with autologous feed cells, interleukin 2, and a streptococcal antigen. The T8 + clone of cells responded specifically to the streptococcal antigen, in the absence of accessory cells,and released a soluble factor. Both the cloned cells and the corresponding soluble factor expressed augmenting helper but not suppressor activity. The augmenting helper activity for B cell antibody synthesis was demonstrable only in the presence of autologous T 4 cells. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure antibodies. Although stimulation of the T8 + cloned cells was antigen-specific, the resulting soluble factor elicited nonspecific antibody synthesis in the presence of T4 and B cells. The T8 + cloned cell-derived factor was adsorbed by B cells but not by T4 cells. Preliminary studies suggest that the factor has the properties of a B cell growth factor. They suggest that the T8 + population consists of functionally heterogeneous cell subsets, some that have suppressor function and others that augment the T4 + helper-inducer activity in B cell antibody synthesis

  8. Specific dose-dependent effects of ethane 1,2-dimethanesulfonate in rat and mouse Leydig cells and non-steroidogenic cells on programmed cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.F.G. Rommerts (Focko); L. Kuhne; W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); D.M. Stocco; S.R. King (Steven); A. Jankowska

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe mechanism by which ethane 1,2-dimethanesulfonate (EDS) selectively kills Leydig cells is poorly understood. To characterize further the cell-specific actions of EDS, we studied biochemical and morphological changes during apoptosis in different Leydig cell and

  9. Germline bias dictates cross-serotype reactivity in a common dengue-virus-specific CD8+ T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culshaw, Abigail; Ladell, Kristin; Gras, Stephanie; McLaren, James E; Miners, Kelly L; Farenc, Carine; van den Heuvel, Heleen; Gostick, Emma; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Wangteeraprasert, Apirath; Duangchinda, Thaneeya; Chotiyarnwong, Pojchong; Limpitikul, Wannee; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Malasit, Prida; Dong, Tao; Rossjohn, Jamie; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Price, David A; Screaton, Gavin R

    2017-11-01

    Adaptive immune responses protect against infection with dengue virus (DENV), yet cross-reactivity with distinct serotypes can precipitate life-threatening clinical disease. We found that clonotypes expressing the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) β-chain variable region 11 (TRBV11-2) were 'preferentially' activated and mobilized within immunodominant human-leukocyte-antigen-(HLA)-A*11:01-restricted CD8 + T cell populations specific for variants of the nonstructural protein epitope NS3 133 that characterize the serotypes DENV1, DENV3 and DENV4. In contrast, the NS3 133 -DENV2-specific repertoire was largely devoid of such TCRs. Structural analysis of a representative TRBV11-2 + TCR demonstrated that cross-serotype reactivity was governed by unique interplay between the variable antigenic determinant and germline-encoded residues in the second β-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR2β). Extensive mutagenesis studies of three distinct TRBV11-2 + TCRs further confirmed that antigen recognition was dependent on key contacts between the serotype-defined peptide and discrete residues in the CDR2β loop. Collectively, these data reveal an innate-like mode of epitope recognition with potential implications for the outcome of sequential exposure to heterologous DENVs.

  10. Distinct modulation of allergic T cell responses by subcutaneous versus sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulten, Véronique; Tripple, Victoria; Andersen, Kristian Aasbjerg

    2016-01-01

    mechanisms involved have not been fully explored. OBJECTIVE: To compare changes in the allergen-specific T cell response induced by subcutaneous versus sublingual administration of allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT). METHODS: Grass pollen allergic patients were randomized into groups receiving either SCIT...... injections, or SLIT tablets or neither. PBMC were tested for Timothy grass (TG)-specific cytokine production by ELISPOT after in vitro expansion with TG peptide pools. Phenotypic characterization of cytokine producing cells was performed by FACS. RESULTS: In the SCIT group, decreased IL-5 production...

  11. Characterization of the Murine Salmonella Typhimurium-Specific Primary B-Cell Repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-27

    precursor is identical in specificity to the eventual 22 antibody product of that cell; 2) each precursor cell is committed to the synthesis of...which is committed to the synthesis of antibodies of a unique specificity, and each of which expresses antigen-specific receptors which are...S.A. B r o i t m a n , and N.Z. Zamcheck. 1971. Sa lmonel la e n t e r i t i s : fulminent d i a r rhea in and e f f ec t s on t h e s m a l l i

  12. Human platelet lysate supplementation of mesenchymal stromal cell delivery: issues of xenogenicity and species variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ashley B; Butts, Emily B; Copland, Ian B; Stevens, Hazel Y; Guldberg, Robert E

    2017-10-01

    Immunogenicity of fetal bovine serum (FBS) poses a problem for its use in the propagation of autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for cell therapy. Human platelet lysate (hPL), an enriched growth factor solution containing mitogenic and angiogenic cues, has potential utility in replacing FBS for human MSC (hMSC) delivery strategies. Despite its potentiation of hMSC number in vitro, little is known concerning its capacity to supplement implanted hMSC-seeded constructs and promote tissue regeneration in vivo. In this study, we tested the effects of incorporating hPL in cell-seeded constructs implanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised rats, investigated in vitro interactions between hPL and rat MSCs (rMSCs) and determined interspecies variability in the PL product [hPL vs rat PL (rPL)] and its effect on cultured MSCs (hPL/hMSCs vs rPL/rMSCs). The overarching aim was to determine the utility of hPL to foster MSC survival in preclinical rodent models. Exposure to hPL-supplemented media resulted in rMSC death, by a process attributable to heat-labile proteins, but not membrane attack complex formation. In the in vitro syngeneic model, the rodent product proved fundamentally distinct from the human product, with rPL having substantially lower growth factor content than hPL. Moreover, contrary to the positive effects of hPL on hMSC expansion, rPL did not reduce rMSC doubling time for the serum concentrations examined. When tested in vivo, hPL did not improve cell survival within hydrogel constructs through 2 weeks postimplantation. In summary, this study highlights the many facets of xenogenicity and interspecies variability that must be considered in the preclinical evaluation of hPL. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Solar harvesting by a heterostructured cell with built-in variable width quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, W.; Wang, H.; Mil'shtein, S.

    2018-02-01

    We propose cascaded heterostructured p-i-n solar cells, where inside of the i-region is a set of Quantum Wells (QWs) with variable thicknesses to enhance absorption of different photonic energies and provide quick relaxation for high energy carriers. Our p-i-n heterostructure carries top p-type and bottom n-type 11.3 Å thick AlAs layers, which are doped by acceptors and donor densities up to 1019/cm3. The intrinsic region is divided into 10 segments where each segment carries ten QWs of the same width and the width of the QWs in each subsequent segment gradually increases. The top segment consists of 10 QWs with widths of 56.5Å, followed by a segment with 10 wider QWs with widths of 84.75Å, followed by increasing QW widths until the last segment has 10 QWs with widths of 565Å, bringing the total number of QWs to 100. The QW wall height is controlled by alternating AlAs and GaAs layers, where the AlAs layers are all 11.3Å thick, throughout the entire intrinsic region. Configuration of variable width QWs prescribes sets of energy levels which are suitable for absorption of a wide range of photon energies and will dissipate high electron-hole energies rapidly, reducing the heat load on the solar cell. We expect that the heating of the solar cell will be reduced by 8-11%, enhancing efficiency. The efficiency of the designed solar cell is 43.71%, the Fill Factor is 0.86, the density of short circuit current (ISC) will not exceed 338 A/m2 and the open circuit voltage (VOC) is 1.51V.

  14. Lineage-specific enhancers activate self-renewal genes in macrophages and embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucie, Erinn L; Weng, Ziming; Geirsdóttir, Laufey; Molawi, Kaaweh; Maurizio, Julien; Fenouil, Romain; Mossadegh-Keller, Noushine; Gimenez, Gregory; VanHille, Laurent; Beniazza, Meryam; Favret, Jeremy; Berruyer, Carole; Perrin, Pierre; Hacohen, Nir; Andrau, J-C; Ferrier, Pierre; Dubreuil, Patrice; Sidow, Arend; Sieweke, Michael H

    2016-02-12

    Differentiated macrophages can self-renew in tissues and expand long term in culture, but the gene regulatory mechanisms that accomplish self-renewal in the differentiated state have remained unknown. Here we show that in mice, the transcription factors MafB and c-Maf repress a macrophage-specific enhancer repertoire associated with a gene network that controls self-renewal. Single-cell analysis revealed that, in vivo, proliferating resident macrophages can access this network by transient down-regulation of Maf transcription factors. The network also controls embryonic stem cell self-renewal but is associated with distinct embryonic stem cell-specific enhancers. This indicates that distinct lineage-specific enhancer platforms regulate a shared network of genes that control self-renewal potential in both stem and mature cells. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Association of Immunological Cell Profiles with Specific Clinical Phenotypes of Scleroderma Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, David; Mayayo, Teodoro; González-Rodríguez, María Luisa; Rabasco, Antonio María; Lahoz, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to search the correlation among immunological profiles and clinical phenotypes of scleroderma in well-characterized groups of scleroderma patients, comparing forty-nine scleroderma patients stratified according to specific clinical phenotypes with forty-nine healthy controls. Five immunological cell subpopulations (B, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, NK, and monocytes) and their respective stages of apoptosis and activation were analyzed by flow cytometry, in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Analyses of results were stratified according to disease stage, time since the diagnosis, and visceral damage (pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cardiac affliction) and by time of treatment with corticosteroids. An increase in the percentages of monocytes and a decrease in the B cells were mainly related to the disease progression. A general apoptosis decrease was found in all phenotypes studied, except in localized scleroderma. An increase of B and NK cells activation was found in patients diagnosed more than 10 years ago. Specific cell populations like monocytes, NK, and B cells were associated with the type of affected organ. This study shows how, in a heterogeneous disease, proper patient's stratification according to clinical phenotypes allows finding specific cellular profiles. Our data may lead to improvements in the knowledge of prognosis factors and to aid in the analysis of future specific therapies. PMID:24818126

  16. Cross-reactive microbial peptides can modulate HIV-specific CD8+ T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Pohlmeyer

    Full Text Available Heterologous immunity is an important aspect of the adaptive immune response. We hypothesized that this process could modulate the HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cell response, which has been shown to play an important role in HIV-1 immunity and control. We found that stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from HIV-1-positive subjects with microbial peptides that were cross-reactive with immunodominant HIV-1 epitopes resulted in dramatic expansion of HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, the TCR repertoire of HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells generated by ex vivo stimulation of PBMCs using HIV-1 peptide was different from that of cells stimulated with cross-reactive microbial peptides in some HIV-1-positive subjects. Despite these differences, CD8+ T cells stimulated with either HIV-1 or cross-reactive peptides effectively suppressed HIV-1 replication in autologous CD4+ T cells. These data suggest that exposure to cross-reactive microbial antigens can modulate HIV-1-specific immunity.

  17. Effects of immunosuppression on circulating adeno-associated virus capsid-specific T cells in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzych, Elizabeth M; Li, Hua; Yin, Xiangfan; Liu, Qin; Wu, Te-Lang; Podsakoff, Gregory M; High, Katherine A; Levine, Matthew H; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2013-04-01

    In humans adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer is followed by expansion of AAV capsid-specific T cells, evidence of cell damage, and loss of transgene product expression, implicating immunological rejection of vector-transduced cells, which may be prevented by immunosuppressive drugs. We undertook this study to assess the effect of immunosuppression (IS) used for organ transplantation on immune responses to AAV capsid antigens. Recipients of liver or kidney transplants were tested before and 4 weeks after induction of IS in comparison with matched samples from healthy human adults and an additional cohort with comorbid conditions similar to those of the transplant patients. Our data show that transplant patients and comorbid control subjects have markedly higher frequencies of circulating AAV capsid-specific T cells compared with healthy adults. On average, IS resulted in a reduction of AAV-specific CD4⁺ T cells, whereas numbers of circulating CD8⁺ effector and central memory T cells tended to increase. Independent of the type of transplant or the IS regimens, the trend of AAV capsid-specific T cell responses after drug treatment varied; in some patients responses were unaffected whereas others showed decreases or even pronounced increases, casting doubt on the usefulness of prophylactic IS for AAV vector recipients.

  18. Delay equations modeling the effects of phase-specific drugs and immunotherapy on proliferating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, Maria Vittoria; Kuttler, Christina; Zinsl, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    In this work we present a mathematical model for tumor growth based on the biology of the cell cycle. For an appropriate description of the effects of phase-specific drugs, it is necessary to look at the cell cycle and its phases. Our model reproduces the dynamics of three different tumor cell populations: quiescent cells, cells during the interphase and mitotic cells. Starting from a partial differential equations (PDEs) setting, a delay differential equations (DDE) model is derived for an easier and more realistic approach. Our equations also include interactions of tumor cells with immune system effectors. We investigate the model both from the analytical and the numerical point of view, give conditions for positivity of solutions and focus on the stability of the cancer-free equilibrium. Different immunotherapeutic strategies and their effects on the tumor growth are considered, as well.

  19. Human B cells produce chemokine CXCL10 in the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Soren T; Salman, Ahmed M; Ruhwald, Morten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment. A candid......BACKGROUND: The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment...

  20. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cells in chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Haruna; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Onozawa, Erika; Tsuzura, Akiho; Miura, Osamu; Koyama, Takatoshi; Arai, Ayako

    2017-01-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) is a disease characterized by clonally proliferating and activated EBV-infected T or NK cells accompanied by chronic inflammation and T- or NK-cell neoplasms. However, the mechanism for developing CAEBV has not been clarified to date. Because the decreased number or inactivation of EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) resulted in the development of EBV-positive B-cell neoplasms, we investigated the number of CTLs in CAEBV patients using the tetrameric complexes of HLA-restricted EBV-specific peptides. Among the seven patients examined, EBV-specific CTLs were detected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of four cases but were not detected in three cases. The ratio of EBV-specific CTLs in PBMCs tended to be higher in the patients with active disease than in those with inactive disease. In two patients in whom EBV-specific CTLs had not been detected, CTLs appeared after the eradication of EBV-infected T cells by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. These results suggested that the failure of CTLs had a role in developing CAEBV, although the induction number and function of EBV-specific CTLs might vary in each patient.

  1. A single exercise bout augments adenovirus-specific T-cell mobilization and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Hawley E; Spielmann, Guillaume; Agha, Nadia H; O'Connor, Daniel P; Bollard, Catherine M; Simpson, Richard J

    2018-04-30

    Adoptive transfer of virus-specific T-cells (VSTs) effectively treats viral infections following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), but logistical difficulties have limited widespread availability of VSTs as a post-transplant therapeutic. A single exercise bout mobilizes VSTs specific for latent herpesviruses (i.e. CMV and EBV) to peripheral blood and augments their ex vivo expansion. We investigated whether exercise exerts similar effects on T-cells specific for a NON-latent virus such as adenovirus, which is a major contributor to infection-related morbidity and mortality after alloHSCT. Thirty minutes of cycling exercise increased circulating adenovirus-specific T-cells 2.0-fold and augmented their ex vivo expansion by ~33% compared to rest without altering antigen and MHC-specific autologous target cell killing capabilities. We conclude that exercise is a simple and economical adjuvant to boost the isolation and manufacture of therapeutic VSTs specific to latent and non-latent viruses from healthy donors. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Exclusion of Patients with a Severe T-Cell Defect Improves the Definition of Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinchamp, Rémi; Gérard, Laurence; Boutboul, David; Malphettes, Marion; Fieschi, Claire; Oksenhendler, Eric

    In 2014, the European Society for Immune Deficiencies (ESID) revised the common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) diagnosis criteria by incorporating new clinical and biological markers. The new definition appeared more restrictive but had not yet been evaluated in a large cohort of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of this new definition in a large cohort of patients with primary hypogammaglobulinemia. Evaluation of 3 different CVID definitions (ESID/Pan-American Group for Immunodeficiency [PAGID] 1999, ESID 2014, DEFI 2015) in 521 patients included in the French DEFI study with a diagnosis of primary hypogammaglobulinemia. Using the ESID/PAGID 1999 definition, 351 patients were classified as CVID. The new ESID 2014 definition excluded 62 (18%) patients. Most of them (n = 56; 90%) had a less severe disease, whereas 6 (10%) presented with a severe disease with major T-cell defect. We propose different criteria (occurrence of opportunistic infection or very low naive CD4+ T-cell count) to define this population with severe T-cell defect. Sixty-two patients fulfilled these criteria, represented 20% of the initial CVID population but accounted for 77% of the deaths, with a 5-year overall survival of 67.6% (95% confidence interval, 51.0-79.6), and were considered as late onset combined immunodeficiency (LOCID). The new ESID definition for CVID still fails to exclude a large number of patients with severe T-cell defect. We propose a new definition (DEFI 2015) that excluded more patients with a T-cell defect and consider these patients as LOCID. This population has a poor outcome and should be considered as a distinct group requiring specific care. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tissue-specific extracellular matrix coatings for the promotion of cell proliferation and maintenance of cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; He, Yujiang; Bharadwaj, Shantaram; Hammam, Nevin; Carnagey, Kristen; Myers, Regina; Atala, Anthony; Van Dyke, Mark

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that extracellular matrix (ECM) substitutes can have a dramatic impact on cell growth, differentiation and function. However, these ECMs are often applied generically and have yet to be developed for specific cell types. In this study, we developed tissue-specific ECM-based coating substrates for skin, skeletal muscle and liver cell cultures. Cellular components were removed from adult skin, skeletal muscle, and liver tissues, and the resulting acellular matrices were homogenized and dissolved. The ECM solutions were used to coat culture dishes. Tissue matched and non-tissue matched cell types were grown on these coatings to assess adhesion, proliferation, maintenance of phenotype and cell function at several time points. Each cell type showed better proliferation and differentiation in cultures containing ECM from their tissue of origin. Although subtle compositional differences in the three ECM types were not investigated in this study, these results suggest that tissue-specific ECMs provide a culture microenvironment that is similar to the in vivo environment when used as coating substrates, and this new culture technique has the potential for use in drug development and the development of cell-based therapies.

  4. Splenic B cells and antigen-specific B cells process anti-Ig in a similar manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, C.D.; Vitetta, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    B lymphocytes can process and present antigen to T cells. However, the fate of native antigen after its binding to specific B cells, i.e., the intracellular events involved in the processing and recycling of the antigenic fragments to the cell surface for antigen presentation, are not well understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that murine B cells degrade anti-Ig molecules bound to their surface and release acid soluble fragments into the supernatant. We also demonstrate that the kinetics of this process are identical for anti-mu, anti-delta, and anti-light chain antibodies, indicating that both surface IgM and surface IgD are equally effective in binding antigen and directing its processing. We also describe the effects of azide, chloroquine, and irradiation on this process. To extend these studies to the processing of specifically bound antigen, we demonstrate that highly purified trinitrophenyl antigen-binding cells degrade anti-Ig molecules with the same kinetics as unpurified splenic B cells. Thus, this purified population provides a suitable model system for the analysis of antigen degradation by antigen-specific cells

  5. Specific microtubule-depolymerizing agents augment efficacy of dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Wei-Ting

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs are associated with immunogenic cell death and have the ability to enhance maturation and antigen presentation of dendritic cells (DCs. Specific microtubule-depolymerizing agents (MDAs such as colchicine have been shown to confer anti-cancer activity and also trigger activation of DCs. Methods In this study, we evaluated the ability of three MDAs (colchicine and two 2-phenyl-4-quinolone analogues to induce immunogenic cell death in test tumor cells, activate DCs, and augment T-cell proliferation activity. These MDAs were further evaluated for use as an adjuvant in a tumor cell lysate-pulsed DC vaccine. Results The three test phytochemicals considerably increased the expression of DAMPs including HSP70, HSP90 and HMGB1, but had no effect on expression of calreticulin (CRT. DC vaccines pulsed with MDA-treated tumor cell lysates had a significant effect on tumor growth, showed cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity against tumors, and increased the survival rate of test mice. In vivo antibody depletion experiments suggested that CD8+ and NK cells, but not CD4+ cells, were the main effector cells responsible for the observed anti-tumor activity. In addition, culture of DCs with GM-CSF and IL-4 during the pulsing and stimulation period significantly increased the production of IL-12 and decreased production of IL-10. MDAs also induced phenotypic maturation of DCs and augmented CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation when co-cultured with DCs. Conclusions Specific MDAs including the clinical drug, colchicine, can induce immunogenic cell death in tumor cells, and DCs pulsed with MDA-treated tumor cell lysates (TCLs can generate potent anti-tumor immunity in mice. This approach may warrant future clinical evaluation as a cancer vaccine.

  6. Variability in cell response of Cronobacter sakazakii after mild-heat treatments and its impact on food safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio eParra-Flores

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cronobacter spp. have been responsible for severe infections in infants associated with consumption of powdered infant formula (PIF and follow-up formulae (FUF. Despite several risk assessments described in published studies, few approaches have considered the tremendous variability in cell response that small micropopulations or single cells can have in infant formula during storage, preparation or post process/preparation before the feeding of infants. Stochastic approaches can better describe microbial single cell response than deterministic models as we prove in this study. A large variability of lag phase was observed in single cell and micropopulations of ≤50 cells. This variability increased as the heat shock increased and growth temperature decreased. Obviously, variability of growth of individual Cronobacter sakazakii cell is affected by inoculum size, growth temperature and the probability of cells able to grow at the conditions imposed by the experimental conditions should be taken into account, especially when errors in bottle-preparation practices, such as improper holding temperatures or manipulation, may lead to growth of the pathogen to a critical cell level. The mean probability of illness from initial inoculum size of 1 cell were below 0.2 in all the cases and for inoculum size of 50 cells the mean probability of illness were, in most of the cases, was above 0.7.

  7. Mechanism of arctigenin-mediated specific cytotoxicity against human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanti, Siti; Iwasaki, Hironori; Inafuku, Masashi; Taira, Naoyuki; Oku, Hirosuke

    2013-12-15

    The lignan arctigenin (ARG) from the herb Arctium lappa L. possesses anti-cancer activity, however the mechanism of action of ARG has been found to vary among tissues and types of cancer cells. The current study aims to gain insight into the ARG mediated mechanism of action involved in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis in lung adenocarcinoma cells. This study also delineates the cancer cell specificity of ARG by comparison with its effects on various normal cell lines. ARG selectively arrested the proliferation of cancer cells at the G0/G1 phase through the down-regulation of NPAT protein expression. This down-regulation occurred via the suppression of either cyclin E/CDK2 or cyclin H/CDK7, while apoptosis was induced through the modulation of the Akt-1-related signaling pathway. Furthermore, a GSH synthase inhibitor specifically enhanced the cytotoxicity of ARG against cancer cells, suggesting that the intracellular GSH content was another factor influencing the susceptibility of cancer cells to ARG. These findings suggest that specific cytotoxicity of ARG against lung cancer cells was explained by its selective modulation of the expression of NPAT, which is involved in histone biosynthesis. The cytotoxicity of ARG appeared to be dependent on the intracellular GSH level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Primate-specific endogenous retrovirus-driven transcription defines naive-like stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichang; Xie, Gangcai; Singh, Manvendra; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Raskó, Tamás; Szvetnik, Attila; Cai, Huiqiang; Besser, Daniel; Prigione, Alessandro; Fuchs, Nina V; Schumann, Gerald G; Chen, Wei; Lorincz, Matthew C; Ivics, Zoltán; Hurst, Laurence D; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2014-12-18

    Naive embryonic stem cells hold great promise for research and therapeutics as they have broad and robust developmental potential. While such cells are readily derived from mouse blastocysts it has not been possible to isolate human equivalents easily, although human naive-like cells have been artificially generated (rather than extracted) by coercion of human primed embryonic stem cells by modifying culture conditions or through transgenic modification. Here we show that a sub-population within cultures of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) manifests key properties of naive state cells. These naive-like cells can be genetically tagged, and are associated with elevated transcription of HERVH, a primate-specific endogenous retrovirus. HERVH elements provide functional binding sites for a combination of naive pluripotency transcription factors, including LBP9, recently recognized as relevant to naivety in mice. LBP9-HERVH drives hESC-specific alternative and chimaeric transcripts, including pluripotency-modulating long non-coding RNAs. Disruption of LBP9, HERVH and HERVH-derived transcripts compromises self-renewal. These observations define HERVH expression as a hallmark of naive-like hESCs, and establish novel primate-specific transcriptional circuitry regulating pluripotency.

  9. Characterization of Antigen-Specific B Cells Using Nominal Antigen-Coated Flow-Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Ahmed; Lepetit, Maud; Crochette, Romain; Giral, Magali; Lepourry, Julie; Pallier, Annaick; Castagnet, Stéphanie; Dugast, Emilie; Guillot-Gueguen, Cécile; Jacq-Foucher, Marylène; Saulquin, Xavier; Cesbron, Anne; Laplaud, David; Nicot, Arnaud; Brouard, Sophie; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    In order to characterize the reactivity of B cells against nominal antigens, a method based on the coupling of antigens onto the surface of fluorescent core polystyrene beads was developed. We first demonstrate that murine B cells with a human MOG-specific BCR are able to interact with MOG-coated beads and do not recognize beads coated with human albumin or pp65. B cells purified from human healthy volunteer blood or immunized individuals were tested for their ability to interact with various nominal antigens, including viral, vaccine, self and alloantigens, chosen for their usefulness in studying a variety of pathological processes. A substantial amount of B cells binding self-antigen MOG-coated beads can be detected in normal blood. Furthermore, greater frequencies of B cell against anti-Tetanic Toxin or anti-EBNA1 were observed in primed individuals. This method can reveal increased frequencies of anti-HLA committed B cells in patients with circulating anti-HLA antibodies compared to unsensitized patients and normal individuals. Of interest, those specific CD19 cells were preferentially identified within CD27−IgD+ (i-e naïve) subset. These observations suggest that a broad range of medical situations could benefit from a tool that allows the detection, the quantification and the characterization of antigen-specific blood B cells. PMID:24386360

  10. Optimization of Invasion-Specific Effects of Betulin Derivatives on Prostate Cancer Cells through Lead Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Härmä

    Full Text Available The anti-invasive and anti-proliferative effects of betulins and abietane derivatives was systematically tested using an organotypic model system of advanced, castration-resistant prostate cancers. A preliminary screen of the initial set of 93 compounds was performed in two-dimensional (2D growth conditions using non-transformed prostate epithelial cells (EP156T, an androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP, and the castration-resistant, highly invasive cell line PC-3. The 25 most promising compounds were all betulin derivatives. These were selected for a focused secondary screen in three-dimensional (3D growth conditions, with the goal to identify the most effective and specific anti-invasive compounds. Additional sensitivity and cytotoxicity tests were then performed using an extended cell line panel. The effects of these compounds on cell cycle progression, mitosis, proliferation and unspecific cytotoxicity, versus their ability to specifically interfere with cell motility and tumor cell invasion was addressed. To identify potential mechanisms of action and likely compound targets, multiplex profiling of compound effects on a panel of 43 human protein kinases was performed. These target de-convolution studies, combined with the phenotypic analyses of multicellular organoids in 3D models, revealed specific inhibition of AKT signaling linked to effects on the organization of the actin cytoskeleton as the most likely driver of altered cell morphology and motility.

  11. Mechanisms maintaining enhancement of allografts. I. Demonstration of a specific suppressor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    DA rats treated with hyperimmune anti-PVG serum and grafted with (DA X PVG)F1 heart grafts in which graft survival was prolonged for greater than 75 d were used to examine the cellular mechanisms that maintain the state of specific unresponsiveness found in these animals. The capacity of lymphocytes from these animals to effect or inhibit graft rejection on adoptive transfer to irradiated heart-grafted hosts was tested. Spleen cell populations and the T cell subpopulation separated from spleen cells in vitro failed to restore rejection of PVG heart grafts in irradiated DA recipients but restored third party Lew graft rejection. Whole spleen cells had the capacity to suppress the ability of normal DA LNC to cause graft rejection, but T cells from spleen only delayed the restoration of rejection. LNC and recirculating T cells from rats with enhanced grafts adoptively restored PVG rejection, however. These studies show that the state of specific unresponsiveness that follows the induction of passive enhancement is dependent in part upon active suppression, which is induced or mediated by T lymphocytes. The recirculating pool of lymphocytes in these animals is not depleted of specific alloreactive cells with the capacity to initiate and effect rejection. Thus, these animals responsiveness is not like that found in transplantation tolerance induced in neonatal rats, but is, in part, due to a suppressor response that can inhibit normal alloreactive cells capacity to initiate and effect rejection

  12. Insights into cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity after CD19-specific CAR-T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Jordan; Turtle, Cameron J

    2018-04-03

    T-cells engineered to express CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CD19 CAR-T cells) can achieve high response rates in patients with refractory/relapsed (R/R) CD19+ hematologic malignancies. Nonetheless, the efficacy of CD19-specific CAR-T cell therapy can be offset by significant toxicities, such as cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity. In this report of our presentation at the 2018 Second French International Symposium on CAR-T cells (CAR-T day), we describe the clinical presentations of CRS and neurotoxicity in a cohort of 133 adults treated with CD19 CAR-T cells at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and provide insights into the mechanisms contributing to these toxicities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy elicits tumor specific T cell responses in a breast cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal-Estévez, David; Sánchez, Ramiro; Tejada, Rafael E.; Parra-López, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical studies in breast cancer suggest that some anti-tumor therapy regimens generate stimulation of the immune system that accounts for tumor clinical responses, however, demonstration of the immunostimulatory power of these therapies on cancer patients continues to be a formidable challenge. Here we present experimental evidence from a breast cancer patient with complete clinical response after 7 years, associated with responsiveness of tumor specific T cells. T cells were obtained before and after anti-tumor therapy from peripheral blood of a 63-years old woman diagnosed with ductal breast cancer (HER2/neu+++, ER-, PR-, HLA-A*02:01) treated with surgery, followed by paclitaxel, trastuzumab (suspended due to cardiac toxicity), and radiotherapy. We obtained a leukapheresis before surgery and after 8 months of treatment. Using in vitro cell cultures stimulated with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that produce high levels of IL-12, we characterize by flow cytometry the phenotype of tumor associated antigens (TAAs) HER2/neu and NY-ESO 1 specific T cells. The ex vivo analysis of the TCR-Vβ repertoire of TAA specific T cells in blood and Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs) were performed in order to correlate both repertoires prior and after therapy. We evidence a functional recovery of T cell responsiveness to polyclonal stimuli and expansion of TAAs specific CD8+ T cells using peptide pulsed DCs, with an increase of CTLA-4 and memory effector phenotype after anti-tumor therapy. The ex vivo analysis of the TCR-Vβ repertoire of TAA specific T cells in blood and TILs showed that whereas the TCR-Vβ04-02 clonotype is highly expressed in TILs the HER2/neu specific T cells are expressed mainly in blood after therapy, suggesting that this particular TCR was selectively enriched in blood after anti-tumor therapy. Our results show the benefits of anti-tumor therapy in a breast cancer patient with clinical complete response in

  14. Systematic and Cell Type-Specific Telomere Length Changes in Subsets of Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres, the protective DNA-protein complexes at the ends of linear chromosomes, are important for genome stability. Leukocyte or peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC telomere length is a potential biomarker for human aging that integrates genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors and is associated with mortality and risks for major diseases. However, only a limited number of studies have examined longitudinal changes of telomere length and few have reported data on sorted circulating immune cells. We examined the average telomere length (TL in CD4+, CD8+CD28+, and CD8+CD28− T cells, B cells, and PBMCs, cross-sectionally and longitudinally, in a cohort of premenopausal women. We report that TL changes over 18 months were correlated among these three T cell types within the same participant. Additionally, PBMC TL change was also correlated with those of all three T cell types, and B cells. The rate of shortening for B cells was significantly greater than for the three T cell types. CD8+CD28− cells, despite having the shortest TL, showed significantly more rapid attrition when compared to CD8+CD28+ T cells. These results suggest systematically coordinated, yet cell type-specific responses to factors and pathways contribute to telomere length regulation.

  15. Origin of the OFF state variability in ReRAM cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaoru, Iulia; Khiat, Ali; Li, Qingjiang; Prodromakis, Themistoklis; Berdan, Radu; Papavassiliou, Christos

    2014-01-01

    This work exploits the switching dynamics of nanoscale resistive random access memory (ReRAM) cells with particular emphasis on the origin of the observed variability when cells are consecutively cycled/programmed at distinct memory states. It is demonstrated that this variance is a common feature of all ReRAM elements and is ascribed to the formation and rupture of conductive filaments that expand across the active core, independently of the material employed as the active switching core, the causal physical switching mechanism, the switching mode (bipolar/unipolar) or even the unit cells' dimensions. Our hypothesis is supported through both experimental and theoretical studies on TiO 2 and In 2 O 3  : SnO 2 (ITO) based ReRAM cells programmed at three distinct resistive states. Our prototypes employed TiO 2 or ITO active cores over 5 × 5 µm 2 and 100 × 100 µm 2 cell areas, with all tested devices demonstrating both unipolar and bipolar switching modalities. In the case of TiO 2 -based cells, the underlying switching mechanism is based on the non-uniform displacement of ionic species that foster the formation of conductive filaments. On the other hand, the resistive switching observed in the ITO-based devices is considered to be due to a phase change mechanism. The selected experimental parameters allowed us to demonstrate that the observed programming variance is a common feature of all ReRAM devices, proving that its origin is dependent upon randomly oriented local disorders within the active core that have a substantial impact on the overall state variance, particularly for high-resistive states. (paper)

  16. Conditional and specific cell ablation in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinoth Babu Veedin-Rajan

    Full Text Available The marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii has become a model system for evo-devo, neurobiology and marine biology. The functional assessment of its cell types, however, has so far been very limited. Here we report on the establishment of a generally applicable, cell type specific ablation technique to overcome this restriction. Using a transgenic strain expressing the bacterial enzyme nitroreductase (ntr under the control of the worm's r-opsin1 locus, we show that the demarcated photoreceptor cells can be specifically ablated by the addition of the prodrug metronidazole (mtz. TUNEL staining indicates that ntr expressing cells undergo apoptotic cell death. As we used a transgenic strain co-expressing ntr with enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp coding sequence, we were able to validate the ablation of photoreceptors not only in fixed tissue, using r-opsin1 riboprobes, but also by monitoring eGFP+ cells in live animals. The specificity of the ablation was demonstrated by the normal presence of the eye pigment cells, as well as of neuronal markers expressed in other cells of the brain, such as phc2, tyrosine hydroxylase and brn1/2/4. Additional analyses of the position of DAPI stained nuclei, the brain's overall neuronal scaffold, as well as the positions and projections of serotonergic neurons further confirmed that mtz treatment did not induce general abnormalities in the worm's brain. As the prodrug is administered by adding it to the water, targeted ablation of specific cell types can be achieved throughout the life of the animal. We show that ablation conditions need to be adjusted to the size of the worms, likely due to differences in the penetration of the prodrug, and establish ablation conditions for worms containing 10 to 55 segments. Our results establish mtz/ntr mediated conditional cell ablation as a powerful functional tool in Platynereis.

  17. Association between morphometric variables and nocturnal desaturation in sickle-cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Cristina; Bispo, Marcelo; Trindade-Ramos, Regina Terse

    2014-01-01

    to evaluate associations between morphometric variables, cervical circumference (CC), and abdominal circumference (AC) with the presence of nocturnal desaturation in children and adolescents with sickle-cell anemia. all patients were submitted to baseline polysomnography, oral cavity measurements (maxillary intermolar distance, mandibular intermolar distance, and overjet), and CC and AC measurements. a total of 85 patients were evaluated. A positive correlation was observed between the height/age Z-score and CC measurement (r = 0.233, p = 0.031). The presence of nocturnal desaturation was associated with CC (59.2± 9.3 vs. 67.5 ± 10.7, p = 0.006) and AC measurements (27.0 ± 2.0 vs. 29.0± 2.1, p = 0.028). There was a negative correlation between desaturation and maxillary intermolar distance (r = -0.365, p = 0.001) and mandibular intermolar distance (r = -0.233, p = 0.037). the morphometric variables of CC and AC may contribute to raise suspicion of nocturnal desaturation in children and adolescents with sickle-cell anemia. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Association between morphometric variables and nocturnal desaturation in sickle-cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Salles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate associations between morphometric variables, cervical circumference (CC, and abdominal circumference (AC with the presence of nocturnal desaturation in children and adolescents with sickle-cell anemia. METHODS: all patients were submitted to baseline polysomnography, oral cavity measurements (maxillary intermolar distance, mandibular intermolar distance, and overjet, and CC and AC measurements. RESULTS: a total of 85 patients were evaluated. A positive correlation was observed between the height/age Z-score and CC measurement (r = 0.233, p = 0.031. The presence of nocturnal desaturation was associated with CC (59.2± 9.3 vs. 67.5 ± 10.7, p = 0.006 and AC measurements (27.0 ± 2.0 vs. 29.0± 2.1, p = 0.028. There was a negative correlation between desaturation and maxillary intermolar distance (r = -0.365, p = 0.001 and mandibular intermolar distance (r = -0.233, p = 0.037. CONCLUSIONS: the morphometric variables of CC and AC may contribute to raise suspicion of nocturnal desaturation in children and adolescents with sickle-cell anemia.

  19. A Tetrameric Peptide Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibits Specific Cytotoxic Effects against Oral Squamous-Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines

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    Víctor A. Solarte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several short linear peptides derived from cyclic bovine lactoferricin were synthesized and tested for their cytotoxic effect against the oral cavity squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC cell lines CAL27 and SCC15. As a control, an immortalized and nontumorigenic cell line, Het-1A, was used. Linear peptides based on the RRWQWR core sequence showed a moderate cytotoxic effect and specificity towards tumorigenic cells. A tetrameric peptide, LfcinB(20–254, containing the RRWQWR motif, exhibited greater cytotoxic activity (>90% in both OSCC cell lines compared to the linear lactoferricin peptide or the lactoferrin protein. Additionally, this tetrameric peptide showed the highest specificity towards tumorigenic cells among the tested peptides. Interestingly, this effect was very fast, with cell shrinkage, severe damage to cell membrane permeability, and lysis within one hour of treatment. Our results are consistent with a necrotic effect rather than an apoptotic one and suggest that this tetrameric peptide could be considered as a new candidate for the therapeutic treatment of OSCC.

  20. A Tetrameric Peptide Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibits Specific Cytotoxic Effects against Oral Squamous-Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solarte, Víctor A; Rosas, Jaiver E; Rivera, Zuly J; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L; García, Javier E; Vernot, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Several short linear peptides derived from cyclic bovine lactoferricin were synthesized and tested for their cytotoxic effect against the oral cavity squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines CAL27 and SCC15. As a control, an immortalized and nontumorigenic cell line, Het-1A, was used. Linear peptides based on the RRWQWR core sequence showed a moderate cytotoxic effect and specificity towards tumorigenic cells. A tetrameric peptide, LfcinB(20-25)4, containing the RRWQWR motif, exhibited greater cytotoxic activity (>90%) in both OSCC cell lines compared to the linear lactoferricin peptide or the lactoferrin protein. Additionally, this tetrameric peptide showed the highest specificity towards tumorigenic cells among the tested peptides. Interestingly, this effect was very fast, with cell shrinkage, severe damage to cell membrane permeability, and lysis within one hour of treatment. Our results are consistent with a necrotic effect rather than an apoptotic one and suggest that this tetrameric peptide could be considered as a new candidate for the therapeutic treatment of OSCC.

  1. Phospho-specific flow cytometry identifies aberrant signaling in indolent B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blix Egil S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about signaling pathways in malignant cells may provide prognostic and diagnostic information in addition to identify potential molecular targets for therapy. B-cell receptor (BCR and co-receptor CD40 signaling is essential for normal B cells, and there is increasing evidence that signaling via BCR and CD40 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoma. The aim of this study was to investigate basal and induced signaling in lymphoma B cells and infiltrating T cells in single-cell suspensions of biopsies from small cell lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL patients. Methods Samples from untreated SLL/CLL and MZL patients were examined for basal and activation induced signaling by phospho-specific flow cytometry. A panel of 9 stimulation conditions targeting B and T cells, including crosslinking of the B cell receptor (BCR, CD40 ligand and interleukins in combination with 12 matching phospho-protein readouts was used to study signaling. Results Malignant B cells from SLL/CLL patients had higher basal levels of phosphorylated (p-SFKs, p-PLCγ, p-ERK, p-p38, p-p65 (NF-κB, p-STAT5 and p-STAT6, compared to healthy donor B cells. In contrast, anti-BCR induced signaling was highly impaired in SLL/CLL and MZL B cells as determined by low p-SFK, p-SYK and p-PLCγ levels. Impaired anti-BCR-induced p-PLCγ was associated with reduced surface expression of IgM and CD79b. Similarly, CD40L-induced p-ERK and p-p38 were also significantly reduced in lymphoma B cells, whereas p-p65 (NF-κB was equal to that of normal B cells. In contrast, IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15 induced p-STAT5 in tumor-infiltrating T cells were not different from normal T cells. Conclusions BCR signaling and CD40L-induced p-p38 was suppressed in malignant B cells from SLL/CLL and MZL patients. Single-cell phospho-specific flow cytometry for detection of basal as well as activation

  2. Comparison of Whole-Cell SELEX Methods for the Identification of Staphylococcus Aureus-Specific DNA Aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Jihea; Kim, Giyoung; Park, Saet Byeol; Lim, Jongguk; Mo, Changyeun

    2015-01-01

    Whole-cell Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) is the process by which aptamers specific to target cells are developed. Aptamers selected by whole-cell SELEX have high affinity and specificity for bacterial surface molecules and live bacterial targets. To identify DNA aptamers specific to Staphylococcus aureus, we applied our rapid whole-cell SELEX method to a single-stranded ssDNA library. To improve the specificity and selectivity of the aptamers, we designed, s...

  3. Identification of a regulatory T cell specific cell surface molecule that mediates suppressive signals and induces Foxp3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Wan, Qi; Kozhaya, Lina; Fujii, Hodaka; Unutmaz, Derya

    2008-07-16

    Regulatory T (T(reg)) cells control immune activation and maintain tolerance. How T(regs) mediate their suppressive function is unclear. Here we identified a cell surface molecule, called GARP, (or LRRC32), which within T cells is specifically expressed in T(regs) activated through the T cell receptor (TCR). Ectopic expression of GARP in human naïve T (T(N)) cells inhibited their proliferation and cytokine secretion upon TCR activation. Remarkably, GARP over-expression in T(N) cells induced expression of T(reg) master transcription factor Foxp3 and endowed them with a partial suppressive function. The extracellular but not the cytoplasmic region of GARP, was necessary for these functions. Silencing Foxp3 in human T(reg) cells reduced expression of GARP and attenuated their suppressive function. However, GARP function was not affected when Foxp3 was downregulated in GARP-overexpressing cells, while silencing GARP in Foxp3-overexpressing cells reduced their suppressive activity. These findings reveal a novel cell surface molecule-mediated regulatory mechanism, with implications for modulating aberrant immune responses.

  4. Identification of a regulatory T cell specific cell surface molecule that mediates suppressive signals and induces Foxp3 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (T(reg cells control immune activation and maintain tolerance. How T(regs mediate their suppressive function is unclear. Here we identified a cell surface molecule, called GARP, (or LRRC32, which within T cells is specifically expressed in T(regs activated through the T cell receptor (TCR. Ectopic expression of GARP in human naïve T (T(N cells inhibited their proliferation and cytokine secretion upon TCR activation. Remarkably, GARP over-expression in T(N cells induced expression of T(reg master transcription factor Foxp3 and endowed them with a partial suppressive function. The extracellular but not the cytoplasmic region of GARP, was necessary for these functions. Silencing Foxp3 in human T(reg cells reduced expression of GARP and attenuated their suppressive function. However, GARP function was not affected when Foxp3 was downregulated in GARP-overexpressing cells, while silencing GARP in Foxp3-overexpressing cells reduced their suppressive activity. These findings reveal a novel cell surface molecule-mediated regulatory mechanism, with implications for modulating aberrant immune responses.

  5. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine Remodeling Precedes Lineage Specification during Differentiation of Human CD4+ T Cells

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    Colm E. Nestor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available 5-methylcytosine (5mC is converted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC by the TET family of enzymes as part of a recently discovered active DNA de-methylation pathway. 5hmC plays important roles in regulation of gene expression and differentiation and has been implicated in T cell malignancies and autoimmunity. Here, we report early and widespread 5mC/5hmC remodeling during human CD4+ T cell differentiation ex vivo at genes and cell-specific enhancers with known T cell function. We observe similar DNA de-methylation in CD4+ memory T cells in vivo, indicating that early remodeling events persist long term in differentiated cells. Underscoring their important function, 5hmC loci were highly enriched for genetic variants associated with T cell diseases and T-cell-specific chromosomal interactions. Extensive functional validation of 22 risk variants revealed potentially pathogenic mechanisms in diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Our results support 5hmC-mediated DNA de-methylation as a key component of CD4+ T cell biology in humans, with important implications for gene regulation and lineage commitment.

  6. An innovative pre-targeting strategy for tumor cell specific imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Peng, Meng-Yun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Cheng, Si-Xue; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-21

    A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the "biotin-avidin" interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging and therapeutic agents for tumor treatments.

  7. A composite model including visfatin, tissue polypeptide-specific antigen, hyaluronic acid, and hematological variables for the diagnosis of moderate-to-severe fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwist, Alina; Hartleb, Marek; Lekstan, Andrzej; Kukla, Michał; Gutkowski, Krzysztof; Kajor, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Histopathological risk factors for end-stage liver failure in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) include nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and advanced liver fibrosis. There is a need for noninvasive diagnostic methods for these 2 conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate new laboratory variables with a predictive potential to detect advanced fibrosis (stages 2 and 3) in NAFLD. The study involved 70 patients with histologically proven NAFLD of varied severity. Additional laboratory variables included zonulin, haptoglobin, visfatin, adiponectin, leptin, tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPSA), hyaluronic acid, and interleukin 6. Patients with NASH (NAFLD activity score of ≥5) had significantly higher HOMA-IR values and serum levels of visfatin, haptoglobin, and zonulin as compared with those without NASH on histological examination. Advanced fibrosis was found in 16 patients (22.9%) and the risk factors associated with its prevalence were age, the ratio of erythrocyte count to red blood cell distribution width, platelet count, and serum levels of visfatin and TPSA. Based on these variables, we constructed a scoring system that differentiated between NAFLD patients with and without advanced fibrosis with a sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 100% (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.93). The scoring system based on the above variables allows to predict advanced fibrosis with high sensitivity and specificity. However, its clinical utility should be verified in further studies involving a larger number of patients.

  8. FGF signalling controls the specification of hair placode-derived SOX9 positive progenitors to Merkel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Binh; Cohen, Idan; Kumar, Vinod; Xu, Zijian; Bar, Carmit; Dauber-Decker, Katherine L; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Marangoni, Pauline; Klein, Ophir D; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Chen, Ting; Mikkola, Marja L; Ezhkova, Elena

    2018-06-13

    Merkel cells are innervated mechanosensory cells responsible for light-touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are located in touch domes and found in the epidermis around primary hairs. While it has been shown that Merkel cells are skin epithelial cells, the progenitor cell population that gives rise to these cells is unknown. Here, we show that during embryogenesis, SOX9-positive (+) cells inside hair follicles, which were previously known to give rise to hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) and cells of the hair follicle lineage, can also give rise to Merkel Cells. Interestingly, while SOX9 is critical for HFSC specification, it is dispensable for Merkel cell formation. Conversely, FGFR2 is required for Merkel cell formation but is dispensable for HFSCs. Together, our studies uncover SOX9(+) cells as precursors of Merkel cells and show the requirement for FGFR2-mediated epithelial signalling in Merkel cell specification.

  9. Symmetry breaking, germ layer specification and axial organisation in aggregates of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Susanne C; Baillie-Johnson, Peter; Balayo, Tina; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Nowotschin, Sonja; Turner, David A; Martinez Arias, Alfonso

    2014-11-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) are clonal populations derived from preimplantation mouse embryos that can be propagated in vitro and, when placed into blastocysts, contribute to all tissues of the embryo and integrate into the normal morphogenetic processes, i.e. they are pluripotent. However, although they can be steered to differentiate in vitro into all cell types of the organism, they cannot organise themselves into structures that resemble embryos. When aggregated into embryoid bodies they develop disorganised masses of different cell types with little spatial coherence. An exception to this rule is the emergence of retinas and anterior cortex-like structures under minimal culture conditions. These structures emerge from the cultures without any axial organisation. Here, we report that small aggregates of mESCs, of about 300 cells, self-organise into polarised structures that exhibit collective behaviours reminiscent of those that cells exhibit in early mouse embryos, including symmetry breaking, axial organisation, germ layer specification and cell behaviour, as well as axis elongation. The responses are signal specific and uncouple processes that in the embryo are tightly associated, such as specification of the anteroposterior axis and anterior neural development, or endoderm specification and axial elongation. We discuss the meaning and implications of these observations and the potential uses of these structures which, because of their behaviour, we suggest to call 'gastruloids'. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Interhospital Variability in Perioperative Red Blood Cell Ordering Patterns in United States Pediatric Surgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Rachel M; Thurm, Cary W; Rothstein, David H

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate perioperative red blood cell (RBC) ordering and interhospital variability patterns in pediatric patients undergoing surgical interventions at US children's hospitals. This is a multicenter cross-sectional study of children aged blood type and crossmatch were included when done on the day before or the day of the surgical procedure. The RBC transfusions included were those given on the day of or the day after surgery. The type and crossmatch-to-transfusion ratio (TCTR) was calculated for each surgical procedure. An adjusted model for interhospital variability was created to account for variation in patient population by age, sex, race/ethnicity, payer type, and presence/number of complex chronic conditions (CCCs) per patient. A total of 357 007 surgical interventions were identified across all participating hospitals. Blood type and crossmatch was performed 55 632 times, and 13 736 transfusions were provided, for a TCTR of 4:1. There was an association between increasing age and TCTR (R(2) = 0.43). Patients with multiple CCCs had lower TCTRs, with a stronger relationship (R(2) = 0.77). There was broad variability in adjusted TCTRs among hospitals (range, 2.5-25). The average TCTR in US children's hospitals was double that of adult surgical data, and was associated with wide interhospital variability. Age and the presence of CCCs markedly influenced this ratio. Studies to evaluate optimal preoperative RBC ordering and standardization of practices could potentially decrease unnecessary costs and wasted blood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An Integrated Workflow To Assess Technical and Biological Variability of Cell Population Frequencies in Human Peripheral Blood by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, Julie G; Qian, Yu; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia; Weiskopf, Daniela; Zapardiel-Gonzalo, Jose; Taplitz, Randy; Gilman, Robert H; Saito, Mayuko; de Silva, Aruna D; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Scheuermann, Richard H; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2017-02-15

    In the context of large-scale human system immunology studies, controlling for technical and biological variability is crucial to ensure that experimental data support research conclusions. In this study, we report on a universal workflow to evaluate both technical and biological variation in multiparameter flow cytometry, applied to the development of a 10-color panel to identify all major cell populations and T cell subsets in cryopreserved PBMC. Replicate runs from a control donation and comparison of different gating strategies assessed the technical variability associated with each cell population and permitted the calculation of a quality control score. Applying our panel to a large collection of PBMC samples, we found that most cell populations showed low intraindividual variability over time. In contrast, certain subpopulations such as CD56 T cells and Temra CD4 T cells were associated with high interindividual variability. Age but not gender had a significant effect on the frequency of several populations, with a drastic decrease in naive T cells observed in older donors. Ethnicity also influenced a significant proportion of immune cell population frequencies, emphasizing the need to account for these covariates in immune profiling studies. We also exemplify the usefulness of our workflow by identifying a novel cell-subset signature of latent tuberculosis infection. Thus, our study provides a universal workflow to establish and evaluate any flow cytometry panel in systems immunology studies. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Induction of Live Cell Phagocytosis by a Specific Combination of Inflammatory Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Ishidome

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Conditions of severe hyper-inflammation can lead to uncontrolled activation of macrophages, and the ensuing phagocytosis of live cells. However, relationships between inflammatory stimuli and uncontrolled phagocytosis of live cells by macrophages are poorly understood. To identify mediators of this process, we established phagocytosis assays of live cells by stimulating macrophages with CpG DNA, interferon-γ, and anti-interleukin-10 receptor antibody. In this model, various cell surface receptors were upregulated on macrophages, and phagocytosis of live cells was induced in a Rac1-dependent manner. Subsequent inhibition of the ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and both of these receptors abolished in vitro and in vivo phagocytosis of live T cells, myeloid cells, and B cells, respectively. Specifically, the reduction in lymphocyte numbers due to in vivo activation of macrophages was ameliorated in Icam-1-deficient mice. In addition, overexpression of ICAM-1 or VCAM-1 in non-phagocytic NIH3T3 cells led to active phagocytosis of live cells. These data indicate molecular mechanisms underlying live cell phagocytosis induced by hyper-inflammation, and this experimental model will be useful to clarify the pathophysiological mechanisms of hemophagocytosis and to indicate therapeutic targets.

  13. Virus-specific regulatory T cells ameliorate encephalitis by repressing effector T cell functions from priming to effector stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Zhao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the presence of pathogen-specific Foxp3+ CD4 regulatory T cells (Treg in infected animals, but little is known about where and how these cells affect the effector T cell responses and whether they are more suppressive than bulk Treg populations. We recently showed the presence of both epitope M133-specific Tregs (M133 Treg and conventional CD4 T cells (M133 Tconv in the brains of mice with coronavirus-induced encephalitis. Here, we provide new insights into the interactions between pathogenic Tconv and Tregs responding to the same epitope. M133 Tregs inhibited the proliferation but not initial activation of M133 Tconv in draining lymph nodes (DLN. Further, M133 Tregs inhibited migration of M133 Tconv from the DLN. In addition, M133 Tregs diminished microglia activation and decreased the number and function of Tconv in the infected brain. Thus, virus-specific Tregs inhibited pathogenic CD4 T cell responses during priming and effector stages, particularly those recognizing cognate antigen, and decreased mortality and morbidity without affecting virus clearance. These cells are more suppressive than bulk Tregs and provide a targeted approach to ameliorating immunopathological disease in infectious settings.

  14. iPSC-Derived Regulatory Dendritic Cells Inhibit Allograft Rejection by Generating Alloantigen-Specific Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songjie Cai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory dendritic cell (DCregs-based immunotherapy is a potential therapeutic tool for transplant rejection. We generated DCregs from murine induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, which could remain in a “stable immature stage” even under strong stimulation. Harnessing this characteristic, we hypothesized that iPS-DCregs worked as a negative vaccine to generate regulatory T cells (Tregs, and induced donor-specific allograft acceptance. We immunized naive CBA (H-2Kk mice with B6 (H-2Kb iPS-DCregs and found that Tregs (CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ significantly increased in CBA splenocytes. Moreover, immunized CBA recipients permanently accepted B6 cardiac grafts in a donor-specific pattern. We demonstrated mechanistically that donor-type iPS-DCregs triggered transforming growth factor β1 secretion, under which the donor-antigen peptides directed naive CD4+ T cells to differentiate into donor-specific FOXP3+ Tregs instead of into effector T cells in vivo. These findings highlight the potential of iPS-DCregs as a key cell therapy resource in clinical transplantation.

  15. Transfer of mRNA Encoding Invariant NKT Cell Receptors Imparts Glycolipid Specific Responses to T Cells and γδT Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Yamasaki, Satoru; Kawamura, Masami; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Sato, Yusuke; Iyoda, Tomonori; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies using genetically engineered lymphocytes expressing antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) hold promise for the treatment of several types of cancers. Almost all studies using this modality have focused on transfer of TCR from CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). The transfer of TCR from innate lymphocytes to other lymphocytes has not been studied. In the current study, innate and adaptive lymphocytes were transfected with the human NKT cell-derived TCRα and β chain mRNA (the Vα24 and Vβ11 TCR chains). When primary T cells transfected with NKT cell-derived TCR were subsequently stimulated with the NKT ligand, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), they secreted IFN-γ in a ligand-specific manner. Furthermore when γδT cells were transfected with NKT cell-derived TCR mRNA, they demonstrated enhanced proliferation, IFN-γ production and antitumor effects after α-GalCer stimulation as compared to parental γδT cells. Importantly, NKT cell TCR-transfected γδT cells responded to both NKT cell and γδT cell ligands, rendering them bi-potential innate lymphocytes. Because NKT cell receptors are unique and universal invariant receptors in humans, the TCR chains do not yield mispaired receptors with endogenous TCR α and β chains after the transfection. The transfection of NKT cell TCR has the potential to be a new approach to tumor immunotherapy in patients with various types of cancer.

  16. Variability in surface antigen expression on neuroblastoma cells as revealed by monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malpas, J.S.; Kemshead, J.T.; Pritchard, J.; Greaves, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    In treatment programmes for neuroblastoma involving autologous bone marrow transplantation, a problem exists in the identification of small numbers of metastatic tumour cells present in the marrow aspirates. Reinfusion of tumour cells along with normal bone marrow may reseed the tumour within a patient who has received high dose chemotherapy. Formalin-induced fluorescence in neuroblastoma is a possible diagnostic aid, but this method has no therapeutic potential. Other methods of detecting tumour relying on gross physiological changes in the patient are not suitable for diagnosis of minimal metastatic disease. As an immunological approach to the problem, rabbit antisera to neuroblastoma have been raised but these reagents suffer from low titre after absorption to make them specific. The authors have used the technique of somatic cell hybridisation to raise monoclonal antibodies which bind to neuroblastoma cells and not to normal haemopoietic progenitors. A panel of such reagents to demonstrate heterogeneity in antigen expression amongst metastatic neuroblastoma cells was employed in a radioimmunoassay as diagnostic aid for this problem. (Auth.)

  17. Standard Specification for Physical Characteristics of Nonconcentrator Terrestrial Photovoltaic Reference Cells

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This specification describes the physical requirements for primary and secondary terrestrial nonconcentrator photovoltaic reference cells. A reference cell is defined as a device that meets the requirements of this specification and is calibrated in accordance with Test Method E1125 or Test Method E1362. 1.2 Reference cells are used in the determination of the electrical performance of photovoltaic devices, as stated in Test Methods E948 and E1036. 1.3 Two reference cell physical specifications are described: 1.3.1 Small-Cell Package Design—A small, durable package with a low thermal mass, wide optical field-of-view, and standardized dimensions intended for photovoltaic devices up to 20 by 20 mm, and 1.3.2 Module-Package Design—A package intended to simulate the optical and thermal properties of a photovoltaic module design, but electric connections are made to only one photovoltaic cell in order to eliminate problems with calibrating series and parallel connections of cells. Physical dimensions ...

  18. CD25 targeted therapy of chemotherapy resistant leukemic stem cells using DR5 specific TRAIL peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakasam Madhumathi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy resistant leukemic stem cells (LSCs are being targeted as a modern therapeutic approach to prevent disease relapse. LSCs isolated from methotrexate resistant side population (SP of leukemic cell lines HL60 and MOLT4 exhibited high levels of CD25 and TRAIL R2/DR5 which are potential targets. Recombinant immunotoxin conjugating IL2α with TRAIL peptide mimetic was constructed for DR5 receptor specific targeting of LSCs and were tested in total cell population and LSCs. IL2-TRAIL peptide induced apoptosis in drug resistant SP cells from cell lines and showed potent cytotoxicity in PBMCs derived from leukemic patients with an efficacy of 81.25% in AML and 100% in CML, ALL and CLL. IL2-TRAIL peptide showed cytotoxicity in relapsed patient samples and was more effective than TRAIL or IL2-TRAIL proteins. Additionally, DR5 specific IL2-TRAIL peptide was effective in targeting and killing LSCs purified from cell lines [IC50: 952 nM in HL60, 714 nM in MOLT4] and relapsed patient blood samples with higher efficacy (85% than IL2-TRAIL protein (46%. Hence, CD25 and DR5 specific targeting by IL2-TRAIL peptide may be an effective strategy for targeting drug resistant leukemic cells and LSCs.

  19. Quantitative measurement of pathogen specific human memory T cell repertoire diversity using a CDR3β-specific microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorski Jack

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Providing quantitative microarray data that is sensitive to very small differences in target sequence would be a useful tool in any number of venues where a sample can consist of a multiple related sequences present in various abundances. Examples of such applications would include measurement of pseudo species in viral infections and the measurement of species of antibodies or T cell receptors that constitute immune repertoires. Difficulties that must be overcome in such a method would be to account for cross-hybridization and for differences in hybridization efficiencies between the arrayed probes and their corresponding targets. We have used the memory T cell repertoire to an influenza-derived peptide as a test case for developing such a method. Results The arrayed probes were corresponded to a 17 nucleotide TCR-specific region that distinguished sequences differing by as little as a single nucleotide. Hybridization efficiency between highly related Cy5-labeled subject sequences was normalized by including an equimolar mixture of Cy3-labeled synthetic targets representing all 108 arrayed probes. The same synthetic targets were used to measure the degree of cross hybridization between probes. Reconstitution studies fou