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Sample records for cell specific expression

  1. Cell population-specific expression analysis of human cerebellum

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    Kuhn Alexandre

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpreting gene expression profiles obtained from heterogeneous samples can be difficult because bulk gene expression measures are not resolved to individual cell populations. We have recently devised Population-Specific Expression Analysis (PSEA, a statistical method that identifies individual cell types expressing genes of interest and achieves quantitative estimates of cell type-specific expression levels. This procedure makes use of marker gene expression and circumvents the need for additional experimental information like tissue composition. Results To systematically assess the performance of statistical deconvolution, we applied PSEA to gene expression profiles from cerebellum tissue samples and compared with parallel, experimental separation methods. Owing to the particular histological organization of the cerebellum, we could obtain cellular expression data from in situ hybridization and laser-capture microdissection experiments and successfully validated computational predictions made with PSEA. Upon statistical deconvolution of whole tissue samples, we identified a set of transcripts showing age-related expression changes in the astrocyte population. Conclusions PSEA can predict cell-type specific expression levels from tissues homogenates on a genome-wide scale. It thus represents a computational alternative to experimental separation methods and allowed us to identify age-related expression changes in the astrocytes of the cerebellum. These molecular changes might underlie important physiological modifications previously observed in the aging brain.

  2. Cardiomyocyte expression and cell-specific processing of procholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens P.; Johnsen, Anders H.; Kistorp, Caroline;

    2015-01-01

    Heart muscle cells produce peptide hormones such as natriuretic peptides. Developing hearts also express the gene for the classic intestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) in amounts similar to those in the intestine and brain. However, cardiac expression of peptides other than natriuretic peptides...... has only been suggested using transcriptional measures or methods, with the post-translational phase of gene expression unaddressed. In this study, we examined the cardiac expression of the CCK gene in adult mammals and its expression at the protein level. Using quantitative PCR, a library of sequence......-specific pro-CCK assays, peptide purification, and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that the mammalian heart expresses pro-CCK in amounts comparable to natriuretic prohormones and processes it to a unique, triple-sulfated, and N-terminally truncated product distinct from intestinal and cerebral CCK peptides...

  3. Cell-specific information processing in segregating populations of Eph receptor ephrin-expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Sherman, Andrew; Chen, Ginny I; Pasculescu, Adrian; Poliakov, Alexei; Hsiung, Marilyn; Larsen, Brett; Wilkinson, David G; Linding, Rune; Pawson, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Cells have self-organizing properties that control their behavior in complex tissues. Contact between cells expressing either B-type Eph receptors or their transmembrane ephrin ligands initiates bidirectional signals that regulate cell positioning. However, simultaneously investigating how...... information is processed in two interacting cell types remains a challenge. We implemented a proteomic strategy to systematically determine cell-specific signaling networks underlying EphB2- and ephrin-B1-controlled cell sorting. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of mixed populations of EphB2- and...... revealed that signaling between mixed EphB2- and ephrin-B1-expressing cells is asymmetric and that the distinct cell types use different tyrosine kinases and targets to process signals induced by cell-cell contact. We provide systems- and cell-specific network models of contact-initiated signaling between...

  4. Quantitative analysis of cell-type specific gene expression in the green alga Volvox carteri

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    Hallmann Armin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multicellular alga Volvox carteri possesses only two cell types: mortal, motile somatic cells and potentially immortal, immotile reproductive cells. It is therefore an attractive model system for studying how cell-autonomous cytodifferentiation is programmed within a genome. Moreover, there are ongoing genome projects both in Volvox carteri and in the closely related unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. However, gene sequencing is only the beginning. To identify cell-type specific expression and to determine relative expression rates, we evaluate the potential of real-time RT-PCR for quantifying gene transcript levels. Results Here we analyze a diversified pool of 39 target genes by real-time RT-PCR for each cell type. This gene pool contains previously known genes with unknown localization of cellular expression, 28 novel genes which are described in this study for the first time, and a few known, cell-type specific genes as a control. The respective gene products are, for instance, part of photosynthesis, cellular regulation, stress response, or transport processes. We provide expression data for all these genes. Conclusion The results show that quantitative real-time RT-PCR is a favorable approach to analyze cell-type specific gene expression in Volvox, which can be extended to a much larger number of genes or to developmental or metabolic mutants. Our expression data also provide a basis for a detailed analysis of individual, previously unknown, cell-type specifically expressed genes.

  5. Onset of cell-specific gene expression in the developing mouse pancreas.

    OpenAIRE

    Gittes, G K; Rutter, W J

    1992-01-01

    A central question in developmental biology has been the initiation of cell-specific gene expression and its temporal relationship to morphogenesis. We have coupled embryo microdissection with the exquisite sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction to define the onset of cell-specific gene expression during pancreatic organogenesis. Using the precise assignment of gestational age by the number of somites in each embryo, we determined the onset of transcription of major genes of the endocri...

  6. Lineage-specific expression of bestrophin-2 and bestrophin-4 in human intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ito, Go; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Murano, Tatsuro;

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate the absorption and secretion of anions, such as HCO3(-) or Cl(-). Bestrophin genes represent a newly identified group of calcium-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs). Studies have suggested that, among the four human bestrophin-family genes, bestrophin-2...... (BEST2) and bestrophin-4 (BEST4) might be expressed within the intestinal tissue. Consistently, a study showed that BEST2 is expressed by human colonic goblet cells. However, their precise expression pattern along the gastrointestinal tract, or the lineage specificity of the cells expressing these genes...

  7. Embryonic Stem Cell (ES)-Specific Enhancers Specify the Expression Potential of ES Genes in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Aran, Dvir; Abu-Remaileh, Monther; Levy, Revital; Meron, Nurit; Toperoff, Gidon; Edrei, Yifat; Bergman, Yehudit; Hellman, Asaf

    2016-01-01

    Cancers often display gene expression profiles resembling those of undifferentiated cells. The mechanisms controlling these expression programs have yet to be identified. Exploring transcriptional enhancers throughout hematopoietic cell development and derived cancers, we uncovered a novel class of regulatory epigenetic mutations. These epimutations are particularly enriched in a group of enhancers, designated ES-specific enhancers (ESSEs) of the hematopoietic cell lineage. We found that hema...

  8. Ontogenesis and cell specific localization of Fas ligand expression in the rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abrizio, Piera; Baldini, Enke; Russo, Paola F; Biordi, Leda; Graziano, Filomena M; Rucci, Nadia; Properzi, Giuliana; Francavilla, Sandro; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2004-10-01

    Over the past few years, a number of experimental evidences suggested the involvement of Fas Ligand (FasL) expressing Sertoli cells to induce apoptosis of Fas bearing germ cells. However, the FasL expression during testicular development and its cell specific localization within the testis is still a matter of debate. In the present study, we have monitored FasL expression during rat testis development by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and evaluated cell specific localization of FasL expression, by in situ RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, on adult rat testis. RT-PCR analysis, performed on total RNA from rat testes obtained from 1 day up to 1-year-old animals, demonstrated the presence of FasL transcripts at all developmental stages examined. In situ RT-PCR analysis clearly indicated the presence of FasL mRNA in Sertoli cells of adult testis, while we could never detect FasL transcripts in germ cells. Immunohistochemistry experiments showed a strong immunostaining for FasL in Sertoli cells of adult testis and again, no immunopositivity was observed in germ cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that FasL expression in rat testis is present from the early postnatal days up to the adult, and the Sertoli cells is the main FasL expressing cell within the seminiferous tubule. PMID:15379972

  9. Gene expression profiles of hepatic cell-type specific marker genes in progression of liver fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiyuki Takahara; Mitsuo Takahashi; Hiroki Wagatsuma; Fumihiko Yokoya; Qing-Wei Zhang; Mutsuyo Yamaguchi; Hiroyuki Aburatani; Norifumi Kawada

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the gene expression profile data for the whole liver during development of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced hepatic fibrosis.METHODS: Marker genes were identified for different types of hepatic cells, including hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), Kupffer cells (including other inflammatory cells),and hepatocytes, using independent temporal DNA microarray data obtained from isolated hepatic cells.RESULTS: The cell-type analysis of gene expression gave several key results and led to formation of three hypotheses: (1) changes in the expression of HSCspecific marker genes during fibrosis were similar to gene expression data in in vitro cultured HSCs, suggesting a major role of the self-activating characteristics of HSCs in formation of fibrosis; (2) expression of mast cell-specific marker genes reached a peak during liver fibrosis,suggesting a possible role of mast cells in formation of fibrosis; and (3) abnormal expression of hepatocytespecific marker genes was found across several metabolic pathways during fibrosis, including sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and drug metabolism, suggesting a mechanistic relationship between these abnormalities and symptoms of liver fibrosis.CONCLUSION: Analysis of marker genes for specific hepatic cell types can identify the key aspects of fibrogenesis. Sequential activation of inflammatory cells and the self-supporting properties of HSCs play an important role in development of fibrosis.

  10. Analysis of cell-type-specific gene expression during mouse spermatogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Nielsen, John E; Hansen, Martin Asser;

    2004-01-01

    In rodents, changes in gene expression during spermatogenesis can be monitored by sampling testis from each day during postnatal development. However, changes in gene expression at the tissue level can reflect changes in the concentration of an mRNA in a specific cell type, changes in volume of s...

  11. T cells expressing CD19-specific Engager Molecules for the Immunotherapy of CD19-positive Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Mireya Paulina Velasquez; David Torres; Kota Iwahori; Sunitha Kakarla; Caroline Arber; Tania Rodriguez-Cruz; Arpad Szoor; Bonifant, Challice L.; Claudia Gerken; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Xiao-Tong Song; Stephen Gottschalk

    2016-01-01

    T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or the infusion of bispecific T-cell engagers (BITEs) have shown antitumor activity in humans for CD19-positive malignancies. While BITEs redirect the large reservoir of resident T cells to tumors, CAR T cells rely on significant in vivo expansion to exert antitumor activity. We have shown that it is feasible to modify T cells to secrete solid tumor antigen-specific BITEs, enabling T cells to redirect resident T cells to tumor cells. To ada...

  12. ROW1 maintains quiescent centre identity by confining WOX5 expression to specific cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yuzhou; Jiao, Yue; Liu, Zhaohui; Zhu, Yu-Xian

    2015-01-01

    The quiescent centre (QC) in the Arabidopsis root apical meristem is essential for stem cell organization. Here we show that the loss of REPRESSOR OF WUSCHEL1 (ROW1), a PHD domain-containing protein, leads to QC failure, defects in cell differentiation and ectopic expression of WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 5 (WOX5) in cells that normally express ROW1. The wox5-1/row1-3 double mutants show similar phenotypes to wox5-1 indicating that WOX5 is epistatic to ROW1. ROW1 specifically binds trimethylated...

  13. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  14. Cell-Specific Expression of Connexins and Evidence of Restricted Gap Junctional Coupling between Glial Cells and between Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Rash, John E.; Yasumura, Thomas; Dudek, F. Edward; NAGY, JAMES I.

    2001-01-01

    The transmembrane connexin proteins of gap junctions link extracellularly to form channels for cell-to-cell exchange of ions and small molecules. Two primary hypotheses of gap junction coupling in the CNS are the following: (1) generalized coupling occurs between neurons and glia, with some connexins expressed in both neurons and glia, and (2) intercellular junctional coupling is restricted to specific coupling partners, with different connexins expressed in each cell type. There is consensus...

  15. Expression of Pigment Cell-Specific Genes in the Ontogenesis of the Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageenko, Natalya V; Kiselev, Konstantin V; Odintsova, Nelly A

    2011-01-01

    One of the polyketide compounds, the naphthoquinone pigment echinochrome, is synthesized in sea urchin pigment cells. We analyzed polyketide synthase (pks) and sulfotransferase (sult) gene expression in embryos and larvae of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius from various stages of development and in specific tissues of the adults. We observed the highest level of expression of the pks and sult genes at the gastrula stage. In unfertilized eggs, only trace amounts of the pks and sult transcripts were detected, whereas no transcripts of these genes were observed in spermatozoids. The addition of shikimic acid, a precursor of naphthoquinone pigments, to zygotes and embryos increased the expression of the pks and sult genes. Our findings, including the development of specific conditions to promote pigment cell differentiation of embryonic sea urchin cells in culture, represent a definitive study on the molecular signaling pathways that are involved in the biosynthesis of pigments during sea urchin development. PMID:21804858

  16. Expression of Pigment Cell-Specific Genes in the Ontogenesis of the Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius

    OpenAIRE

    Natalya V. Ageenko; Konstantin V. Kiselev; Odintsova, Nelly A.

    2011-01-01

    One of the polyketide compounds, the naphthoquinone pigment echinochrome, is synthesized in sea urchin pigment cells. We analyzed polyketide synthase (pks) and sulfotransferase (sult) gene expression in embryos and larvae of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius from various stages of development and in specific tissues of the adults. We observed the highest level of expression of the pks and sult genes at the gastrula stage. In unfertilized eggs, only trace amounts of the pks and sul...

  17. Transcription factor co-localization patterns affect human cell type-specific gene expression

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    Wang Dennis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular development requires the precise control of gene expression states. Transcription factors are involved in this regulatory process through their combinatorial binding with DNA. Information about transcription factor binding sites can help determine which combinations of factors work together to regulate a gene, but it is unclear how far the binding data from one cell type can inform about regulation in other cell types. Results By integrating data on co-localized transcription factor binding sites in the K562 cell line with expression data across 38 distinct hematopoietic cell types, we developed regression models to describe the relationship between the expression of target genes and the transcription factors that co-localize nearby. With K562 binding sites identifying the predictors, the proportion of expression explained by the models is statistically significant only for monocytic cells (p-valueFOS, TAF1 and YY1 to a sparsely studied gene LRIG2. We also find that the activity of a transcription factor may be different depending on the cell type and the identity of other co-localized factors. Conclusion Our approach shows that gene expression can be explained by a modest number of co-localized transcription factors, however, information on cell-type specific binding is crucial for understanding combinatorial gene regulation.

  18. Antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies isolated from B cells expressing constitutively active STAT5.

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    Ferenc A Scheeren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fully human monoclonal antibodies directed against specific pathogens have a high therapeutic potential, but are difficult to generate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Memory B cells were immortalized by expressing an inducible active mutant of the transcription factor Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5. Active STAT5 inhibits the differentiation of B cells while increasing their replicative life span. We obtained cloned B cell lines, which produced antibodies in the presence of interleukin 21 after turning off STAT5. We used this method to obtain monoclonal antibodies against the model antigen tetanus toxin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we describe a novel and relatively simple method of immortalizing antigen-specific human B cells for isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. These results show that STAT5 overexpression can be employed to isolate antigen specific antibodies from human memory B cells.

  19. Human rotavirus specific T cells: quantification by ELISPOT and expression of homing receptors on CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an intracellular cytokine assay, we recently showed that the frequencies of rotavirus (RV)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells secreting INFγ, circulating in RV infected and healthy adults, are very low compared to the frequencies of circulating cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactive T cells in comparable individuals. In children with acute RV infection, these T cells were barely or not detectable. In the present study, an ELISPOT assay enabled detection of circulating RV-specific INFγ-secreting cells in children with RV diarrhea but not in children with non-RV diarrhea without evidence of a previous RV infection. Using microbead-enriched CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets, IFNγ-secreting RV-specific CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells were detected in recently infected children. Using the same approach, both CD4+ and CD8+ RV-specific T cells were detected in healthy adults. Furthermore, stimulation of purified subsets of PBMC that express lymphocyte homing receptors demonstrated that RV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4+ T cells from adult volunteers preferentially express the intestinal homing receptor α4β7, but not the peripheral lymph node homing receptor L-selectin. In contrast, CMV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4+ T cells preferentially express L-selectin but not α4β7. These results suggest that the expression of homing receptors on virus-specific T cells depends on the organ where these cells were originally stimulated and that their capacity to secrete INFγ is independent of the expression of these homing receptors

  20. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta; Ozono, Eiko; Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P; Komori, Hideyuki; Ohtani, Kiyoshi

    2014-07-18

    In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter is activated by E2F only in cancer cells and therefore may be more cancer cell-specific than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. We show here that the ARF promoter has lower activity in normal growing fibroblasts and shows higher cancer cell-specificity compared to the E2F1 promoter. We also demonstrate that adenovirus expressing HSV

  1. GFAP promoter directs lacZ expression specifically in a rat hepatic stellate cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gunter Maubach; Michelle Chin Chia Lim; Chun-Yan Zhang; Lang Zhuo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: The GFAP was traditionally considered to be a biomarker for neural glia (mainly astrocytes and nonmyelinating Schwann cells). Genetically, a 2.2-kb human GFAP promoter has been successfully used to target astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. More recently, GFAP was also established as one of the several makers for identifying hepatic stellate cells (HSC). In this project,possible application of the same 2.2-kb human GFAP promoter for targeting HSC was investigated.METHODS: The GFAP-lacZ transgene was transfected into various cell lines (HSC, hepatocyte, and other nonHSC cell types). The transgene expression specificity was determined by X-gal staining of the β-galactosidase activity. And the responsiveness of the transgene was tested with a typical pro-fibrotic cytokine TGF-β1. The expression of endogenous GFAP gene was assessed by real-time RT-PCR, providing a reference for the transgene expression.RESULTS: The results demonstrated for the first time that the 2.2 kb hGFAP promoter was not only capable of directing HSC-specific expression, but also responding to a known pro-fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1 by upregulation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, similar to the endogenous GFAP.CONCLUSION: In conclusion, these findings suggested novel utilities for using the GFAP promoter to specifically manipulate HSC for therapeutic purpose.

  2. Receptors for B cell stimulatory factor 2. Quantitation, specificity, distribution, and regulation of their expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taga, T.; Kawanishi, Y.; Hardy, R.R.; Hirano, T.; Kishimoto, T.

    1987-10-01

    B cell stimulatory factor 2 receptors (BSF-2-R) were studied using radioiodinated recombinant BSF-2 with a specific activity of 6.16 X 10(13) cpm/g. Kinetic studies showed that binding of /sup 125/I-BSF-2 to CESS cells reached maximum level within 150 min at 0 degrees C. There was a single class of receptors with high affinity (Kd 3.4 X 10(-10) M) on CESS, and the number of receptors was 2700 per cell. Binding of /sup 125/I-BSF-2 to CESS was competitively inhibited by unlabeled BSF-2 but not by IL-1, IL-2, IFN-beta, IFN-gamma, and G-CSF, indicating the presence of the receptors specific for BSF-2. EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (CESS, SKW6-CL4, LCL13, and LCL14) expressed BSF-2-R, whereas Burkitt's lines did not. EBV or EBNA2 did not induce the expression of the receptors on Burkitt's cells. The plasma cell lines (ARH-77 and U266) expressed BSF-2-R, fitting the function of BSF-2 as plasma cell growth factor. Several other cell lines, the histiocytic line U937, the promyelocytic line HL60, the astrocytoma line U373 and the glioblastoma line SK-MG-4, in which BSF-2 was inducible with IL-1 or TPA, displayed BSF-2-R with Kd in the range of 1.3-6.4 X 10(-10) M, suggesting the autocrine mechanism in BSF-2 function. The four T cell lines (CEM, HSB, Jurkat, and OM 1) did not express a detectable number of receptors, but normal resting T cells expressed 100-1000 receptors per cell. BSF-2-R were not present on normal resting B cells but expressed on activated B cells with a Kd of 3.6-5.0 X 10(-10) M, fitting the function of BSF-2, which acts on B cells at the final maturation stage to induce immunoglobulin production.

  3. Gene Expression Programs in Response to Hypoxia: Cell Type Specificity and Prognostic Significance in Human Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inadequate oxygen (hypoxia triggers a multifaceted cellular response that has important roles in normal physiology and in many human diseases. A transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, plays a central role in the hypoxia response; its activity is regulated by the oxygen-dependent degradation of the HIF-1alpha protein. Despite the ubiquity and importance of hypoxia responses, little is known about the variation in the global transcriptional response to hypoxia among different cell types or how this variation might relate to tissue- and cell-specific diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We analyzed the temporal changes in global transcript levels in response to hypoxia in primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, breast epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells with DNA microarrays. The extent of the transcriptional response to hypoxia was greatest in the renal tubule cells. This heightened response was associated with a uniquely high level of HIF-1alpha RNA in renal cells, and it could be diminished by reducing HIF-1alpha expression via RNA interference. A gene-expression signature of the hypoxia response, derived from our studies of cultured mammary and renal tubular epithelial cells, showed coordinated variation in several human cancers, and was a strong predictor of clinical outcomes in breast and ovarian cancers. In an analysis of a large, published gene-expression dataset from breast cancers, we found that the prognostic information in the hypoxia signature was virtually independent of that provided by the previously reported wound signature and more predictive of outcomes than any of the clinical parameters in current use. CONCLUSIONS: The transcriptional response to hypoxia varies among human cells. Some of this variation is traceable to variation in expression of the HIF1A gene. A gene-expression signature of the cellular response to hypoxia is associated with a significantly poorer prognosis

  4. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  5. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Ozono, Eiko [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary, University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, 12800 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Komori, Hideyuki [Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ohtani, Kiyoshi, E-mail: btm88939@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  6. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E; Ladell, Kristin; Buus, Anette Stryhn; Koofhethile, Catherine; Brener, Jacqui; Chen, Fabian; Riddell, Lynn; Graziano, Luzzi; Klenerman, Paul; Leslie, Alasdair; Buus, Søren; Price, David A; Goulder, Philip

    2014-01-01

    ) clonotypes within individual HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations was also apparent, independent of clonal dominance hierarchies. Positive correlations were detected between PD-1 expression and plasma viral load, which were reinforced by stratification for epitope sequence stability and dictated by...... effector memory CD8+ T cells. CONCLUSION: Collectively, these data suggest that PD-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells tracks antigen load at the level of epitope specificity and TCR clonotype usage. These findings are important because they provide evidence that PD-1 expression levels are......OBJECTIVES: Although CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the control of HIV-1 infection,their antiviral efficacy can be limited by antigenic variation and immune exhaustion.The latter phenomenon is characterized by the upregulation of multiple inhibitory receptors, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1...

  7. The evolutionary emergence of cell type-specific genes inferred from the gene expression analysis of Hydra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jung Shan; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Hayakawa, Shiho; Osato, Naoki; Nishimiya-Fujisawa, Chiemi; Ikeo, Kazuho; David, Charles N.; Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Gojobori, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Cell lineages of cnidarians including Hydra represent the fundamental cell types of metazoans and provides us a unique opportunity to study the evolutionary diversification of cell type in the animal kingdom. Hydra contains epithelial cells as well as a multipotent interstitial cell (I-cell) that gives rise to nematocytes, nerve cells, gland cells, and germ-line cells. We used cDNA microarrays to identify cell type-specific genes by comparing gene expression in normal Hydra with animals lacking the I-cell lineage, so-called epithelial Hydra. We then performed in situ hybridization to localize expression to specific cell types. Eighty-six genes were shown to be expressed in specific cell types of the I-cell lineage. An additional 29 genes were expressed in epithelial cells and were down-regulated in epithelial animals lacking I-cells. Based on the above information, we constructed a database (http://hydra.lab.nig.ac.jp/hydra/), which describes the expression patterns of cell type-specific genes in Hydra. Most genes expressed specifically in either I-cells or epithelial cells have homologues in higher metazoans. By comparison, most nematocyte-specific genes and approximately half of the gland cell- and nerve cell-specific genes are unique to the cnidarian lineage. Because nematocytes, gland cells, and nerve cells appeared along with the emergence of cnidarians, this suggests that lineage-specific genes arose in cnidarians in conjunction with the evolution of new cell types required by the cnidarians. PMID:17766437

  8. Novel strong tissue specific promoter for gene expression in human germ cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmin Denis

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue specific promoters may be utilized for a variety of applications, including programmed gene expression in cell types, tissues and organs of interest, for developing different cell culture models or for use in gene therapy. We report a novel, tissue-specific promoter that was identified and engineered from the native upstream regulatory region of the human gene NDUFV1 containing an endogenous retroviral sequence. Results Among seven established human cell lines and five primary cultures, this modified NDUFV1 upstream sequence (mNUS was active only in human undifferentiated germ-derived cells (lines Tera-1 and EP2102, where it demonstrated high promoter activity (~twice greater than that of the SV40 early promoter, and comparable to the routinely used cytomegaloviral promoter. To investigate the potential applicability of the mNUS promoter for biotechnological needs, a construct carrying a recombinant cytosine deaminase (RCD suicide gene under the control of mNUS was tested in cell lines of different tissue origin. High cytotoxic effect of RCD with a cell-death rate ~60% was observed only in germ-derived cells (Tera-1, whereas no effect was seen in a somatic, kidney-derived control cell line (HEK293. In further experiments, we tested mNUS-driven expression of a hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposase (SB100X. The mNUS-SB100X construct mediated stable transgene insertions exclusively in germ-derived cells, thereby providing further evidence of tissue-specificity of the mNUS promoter. Conclusions We conclude that mNUS may be used as an efficient promoter for tissue-specific gene expression in human germ-derived cells in many applications. Our data also suggest that the 91 bp-long sequence located exactly upstream NDUFV1 transcriptional start site plays a crucial role in the activity of this gene promoter in vitro in the majority of tested cell types (10/12, and an important role - in the rest two cell lines.

  9. Upregulation of T-Cell-Specific Transcription Factor Expression in Pediatric T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müge Sayitoğlu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is associated with recurrent chromosomal aberrations and abnormal ectopic gene expression during T-cell development. In order to gain insight into the pathogenesis of T-ALL this study aimed to measure the level of expression of 7 T-cell oncogenes (LMO2, LYL1, TAL1, TLX1, TLX3, BMI1, and CALM-AF10 in pediatric T-ALL patients. METHODS: LMO2, LYL1, TLX1, TLX3, BMI1, TAL1, and CALM-AF10 expression was measured using quantitative real-time PCR in 43 pediatric T-ALL patients. RESULTS: A high level of expression of LMO2, LYL1, TAL1, and BMI1 genes was observed in a large group of T-ALL. Several gene expression signatures indicative of leukemic arrest at specific stages of normal thymocyte development (LYL1 and LMO2 were highly expressed during the cortical and mature stages of T-cell development. Furthermore, upregulated TAL1 and BMI1 expression was observed in all phenotypic subgroups. In all, 6 of the patients had TLX1 and TLX3 proto-oncogene expression, which does not occur in normal cells, and none of the patients had CALM-AF10 fusion gene transcription. Expression of LYL1 alone and LMO2-LYL1 co-expression were associated with mediastinal involvement; however, high-level oncogene expression was not predictive of outcome in the present pediatric T-ALL patient group, but there was a trend towards a poor prognostic impact of TAL1 and/or LMO2 and/or LYL1 protooncogene expression. CONCLUSION: Poor prognostic impact of TAL1 and/or LMO2 and/or LYL1 proto-oncogene expression indicate the need for extensive study on oncogenic rearrangement and immunophenotypic markers in T-ALL, and their relationship to treatment outcome.

  10. CD69 expression on a-gliadin-specific T cells in coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Perticarari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease (CD is a T-cell mediated immunological disease of the small intestine which is triggered in susceptible individuals by ingestion of gluten. The pathogenic mechanism of coeliac disease, and the role that a-gliadin specific T cells play in mucosal lesions and their involvement in peripheral blood is not yet explained at all. Previous studies have reported proliferative response to a-gliadin measured with the classic assay of 3HTdR incorporation. We analysed the activation antigen CD69 on T cells from CD patients and normal individuals following stimulation with a-gliadin and different antigens (tetanus toxoid, peptides unrelated to gliadin and PHA. CD69 coexpression with T cell CD3+ and proliferation marker Ki67 was evaluated with time. CD69 coexpression with T cell CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ was also evaluated. It was found that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of coeliac patients increased their percentage of CD69 positive T cells when stimulated with a-gliadin, in comparison with cells from controls. Significant T cell activation was found only in subjects not treated with the gluten free diet; a positive response was found also in two coeliac patients with selective IgA deficiency, anti-endomisium negative, without circulat- ing IgA anti a-gliadin or anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies. The CD69 expression after stimulation was compared with the standard method of 3HTdR incorporation. Our data show that CD69 expression is useful to asses a specific T cell response to a-gliadin in coeliac disease. in a very short time. Moreover, the method allows to investigate T cell response at the lymphocyte subsets level, which represents a useful tool in the diagnosis of coeliac disease.

  11. Expression of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C isoforms in native endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine M Béziau

    Full Text Available Phospholipase C (PLC comprises a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in a wide array of intracellular signalling pathways, including protein kinase C and intracellular calcium. Thirteen different mammalian PLC isoforms have been identified and classified into 6 families (PLC-β, γ, δ, ε, ζ and η based on their biochemical properties. Although the expression of PLC isoforms is tissue-specific, concomitant expression of different PLC has been reported, suggesting that PLC family is involved in multiple cellular functions. Despite their critical role, the PLC isoforms expressed in native endothelial cells (ECs remains undetermined. A conventional PCR approach was initially used to elucidate the mRNA expression pattern of PLC isoforms in 3 distinct murine vascular beds: mesenteric (MA, pulmonary (PA and middle cerebral arteries (MCA. mRNA encoding for most PLC isoforms was detected in MA, MCA and PA with the exception of η2 and β2 (only expressed in PA, δ4 (only expressed in MCA, η1 (expressed in all but MA and ζ (not detected in any vascular beds tested. The endothelial-specific PLC expression was then sought in freshly isolated ECs. Interestingly, the PLC expression profile appears to differ across the investigated arterial beds. While mRNA for 8 of the 13 PLC isoforms was detected in ECs from MA, two additional PLC isoforms were detected in ECs from PA and MCA. Co-expression of multiple PLC isoforms in ECs suggests an elaborate network of signalling pathways: PLC isoforms may contribute to the complexity or diversity of signalling by their selective localization in cellular microdomains. However in situ immunofluorescence revealed a homogeneous distribution for all PLC isoforms probed (β3, γ2 and δ1 in intact endothelium. Although PLC isoforms play a crucial role in endothelial signal transduction, subcellular localization alone does not appear to be sufficient to determine the role of PLC in the signalling microdomains found

  12. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W Busser

    Full Text Available Homeodomain (HD proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs, but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs. Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory

  13. Male germ cell-specific expression of a novel Patched-domain containing gene Ptchd3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role in various biological processes, including pattern formation, cell fate determination, proliferation, and differentiation. Hh function is mediated through its membrane receptor Patched. Herein, we have characterized a novel Patched-domain containing gene Ptchd3 in mouse. Messenger RNA of Ptchd3 was exclusively detected in the testis, and existed in two isoforms Ptchd3a and Ptchd3b. The expression of these two mRNA isoforms was shown to be developmentally regulated in testes, and specifically found in male germ cells. Further analysis revealed that the Ptchd3 protein was located on the midpiece of mouse, rat and human sperm. Collectively, these results indicate that Ptchd3 is a novel male germ cell-specific gene and may be involved in the Hh signaling to regulate sperm development and/or sperm function

  14. Embryonic Stem Cell (ES)-Specific Enhancers Specify the Expression Potential of ES Genes in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran, Dvir; Abu-Remaileh, Monther; Levy, Revital; Meron, Nurit; Toperoff, Gidon; Edrei, Yifat; Bergman, Yehudit; Hellman, Asaf

    2016-02-01

    Cancers often display gene expression profiles resembling those of undifferentiated cells. The mechanisms controlling these expression programs have yet to be identified. Exploring transcriptional enhancers throughout hematopoietic cell development and derived cancers, we uncovered a novel class of regulatory epigenetic mutations. These epimutations are particularly enriched in a group of enhancers, designated ES-specific enhancers (ESSEs) of the hematopoietic cell lineage. We found that hematopoietic ESSEs are prone to DNA methylation changes, indicative of their chromatin activity states. Strikingly, ESSE methylation is associated with gene transcriptional activity in cancer. Methylated ESSEs are hypermethylated in cancer relative to normal somatic cells and co-localized with silenced genes, whereas unmethylated ESSEs tend to be hypomethylated in cancer and associated with reactivated genes. Constitutive or hematopoietic stem cell-specific enhancers do not show these trends, suggesting selective reactivation of ESSEs in cancer. Further analyses of a hypomethylated ESSE downstream to the VEGFA gene revealed a novel regulatory circuit affecting VEGFA transcript levels across cancers and patients. We suggest that the discovered enhancer sites provide a framework for reactivation of ES genes in cancer. PMID:26886256

  15. Dual-specificity anti-sigma factor reinforces control of cell-type specific gene expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Mónica; Gao, JinXin; Bota, João; Bate, Ashley R; Meisner, Jeffrey; Eichenberger, Patrick; Moran, Charles P; Henriques, Adriano O

    2015-04-01

    Gene expression during spore development in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors. σFand σE control early stages of development in the forespore and the mother cell, respectively. When, at an intermediate stage in development, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, σF is replaced by σG and σE is replaced by σK. The anti-sigma factor CsfB is produced under the control of σF and binds to and inhibits the auto-regulatory σG, but not σF. A position in region 2.1, occupied by an asparagine in σG and by a glutamate in οF, is sufficient for CsfB discrimination of the two sigmas, and allows it to delay the early to late switch in forespore gene expression. We now show that following engulfment completion, csfB is switched on in the mother cell under the control of σK and that CsfB binds to and inhibits σE but not σK, possibly to facilitate the switch from early to late gene expression. We show that a position in region 2.3 occupied by a conserved asparagine in σE and by a conserved glutamate in σK suffices for discrimination by CsfB. We also show that CsfB prevents activation of σG in the mother cell and the premature σG-dependent activation of σK. Thus, CsfB establishes negative feedback loops that curtail the activity of σE and prevent the ectopic activation of σG in the mother cell. The capacity of CsfB to directly block σE activity may also explain how CsfB plays a role as one of the several mechanisms that prevent σE activation in the forespore. Thus the capacity of CsfB to differentiate between the highly similar σF/σG and σE/σK pairs allows it to rinforce the cell-type specificity of these sigma factors and the transition from early to late development in B. subtilis, and possibly in all sporeformers that encode a CsfB orthologue. PMID:25835496

  16. Specific expression of human intelectin-1 in malignant pleural mesothelioma and gastrointestinal goblet cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kota Washimi

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is a fatal tumor. It is often hard to discriminate MPM from metastatic tumors of other types because currently, there are no reliable immunopathological markers for MPM. MPM is differentially diagnosed by some immunohistochemical tests on pathology specimens. In the present study, we investigated the expression of intelectin-1, a new mesothelioma marker, in normal tissues in the whole body and in many cancers, including MPM, by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that in normal tissues, human intelectin-1 was mainly secreted from gastrointestinal goblet cells along with mucus into the intestinal lumen, and it was also expressed, to a lesser extent, in mesothelial cells and urinary epithelial cells. Eighty-eight percent of epithelioid-type MPMs expressed intelectin-1, whereas sarcomatoid-type MPMs, biphasic MPMs, and poorly differentiated MPMs were rarely positive for intelectin-1. Intelectin-1 was not expressed in other cancers, except in mucus-producing adenocarcinoma. These results suggest that intelectin-1 is a better marker for epithelioid-type MPM than other mesothelioma markers because of its specificity and the simplicity of pathological assessment. Pleural intelectin-1 could be a useful diagnostic marker for MPM with applications in histopathological identification of MPM.

  17. IDO expressing fibroblasts promote the expansion of antigen specific regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Terry-Ann; Jalili, Reza Baradar; Farrokhi, Ali; Ghahary, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells (Tregs) can be induced and expanded by dendritic cells (DCs) in the presence of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Here we report that a possible alternative to DCs are IDO expressing dermal fibroblasts (DFs), which are easier to isolate and sustain in culture compared to DCs. When mouse splenocytes were co-cultured with IDO expressing DFs, a significant increase in frequency and the number of Tregs was found compared to those of control group (13.16%±1.8 vs. 5.53%±1.2, pa subset of Tregs which can be used to generate antigen-specific immune tolerance. PMID:23891282

  18. Novel insights of the gastric gland organization revealed by chief cell specific expression of moesin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lixin; Hatakeyama, Jason; Zhang, Bing; Makdisi, Joy; Ender, Cody; Forte, John G.

    2008-01-01

    ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) proteins play critical roles in epithelial and endothelial cell polarity, among other functions. In gastric glands, ezrin is mainly expressed in acid-secreting parietal cells, but not in mucous neck cells or zymogenic chief cells. In looking for other ERM proteins, moesin was found lining the lumen of much of the gastric gland, but it was not expressed in parietal cells. No significant radixin expression was detected in the gastric glands. Moesin showed an inc...

  19. CHD7 targets active gene enhancer elements to modulate ES cell-specific gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Schnetz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available CHD7 is one of nine members of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding domain family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes found in mammalian cells. De novo mutation of CHD7 is a major cause of CHARGE syndrome, a genetic condition characterized by multiple congenital anomalies. To gain insights to the function of CHD7, we used the technique of chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq to map CHD7 sites in mouse ES cells. We identified 10,483 sites on chromatin bound by CHD7 at high confidence. Most of the CHD7 sites show features of gene enhancer elements. Specifically, CHD7 sites are predominantly located distal to transcription start sites, contain high levels of H3K4 mono-methylation, found within open chromatin that is hypersensitive to DNase I digestion, and correlate with ES cell-specific gene expression. Moreover, CHD7 co-localizes with P300, a known enhancer-binding protein and strong predictor of enhancer activity. Correlations with 18 other factors mapped by ChIP-seq in mouse ES cells indicate that CHD7 also co-localizes with ES cell master regulators OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG. Correlations between CHD7 sites and global gene expression profiles obtained from Chd7(+/+, Chd7(+/-, and Chd7(-/- ES cells indicate that CHD7 functions at enhancers as a transcriptional rheostat to modulate, or fine-tune the expression levels of ES-specific genes. CHD7 can modulate genes in either the positive or negative direction, although negative regulation appears to be the more direct effect of CHD7 binding. These data indicate that enhancer-binding proteins can limit gene expression and are not necessarily co-activators. Although ES cells are not likely to be affected in CHARGE syndrome, we propose that enhancer-mediated gene dysregulation contributes to disease pathogenesis and that the critical CHD7 target genes may be subject to positive or negative regulation.

  20. Specific Tandem 3'UTR Patterns and Gene Expression Profiles in Mouse Thy1+ Germline Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Huang

    Full Text Available A recently developed strategy of sequencing alternative polyadenylation (APA sites (SAPAS with second-generation sequencing technology can be used to explore complete genome-wide patterns of tandem APA sites and global gene expression profiles. spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs maintain long-term reproductive abilities in male mammals. The detailed mechanisms by which SSCs self-renew and generate mature spermatozoa are not clear. To understand the specific alternative polyadenylation pattern and global gene expression profile of male germline stem cells (GSCs, mainly referred to SSCs here, we isolated and purified mouse Thy1+ cells from testis by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS and then used the SAPAS method for analysis, using pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs and differentiated mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs as controls. As a result, we obtained 99,944 poly(A sites, approximately 40% of which were newly detected in our experiments. These poly(A sites originated from three mouse cell types and covered 17,499 genes, including 831 long non-coding RNA (lncRNA genes. We observed that GSCs tend to have shorter 3'UTR lengths while MEFs tend towards longer 3'UTR lengths. We also identified 1337 genes that were highly expressed in GSCs, and these genes were highly consistent with the functional characteristics of GSCs. Our detailed bioinformatics analysis identified APA site-switching events at 3'UTRs and many new specifically expressed genes in GSCs, which we experimentally confirmed. Furthermore, qRT-PCR was performed to validate several events of the 334 genes with distal-to-proximal poly(A switch in GSCs. Consistently APA reporter assay confirmed the total 3'UTR shortening in GSCs compared to MEFs. We also analyzed the cis elements around the proximal poly(A site preferentially used in GSCs and found C-rich elements may contribute to this regulation. Overall, our results identified the expression level and polyadenylation site

  1. Th2 cell-specific cytokine expression and allergen-induced airway inflammation depend on JunB

    OpenAIRE

    Hartenstein, Bettina; Teurich, Sibylle; Hess, Jochen; Schenkel, Johannes; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina; Angel, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into effector T helper 1 (Th1) or Th2 cells, which are classified by their specific set of cytokines. Here we demonstrate that loss of JunB in in vitro polarized Th2 cells led to a dysregulated expression of the Th2-specific cytokines IL-4 and IL-5. These cells produce IFN-γ and express T-bet, the key regulator of Th1 cells. In line with the essential role of Th2 cells in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma, mice with JunB-deficient CD4+ T cells exhibited an i...

  2. Surface engineered magnetic nanoparticles for specific immunotargeting of cadherin expressing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moros, Maria; Delhaes, Flavien; Puertas, Sara; Saez, Berta; de la Fuente, Jesús M.; Grazú, Valeria; Feracci, Helene

    2016-02-01

    In spite of historic advances in cancer biology and recent development of sophisticated chemotherapeutics, the outlook for patients with advanced cancer is still grim. In this sense nanoparticles (NPs), through their unique physical properties, enable the development of new approaches for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Thus far the most used active targeting scheme involves NPs functionalization with antibodies specific to molecules overexpressed on cancer cell’s surface. Therefore, such active targeting relies on differences in NPs uptake kinetics rates between tumor and healthy cells. Many cancers of epithelial origin are associated with the inappropriate expression of non-epithelial cadherins (e.g. N-, P-, -11) with concomitant loss of E-cadherin. Such phenomenon named cadherin switching favors tumor development and metastasis via interactions of tumor cells with stromal components. That is why we optimized the oriented functionalization of fluorescently labelled magnetic NPs with a novel antibody specific for the extracellular domain of cadherin-11. The obtained Ab-NPs exhibited high specificity when incubated with two cell lines used as models of tumor and healthy cells. Thus, cadherin switching offers a great opportunity for the development of active targeting strategies aimed to improve the early detection and treatment of cancer.

  3. Tumor Antigen Specific Activation of Primary Human T-Cells Expressing a Virally Encoded Chimeric T-Cell Receptor Specific for p185HER2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建民; MichaelSFRIEDMAN; ChristopherMREYNOLDS; MarianneTHUBEN; LeeWILKE; JenniferFULLER; 李桥; ZeligESHHAR; JamesJMULE; KevimTMCDONAGH

    2004-01-01

    We have developed and tested chimeric T-cell receptors (TCR) specific for p185HER2. In these experiments,retroviral vectors expressing the N297 or N29ξ receptors were constructed in pRET6. Amphotropic viral producer cells were established in the GALV-based PG13 packaging cell line. Ficoll purified human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were vitally transduced using an optimized protocol incorporating activation with immobilized anti-CD3/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies, followed by viral infection in the presence of fibronectin fragment CH296. Transduced cells were co-cultured with human tumor cell lines that overexpress (SK-OV-3) or underexpress (MCF7) p185HER2 to assay for antigen specific immune responses. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells transduced with the N297 or N29ξ chTCR demonstrated HER2-specific antigen responses, as determined by release of Th1 like cytokines, and cellular cytotoxicity assays. Our results support the feasibility of adoptive immunothempy with genetically modified T-cells expressing a chTCR specific for p185HER2.

  4. Cell-cycle specific expression of a small proline-rich protein in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squamous metaplasia of the bronchial epithelium is generally believed to be involved in the neoplastic progression toward squamous cell carcinomas. Thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms controlling this type of differentiation. The induction of two families of cDNAs encoding a small proline-rich protein (sPRP), sprI and sprII, was first identified in human keratinocytes exhibiting squamous differentiation. cDNAs similar to sprI have also been identified in cultured tracheal epithelial cells undergoing squamous differentiation. The first step during the squamous differentiation process is the inhibition of cell growth; it has also been noted that a sPRP mRNA in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells is induced 10-fold just before the cultures reach confluence. Thus, sPRP may stop cell division in cells undergoing squamous differentation. In support of this possibility are the recent investigations correlating expression of sPRP with cell morphology. Specific immunoreactivity to sPRP, using affinity-purified antibodies, showed a strong immunostaining in cells with a round configuration, while less staining was observed in other cells. The major part of the CHO population showed no immunoreactivity. One interpretation of this observation is that the expression of sPRP may be cell-cyle regulated. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the phase of the cell cycle where induced synthesis of sPRP mRNA occurs

  5. Novel insights of the gastric gland organization revealed by chief cell specific expression of moesin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lixin; Hatakeyama, Jason; Zhang, Bing; Makdisi, Joy; Ender, Cody; Forte, John G.

    2009-01-01

    ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) proteins play critical roles in epithelial and endothelial cell polarity, among other functions. In gastric glands, ezrin is mainly expressed in acid-secreting parietal cells, but not in mucous neck cells or zymogenic chief cells. In looking for other ERM proteins, moesin was found lining the lumen of much of the gastric gland, but it was not expressed in parietal cells. No significant radixin expression was detected in the gastric glands. Moesin showed an increased gradient of expression from the neck to the base of the glands. In addition, the staining pattern of moesin revealed a branched morphology for the gastric lumen. This pattern of short branches extending from the glandular lumen was confirmed by using antibody against zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) to stain tight junctions. With a mucous neck cell probe (lectin GSII, from Griffonia simplicifolia) and a chief cell marker (pepsinogen C), immunohistochemistry revealed that the mucous neck cells at the top of the glands do not express moesin, but, progressing toward the base, mucous cells showing decreased GSII staining had low or moderate level of moesin expression. The level of moesin expression continued to increase toward the base of the glands and reached a plateau in the base where chief cells and parietal cells abound. The level of pepsinogen expression also increased toward the base. Pepsinogen C was located on cytoplasmic granules and/or more generally distributed in chief cells, whereas moesin was exclusively expressed on the apical membrane. This is a clear demonstration of distinctive cellular expression of two ERM family members in the same tissue. The results provide the first evidence that moesin is involved in the cell biology of chief cells. Novel insights on gastric gland morphology revealed by the moesin and ZO-1 staining provide the basis for a model of cell maturation and migration within the gland. PMID:19074636

  6. Novel insights of the gastric gland organization revealed by chief cell specific expression of moesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lixin; Hatakeyama, Jason; Zhang, Bing; Makdisi, Joy; Ender, Cody; Forte, John G

    2009-02-01

    ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) proteins play critical roles in epithelial and endothelial cell polarity, among other functions. In gastric glands, ezrin is mainly expressed in acid-secreting parietal cells, but not in mucous neck cells or zymogenic chief cells. In looking for other ERM proteins, moesin was found lining the lumen of much of the gastric gland, but it was not expressed in parietal cells. No significant radixin expression was detected in the gastric glands. Moesin showed an increased gradient of expression from the neck to the base of the glands. In addition, the staining pattern of moesin revealed a branched morphology for the gastric lumen. This pattern of short branches extending from the glandular lumen was confirmed by using antibody against zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) to stain tight junctions. With a mucous neck cell probe (lectin GSII, from Griffonia simplicifolia) and a chief cell marker (pepsinogen C), immunohistochemistry revealed that the mucous neck cells at the top of the glands do not express moesin, but, progressing toward the base, mucous cells showing decreased GSII staining had low or moderate level of moesin expression. The level of moesin expression continued to increase toward the base of the glands and reached a plateau in the base where chief cells and parietal cells abound. The level of pepsinogen expression also increased toward the base. Pepsinogen C was located on cytoplasmic granules and/or more generally distributed in chief cells, whereas moesin was exclusively expressed on the apical membrane. This is a clear demonstration of distinctive cellular expression of two ERM family members in the same tissue. The results provide the first evidence that moesin is involved in the cell biology of chief cells. Novel insights on gastric gland morphology revealed by the moesin and ZO-1 staining provide the basis for a model of cell maturation and migration within the gland. PMID:19074636

  7. An Egr-1-specific DNAzyme regulates Egr-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, JUNBIAO; GUO, CHANGLEI; WANG, RAN; HUANG, LULI; LIANG, WANQIAN; LIU, RUNNAN; SUN, BING

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to transfect rat aortic smooth muscle cells with an early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1)-specific DNAzyme (ED5), to observe its effect on Egr-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and to elucidate the mechanism of ED5-mediated inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. VSMCs in primary culture obtained by tissue block adhesion were identified by morphological observation and α smooth muscle actin (α-SM-actin) immunocytochemistry. The cells were then transfected with ED5 or scrambled ED5 (ED5SCR). The three groups of cells used in the present study were the control group, ED5 group and ED5SCR group. The expression levels of Egr-1 and PCNA protein were detected following transfection by analyzing and calculating the integral optical density value in each group. Primary culture of VSMCs and transfection of ED5 and ED5SCR were successfully accomplished. Following stimulation with 10% fetal calf serum, the Egr-1 protein was expressed most strongly at 1 h and demonstrated a declining trend over time; the expression of PCNA protein began at 4 h, peaked at 24 h and then demonstrated a slightly declining trend over time. Compared with the control group and the ED5SCR group, ED5 inhibited the expression of Egr-1 and PCNA (P<0.05). ED5 was able to inhibit the expression of Egr-1 and PCNA proteins in VSMCs to a certain extent and VSMC proliferation in vitro. DNAzyme gene therapy may be useful as a new method for treating vascular proliferative diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:23737882

  8. Improved salinity tolerance of rice through cell type-specific expression of AtHKT1;1

    OpenAIRE

    Darren Plett; Gehan Safwat; Matthew Gilliham; Inge Skrumsager Møller; Stuart Roy; Neil Shirley; Andrew Jacobs; Alexander Johnson; Mark Tester

    2010-01-01

    Previously, cell type-specific expression of AtHKT1;1, a sodium transporter, improved sodium (Na(+)) exclusion and salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis. In the current work, AtHKT1;1, was expressed specifically in the root cortical and epidermal cells of an Arabidopsis GAL4-GFP enhancer trap line. These transgenic plants were found to have significantly improved Na(+) exclusion under conditions of salinity stress. The feasibility of a similar biotechnological approach in crop plants was explored...

  9. Post-proliferative immature radial glial cells female-specifically express aromatase in the medaka optic tectum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Takeuchi

    Full Text Available Aromatase, the key enzyme responsible for estrogen biosynthesis, is present in the brain of all vertebrates. Much evidence has accumulated that aromatase is highly and exclusively expressed in proliferating mature radial glial cells in the brain of teleost fish even in adulthood, unlike in other vertebrates. However, the physiological significance of this expression remains unknown. We recently found that aromatase is female-specifically expressed in the optic tectum of adult medaka fish. In the present study, we demonstrated that, contrary to the accepted view of the teleost brain, female-specific aromatase-expressing cells in the medaka optic tectum represent a transient subset of post-proliferative immature radial glial cells in the neural stem cell lineage. This finding led us to hypothesize that female-specific aromatase expression and consequent estrogen production causes some sex difference in the life cycle of tectal cells. As expected, the female tectum exhibited higher expression of genes indicative of cell proliferation and radial glial maturation and lower expression of an anti-apoptotic gene than did the male tectum, suggesting a female-biased acceleration of the cell life cycle. Complicating the interpretation of this result, however, is the additional observation that estrogen administration masculinized the expression of these genes in the optic tectum, while simultaneously stimulating aromatase expression. Taken together, these results provide evidence that a unique subpopulation of neural stem cells female-specifically express aromatase in the optic tectum and suggest that this aromatase expression and resultant estrogen synthesis have an impact on the life cycle of tectal cells, whether stimulatory or inhibitory.

  10. Decreased expression of dual-specificity phosphatase 9 is associated with poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhuowei

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms involved in the development and progression of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the expression of dual-specificity phosphatase 9 (DUSP-9 and determine its clinical significance in human ccRCCs. Methods The expression of DUSP-9 mRNA was determined in 46 paired samples of ccRCCs and adjacent normal tissues by using real-time qPCR. The expression of the DUSP-9 was determined in 211 samples of ccRCCs and 107 paired samples of adjacent normal tissues by immunohistochemical analysis. Statistical analysis was performed to define the relationship between the expression of DUSP-9 and the clinical features of ccRCC. Results The mRNA level of DUSP-9, which was determined by real-time RT-PCR, was found to be significantly lower in tumorous tissues than in the adjacent non-tumorous tissues (p Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study that determines the relationship between DUSP-9 expression and prognosis in ccRCC. We found that decreased expression of DUSP-9 is associated with poor prognosis in ccRCC. DUSP-9 may represent a novel and useful prognostic marker for ccRCC.

  11. Regional differences in expression of specific markers for human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Steen B; Møllgård, Kjeld; Olesen, Christian;

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines derived from the inner cell masses of blastocysts generally includes expression analysis of markers such as OCT4, NANOG, SSEA3, SSEA4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81. Expression is usually detected by immunocytochemical staining of entire colonies...

  12. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbon, Alexis; Standley, Daron M; Date, Hiroshi; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcr...

  13. DNA conformation driven by AP-1 triggers cell-specific expression via a strong epithelial enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virolle, T; Djabari, Z; Ortonne, J P; Aberdam, D

    2000-10-01

    We report here the characterization of the regulatory region of the human LAMA3 gene, coding for the alpha3A chain of laminin-5. A 202 bp fragment is sufficient to confer epithelial-specific expression to a thymidine kinase promoter through the cooperative effect of three AP-1 binding sites. Remarkably, removal of the sequences located between the AP-1 sites does not modify the promoter activity in keratinocytes but allows strong expression in fibroblasts. Replacement of the deleted sequences by non-homologous ones fully restores the restricted enhancement in keratinocytes. Functional analysis and mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that a minimal distance between the AP-1 sites is required for the enhancer DNA fragment to adopt a particular conformation driven by the binding of Jun-Fos heterodimers. In non-permissive cells, this conformation leads to the anchorage of non-DNA-binding fibroblastic cofactors to form an inhibitory ternary complex. Therefore, our results describe for the first time an unusual conformation-dependent epithelial-specific enhancer. PMID:11269498

  14. Redirecting T-Cell Specificity to EGFR Using mRNA to Self-limit Expression of Chimeric Antigen Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Hillary G; Torikai, Hiroki; Zhang, Ling; Maiti, Sourindra; Dai, Jianliang; Do, Kim-Anh; Singh, Harjeet; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Heimberger, Amy B; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2016-06-01

    Potential for on-target, but off-tissue toxicity limits therapeutic application of genetically modified T cells constitutively expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) from tumor-associated antigens expressed in normal tissue, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Curtailing expression of CAR through modification of T cells by in vitro-transcribed mRNA species is one strategy to mitigate such toxicity. We evaluated expression of an EGFR-specific CAR coded from introduced mRNA in human T cells numerically expanded ex vivo to clinically significant numbers through coculture with activating and propagating cells (AaPC) derived from K562 preloaded with anti-CD3 antibody. The density of AaPC could be adjusted to affect phenotype of T cells such that reduced ratio of AaPC resulted in higher proportion of CD8 and central memory T cells that were more conducive to electrotransfer of mRNA than T cells expanded with high ratios of AaPC. RNA-modified CAR T cells produced less cytokine, but demonstrated similar cytolytic capacity as DNA-modified CAR T cells in response to EGFR-expressing glioblastoma cells. Expression of CAR by mRNA transfer was transient and accelerated by stimulation with cytokine and antigen. Loss of CAR abrogated T-cell function in response to tumor and normal cells expressing EGFR. We describe a clinically applicable method to propagate and modify T cells to transiently express EGFR-specific CAR to target EGFR-expressing tumor cells that may be used to limit on-target, off-tissue toxicity to normal tissue. PMID:27163741

  15. TIM-4, expressed by medullary macrophages, regulates respiratory tolerance by mediating phagocytosis of antigen-specific T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Albacker, Lee A; Yu, Sanhong; Bedoret, Denis; Lee, Wan-Ling; Umetsu, Sarah E.; Monahan, Sheena; Freeman, Gordon J.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory exposure to antigen induces T cell tolerance via several overlapping mechanisms that limit the immune response. While the mechanisms involved in the development of Treg cells have received much attention, those that result in T cell deletion are largely unknown. Herein, we show that F4/80+ lymph node medullary macrophages expressing TIM-4, a phosphatidylserine receptor, remove antigen-specific T cells during respiratory tolerance, thereby reducing secondary T cell responses. Block...

  16. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of EBV-negative Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells includes some changes similar to those seen in normal B lymphocytes that have been growth transformed by EBV. The role of individual EBV genes in this process was evaluated by introducing each of the viral genes that are normally expressed in EBV growth-transformed and latently infected lymphoblasts into an EBV-negative BL cell line, using recombinant retrovirus-mediated transfer. Clones of cells were derived that stably express the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), EBNA-2, EBNA-3, EBNA-leader protein, or EBV latent membrane protein (LMP). These were compared with control clones infected with the retrovirus vector. All 10 clones converted to EBNA-2 expression differed from control clones or clones expressing other EBV proteins by growth in tight clumps and by markedly increased expression of one particular surface marker of B-cell activation, CD23. Other activation antigens were unaffected by EBNA-2 expression, as were markers already expressed on the parent BL cell line. The results indicate that EBNA-2 is a specific direct or indirect trans-activator of CD23. This establishes a link between an EBV gene and cell gene expression. Since CD23 has been implicated in the transduction of B-cell growth signals, its specific induction by EBNA-2 could be important in EBV induction of B-lymphocyte transformation

  17. Decreased expression of dual-specificity phosphatase 9 is associated with poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the development and progression of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the expression of dual-specificity phosphatase 9 (DUSP-9) and determine its clinical significance in human ccRCCs. The expression of DUSP-9 mRNA was determined in 46 paired samples of ccRCCs and adjacent normal tissues by using real-time qPCR. The expression of the DUSP-9 was determined in 211 samples of ccRCCs and 107 paired samples of adjacent normal tissues by immunohistochemical analysis. Statistical analysis was performed to define the relationship between the expression of DUSP-9 and the clinical features of ccRCC. The mRNA level of DUSP-9, which was determined by real-time RT-PCR, was found to be significantly lower in tumorous tissues than in the adjacent non-tumorous tissues (p < 0.001). An immunohistochemical analysis of 107 paired tissue specimens showed that the DUSP-9 expression was lower in tumorous tissues than in the adjacent non-tumorous tissues (p < 0.001). Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the DUSP-9 expression in ccRCCs and gender (p = 0.031), tumor size (p = 0.001), pathologic stage (p = 0.001), Fuhrman grade (p = 0.002), T stage (p = 0.001), N classification (p = 0.012), metastasis (p = 0.005), and recurrence (p < 0.001). Patients with lower DUSP-9 expression had shorter overall survival time than those with higher DUSP-9 expression (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that low expression of the DUSP-9 was an independent predictor for poor survival of ccRCC patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study that determines the relationship between DUSP-9 expression and prognosis in ccRCC. We found that decreased expression of DUSP-9 is associated with poor prognosis in ccRCC. DUSP-9 may represent a novel and useful prognostic marker for ccRCC

  18. Dendritic cells engineered to express defined allo-HLA peptide complexes induce antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells efficiently killing tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stronen, E; Abrahamsen, I W; Gaudernack, G; Wälchli, S; Munthe, E; Buus, S; Johansen, F-E; Lund-Johansen, F; Olweus, J

    2009-01-01

    , efficiently present externally loaded peptides from the antigen, Melan-A/MART-1 to T cells from HLA-A*0201-negative donors. CD8(+) T cells binding HLA-A*0201/MART-1 pentamers were detected already after 12 days of co-culture in 11/11 donors. The majority of cells from pentamer(+) cell lines were CTL and...... efficiently killed HLA-A*0201(+) melanoma cells, whilst sparing HLA-A*0201(+) B-cells. Allo-restricted CTL specific for peptides from the leukaemia-associated antigens CD33 and CD19 were obtained with comparable efficiency. Collectively, the results show that dendritic cells engineered to express defined allo...

  19. Cis-Regulatory Elements Determine Germline Specificity and Expression Level of an Isopentenyltransferase Gene in Sperm Cells of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinghua; Yuan, Tong; Duan, Xiaomeng; Wei, Xiaoping; Shi, Tao; Li, Jia; Russell, Scott D; Gou, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Flowering plant sperm cells transcribe a divergent and complex complement of genes. To examine promoter function, we chose an isopentenyltransferase gene known as PzIPT1. This gene is highly selectively transcribed in one sperm cell morphotype of Plumbago zeylanica, which preferentially fuses with the central cell during fertilization and is thus a founding cell of the primary endosperm. In transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), PzIPT1 promoter displays activity in both sperm cells and upon progressive promoter truncation from the 5'-end results in a progressive decrease in reporter production, consistent with occurrence of multiple enhancer sites. Cytokinin-dependent protein binding motifs are identified in the promoter sequence, which respond with stimulation by cytokinin. Expression of PzIPT1 promoter in sperm cells confers specificity independently of previously reported Germline Restrictive Silencer Factor binding sequence. Instead, a cis-acting regulatory region consisting of two duplicated 6-bp Male Gamete Selective Activation (MGSA) motifs occurs near the site of transcription initiation. Disruption of this sequence-specific site inactivates expression of a GFP reporter gene in sperm cells. Multiple copies of the MGSA motif fused with the minimal CaMV35S promoter elements confer reporter gene expression in sperm cells. Similar duplicated MGSA motifs are also identified from promoter sequences of sperm cell-expressed genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting selective activation is possibly a common mechanism for regulation of gene expression in sperm cells of flowering plants. PMID:26739233

  20. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis to Evaluate Cell Type Specific Expression of Targets Relevant for Immunotherapy of Hematological Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M J Pont

    Full Text Available Cellular immunotherapy has proven to be effective in the treatment of hematological cancers by donor lymphocyte infusion after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and more recently by targeted therapy with chimeric antigen or T-cell receptor-engineered T cells. However, dependent on the tissue distribution of the antigens that are targeted, anti-tumor responses can be accompanied by undesired side effects. Therefore, detailed tissue distribution analysis is essential to estimate potential efficacy and toxicity of candidate targets for immunotherapy of hematological malignancies. We performed microarray gene expression analysis of hematological malignancies of different origins, healthy hematopoietic cells and various non-hematopoietic cell types from organs that are often targeted in detrimental immune responses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation leading to graft-versus-host disease. Non-hematopoietic cells were also cultured in the presence of IFN-γ to analyze gene expression under inflammatory circumstances. Gene expression was investigated by Illumina HT12.0 microarrays and quality control analysis was performed to confirm the cell-type origin and exclude contamination of non-hematopoietic cell samples with peripheral blood cells. Microarray data were validated by quantitative RT-PCR showing strong correlations between both platforms. Detailed gene expression profiles were generated for various minor histocompatibility antigens and B-cell surface antigens to illustrate the value of the microarray dataset to estimate efficacy and toxicity of candidate targets for immunotherapy. In conclusion, our microarray database provides a relevant platform to analyze and select candidate antigens with hematopoietic (lineage-restricted expression as potential targets for immunotherapy of hematological cancers.

  1. The Oncoplacental Gene Placenta-Specific Protein 1 Is Highly Expressed in Endometrial Tumors and Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Devor, Eric J.; Leslie, Kimberly K.

    2013-01-01

    Placenta-specific protein 1 (PLAC1) is a small secreted protein expressed exclusively in trophoblast cells in the mammalian placenta. PLAC1 is expressed early in gestation and is maintained throughout. It is thought to function in trophoblast invasion of the uterine epithelium and, subsequently, to anchor the placenta to the epithelium. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that PLAC1 is also expressed in a variety of human solid tumors, notably in breast cancers. We demonstrate for the f...

  2. Dopamine D1 receptor expression is bipolar cell type-specific in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshi, Pershang; Fyk-Kolodziej, Bozena; Krolewski, David M; Walker, Paul D; Ichinose, Tomomi

    2016-07-01

    In the retina, dopamine is a key molecule for daytime vision. Dopamine is released by retinal dopaminergic amacrine cells and transmits signaling either by conventional synaptic or by volume transmission. By means of volume transmission, dopamine modulates all layers of retinal neurons; however, it is not well understood how dopamine modulates visual signaling pathways in bipolar cells. Here we analyzed Drd1a-tdTomato BAC transgenic mice and found that the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) is expressed in retinal bipolar cells in a type-dependent manner. Strong tdTomato fluorescence was detected in the inner nuclear layer and localized to type 1, 3b, and 4 OFF bipolar cells and type 5-2, XBC, 6, and 7 ON bipolar cells. In contrast, type 2, 3a, 5-1, 9, and rod bipolar cells did not express Drd1a-tdTomato. Other interneurons were also found to express tdTomato including horizontal cells and a subset (25%) of AII amacrine cells. Diverse visual processing pathways, such as color or motion-coded pathways, are thought to be initiated in retinal bipolar cells. Our results indicate that dopamine sculpts bipolar cell performance in a type-dependent manner to facilitate daytime vision. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2059-2079, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26587737

  3. Expression of HSV-1 ICP0 Antigen Peptide in Prokaryotic Cells and Preparation of Specific Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As an immediate-early protein of herpes simplex virus, infected-cell polypeptide 0 (ICP0) exhibits complicated interactions with host cells, and its regulatory function on gene expression is of great importance. Since the ICP0 encoding sequence contains many rare codons which are absent in E.coli, and ICP0 is highly unstable in prokaryotic cells, expression of entire ICP0 in prokaryotic cells has never been reported. In order to further investigate the function of ICP0, a recombinant plasmid was constructed by subcloning a cDNA fragment encoding an amino-terminal of 105 residues of the ICP0 protein into pGEX-5x-1 vector. The resulting GST-105 fusion antigen peptide was expressed with high efficiency in E.coli. Antibodies prepared after the immunization of mice with purified fusion protein can recognize not only the denatured ICP0 protein, but also the native ICP0 protein with normal biological conformation.

  4. Human cerebrospinal fluid contains CD4+ memory T cells expressing gut- or skin-specific trafficking determinants: relevance for immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell James J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circulating memory T cells can be divided into tissue-specific subsets, which traffic through distinct tissue compartments during physiologic immune surveillance, based on their expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors. We reasoned that a bias (either enrichment or depletion of CSF T cell expression of known organ-specific trafficking determinants might suggest that homing of T cells to the subarachnoid space could be governed by a CNS-specific adhesion molecule or chemokine receptor. Results The expression of cutaneous leukocyte antigen (CLA and CC-chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4; associated with skin-homing as well as the expression of integrin α4β7 and CCR9 (associated with gut-homing was analyzed on CD4+ memory T cells in CSF from individuals with non-inflammatory neurological diseases using flow cytometry. CSF contained similar proportions of CD4+ memory T cells expressing CLA, CCR4, integrin α4β7 and CCR9 as paired blood samples. Conclusion The results extend our previous findings that antigen-experienced CD4+ memory T cells traffic through the CSF in proportion to their abundance in the peripheral circulation. Furthermore, the ready access of skin- and gut-homing CD4+ memory T cells to the CNS compartment via CSF has implications for the mechanisms of action of immunotherapeutic strategies, such as oral tolerance or therapeutic immunization, where immunogens are administered using an oral or subcutaneous route.

  5. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Standley, Daron M.; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A.; Ishizu, Yuri; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M.; Archer, John A.C.; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Baker, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V.; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C.; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A.; Deplancke, Bart; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D.; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S.B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Frith, Martin C.; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furuno, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gibson, Andrew; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Sui, Shannan J. Ho; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Fumi; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R.; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T.; Laros, Jeroen F.J.; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C.; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morais, David A. de Lima; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G.D.; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Ramilowski, Jordan A.; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B.; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A.; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W.; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Masanori; Swoboda, Rolf K.; 't Hoen, Peter A.C.; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyoda, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Eivind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J.; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Suzan E.; Zhang, Peter G.; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M.; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C.; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Taylor, Martin S.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A.; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcriptional start site clusters, whereas Foxp3 binding regions had no significant correlation with either up- or down-regulated clusters in nonactivated Treg cells. However, in activated Treg cells, Foxp3 binding regions showed a strong correlation with down-regulated clusters. In accordance with these findings, the above two features of activation-dependent gene regulation in Treg cells tend to occur at different locations in the genome. The results collectively indicate that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylation is instrumental in gene up-regulation in steady state Treg cells, whereas Foxp3 down-regulates the expression of its target genes in activated Treg cells. Thus, the two events seem to play distinct but complementary roles in Treg-specific gene expression. PMID:24706905

  6. EFFECT OF STAT3 SPECIFIC SHRNA EXPRESSION VECTOR ON PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS OF HUMAN PANCREATIC CANCER CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To construct signal transduction and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector and to investigate its inhibitory effects on STAT3 expression, cell proliferation and apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer. Methods Three pairs of hairpin-like oligonucleotide sequences specific for human STAT3 gene were designed and synthesized. The annealed oligonucleotide fragments were subcloned into pRNAT-U6.1/Neo plasmid. The STAT3 shRNA expressing vectors were confirmed by PCR and DNA sequencing. STAT3 mRNA and protein expression were examined by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. MTT assay and flow cytometry were performed to detect the state of cell proliferation and cell apoptosis, respectively. Results PCR and DNA sequencing showed that the oligonucleotide fragments were correctly inserted into pRNAT-U6.1/Neo plasmid. STAT3 expression and cell proliferation in the transfected cells was inhibited significantly by three STAT3 shRNA expressing vectors (P<0.05). ConclusionSTAT3 shRNA expression vector can effectively inhibit the expression of STAT3. Silencing of STAT3 with RNAi can significantly inhibit the proliferation and promotes the apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells and may provide a novel therapeutic target for treating pancreatic cancer.

  7. The Nanos3-3'UTR is required for germ cell specific NANOS3 expression in mouse embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Suzuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The regulation of gene expression via a 3' untranslated region (UTR plays essential roles in the discrimination of the germ cell lineage from somatic cells during embryogenesis. This is fundamental to the continuation of a species. Mouse NANOS3 is an essential protein required for the germ cell maintenance and is specifically expressed in these cells. However, the regulatory mechanisms that restrict the expression of this gene in the germ cells is largely unknown at present. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our current study, we show that differences in the stability of Nanos3 mRNA between germ cells and somatic cells is brought about in a 3'UTR-dependent manner in mouse embryos. Although Nanos3 is transcribed in both cell lineages, it is efficiently translated only in the germ lineage. We also find that the translational suppression of NANOS3 in somatic cells is caused by a 3'UTR-mediated mRNA destabilizing mechanism. Surprisingly, even when under the control of the CAG promoter which induces strong ubiquitous transcription in both germ cells and somatic cells, the addition of the Nanos3-3'UTR sequence to the coding region of exogenous gene was effective in restricting protein expression in germ cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our current study thus suggests that Nanos3-3'UTR has an essential role in translational control in the mouse embryo.

  8. Asymmetric division triggers cell-specific gene expression through coupled capture and stabilization of a phosphatase

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, Niels; Losick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Formation of a division septum near a randomly chosen pole during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis creates unequal sized daughter cells with dissimilar programs of gene expression. An unanswered question is how polar septation activates a transcription factor (σF) selectively in the small cell. We present evidence that the upstream regulator of σF, the phosphatase SpoIIE, is compartmentalized in the small cell by transfer from the polar septum to the adjacent cell pole where SpoIIE is protect...

  9. Clone-specific expression, transcriptional regulation, and action of interleukin-6 in human colon carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many cancer cells produce interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine that plays a role in growth stimulation, metastasis, and angiogenesis of secondary tumours in a variety of malignancies, including colorectal cancer. Effectiveness of IL-6 in this respect may depend on the quantity of basal and inducible IL-6 expressed as the tumour progresses through stages of malignancy. We therefore have evaluated the effect of IL-6 modulators, i.e. IL-1β, prostaglandin E2, 17β-estradiol, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, on expression and synthesis of the cytokine at different stages of tumour progression. We utilized cultures of the human colon carcinoma cell clones Caco-2/AQ, COGA-1A and COGA-13, all of which expressed differentiation and proliferation markers typical of distinct stages of tumour progression. IL-6 mRNA and protein levels were assayed by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. DNA sequencing was utilized to detect polymorphisms in the IL-6 gene promoter. IL-6 mRNA and protein concentrations were low in well and moderately differentiated Caco-2/AQ and COGA-1A cells, but were high in poorly differentiated COGA-13 cells. Addition of IL-1β (5 ng/ml) to a COGA-13 culture raised IL-6 production approximately thousandfold via a prostaglandin-independent mechanism. Addition of 17β-estradiol (10-7 M) reduced basal IL-6 production by one-third, but IL-1β-inducible IL-6 was unaffected. Search for polymorphisms in the IL-6 promoter revealed the presence of a single haplotype, i.e., -597A/-572G/-174C, in COGA-13 cells, which is associated with a high degree of transcriptional activity of the IL-6 gene. IL-6 blocked differentiation only in Caco-2/AQ cells and stimulated mitosis through up-regulation of c-myc proto-oncogene expression. These effects were inhibited by 10-8 M 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. In human colon carcinoma cells derived from well and moderately differentiated tumours, IL-6 expression is low and only marginally affected, if at all, by PGE2, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and 17

  10. Prostate-specific expression of Bax delivered by an adenoviral vector induces apoptosis in LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, S L; Rubinchik, S; Honda, T; McDonnell, T J; Dong, J Y; Norris, J S

    2001-09-01

    In prostate carcinoma, overexpression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 has been found to be associated with resistance to therapies including radiation and androgen ablation. Restoring the balance of Bcl-2 family members may result in the induction of apoptosis in prostate cancer cells previously resistant to treatment. To accomplish this, a strategy involving overexpression of the pro-apoptotic gene Bax was executed. The use of cytotoxic genes such as Bax require selective expression of the gene. In this study, we examined the ability of selective expression of Bax protein directed by a prostate-specific promoter to induce apoptosis in human prostate carcinoma. A second-generation adenoviral vector was constructed with the modified prostate-specific probasin promoter, ARR2PB, directing expression of an HA-tagged Bax gene and a green fluorescent protein reporter translated from an internal ribosome entry site (ARR2PB.Bax.GFP). ARR2PB promoter activity is tightly regulated and highly prostate specific and is responsive to androgens and glucocorticoids. The prostate-specific promoter-Bax-GFP transgene cassette was inserted into a cloning site near the right inverted terminal repeat of the adenoviral vector to retain specificity of the promoter. LNCaP cells infected with Ad/ARR(2)PB.Bax.GFP showed high levels of Bax expression 48 h after infection resulting in an 85% reduction in cell viability. Importantly, LNCaP cells stably transfected to overexpress Bcl-2 showed similar patterns of cell death when infected with Ad/ARR(2)PB.Bax.GFP, an 82% reduction in cell viability seen 48 h after infection. Apoptosis was confirmed by measuring caspase activation and using the TUNEL assay. Tissue specificity was evaluated using A549 cells (lung adenocarcinoma), SK-Hep-1 (liver cancer) cells, and Hela (cervical cancer) cells which did not show detectable expression of virally delivered Bax protein or any increase in cell death. Systemic administration of Ad/ARR2PB. Bax.GFP in nude

  11. Production of transgenic cashmere goat embryos expressing red fluorescent protein and containing IGF1 hair-follicle-cell specific expression cassette by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO XuDong; YANG DongShan; Ao XuDong; WU Xia; LI GuangPeng; WANG LingLing; BAO MingTao; XUE Lian; BOU ShorGan

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, cashmere goat fetal flbroblasta were transfected with pCDsR-KI, a hair-follicle-cell specific expression vector for insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF1) that contains two markers for selection (red fluorescent protein gene and neomycin resistant gene). The transgenic fibroblasta cell lines were obtained after G418 selection. Prior to the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the maturation rate of caprine cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) was optimized to an in vitro maturation time of 18 h.Parthenogenetic ooctyes were used as a model to Investigate the effect of two activation methods, one with calcium ionophore IA23187 plus 6-DMAP and the other with ethanol plus 6-DMAP. The cleavage rates after 48 h were respectively 88.7% and 86.4%, with no significant difference (P>0.05). There was no significant difference between the cleavage rate and the blastocyst rate in two different media (SO-Faa and CR1aa; 86.3% va 83.9%, P>0.05 and 23.1% vs 17.2%, P>0.05). The fusion rate of a 190 V/mm group (62.4%) was significantly higher than 130 V/mm (32.8%) and 200 V/mm (42.9%), groups (P<0.05).After transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer (TSCNT) manipulation, 203 reconstructed embryos were obtained in which the cleavage rate after in vitro development (IVD) for 48 h was 79.3% (161/203). The blastocyst rate after IVD for 7 to 9 d was 15.3% (31/203). There were 17 embryos out of 31 strongly ex-pressing red fluorescence. Two of the red fluorescent blastocysta were randomly selected to identify transgene by polymeraee chain reaction. Both were positive. These results showed that: (i) RFP and Neo genes were correctly expressed indicating that transgenlc somatic cell lines and positive trans-genic embryos were obtained; (ii) one more selection at the blastocyst stage was necessary although the donor cells were transgenic positive, because only partially transgenic embryos expressing red fluorescence were obtained; and (iii) through TSCNT manipulation and

  12. Construction of a recombinant human insulin expression vector for mammary gland-specific expression in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) mammary epithelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Ramakant; Singh, Karn Pratap; Kumari, Archana; Rameshbabu, K; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Manik, Radhey Shyam; Palta, Prabhat; Singla, Suresh Kumar; Chauhan, Manmohan Singh

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was construction of mammary gland specific expression vector for high level of human insulin (hINS) expression in transgenic buffalo for therapeutic use. We have constructed mammary gland specific vector containing human insulin gene and there expression efficiency was checked into in vitro cultured buffalo mammary epithelial cells (BuMECs). Human pro-insulin coding region was isolated from human genomic DNA by intron skipping PCR primer and furin cleavage site was inserted between B-C and C-A chain of human insulin by overlap extension PCR. A mammary gland-specific buffalo beta-lactoglobulin promoter was isolated from buffalo DNA and used for human insulin expression in BuMEC cells. The construct was transfected into BuMECs by lipofection method and positive transgene cell clones were obtained by G418 selection after 3 weeks. Expression of hINS in transfected cells were confirmed by RT-PCR, Immunocytochemistry, Western Blotting and ELISA. The pAcISUBC insulin-expressing clones secreted insulin at varying levels between 0.18 - 1.43 ng/ml/24 h/2.0 × 10(6) cells. PMID:24969480

  13. Expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, GAGE and BAGE in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To observe mRNA expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, to explore the relationship between gene expression and diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of ovarian cancer, and to evaluate the feasibility of their gene products as markers, and an immunotherapy target for ovarian cancer. mRNA expression of MAGE-1, MAGE-3, GAGE-1/2 and BAGE were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 14 cases of normal ovarian tissue, 20 cases of ovarian benign tumor specimens, 41 cases of ovarian cancer specimens, and ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3, A2780, and COC1. MAGE, GAGE and BAGE genes were not expressed in normal ovarian tissue. In benign tumors, only the MAGE gene was expressed; the expression rate of this gene in benign tumors was 15% (3/20). In ovarian cancer tissues, MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 was highly expressed, with expression rates of 53.7% (22/41) and 36.6% (15/41), while GAGE-1/2 and BAGE had relatively low expression, with rates of 26.8% (11/41) and 14.6% (6/41). In metastatic lesions of ovarian cancer, only MAGE-1 and BAGE were expressed, with expression rates of 28.6% (2/7) and 14.3% (1/7). The positive expression rates of MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 in serous cystadenocarcinoma were significantly higher than that in other types of ovarian cancer (P < 0.05). Gene expression rate was not correlated with menopause or lymph node metastasis. Positive expression of MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 was positively correlated with tumor differentiation and the clinical stage of the ovarian cancer. In addition, the positive expression rate of BAGE was significantly higher in ovarian cancer patients with ascites (P < 0.05). The mRNA expression profiles of MAGE, GAGE and BAGE in ovarian carcinoma cell lines SKOV3, A2780 and COC1 varied, but there was at least one gene expressed in each cell line. Tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE may play a role in the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer

  14. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R R; Standley, Daron M; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Clevers, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA

  15. Upregulation of T-Cell-Specific Transcription Factor Expression in Pediatric T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL)

    OpenAIRE

    Müge Sayitoğlu; Yücel Erbilgin; Özden Hatırnaz; İnci Yıldız; Tiraje Celkan; Sema Anak; Ömer Devecioğlu; Gönül Aydoğan; Serap Karaman; Nazan Sarper; Çetin Timur; Ümit Üre; Uğur Özbek

    2012-01-01

    Objective: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is associated with recurrent chromosomal aberrations andabnormal ectopic gene expression during T-cell development. In order to gain insight into the pathogenesis of T-ALLthis study aimed to measure the level of expression of 7 T-cell oncogenes (LMO2, LYL1, TAL1, TLX1, TLX3, BMI1, andCALM-AF10) in pediatric T-ALL patients Material and Methods: LMO2, LYL1, TLX1, TLX3, BMI1, TAL1, and CALM-AF10 expression was measured usingquantitative real...

  16. Production of transgenic cashmere goat embryos expressing red fluorescent protein and containing IGF1 hair-follicle-cell specific expression cassette by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BOU; ShorGan

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, cashmere goat fetal fibroblasts were transfected with pCDsR-KI, a hair-follicle-cell specific expression vector for insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) that contains two markers for selection (red fluorescent protein gene and neomycin resistant gene). The transgenic fibroblasts cell lines were obtained after G418 selection. Prior to the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the maturation rate of caprine cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) was optimized to an in vitro maturation time of 18 h. Parthenogenetic ooctyes were used as a model to investigate the effect of two activation methods, one with calcium ionophore IA23187 plus 6-DMAP and the other with ethanol plus 6-DMAP. The cleavage rates after 48 h were respectively 88.7% and 86.4%, with no significant difference (P>0.05). There was no significant difference between the cleavage rate and the blastocyst rate in two different media (SO- Faa and CR1aa; 86.3% vs 83.9%, P>0.05 and 23.1% vs 17.2%,P>0.05). The fusion rate of a 190 V/mm group (62.4%) was significantly higher than 130 V/mm (32.8%) and 200 V/mm (42.9%), groups (P<0.05). After transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer (TSCNT) manipulation, 203 reconstructed embryos were obtained in which the cleavage rate after in vitro development (IVD) for 48 h was 79.3% (161/203). The blastocyst rate after IVD for 7 to 9 d was 15.3% (31/203). There were 17 embryos out of 31 strongly ex- pressing red fluorescence. Two of the red fluorescent blastocysts were randomly selected to identify transgene by polymerase chain reaction. Both were positive. These results showed that: (i) RFP and Neor genes were correctly expressed indicating that transgenic somatic cell lines and positive trans- genic embryos were obtained; (ii) one more selection at the blastocyst stage was necessary although the donor cells were transgenic positive, because only partially transgenic embryos expressing red fluorescence were obtained; and (iii) through TSCNT manipulation and

  17. Chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7)-expression and IFNγ production define vaccine-specific canine T-cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Ashley N; Tarleton, Rick L

    2015-04-15

    Canines suffer from and serve as strong translational animals models for many immunological disorders and infectious diseases. Routine vaccination has been a mainstay of protecting dogs through the stimulation of robust antibody responses and expansion of memory T-cell populations. Commercially available reagents and described techniques are limited for identifying and characterizing canine T-cell subsets and evaluating T-cell-specific effector function. To define reagents for delineating naïve versus activated T-cells and identify antigen-specific T-cells, we tested anti-human and anti-bovine T-cell specific cell surface marker reagents for cross-reactivity with canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells from healthy canine donors showed reactivity to CCL19-Ig, a CCR7 ligand, and coexpression with CD62L. An in vitro stimulation with concanavalin A validated downregulation of CCR7 and CD62L expression on stimulated healthy control PBMCs, consistent with an activated T-cell phenotype. Anti-IFNγ antibodies identified antigen-specific IFNγ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells upon in vitro vaccine antigen PBMC stimulation. PBMC isolation within 24h of sample collection allowed for efficienT-cell recovery and accurate T-cell effector function characterization. These data provide a reagent and techniques platform via flow cytometry for identifying canine T-cell subsets and characterizing circulating antigen-specific canine T-cells for potential use in diagnostic and field settings. PMID:25758065

  18. Expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, GAGE and BAGE in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To observe mRNA expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, to explore the relationship between gene expression and diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of ovarian cancer, and to evaluate the feasibility of their gene products as markers, and an immunotherapy target for ovarian cancer. Methods mRNA expression of MAGE-1, MAGE-3, GAGE-1/2 and BAGE were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in 14 cases of normal ovarian tissue, 20 cases of ovarian benign tumor specimens, 41 cases of ovarian cancer specimens, and ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3, A2780, and COC1. Results MAGE, GAGE and BAGE genes were not expressed in normal ovarian tissue. In benign tumors, only the MAGE gene was expressed; the expression rate of this gene in benign tumors was 15% (3/20. In ovarian cancer tissues, MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 was highly expressed, with expression rates of 53.7% (22/41 and 36.6% (15/41, while GAGE-1/2 and BAGE had relatively low expression, with rates of 26.8% (11/41 and 14.6% (6/41. In metastatic lesions of ovarian cancer, only MAGE-1 and BAGE were expressed, with expression rates of 28.6% (2/7 and 14.3% (1/7. The positive expression rates of MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 in serous cystadenocarcinoma were significantly higher than that in other types of ovarian cancer (P P Conclusion Tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE may play a role in the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer. These genes can be used as one of the important indicators for early diagnosis, efficacy evaluation and prognostic determination of ovarian cancer.

  19. Effects of specific and prolonged expression of zebrafish growth factors, Fgf2 and Lif in primordial germ cells in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We discovered that nanos3 3′UTR prolonged PGC-specific protein expression up to 26 days. ► Expression of Fgf2 in PGCs significantly increased PGC number at later developmental stages. ► Expression of Lif in PGCs resulted in a significant disruption of PGC migration. ► Lif illicited its effect on PGC migration through Lif receptor a. ► Our approach could be used to achieve prolonged PGC-specific expression of other proteins. -- Abstract: Primordial germ cells (PGCs), specified early in development, proliferate and migrate to the developing gonad before sexual differentiation occurs in the embryo and eventually give rise to spermatogonia or oogonia. In this study, we discovered that nanos3 3′UTR, a common method used to label PGCs, not only directed PGC-specific expression of DsRed but also prolonged this expression up to 26 days post fertilization (dpf) when DsRed-nanos3 3′UTR hybrid mRNAs were introduced into 1- to 2-cell-stage embryos. As such, we employed this knowledge to express zebrafish leukemia inhibitory factor (Lif), basic fibroblast growth factor (Fgf2) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) in the PGCs and evaluate their effects on PGC development in vivo for over a period of 3 weeks. The results show that expression of Fgf2 significantly increased PGC number at 14- and 21-dpf while Bmp4 resulted in severe ventralization and death of the embryos by 3 days. Expression of Lif resulted in a significant disruption of PGC migration. Mopholino knockdown experiments indicated that Lif illicited its effect on PGC migration through Lif receptor a (Lifra) but not Lifrb. The general approach described in this study could be used to achieve prolonged PGC-specific expression of other proteins to investigate their roles in germ cell and gonad development. The results also indicate that zebrafish PGCs have a mechanism to stabilize and prolong the expression of mRNA that carries nanos3 3′UTR. Understanding this mechanism may make it

  20. Effects of specific and prolonged expression of zebrafish growth factors, Fgf2 and Lif in primordial germ cells in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Ten-Tsao, E-mail: wong20@purdue.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, 901 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Collodi, Paul [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, 901 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discovered that nanos3 3 Prime UTR prolonged PGC-specific protein expression up to 26 days. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Fgf2 in PGCs significantly increased PGC number at later developmental stages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Lif in PGCs resulted in a significant disruption of PGC migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lif illicited its effect on PGC migration through Lif receptor a. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our approach could be used to achieve prolonged PGC-specific expression of other proteins. -- Abstract: Primordial germ cells (PGCs), specified early in development, proliferate and migrate to the developing gonad before sexual differentiation occurs in the embryo and eventually give rise to spermatogonia or oogonia. In this study, we discovered that nanos3 3 Prime UTR, a common method used to label PGCs, not only directed PGC-specific expression of DsRed but also prolonged this expression up to 26 days post fertilization (dpf) when DsRed-nanos3 3 Prime UTR hybrid mRNAs were introduced into 1- to 2-cell-stage embryos. As such, we employed this knowledge to express zebrafish leukemia inhibitory factor (Lif), basic fibroblast growth factor (Fgf2) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) in the PGCs and evaluate their effects on PGC development in vivo for over a period of 3 weeks. The results show that expression of Fgf2 significantly increased PGC number at 14- and 21-dpf while Bmp4 resulted in severe ventralization and death of the embryos by 3 days. Expression of Lif resulted in a significant disruption of PGC migration. Mopholino knockdown experiments indicated that Lif illicited its effect on PGC migration through Lif receptor a (Lifra) but not Lifrb. The general approach described in this study could be used to achieve prolonged PGC-specific expression of other proteins to investigate their roles in germ cell and gonad development. The results also indicate that zebrafish PGCs

  1. Genes expressed in the Drosophila head reveal a role for fat cells in sex-specific physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Shinsuke; Amrein, Hubert

    2002-01-01

    The downstream effectors of the Drosophila sex determination cascade are mostly unknown and thought to mediate all aspects of sexual differentiation, physiology and behavior. Here, we employed serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) to identify male and female effectors expressed in the head, and report 46 sex-biased genes (>4-fold/P < 0.01). We characterized four novel, male- or female-specific genes and found that all are expressed mainly in the fat cells in the head. Tsx (turn on sex-spe...

  2. Reversibility of β-Cell-Specific Transcript Factors Expression by Long-Term Caloric Restriction in db/db Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjun Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is characterized by β-cell dedifferentiation, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The purpose of the current study was to explore the mechanisms of β-cell dedifferentiation with and without long-term control of calorie intake. We used a diabetes mouse model (db/db to analyze the changes in the expression levels of β-cell-specific transcription factors (TFs and functional factors with long-term caloric restriction (CR. Our results showed that chronic euglycemia was maintained in the db/db mice with long-term CR intervention, and β-cell dedifferentiation was significantly reduced. The expression of Glut2, Pdx1, and Nkx6.1 was reversed, while MafA expression was significantly increased with long-term CR. GLP-1 pathway was reactivated with long-term CR. Our work showed that the course of β-cell dedifferentiation can intervene by long-term control of calorie intake. Key β-cell-specific TFs and functional factors play important roles in maintaining β-cell differentiation. Targeting these factors could optimize T2D therapies.

  3. Enhancement of cell-specific transgene expression from a Tet-Off regulatory system using a transcriptional amplification strategy in the rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Beihui; Wang, Shu; Brenner, Michael; Paton, Julian FR; Kasparov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Background The Tet-Off system uses a tetracycline-controlled transactivator protein (tTA) and a tetracycline-responsive promoter element (TRE) to regulate expression of a target gene. This system can be used to achieve regulatable transgene expression in specific cell types by employing a cell-specific promoter to drive tTA expression. Wide applications of this attractive approach are, however, hindered by relatively weak transcriptional activity of most cell-specific promoters. We report her...

  4. Dynamic changes in replication timing and gene expression during lineage specification of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Mulia, Juan Carlos; Buckley, Quinton; Sasaki, Takayo; Zimmerman, Jared; Didier, Ruth A; Nazor, Kristopher; Loring, Jeanne F; Lian, Zheng; Weissman, Sherman; Robins, Allan J; Schulz, Thomas C; Menendez, Laura; Kulik, Michael J; Dalton, Stephen; Gabr, Haitham; Kahveci, Tamer; Gilbert, David M

    2015-08-01

    Duplication of the genome in mammalian cells occurs in a defined temporal order referred to as its replication-timing (RT) program. RT changes dynamically during development, regulated in units of 400-800 kb referred to as replication domains (RDs). Changes in RT are generally coordinated with transcriptional competence and changes in subnuclear position. We generated genome-wide RT profiles for 26 distinct human cell types, including embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived, primary cells and established cell lines representing intermediate stages of endoderm, mesoderm, ectoderm, and neural crest (NC) development. We identified clusters of RDs that replicate at unique times in each stage (RT signatures) and confirmed global consolidation of the genome into larger synchronously replicating segments during differentiation. Surprisingly, transcriptome data revealed that the well-accepted correlation between early replication and transcriptional activity was restricted to RT-constitutive genes, whereas two-thirds of the genes that switched RT during differentiation were strongly expressed when late replicating in one or more cell types. Closer inspection revealed that transcription of this class of genes was frequently restricted to the lineage in which the RT switch occurred, but was induced prior to a late-to-early RT switch and/or down-regulated after an early-to-late RT switch. Analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks showed that this class of genes contains strong regulators of genes that were only expressed when early replicating. These results provide intriguing new insight into the complex relationship between transcription and RT regulation during human development. PMID:26055160

  5. Differential microRNA expression signatures and cell type-specific association with Taxol resistance in ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YW

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Wan Kim,1 Eun Young Kim,1 Doin Jeon,1 Juinn-Lin Liu,2 Helena Suhyun Kim,3 Jin Woo Choi,4 Woong Shick Ahn5 1Cancer Research Institute of Medical Science, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Brain Tumor Center, Department of Neuro-Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, TX, USA; 3Cancer Rehab Laboratory, RH Healthcare Systems Inc, TX, USA; 4Harvard Medical School and Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Cambridge, MA, USA; 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea Abstract: Paclitaxel (Taxol resistance remains a major obstacle for the successful treatment of ovarian cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have oncogenic and tumor suppressor activity and are associated with poor prognosis phenotypes. miRNA screenings for this drug resistance are needed to estimate the prognosis of the disease and find better drug targets. miRNAs that were differentially expressed in Taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cells, compared with Taxol-sensitive cells, were screened by Illumina Human MicroRNA Expression BeadChips. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR was used to identify target genes of selected miRNAs. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis was applied to identify dysregulated miRNAs in ovarian cancer patients using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. A total of 82 miRNAs were identified in ovarian carcinoma cells compared to normal ovarian cells. miR-141, miR-106a, miR-200c, miR-96, and miR-378 were overexpressed, and miR-411, miR-432, miR-494, miR-409-3p, and miR-655 were underexpressed in ovarian cancer cells. Seventeen miRNAs were overexpressed in Taxol-resistant cells, including miR-663, miR-622, and HS_188. Underexpressed miRNAs in Taxol-sensitive cells included miR-497, miR-187, miR-195, and miR-107. We further showed miR-663 and miR-622 as significant prognosis markers of the chemo-resistant patient group. In particular, the

  6. Single cell derived murine embryonic stem cell clones stably express Rex1-specific green fluorescent protein and their differentiation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) often display high rates of apoptosis and spontaneous differentiation in routine culture, thus bring the proliferation of these cells highly inefficient. Moreover, little is known about the factors that are indispensable for sustaining self-renewal. To surmount these issues, we established transgenic mES cell lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the Rex1 promoter which is a key regulator of pluripotency in ES cells. In addition, we provided a simplified and improved protocol to derive transgenic mESCs from single cell. Finally, we showed that embryoid body (EB) development was faster than adherent differentiation in terms of differentiation ratio by real-time tracking of the EGFP expression. Therefore, these cell lines can be tracked and selected both in vitro and in vivo and should be invaluable for studying the factors that are indispensable for maintaining pluripotency

  7. Cell-Type Specific Determinants of NRAMP1 Expression in Professional Phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu F. M. Cellier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1 or Solute carrier 11 member 1, Slc11a1 transports divalent metals across the membrane of late endosomes and lysosomes in professional phagocytes. Nramp1 represents an ancient eukaryotic cell-autonomous defense whereas the gene duplication that yielded Nramp1 and Nramp2 predated the origin of Sarcopterygians (lobe-finned fishes and tetrapods. SLC11A1 genetic polymorphisms associated with human resistance to tuberculosis consist of potential regulatory variants. Herein, current knowledge of the regulation of SLC11A1 gene expression is reviewed and comprehensive analysis of ENCODE data available for hematopoietic cell-types suggests a hypothesis for the regulation of SLC11A1 expression during myeloid development and phagocyte functional polarization. SLC11A1 is part of a 34.6 kb CTCF-insulated locus scattered with predicted regulatory elements: a 3' enhancer, a large 5' enhancer domain and four elements spread around the transcription start site (TSS, including several C/EBP and PU.1 sites. SLC11A1 locus ends appear mobilized by ETS-related factors early during myelopoiesis; activation of both 5' and 3' enhancers in myelo-monocytic cells correlate with transcription factor binding at the TSS. Characterizing the corresponding cis/trans determinants functionally will establish the mechanisms involved and possibly reveal genetic variation that impacts susceptibility to infectious or immune diseases.

  8. Cell-type specific oxytocin gene expression from AAV delivered promoter deletion constructs into the rat supraoptic nucleus in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L Fields

    Full Text Available The magnocellular neurons (MCNs in the hypothalamus selectively express either oxytocin (OXT or vasopressin (AVP neuropeptide genes, a property that defines their phenotypes. Here we examine the molecular basis of this selectivity in the OXT MCNs by stereotaxic microinjections of adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors that contain various OXT gene promoter deletion constructs using EGFP as the reporter into the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON. Two weeks following injection of the AAVs, immunohistochemical assays of EGFP expression from these constructs were done to determine whether the EGFP reporter co-localizes with either the OXT- or AVP-immunoreactivity in the MCNs. The results show that the key elements in the OT gene promoter that regulate the cell-type specific expression the SON are located -216 to -100 bp upstream of the transcription start site. We hypothesize that within this 116 bp domain a repressor exists that inhibits expression specifically in AVP MCNs, thereby leading to the cell-type specific expression of the OXT gene only in the OXT MCNs.

  9. Characterization of promoter elements required for cell-specific expression of the neurotensin/neuromedin N gene in a human endocrine cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, B M; X Wang; Zhou, Z; Townsend, C M; McNeil, G P; Dobner, P R

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the gene encoding neurotensin/neuromedin N (NT/N) is mostly limited to the brain and specialized enteroendocrine cells (N cells) of the distal small intestine. We have analyzed the NT/N DNA sequences upstream of the RNA start site that direct cell-specific expression using a novel human endocrine cell line, BON, that resembles intestinal N cells in several important aspects, including NT/N precursor protein processing, ratios of different NT/N mRNA forms, and high levels of cons...

  10. Key metalloproteinases are expressed by specific cell types in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Nuttall, Robert K; Edwards, Dylan R;

    2004-01-01

    Metalloproteinases (MPs) include matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and metalloproteinase-disintegrins (ADAMs). Their physiological inhibitors are tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). MPs are thought to be mediators of cellular infiltration in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and its...... animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We used real-time RT-PCR to profile the expression of all 22 known mouse MMPs, seven ADAMs, and all four known TIMPs in spinal cord from SJL/J mice and mice with adoptively transferred myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific EAE. A significant...

  11. Cloning and substrate specificity of a human phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferase expressed in COS-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rat kidney phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferase cDNA was used to isolate a human liver phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferase cDNA by screening of a human liver cDNA library in the expression vector λgt11. The 2.4-kilobase cDNA contained an open reading frame of 1,593 base pairs coding for a protein of 531 residues. The human liver cDNA was subcloned into the vector pKCRH2. Transfection of this recombinant plasmid into COS-7 cells allowed the expression of a protein of ∼ 55 kDa. The enzyme synthesized was a glycoprotein, as indicated by a reduction in molecular mass of ∼ 3 kDa after biosynthesis in the presence of tunicamycin. The expressed enzyme rapidly catalyzed the glucuronidation of 1-naphthol, 4-methylumbelliferone, and 4-nitrophenol. The use of a related series of simple phenols provided an outline description of the substituent restrictions imposed upon the phenolic structures accepted as substrates. The glucuronidation of testosterone, androsterone, and estrone was not catalyzed by this cloned UDP-glucuronosyltransferase

  12. Specific micro RNA-regulated TetR-KRAB transcriptional control of transgene expression in viral vector-transduced cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Pichard

    Full Text Available Precise control of transgene expression in a tissue-specific and temporally regulated manner is desirable for many basic and applied investigations gene therapy applications. This is important to regulate dose of transgene products and minimize unwanted effects. Previously described methods have employed tissue specific promoters, miRNA-based transgene silencing or tetR-KRAB-mediated suppression of transgene promoters. To improve on versatility of transgene expression control, we have developed expression systems that use combinations of a tetR-KRAB artificial transgene-repressor, endogenous miRNA silencing machinery and tissue specific promoters. Precise control of transgene expression was demonstrated in liver-, macrophage- and muscle-derived cells. Efficiency was also demonstrated in vivo in murine muscle. This multicomponent and modular regulatory system provides a robust and easily adaptable method for achieving regulated transgene expression in different tissue types. The improved precision of regulation will be useful for many gene therapy applications requiring specific spatiotemporal transgene regulation.

  13. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  14. A quantitative comparison of cell-type-specific microarray gene expression profiling methods in the mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin W Okaty

    Full Text Available Expression profiling of restricted neural populations using microarrays can facilitate neuronal classification and provide insight into the molecular bases of cellular phenotypes. Due to the formidable heterogeneity of intermixed cell types that make up the brain, isolating cell types prior to microarray processing poses steep technical challenges that have been met in various ways. These methodological differences have the potential to distort cell-type-specific gene expression profiles insofar as they may insufficiently filter out contaminating mRNAs or induce aberrant cellular responses not normally present in vivo. Thus we have compared the repeatability, susceptibility to contamination from off-target cell-types, and evidence for stress-responsive gene expression of five different purification methods--Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM, Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP, Immunopanning (PAN, Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS, and manual sorting of fluorescently labeled cells (Manual. We found that all methods obtained comparably high levels of repeatability, however, data from LCM and TRAP showed significantly higher levels of contamination than the other methods. While PAN samples showed higher activation of apoptosis-related, stress-related and immediate early genes, samples from FACS and Manual studies, which also require dissociated cells, did not. Given that TRAP targets actively translated mRNAs, whereas other methods target all transcribed mRNAs, observed differences may also reflect translational regulation.

  15. Hepatoblast and mesenchymal cell-specific gene-expression in fetal rat liver and in cultured fetal rat liver cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mansuroglu, Tümen; Dudás, József; Elmaouhoub, Abderrahim; Joza, Tobias; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether passaged rat fetal liver cells are functional hepatoblasts. Hepatocyte/hepatoblast- and liver myofibroblast-gene-expressions were studied in adult and fetal rat liver tissues as well as in primary and passaged cultures of isolated rat fetal liver cells at both the mRNA and protein level. Desmin- and Alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA)-positive cells were located in the walls of liver vessels, whereas Desmin-positive/SMA-negative cells were distribute...

  16. Expression of aquaporin-1 in rat pleural mesothelial cells and its specific inhibition by RNA interference in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; XIE Can-mao; LI Zhi-ping

    2007-01-01

    Background The discovery of water channel aquaporins(AQPs)has greatly expanded the understanding of the regulation of the water permeability of biological membranes.Aquaporin-1(AQP1)may be involved in fluid transport in numerous pathological conditions.The objective of the present study was to examine whether AQP1 is present in cultured rat pleural mesothelial cells(PMCs)and to investigate the specific inhibitory effect of RNA interference(RNAi) on AQP1 expression in PMCs,which may provide a new method for the further studies on the relation between expression of AQP1 in PMCs and pleural fluid removal in vivo.Methods PMCs were isolated and cultured from rat pleura.The expression of AQP1 in PMCs was confirmed by immunocytochemical staining and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR).Two eukaryotic expression plasmid vectors of short hairpin RNA(shRNA)specific for the AQP1 gene of rat sapien were designed and constructed.The recombinant plasmid vectors were transfected into cultured rat PMCs by cation liposomes.Flow cytometry was used to screen the most effective shRNA at 48 hours after transfection.The expressions of AQP1 mRNA and protein were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting method at 48 hours after transfection.Results RT-PCR and immunostaining revealed that AQP1 mRNA and protein were present in cultured rat PMCs.Two effective eukaryotic expression plasmid vectors of shRNA specific for the AQP1 gene were constructed successfully.The levels of the expression of AQP1 were inhibited by 83.45%,90.93%,respectively,at mRNA level and 41.24%,67.60%,respectively at protein level by two recombinant plasmids at 48 hours after transfection.The expression of AQP1 in PMCs transfected with plasmid was significantly lower than that of the cells transfected with the control plasmid HK and that of the untransfected cells(P<0.01).There was no significant difference in AQP1 expression between the control group and the group transfected with AQP1 nonspecific sh

  17. Characterization of a human cell line stably over-expressing the candidate oncogene, dual specificity phosphatase 12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Cain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of chromosomal rearrangements within primary tumors has been influential in the identification of novel oncogenes. Identification of the "driver" gene(s within cancer-derived amplicons is, however, hampered by the fact that most amplicons contain many gene products. Amplification of 1q21-1q23 is strongly associated with liposarcomas and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization narrowed down the likely candidate oncogenes to two: the activating transcription factor 6 (atf6 and the dual specificity phosphatase 12 (dusp12. While atf6 is an established transcriptional regulator of the unfolded protein response, the potential role of dusp12 in cancer remains uncharacterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the oncogenic potential of dusp12, we established stable cell lines that ectopically over-express dusp12 in isolation and determined whether this cell line acquired properties frequently associated with transformed cells. Here, we demonstrate that cells over-expressing dusp12 display increased cell motility and resistance to apoptosis. Additionally, over-expression of dusp12 promoted increased expression of the c-met proto-oncogene and the collagen and laminin receptor intergrin alpha 1 (itga1 which is implicated in metastasis. SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, these results suggest that dusp12 is oncologically relevant and exposes a potential association between dusp12 and established oncogenes that could be therapeutically targeted.

  18. Expression of NR2B in cerebellar granule cells specifically facilitates effect of motor training on motor learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Jiao

    Full Text Available It is believed that gene/environment interaction (GEI plays a pivotal role in the development of motor skills, which are acquired via practicing or motor training. However, the underlying molecular/neuronal mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we reported that the expression of NR2B, a subunit of NMDA receptors, in cerebellar granule cells specifically enhanced the effect of voluntary motor training on motor learning in the mouse. Moreover, this effect was characterized as motor learning-specific and developmental stage-dependent, because neither emotional/spatial memory was affected nor was the enhanced motor learning observed when the motor training was conducted starting at the age of 3 months old in these transgenic mice. These results indicate that changes in the expression of gene(s that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity in cerebellar granule cells may constitute a molecular basis for the cerebellum to be involved in the GEI by facilitating motor skill learning.

  19. Decreased N-TAF1 expression in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism patient-specific neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Naoto; Hendriks, William T.; Dhakal, Jyotsna; Vaine, Christine A.; Liu, Christina; Shin, David; Shin, Kyle; Wakabayashi-Ito, Noriko; Dy, Marisela; Multhaupt-Buell, Trisha; Sharma, Nutan; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Bragg, D. Cristopher

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (XDP) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder involving a progressive loss of striatal medium spiny neurons. The mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are not known, in part because there have been few cellular models available for studying the disease. The XDP haplotype consists of multiple sequence variations in a region of the X chromosome containing TAF1, a large gene with at least 38 exons, and a multiple transcript system (MTS) composed of five unconventional exons. A previous study identified an XDP-specific insertion of a SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA)-type retrotransposon in intron 32 of TAF1, as well as a neural-specific TAF1 isoform, N-TAF1, which showed decreased expression in post-mortem XDP brain compared with control tissue. Here, we generated XDP patient and control fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in order to further probe cellular defects associated with this disease. As initial validation of the model, we compared expression of TAF1 and MTS transcripts in XDP versus control fibroblasts and iPSC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Compared with control cells, XDP fibroblasts exhibited decreased expression of TAF1 transcript fragments derived from exons 32-36, a region spanning the SVA insertion site. N-TAF1, which incorporates an alternative exon (exon 34′), was not expressed in fibroblasts, but was detectable in iPSC-differentiated NSCs at levels that were ∼threefold lower in XDP cells than in controls. These results support the previous findings that N-TAF1 expression is impaired in XDP, but additionally indicate that this aberrant transcription might occur in neural cells at relatively early stages of development that precede neurodegeneration. PMID:26769797

  20. Multilineage differentiation of porcine bone marrow stromal cells associated with specific gene expression pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Lijin; Zou, Xuenong; Chen, Li;

    2008-01-01

    There are increasing reports regarding differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) from human and various species of animals including pigs. The phenotype and function of BMSC along a mesenchymal lineage differentiation are well characterized by specific transcription factors and marker...... genes along those three mesenchymal lineages during a particular lineage differentiation of porcine BMSC by means of real-time PCR measurement. In an osteogenic medium, the mRNA levels of cbfa1, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, type 1 collagen, osteonectin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin were induced...

  1. Regulatory mechanisms for abnormal expression of the human breast cancer specific gene 1 in breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Aiping; LI; Qing; LIU; Jingwen

    2006-01-01

    Breast cancer-specific gene 1 (BCSG1), also referred as synuclein γ, was originally isolated from a human breast cancer cDNA library and the protein is mainly localized to presynaptic terminals in the nervous system. BCSG1 is not expressed in normal or benign breast lesions, but expressed at an extremely high level in the vast majority of the advanced staged breast carcinomas and ovarian carcinomas. Overexpression of BCSG1 in cancer cells led to significant increase in cell proliferation, motility and invasiveness, and metastasis. To elucidate the molecular mechanism and regulation for abnormal transcription of BCSG1, a variety of BCSG1 promoter luciferase reporters were constructed including 3' end deleted sequences, Sp1 deleted, and activator protein-1 (AP1) domains mutated. Transient transfection assay was used to detect the transcriptional activation of BCSG1 promoters. Results showed that the Sp1 sequence in 5'-flanking region was involved in the basal transcriptional activities of BCSG1 without cell-type specificity. In comparison to pGL3-1249, the reporter activities of pGL3-1553 in BCSG1-negative MCF-7 cells and pGL3-1759 in HepG2 cells were notably decreased. Mutations at AP1 sites in BCSG1 intron 1 significantly reduced the promoter activity in all cell lines. Transcription factors, c-jun, c-fos and cyclin AMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein, could markedly enhance the promoter activities. Thus, our results suggest that the abnormal expression of BCSG1 in breast cancer cells is likely regulated by multiple mechanisms. The 5' flanking region of BCSG1 provides the basal transcriptional activity without cell type specificity. A critical promoter element involved in abnormal expression of BCSG1 presents in the first exon. The cell type specificity of BCSG1 transcription is probably affected through intronic cis-regulatory sequences. AP1 domains in the first intron play an important role in control of BCSG1 transcription.

  2. Deregulated sex chromosome gene expression with male germ cell-specific loss of Dicer1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne R Greenlee

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of endogenous, non-coding RNAs that mediate post-transcriptional gene silencing by inhibiting mRNA translation and promoting mRNA decay. DICER1, an RNase III endonuclease encoded by Dicer1, is required for processing short 21-22 nucleotide miRNAs from longer double-stranded RNA precursors. Here, we investigate the loss of Dicer1 in mouse postnatal male germ cells to determine how disruptions in the miRNA biogenesis pathway may contribute to infertility. Reduced levels of Dicer1 transcripts and DICER1 were confirmed in germ cell knock-out (GCKO testes by postnatal day 18 (P18. Compared to wild-type (WT at 8 weeks, GCKO males had no change in body weight; yet showed significant reductions in testis mass and sperm number. Histology and fertility tests confirmed spermatogenic failure in GCKO males. Array analyses at P18 showed that in comparison to WT testes, 75% of miRNA genes and 37% of protein coding genes were differentially expressed in GCKO testes. Among these, 96% of miRNA genes were significantly down-regulated, while 4% miRNA genes were overexpressed. Interestingly, we observed preferential overexpression of genes encoded on the sex chromosomes in GCKO testes, including more than 80% of previously identified targets of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI. Compared to WT, GCKO mice showed higher percentages of germ cells at early meiotic stages (leptotene and zygotene but lower percentages at later stages (pachytene, diplotene and metaphase I providing evidence that deletion of Dicer1 leads to disruptions in meiotic progression. Therefore, deleting Dicer1 in early postnatal germ cells resulted in deregulation of transcripts encoded by genes on the sex chromosomes, impaired meiotic progression and led to spermatogenic failure and infertility.

  3. Suppression of tumor growth and angiogenesis by a specific antagonist of the cell-surface expressed nucleolin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Destouches

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emerging evidences suggest that nucleolin expressed on the cell surface is implicated in growth of tumor cells and angiogenesis. Nucleolin is one of the major proteins of the nucleolus, but it is also expressed on the cell surface where is serves as a binding protein for variety of ligands implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, mitogenesis and angiogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a specific antagonist that binds the C-terminal tail of nucleolin, the HB-19 pseudopeptide, here we show that the growth of tumor cells and angiogenesis are suppressed in various in vitro and in vivo experimental models. HB-19 inhibited colony formation in soft agar of tumor cell lines, impaired migration of endothelial cells and formation of capillary-like structures in collagen gel, and reduced blood vessel branching in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. In athymic nude mice, HB-19 treatment markedly suppressed the progression of established human breast tumor cell xenografts in nude mice, and in some cases eliminated measurable tumors while displaying no toxicity to normal tissue. This potent antitumoral effect is attributed to the direct inhibitory action of HB-19 on both tumor and endothelial cells by blocking and down regulating surface nucleolin, but without any apparent effect on nucleolar nucleolin. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results illustrate the dual inhibitory action of HB-19 on the tumor development and the neovascularization process, thus validating the cell-surface expressed nucleolin as a strategic target for an effective cancer drug. Consequently, the HB-19 pseudopeptide provides a unique candidate to consider for innovative cancer therapy.

  4. Cell-specific precursor processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F; Bundgaard, Jens R

    2010-01-01

    The singular gene for a peptide hormone is expressed not only in a specific endocrine cell type but also in other endocrine cells as well as in entirely different cells such as neurons, adipocytes, myocytes, immune cells, and cells of the sex-glands. The cellular expression pattern for each gene...... varies with development, time and species. Endocrine regulation is, however, based on the release of a given hormone from an endocrine cell to the general circulation from whose cappilaries the hormone reaches the specific target cell elsewhere in the body. The widespread expression of hormone genes in...... different cells and tissues therefore requires control of biogenesis and secretion in order to avoid interference with the function of a specific hormonal peptide from a particular endocrine cell. Several mechanisms are involved in such control, one of them being cell-specific processing of prohormones. The...

  5. Tissue-specific expression of a gene encoding a cell wall-localized lipid transfer protein from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, S; Hecht, U; Kippers, A; Botella, J; De Vries, S; Somerville, C

    1994-05-01

    Nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) from plants are characterized by their ability to stimulate phospholipid transfer between membranes in vitro. However, because these proteins are generally located outside of the plasma membrane, it is unlikely that they have a similar role in vivo. As a step toward identifying the function of these proteins, one of several LTP genes from Arabidoposis has been cloned and the expression pattern of the gene has been examined by analysis of the tissue specificity of beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in transgenic plants containing LTP promoter-GUS fusions and by in situ mRNA localization. The LTP1 promoter was active early in development in protoderm cells of embryos, vascular tissues, lignified tips of cotyledons, shoot meristem, and stipules. In adult plants, the gene was expressed in epidermal cells of young leaves and the stem. In flowers, expression was observed in the epidermis of all developing influorescence and flower organ primordia, the epidermis of the siliques and the outer ovule wall, the stigma, petal tips, and floral nectaries of mature flowers, and the petal/sepal abscission zone of mature siliques. The presence of GUS activity in guard cells, lateral roots, pollen grains, leaf vascular tissue, and internal cells of stipules and nectaries was not confirmed by in situ hybridizations, supporting previous observations that suggest that the reporter gene is subject to artifactual expression. These results are consistent with a role for the LTP1 gene product in some aspect of secretion or deposition of lipophilic substances in the cell walls of expanding epidermal cells and certain secretory tissues. The LTP1 promoter region contained sequences homologous to putative regulatory elements of genes in the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway, suggesting that the expression of the LTP1 gene may be regulated by the same or similar mechanisms as genes in the phenylpropanoid pathway. PMID:8029357

  6. Triptolide inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells and down-regulates SUMO-specific protease 1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Huang

    Full Text Available Recently, traditional Chinese medicine and medicinal herbs have attracted more attentions worldwide for its anti-tumor efficacy. Celastrol and Triptolide, two active components extracted from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (known as Lei Gong Teng or Thunder of God Vine, have shown anti-tumor effects. Celastrol was identified as a natural 26 s proteasome inhibitor which promotes cell apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth. The effect and mechanism of Triptolide on prostate cancer (PCa is not well studied. Here we demonstrated that Triptolide, more potent than Celastrol, inhibited cell growth and induced cell death in LNCaP and PC-3 cell lines. Triptolide also significantly inhibited the xenografted PC-3 tumor growth in nude mice. Moreover, Triptolide induced PCa cell apoptosis through caspases activation and PARP cleavage. Unbalance between SUMOylation and deSUMOylation was reported to play an important role in PCa progression. SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1 was thought to be a potential marker and therapeutical target of PCa. Importantly, we observed that Triptolide down-regulated SENP1 expression in both mRNA and protein levels in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners, resulting in an enhanced cellular SUMOylation in PCa cells. Meanwhile, Triptolide decreased AR and c-Jun expression at similar manners, and suppressed AR and c-Jun transcription activity. Furthermore, knockdown or ectopic SENP1, c-Jun and AR expression in PCa cells inhibited the Triptolide anti-PCa effects. Taken together, our data suggest that Triptolide is a natural compound with potential therapeutic value for PCa. Its anti-tumor activity may be attributed to mechanisms involving down-regulation of SENP1 that restores SUMOylation and deSUMOyaltion balance and negative regulation of AR and c-Jun expression that inhibits the AR and c-Jun mediated transcription in PCa.

  7. Fucci2a: a bicistronic cell cycle reporter that allows Cre mediated tissue specific expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mort, Richard Lester; Ford, Matthew Jonathan; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Lindstrom, Nils Olof; Casadio, Angela; Douglas, Adam Thomas; Keighren, Margaret Anne; Hohenstein, Peter; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Jackson, Ian James

    2014-01-01

    Markers of cell cycle stage allow estimation of cell cycle dynamics in cell culture and during embryonic development. The Fucci system incorporates genetically encoded probes that highlight G1 and S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle allowing live imaging. However the available mouse models that incorporate Fucci are beset by problems with transgene inactivation, varying expression level, lack of conditional potential and/or the need to maintain separate transgenes-there is no transgenic mouse model that solves all these problems. To address these shortfalls we re-engineered the Fucci system to create 2 bicistronic Fucci variants incorporating both probes fused using the Thosea asigna virus 2A (T2A) self cleaving peptide. We characterize these variants in stable 3T3 cell lines. One of the variants (termed Fucci2a) faithfully recapitulated the nuclear localization and cell cycle stage specific florescence of the original Fucci system. We go on to develop a conditional mouse allele (R26Fucci2aR) carefully designed for high, inducible, ubiquitous expression allowing investigation of cell cycle status in single cell lineages within the developing embryo. We demonstrate the utility of R26Fucci2aR for live imaging by using high resolution confocal microscopy of ex vivo lung, kidney and neural crest development. Using our 3T3 system we describe and validate a method to estimate cell cycle times from relatively short time-lapse sequences that we then apply to our neural crest data. The Fucci2a system and the R26Fucci2aR mouse model are compelling new tools for the investigation of cell cycle dynamics in cell culture and during mouse embryonic development. PMID:25486356

  8. Role of Site-Specific N-Glycans Expressed on GluA2 in the Regulation of Cell Surface Expression of AMPA-Type Glutamate Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Takeuchi

    Full Text Available The AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR, which is a tetrameric complex composed of four subunits (GluA1-4 with several combinations, mediates the majority of rapid excitatory synaptic transmissions in the nervous system. Cell surface expression levels of AMPAR modulate synaptic plasticity, which is considered one of the molecular bases for learning and memory formation. To date, a unique trisaccharide (HSO3-3GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc, human natural killer-1 (HNK-1 carbohydrate, was found expressed specifically on N-linked glycans of GluA2 and regulated the cell surface expression of AMPAR and the spine maturation process. However, evidence that the HNK-1 epitope on N-glycans of GluA2 directly affects these phenomena is lacking. Moreover, it is thought that other N-glycans on GluA2 also have potential roles in the regulation of AMPAR functions. In the present study, using a series of mutants lacking potential N-glycosylation sites (N256, N370, N406, and N413 within GluA2, we demonstrated that the mutant lacking the N-glycan at N370 strongly suppressed the intracellular trafficking of GluA2 from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER in HEK293 cells. Cell surface expression of GluA1, which is a major subunit of AMPAR in neurons, was also suppressed by co-expression of the GluA2 N370S mutant. The N370S mutant and wild-type GluA2 were co-immunoprecipitated with GluA1, suggesting that N370S was properly associated with GluA1. Moreover, we found that N413 was the main potential site of the HNK-1 epitope that promoted the interaction of GluA2 with N-cadherin, resulting in enhanced cell surface expression of GluA2. The HNK-1 epitope on N-glycan at the N413 of GluA2 was also involved in the cell surface expression of GluA1. Thus, our data suggested that site-specific N-glycans on GluA2 regulate the intracellular trafficking and cell surface expression of AMPAR.

  9. Nursing for 48 hours from birth supports porcine uterine gland development and endometrial cell compartment-specific gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dori J; Wiley, Anne A; Chen, Joseph C; Bagnell, Carol A; Bartol, Frank F

    2013-01-01

    The first 2 wk of neonatal life constitute a critical period for estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1)-dependent uterine adenogenesis in the pig. A relaxin receptor (RXFP1)-mediated, lactocrine-driven mechanism was proposed to explain how nursing could regulate endometrial ESR1 and related gene expression events associated with adenogenesis in the porcine neonate during this period. To determine effects of nursing on endometrial morphogenesis and cell compartment-specific gene expression, gilts (n = 6-8/group) were assigned at birth to be either 1) nursed ad libitum for 48 h, 2) gavage fed milk replacer for 48 h, 3) nursed ad libitum to Postnatal Day (PND) 14, or 4) gavage fed milk replacer for 48 h followed by ad libitum nursing to PND 14. Uteri were collected on PND 2 or PND 14. Endometrial histoarchitecture and both ESR1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes (LIs) were evaluated. Laser microdissection was used to capture epithelium and stroma to evaluate treatment effects on cell compartment-specific ESR1, VEGFA, and RXFP1 expression. Imposition of a lactocrine-null state by milk replacer feeding for 48 h from birth retarded endometrial development and adenogenesis. Effects of replacer feeding, evident by PND 2, were marked by PND 14 when endometrial thickness, glandularity, and gland depth were reduced. Consistently, in lactocrine-null gilts, PCNA LI was reduced in glandular epithelium (GE) and stroma on PND 14, when epithelial ESR1 expression and ESR1 LI in GE were reduced and stromal VEGFA and RXFP1 expression increased. Results establish that lactocrine signaling effects morphogenetic changes in developing uterine tissues that may determine reproductive capacity later in life. PMID:23136302

  10. Constitutive induction of intestinal Tc17 cells in the absence of hematopoietic cell-specific MHC class II expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Stephen J; Geddes, Kaoru; Magalhaes, Joao G; Streutker, Catherine; Philpott, Dana J; Girardin, Stephen E

    2013-11-01

    The enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium induces a mucosal IL-17 response in CD4(+) T helper (Th17) cells that is dependent on the Nod-like receptors Nod1 and Nod2. Here, we sought to determine whether this early Th17 response required antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) for full induction. At early phases of C. rodentium infection, we observed that the intestinal mucosal Th17 response was fully blunted in irradiated mice reconstituted with MHCII-deficient (MHCII(-/-) →WT) hematopoietic cells. Surprisingly, we also observed a substantial increase in the relative frequency of IL-17(+) CD8(+) CD4(-) TCR-β(+) cells (Tc17 cells) and FOXP3(+) CD8(+) CD4(-) TCR-β(+) cells in the lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocyte compartment of MHCII(-/-) →WT mice compared with that in WT→WT counterparts. Moreover, MHCII(-/-) →WT mice displayed increased susceptibility, increased bacterial translocation to deeper organs, and more severe colonic histopathology after infection with C. rodentium. Finally, a similar phenotype was observed in mice deficient for CIITA, a transcriptional regulator of MHCII expression. Together, these results indicate that MHCII is required to mount early mucosal Th17 responses to an enteric pathogen, and that MHCII regulates the induction of atypical CD8(+) T-cell subsets, such as Tc17 cells and FOXP3(+) CD8(+) cells, in vivo. PMID:23881368

  11. Protein profile of basal prostate epithelial progenitor cells-stage-specific embryonal antigen 4 expressing cells have enhanced regenerative potential in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfner, Thomas; Klein, Corinna; Eisen, Christian; Rigo-Watermeier, Teresa; Haferkamp, Axel; Sprick, Martin R

    2016-04-01

    The long-term propagation of basal prostate progenitor cells ex vivo has been very difficult in the past. The development of novel methods to expand prostate progenitor cells in vitro allows determining their cell surface phenotype in greater detail. Mouse (Lin(-) Sca-1(+) CD49f(+) Trop2(high) -phenotype) and human (Lin(-) CD49f(+) TROP2(high) ) basal prostate progenitor cells were expanded in vitro. Human and mouse cells were screened using 242 anti-human or 176 antimouse monoclonal antibodies recognizing the cell surface protein profile. Quantitative expression was evaluated at the single-cell level using flow cytometry. Differentially expressed cell surface proteins were evaluated in conjunction with the known CD49f(+) /TROP2(high) phenotype of basal prostate progenitor cells and characterized by in vivo sandwich-transplantation experiments using nude mice. The phenotype of basal prostate progenitor cells was determined as CD9(+) /CD24(+) /CD29(+) /CD44(+) /CD47(+) /CD49f(+) /CD104(+) /CD147(+) /CD326(+) /Trop2(high) of mouse as well as human origin. Our analysis revealed several proteins, such as CD13, Syndecan-1 and stage-specific embryonal antigens (SSEAs), as being differentially expressed on murine and human CD49f(+) TROP2(+) basal prostate progenitor cells. Transplantation experiments suggest that CD49f(+) TROP2(high) SSEA-4(high) human prostate basal progenitor cells to be more potent to regenerate prostate tubules in vivo as compared with CD49f(+) TROP2(high) or CD49f(+) TROP2(high) SSEA-4(low) cells. Determination of the cell surface protein profile of functionally defined murine and human basal prostate progenitor cells reveals differentially expressed proteins that may change the potency and regenerative function of epithelial progenitor cells within the prostate. SSEA-4 is a candidate cell surface marker that putatively enables a more accurate identification of the basal PESC lineage. PMID:26849468

  12. Expression mapping of tetracycline-responsive prion protein promoter: digital atlasing for generating cell-specific disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, Jana; Leergaard, Trygve B; Schmidt, Thorsten; Odeh, Francis; Bichelmeier, Ulrike; Nuber, Silke; Holzmann, Carsten; Wree, Andreas; Prusiner, Stanley B; Bujard, Hermann; Riess, Olaf; Bjaalie, Jan G

    2006-11-01

    We present a digital atlas system that allows mapping of molecular expression patterns at cellular resolution through large series of histological sections. Using this system, we have mapped the distribution of a distinct marker, encoded by the LacZ reporter gene driven by the tetracycline-responsive prion protein promoter in double transgenic mice. The purpose is to evaluate the suitability of this promoter mouse line for targeting genes of interest to specific brain regions, essential for construction of inducible transgenic disease models. Following processing to visualize the promoter expression, sections were counterstained to simultaneously display cytoarchitectonics. High-resolution mosaic images covering entire coronal sections were collected through the mouse brain at intervals of 200 microm. A web-based application provides access to a customized virtual microscopy tool for viewing and navigation within and across the section images. For each section image, the nearest section in a standard atlas is defined, and annotations of key structures and regions inserted. Putative categorization of labeled cells was performed with use of distribution patterns, followed by cell size and shape, as parameters that were compared to legacy data. Among the ensuing results were expression of this promoter in putative glial cells in the cerebellum (and not in Purkinje cells), in putative glial cells in the substantia nigra, in pallidal glial cells or interneurons, and in distinct cell layers and regions of the hippocampus. The study serves as a precursor for a database resource allowing evaluation of the suitability of different promoter mouse lines for generating disease models. PMID:16931059

  13. Recombinant Yellow Fever Vaccine Virus 17D Expressing Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac239 Gag Induces SIV-Specific CD8+ T-Cell Responses in Rhesus Macaques ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaldo, Myrna C.; Martins, Mauricio A.; Rudersdorf, Richard; Mudd, Philip A.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Piaskowski, Shari M.; Costa Neves, Patrícia C.; Veloso de Santana, Marlon G.; Vojnov, Lara; Capuano, Saverio; Rakasz, Eva G.; Wilson, Nancy A.; Fulkerson, John; Sadoff, Jerald C.; Watkins, David I.

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe a novel vaccine vector for expressing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigens. We show that recombinant attenuated yellow fever vaccine virus 17D expressing simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 Gag sequences can be used as a vector to generate SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in the rhesus macaque. Priming with recombinant BCG expressing SIV antigens increased the frequency of these SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses after recombinant YF17D boosting. These recombinan...

  14. Identification of swine influenza virus epitopes and analysis of multiple specificities expressed by cytotoxic T cell subsets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Riber, Ulla;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptide binding and presentation are essential for antigen-specific activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and swine MHC class I molecules, also termed swine leukocyte antigens (SLA), thus play a crucial role in the process that leads...... to elimination of viruses such as swine influenza virus (SwIV). This study describes the identification of SLA-presented peptide epitopes that are targets for a swine CTL response, and further analyses multiple specificities expressed by SwIV activated CTL subsets. Findings: Four SwIV derived...... peptides were identified as T cell epitopes using fluorescent influenza: SLA tetramers. In addition, multiple CTL specificities were analyzed using peptide sequence substitutions in two of the four epitope candidates analyzed. Interestingly both conserved and substituted peptides were found to stain the CD...

  15. Microarray gene expression analysis to evaluate cell type specific expression of targets relevant for immunotherapy of hematological malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Pont (Margot); M.W. Honders; A.N. Kremer; C. van Kooten (Cees); C. Out; P.S. Hiemstra (Pieter); H.C. De Boer; M.J. Jager (Martine); E. Schmelzer; R.G.J. Vries (Robert); A.S. Al Hinai; W.G. Kroes (W.); R. Monajemi (Ramin); J.J. Goeman (Jelle); S. Böhringer (Stefan); W.A.F. Marijt; J.H.F. Falkenburg (Frederik); M. Griffioen

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCellular immunotherapy has proven to be effective in the treatment of hematological cancers by donor lymphocyte infusion after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and more recently by targeted therapy with chimeric antigen or T-cell receptor-engineered T cells. However, de

  16. Medullary Epithelial Cells of the Human Thymus Express a Highly Diverse Selection of Tissue-specific Genes Colocalized in Chromosomal Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Gotter, Jörn; Brors, Benedikt; Hergenhahn, Manfred; Kyewski, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    Promiscuous expression of tissue-specific self-antigens in the thymus imposes T cell tolerance and protects from autoimmune diseases, as shown in animal studies. Analysis of promiscuous gene expression in purified stromal cells of the human thymus at the single and global gene level documents the species conservation of this phenomenon. Medullary thymic epithelial cells overexpress a highly diverse set of genes (>400) including many tissue-specific antigens, disease-associated autoantigens, a...

  17. Balancing intestinal and systemic inflammation through cell type-specific expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstätter, Olga; Schanz, Oliver; Vorac, Julia; König, Jessica; Mori, Tetsushi; Maruyama, Toru; Korkowski, Markus; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; von Smolinski, Dorthe; Schultze, Joachim L; Abel, Josef; Esser, Charlotte; Takeyama, Haruko; Weighardt, Heike; Förster, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    As a sensor of polyaromatic chemicals the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) exerts an important role in immune regulation besides its requirement for xenobiotic metabolism. Transcriptional activation of AhR target genes is counterregulated by the AhR repressor (AhRR) but the exact function of the AhRR in vivo is currently unknown. We here show that the AhRR is predominantly expressed in immune cells of the skin and intestine, different from other AhR target genes. Whereas AhRR antagonizes the anti-inflammatory function of the AhR in the context of systemic endotoxin shock, AhR and AhRR act in concert to dampen intestinal inflammation. Specifically, AhRR contributes to the maintenance of colonic intraepithelial lymphocytes and prevents excessive IL-1β production and Th17/Tc17 differentiation. In contrast, the AhRR enhances IFN-γ-production by effector T cells in the inflamed gut. Our findings highlight the physiologic importance of cell-type specific balancing of AhR/AhRR expression in response to microbial, nutritional and other environmental stimuli. PMID:27184933

  18. Cytometry by Time-of-Flight Shows Combinatorial Cytokine Expression and Virus-Specific Cell Niches within a Continuum of CD8+ T Cell Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Newell, Evan W; Sigal, Natalia; Bendall, Sean C.; Garry P Nolan; Davis, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes directly kill infected or aberrant cells and secrete proinflammatory cytokines. By using metal-labeled probes and mass spectrometric analysis (cytometry by time-of-flight, or CyTOF) of human CD8+ T cells, we analyzed the expression of many more proteins than previously possible with fluorescent labels, including surface markers, cytokines, and antigen specificity with modified peptide-MHC tetramers. With 3-dimensional principal component analysis (3D-PCA) to displ...

  19. Highly Synchronized Expression of Lineage-Specific Genes during In Vitro Hepatic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosheh, Nidal; Olsson, Björn; Edsbagge, Josefina; Küppers-Munther, Barbara; Van Giezen, Mariska; Asplund, Annika; Andersson, Tommy B; Björquist, Petter; Carén, Helena; Simonsson, Stina; Sartipy, Peter; Synnergren, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells- (hPSCs-) derived hepatocytes have the potential to replace many hepatic models in drug discovery and provide a cell source for regenerative medicine applications. However, the generation of fully functional hPSC-derived hepatocytes is still a challenge. Towards gaining better understanding of the differentiation and maturation process, we employed a standardized protocol to differentiate six hPSC lines into hepatocytes and investigated the synchronicity of the hPSC lines by applying RT-qPCR to assess the expression of lineage-specific genes (OCT4, NANOG, T, SOX17, CXCR4, CER1, HHEX, TBX3, PROX1, HNF6, AFP, HNF4a, KRT18, ALB, AAT, and CYP3A4) which serve as markers for different stages during liver development. The data was evaluated using correlation and clustering analysis, demonstrating that the expression of these markers is highly synchronized and correlated well across all cell lines. The analysis also revealed a distribution of the markers in groups reflecting the developmental stages of hepatocytes. Functional analysis of the differentiated cells further confirmed their hepatic phenotype. Taken together, these results demonstrate, on the molecular level, the highly synchronized differentiation pattern across multiple hPSC lines. Moreover, this study provides additional understanding for future efforts to improve the functionality of hPSC-derived hepatocytes and thereby increase the value of related models. PMID:26949401

  20. Expression Patterns of Cancer Stem Cell Markers During Specific Celecoxib Therapy in Multistep Rat Colon Carcinogenesis Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Elsayed I; Hegazi, Mona M; Kang, Jin Seok; Helmy, Hager M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of colon cancer stem cells (CSCs) during chemicallyinduced rat multi-step colon carcinogenesis with or without the treatment with a specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor drug (celecoxib). Two experiments were performed, the first, a short term 12 week colon carcinogenesis bioassay in which only surrogate markers for colon cancer, aberrant crypt foci (ACF) lesions, were formed. The other experiment was a medium term colon cancer rat assay in which tumors had developed after 32 weeks. Treatment with celecoxib lowered the numbers of ACF, as well as the tumor volumes and multiplicities after 32 weeks. Immunohistochemical proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes LI (%) were downregulated after treatment by celecoxib. Also different cell surface antigens known to associate with CSCs such as the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD44 and CD133 were compared between the two experiments and showed differential expression patterns depending on the stage of carcinogenesis and treatment with celecoxib. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the numbers of CD133 cells were increased in the colonic epithelium after 12 weeks while those of CD44 but not CD133 cells were increased after 32 weeks. Moreover, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity levels in the colonic epithelium (a known CSC marker) detected by ELISA assay were found down-regulated after 12 weeks, but were up-regulated after 32 weeks. The data have also shown that the protective effect of celecoxib on these specific markers and populations of CSCs and on other molecular processes such as apoptosis targeted by this drug may vary depending on the genetic and phenotypic stages of carcinogenesis. Therefore, uncovering these distinction roles of CSCs during different phases of carcinogenesis and during specific treatment could be useful for targeted therapy. PMID:27039721

  1. MPC1-like Is a Placental Mammal-specific Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier Subunit Expressed in Postmeiotic Male Germ Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderperre, Benoît; Cermakova, Kristina; Escoffier, Jessica; Kaba, Mayis; Bender, Tom; Nef, Serge; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-08-01

    Selective transport of pyruvate across the inner mitochondrial membrane by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) is a fundamental step that couples cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolism. The recent molecular identification of the MPC complex has revealed two interacting subunits, MPC1 and MPC2. Although in yeast, an additional subunit, MPC3, can functionally replace MPC2, no alternative MPC subunits have been described in higher eukaryotes. Here, we report for the first time the existence of a novel MPC subunit termed MPC1-like (MPC1L), which is present uniquely in placental mammals. MPC1L shares high sequence, structural, and topological homology with MPC1. In addition, we provide several lines of evidence to show that MPC1L is functionally equivalent to MPC1: 1) when co-expressed with MPC2, it rescues pyruvate import in a MPC-deleted yeast strain; 2) in mammalian cells, it can associate with MPC2 to form a functional carrier as assessed by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer; 3) in MPC1 depleted mouse embryonic fibroblasts, MPC1L rescues the loss of pyruvate-driven respiration and stabilizes MPC2 expression; and 4) MPC1- and MPC1L-mediated pyruvate imports show similar efficiency. However, we show that MPC1L has a highly specific expression pattern and is localized almost exclusively in testis and more specifically in postmeiotic spermatids and sperm cells. This is in marked contrast to MPC1/MPC2, which are ubiquitously expressed throughout the organism. To date, the biological importance of this alternative MPC complex during spermatogenesis in placental mammals remains unknown. Nevertheless, these findings open up new avenues for investigating the structure-function relationship within the MPC complex. PMID:27317664

  2. Stem cell-specific expression of Dax1 is conferred by STAT3 and Oct3/4 in embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells derived from inner cell mass of blastocysts. An orphan nuclear receptor, Dax1, is specifically expressed in undifferentiated ES cells and plays an important role in their self-renewal. The regulatory mechanism of Dax1 expression in ES cells, however, remains unknown. In this study, we found that STAT3 and Oct3/4, essential transcription factors for ES cell self-renewal, are involved in the regulation of Dax1 expression. Suppression of either STAT3 or Oct3/4 resulted in down-regulation of Dax1. Reporter assay identified putative binding sites for these factors in the promoter/enhancer region of the Dax1 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis suggested the in vivo association of STAT3 and Oct3/4 with the putative sites. Furthermore, gel shift assay indicated that these transcription factors directly bind to their putative binding sites. These results suggest that STAT3 and Oct3/4 control the expression of Dax1 to maintain the self-renewal of ES cells

  3. Prolactin and glucocorticoid signaling induces lactation-specific tight junctions concurrent with β-casein expression in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ken; Tsugami, Yusaku; Matsunaga, Kota; Oyama, Shoko; Kuki, Chinatsu; Kumura, Haruto

    2016-08-01

    Alveolar mammary epithelial cells (MECs) in mammary glands are highly specialized cells that produce milk for suckling infants. Alveolar MECs also form less permeable tight junctions (TJs) to prevent the leakage of milk components after parturition. In the formation process of less permeable TJs, MECs show a selective downregulation of Cldn4 and a localization change of Cldn3. To investigate what induces less permeable TJs through these compositional changes in Cldns, we focused on two lactogenesis-related hormones: prolactin (Prl) and glucocorticoids. Prl caused a downregulation of Cldn3 and Cldn4 with the formation of leaky TJs in MECs in vitro. Prl-treated MECs also showed low β-casein expression with the activation of STAT5 signaling. By contrast, dexamethasone (Dex), a glucocorticoid analogue, upregulated Cldn3 and Cldn4, concurrent with the formation of less permeable TJs and the activation of glucocorticoid signaling without the expression of β-casein. Cotreatment with Prl and Dex induced the selective downregulation of Cldn4 and the concentration of Cldn3 in the region of TJs concurrent with less permeable TJ formation and high β-casein expression. The inhibition of Prl secretion by bromocriptine in lactating mice induced the upregulation of Cldn3 and Cldn4 concurrent with the downregulation of milk production. These results indicate that the coactivation of Prl and glucocorticoid signaling induces lactation-specific less permeable TJs concurrent with lactogenesis. PMID:27130254

  4. Cytometry by time-of-flight shows combinatorial cytokine expression and virus-specific cell niches within a continuum of CD8+ T cell phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Evan W; Sigal, Natalia; Bendall, Sean C; Nolan, Garry P; Davis, Mark M

    2012-01-27

    Cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes directly kill infected or aberrant cells and secrete proinflammatory cytokines. By using metal-labeled probes and mass spectrometric analysis (cytometry by time-of-flight, or CyTOF) of human CD8(+) T cells, we analyzed the expression of many more proteins than previously possible with fluorescent labels, including surface markers, cytokines, and antigen specificity with modified peptide-MHC tetramers. With 3-dimensional principal component analysis (3D-PCA) to display phenotypic diversity, we observed a relatively uniform pattern of variation in all subjects tested, highlighting the interrelatedness of previously described subsets and the continuous nature of CD8(+) T cell differentiation. These data also showed much greater complexity in the CD8(+) T cell compartment than previously appreciated, including a nearly combinatorial pattern of cytokine expression, with distinct niches occupied by virus-specific cells. This large degree of functional diversity even between cells with the same specificity gives CD8(+) T cells a remarkable degree of flexibility in responding to pathogens. PMID:22265676

  5. Germ cell differentiation-dependent and stage-specific expression of LANCL1 in rodent testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Hansen, Martin Asser; Jørgensen, Marianne;

    2003-01-01

    LANCL1 (LanC-like protein 1) is related to the bacterial LanC (lanthionine synthetase C) family, which is involved in the biosynthesis of antimicrobial peptides. Highest expression levels of LANCL1 are found in testes and brain, two organs that exist behind blood-tissue barriers. In the mouse, th...

  6. In vivo anti-tumor activity of marine hematopoietic stem cells expressing a p185HER2-specific chimeric T-cell receptor gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN MIN YANG; MICHAEL S FRIEDMAN; MARIANNE T HUBEN; JENNIFER FULLER; QIAO LI; ALFRED E CHANG; JAMES J MULE; KEVIN T MCDONAGH

    2006-01-01

    We have confirmed efficient anti-tumor activities of the peripheral lymphocytes transduced with a p185HER2-specific chimeric T-cell receptor gene both in murine and in human in our previous studies. To further test the feasibility of chimeric T-cell receptor in a bone marrow transplantation model, we first, made two murine tumor cell lines: MT901 and MCA-205, to express human p185HER2by retroviral gene transduction. Murine bone marrow cells were retrovirally transduced to express the chimeric T-cell receptor and gene-modified bone marrow cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mouse. Six months post transplantation, p185HER2-positive tumor cells: MT-901/HER2 or MCA-205/HER2 was subcutaneously or intravenously injected to make mouse models simulating primary breast cancer or pulmonary metastasis. The in vivo anti-tumor effects were monitored by the size of the subcutaneous tumor or counting the tumor nodules in the lungs after India ink staining. The size of the subcutaneous tumor was significantly inhibited and the number of pulmonary nodules were significantly decreased in mouse recipients transplanted with chimeric T-cell receptor modified bone marrow cells compared with the control group. Our results suggest the efficient in vivo anti-tumor activities of chimeric T-cell receptor gene modified bone marrow cells.

  7. The multifunctional FUS, EWS and TAF15 proto-oncoproteins show cell type-specific expression patterns and involvement in cell spreading and stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenman Göran

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FUS, EWS and TAF15 are structurally similar multifunctional proteins that were first discovered upon characterization of fusion oncogenes in human sarcomas and leukemias. The proteins belong to the FET (previously TET family of RNA-binding proteins and are implicated in central cellular processes such as regulation of gene expression, maintenance of genomic integrity and mRNA/microRNA processing. In the present study, we investigated the expression and cellular localization of FET proteins in multiple human tissues and cell types. Results FUS, EWS and TAF15 were expressed in both distinct and overlapping patterns in human tissues. The three proteins showed almost ubiquitous nuclear expression and FUS and TAF15 were in addition present in the cytoplasm of most cell types. Cytoplasmic EWS was more rarely detected and seen mainly in secretory cell types. Furthermore, FET expression was downregulated in differentiating human embryonic stem cells, during induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells and absent in terminally differentiated melanocytes and cardiac muscle cells. The FET proteins were targeted to stress granules induced by heat shock and oxidative stress and FUS required its RNA-binding domain for this translocation. Furthermore, FUS and TAF15 were detected in spreading initiation centers of adhering cells. Conclusion Our results point to cell-specific expression patterns and functions of the FET proteins rather than the housekeeping roles inferred from earlier studies. The localization of FET proteins to stress granules suggests activities in translational regulation during stress conditions. Roles in central processes such as stress response, translational control and adhesion may explain the FET proteins frequent involvement in human cancer.

  8. TGF-β2 is specifically expressed in human dermal papilla cells and modulates hair folliculogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Keita; Aoi, Noriyuki; Yamauchi, Yuji; Sato, Takahiro; Suga, Hirotaka; Eto, Hitomi; Kato, Harunosuke; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2009-01-01

    Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) in the mammalian hair follicle have been shown to develop hair follicles through epithelial–mesenchymal interactions. A cell therapy to regenerate human hair is theoretically possible by expanding autologous human DPCs (hDPCs) and transplanting them into bald skin, though much remains to be overcome before clinical success. In this study, we compared gene signatures of hDPCs at different passages and human dermal fibroblasts, and found transforming growth factor (T...

  9. Tumor-promoting macrophages induce the expression of the macrophage-specific receptor CD163 in malignant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Etzerodt, Anders; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm; Steiniche, Torben; Borre, Michael; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Møller, Holger Jon

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent a distinct malignancy-promoting phenotype suggested to play a key role in tumor formation and metastasis. We aimed to investigate the expression of the monocyte/macrophage-restricted receptor CD163 in bladder tumor biopsies and assess the potential...... and histologically advanced disease. In 39% of the biopsies, CD163 immunoreactivity was also observed in tumor cells, and CD163-expressing metastatic cells were identified in lymph node biopsies (n = 8). Bladder cancer cell lines did not express CD163; however, when cocultured with macrophages the...... expressed by a significant portion of the malignant cells in both tumors and lymph nodes. CD163 expressing tumor cells may constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells with a phenotypic shift associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and increased metastatic activity induced by TAMs....

  10. Specific glycosylation of membrane proteins in epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines: glycan structures reflect gene expression and DNA methylation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anugraham, Merrina; Jacob, Francis; Nixdorf, Sheri; Everest-Dass, Arun Vijay; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola; Packer, Nicolle H

    2014-09-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer in women worldwide bearing the highest mortality rate among all gynecological cancers. Cell membrane glycans mediate various cellular processes such as cell signaling and become altered during carcinogenesis. The extent to which glycosylation changes are influenced by aberrant regulation of gene expression is nearly unknown for ovarian cancer and remains crucial in understanding the development and progression of this disease. To address this effect, we analyzed the membrane glycosylation of non-cancerous ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE 6.3 and HOSE 17.1) and serous ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV 3, IGROV1, A2780, and OVCAR 3), the most common histotype among epithelial ovarian cancers. N-glycans were released from membrane glycoproteins by PNGase F and analyzed using nano-liquid chromatography on porous graphitized carbon and negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Glycan structures were characterized based on their molecular masses and tandem MS fragmentation patterns. We identified characteristic glycan features that were unique to the ovarian cancer membrane proteins, namely the "bisecting N-acetyl-glucosamine" type N-glycans, increased levels of α 2-6 sialylated N-glycans and "N,N'-diacetyl-lactosamine" type N-glycans. These N-glycan changes were verified by examining gene transcript levels of the enzymes specific for their synthesis (MGAT3, ST6GAL1, and B4GALNT3) using qRT-PCR. We further evaluated the potential epigenetic influence on MGAT3 expression by treating the cell lines with 5-azacytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor. For the first time, we provide evidence that MGAT3 expression may be epigenetically regulated by DNA hypomethylation, leading to the synthesis of the unique "bisecting GlcNAc" type N-glycans on the membrane proteins of ovarian cancer cells. Linking the observation of specific N-glycan substructures and their complex association with epigenetic

  11. mgm 1, the earliest sex-specific germline marker in Drosophila, reflects expression of the gene esg in male stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Adrian; Bernasconi, Luca; Sergeev, Pavel; Cruz, Alex; Steinmann-Zwicky, Monica

    2002-01-01

    The pathway that controls sex in Drosophila has been well characterized. The elements of this genetic hierarchy act cell-autonomously in somatic cells. We have previously shown that the sex of germ cells is determined by a different mechanism and that somatic and autonomously acting elements interact to control the choice between spermatogenesis and oogenesis. A target for both types of signals is the enhancer-trap mgm1, which monitors male-specific gene expression in germ cells. Here we report that mgm1 reflects the expression of escargot (esg), a member of the snail gene family, which are transcription factors with zink finger motifs. Genes of this family partially redundantly control a number of processes involving cell fate choices. The regulation of gene expression in germ cells by sex-specific esg enhancers is already seen in embryos. Therefore, autonomous and non-autonomous sex-specific factors that participate in germline sex determination are already present at this early stage. esg is expressed in the male gonad, both in somatic cells and in germline stem cells. We show that esg expression in the male germline is not required for proper sex determination and spermatogenesis, as functional sperm is differentiated by mutant germ cells in wild type hosts. However, somatic esg expression is required for the maintenance of male germline stem cells. PMID:11902678

  12. Myelin-specific T cells induce interleukin-1beta expression in lesion-reactive microglial-like cells in zones of axonal degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grebing, Manuela; Nielsen, Helle H; Fenger, Christina D; T Jensen, Katrine; von Linstow, Christian U; Clausen, Bettina H; Söderman, Martin; Lambertsen, Kate L; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Finsen, Bente

    2016-01-01

    revealed that, among the 1,447 differently expressed transcripts, the interleukin (IL)-1 pathway including all IL-1 receptor ligands was upregulated in the presence of myelin-specific T cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed increased mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-1α, and IL-1 receptor antagonist...... in the T-cell-infiltrated hippocampi from axonal-lesioned mice. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed a T-cell-enhanced lesion-specific expression of IL-1β mRNA and protein, respectively, and induction of the apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, ASC, in CD11b(+) cells. Double in...... situ hybridization showed colocalization of IL-1β mRNA in a subset of CD11b mRNA(+) cells, of which many were part of cellular doublets or clusters, characteristic of proliferating, lesion-reactive microglia. Double-immunofluorescence showed a T-cell-enhanced colocalization of IL-1β to CD11b(+) cells...

  13. Expression and characterization of hydrophobin HGFI fused with the cell-specific peptide TPS in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Baolong; Huang, Yujian; Zhang, Suai; Wang, Dandan; Xu, Haijin; Kong, Deling; Qiao, Mingqiang

    2012-05-01

    The cell-specific peptide TPS (TPSLEQRTVYAK) has been proposed as a potential candidate for fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds based on its ability of binding to human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) with high affinity and specificity. In this study, the class I hydrophobin hgfI gene from Grifola frondosa and the tps were fused and cloned into pPIC9. The fusion gene was expressed in Pichia pastoris under the control of alcohol oxidase 1 promoter. Tricine-SDS-PAGE and Western blotting confirmed that the fusion protein TPS-linker-HGFI (TLH) was successfully secreted into the culture medium. The fusion protein TLH was purified by ultrafiltration and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Water contact angle (WCA) demonstrated that similar to recombinant HGFI (rHGFI), the purified TLH could convert the surface wettability of polystyrene and mica. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements indicated that the purified TLH could form stable films on the hydrophobic siliconized glass surface. The cell adhesion examination showed that the TLH modified poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) could specially facilitate the EPC (particularly EPC derived from human) binding, while rHGFI modified PCL could nonselectively enhance cells adhesion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates that the TPS peptide was immobilized on biomaterial-PCL surface by fusion with hydrophobin. The potential application of this finding in combination with biomedical devices for EPC culture, will facilitate the current techniques used for cell-based therapies. PMID:22440542

  14. The gene for erythropoietin receptor is expressed in multipotential hematopoietic and embryonal stem cells: evidence for differentiation stage-specific regulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Heberlein, C; Fischer, K D; Stoffel, M; Nowock, J; Ford, A.; Tessmer, U.; Stocking, C

    1992-01-01

    The principal regulator of erythropoiesis is the glycoprotein erythropoietin, which interacts with a specific cell surface receptor (EpoR). A study aimed at analyzing EpoR gene regulation has shown that both pluripotent embryonal stem cells and early multipotent hematopoietic cells express EpoR transcripts. Commitment to nonerythroid lineages (e.g., macrophage or lymphocytic) results in the shutdown of EpoR gene expression, whereas commitment to the erythroid lineage is concurrent with or fol...

  15. Short communication: Altered expression of specificity protein 1 impairs milk fat synthesis in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J J; Luo, J; Xu, H F; Wang, H; Loor, J J

    2016-06-01

    Specificity protein 1 (encoded by SP1) is a novel transcription factor important for the regulation of lipid metabolism and the normal function of various hormones in model organisms. Its potential role, if any, on ruminant milk fat is unknown. Despite the lower expression of the lipolysis-related gene ATGL (by 44 and 37% respectively), both the adenoviral overexpression and the silencing of SP1 [via short interfering (si)RNA] markedly reduced cellular triacylglycerol (TAG) content (by 28 and 25%, respectively), at least in part by decreasing the expression of DGAT1 (-36% in adenovirus treatment) and DGAT2 (-81 and -87%, respectively) that are involved in TAG synthesis. Consistent with the markedly lower expression of genes related to lipid droplet formation and secretion (TIP47 by 19 and 32%, and ADFP by 25 and 25%, respectively), cellular lipid droplet content was also decreased sharply, by 9 and 8.5%, respectively, after adenoviral overexpression of SP1 or its silencing via siRNA. Overall, the results underscored a potentially important role of SP1 in maintaining milk-fat droplet synthesis in goat mammary epithelial cells. PMID:26995134

  16. Gene expression relationship between prostate cancer cells of Gleason 3, 4 and normal epithelial cells as revealed by cell type-specific transcriptomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer cells in primary tumors have been typed CD10-/CD13-/CD24hi/CD26+/CD38lo/CD44-/CD104-. This CD phenotype suggests a lineage relationship between cancer cells and luminal cells. The Gleason grade of tumors is a descriptive of tumor glandular differentiation. Higher Gleason scores are associated with treatment failure. CD26+ cancer cells were isolated from Gleason 3+3 (G3) and Gleason 4+4 (G4) tumors by cell sorting, and their gene expression or transcriptome was determined by Affymetrix DNA array analysis. Dataset analysis was used to determine gene expression similarities and differences between G3 and G4 as well as to prostate cancer cell lines and histologically normal prostate luminal cells. The G3 and G4 transcriptomes were compared to those of prostatic cell types of non-cancer, which included luminal, basal, stromal fibromuscular, and endothelial. A principal components analysis of the various transcriptome datasets indicated a closer relationship between luminal and G3 than luminal and G4. Dataset comparison also showed that the cancer transcriptomes differed substantially from those of prostate cancer cell lines. Genes differentially expressed in cancer are potential biomarkers for cancer detection, and those differentially expressed between G3 and G4 are potential biomarkers for disease stratification given that G4 cancer is associated with poor outcomes. Differentially expressed genes likely contribute to the prostate cancer phenotype and constitute the signatures of these particular cancer cell types

  17. Cell-Type-Specific Transcriptome Analysis in the Drosophila Mushroom Body Reveals Memory-Related Changes in Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Amanda; Guan, Xiao-Juan; Murphy, Coleen T; Murthy, Mala

    2016-05-17

    Learning and memory formation in Drosophila rely on a network of neurons in the mushroom bodies (MBs). Whereas numerous studies have delineated roles for individual cell types within this network in aspects of learning or memory, whether or not these cells can also be distinguished by the genes they express remains unresolved. In addition, the changes in gene expression that accompany long-term memory formation within the MBs have not yet been studied by neuron type. Here, we address both issues by performing RNA sequencing on single cell types (harvested via patch pipets) within the MB. We discover that the expression of genes that encode cell surface receptors is sufficient to identify cell types and that a subset of these genes, required for sensory transduction in peripheral sensory neurons, is not only expressed within individual neurons of the MB in the central brain, but is also critical for memory formation. PMID:27160913

  18. Cell-Type-Specific Profiling of Gene Expression and Chromatin Binding without Cell Isolation: Assaying RNA Pol II Occupancy in Neural Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Southall, Tony D.; Gold, Katrina S.; Egger, Boris; Davidson, Catherine M.; Caygill, Elizabeth E.; Marshall, Owen J.; Brand, Andrea H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell-type-specific transcriptional profiling often requires the isolation of specific cell types from complex tissues. We have developed “TaDa,” a technique that enables cell-specific profiling without cell isolation. TaDa permits genome-wide profiling of DNA- or chromatin-binding proteins without cell sorting, fixation, or affinity purification. The method is simple, sensitive, highly reproducible, and transferable to any model system. We show that TaDa can be used to identify transc...

  19. Plasmodium falciparum parasites expressing pregnancy-specific variant surface antigens adhere strongly to the choriocarcinoma cell line BeWo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Rikke N; Megnekou, Rosette; Lundquist, Maja; Ofori, Michael F; Hviid, Lars; Staalsoe, Trine

    2006-01-01

    Placenta-sequestering Plasmodium falciparum parasites causing pregnancy-associated malaria express pregnancy-specific variant surface antigens (VSA(PAM)). We report here that VSA(PAM)-expressing patient isolates adhere strongly to the choriocarcinoma cell line BeWo and that the BeWo line can be...

  20. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  1. Tuberculosis Therapy Modifies the Cytokine Profile, Maturation State, and Expression of Inhibitory Molecules on Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4+ T-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil K Saharia

    Full Text Available Little is known about the expression of inhibitory molecules cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 and programmed-death-1 (PD-1 on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb-specific CD4 T-cells and how their expression is impacted by TB treatment.Cryopreserved PBMCs from HIV-TB co-infected and TB mono-infected patients with untreated and treated tuberculosis (TB disease were stimulated for six hours with PPD and stained. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we characterized the differentiation state, cytokine profile, and inhibitory molecule expression on PPD-specific CD4 T-cells.In our HIV-TB co-infected cohort, TB treatment increased the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T-cells co-producing IFN-γ+IL-2+TNF-α+ and IFN-γ+IL-2+ (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.0002, respectively while decreasing the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T-cells co-producing IFN-γ+MIP1-β+TNF-α+ and IFN-γ+MIP1-β+. The proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T-cells expressing an effector memory phenotype decreased (63.6% vs 51.6%, p = 0.0015 while the proportion expressing a central memory phenotype increased (7.8% vs. 21.7%, p = 0.001 following TB treatment. TB treatment reduced the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T-cells expressing CTLA-4 (72.4% vs. 44.3%, p = 0.0005 and PD-1 (34.5% vs. 29.2%, p = 0.03. Similar trends were noted in our TB mono-infected cohort.TB treatment alters the functional profile of Mtb-specific CD4 T-cells reflecting shifts towards a less differentiated maturational profile and decreases PD-1 and CTLA-4 expression. These could serve as markers of reduced mycobacterial burden. Further study is warranted.

  2. Fucci2a: A bicistronic cell cycle reporter that allows Cre mediated tissue specific expression in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mort, Richard Lester; Ford, Matthew Jonathan; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Lindstrom, Nils Olof; Casadio, Angela; Douglas, Adam Thomas; Keighren, Margaret Anne; Hohenstein, Peter; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Jackson, Ian James

    2014-01-01

    Markers of cell cycle stage allow estimation of cell cycle dynamics in cell culture and during embryonic development. The Fucci system incorporates genetically encoded probes that highlight G1 and S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle allowing live imaging. However the available mouse models that incorporate Fucci are beset by problems with transgene inactivation, varying expression level, lack of conditional potential and/or the need to maintain separate transgenes—there is no transgenic mouse mod...

  3. Gene expression down-regulation in CD90+ prostate tumor-associated stromal cells involves potential organ-specific genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prostate stroma is a key mediator of epithelial differentiation and development, and potentially plays a role in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer. The tumor-associated stroma is marked by increased expression of CD90/THY1. Isolation and characterization of these stromal cells could provide valuable insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. Prostate CD90+ stromal fibromuscular cells from tumor specimens were isolated by cell-sorting and analyzed by DNA microarray. Dataset analysis was used to compare gene expression between histologically normal and tumor-associated stromal cells. For comparison, stromal cells were also isolated and analyzed from the urinary bladder. The tumor-associated stromal cells were found to have decreased expression of genes involved in smooth muscle differentiation, and those detected in prostate but not bladder. Other differential expression between the stromal cell types included that of the CXC-chemokine genes. CD90+ prostate tumor-associated stromal cells differed from their normal counterpart in expression of multiple genes, some of which are potentially involved in organ development

  4. Differential Expression Pattern of the Human Endoderm-Specific Transcription Factor Sox17 in Various Tissues and Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sox17 is a member of the Sry-related high mobility group (HMG) of transcription factors that is necessary for endodermal formation and liver development in multiple species. Sox17 gene expression is required for formation of definitive endoderm that gives rise to various tissues. Objective: To examine the expression of Sox17 in various human tissues and cells. Methods: Semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to evaluate the expression of Sox17 in adult liver, ...

  5. Cell-type-specific and hypoxia-inducible expression of the human erythropoietin gene in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Semenza, G L; Koury, S. T.; Nejfelt, M K; Gearhart, J D; Antonarakis, S E

    1991-01-01

    Synthesis of erythropoietin, the primary humoral regulator of erythropoiesis, in liver and kidney is inducible by anemia or hypoxia. Analysis of human erythropoietin gene expression in transgenic mice revealed that sequences located 6-14 kilobases 5' to the gene direct expression to the kidney, whereas sequences within the immediate 3'-flanking region control hepatocyte-specific expression. Human erythropoietin transcription initiation sites were differentially utilized in liver and kidney. I...

  6. Diethylnitrosamine-induced expression of germline-specific genes and pluripotency factors, including vasa and oct4, in medaka somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jialing; Yokota, Shinpei; Yokoi, Hayato; Suzuki, Tohru

    2016-09-16

    Various methods have been developed to reprogram mammalian somatic cells into pluripotent cells as well as to directly reprogram somatic cells into other cell lineages. We are interested in applying these methods to fish, and here, we examined whether mRNA expression of germline-specific genes (vasa, nanos2, -3) and pluripotency factors (oct4, sox2, c-myc, nanog) is inducible in somatic cells of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). We found that the expression of vasa is induced in the gut and regenerating fin by exposure to a carcinogen, diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Induction of vasa in the gut started on the 5th day of treatment with >50 ppm DEN. In addition, nanos2, -3, oct4, sox2, klf4, c-myc, and nanog were also expressed simultaneously in some vasa-positive gut and regenerating fin samples. Vasa-positive cells were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the muscle surrounding the gut and in the wound epidermis, blastema, and fibroblast-like cells in regenerating fin. In vasa:GFP transgenic medaka, green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence appeared in the wound epidermis and fibroblast-like cells in the regenerating fin following DEN exposure, in agreement with the IHC data. Our data show that mRNA expression of genes relevant to germ cell specification and pluripotency can be induced in fish somatic cells by exposure to DEN, suggesting the possibility of efficient and rapid cell reprogramming of fish somatic cells. PMID:27514449

  7. Compound-specific effects of diverse neurodevelopmental toxicants on global gene expression in the neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theunissen, P.T., E-mail: Peter.Theunissen@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Robinson, J.F. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pennings, J.L.A. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Herwijnen, M.H. van [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kleinjans, J.C.S. [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Piersma, A.H. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing are needed to reduce animal use in regulatory toxicology. The in vitro murine neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn) was designed as an alternative for neurodevelopmental toxicity testing. The integration of toxicogenomic-based approaches may further increase predictivity as well as provide insight into underlying mechanisms of developmental toxicity. In the present study, we investigated concentration-dependent effects of six mechanistically diverse compounds, acetaldehyde (ACE), carbamazepine (CBZ), flusilazole (FLU), monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), penicillin G (PENG) and phenytoin (PHE), on the transcriptome and neural differentiation in the ESTn. All compounds with the exception of PENG altered ESTn morphology (cytotoxicity and neural differentiation) in a concentration-dependent manner. Compound induced gene expression changes and corresponding enriched gene ontology biological processes (GO–BP) were identified after 24 h exposure at equipotent differentiation-inhibiting concentrations of the compounds. Both compound-specific and common gene expression changes were observed between subsets of tested compounds, in terms of significance, magnitude of regulation and functionality. For example, ACE, CBZ and FLU induced robust changes in number of significantly altered genes (≥ 687 genes) as well as a variety of GO–BP, as compared to MEHP, PHE and PENG (≤ 55 genes with no significant changes in GO–BP observed). Genes associated with developmentally related processes (embryonic morphogenesis, neuron differentiation, and Wnt signaling) showed diverse regulation after exposure to ACE, CBZ and FLU. In addition, gene expression and GO–BP enrichment showed concentration dependence, allowing discrimination of non-toxic versus toxic concentrations on the basis of transcriptomics. This information may be used to define adaptive versus toxic responses at the transcriptome level.

  8. Compound-specific effects of diverse neurodevelopmental toxicants on global gene expression in the neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing are needed to reduce animal use in regulatory toxicology. The in vitro murine neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn) was designed as an alternative for neurodevelopmental toxicity testing. The integration of toxicogenomic-based approaches may further increase predictivity as well as provide insight into underlying mechanisms of developmental toxicity. In the present study, we investigated concentration-dependent effects of six mechanistically diverse compounds, acetaldehyde (ACE), carbamazepine (CBZ), flusilazole (FLU), monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), penicillin G (PENG) and phenytoin (PHE), on the transcriptome and neural differentiation in the ESTn. All compounds with the exception of PENG altered ESTn morphology (cytotoxicity and neural differentiation) in a concentration-dependent manner. Compound induced gene expression changes and corresponding enriched gene ontology biological processes (GO–BP) were identified after 24 h exposure at equipotent differentiation-inhibiting concentrations of the compounds. Both compound-specific and common gene expression changes were observed between subsets of tested compounds, in terms of significance, magnitude of regulation and functionality. For example, ACE, CBZ and FLU induced robust changes in number of significantly altered genes (≥ 687 genes) as well as a variety of GO–BP, as compared to MEHP, PHE and PENG (≤ 55 genes with no significant changes in GO–BP observed). Genes associated with developmentally related processes (embryonic morphogenesis, neuron differentiation, and Wnt signaling) showed diverse regulation after exposure to ACE, CBZ and FLU. In addition, gene expression and GO–BP enrichment showed concentration dependence, allowing discrimination of non-toxic versus toxic concentrations on the basis of transcriptomics. This information may be used to define adaptive versus toxic responses at the transcriptome level.

  9. Cell Type-Specific Expression and Function of Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 in Human Placenta: Implications in Fetal Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Yuehong; Krikun, Graciela; Abrahams, Vikki M.; Mor, Gil; Guller, Seth

    2007-01-01

    Placental infection is associated with adverse fetal outcomes. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical regulators of the innate immune response based on their ability to recognize and respond to pathogen-associated molecular patterns expressed by microbes. To date, cell-type specific expression and regulation of TLR function in human term placenta remains largely unelucidated. The goal of the current study was to examine the in vivo and in vitro patterns of TLR expression and function in majo...

  10. Position-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate cell-specific expression of the SpoC1 gene cluster of Aspergillus nidulans.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, B.L.; Miller, K. Y.; Roberti, K A; Timberlake, W E

    1987-01-01

    Many genes that are expressed specifically in the differentiating asexual spores (conidia) of Aspergillus nidulans are organized into clusters. We investigated the effects of altered chromosomal position on expression of a gene from the conidiation-specific SpoC1 gene cluster. The gene became deregulated when integrated at nonhomologous chromosomal sites, in that transcript levels were elevated in vegetative cells (hyphae) and variably altered in conidia. We also investigated the effects on e...

  11. Promoter and 11-kilobase upstream enhancer elements responsible for hepatoma cell-specific expression of the rat ornithine transcarbamylase gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, T.; Nishiyori, A; Takiguchi, M.; Mori, M

    1990-01-01

    The gene for ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC; EC 2.1.3.3), a urea cycle enzyme, is expressed almost exclusively in the liver and small intestine. To identify DNA elements regulating transcription of the OTC gene in the liver, transient expression analysis was carried out by using hepatoma (HepG2) and nonhepatic (CHO) cell lines. The 1.3-kilobase 5'-flanking region of the rat OTC gene directed expression of the fused chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in HepG2 cells much more efficiently t...

  12. Cell-type-specific Jumonji histone demethylase gene expression in the healthy rat CNS: detection by a novel flow cytometry method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M.C. Smith

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of how histone demethylation contributes to the regulation of basal gene expression in the brain is largely unknown in any injury model, and especially in the healthy adult brain. Although Jumonji genes are often regulated transcriptionally, cell-specific gene expression of Jumonji histone demethylases in the brain remains poorly understood. Thus, in the present study we profiled the mRNA levels of 26 Jumonji genes in microglia (CD11b+, neurons (NeuN+ and astrocytes (GFAP+ from the healthy adult rat brain. We optimized a method combining a mZBF (modified zinc-based fixative and FCM (flow cytometry to simultaneously sort cells from non-transgenic animals. We evaluated cell-surface, intracellular and nuclear proteins, including histones, as well as messenger- and micro-RNAs in different cell types simultaneously from a single-sorted sample. We found that 12 Jumonji genes were differentially expressed between adult microglia, neurons and astrocytes. While JMJD2D was neuron-restricted, PHF8 and JMJD1C were expressed in all three cell types although the expression was highest in neurons. JMJD3 and JMJD5 were expressed in all cell types, but were highly enriched in microglia; astrocytes had the lowest expression of UTX and JHDM1D. Levels of global H3K27 (H3 lysine 27 methylation varied among cell types and appeared to be lowest in microglia, indicating that differences in basal gene expression of specific Jumonji histone demethylases may contribute to cell-specific gene expression in the CNS (central nervous system. This multiparametric technique will be valuable for simultaneously assaying chromatin modifications and gene regulation in the adult CNS.

  13. Gene expression relationship between prostate cancer cells of Gleason 3, 4 and normal epithelial cells as revealed by cell type-specific transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Laura S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer cells in primary tumors have been typed CD10-/CD13-/CD24hi/CD26+/CD38lo/CD44-/CD104-. This CD phenotype suggests a lineage relationship between cancer cells and luminal cells. The Gleason grade of tumors is a descriptive of tumor glandular differentiation. Higher Gleason scores are associated with treatment failure. Methods CD26+ cancer cells were isolated from Gleason 3+3 (G3 and Gleason 4+4 (G4 tumors by cell sorting, and their gene expression or transcriptome was determined by Affymetrix DNA array analysis. Dataset analysis was used to determine gene expression similarities and differences between G3 and G4 as well as to prostate cancer cell lines and histologically normal prostate luminal cells. Results The G3 and G4 transcriptomes were compared to those of prostatic cell types of non-cancer, which included luminal, basal, stromal fibromuscular, and endothelial. A principal components analysis of the various transcriptome datasets indicated a closer relationship between luminal and G3 than luminal and G4. Dataset comparison also showed that the cancer transcriptomes differed substantially from those of prostate cancer cell lines. Conclusions Genes differentially expressed in cancer are potential biomarkers for cancer detection, and those differentially expressed between G3 and G4 are potential biomarkers for disease stratification given that G4 cancer is associated with poor outcomes. Differentially expressed genes likely contribute to the prostate cancer phenotype and constitute the signatures of these particular cancer cell types.

  14. HIV-Specific CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Viral Suppression Correlates With the Expression of CD57

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne S; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Larsen, Tine Kochendorf;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses are believed to play an important role in the control of HIV-1 infection; however, what constitutes an effective HIV-1 CD8(+) T-cell response remains a topic of debate. The ex vivo viral suppressive capacity was measured of CD8(+) T cells from 44...

  15. B-cell subpopulations from normal human secondary lymphoid tissues with specific gene expression profiles and phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Schmitz, Alexander; Perez Andres, Martin;

    and single gene expression analysis (qRT-PCR) for transcription factors as well as global gene expression profiling (GEP; GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array). For example for tonsils, based on the immunophenotypic presentation (including CD3/44/CXCR4 in the panel), B-cell subsets were identified and......In order to improve insights into the B-cell biology and thereby B-cell myelomagenesis we have established a MSCNET standard for multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) and cell sorting (FACS) for subsequent genetic analysis. The material analysed was fresh tonsils, blood and bone marrow. The method...... included homogenization, isolation of mononuclear cells, MFC and FACS sorting using multicolour fluorescence single tube panels.of antibodies against surface molecules as CD10/20/27/38/45, supplemented with tissue related antibodies. Isolated B-cell subpopulations were evaluated by morphological inspection...

  16. HTLV-1 tax specific CD8+ T cells express low levels of Tim-3 in HTLV-1 infection: implications for progression to neurological complications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishomwa C Ndhlovu

    Full Text Available The T cell immunoglobulin mucin 3 (Tim-3 receptor is highly expressed on HIV-1-specific T cells, rendering them partially "exhausted" and unable to contribute to the effective immune mediated control of viral replication. To elucidate novel mechanisms contributing to the HTLV-1 neurological complex and its classic neurological presentation called HAM/TSP (HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, we investigated the expression of the Tim-3 receptor on CD8(+ T cells from a cohort of HTLV-1 seropositive asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Patients diagnosed with HAM/TSP down-regulated Tim-3 expression on both CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells compared to asymptomatic patients and HTLV-1 seronegative controls. HTLV-1 Tax-specific, HLA-A*02 restricted CD8(+ T cells among HAM/TSP individuals expressed markedly lower levels of Tim-3. We observed Tax expressing cells in both Tim-3(+ and Tim-3(- fractions. Taken together, these data indicate that there is a systematic downregulation of Tim-3 levels on T cells in HTLV-1 infection, sustaining a profoundly highly active population of potentially pathogenic T cells that may allow for the development of HTLV-1 complications.

  17. Induction of CML28-specific cytotoxic T cell responses using co-transfected dendritic cells with CML28 DNA vaccine and SOCS1 small interfering RNA expression vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CML28 is an attractive target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. SOCS1 represents an inhibitory control mechanism for DC antigen presentation and the magnitude of adaptive immunity. In this study, we evaluated the potential for inducing CML28-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses by dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. We constructed a CML28 DNA vaccine and a SOCS1 siRNA vector and then cotransfect monocyte-derived DCs. Flow cytometry analysis showed gene silencing of SOCS1 resulted in higher expressions of costimulative moleculars in DCs. Mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) indicated downregulation of SOCS1 stronger capability to stimulate proliferation of responder cell in DCs. The CTL assay revealed transfected DCs effectively induced autologous CML28-specific CTL responses and the lytic activities induced by SOCS1-silenced DCs were significantly higher compared with those induced by SOCS1-expressing DCs. These results in our study indicates gene silencing of SOCS1 remarkably enhanced the cytotoxicity efficiency of CML28 DNA vaccine in DCs

  18. mtDNA depletion confers specific gene expression profiles in human cells grown in culture and in xenograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaswamy Krishna

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between the gene products encoded by the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes play critical roles in eukaryotic cellular function. However, the effects mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA levels have on the nuclear transcriptome have not been defined under physiological conditions. In order to address this issue, we characterized the gene expression profiles of A549 lung cancer cells and their mtDNA-depleted ρ0 counterparts grown in culture and as tumor xenografts in immune-deficient mice. Results Cultured A549 ρ0 cells were respiration-deficient and showed enhanced levels of transcripts relevant to metal homeostasis, initiation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and glucuronidation pathways. Several well-established HIF-regulated transcripts showed increased or decreased abundance relative to the parental cell line. Furthermore, growth in culture versus xenograft has a significantly greater influence on expression profiles, including transcripts involved in mitochondrial structure and both aerobic and anaerobic energy metabolism. However, both in vitro and in vivo, mtDNA levels explained the majority of the variance observed in the expression of transcripts in glucuronidation, tRNA synthetase, and immune surveillance related pathways. mtDNA levels in A549 xenografts also affected the expression of genes, such as AMACR and PHYH, involved in peroxisomal lipid metabolic pathways. Conclusion We have identified mtDNA-dependent gene expression profiles that are shared in cultured cells and in xenografts. These profiles indicate that mtDNA-depleted cells could provide informative model systems for the testing the efficacy of select classes of therapeutics, such as anti-angiogenesis agents. Furthermore, mtDNA-depleted cells grown culture and in xenografts provide a powerful means to investigate possible relationships between mitochondrial activity and gene expression profiles in normal and pathological cells.

  19. Diverse cell-specific expression of myoglobin isoforms in brain, kidney, gill and liver of the hypoxia-tolerant carp and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossins, Andrew R; Williams, Daryl R; Foulkes, Nick S; Berenbrink, Michael; Kipar, Anja

    2009-03-01

    Myoglobin (Mb) is famous as a muscle-specific protein--yet the common carp expresses the gene (cMb1) encoding this protein in a range of non-muscle tissues and also expresses a novel isoform (cMb2) in the brain. Using a homologous antibody and riboprobes, we have established the relative amounts and cellular sites of non-muscle Mb expression in different tissues. The amounts of carp myoglobin (cMb) in supernatants of different tissues were just 0.4-0.7% relative to that of heart supernatants and were upregulated by two-to-four fold in liver, gill and brain following 5 days of hypoxic treatment. Brain exhibited both cMb proteins in western analysis, whereas all other tissues had only cMb1. We have also identified cells expressing cMb protein and cMb mRNA using immunohistology and RNA in situ hybridisation (RNA-ISH), respectively. Mb was strongly expressed throughout all cardiac myocytes and a subset of skeletal muscle fibres, whereas it was restricted to a small range of specific cell types in each of the non-muscle tissues. These include pillar and epithelial cells in secondary gill lamellae, hepatocytes, some neurones, and tubular epithelial cells in the kidney. Capillaries and small blood vessels in all tissues exhibited Mb expression within vascular endothelial cells. The cMb2 riboprobe located expression to a subset of neurones but not to endothelial cells. In zebrafish, which possesses only one Mb gene, a similar expression pattern of Mb protein and mRNA was observed. This establishes a surprisingly cell-specific distribution of Mb within non-muscle tissues in both carp and zebrafish, where it probably plays an important role in the regulation of microvascular, renal and brain function. PMID:19218513

  20. Xenoantigen, an αGal epitope-expression construct driven by the hTERT-promoter, specifically kills human pancreatic cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchinoue Shohei

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported the usefulness of the αGal epitope as a target molecule for gene therapy against cancer. To induce cancer cell specific transcription of the αGal epitope, an expression vector which synthesizes the αGal epitope under the control of a promoter region of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, NK7, was constructed. Methods NK7 was transfected into a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line, MIA cells, and telomerase-negative SUSM-1 cells served controls. Expression of the αGal epitope was confirmed by flow cytometry using IB4 lectin. The susceptibility of transfected MIA cells to human natural antibodies, was examined using a complement-dependent cytotoxic cross-match test (CDC and a flow cytometry using annexin V. Results The αGal epitope expression was detected only on the cell surfaces of NK7-transfected MIA cells, i.e., not on naive MIA cells or telomerase negative SUSM-1 cells. The CDC results indicated that MIA cells transfected with NK7 are susceptible to human natural antibody-mediated cell killing, and the differences, as compared to NK-7 transfected telomerase negative SUSM-1 cells or telomerase positive naïve MIA cells, were statistically significant. The flow cytometry using annexin V showed a higher number of the apoptotic cells in NK-7 transfected MIA cells than in naïve MIA cells. Conclusions The results suggest that αGal epitope-expression, under the control of the hTERT-promoter, may be useful in cancer specific gene therapy.

  1. Inhibition of Bcl-2 expression by a novel tumor-specific RNA interference system increases chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil in Hela cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-lin HUANG; Yi WU; Hai YU; Ping ZHANG; Xing-qian ZHANG; Lei YING; Han-fang ZHAO

    2006-01-01

    Aim: RNA interference (RNAi) has been proposed as a potential treatment for cancer, but the lack of cellular targets limits its use in cancer gene therapy. No current technology has achieved direct tumor-specific gene silencing using RNAi.In the present study we attempt to develop a tumor-specific RNAi system using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter; furthermore, we analyzed its inhibitive effect on Bcl-2 expression. Methods: The vectors containing a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) to target exogenous reporters [firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)] and endogenous gene (Bcl-2)were constructed. Luciferase expression was determined by dual luciferase assay.Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) were used to measure EGFP expression. Inhibition of Bcl-2 was evaluated by RT-PCR and Western blotting.Cell proliferation and viability were measured by using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. FACS was used to analyze the cell cycle distribution profile. Results: We showed that with the hTERT promoter directly driving shRNA transcription, expression of the exogenous reporters (LUC and EGFP) in tumor cells, but not normal cells, was specifically inhibited in vitro. The hTERT promoter-driven shRNA also depressed the expression of Bcl-2. Inhibition of Bcl-2 did not affect cell proliferation, but increased the chemosensitivity of HeLa cells to 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: The present study describes an efficient RNAi system for gene silencing that is specific to tumor cells using the hTERT promoter. Suppression of Bcl-2 by using this system sensitized HeLa cells to 5-fluorouracil. This system may be useful for RNAi therapy.

  2. Trichostatin A specifically improves the aberrant expression of transcription factor genes in embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Kimiko Inoue; Mami Oikawa; Satoshi Kamimura; Narumi Ogonuki; Toshinobu Nakamura; Toru Nakano; Kuniya Abe; Atsuo Ogura

    2015-01-01

    Although mammalian cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been established in various species, the low developmental efficiency has hampered its practical applications. Treatment of SCNT-derived embryos with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can improve their development, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. To address this question, we analysed gene expression profiles of SCNT-derived 2-cell mouse embryos treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a potent HDAC inhibitor t...

  3. Combination of expression levels of miR-21 and miR-126 is associated with cancer-specific survival in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is marked by high mortality rate. To date, no robust risk stratification by clinical or molecular prognosticators of cancer-specific survival (CSS) has been established for early stages. Transcriptional profiling of small non-coding RNA gene products (miRNAs) seems promising for prognostic stratification. The expression of miR-21 and miR-126 was analysed in a large cohort of RCC patients; a combined risk score (CRS)-model was constructed based on expression levels of both miRNAs. Expression of miR-21 and miR-126 was evaluated by qRT-PCR in tumour and adjacent non-neoplastic tissue in n = 139 clear cell RCC patients. Relation of miR-21 and miR-126 expression with various clinical parameters was assessed. Parameters were analysed by uni- and multivariate COX regression. A factor derived from the z-score resulting from the COX model was determined for both miRs separately and a combined risk score (CRS) was calculated multiplying the relative expression of miR-21 and miR-126 by this factor. The best fitting COX model was selected by relative goodness-of-fit with the Akaike information criterion (AIC). RCC with and without miR-21 up- and miR-126 downregulation differed significantly in synchronous metastatic status and CSS. Upregulation of miR-21 and downregulation of miR-126 were independently prognostic. A combined risk score (CRS) based on the expression of both miRs showed high sensitivity and specificity in predicting CSS and prediction was independent from any other clinico-pathological parameter. Association of CRS with CSS was successfully validated in a testing cohort containing patients with high and low risk for progressive disease. A combined expression level of miR-21 and miR-126 accurately predicted CSS in two independent RCC cohorts and seems feasible for clinical application in assessing prognosis

  4. Retinoic acid enhances expression of neural specific genes in Sca-1+ cells of mouse fetal liver through activating protein kinase C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gexiu Liu; Yuan Zhang; Dongmei He

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interstitial stem cell is characterized by multiple differentiations,and retinoic acid (RA) can induce differentiation of stromal cells into nerve tissue cells in fetal liver of mice, so, its signal transduction pathway should be discussed to trigger differentiation.OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of RA on expression of neural specific gene and its signal transduction in fetal liver of mice.DESIGN: Paired controlled study on the basis of cell.SETTING: Institute of Hematology, Medical College of Jinan University.MATERIALS: The experiment was completed in the Institute of Hematology, Medical College of Jinan University from April to December 2005. C57BL/6 mice, of clean grade, aged 8-10 weeks, weighting 20-35 g,10 females and 4 males, were selected in this study.METHODS: Sca-1+ cells in fetal liver were prepared with MACS kit and cultured with DMEM + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). On the fourth day, it was added with or without protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine chloride (3 μmol/L) and 5×10-7 mol/L RA for 24 hours, and then incubated in serum-free medium for 5 days. Expressions of genes were assayed by Western blotting and semi-quantitative RT-PCR.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Expression of neural specific gene NF-L, NF-H, BF-1 and TH.RESULTS: Expression of neural specific gene NF-L, NF-H, BF-1 and TH was significantly increased after treatment with RA and they were increased 5.06, 5.15, 4.63 and 3.33 times, respectively. However, chelerythrine chloride could inhibit expression of neural specific gene NF-L, NF-H, BF-1 and TH induced by RA.CONCLUSION: RA can promote the expression of neural specific genes in Sca-1+ cells of fetal liver, and its pathway may be related to PKC.

  5. Specific expression of the human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, promotes tumor progression and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Hv1 is specifically expressed in highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues. → Hv1 regulates breast cancer cytosolic pH. → Hv1 acidifies extracellular milieu. → Hv1 exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells. -- Abstract: The newly discovered human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is essential for proton transfer, which contains a voltage sensor domain (VSD) without a pore domain. We report here for the first time that Hv1 is specifically expressed in the highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues, but not in poorly metastatic breast cancer tissues, detected by immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression levels of Hv1 have significant differences among breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-453, T-47D and SK-BR-3, in which Hv1 is expressed at a high level in highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, but at a very low level in poorly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Inhibition of Hv1 expression in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreases the invasion and migration of the cells. The intracellular pH of MDA-MB-231 cells down-regulated Hv1 expression by siRNA is obviously decreased compared with MDA-MB-231 with the scrambled siRNA. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and gelatinase activity in MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed Hv1 by siRNA were reduced. Our results strongly suggest that Hv1 regulates breast cancer intracellular pH and exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells.

  6. Specific expression of the human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, promotes tumor progression and metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yifan [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Physics Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Shu Jie, E-mail: shujieli@nankai.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Physics Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Pan, Juncheng [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Physics Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Che, Yongzhe, E-mail: cheli@nankai.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Yin, Jian [Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300060 (China); Zhao, Qing [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Physics Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Hv1 is specifically expressed in highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues. {yields} Hv1 regulates breast cancer cytosolic pH. {yields} Hv1 acidifies extracellular milieu. {yields} Hv1 exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells. -- Abstract: The newly discovered human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is essential for proton transfer, which contains a voltage sensor domain (VSD) without a pore domain. We report here for the first time that Hv1 is specifically expressed in the highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues, but not in poorly metastatic breast cancer tissues, detected by immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression levels of Hv1 have significant differences among breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-453, T-47D and SK-BR-3, in which Hv1 is expressed at a high level in highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, but at a very low level in poorly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Inhibition of Hv1 expression in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreases the invasion and migration of the cells. The intracellular pH of MDA-MB-231 cells down-regulated Hv1 expression by siRNA is obviously decreased compared with MDA-MB-231 with the scrambled siRNA. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and gelatinase activity in MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed Hv1 by siRNA were reduced. Our results strongly suggest that Hv1 regulates breast cancer intracellular pH and exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells.

  7. Positive and Negative Selection in Transgenic Mice Expressing a T-Cell Receptor Specific for Influenza Nucleoprotein and Endogenous Superantigen

    OpenAIRE

    Mamalaki, Clio; Elliott, James; Norton, Trisha; Yannoutsos, Nicholas; Townsend, Alain R.; Chandler, Phillip; Simpson, Elizabeth; Kioussis, Dimitris

    1993-01-01

    A transgenic mouse was generated expressing on most (>80%) of thymocytes and peripheral T cells a T-cell receptor isolated from a cytotoxic T-cell clone (F5). This clone is CD8+ and recognizes αα366-374 of the nucleoprotein (NP 366-374) of influenza virus (A/NT/60/68), in the context of Class ,MHC Db (Townsend et al., 1986). The receptor utilizes the Vβ11 and Vα4 gene segments for the β chain and α chain, respectively (Palmer et al., 1989). The usage of Vβ11 makes this TcR reactive to Class I...

  8. Cell type-specific deficiency of c-kit gene expression in mutant mice of mi/mi genotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Isozaki, K; Tsujimura, T; Nomura, S; Morii, E; Koshimizu, U.; Nishimune, Y; Kitamura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The mi locus of mice encodes a novel member of the basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper protein family of transcription factors (hereafter called mi factor). In addition to microphthalmus, osteopetrosis, and lack of melanocytes, mice of mi/mi genotype are deficient in mast cells. Since the c-kit receptor tyrosine kinase plays an important role in the development of mast cells, and since the c-kit expression by cultured mast cells from mi/mi mice is deficient in both mRNA and protein levels, ...

  9. B-cell subpopulations from normal human secondary lymphoid tissues with specific gene expression profiles and phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Schmitz, Alexander; Perez Andres, Martin; Johansen, P; Bøgsted, Martin; Nyegaard, Mette; Bukh, Anne; Fogd, Kirsten; Orfao, Alberto; Dybkær, Karen

    included homogenization, isolation of mononuclear cells, MFC and FACS sorting using multicolour fluorescence single tube panels.of antibodies against surface molecules as CD10/20/27/38/45, supplemented with tissue related antibodies. Isolated B-cell subpopulations were evaluated by morphological inspection...... and single gene expression analysis (qRT-PCR) for transcription factors as well as global gene expression profiling (GEP; GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array). For example for tonsils, based on the immunophenotypic presentation (including CD3/44/CXCR4 in the panel), B-cell subsets were identified and...... sorted, naïve, centroblast, centrocyte, memory, and plasmablasts. The identity of the tonsillar subpopulations was verified using qRT-PCR and exon microarray GEP based on the used discriminative phenotypic markers as well as transcriptions factors BACH2, BCL6, PAX5, IRF4, P27, PRDM1 and XBP1. Globally...

  10. Correlation of mRNA and protein levels: Cell type-specific gene expression of cluster designation antigens in the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deutsch Eric W

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Expression levels of mRNA and protein by cell types exhibit a range of correlations for different genes. In this study, we compared levels of mRNA abundance for several cluster designation (CD genes determined by gene arrays using magnetic sorted and laser-capture microdissected human prostate cells with levels of expression of the respective CD proteins determined by immunohistochemical staining in the major cell types of the prostate – basal epithelial, luminal epithelial, stromal fibromuscular, and endothelial – and for prostate precursor/stem cells and prostate carcinoma cells. Immunohistochemical stains of prostate tissues from more than 50 patients were scored for informative CD antigen expression and compared with cell-type specific transcriptomes. Results: Concordance between gene and protein expression findings based on 'present' vs. 'absent' calls ranged from 46 to 68%. Correlation of expression levels was poor to moderate (Pearson correlations ranged from 0 to 0.63. Divergence between the two data types was most frequently seen for genes whose array signals exceeded background (> 50 but lacked immunoreactivity by immunostaining. This could be due to multiple factors, e.g. low levels of protein expression, technological sensitivities, sample processing, probe set definition or anatomical origin of tissue and actual biological differences between transcript and protein abundance. Conclusion: Agreement between these two very different methodologies has great implications for their respective use in both molecular studies and clinical trials employing molecular biomarkers.

  11. Paclitaxel alters the expression and specific activity of deoxycytidine kinase and cytidine deaminase in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Shitalben R

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We observed that paclitaxel altered the pharmacokinetic properties of gemcitabine in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and limited the accumulation of gemcitabine and its metabolites in various primary and immortalized human cells. Therefore, we classified the drug-drug interaction and the effects of paclitaxel on deoxycytidine kinase (dCK and cytidine deaminase (CDA in three NSCLC cell lines. These enzymes are responsible for the metabolism of gemcitabine to its deaminated metabolite dFdU (80% of the parent drug and the phosphorylated metabolites dFdCMP, dFdCDP and dFdCTP. These metabolites appear to relate to sensitivity and tolerability of gemcitabine based on previous animal and laboratory studies. Methods Three immortalized human cells representative of the most common histological subtypes identified in patients with advanced NSCLC were exposed to the individual drugs or combinations to complete a multiple drug effect analysis. These same cell lines were exposed to vehicle-control or paclitaxel and the mRNA levels, protein expression and specific activity of dCK and CDA were compared. Comparisons were made using a two-tailed paired t-test or analysis of variance with a P value of Results The multiple drug effect analysis indicated synergy for H460, H520 and H838 cells independent of sequence. As anticipated, paclitaxel-gemcitabine increased the number of G2/M cells, whereas gemcitabine-paclitaxel increased the number of G0/G1 or S cells. Paclitaxel significantly decreased dCK and CDA mRNA levels in H460 and H520 cells (40% to 60%, P Conclusion In summary, paclitaxel altered the mRNA levels and specific activity of dCK and CDA and these effects could be dependent on histological subtype. More cell and animal studies are needed to further characterize the relationship between mRNA levels and the overall drug-drug interaction and the potential to use histological subtype as a predictive factor in the

  12. Tuberculosis Therapy Modifies the Cytokine Profile, Maturation State, and Expression of Inhibitory Molecules on Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4+ T-Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharia, Kapil K.; Petrovas, Constantinos; Ferrando-Martinez, Sara; Leal, Manuel; Luque, Rafael; Ive, Prudence; Luetkemeyer, Anne; Havlir, Diane; Koup, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the expression of inhibitory molecules cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed-death-1 (PD-1) on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific CD4 T-cells and how their expression is impacted by TB treatment. Methods Cryopreserved PBMCs from HIV-TB co-infected and TB mono-infected patients with untreated and treated tuberculosis (TB) disease were stimulated for six hours with PPD and stained. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we characterized the differentiation state, cytokine profile, and inhibitory molecule expression on PPD-specific CD4 T-cells. Results In our HIV-TB co-infected cohort, TB treatment increased the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T-cells co-producing IFN-γ+IL-2+TNF-α+ and IFN-γ+IL-2+ (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.0002, respectively) while decreasing the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T-cells co-producing IFN-γ+MIP1-β+TNF-α+ and IFN-γ+MIP1-β+. The proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T-cells expressing an effector memory phenotype decreased (63.6% vs 51.6%, p = 0.0015) while the proportion expressing a central memory phenotype increased (7.8% vs. 21.7%, p = 0.001) following TB treatment. TB treatment reduced the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T-cells expressing CTLA-4 (72.4% vs. 44.3%, p = 0.0005) and PD-1 (34.5% vs. 29.2%, p = 0.03). Similar trends were noted in our TB mono-infected cohort. Conclusion TB treatment alters the functional profile of Mtb-specific CD4 T-cells reflecting shifts towards a less differentiated maturational profile and decreases PD-1 and CTLA-4 expression. These could serve as markers of reduced mycobacterial burden. Further study is warranted. PMID:27367521

  13. Inhibitory receptors are expressed by Trypanosoma cruzi-specific effector T cells and in hearts of subjects with chronic Chagas disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael J Argüello

    Full Text Available We had formerly demonstrated that subjects chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi show impaired T cell responses closely linked with a process of T cell exhaustion. Recently, the expression of several inhibitory receptors has been associated with T cell dysfunction and exhaustion. In this study, we have examined the expression of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4 and the leukocyte immunoglobulin like receptor 1 (LIR-1 by peripheral T. cruzi antigen-responsive IFN-gamma (IFN-γ-producing and total T cells from chronically T. cruzi-infected subjects with different clinical forms of the disease. CTAL-4 expression was also evaluated in heart tissue sections from subjects with severe myocarditis. The majority of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+ T cells responsive to a parasite lysate preparation were found to express CTLA-4 but considerably lower frequencies express LIR-1, irrespective of the clinical status of the donor. Conversely, few IFN-γ-producing T cells responsive to tetanus and diphtheria toxoids expressed CTLA-4 and LIR-1. Polyclonal stimulation with anti-CD3 antibodies induced higher frequencies of CD4(+CTAL-4(+ T cells in patients with severe heart disease than in asymptomatic subjects. Ligation of CTLA-4 and LIR-1 with their agonistic antibodies, in vitro, reduces IFN-γ production. Conversely, CTLA-4 blockade did not improved IFN-γ production in response to T. cruzi antigens. Subjects with chronic T. cruzi infection had increased numbers of CD4(+LIR-1(+ among total peripheral blood mononuclear cells, relative to uninfected individuals and these numbers decreased after treatment with benznidazole. CTLA-4 was also expressed by CD3(+ T lymphocytes infiltrating heart tissues from chronically infected subjects with severe myocarditis. These findings support the conclusion that persistent infection with T. cruzi leads to the upregulation of inhibitory receptors which could alter parasite specific T cell responses in the chronic phase

  14. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Hematological Malignancies Using T Cells Gene-Modified to Express Tumor Antigen-Specific Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujiwara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that adoptive T-cell immunotherapy could be a promising option for control of cancer; evident examples include the graft-vs-leukemia effect mediated by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI and therapeutic infusion of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL for melanoma. Currently, along with advances in synthetic immunology, gene-modified T cells retargeted to defined tumor antigens have been introduced as “cellular drugs”. As the functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs, transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors should enable polyclonal T cells to be uniformly redirected toward cancer cells. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells has an impressive track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR gene-modified T cells redirected towards CD19 in patients with B-cell malignancy, and the encouraging results obtained with TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. This article overviews the current status of this treatment option, and discusses challenging issues that still restrain the full effectiveness of this strategy, especially in the context of hematological malignancy.

  15. Tissue- and cell-specific expression of metallothionein genes in cadmium- and copper-exposed mussels analyzed by in situ hybridization and RT-PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are metal-inducible proteins that can be used as biomarkers of metal exposure. In mussels two families of MT isoforms (MT10 and MT20) have been characterized. In this study, mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) were exposed to 200 ppb Cd and 40 ppb Cu for 2 and 9 days to characterize the tissue and isoform specificity of metal-induced MT expression. Non-radioactive in situ hybridization demonstrated that both MT isoforms were mainly transcribed in digestive tubule epithelial cells, especially in basophilic cells. Weaker MT expression was detected in non-ciliated duct cells, stomach and gill epithelial cells, haemocytes, adipogranular cells, spermatic follicles and oocytes. RT-PCR resulted in cloning of a novel M. galloprovincialis isoform homologous to recently cloned Mytilus edulis intron-less MT10B isoform. In gills, Cd only affected MT10 gene expression after 2 days of exposure while increases in MT protein levels occurred at day 9. In the digestive gland, a marked increase of both isoforms, but especially of MT20, was accompanied by increased levels of MT proteins and basophilic cell volume density (VvBAS) after 2 and 9 days and of intralysosomal metal accumulation in digestive cells after 9 days. Conversely, although metal was accumulated in digestive cells lysosomes and the VvBAS increased in Cu-exposed mussels, Cu exposure did not produce an increase of MT gene expression or MT protein levels. These data suggest that MTs are expressed in a tissue-, cell- and isoform-specific way in response to different metals

  16. Follicular dendritic cell-specific prion protein (PrP) expression alone is sufficient to sustain prion infection in the spleen.

    OpenAIRE

    Laura McCulloch; Brown, Karen L.; Bradford, Barry M.; John Hopkins; Mick Bailey; Klaus Rajewsky; Manson, Jean C; Mabbott, Neil A.

    2011-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterised by the accumulation of PrP(Sc), an abnormally folded isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), in affected tissues. Following peripheral exposure high levels of prion-specific PrP(Sc) accumulate first upon follicular dendritic cells (FDC) in lymphoid tissues before spreading to the CNS. Expression of PrP(C) is mandatory for cells to sustain prion infection and FDC appear to express high levels. However, whether FDC actively replicate prions or simply acq...

  17. Analysis of antigen-specific, Ig-restricted cell-free material made by I-J+ Ly-1 cells (Ly-1 TsiF) that induces Ly-2+ cells to express suppressive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, K; Murphy, D; Cantor, H; Gershon, R K

    1981-11-01

    A set of T cells defined by a unique profile of cell surface alloantigens (phenotype Ly-1+2-; Qa-1+; I-J+) produces biologically active cell-free material(s) (Ly-1 TsiF) which induces another T cell set (cell surface phenotype Ly-1,2+; I-J/; Qa-1+) to participate in the suppression of primary immune responses to heterologous erythrocytes. The suppression is specific for the inducing antigen, and the Ly-1 TsiF binds antigen in a specific way. The activity of Ly-1 TsiF can be removed by anti-I-J immunosorbents and will not be expressed if the functional producer and acceptor cells do not share gene products that are encoded in or are tightly linked to the VH portion of the Ig complex. There is no requirement for the Ly-1 TsiF and its acceptor cell(s) to share major histocompatibility complex gene products. Thus, for optimal induction of antigen-specific suppression by cell-gree materials from Ly-1 T cells, three necessary conditions must be met: (a) antigen recognition by Ly-1 TsiF; (b) the expression of I-J gene products and (c) identify of VH-linked Ig locus gene products (or other products influenced by those genes) on both the inducer molecule and its acceptor cell. The role of the Ig-linked restriction is particularly intriguing, and its possible meaning is considered in detail. PMID:6173228

  18. B-cell-specific conditional expression of Myd88p.L252P leads to the development of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Gero; Liedgens, Paul; Korovkina, Darya; Seeger, Jens M; Al-Baldawi, Yussor; Al-Maarri, Mona; Fritz, Christian; Vlantis, Katerina; Bezhanova, Svetlana; Scheel, Andreas H; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Reimann, Maurice; Möller, Peter; López, Cristina; Schlesner, Matthias; Lohneis, Philipp; Weber, Alexander N R; Trümper, Lorenz; Staudt, Louis M; Ortmann, Monika; Pasparakis, Manolis; Siebert, Reiner; Schmitt, Clemens A; Klatt, Andreas R; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Schäfer, Stephan C; Persigehl, Thorsten; Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Odenthal, Margarete; Büttner, Reinhard; Frenzel, Lukas P; Kashkar, Hamid; Reinhardt, H Christian

    2016-06-01

    The adaptor protein MYD88 is critical for relaying activation of Toll-like receptor signaling to NF-κB activation. MYD88 mutations, particularly the p.L265P mutation, have been described in numerous distinct B-cell malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Twenty-nine percent of activated B-cell-type DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL), which is characterized by constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway, carry the p.L265P mutation. In addition, ABC-DLBCL frequently displays focal copy number gains affecting BCL2 Here, we generated a novel mouse model in which Cre-mediated recombination, specifically in B cells, leads to the conditional expression of Myd88(p.L252P) (the orthologous position of the human MYD88(p.L265P) mutation) from the endogenous locus. These mice develop a lymphoproliferative disease and occasional transformation into clonal lymphomas. The clonal disease displays the morphologic and immunophenotypical characteristics of ABC-DLBCL. Lymphomagenesis can be accelerated by crossing in a further novel allele, which mediates conditional overexpression of BCL2 Cross-validation experiments in human DLBCL samples revealed that both MYD88 and CD79B mutations are substantially enriched in ABC-DLBCL compared with germinal center B-cell DLBCL. Furthermore, analyses of human DLBCL genome sequencing data confirmed that BCL2 amplifications frequently co-occurred with MYD88 mutations, further validating our approach. Finally, in silico experiments revealed that MYD88-mutant ABC-DLBCL cells in particular display an actionable addiction to BCL2. Altogether, we generated a novel autochthonous mouse model of ABC-DLBCL that could be used as a preclinical platform for the development and validation of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of ABC-DLBCL. PMID:27048211

  19. Dynamic regulation of permissive histone modifications and GATA3 binding underpin acquisition of granzyme A expression by virus-specific CD8(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michelle L T; Hatton, Lauren; Li, Jasmine; Olshansky, Moshe; Kelso, Anne; Russ, Brendan E; Turner, Stephen J

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have focused on the molecular regulation of perforin (PFP) and granzyme B (GZMB) expression by activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), but little is known about the molecular factors that underpin granzyme A (GZMA) expression. In vitro activation of naïve CD8(+) T cells, in the presence of IL-4, enhanced STAT6-dependent GZMA expression and was associated with GATA3 binding and enrichment of transcriptionally permissive histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) across the Gzma gene locus. While GZMA expression by effector influenza A virus specific CTLs was also associated with a similar permissive epigenetic signature, memory CTL lacked enrichment of permissive histone PTMs at the Gzma locus, although this was restored within recalled secondary effector CTLs. Importantly, GZMA expression by virus-specific CTLs was associated with GATA3 binding at the Gzma locus, and independent of STAT6-mediated signaling. This suggests regulation of GZMA expression is underpinned by differentiation-dependent regulation of chromatin composition at the Gzma locus and that, given GATA3 is key for CTL differentiation in response to infection, GATA3 expression is regulated by a distinct, IL-4 independent, signaling pathway. Overall, this study provides insights into the molecular mechanisms that control transcription of Gzma during virus-induced CD8(+) T-cell differentiation. PMID:26519105

  20. Follicular dendritic cell-specific prion protein (PrP expression alone is sufficient to sustain prion infection in the spleen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura McCulloch

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are characterised by the accumulation of PrP(Sc, an abnormally folded isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C, in affected tissues. Following peripheral exposure high levels of prion-specific PrP(Sc accumulate first upon follicular dendritic cells (FDC in lymphoid tissues before spreading to the CNS. Expression of PrP(C is mandatory for cells to sustain prion infection and FDC appear to express high levels. However, whether FDC actively replicate prions or simply acquire them from other infected cells is uncertain. In the attempts to-date to establish the role of FDC in prion pathogenesis it was not possible to dissociate the Prnp expression of FDC from that of the nervous system and all other non-haematopoietic lineages. This is important as FDC may simply acquire prions after synthesis by other infected cells. To establish the role of FDC in prion pathogenesis transgenic mice were created in which PrP(C expression was specifically "switched on" or "off" only on FDC. We show that PrP(C-expression only on FDC is sufficient to sustain prion replication in the spleen. Furthermore, prion replication is blocked in the spleen when PrP(C-expression is specifically ablated only on FDC. These data definitively demonstrate that FDC are the essential sites of prion replication in lymphoid tissues. The demonstration that Prnp-ablation only on FDC blocked splenic prion accumulation without apparent consequences for FDC status represents a novel opportunity to prevent neuroinvasion by modulation of PrP(C expression on FDC.

  1. Follicular dendritic cell-specific prion protein (PrP) expression alone is sufficient to sustain prion infection in the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Laura; Brown, Karen L; Bradford, Barry M; Hopkins, John; Bailey, Mick; Rajewsky, Klaus; Manson, Jean C; Mabbott, Neil A

    2011-12-01

    Prion diseases are characterised by the accumulation of PrP(Sc), an abnormally folded isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), in affected tissues. Following peripheral exposure high levels of prion-specific PrP(Sc) accumulate first upon follicular dendritic cells (FDC) in lymphoid tissues before spreading to the CNS. Expression of PrP(C) is mandatory for cells to sustain prion infection and FDC appear to express high levels. However, whether FDC actively replicate prions or simply acquire them from other infected cells is uncertain. In the attempts to-date to establish the role of FDC in prion pathogenesis it was not possible to dissociate the Prnp expression of FDC from that of the nervous system and all other non-haematopoietic lineages. This is important as FDC may simply acquire prions after synthesis by other infected cells. To establish the role of FDC in prion pathogenesis transgenic mice were created in which PrP(C) expression was specifically "switched on" or "off" only on FDC. We show that PrP(C)-expression only on FDC is sufficient to sustain prion replication in the spleen. Furthermore, prion replication is blocked in the spleen when PrP(C)-expression is specifically ablated only on FDC. These data definitively demonstrate that FDC are the essential sites of prion replication in lymphoid tissues. The demonstration that Prnp-ablation only on FDC blocked splenic prion accumulation without apparent consequences for FDC status represents a novel opportunity to prevent neuroinvasion by modulation of PrP(C) expression on FDC. PMID:22144895

  2. Tumour-initiating cell-specific miR-1246 and miR-1290 expression converge to promote non-small cell lung cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen Cai; Chin, Tan Min; Yang, Henry; Nga, Min En; Lunny, Declan Patrick; Lim, Edwin Kok Hao; Sun, Li Li; Pang, Yin Huei; Leow, Yi Ning; Malusay, Shanneen Rossellini Y; Lim, Priscilla Xin Hui; Lee, Jeravan Zili; Tan, Benedict Jian Wei; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Lim, Elaine Hsuen; Lim, Wan Teck; Tan, Daniel Shao Weng; Tan, Eng Huat; Tai, Bee Choo; Soo, Ross Andrew; Tam, Wai Leong; Lim, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The tumour-initiating cell (TIC) model accounts for phenotypic and functional heterogeneity among tumour cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulatory molecules frequently aberrantly expressed in cancers, and may contribute towards tumour heterogeneity and TIC behaviour. More recent efforts have focused on miRNAs as diagnostic or therapeutic targets. Here, we identified the TIC-specific miRNAs, miR-1246 and miR-1290, as crucial drivers for tumour initiation and cancer progression in human non-small cell lung cancer. The loss of either miRNA impacted the tumour-initiating potential of TICs and their ability to metastasize. Longitudinal analyses of serum miR-1246 and miR-1290 levels across time correlate their circulating levels to the clinical response of lung cancer patients who were receiving ongoing anti-neoplastic therapies. Functionally, direct inhibition of either miRNA with locked nucleic acid administered systemically, can arrest the growth of established patient-derived xenograft tumours, thus indicating that these miRNAs are clinically useful as biomarkers for tracking disease progression and as therapeutic targets. PMID:27325363

  3. Stage-specific expression of TNFα regulates bad/bid-mediated apoptosis and RIP1/ROS-mediated secondary necrosis in Birnavirus-infected fish cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lun Wang

    Full Text Available Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV can induce Bad-mediated apoptosis followed by secondary necrosis in fish cells, but it is not known how these two types of cell death are regulated by IPNV. We found that IPNV infection can regulate Bad/Bid-mediated apoptotic and Rip1/ROS-mediated necrotic death pathways via the up-regulation of TNFα in zebrafish ZF4 cells. Using a DNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses, two major subsets of differentially expressed genes were characterized, including the innate immune response gene TNFα and the pro-apoptotic genes Bad and Bid. In the early replication stage (0-6 h post-infection, or p.i., we observed that the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα underwent a rapid six-fold induction. Then, during the early-middle replication stages (6-12 h p.i., TNFα level was eight-fold induction and the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members Bad and Bid were up-regulated. Furthermore, specific inhibitors of TNFα expression (AG-126 or TNFα-specific siRNA were used to block apoptotic and necrotic death signaling during the early or early-middle stages of IPNV infection. Inhibition of TNFα expression dramatically reduced the Bad/Bid-mediated apoptotic and Rip1/ROS-mediated necrotic cell death pathways and rescued host cell viability. Moreover, we used Rip1-specific inhibitors (Nec-1 and Rip1-specific siRNA to block Rip1 expression. The Rip1/ROS-mediated secondary necrotic pathway appeared to be reduced in IPNV-infected fish cells during the middle-late stage of infection (12-18 h p.i.. Taken together, our results indicate that IPNV triggers two death pathways via up-stream induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα, and these results may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of RNA viruses.

  4. Expansion of Parasite-Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells Expressing IL-10 Superfamily Cytokine Members and Their Regulation in Human Lymphatic Filariasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; George, Parakkal Jovvian; Hanna, Luke E.; Kumaran, Paul; Chandrasekaran, Vedachalam; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is known to be associated with an increased production of IL-10. The role of the other IL-10 family members in the pathogenesis of infection and/or disease is not known. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the expression patterns of IL-10 family members – IL-19, IL-24 and IL-26 in LF. We demonstrate that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells express IL-19, IL-24 and IL-26 and that the frequency of CD4+ T cells expressing IL-19 and IL-24 (as well as IL-10) is significantly increased at baseline and following filarial antigen stimulation in patients with LF in comparison to individuals with filarial lymphedema and uninfected individuals. This CD4+ T cell expression pattern was associated with increased production of IL-19 and IL-24 by filarial – antigen stimulated PBMC. Moreover, the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing IL-26 was significantly increased following filarial antigen stimulation in filarial lymphedema individuals. Interestingly, IL-10 blockade resulted in diminished frequencies of IL-19+ and IL-24+ T cells, whereas the addition of recombinant IL-10 resulted in significantly increased frequency of IL-19+ and IL-24+ T cells as well as significantly up regulated IL-19 and IL-24 gene expression, suggesting that IL-10 regulates IL-19 and IL-24 expression in T cells. In addition, IL-1β and IL-23 blockade also induced a diminution in the frequency of IL-19+ and IL-24+ T cells, indicating a novel role for these cytokines in the induction of IL-19 and IL-24 expressing T cells. Finally, elimination of infection resulted in significantly decreased frequencies of antigen – specific CD4+ T cells expressing IL-10, IL-19 and IL-24. Conclusions Our findings, therefore, suggest that IL-19 and IL-24 are associated with the regulation of immune responses in active filarial infection and potentially with protection against development of pathology, while IL-26 is predominantly associated with pathology in LF. PMID:24699268

  5. A Functionally Superior Second-Generation Vector Expressing an Aurora Kinase-A-Specific T-Cell Receptor for Anti-Leukaemia Adoptive Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Nicholas Paul; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Kazushi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Mineno, Junichi; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Shiku, Hiroshi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Aurora Kinase A is a cancer-associated protein normally involved in the regulation of mitosis. Being over-expressed in a range of cancers, it is a suitable target for cell-based immunotherapy. Gene transfer of T-cell receptor sequences cognisant of HLA-A*0201-restricted Aurora Kinase A antigen has previously been shown to transfer specific immunoreactivity against the target peptide in a Human Lymphocyte Antigen-restricted manner. While T cell receptor gene-transfer has great potential in overcoming the difficulties of isolating and expanding tumour-reactive lymphocytes from a patient's own cells, one hurdle is potential mispairing and competition between exogenous and endogenous T cell receptor chains. We have used a retroviral vector design bearing a short-interfering RNA that downregulates endogenous T cell receptor chains, without affecting expression of the transgenic T cell receptor sequences. The T cell receptor expression cassette also includes a 2A self-cleaving peptide, resulting in equimolar expression of the T cell receptor alpha and beta chains, further enhancing formation of the desired T cell receptor. Via a simple, modular cloning method, we have cloned the alpha and beta chains of the anti-Aurora Kinase A-reactive T cell receptor into this 'siTCR' vector. We then compared the activity of this vector against the original, 'conventional' vector across a panel of assays. T cell receptors expressed from the siTCR-vector retained the cytotoxic functionality of the original vector, with evidence of reduced off-target reactivity. The rate of expression of correctly-formed T cell receptors was superior using the siTCR design, and this was achieved at lower vector copy numbers. Maintaining T cell receptor efficacy with a reduced vector copy number reduces the risk of genotoxicity. The siTCR design also reduces the risk of mispairing and cross-reactivity, while increasing the functional titre. Such improvements in the safety of T cell receptor gene

  6. A Functionally Superior Second-Generation Vector Expressing an Aurora Kinase-A-Specific T-Cell Receptor for Anti-Leukaemia Adoptive Immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Paul Casey

    Full Text Available Aurora Kinase A is a cancer-associated protein normally involved in the regulation of mitosis. Being over-expressed in a range of cancers, it is a suitable target for cell-based immunotherapy. Gene transfer of T-cell receptor sequences cognisant of HLA-A*0201-restricted Aurora Kinase A antigen has previously been shown to transfer specific immunoreactivity against the target peptide in a Human Lymphocyte Antigen-restricted manner. While T cell receptor gene-transfer has great potential in overcoming the difficulties of isolating and expanding tumour-reactive lymphocytes from a patient's own cells, one hurdle is potential mispairing and competition between exogenous and endogenous T cell receptor chains. We have used a retroviral vector design bearing a short-interfering RNA that downregulates endogenous T cell receptor chains, without affecting expression of the transgenic T cell receptor sequences. The T cell receptor expression cassette also includes a 2A self-cleaving peptide, resulting in equimolar expression of the T cell receptor alpha and beta chains, further enhancing formation of the desired T cell receptor. Via a simple, modular cloning method, we have cloned the alpha and beta chains of the anti-Aurora Kinase A-reactive T cell receptor into this 'siTCR' vector. We then compared the activity of this vector against the original, 'conventional' vector across a panel of assays. T cell receptors expressed from the siTCR-vector retained the cytotoxic functionality of the original vector, with evidence of reduced off-target reactivity. The rate of expression of correctly-formed T cell receptors was superior using the siTCR design, and this was achieved at lower vector copy numbers. Maintaining T cell receptor efficacy with a reduced vector copy number reduces the risk of genotoxicity. The siTCR design also reduces the risk of mispairing and cross-reactivity, while increasing the functional titre. Such improvements in the safety of T cell

  7. Transcriptome analysis of human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC) from umbilical cords of gestational diabetic mothers reveals candidate sites for an epigenetic modulation of specific gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambra, R; Manca, S; Palumbo, M C; Leoni, G; Natarelli, L; De Marco, A; Consoli, A; Pandolfi, A; Virgili, F

    2014-01-01

    Within the complex pathological picture associated to diabetes, high glucose (HG) has "per se" effects on cells and tissues that involve epigenetic reprogramming of gene expression. In fetal tissues, epigenetic changes occur genome-wide and are believed to induce specific long term effects. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) obtained at delivery from gestational diabetic women were used to study the transcriptomic effects of chronic hyperglycemia in fetal vascular cells using Affymetrix microarrays. In spite of the small number of samples analyzed (n=6), genes related to insulin sensing and extracellular matrix reorganization were found significantly affected by HG. Quantitative PCR analysis of gene promoters identified a significant differential DNA methylation in TGFB2. Use of Ea.hy926 endothelial cells confirms data on HUVEC. Our study corroborates recent evidences suggesting that epigenetic reprogramming of gene expression occurs with persistent HG and provides a background for future investigations addressing genomic consequences of chronic HG. PMID:24667242

  8. Balancing intestinal and systemic inflammation through cell type-specific expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Brandstätter; Oliver Schanz; Julia Vorac; Jessica König; Tetsushi Mori; Toru Maruyama; Markus Korkowski; Thomas Haarmann-Stemmann; Dorthe von Smolinski; Schultze, Joachim L.; Josef Abel; Charlotte Esser; Haruko Takeyama; Heike Weighardt; Irmgard Förster

    2016-01-01

    As a sensor of polyaromatic chemicals the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) exerts an important role in immune regulation besides its requirement for xenobiotic metabolism. Transcriptional activation of AhR target genes is counterregulated by the AhR repressor (AhRR) but the exact function of the AhRR in vivo is currently unknown. We here show that the AhRR is predominantly expressed in immune cells of the skin and intestine, different from other AhR target genes. Whereas AhRR antagonizes the a...

  9. Developmental expression and differentiation-related neuron-specific splicing of metastasis suppressor 1 (Mtss1 in normal and transformed cerebellar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baader Stephan L

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mtss1 encodes an actin-binding protein, dysregulated in a variety of tumors, that interacts with sonic hedgehog/Gli signaling in epidermal cells. Given the prime importance of this pathway for cerebellar development and tumorigenesis, we assessed expression of Mtss1 in the developing murine cerebellum and human medulloblastoma specimens. Results During development, Mtss1 is transiently expressed in granule cells, from the time point they cease to proliferate to their synaptic integration. It is also expressed by granule cell precursor-derived medulloblastomas. In the adult CNS, Mtss1 is found exclusively in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Neuronal differentiation is accompanied by a switch in Mtss1 splicing. Whereas immature granule cells express a Mtss1 variant observed also in peripheral tissues and comprising exon 12, this exon is replaced by a CNS-specific exon, 12a, in more mature granule cells and in adult Purkinje cells. Bioinformatic analysis of Mtss1 suggests that differential exon usage may affect interaction with Fyn and Src, two tyrosine kinases previously recognized as critical for cerebellar cell migration and histogenesis. Further, this approach led to the identification of two evolutionary conserved nuclear localization sequences. These overlap with the actin filament binding site of Mtss1, and one also harbors a potential PKA and PKC phosphorylation site. Conclusion Both the pattern of expression and splicing of Mtss1 is developmentally regulated in the murine cerebellum. These findings are discussed with a view on the potential role of Mtss1 for cytoskeletal dynamics in developing and mature cerebellar neurons.

  10. Stable, Nonviral Expression of Mutated Tumor Neoantigen-specific T-cell Receptors Using the Sleeping Beauty Transposon/Transposase System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniger, Drew C; Pasetto, Anna; Tran, Eric; Parkhurst, Maria R; Cohen, Cyrille J; Robbins, Paul F; Cooper, Laurence Jn; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Neoantigens unique to each patient's tumor can be recognized by autologous T cells through their T-cell receptor (TCR) but the low frequency and/or terminal differentiation of mutation-specific T cells in tumors can limit their utility as adoptive T-cell therapies. Transfer of TCR genes into younger T cells from peripheral blood with a high proliferative potential could obviate this problem. We generated a rapid, cost-effective strategy to genetically engineer cancer patient T cells with TCRs using the clinical Sleeping Beauty transposon/transposase system. Patient-specific TCRs reactive against HLA-A*0201-restriced neoantigens AHNAK(S2580F) or ERBB2(H473Y) or the HLA-DQB*0601-restricted neoantigen ERBB2IP(E805G) were assembled with murine constant chains and cloned into Sleeping Beauty transposons. Patient peripheral blood lymphocytes were coelectroporated with SB11 transposase and Sleeping Beauty transposon, and transposed T cells were enriched by sorting on murine TCRβ (mTCRβ) expression. Rapid expansion of mTCRβ(+) T cells with irradiated allogeneic peripheral blood lymphocytes feeders, OKT3, interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-15, and IL-21 resulted in a preponderance of effector (CD27(-)CD45RA(-)) and less-differentiated (CD27(+)CD45RA(+)) T cells. Transposed T cells specifically mounted a polyfunctional response against cognate mutated neoantigens and tumor cell lines. Thus, Sleeping Beauty transposition of mutation-specific TCRs can facilitate the use of personalized T-cell therapy targeting unique neoantigens. PMID:26945006

  11. {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate uptake in hepatoma cells due to tissue-specific human sodium iodide symporter gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Libo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200233 Shanghai (China); Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Altman, Annette [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Mier, Walter [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Lu Hankui [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200233 Shanghai (China); Zhu Ruisen [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200233 Shanghai (China); Haberkorn, Uwe [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany) and Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: uwe_haberkorn@med.uni-heidelberg.de

    2006-05-15

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene could be used as an ideal reporter gene as well as a promising therapeutic gene. {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate has proven to be more advantageous than {sup 131}I-iodide with respect to image quality, procedure and radiation dose in examination of thyroid uptake and scintigraphy. Herein, we investigated the feasibility of monitoring human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression with {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate in hepatoma cells (MH3924A) following tissue-specific expression. Methods: MH3924A cells were stably transfected with the recombinant retroviral vector, in which hNIS cDNA was driven by murine albumin enhancer/promoter (mAlb) and coupled to hygromycin resistance gene using an internal ribosomal entry site. Functional NIS expression in hepatoma cells was confirmed by an {sup 125}I{sup -} uptake assay. The dynamic uptake and efflux of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate was determined both in vitro and in vivo. Results: The {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate was up to 254-fold higher in stably transfected MH3924A cells than in wild-type cells. However, the in vitro efflux of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate out of recombinant cells was rapid with a half-life of less than 2 min. Further, the in vivo studies yielded clear images and quantitative data of mAlbhNIS-infected tumor xenografts using {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate and {gamma} camera. Conclusion: The current study demonstrates enhanced {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate uptake in hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo following tissue-specific gene transfer using a recombinant retrovirus with the albumin enhancer/promoter and the hNIS gene. It is feasible to monitor hNIS gene expression noninvasively and quantitatively using conventional {gamma} camera and {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate.

  12. Construction of a recombinant adenovirus co-expressing truncated human prostate-specific membrane antigen and mouse 4-1BBL genes and its effect on dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaodong Weng; Youlin Kuang; Xiuheng Liu; Zhiyuan Chen; Hengcheng Zhu; Hui Chen; Botao Jiang; Hao Shen

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to construct a recombinant adenovirus co-expressing truncated human prostate-specific membrane antigen (tPSMA) and mouse 4-1BBL genes and to determine its effect on dendritic cells (DCs) generated from bone marrow suspensions harvested from C57BL/6 mice for which the effect of 4-1BBL on DCs is not clear, especially during DCs processing tumor-associated antigen. Replication deficient adenovirus AdMaxTM Expression System was used to construct recombinant adenovirus Ad-tPSMA-interna...

  13. A putative Arabidopsis thaliana glycosyltransferase, At4g01220, which is closely related to three plant cell wall-specific xylosyltransferases, is differentially expressed spatially and temporally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangel, Jonatan U; Petersen, Bent L; Jensen, Niels B; Willats, William G T; Bacic, Antony; Egelund, Jack

    2011-03-01

    Plant cell wall polysaccharides are amongst the most complex, heterogeneous and abundant bio-molecules on earth. This makes the biosynthetic enzymes, namely the glycosyltransferases and polysaccharide synthases, important research targets in plant science and biotechnology. As an initial step to characterize At4g01220, a putative Arabidopsis thaliana encoding glycosyltransferases in CAZy GT-family-77 that is similar to three known xylosyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan II, we conducted an expression analysis. In transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants containing a fusion between the At4g01220 promoter and the gusA reporter gene we found the expression to be spatially and developmentally regulated. Analysis of Nicotiana benthamiana transfected with the At2g01220::YFP fusion protein revealed that the fusion protein resided in a Brefeldin A-sensitive compartment consistent with a sub-cellular location in the Golgi apparatus. In addition, in silico expression analysis from the Genevestigator database revealed that At4g01220 was up-regulated upon treatment with isoxaben, an inhibitor of cellulose synthesis, which, together with a co-expression analysis that identified a number of plant cell wall co-related biosynthetic genes, suggests involvement in cell wall biosynthesis with pectin being a prime candidate. The data presented provide insights into the expression, sub-cellular location and regulation of At4g01220 under various conditions and may help elucidate its specific function. PMID:21421394

  14. Heterologous expression of pathogen-specific genes ligA and ligB in the saprophyte Leptospira biflexa confers enhanced adhesion to cultured cells and fibronectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haake David A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparison to other bacterial pathogens, our knowledge of the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of leptospirosis is extremely limited. An improved understanding of leptospiral pathogenetic mechanisms requires reliable tools for functional genetic analysis. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig proteins are surface proteins found in pathogenic Leptospira, but not in saprophytes. Here, we describe a system for heterologous expression of the Leptospira interrogans genes ligA and ligB in the saprophyte Leptospira biflexa serovar Patoc. Results The genes encoding LigA and LigB under the control of a constitutive spirochaetal promoter were inserted into the L. biflexa replicative plasmid. We were able to demonstrate expression and surface localization of LigA and LigB in L. biflexa. We found that the expression of the lig genes significantly enhanced the ability of transformed L. biflexa to adhere in vitro to extracellular matrix components and cultured cells, suggesting the involvement of Lig proteins in cell adhesion. Conclusions This work reports a complete description of the system we have developed for heterologous expression of pathogen-specific proteins in the saprophytic L. biflexa. We show that expression of LigA and LigB proteins from the pathogen confers a virulence-associated phenotype on L. biflexa, namely adhesion to eukaryotic cells and fibronectin in vitro. This study indicates that L. biflexa can serve as a surrogate host to characterize the role of key virulence factors of the causative agent of leptospirosis.

  15. Control of mammary epithelial differentiation: basement membrane induces tissue-specific gene expression in the absence of cell-cell interaction and morphological polarity

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Functional differentiation in mammary epithelia requires specific hormones and local environmental signals. The latter are provided both by extracellular matrix and by communication with adjacent cells, their action being intricately connected in what appears to be a cascade of events leading to milk production. To distinguish between the influence of basement membrane and that of cell-cell contact in this process, we developed a novel suspension culture assay in which mammary epithelial cell...

  16. Cell-Specific Expression of Homospermidine Synthase, the Entry Enzyme of the Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Pathway in Senecio vernalis, in Comparison with Its Ancestor, Deoxyhypusine Synthase1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Stefanie; Anke, Sven; Kahmann, Uwe; Hänsch, Robert; Hartmann, Thomas; Ober, Dietrich

    2002-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are constitutive plant defense compounds with a sporadic taxonomic occurrence. The first committed step in PA biosynthesis is catalyzed by homospermidine synthase (HSS). Recent evidence confirmed that HSS evolved by gene duplication from deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS), an enzyme involved in the posttranslational activation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A. To better understand the evolutionary relationship between these two enzymes, which are involved in completely different biological processes, we studied their tissue-specific expression. RNA-blot analysis, reverse transcriptase-PCR, and immunolocalization techniques demonstrated that DHS is constitutively expressed in shoots and roots of Senecio vernalis (Asteraceae), whereas HSS expression is root specific and restricted to distinct groups of endodermis and neighboring cortex cells located opposite to the phloem. All efforts to detect DHS by immunolocalization failed, but studies with promoter-β-glucuronidase fusions confirmed a general expression pattern, at least in young seedlings of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The expression pattern for HSS differs completely from its ancestor DHS due to the adaptation of HSS to the specific requirements of PA biosynthesis. PMID:12226485

  17. Upregulation of cathepsin W-expressing T cells is specific for autoimmune atrophic gastritis compared to other types of chronic gastritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Doerthe Kuester; Michael Vieth; Ulrich Peitz; Stefan Kahl; Manfred Stolte; Albert Roessner; Ekkehard Weber; Peter Malfertheiner; Thomas Wex

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate a pathophysiological role of cathepsin W (CatW), a putative thiol-dependent cysteine protease,which is specifically expressed in cytotoxic lymphocytes,in different types of chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa.METHODS: Gastric and duodenal biopsies of patients with Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori)-associated active gastritis ( Hp,n = 19), chemically induced reactive gastritis (CG, n = 17),autoimmune atrophic gastritis (AIG, n = 20), lymphocytic corpus gastritis (LG, n = 29), celiac disease (CD, n = 10),and corresponding controls (n = 24) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for the expression of CatW and CD45. Furthermore, immunohistochemical double staining with anti-CD3 and anti-cathepsin was performed for the samples of AIG.RESULTS: Median values of CatW-expressing cells among CD45-positive immune cells were between 2% and 6% for normal gastric mucosa, CG, and LG, whereas the corresponding value was significantly increased for AIG (24.7%, P<0.001) and significantly decreased for HP (0.7%, P<0.05). Double staining with anti-CD3 and antiCatW antibodies revealed that >90% of CatW-expressing cells in gastric mucosa of AIG were T cells. Duodenal mucosa had significantly more CatW/CD45-positive cells than normal gastric mucosa (median: 17.8% vs 2%, P<0.01).The corresponding proportion of CatW/CD45-positive cells was decreased in CD compared to duodenal mucosa (median: 2.1% vs 17.8%, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: The opposite findings regarding the presence of CatW-positive cells in AIG (increase) and CD (decrease) reflects the different cellular composition of immune cells involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  18. Intrinsic properties of Tcf1 and Tcf4 splice variants determine cell-type-specific Wnt/β-catenin target gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Wallmen, Britta; Schrempp, Monika; Hecht, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    T-cell factor (Tcf)/lymphoid-enhancer factor (Lef) proteins are a structurally diverse family of deoxyribonucleic acid-binding proteins that have essential nuclear functions in Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Expression of Wnt/β-catenin target genes is highly dependent on context, but the precise role of Tcf/Lef family members in the generation and maintenance of cell-type-specific Wnt/β-catenin responses is unknown. Herein, we show that induction of a subset of Wnt/β-catenin targets in embryonic s...

  19. Human neutrophil elastase regulates the expression and secretion of elafin (elastase-specific inhibitor) in type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, P T; Marsden, M E; Cunningham, G A; Haslett, C; Sallenave, J M

    1999-08-20

    Elafin is a low molecular weight antiproteinase believed to be important in the regulation of elastase mediated tissue damage. The expression of elafin is known to be regulated by proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor but little was known regarding the effect of human neutrophil elastase (HNE). Employing a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter construct of the human elafin gene, reverse transcription PCR from total cellular RNA and ELISA techniques, we have examined the effect of human neutrophil elastase on the transcription and secretion of human elafin in the pulmonary epithelial A549 cell line. Stimulation with HNE at concentrations of 10(-10) and 10(-11) M resulted in a significant upregulation of elafin promoter activity. Similarly, transcription of the endogenous human elafin gene was upregulated with HNE concentrations ranging from 10(-10) to 10(-12) M. In addition, we demonstrate that stimulation with HNE at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) and 10(-12) M resulted in a significant reduction in the secreted elafin protein as measured in the cell supernatant. These results provide further evidence for a role of elafin in the regulation of HNE driven proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. PMID:10486558

  20. Co-introduced functional CCR2 potentiates in vivo anti-lung cancer functionality mediated by T cells double gene-modified to express WT1-specific T-cell receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Asai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although gene-modification of T cells to express tumor-related antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR has clinically proved promise, there still remains room to improve the clinical efficacy of re-directed T-cell based antitumor adoptive therapy. In order to achieve more objective clinical responses using ex vivo-expanded tumor-responsive T cells, the infused T cells need to show adequate localized infiltration into the tumor. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human lung cancer cells variously express a tumor antigen, Wilms' Tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and an inflammatory chemokine, CCL2. However, CCR2, the relevant receptor for CCL2, is rarely expressed on activated T-lymphocytes. A HLA-A2402(+ human lung cancer cell line, LK79, which expresses high amounts of both CCL2 and WT1 mRNA, was employed as a target. Normal CD8(+ T cells were retrovirally gene-modified to express both CCR2 and HLA-A*2402-restricted and WT1(235-243 nonapeptide-specific TCR as an effector. Anti-tumor functionality mediated by these effector cells against LK79 cells was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. Finally the impact of CCL2 on WT1 epitope-responsive TCR signaling mediated by the effector cells was studied. Introduced CCR2 was functionally validated using gene-modified Jurkat cells and human CD3(+ T cells both in vitro and in vivo. Double gene-modified CD3(+ T cells successfully demonstrated both CCL2-tropic tumor trafficking and cytocidal reactivity against LK79 cells in vitro and in vivo. CCL2 augmented the WT1 epitope-responsive TCR signaling shown by relevant luciferase production in double gene-modified Jurkat/MA cells to express luciferase and WT1-specific TCR, and CCL2 also dose-dependently augmented WT1 epitope-responsive IFN-γ production and CD107a expression mediated by these double gene-modified CD3(+ T cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Introduction of the CCL2/CCR2 axis successfully potentiated in

  1. Dimorphic ovary differentiation in honeybee (Apis mellifera larvae involves caste-specific expression of homologs of ark and buffy cell death genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pires Dallacqua

    Full Text Available The establishment of the number of repeated structural units, the ovarioles, in the ovaries is one of the critical events that shape caste polyphenism in social insects. In early postembryonic development, honeybee (Apis mellifera larvae have a pair of ovaries, each one consisting of almost two hundred ovariole primordia. While practically all these ovarioles continue developing in queen-destined larvae, they undergo massive programmed cell death (PCD in worker-destined larvae. So as to gain insight into the molecular basis of this fundamental process in caste differentiation we used quantitative PCR (qPCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH to investigate the expression of the Amark and Ambuffy genes in the ovaries of the two honeybee castes throughout the fifth larval instar. These are the homologs of ark and buffy Drosophila melanogaster genes, respectively, involved in activating and inhibiting PCD. Caste-specific expression patterns were found during this time-window defining ovariole number. Amark transcript levels were increased when ovariole resorption was intensified in workers, but remained at low levels in queen ovaries. The transcripts were mainly localized at the apical end of all the worker ovarioles, but appeared in only a few queen ovarioles, thus strongly suggesting a function in mediating massive ovariolar cell death in worker larvae. Ambuffy was mainly expressed in the peritoneal sheath cells covering each ovariole. The levels of Ambuffy transcripts increased earlier in the developing ovaries of queens than in workers. Consistent with a protective role against cell death, Ambuffy transcripts were localized in practically all queen ovarioles, but only in few worker ovarioles. The results are indicative of a functional relationship between the expression of evolutionary conserved cell death genes and the morphological events leading to caste-specific ovary differentiation in a social insect.

  2. Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Patterns.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Tolic, Ana; Xie, Yumei; Lai, Xianyin; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Waters, Katrina M.; Holian, Andrij; Witzmann, Frank A.; Orr, Galya

    2014-08-01

    The growing use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in commercial and medical applications raises the urgent need for tools that can predict NP toxicity. Global transcriptome and proteome analyses were conducted on three human cell types, exposed to two high aspect ratio NP types, to identify patterns of expression that might indicate high versus low NP toxicity. Three cell types representing the most common routes of human exposure to NPs, including macrophage-like (THP-1), small airway epithelial and intestinal (Caco-2/HT29-MTX) cells, were exposed to TiO2 nanobelts (TiO2-NB; high toxicity) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT; low toxicity) at low (10 µg/mL) and high (100 µg/mL) concentrations for 1 and 24 h. Unique patterns of gene and protein expressions were identified for each cell type, with no differentially expressed (p < 0.05, 1.5-fold change) genes or proteins overlapping across all three cell types. While unique to each cell type, the early response was primarily independent of NP type, showing similar expression patterns in response to both TiO2-NB and MWCNT. The early response might, therefore, indicate a general response to insult. In contrast, the 24 h response was unique to each NP type. The most significantly (p < 0.05) enriched biological processes in THP-1 cells indicated TiO2-NB regulation of pathways associated with inflammation, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA replication stress and genomic instability, while MWCNT-regulated pathways indicated increased cell proliferation, DNA repair and anti-apoptosis. These two distinct sets of biological pathways might, therefore, underlie cellular responses to high and low NP toxicity, respectively.

  3. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Choudhury, Mayukh; Stoica, Ana; Di Cristo, Graziella; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X) that were found in a cohort of French Canadian families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1−/− GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D) induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  4. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Choudhury, Mayukh; Stoica, Ana; Di Cristo, Graziella; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X) that were found in a cohort of French Canadian families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1 (flox/flox) mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1 (-/-) GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D) induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  5. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Lachance-Touchette

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X that were found in a cohort of families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1-/- GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  6. Multiple POU-binding motifs, recognized by tissue-specific nuclear factors, are important for Dll1 gene expression in neural stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We cloned the 5'-flanking region of the mouse homolog of the Delta gene (Dll1) and demonstrated that the sequence between nucleotide position -514 and -484 in the 5'-flanking region of Dll1 played a critical role in the regulation of its tissue-specific expression in neural stem cells (NSCs). Further, we showed that multiple POU-binding motifs, located within this short sequence of 30 bp, were essential for transcriptional activation of Dll1 and also that multiple tissue-specific nuclear factors recognized these POU-binding motifs in various combinations through differentiation of NSCs. Thus, POU-binding factors may play an important role in Dll1 expression in developing NSCs

  7. Self-recognition specificity expressed by T cells from nude mice. Absence of detectable Ia-restricted T cells in nude mice that do exhibit self-K/D-restricted T cell responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence in athymic nude mice of precursor T cells with self-recognition specificity for either H-2 K/D or H-2 I region determinants was investigated. Chimeras were constructed of lethally irradiated parental mice receiving a mixture of F1 nude mouse (6-8 wk old) spleen and bone marrow cells. The donor inoculum was deliberately not subjected to any T cell depletion procedure, so that any potential major histocompatibility complex-committed precursor T cells were allowed to differentiate and expand in the normal parental recipients. 3 mo after reconstitution, the chimeras were immunized with several protein antigens in complete Freund's adjuvant in the footpads and their purified draining lymph node T cells tested 10 d later for ability to recognize antigen on antigen-presenting cells of either parental haplotype. Also, their spleen and lymph node cells were tested for ability to generate a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified stimulator cells of either parental haplotype. It was demonstrated that T cell proliferative responses of these F1(nude)----parent chimeras were restricted solely to recognizing parental host I region determinants as self and expressed the Ir gene phenotype of the host. In contrast, CTL responses could be generated (in the presence of interleukin 2) to TNP-modified stimulator cells of either parental haplotype. Thus these results indicate that nude mice which do have CTL with self-specificity for K/D region determinants lack proliferating T cells with self-specificity for I region determinants. These results provide evidence for the concepts that development of the I region-restricted T cell repertoire is strictly an intrathymically determined event and that young nude mice lack the unique thymic elements responsible for education of I region-restricted T cells

  8. Expression of RNA interference triggers from an oncolytic herpes simplex virus results in specific silencing in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to tumours remains a major obstacle for the development of RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutics. Following the promising pre-clinical and clinical results with the oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) OncoVEXGM-CSF, we aimed to express RNAi triggers from oncolytic HSV, which although has the potential to improve treatment by silencing tumour-related genes, was not considered possible due to the highly oncolytic properties of HSV. To evaluate RNAi-mediated silencing from an oncolytic HSV backbone, we developed novel replicating HSV vectors expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) or artificial microRNA (miRNA) against the reporter genes green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and β-galactosidase (lacZ). These vectors were tested in non-tumour cell lines in vitro and tumour cells that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection both in vitro and in mice xenografts in vivo. Silencing was assessed at the protein level by fluorescent microscopy, x-gal staining, enzyme activity assay, and western blotting. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to express shRNA and artificial miRNA from an oncolytic HSV backbone, which had not been previously investigated. Furthermore, oncolytic HSV-mediated delivery of RNAi triggers resulted in effective and specific silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo, with the viruses expressing artificial miRNA being comprehensibly more effective. This preliminary data provide the first demonstration of oncolytic HSV-mediated expression of shRNA or artificial miRNA and silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. The vectors developed in this study are being adapted to silence tumour-related genes in an ongoing study that aims to improve the effectiveness of oncolytic HSV treatment in tumours that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection and thus, potentially improve response rates seen in human clinical trials

  9. Expansins are among plant cell wall modifying agents specifically expressed during development of nematode-induced syncytia

    OpenAIRE

    Fudali, Sylwia; Sobczak, Miroslaw; Janakowski, Slawomir; Griesser, Michaela; Grundler, Florian MW; Golinowski, Wladyslaw

    2008-01-01

    Cyst nematodes are economically important pests. As obligatory biotrophic endoparasites they invade host roots and induce formation of syncytia, structures that serve them as the only source of nutrients. During syncytium development, extensive cell wall modifications take place. Cell wall dissolution occurs during cell wall opening formation, cell walls expand during hypertrophy of syncytial elements and local cell wall synthesis leads to the thickening of syncytial cell wall and the formati...

  10. Identification of an intestine-specific promoter and inducible expression of bacterial α-galactosidase in mammalian cells by a lac operon system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Feng Zhai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background α-galactosidase has been widely used in animal husbandry to reduce anti-nutritional factors (such as α-galactoside in feed. Intestine-specific and substrate inducible expression of α-galactosidase would be highly beneficial for transgenic animal production. Methods To achieve the intestine-specific and substrate inducible expression of α-galactosidase, we first identified intestine-specific promoters by comparing the transcriptional activity and tissue specificity of four intestine-specific promoters from human intestinal fatty acid binding protein, rat intestinal fatty acid binding protein, human mucin-2 and human lysozyme. We made two chimeric constructs combining the promoter and enhancer of human mucin-2, rat intestinal trefoil factor and human sucrase-isomaltase. Then a modified lac operon system was constructed to investigate the induction of α-galactosidase expression and enzyme activity by isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG and an α-galactosidase substrate, α-lactose. We declared that the research carried out on human (Zhai Yafeng was in compliance with the Helsinki Declaration, and experimental research on animals also followed internationally recognized guidelines. Results The activity of the human mucin-2 promoter was about 2 to 3 times higher than that of other intestine-specific promoters. In the lac operon system, the repressor significantly decreased (P P Conclusions We have successfully constructed a high specificity inducible lac operon system in an intestine-derived cell line, which could be of great value for gene therapy applications and transgenic animal production.

  11. Insect-cell expression, crystallization and X-ray data collection of the bradyzoite-specific antigen BSR4 from Toxoplasma gondii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the bradyzoite-specific surface antigen BSR4 from T. gondii are described. Toxoplasma gondii is an important global pathogen that infects nearly one third of the world’s adult population. A family of developmentally expressed structurally related surface-glycoprotein adhesins (SRSs) mediate attachment to and are utilized for entry into host cells. The latent bradyzoite form of T. gondii persists for the life of the host and expresses a distinct family of SRS proteins, of which the bradyzoite-specific antigen BSR4 is a prototypical member. Structural studies of BSR4 were initiated by first recombinantly expressing BSR4 in insect cells, which was followed by crystallization and preliminary X-ray data collection to 1.95 Å resolution. Data processing showed that BSR4 crystallized with one molecule in the asymmetric unit of the P41212 or P43212 space group, with a solvent content of 60% and a corresponding Matthews coefficient of 2.98 Å3 Da−1

  12. Insect-cell expression, crystallization and X-ray data collection of the bradyzoite-specific antigen BSR4 from Toxoplasma gondii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grujic, Ognjen [Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, PO Box 3055 STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada); Grigg, Michael E. [Molecular Parasitology Unit, Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 4 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Boulanger, Martin J., E-mail: mboulang@uvic.ca [Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, PO Box 3055 STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2008-05-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the bradyzoite-specific surface antigen BSR4 from T. gondii are described. Toxoplasma gondii is an important global pathogen that infects nearly one third of the world’s adult population. A family of developmentally expressed structurally related surface-glycoprotein adhesins (SRSs) mediate attachment to and are utilized for entry into host cells. The latent bradyzoite form of T. gondii persists for the life of the host and expresses a distinct family of SRS proteins, of which the bradyzoite-specific antigen BSR4 is a prototypical member. Structural studies of BSR4 were initiated by first recombinantly expressing BSR4 in insect cells, which was followed by crystallization and preliminary X-ray data collection to 1.95 Å resolution. Data processing showed that BSR4 crystallized with one molecule in the asymmetric unit of the P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 space group, with a solvent content of 60% and a corresponding Matthews coefficient of 2.98 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}.

  13. IL-2 and IL-15 Each Mediate De Novo Induction of FOXP3 Expression in Human Tumor Antigen-specific CD8 T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadzadeh, Mojgan; Antony, Paul A.; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2007-01-01

    Although FOXP3 is primarily expressed by regulatory CD4 T cells (Treg) in vivo, polyclonal activation of human CD8 T cells can result in the expression of FOXP3 in a fraction of CD8 T cells. However, the cellular lineage and mechanism of FOXP3 induction in CD8 T cells remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that interleukin-2 (IL-2) induces FOXP3 expression in OKT3-stimulated or antigen-stimulated CD8 T cells, indicating that FOXP3 expression is neither limited to a unique subset of CD8 T cells ...

  14. Enhanced Yield of Recombinant Proteins with Site-specifically Incorporated Unnatural Amino Acids Using a Cell-Free Expression System

    OpenAIRE

    Smolskaya, Sviatlana; Zhang, Zhiwen Jonathan; Alfonta, Lital

    2013-01-01

    Using a commercial protein expression system, we sought the crucial elements and conditions for the expression of proteins with genetically encoded unnatural amino acids. By identifying the most important translational components, we were able to increase suppression efficiency to 55% and to increase mutant protein yields to levels higher than achieved with wild type expression (120%), reaching over 500 µg/mL of translated protein (comprising 25 µg in 50 µL of reaction mixture). To our knowle...

  15. The effects of human TSH receptor gene transfection on iodide uptake and thyroid-specific gene expression in poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the changes of iodide uptake and the expression of thyroid-specific genes in poorly differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) cells after transfection of human TSH receptor (hTSHR) gene in vitro. Methods: The recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid PcDNA3.1/hTSHR-cDNA was transformed into DH5a bacterial for amplification and then the recombinant plasmid was extracted. The recombinant was identified with PCR amplifying, restriction enzyme digestion analysis and DNA sequencing. The recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1/hTSHR was transfected into FTC-133 cell line by lipofectin method in vitro. Immunofluorescence, iodide uptake studies and real time-PCR were applied to detect target protein expression. Statistical analysis was performed with t-test using SPSS 13.0 software. Results: Kpn I and Xba I restriction enzyme digestion, PCR amplifying and DNA sequencing confirmed that pcDNA3.1/hTSHR was successfully constructed. After transfection of the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1/hTSHR-cDNA and the stimulation of hTSH, the tumor cells displayed the expression of hTSHR protein at cell surface and cytoplasm. The iodine uptake in pcDNA3.1/hTSHR transfected cells was 2.9 times higher than that of control(pcDNA3.1(+) transfected cells) group(t = 28.63, P<0.01). The expression of TSHR, NIS, TPO and Tg (mRNA levels) in pcDNA3.1/hTSHR transfected cells were also significantly elevated by 1.74 (t =5.959, P<0.01), 7.2 (t =3.807, P<0.05), 2.88 (t=4.769, P<0.01) and 2.67 times (t=6.388, P<0.01) respectively compared to those of the control group. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that iodide uptake may be reactivated by hTSHR receptor gene transfection in poorly differentiated FTC cell. (authors)

  16. Differences in the expressed HLA class I alleles effect the differential clustering of HIV type 1-specific T cell responses in infected Chinese and Caucasians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu,XG; Addo,MM; Perkins,BA; Wej,FL; Rathod,A; Geer,SC; Parta,M; Cohen,D; Stone,DR; Russell,CJ; Tanzi,G; Mei,S; Wureel,AG; Frahm,N; Lichterfeld,M; Heath,L; Mullins,JI; Marincola,F; Goulder,PJR; Brander,C; Allen,T; Cao,YZ; Walker,BD; Altfeld,M

    2005-01-01

    China is a region of the world with a rapidly spreading HIV-1 epidemic. Studies providing insights into HIV-1 pathogenesis in infected Chinese are urgently needed to support the design and testing of an effective HIV-1 vaccine for this population. HIV-1-specific T cell responses were characterized in 32 HIV-1-infected individuals of Chinese origin and compared to 34 infected caucasians using 410 overlapping peptides spanning the entire HIV-1 clade B consensus sequence in an IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. All HIV-1 proteins were targeted with similar frequency in both populations and all study subjects recognized at least one overlapping peptide. HIV-1-specific T cell responses clustered in seven different regions of the HIV-1 genome in the Chinese cohort and in nine different regions in the caucasian cohort. The dominant HLA class I alleles expressed in the two populations differed significantly, and differences in epitope clustering pattern were shown to be influenced by differences in class I alleles that restrict immunodominant epitopes. These studies demonstrate that the clustering of HIV-1-specific T cell responses is influenced by the genetic HLA class I background in the study populations. The design and testing of candidate vaccines to fight the rapidly growing HIV-1 epidemic must therefore take the HLA genetics of the population into account as specific regions of the virus can be expected to be differentially targeted in ethnically diverse populations.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of the mouse lung transcriptome reveals novel molecular gene interaction networks and cell-specific expression signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Robert W

    2011-05-01

    450 transcript had a strong trans-acting eQTL (LOD 11.8 on Chr 12 at 36 ± 1 Mb. This interval contains the transcription factor Ahr that has a critical mis-sense allele in the DBA/2J haplotype and evidently modulates transcriptional activation by AhR. Conclusions Large-scale gene expression analyses in genetic reference populations revealed lung-specific and immune-cell gene expression profiles and suggested specific gene regulatory interactions.

  18. Expression of S-adenosylmethionine Hydrolase in Tissues Synthesizing Secondary Cell Walls Alters Specific Methylated Cell Wall Fractions and Improves Biomass Digestibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudes, Aymerick; Zhao, Nanxia; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Lao, Jeemeng; Wang, George; Yogiswara, Sasha; Lee, Taek Soon; Singh, Seema; Mortimer, Jenny C.; Keasling, Jay D.; Simmons, Blake A.; Loqué, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Plant biomass is a large source of fermentable sugars for the synthesis of bioproducts using engineered microbes. These sugars are stored as cell wall polymers, mainly cellulose and hemicellulose, and are embedded with lignin, which makes their enzymatic hydrolysis challenging. One of the strategies to reduce cell wall recalcitrance is the modification of lignin content and composition. Lignin is a phenolic polymer of methylated aromatic alcohols and its synthesis in tissues developing secondary cell walls is a significant sink for the consumption of the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). In this study, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis stems that targeted expression of AdoMet hydrolase (AdoMetase, E.C. 3.3.1.2) in secondary cell wall synthesizing tissues reduces the AdoMet pool and impacts lignin content and composition. In particular, both NMR analysis and pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry of lignin in engineered biomass showed relative enrichment of non-methylated p-hydroxycinnamyl (H) units and a reduction of dimethylated syringyl (S) units. This indicates a lower degree of methylation compared to that in wild-type lignin. Quantification of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates revealed a reduction of ferulate in AdoMetase transgenic lines. Biomass from transgenic lines, in contrast to that in control plants, exhibits an enrichment of glucose content and a reduction in the degree of hemicellulose glucuronoxylan methylation. We also show that these modifications resulted in a reduction of cell wall recalcitrance, because sugar yield generated by enzymatic biomass saccharification was greater than that of wild-type plants. Considering that transgenic plants show no important diminution of biomass yields, and that heterologous expression of AdoMetase protein can be spatiotemporally optimized, this novel approach provides a valuable option for the improvement of lignocellulosic biomass feedstock. PMID:27486577

  19. Expression of S-adenosylmethionine Hydrolase in Tissues Synthesizing Secondary Cell Walls Alters Specific Methylated Cell Wall Fractions and Improves Biomass Digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudes, Aymerick; Zhao, Nanxia; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Baidoo, Edward E K; Lao, Jeemeng; Wang, George; Yogiswara, Sasha; Lee, Taek Soon; Singh, Seema; Mortimer, Jenny C; Keasling, Jay D; Simmons, Blake A; Loqué, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Plant biomass is a large source of fermentable sugars for the synthesis of bioproducts using engineered microbes. These sugars are stored as cell wall polymers, mainly cellulose and hemicellulose, and are embedded with lignin, which makes their enzymatic hydrolysis challenging. One of the strategies to reduce cell wall recalcitrance is the modification of lignin content and composition. Lignin is a phenolic polymer of methylated aromatic alcohols and its synthesis in tissues developing secondary cell walls is a significant sink for the consumption of the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). In this study, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis stems that targeted expression of AdoMet hydrolase (AdoMetase, E.C. 3.3.1.2) in secondary cell wall synthesizing tissues reduces the AdoMet pool and impacts lignin content and composition. In particular, both NMR analysis and pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry of lignin in engineered biomass showed relative enrichment of non-methylated p-hydroxycinnamyl (H) units and a reduction of dimethylated syringyl (S) units. This indicates a lower degree of methylation compared to that in wild-type lignin. Quantification of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates revealed a reduction of ferulate in AdoMetase transgenic lines. Biomass from transgenic lines, in contrast to that in control plants, exhibits an enrichment of glucose content and a reduction in the degree of hemicellulose glucuronoxylan methylation. We also show that these modifications resulted in a reduction of cell wall recalcitrance, because sugar yield generated by enzymatic biomass saccharification was greater than that of wild-type plants. Considering that transgenic plants show no important diminution of biomass yields, and that heterologous expression of AdoMetase protein can be spatiotemporally optimized, this novel approach provides a valuable option for the improvement of lignocellulosic biomass feedstock. PMID:27486577

  20. A Specific Nutrient Combination Attenuates the Reduced Expression of PSD-95 in the Proximal Dendrites of Hippocampal Cell Body Layers in a Mouse Model of Phenylketonuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibeke M. Bruinenberg

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The inherited metabolic disease phenylketonuria (PKU is characterized by increased concentrations of phenylalanine in the blood and brain, and as a consequence neurotransmitter metabolism, white matter, and synapse functioning are affected. A specific nutrient combination (SNC has been shown to improve synapse formation, morphology and function. This could become an interesting new nutritional approach for PKU. To assess whether treatment with SNC can affect synapses, we treated PKU mice with SNC or an isocaloric control diet and wild-type (WT mice with an isocaloric control for 12 weeks, starting at postnatal day 31. Immunostaining for post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95, a post-synaptic density marker, was carried out in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex. Compared to WT mice on normal chow without SNC, PKU mice on the isocaloric control showed a significant reduction in PSD-95 expression in the hippocampus, specifically in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, with a similar trend seen in the cornus ammonis 1 (CA1 and cornus ammonis 3 (CA3 pyramidal cell layer. No differences were found in the striatum or prefrontal cortex. PKU mice on a diet supplemented with SNC showed improved expression of PSD-95 in the hippocampus. This study gives the first indication that SNC supplementation has a positive effect on hippocampal synaptic deficits in PKU mice.

  1. A Specific Nutrient Combination Attenuates the Reduced Expression of PSD-95 in the Proximal Dendrites of Hippocampal Cell Body Layers in a Mouse Model of Phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinenberg, Vibeke M; van Vliet, Danique; Attali, Amos; de Wilde, Martijn C; Kuhn, Mirjam; van Spronsen, Francjan J; van der Zee, Eddy A

    2016-01-01

    The inherited metabolic disease phenylketonuria (PKU) is characterized by increased concentrations of phenylalanine in the blood and brain, and as a consequence neurotransmitter metabolism, white matter, and synapse functioning are affected. A specific nutrient combination (SNC) has been shown to improve synapse formation, morphology and function. This could become an interesting new nutritional approach for PKU. To assess whether treatment with SNC can affect synapses, we treated PKU mice with SNC or an isocaloric control diet and wild-type (WT) mice with an isocaloric control for 12 weeks, starting at postnatal day 31. Immunostaining for post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), a post-synaptic density marker, was carried out in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex. Compared to WT mice on normal chow without SNC, PKU mice on the isocaloric control showed a significant reduction in PSD-95 expression in the hippocampus, specifically in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, with a similar trend seen in the cornus ammonis 1 (CA1) and cornus ammonis 3 (CA3) pyramidal cell layer. No differences were found in the striatum or prefrontal cortex. PKU mice on a diet supplemented with SNC showed improved expression of PSD-95 in the hippocampus. This study gives the first indication that SNC supplementation has a positive effect on hippocampal synaptic deficits in PKU mice. PMID:27102170

  2. Regional and cell-type-specific effects of DAMGO on striatal D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-expressing medium-sized spiny neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Evans

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The striatum can be divided into the DLS (dorsolateral striatum and the VMS (ventromedial striatum, which includes NAcC (nucleus accumbens core and NAcS (nucleus accumbens shell. Here, we examined differences in electrophysiological properties of MSSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons based on their location, expression of DA (dopamine D1/D2 receptors and responses to the μ-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO {[D-Ala2-MePhe4-Gly(ol5]enkephalin}. The main differences in morphological and biophysical membrane properties occurred among striatal sub-regions. MSSNs in the DLS were larger, had higher membrane capacitances and lower Rin (input resistances compared with cells in the VMS. RMPs (resting membrane potentials were similar among regions except for D2 cells in the NAcC, which displayed a significantly more depolarized RMP. In contrast, differences in frequency of spontaneous excitatory synaptic inputs were more prominent between cell types, with D2 cells receiving significantly more excitatory inputs than D1 cells, particularly in the VMS. Inhibitory inputs were not different between D1 and D2 cells. However, MSSNs in the VMS received more inhibitory inputs than those in the DLS. Acute application of DAMGO reduced the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents, but the effect was greater in the VMS, in particular in the NAcS, where excitatory currents from D2 cells and inhibitory currents from D1 cells were inhibited by the largest amount. DAMGO also increased cellular excitability in the VMS, as shown by reduced threshold for evoking APs (action potentials. Together the present findings help elucidate the regional and cell-type-specific substrate of opioid actions in the striatum and point to the VMS as a critical mediator of DAMGO effects.

  3. Cell-specific detection of microRNA expression during cardiomyogenesis by combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Mikael; Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Silahtaroglu, Asli;

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by mediating translational repression or mRNA degradation of their targets, and several miRNAs control developmental decisions through embryogenesis. In the developing heart, miRNA targets comprise key players mediating cardiac lineage determination. Ho...

  4. Mushroom Bodies of the Honeybee Brain Show Cell Population-Specific Plasticity in Expression of Amine-Receptor Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, H. James; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Mercer, Alison R.

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine and octopamine released in the mushroom bodies of the insect brain play a critical role in the formation of aversive and appetitive memories, respectively. As recent evidence suggests a complex relationship between the effects of these two amines on the output of mushroom body circuits, we compared the expression of dopamine- and…

  5. New Strategies for Designing Inexpensive but Selective Bioadsorbants for Environmental Pollutants: Selection of specific Ligands and Their Cell Surface Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent L. Iverson; George Georgiou; Mohammad M. Ataai; Richard R. Koepsel

    2001-02-22

    The Broad, long term objective of the research plan is to develop exquisitely selective polypeptide metal chelators for the remediation of aqueous systems. A variety of polypeptide chelators will be developed and optimized ranging from antibodies to small peptides. Then, through unique molecular engineering approaches developed in our laboratories, the polypeptide chelators will be anchored directly on the surface of the cells that produce them. Thus, instead of using isolated biomolecules we will employ inexpensive genetically engineered whole cell adsorbents. Following a simple, easily scaleable treatment, the engineered cells can be used to manufacture an inexpensive, particulate adsorbent for metal removal.

  6. Enhanced expression of hepatocyte-specific microRNAs in valproic acid mediated hepatic trans-differentiation of human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Akshata; Khanna, Aparna

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the control of cell fate determination during differentiation. In this study, we analyzed the expression pattern of microRNAs (miRNAs) during hepatic trans-differentiation. The protocol employed the use of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), valproic acid (VPA) to induce hepatic trans-differentiation of human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs). The differentiated hepatocyte like cells (HLCs) from hUC-MSCs shared typical characteristics with mature hepatocytes, including morphology, expression of hepatocyte -specific genes at the molecular and cellular level. Moreover, the functionality of HLCs was confirmed through various liver function tests such as periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain for glycogen accumulation, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for synthesis of albumin and release of urea. The aim of the present work was to examine the effect of VPA treatment on miRNA expression during hepatic trans-differentiation. The analysis at miRNA level showed that there was a significant increase in expression of miRNAs involved in hepatic differentiation, due to VPA pre-treatment during differentiation. The study, thus demonstrated that improved expression of hepatocyte-specific miRNAs, miR-23b cluster (miR-27b-3p, miR-24-1-5p and miR-23b-3p), miR-30a-5p, miR-26a-5p, miR-148a-3p, miR-192-5p, miR-122-5p due to VPA pre-treatment contributed to a more efficient hepatic trans-differentiation from hUC-MSCs. The putative targets of these upregulated miRNAs were predicted using Bioinformatics analysis. Finally, miR-122-5p, highly upregulated miRNA during hepatic differentiation, was selected for target verification studies. Thus, this study also provides the basis for the function of miR-122-5p during hepatic differentiation of hUC-MSCs. PMID:27001466

  7. Strain-specific Plasmodium falciparum multifunctional CD4(+) T cell cytokine expression in Malian children immunized with the FMP2.1/AS02A vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Shawna F; Kouriba, Bourema; Diarra, Issa; Daou, Modibo; Niangaly, Amadou; Coulibaly, Drissa; Keita, Yamoussa; Laurens, Matthew B; Berry, Andrea A; Vekemans, Johan; Ripley Ballou, W; Lanar, David E; Dutta, Sheetij; Gray Heppner, D; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter L; Thera, Mahamadou A; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Plowe, Christopher V; Sztein, Marcelo B; Lyke, Kirsten E

    2016-05-17

    Based on Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from strain 3D7, the malaria vaccine candidate FMP2.1/AS02A showed strain-specific efficacy in a Phase 2 clinical trial in 400 Malian children randomized to 3 doses of the AMA1 vaccine candidate or control rabies vaccine on days 0, 30 and 60. A subset of 10 Pf(-) (i.e., no clinical malaria episodes) AMA1 recipients, 11 Pf(+) (clinical malaria episodes with parasites with 3D7 or Fab9-type AMA1 cluster 1 loop [c1L]) AMA1 recipients, and 10 controls were randomly chosen for analysis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated on days 0, 90 and 150 were stimulated with full-length 3D7 AMA1 and c1L from strains 3D7 (c3D7) and Fab9 (cFab9). Production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and/or IL-17A was analyzed by flow cytometry. Among AMA1 recipients, 18/21 evaluable samples stimulated with AMA1 demonstrated increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 derived from CD4(+) T cells by day 150 compared to 0/10 in the control group (pvaccines, CD4(+) cells expressing both TNF-α and IL-2 were increased in Pf(-) children compared to Pf(+) children. When PBMCs were stimulated with c3D7 and cFab9 separately, 4/18 AMA1 recipients with an AMA1-specific CD4(+) response had a significant response to one or both c1L. This suggests that recognition of the AMA1 antigen is not dependent upon c1L alone. In summary, AMA1-specific T cell responses were notably increased in children immunized with an AMA1-based vaccine candidate. The role of CD4(+)TNF-α(+)IL-2(+)-expressing T cells in vaccine-induced strain-specific protection against clinical malaria requires further exploration. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00460525. PMID:27087149

  8. N- and C-terminal isoforms of Arg quantified by real-time PCR are specifically expressed in human normal and neoplastic cells, in neoplastic cell lines, and in HL-60 cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, Roberto A; Corizzato, Matteo; Bianchi, Cristina; Eroini, Barbara; Bosari, Silvano

    2005-04-01

    The human ABL2 (or ARG) gene codes for a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase is involved in translocation with the ETV6 gene in human leukemia and has an altered expression in several human carcinomas. Two isoforms of Arg with different N-termini (1A and 1B) have been described. The C-terminal domain of Arg contains two F-actin-binding sequences that perform a number of actions related to cell morphology and motility by interacting with actin filaments. We have identified different-sized specific cDNAs in hematopoietic, epithelial, nervous, and fibroblastic cells by means of the reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of human Arg mRNA. Some of these cDNAs showed an adjunctive alternative splice event involving the 63 bp sequence of exon II, thus leading to four cDNA types with different N-termini: 1A long and short, and 1B long and short. Other cDNAs lacked a 309 bp sequence in the last exon involving one of the C-terminal F-actin binding domains, thus giving rise to two cDNA types: C-termini long and short. Quantified by real-time PCR-quantitative RT-PCR-these Arg transcript isoforms have specific expression patterns not only in different normal and tumor cell types, but also during cell differentiation and growth arrest. These isoforms maintained the open reading frames, and eight putative proteins were predicted. The different C-termini isoforms seem to retain the same quantitative reciprocal ratio of their respective transcripts. The Arg protein isoforms with different C-terminal actin-binding domains and different N-termini might have specific cellular localizations/concentrations, and differently regulated catalytic activity with different implications in normal and neoplastic cells. PMID:15765532

  9. The specificity of long noncoding RNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloss, Brian S; Dinger, Marcel E

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as a fundamental molecular class whose members play pivotal roles in the regulation of the genome. The observation of pervasive transcription of mammalian genomes in the early 2000s sparked a revolution in the understanding of information flow in eukaryotic cells and the incredible flexibility and dynamic nature of the transcriptome. As a molecular class, distinct loci yielding lncRNAs are set to outnumber those yielding mRNAs. However, like many important discoveries, the road leading to uncovering this diverse class of molecules that act through a remarkable repertoire of mechanisms, was not a straight one. The same characteristic that most distinguishes lncRNAs from mRNAs, i.e. their developmental-stage, tissue-, and cell-specific expression, was one of the major impediments to their discovery and recognition as potentially functional regulatory molecules. With growing numbers of lncRNAs being assigned to biological functions, the specificity of lncRNA expression is now increasingly recognized as a characteristic that imbues lncRNAs with great potential as biomarkers and for the development of highly targeted therapeutics. Here we review the history of lncRNA research and how technological advances and insight into biological complexity have gone hand-in-hand in shaping this revolution. We anticipate that as increasing numbers of these molecules, often described as the dark matter of the genome, are characterized and the structure-function relationship of lncRNAs becomes better understood, it may ultimately be feasible to decipher what these non-(protein)-coding genes encode. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. PMID:26297315

  10. Poly(A)-specific ribonuclease and Nocturnin in squamous cell lung cancer: prognostic value and impact on gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Maragozidis, Panagiotis; Papanastasi, Eirini; Scutelnic, Diana; Totomi, Athina; Kokkori, Ioanna; Zarogiannis, Sotirios G.; Kerenidi, Theodora; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Balatsos, Nikolaos A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide, mainly due to late diagnosis, poor prognosis and tumor heterogeneity. Thus, the need for biomarkers that will aid classification, treatment and monitoring remains intense and challenging and depends on the better understanding of the tumor pathobiology and underlying mechanisms. The deregulation of gene expression is a hallmark of cancer and a critical parameter is the stability of mRNAs that may lead to increased onco...

  11. Expression of RNA interference triggers from an oncolytic herpes simplex virus results in specific silencing in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anesti Anna-Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA to tumours remains a major obstacle for the development of RNA interference (RNAi-based therapeutics. Following the promising pre-clinical and clinical results with the oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV OncoVEXGM-CSF, we aimed to express RNAi triggers from oncolytic HSV, which although has the potential to improve treatment by silencing tumour-related genes, was not considered possible due to the highly oncolytic properties of HSV. Methods To evaluate RNAi-mediated silencing from an oncolytic HSV backbone, we developed novel replicating HSV vectors expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA or artificial microRNA (miRNA against the reporter genes green fluorescent protein (eGFP and β-galactosidase (lacZ. These vectors were tested in non-tumour cell lines in vitro and tumour cells that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection both in vitro and in mice xenografts in vivo. Silencing was assessed at the protein level by fluorescent microscopy, x-gal staining, enzyme activity assay, and western blotting. Results Our results demonstrate that it is possible to express shRNA and artificial miRNA from an oncolytic HSV backbone, which had not been previously investigated. Furthermore, oncolytic HSV-mediated delivery of RNAi triggers resulted in effective and specific silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo, with the viruses expressing artificial miRNA being comprehensibly more effective. Conclusions This preliminary data provide the first demonstration of oncolytic HSV-mediated expression of shRNA or artificial miRNA and silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. The vectors developed in this study are being adapted to silence tumour-related genes in an ongoing study that aims to improve the effectiveness of oncolytic HSV treatment in tumours that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection and thus, potentially improve response rates seen

  12. Growth phase-dependent expression of proteins with decreased plant-specific N-glycans and immunogenicity in tobacco BY2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Plants possess some desirable characteristics to synthesize recombinant glycoproteins for pharma-ceutical application.However,the mammalian glycoproteins produced in plants are somewhat different from their natural counterparts in terms of N-glycoforms.The immunogenicity of plant-specific glyco-epitopes is the major concern in human therapy.Here,the distribution of N-glycans in different growth phases of tobacco BY2 cells and their immunogenicity in mice were determined.It was ob-served that the percentage of β1,2-xylose and α1,3-fucose in proteins of growing cells increased and the corresponding protein extracts caused accelerated immune response in mice.Based on this observation,the recombinant erythropoietin in BY2 cells was expressed and characterized,and Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant erythropoietin contained a relatively small amount of plant-specific glyco-epitopes in the early phase of culture growth.This study may provide a simple but effective strategy for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins with human-like N-glycan structures in plant hosts to avoid a great allergenic risk.

  13. Genome-wide identification and homeolog-specific expression analysis of the SnRK2 genes in Brassica napus guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Ma, Tianyi; Zhu, Ning; Liu, Lihong; Harmon, Alice C; Wang, Qiaomei; Chen, Sixue

    2016-05-01

    Sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2) proteins constitute a small plant-specific serine/threonine kinase family involved in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although SnRK2s have been well-studied in Arabidopsis thaliana, little is known about SnRK2s in Brassica napus. Here we identified 30 putative sequences encoding 10 SnRK2 proteins in the B. napus genome and the expression profiles of a subset of 14 SnRK2 genes in guard cells of B. napus. In agreement with its polyploid origin, B. napus maintains both homeologs from its diploid parents. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and reanalysis of RNA-Seq data showed that certain BnSnRK2 genes were commonly expressed in leaf tissues in different varieties of B. napus. In particular, qRT-PCR results showed that 12 of the 14 BnSnRK2s responded to drought stress in leaves and in ABA-treated guard cells. Among them, BnSnRK2.4 and BnSnRK2.6 were of interest because of their robust responsiveness to ABA treatment and drought stress. Notably, BnSnRK2 genes exhibited up-regulation of different homeologs, particularly in response to abiotic stress. The homeolog expression bias in BnSnRK2 genes suggests that parental origin of genes might be responsible for efficient regulation of stress responses in polyploids. This work has laid a foundation for future functional characterization of the different BnSnKR2 homeologs in B. napus and its parents, especially their functions in guard cell signaling and stress responses. PMID:26898295

  14. Cell layer-specific distribution of transiently expressed barley ESCRT-III component HvVPS60 in developing barley endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilscher, Julia; Kapusi, Eszter; Stoger, Eva; Ibl, Verena

    2016-01-01

    The significance of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT)-III in cereal endosperm has been shown by the identification of the recessive mutant supernumerary aleurone layer1 (SAL1) in maize. ESCRT-III is indispensable in the final membrane fission step during biogenesis of multivesicular bodies (MVBs), responsible for protein sorting to vacuoles and to the cell surface. Here, we annotated barley ESCRT-III members in the (model) crop Hordeum vulgare and show that all identified members are expressed in developing barley endosperm. We used fluorescently tagged core ESCRT-III members HvSNF7a/CHMP4 and HvVPS24/CHMP3 and the associated ESCRT-III component HvVPS60a/CHMP5 for transient localization studies in barley endosperm. In vivo confocal microscopic analyses show that the localization of recombinantly expressed HvSNF7a, HvVPS24 and HvVPS60a differs within barley endosperm. Whereas HvSNF7a induces large agglomerations, HvVPS24 shows mainly cytosolic localization in aleurone and subaleurone. In contrast, HvVPS60a localizes strongly at the plasma membrane in aleurone. In subaleurone, HvVPS60a was found to a lesser extent at the plasma membrane and at vacuolar membranes. These results indicate that the steady-state association of ESCRT-III may be influenced by cell layer-specific protein deposition or trafficking and remodelling of the endomembrane system in endosperm. We show that sorting of an artificially mono-ubiquitinated Arabidopsis plasma membrane protein is inhibited by HvVPS60a in aleurone. The involvement of HvVPS60a in different cell layer-specific trafficking pathways, reflected by localization of HvVPS60a at the plasma membrane in aleurone and at the PSV membrane in subaleurone, is discussed. PMID:25796522

  15. pH-sensitive immunoliposomes mediate target-cell-specific delivery and controlled expression of a foreign gene in mouse.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, C Y; Huang, L

    1987-01-01

    A plasmid containing the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under the control of a mammalian cAMP-regulated promoter was entrapped in H-2Kk antibody-coated liposomes composed of dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, cholesterol, and oleic acid (pH-sensitive immunoliposomes). The entrapped or free DNA was injected intraperitoneally into immunodeficient (nude) BALB/c mice bearing ascites tumor generated by H-2Kk-positive RDM-4 lymphoma cells. About 20% of the injected im...

  16. Early Expression of Pregnancy-Specific Glycoprotein 22 (PSG22) by Trophoblast Cells Modulates Angiogenesis in Mice1

    OpenAIRE

    Blois, Sandra M.; Tirado-González, Irene; Wu, Julie; Barrientos, Gabriela; Johnson, Briana; Warren, James; Freitag, Nancy; Klapp, Burghard F.; Irmak, Ster; Ergun, Suleyman; Dveskler, Gabriela S.

    2012-01-01

    Mouse and human pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSG) are known to exert immunomodulatory functions during pregnancy by inducing maternal leukocytes to secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines that promote a tolerogenic decidual microenvironment. Many such anti-inflammatory mediators also function as proangiogenic factors, which, along with the reported association of murine PSG with the uterine vasculature, suggest that PSG may contribute to the vascular adaptations necessary for successful impl...

  17. A R2R3-MYB transcription factor that is specifically expressed in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers affects secondary cell wall biosynthesis and deposition in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang; Gong, Si-Ying; Nie, Xiao-Ying; Li, Yang; Li, Wen; Huang, Geng-Qing; Li, Xue-Bao

    2015-07-01

    Secondary cell wall (SCW) is an important industrial raw material for pulping, papermaking, construction, lumbering, textiles and potentially for biofuel production. The process of SCW thickening of cotton fibers lays down the cellulose that will constitute the bulk (up to 96%) of the fiber at maturity. In this study, a gene encoding a MYB-domain protein was identified in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and designated as GhMYBL1. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that GhMYBL1 was specifically expressed in cotton fibers at the stage of secondary wall deposition. Further analysis indicated that this protein is a R2R3-MYB transcription factor, and is targeted to the cell nucleus. Overexpression of GhMYBL1 in Arabidopsis affected the formation of SCW in the stem xylem of the transgenic plants. The enhanced SCW thickening also occurred in the interfascicular fibers, xylary fibers and vessels of the GhMYBL1-overexpression transgenic plants. The expression of secondary wall-associated genes, such as CesA4, CesA7, CesA8, PAL1, F5H and 4CL1, were upregulated, and consequently, cellulose and lignin biosynthesis were enhanced in the GhMYBL1 transgenic plants. These data suggested that GhMYBL1 may participate in modulating the process of secondary wall biosynthesis and deposition of cotton fibers. PMID:25534543

  18. Construction of a recombinant adenovirus co-expressing truncated human prostate-specific membrane antigen and mouse 4-1BBL genes and its effect on dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Weng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to construct a recombinant adenovirus co-expressing truncated human prostate-specific membrane antigen (tPSMA and mouse 4-1BBL genes and to determine its effect on dendritic cells (DCs generated from bone marrow suspensions harvested from C57BL/6 mice for which the effect of 4-1BBL on DCs is not clear, especially during DCs processing tumor-associated antigen. Replication deficient adenovirus AdMaxTM Expression System was used to construct recombinant adenovirus Ad-tPSMA-internal ribosome entry site-mouse 4-1BBL (Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL and Ad-enhanced green fluorescent protein. Day 7 proliferating DC aggregates generated from C57BL/6 mice were collected as immature DCs and further mature DCs were obtained by lipopolysaccharide activated immature DCs. After DCs were exposed to the recombinant adenovirus with 250 multiplicity of infection, the expression of tPSMA and m4-1BBL proteins were detected by Western blot, and the apoptosis and phenotype of DCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokines (IL-6 and IL-12 in the supernatant were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Proliferation of T cells was detected by allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions. The tPSMA and m4-1BBL proteins were expressed correctly. The apoptosis rate of DCs transfected with Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL was 14.6%, lower than that of control DCs. The expression of co-stimulatory molecules [CD80 (81.6 ± 5.4% and CD86 (80.13 ± 2.81%] up-regulated in Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL-pulsed DCs, and the level of IL-6 (3960.2 ± 50.54 pg/mL and IL-12 (249.57 ± 12.51 pg/mL production in Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL-transduced DCs were significantly higher (P < 0.05 than those in control DCs. Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL induced higher T-cell proliferation (OD450 = 0.614 ± 0.018, indicating that this recombinant adenovirus can effectively enhance the activity of DCs.

  19. A role for prostaglandins in rapid cycling suggested by episode-specific gene expression shifts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurvich, Artem; Begemann, Martin; Dahm, Liane; Sargin, Derya; Miskowiak, Kamilla; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    monopolar depression (n = 97) were recruited over a period of three years. Repeated psychopathology measurements were conducted using standard instruments. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained during as many consecutive episodes as possible and processed for mRNA isolation and......OBJECTIVES: Over 12% of patients with bipolar disorder exhibit rapid cycling. The underlying biological mechanisms of this extreme form of bipolar disease are still unknown. This study aimed at replicating and extending findings of our previously published case report, where an involvement of...

  20. A 350 bp region of the proximal promoter of Rds drives cell-type specific gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Xue; Conley, Shannon M.; Cheng, Tong; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.; Naash, Muna I.

    2010-01-01

    RDS (retinal degeneration slow) is a photoreceptor-specific tetraspanin protein required for the biogenesis and maintenance of rod and cone outer segments. Mutations in the Rds gene are associated with multiple forms of rod- and cone-dominant retinal degeneration. To gain more insight into the mechanisms underlying the regulation of this gene the identification of regulatory sequences within the promoter of Rds was undertaken. A 3.5kb fragment of the 5′ flanking region of the mouse Rds gene w...

  1. PD-L1-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Borch, Troels Holz; Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increased focus on the immune checkpoint protein PD-1 and its ligand PD-L1 due to the discovery that blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway with monoclonal antibodies elicits striking clinical results in many different malignancies. We have described naturally occurring PD-L1......-specific T cells that recognize both PD-L1-expressing immune cells and malignant cells. Thus, PD-L1-specific T cells have the ability to modulate adaptive immune reactions by reacting to regulatory cells. Thus, utilization of PD-L1-derived T cell epitopes may represent an attractive vaccination strategy...... for targeting the tumor microenvironment and for boosting the clinical effects of additional anticancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes present information about PD-L1 as a T cell antigen, depicts the initial findings about the function of PD-L1-specific T cells in the adjustment of immune...

  2. Tumor-specific gene expression patterns with gene expression profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN; Xiaogang; LI; Yingxin; LI; Jiangeng; GONG; Daoxiong

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of 14 common tumors and their counterpart normal tissues were analyzed with machine learning methods to address the problem of selection of tumor-specific genes and analysis of their differential expressions in tumor tissues. First, a variation of the Relief algorithm, "RFE_Relief algorithm" was proposed to learn the relations between genes and tissue types. Then, a support vector machine was employed to find the gene subset with the best classification performance for distinguishing cancerous tissues and their counterparts. After tissue-specific genes were removed, cross validation experiments were employed to demonstrate the common deregulated expressions of the selected gene in tumor tissues. The results indicate the existence of a specific expression fingerprint of these genes that is shared in different tumor tissues, and the hallmarks of the expression patterns of these genes in cancerous tissues are summarized at the end of this paper.

  3. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Streuli, Charles H

    2011-01-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional di...

  4. Probing Pineal-specific Gene Expression with Transgenic Zebrafish†

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, Daisuke; Dowling, John E.; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2008-01-01

    The pineal gland of zebrafish (Danio rerio) contains lightsensitive photoreceptor cells and plays an important role in the neuroendocrine system. The zebrafish exorhodopsin gene encodes a pineal-specific photoreceptive protein, whose promoter region harbors a cis-acting element, pineal expression-promoting element (PIPE), directing pineal-specific gene expression. For in vivo genetic studies on PIPE-binding proteins and their regulatory mechanisms, we generated a transgenic zebrafish line, Tg...

  5. Kinetic comparison of tissue non-specific and placental human alkaline phosphatases expressed in baculovirus infected cells: application to screening for Down's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grozdea Jean J

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, there are four alkaline phosphatases, and each form exibits a characteristic pattern of tissue distribution. The availability of an easy method to reveal their activity has resulted in large amount of data reporting correlations between variations in activity and illnesses. For example, alkaline phosphatase from neutrophils of mothers pregnent with a trisomy 21 fetus (Down's syndrome displays significant differences both in its biochemical and immunological properties, and in its affinity for some specific inhibitors. Results To analyse these differences, the biochemical characteristics of two isozymes (non specific and placental alkaline phosphatases were expressed in baculovirus infected cells. Comparative analysis of the two proteins allowed us to estimate the kinetic constants of denaturation and sensitivity to two inhibitors (L-p-bromotetramisole and thiophosphate, allowing better discrimination between the two enzymes. These parameters were then used to estimate the ratio of the two isoenzymes in neutrophils of pregnant mothers with or without a trisomy 21 fetus. It appeared that the placental isozyme represented 13% of the total activity of neutrophils of non pregnant women. This proportion did not significantly increase with normal pregnancy. By contrast, in pregnancies with trisomy 21 fetus, the proportion reached 60–80% of activity. Conclusion Over-expression of the placental isozyme compared with the tissue-nonspecific form in neutrophils of mother with a trisomy 21 fetus may explain why the characteristics of the alkaline phosphatase in these cells is different from normal. Application of this knowledge could improve the potential of using alkaline phosphatase measurements to screen for Down's syndrome.

  6. The Construction of a Mammalian Transfection Vector For Expression of Cytosine-5 Specific DNA Methyltransferase Gene M.Msp1 In Cultured Cells

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZDEMİR, Öztürk

    1998-01-01

    The expression vectors are designed for expression and purification of normal or recombi-nant gene of interest. There is a wide variety of stable and transferable selectable mammalian expres-sion vectors.The vector pCDM8 and its derivatives, pcDNAI/Ampicilline are widely used for cloning and analyzing of genes in higher eukaryotic cells. The vectors pRC/CMV, pcDNA3 and pRC/RSV are designed for high-level expression of recombinant genes in mammalian cells. In the present study, we have be...

  7. IFN-γ– and IL-10–expressing virus epitope-specific Foxp3+ T reg cells in the central nervous system during encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jingxian; Zhao, Jincun; Fett, Craig; Trandem, Kathryn; Fleming, Erica; Perlman, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Foxp3+ CD4 regulatory T cells (T reg cells) are important in limiting immunopathology in infections. However, identifying pathogen-specific epitopes targeted by these cells has been elusive. Using MHC class II/peptide tetramers and intracellular cytokine staining, we identify T reg cells recognizing two virus-specific CD4 T cell epitopes in the coronavirus-infected central nervous system as well as naive T cell precursor pools. These T reg cells are detected at the same time as effector T cel...

  8. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2, Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen, and Tissue Polypeptide-Specific Antigen Expression in Egyptian Patients with Cervical Carcinoma: Relationship with Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Imam Ahmed

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a family of proteolytic enzymes produced by both stromal and tumor cells, appear to have a key role in the events leading to local invasion and metastasis by malignant neoplasms. In the present study, we evaluated the role of MMP-2, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA, and tissue polypeptide – specific antigen (TPS in cervical neoplasia. Using Western blotting and enzyme immunoassay (EIA, we analyzed 50 patients with cervical carcinoma (CC and 25 normal controls for expression of MMP-2 in tissue cell lysates. We also quantified SCCA and TPS with microparticle immunoassay and EIA, respectively. The results were correlated with human papilloma virus (HPV infection, clinicopathological findings, and disease outcome. The cutoff point for each marker was estimated from receiver operating characteristic curves. Logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI for each marker. MMP-2, SCCA, and TPS protein expression were significantly higher in patients with CC than in normal controls. While TPS was the best marker for discriminating between patients and controls, MMP-2 was associated with an advanced tumor stage (OR, 13.9 [95% CI, 1.4-133.9] and poor histological grade (OR, 10.2 [95% CI, 1.7-60.5]. Moreover, independent of the effect of an advanced CC stage and grade, the patients' age, and the presence of HPV infection, MMP-2 was considered a strong predictor for CC recurrence (OR, 8.1 [95% CI, 1.3- 49.1]. Tissue markers may be used to select high-risk patients for early detection of and adjuvant therapy for recurrence. Our MMP-2 findings are particularly relevant to the development of protease inhibitors as a new cancer therapy approach.

  9. Using laser micro-dissection and qRT-PCR to analyze cell type-specific gene expression in Norway spruce phloem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina E. Nagy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The tangentially oriented polyphenolic parenchyma (PP and radially organized ray parenchyma in the phloem are central in the defense of conifer stems against insects and pathogens. Laser micro-dissection enables examination of cell-specific defense responses. To examine induced defense responses in Norway spruce stems inoculated with the necrotrophic blue-stain fungus Ceratocystis polonica, RNA extracted from laser micro-dissected phloem parenchyma and vascular cambium was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR to profile transcript levels of selected resistance marker genes. The monitored transcripts included three pathogenesis-related proteins (class IV chitinase (CHI4, defensin (SPI1, peroxidase (PX3, two terpene synthesis related proteins (DXPS and LAS, one ethylene biosynthesis related protein (ACS, and a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL. Three days following inoculation, four genes (CHI4, PAL, PX3, SPI1 were differentially induced in individual cell and tissue types, both close to the inoculation site (5 mm above and, to a lesser degree, further away (10 mm above. These resistance marker genes were all highly induced in ray parenchyma, supporting the important role of the rays in spruce defense propagation. CHI4 and PAL were also induced in PP cells and in conducting secondary phloem tissues. Our data suggests that different cell types in the secondary phloem of Norway spruce have overlapping but not fully redundant roles in active host defense. Furthermore, the study demonstrates the usefulness of laser micro-dissection coupled with qRT-PCR to characterize gene expression in different cell types of conifer bark.

  10. Allele-specific gene expression patterns in primary leukemic cells reveal regulation of gene expression by CpG site methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milani, Lili; Lundmark, Anders; Nordlund, Jessica; Kiialainen, Anna; Flaegstad, Trond; Jonmundsson, Gudmundur; Kanerva, Jukka; Schmiegelow, K.; Gunderson, Kevin L; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2008-01-01

    samples of 197 children with ALL. Using a reproducible, quantitative genotyping method and stringent criteria for scoring ASE, we found that 16% of the analyzed genes display ASE in multiple ALL cell samples. For most of the genes, the level of ASE varied largely between the samples, from 1.4-fold...

  11. Thy1-positive bone marrow stem cells express liver-specific genes in vitro and can mature into hepatocytes in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Si Hyun; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kew; Oh, Il-Hoan; Yoon, Kun Ho; Park, Seong Tae; Kim, Gi Dae; Oh, Seh-Hoon; PETERSEN, BRYON E.

    2007-01-01

    The bone marrow contains stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into a variety of organ-specific mature cells, including the liver and the pancreas. Recently, the origin of hepatic progenitors and hepatocytes was identified to be the bone marrow. However, evidence that describes which cells, among all bone marrow cells, differentiate into hepatocytes, has not yet been presented. Based on recent reports, hematopoietic and hepatic stem cells share characteristic markers such as CD3...

  12. Cell-specific expression of tryptophan decarboxylase and 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, key genes involved in camptothecin biosynthesis in Camptotheca acuminata Decne (Nyssaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santamaria Anna

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camptotheca acuminata is a major natural source of the terpenoid indole alkaloid camptothecin (CPT. At present, little is known about the cellular distribution of the biosynthesis of CPT, which would be useful knowledge for developing new strategies and technologies for improving alkaloid production. Results The pattern of CPT accumulation was compared with the expression pattern of some genes involved in CPT biosynthesis in C. acuminata [i.e., Ca-TDC1 and Ca-TDC2 (encoding for tryptophan decarboxylase and Ca-HGO (encoding for 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase]. Both CPT accumulation and gene expression were investigated in plants at different degrees of development and in plantlets subjected to drought-stress. In all organs, CPT accumulation was detected in epidermal idioblasts, in some glandular trichomes, and in groups of idioblast cells localized in parenchyma tissues. Drought-stress caused an increase in CPT accumulation and in the number of glandular trichomes containing CPT, whereas no increase in epidermal or parenchymatous idioblasts was observed. In the leaf, Ca-TDC1 expression was detected in some epidermal cells and in groups of mesophyll cells but not in glandular trichomes; in the stem, it was observed in parenchyma cells of the vascular tissue; in the root, no expression was detected. Ca-TDC2 expression was observed exclusively in leaves of plantlets subjected to drought-stress, in the same sites described for Ca-TDC1. In the leaf, Ca-HGO was detected in all chlorenchyma cells; in the stem, it was observed in the same sites described for Ca-TDC1; in the root, no expression was detected. Conclusions The finding that the sites of CPT accumulation are not consistently the same as those in which the studied genes are expressed demonstrates an organ-to-organ and cell-to-cell translocation of CPT or its precursors.

  13. ZnT8-Specific CD4+ T cells display distinct cytokine expression profiles between type 1 diabetes patients and healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Chujo

    Full Text Available Determination of antigen-specific T cell repertoires in human blood has been a challenge. Here, we show a novel integrated approach that permits determination of multiple parameters of antigen-specific T cell repertoires. The approach consists of two assays: the Direct assay and the Cytokine-driven assay. Briefly, human PBMCs are first stimulated with overlapping peptides encoding a given antigen for 48 hours to measure cytokine secretion (Direct assay. Peptide-reactive T cells are further expanded by IL-2 for 5 days; and after overnight starvation, expanded cells are stimulated with the same peptides from the initial culture to analyze cytokine secretion (Cytokine-driven assay. We first applied this integrated approach to determine the type of islet-antigen-specific T cells in healthy adults. Out of ten donors, the Direct assay identified GAD65-specific CD4(+ T cells in three adults and zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8-specific CD4(+ T cells in five adults. The intracytoplasmic cytokine staining assay showed that these islet-antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells belonged to the CD45RO(+ memory compartment. The Cytokine-driven assay further revealed that islet-antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells in healthy adults were capable of secreting various types of cytokines including type 1 and type 2 cytokines as well as IL-10. We next applied our integrated assay to determine whether the type of ZnT8-specific CD4(+ T cells is different between Type 1 diabetes patients and age/gender/HLA-matched healthy adults. We found that ZnT8-specific CD4(+ T cells were skewed towards Th1 cells in T1D patients, while Th2 and IL-10-producing cells were prevalent in healthy adults. In conclusion, the Direct assay and the Cytokine-driven assay complement each other, and the combination of the two assays provides information of antigen-specific T cell repertoires on the breadth, type, and avidity. This strategy is applicable to determine the differences in the quality of antigen-specific T

  14. Disease-specific classification using deconvoluted whole blood gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Oh, William K.; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Blood-based biomarker assays have an advantage in being minimally invasive. Diagnostic and prognostic models built on peripheral blood gene expression have been reported for various types of disease. However, most of these studies focused on only one disease type, and failed to address whether the identified gene expression signature is disease-specific or more widely applicable across diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis of 46 whole blood gene expression datasets covering a wide range of diseases and physiological conditions. Our analysis uncovered a striking overlap of signature genes shared by multiple diseases, driven by an underlying common pattern of cell component change, specifically an increase in myeloid cells and decrease in lymphocytes. These observations reveal the necessity of building disease-specific classifiers that can distinguish different disease types as well as normal controls, and highlight the importance of cell component change in deriving blood gene expression based models. We developed a new strategy to develop blood-based disease-specific models by leveraging both cell component changes and cell molecular state changes, and demonstrate its superiority using independent datasets. PMID:27596246

  15. Enhanced activation of human T cell clones specific for virus-like particles expressing the HIV V3 loop in the presence of HIV V3 loop-specific polyclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peifang, S.; Pira, G. L.; Fenoglio, D.; Harris, S.; Costa, M. G.; Venturino, V.; Dessì, V.; Layton, G.; Laman, J.; Huisman, J. G.; Manca, F.

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant virus-like particles (VLP), formed by the yeast Ty p1 protein, carrying the HIV gp120 V3 loop on their surface (V3-VLP) have been tested in vitro for immunogenicity and antigenicity by using VLP p1-specific human CD4+ T cell lines and clones. VLP-specific human T cell lines and clones were generated from normal individuals, indicating that VLP-specific precursor cells present in the peripheral lymphocyte pool can be induced to expand clonally upon antigen challenge in vitro, in the absence of previous immunization. It was also shown that V3-specific polyclonal antibodies enhance V3-VLP-induced activation of VLP-specific T cell clones. Antibody-dependent potentiation has been shown previously in other antigen systems, and it depends on enhanced uptake of complexed antigen by Fc receptor-positive antigen-presenting cells. Since in this case antigen is internalized by presenting cells as a complex, it can be inferred that a similar event of antibody-mediated antigen uptake can take place with V3-specific B cells, resulting in presentation by the B cells of T helper epitopes derived from processing of the VLP p1 moiety. This suggests that T helper cells specific for the carrier VLP p1 protein can be activated to provide help to V3-specific B cells in the presence of the appropriate antigen construct. PMID:7915974

  16. Redirecting Specificity of T cells Using the Sleeping Beauty System to Express Chimeric Antigen Receptors by Mix-and-Matching of VL and VH Domains Targeting CD123+ Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokala, Radhika; Olivares, Simon; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Deniger, Drew; Huls, Helen; Torikai, Hiroki; Singh, Harjeet; Champlin, Richard E; Laskowski, Tamara; McNamara, George; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy infusing T cells with engineered specificity for CD19 expressed on B- cell malignancies is generating enthusiasm to extend this approach to other hematological malignancies, such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). CD123, or interleukin 3 receptor alpha, is overexpressed on most AML and some lymphoid malignancies, such as acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and has been an effective target for T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). The prototypical CAR encodes a VH and VL from one monoclonal antibody (mAb), coupled to a transmembrane domain and one or more cytoplasmic signaling domains. Previous studies showed that treatment of an experimental AML model with CD123-specific CAR T cells was therapeutic, but at the cost of impaired myelopoiesis, highlighting the need for systems to define the antigen threshold for CAR recognition. Here, we show that CARs can be engineered using VH and VL chains derived from different CD123-specific mAbs to generate a panel of CAR+ T cells. While all CARs exhibited specificity to CD123, one VH and VL combination had reduced lysis of normal hematopoietic stem cells. This CAR's in vivo anti-tumor activity was similar whether signaling occurred via chimeric CD28 or CD137, prolonging survival in both AML and ALL models. Co-expression of inducible caspase 9 eliminated CAR+ T cells. These data help support the use of CD123-specific CARs for treatment of CD123+ hematologic malignancies. PMID:27548616

  17. Unique Preservation of Neural Cells in Hutchinson- Gilford Progeria Syndrome Is Due to the Expression of the Neural-Specific miR-9 MicroRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Nissan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One puzzling observation in patients affected with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, who overall exhibit systemic and dramatic premature aging, is the absence of any conspicuous cognitive impairment. Recent studies based on induced pluripotent stem cells derived from HGPS patient cells have revealed a lack of expression in neural derivatives of lamin A, a major isoform of LMNA that is initially produced as a precursor called prelamin A. In HGPS, defective maturation of a mutated prelamin A induces the accumulation of toxic progerin in patient cells. Here, we show that a microRNA, miR-9, negatively controls lamin A and progerin expression in neural cells. This may bear major functional correlates, as alleviation of nuclear blebbing is observed in nonneural cells after miR-9 overexpression. Our results support the hypothesis, recently proposed from analyses in mice, that protection of neural cells from progerin accumulation in HGPS is due to the physiologically restricted expression of miR-9 to that cell lineage.

  18. Differential binding of the Bombyx silk gland-specific factor SGFB to its target DNA sequence drives posterior-cell-restricted expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Horard, B; Julien, E; Nony, P; Garel, A; Couble, P

    1997-01-01

    The gene encoding the silk protein P25 in Bombyx mori is expressed in the posterior silk gland (PSG) cells and repressed in the middle silk gland (MSG) cells. To identify the factors involved in this transcription-dependent spatial restriction, we examined the P25 chromatin in PSG and MSG nuclei by DNase I-aided ligation-mediated PCR and analyzed the expression of various P25-lacZ constructs in biolistically treated silk glands. P25 promoter activation depends on two cis-acting elements. One ...

  19. Use of Ferritin Expression, Regulated by Neural Cell-Specific Promoters in Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells, to Monitor Differentiation with Magnetic Resonance Imaging In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengang Song

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish a method for monitoring the neural differentiation of stem cells using ferritin transgene expression, under the control of a neural-differentiation-inducible promoter, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs were transduced with a lentivirus containing the human ferritin heavy chain 1 (FTH1 gene coupled to one of three neural cell-specific promoters: human synapsin 1 promoter (SYN1p, for neurons, human glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter (GFAPp, for astrocytes, and human myelin basic protein promoter (MBPp, for oligodendrocytes. Three groups of neural-differentiation-inducible ferritin-expressing (NDIFE hADMSCs were established: SYN1p-FTH1, GFAPp-FTH1, and MBPp-FTH1. The proliferation rate of the NDIFE hADMSCs was evaluated using a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. Ferritin expression was assessed with western blotting and immunofluorescent staining before and after the induction of differentiation in NDIFE hADMSCs. The intracellular iron content was measured with Prussian blue iron staining and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. R2 relaxation rates were measured with MRI in vitro. The proliferation rates of control and NDIFE hADMSCs did not differ significantly (P > 0.05. SYN1p-FTH1, GFAPp-FTH1, and MBPp-FTH1 hADMSCs expressed specific markers of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, respectively, after neural differentiation. Neural differentiation increased ferritin expression twofold, the intracellular iron content threefold, and the R2 relaxation rate two- to threefold in NDIFE hADMSCs, resulting in notable hypointensity in T2-weighted images (P < 0.05. These results were cross-validated. Thus, a link between neural differentiation and MRI signals (R2 relaxation rate was established in hADMSCs. The use of MRI and neural-differentiation-inducible ferritin expression is a viable method for monitoring the neural differentiation of

  20. Cell context-specific expression of primary cilia in the human testis and ciliary coordination of Hedgehog signalling in mouse Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg Nygaard, Marie; Almstrup, Kristian; Lindbæk, Louise;

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog signalling, including Smoothened, Patched-1, and GLI2, which are involved in regulating Leydig cell differentiation. Stimulation of Hedgehog signalling increases the localization of Smoothened to the cilium, which is followed by transactivation of the Hedgehog target genes, Gli1 and Ptch1. Our...... findings provide new information on the spatiotemporal formation of primary cilia in the testis and show that primary cilia in immature Leydig cells mediate Hedgehog signalling....

  1. Apoptin: specific killer of tumor cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, M; Guelen, L; Luxon, B A; Gäken, J

    2005-08-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.(1) These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at G2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.(2) In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin's function to kill tumor cells.(3) In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin's ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported "black and white" tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  2. Identification of three PPV1 VP2 protein-specific B cell linear epitopes using monoclonal antibodies against baculovirus-expressed recombinant VP2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianhui; Huang, Liping; Wei, Yanwu; Wang, Yiping; Chen, Dongjie; Du, Wenjuan; Wu, Hongli; Feng, Li; Liu, Changming

    2015-11-01

    Porcine parvovirus type 1 (PPV1) is a major causative agent of embryonic and fetal death in swine. The PPV1 VP2 protein is closely associated with viral immunogenicity for eliciting neutralizing antibodies, but its antigenic structures have been largely unknown. We generated three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against baculovirus-expressed recombinant PPV1 VP2 protein. A PEPSCAN analysis identified the minimal B cell linear epitopes of PPV1 VP2 based on these MAbs. Three core epitopes, (228)QQITDA(233), (284)RSLGLPPK(291), and (344)FEYSNGGPFLTPI(356), were defined and mapped onto three-dimensional models of the PPV1 virion and VP2 monomer. The epitope (228)QQITDA(233) is exposed on the virion surface, and the other two are located inside the protein. An alignment of the PPV1 VP2 amino acid sequences showed that (284)RSLGLPPK(291) and (344)FEYSNGGPFLTPI(356) are absolutely conserved, whereas (228)QQITDA(233) has a single substitution at residue 233 in some (S → A or T). We developed a VP2 epitope-based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) to test for anti-PPV1 antibodies. In a comparative analysis with an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay using 135 guinea pig sera, the VP2-epitope-based iELISA had a concordance rate of 85.19 %, sensitivity of 83.33 %, and specificity of 85.47 %. MAb 8H6 was used to monitor VP2 during the PPV1 replication cycle in vitro with an indirect immunofluorescence assay, which indicated that newly encapsulated virions are released from the nucleus at 24 h postinfection and the PPV1 replication cycle takes less than 24 h. This study provides valuable information clarifying the antigenic structure of PPV1 VP2 and lays the foundations for PPV1 serodiagnosis and antigen detection. PMID:26153140

  3. Leishmania-specific T cells expressing interferon-¿(IFN-¿) and IL-10 upon activation are expanded in individuals cured of visceral leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K; Kemp, M; Kharazmi, A;

    1999-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients who have recovered from visceral leishmaniasis often respond to Leishmania antigens in vitro by production of both IL-4, IFN-gamma and IL-10. In order to establish the cellular sources of these cytokines, we activated cells from individuals...... with a history of visceral leishmaniasis with Leishmania antigen for 6 days in culture, and identified cytokine production at the single-cell level by flow cytometry. The cytokines were only found in CD3+ cells and among these mainly within the CD4+ subset. The percentage of cytokine-producing cells was compared...... in Leishmania-activated PBMC cultures from the previous patients and from individuals living in a village where leishmaniasis does not occur. The percentage of IL-10- and IFN-gamma-containing cells was significantly higher in the previous patients than in the controls, indicating that Leishmania-specific T...

  4. Two adjacent C/EBP-binding sequences that participate in the cell-specific expression of the mouse serum amyloid A3 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, X. X.; J.H. Huang; Rienhoff, H Y; Liao, W S

    1990-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute-phase protein synthesized primarily in the liver. Its expression, very low in normal animals, is increased several hundredfold following acute inflammation. To examine DNA sequences involved in liver-specific expression, 5'-flanking regions of the mouse SAA3 gene were analyzed by transient transfection, band shift, and DNase I protection assays. We found that a 56-bp fragment immediately 5' to the TATA box spanning the region -93 to -38 relative to the t...

  5. Mycotoxins modify the barrier function of Caco-2 cells through differential gene expression of specific claudin isoforms: Protective effect of illite mineral clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Alejandro; Ares, Irma; Ramos, Eva; Castellano, Víctor; Martínez, Marta; Martínez-Larrañaga, María-Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Martínez, María-Aránzazu

    2016-04-15

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), fumonisin B1 (FB1), ochratoxin A (OTA) and T-2 toxin (T2) are mycotoxins that commonly contaminate the food chain and cause various toxicological effects. Their global occurrence is regarded as an important risk factor for human and animal health. In this study, the results demonstrate that, in human Caco-2 cells, AFB1, FB1, OTA and T2 origin cytotoxic effects, determining cell viability through MTT assay and LDH leakage, and decrease trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). The decrease in barrier properties is concomitant with a reduction in the expression levels of the tight junction constituents claudin-3, claudin-4 and occludin. The protective effect of mineral clays (diosmectite, montmorillonite and illite) on alterations in cell viability and epithelial barrier function induced by the mycotoxins was also evaluated. Illite was the best clay to prevent the mycotoxin effects. Illite plus mycotoxin co-treatment completely abolished AFB1 and FB1-induced cytotoxicity. Also, the decreases in the gene expression of claudins and the reduction of TEER induced by mycotoxins were reversed by the illite plus mycotoxin co-treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that mycotoxins AFB1, FB1, T2 and OTA disrupt the intestinal barrier permeability by a mechanism involving reduction of claudin isoform expressions, and illite counteracts this disruption. PMID:27153755

  6. Foxp3 expression in human cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gourgoulianis Konstantinos I; Barda Angeliki K; Kerenidi Theodora; Loules Gedeon; Kalala Fani; Zamanakou Maria; Speletas Matthaios; Karanikas Vaios; Germenis Anastasios E

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective Transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) specifically characterizes the thymically derived naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs). Limited evidence indicates that it is also expressed, albeit to a lesser extent, in tissues other than thymus and spleen, while, very recently, it was shown that Foxp3 is expressed by pancreatic carcinoma. This study was scheduled to investigate whether expression of Foxp3 transcripts and mature protein occurs constitutively i...

  7. Evaluation of NKX2-2 expression in round cell sarcomas and other tumors with EWSR1 rearrangement: imperfect specificity for Ewing sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yin P; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Hornick, Jason L

    2016-04-01

    Ewing sarcoma shows considerable histologic overlap with other round cell tumors. NKX2-2, a homeodomain transcription factor involved in neuroendocrine/glial differentiation and a downstream target of EWSR1-FLI1, has been reported as an immunohistochemical marker for Ewing sarcoma. We assessed the specificity of NKX2-2 for Ewing sarcoma compared with other round cell malignant neoplasms and other soft tissue tumors with EWSR1 translocations. We evaluated whole-tissue sections from 270 cases: 40 Ewing sarcomas (4 with atypical/large cell features), 20 CIC-DUX4 sarcomas, 5 BCOR-CCNB3 sarcomas, 9 unclassified round cell sarcomas, 10 poorly differentiated synovial sarcomas, 10 lymphoblastic lymphomas, 10 alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, 10 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas, 10 Merkel cell carcinomas, 10 small cell carcinomas, 20 melanomas, 5 NUT midline carcinomas, 10 Wilms tumors, 10 neuroblastomas, 10 olfactory neuroblastomas, 12 mesenchymal chondrosarcomas, 10 angiomatoid fibrous histiocytomas, 10 clear cell sarcomas, 5 gastrointestinal clear cell sarcoma-like tumors, 5 desmoplastic small round cell tumors, 10 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, 10 soft tissue and cutaneous myoepitheliomas, and 19 myoepithelial carcinomas. NKX2-2 positivity was defined as moderate-to-strong nuclear immunoreactivity in at least 5% of cells. NKX2-2 was positive in 37/40 (93%) Ewing sarcomas, including all atypical Ewing sarcomas and cases with known EWSR1-FLI1 or EWSR1-ERG fusion; 85% of Ewing sarcomas showed diffuse (>50%) staining. NKX2-2 was positive in 9 (75%) mesenchymal chondrosarcomas, 8 (80%) olfactory neuroblastomas, 1 CIC-DUX4 sarcoma, 1 poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma, 1 neuroblastoma, 2 unclassified round cell sarcomas, and 3 small cell carcinomas; all other EWSR1-associated tumors were negative for NKX2-2, apart from 1 desmoplastic small round cell tumor, 1 myoepithelioma, and 1 myoepithelial carcinoma. In summary, NKX2-2 is a sensitive but imperfectly specific marker for

  8. Self-recognition specificity expressed by T cells from nude mice. Absence of detectable Ia-restricted T cells in nude mice that do exhibit self-K/D-restricted T cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The presence in athymic nude mice of precursor T cells with self- recognition specificity for either H-2 K/D or H-2 I region determinants was investigated. Chimeras were constructed of lethally irradiated parental mice receiving a mixture of F1 nude mouse (6-8 wk old) spleen and bone marrow cells. The donor inoculum was deliberately not subjected to any T cell depletion procedure, so that any potential major histocompatibility complex-committed precursor T cells were allowed to differentiate ...

  9. Urokinase receptor-associated protein (uPARAP) is expressed in connection with malignant as well as benign lesions of the human breast and occurs in specific populations of stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnack Nielsen, Boye; Rank, Fritz; Engelholm, Lars H; Holm, Arne; Danø, Keld; Behrendt, Niels

    2002-01-01

    lesions. Whereas the normal breast tissue was uPARAP-negative, all benign lesions and ductal carcinoma in situ lesions showed immunoreactivity in fibroblast-like cells and myoepithelial cells associated with the lesion. In invasive carcinoma, uPARAP immunoreactivity was limited to tumor......-associated mesenchymal cells. Double immunofluorescence analysis of invasive ductal carcinoma using antibodies against specific cell markers showed that uPARAP was localized in myofibroblasts and macrophages. No malignant cells, no endothelial cells and no vascular smooth muscle cells showed uPARAP immunoreactivity. We...... recognized uPARAP in Western blotting and gave a strong signal in immunohistochemistry. The immunohistochemic localization pattern was found to be identical to that of uPARAP mRNA as determined in parallel by in situ hybridization. uPARAP expression was then studied in both benign and malignant breast...

  10. PIAS1 regulates CP2c localization and active promoter complex formation in erythroid cell-specific α-globin expression

    OpenAIRE

    Chul Kang, Ho; Hyung Chae, Ji; Jeon, Jinseon; Kim, Won; Hyun Ha, Dae; Ho Shin, June; Gil Kim, Chan; Geun Kim, Chul

    2010-01-01

    Data presented here extends our previous observations on α-globin transcriptional regulation by the CP2 and PIAS1 proteins. Using RNAi knockdown, we have now shown that CP2b, CP2c and PIAS1 are each necessary for synergistic activation of endogenous α-globin gene expression in differentiating MEL cells. In this system, truncated PIAS1 mutants lacking the ring finger domain recruited CP2c to the nucleus, as did wild-type PIAS1, demonstrating that this is a sumoylation-independent process. In v...

  11. Specific expression of lacZ and cre recombinase in fetal thymic epithelial cells by multiplex gene targeting at the Foxn1 locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Dong-ming

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymic epithelial cells (TECs promote thymocyte maturation and are required for the early stages of thymocyte development and for positive selection. However, investigation of the mechanisms by which TECs perform these functions has been inhibited by the lack of genetic tools. Since the Foxn1 gene is expressed in all presumptive TECs from the early stages of thymus organogenesis and broadly in the adult thymus, it is an ideal locus for driving gene expression in differentiating and mature TECs. Results We generated two knock-in alleles of Foxn1 by inserting IRES-Cre or IRES-lacZ cassettes into the 3' UTR of the Foxn1 locus. We simultaneously electroporated the two targeting vectors to generate the two independent alleles in the same experiment, demonstrating the feasibility of multiplex gene targeting at this locus. Our analysis shows that the knockin alleles drive expression of Cre or lacZ in all TECs in the fetal thymus. Furthermore, the knockin alleles express Cre or lacZ in a Foxn1-like pattern without disrupting Foxn1 function as determined by phenotype analysis of Foxn1 knockin/Foxn1 null compound heterozygotes. Conclusion These data show that multiplex gene targeting into the 3' UTR of the Foxn1 locus is an efficient method to express any gene of interest in TECs from the earliest stage of thymus organogenesis. The resulting alleles will make possible new molecular and genetic studies of TEC differentiation and function. We also discuss evidence indicating that gene targeting into the 3' UTR is a technique that may be broadly applicable for the generation of genetically neutral driver strains.

  12. Retinoid receptor-specific agonists regulate bovine in vitro early embryonic development, differentiation and expression of genes related to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A; Díez, C; Caamaño, J N; de Frutos, C; Royo, L J; Muñoz, M; Ikeda, S; Facal, N; Alvarez-Viejo, M; Gómez, E

    2007-11-01

    A major goal in reproductive biotechnology is the identification of pathways that regulate early embryonic development and the allocation of cells to the inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE). Retinoids regulate the development and differentiation of the bovine blastocyst in vitro, although the involvement of the retinoid X receptors (RXRs) remains to be clarified. This paper compares the effect of a synthetic RXR agonist (LG100268; LG) with that of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) agonist all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on blastulation. In vitro-produced morulae were treated for 48 h with LG (0.1 microM, 1 microM and 10 microM), ATRA 0.7 microM, or no additives. Treatment with ATRA did not increase the rate of development; however, the LG 0.1 microM treatment increased both the blastocyst development and hatching rate. Cell numbers increased in the ICM with LG 10 microM, while a dose-dependent reduction was observed in the TE in the presence of LG. Gene expression levels of p53 and p66 did not vary with LG but increased with ATRA. Both LG and ATRA activated bax, a pro-apoptotic gene and H2A.Z, a cell cycle-related gene. The above effects suggest the existence of active p53-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways for ATRA and LG, respectively, in the bovine embryo. The expression of p53 and H2A.Z showed a strong, positive correlation (r=0.93; pdevelopment and differentiation. PMID:17869331

  13. Ctip2-, Satb2-, Prox1-, and GAD65-Expressing Neurons in Rat Cultures: Preponderance of Single- and Double-Positive Cells, and Cell Type-Specific Expression of Neuron-Specific Gene Family Members, Nsg-1 (NEEP21 and Nsg-2 (P19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Digilio

    Full Text Available The brain consists of many distinct neuronal cell types, but which cell types are present in widely used primary cultures of embryonic rodent brain is often not known. We characterized how abundantly four cell type markers (Ctip2, Satb2, Prox1, GAD65 were represented in cultured rat neurons, how easily neurons expressing different markers can be transfected with commonly used plasmids, and whether neuronal-enriched endosomal proteins Nsg-1 (NEEP21 and Nsg-2 (P19 are ubiquitously expressed in all types of cultured neurons. We found that cultured neurons stably maintain cell type identities that are reflective of cell types in vivo. This includes neurons maintaining simultaneous expression of two transcription factors, such as Ctip2+/Satb2+ or Prox1+/Ctip2+ double-positive cells, which have also been described in vivo. Secondly, we established the superior efficiency of CAG promoters for both Lipofectamine-mediated transfection as well as for electroporation. Thirdly, we discovered that Nsg-1 and Nsg-2 were not expressed equally in all neurons: whereas high levels of both Nsg-1 and Nsg-2 were found in Satb2-, Ctip2-, and GAD65-positive neurons, Prox1-positive neurons in hippocampal cultures expressed low levels of both. Our findings thus highlight the importance of identifying neuronal cell types for doing cell biology in cultured neurons: Keeping track of neuronal cell type might uncover effects in assays that might otherwise be masked by the mixture of responsive and non-responsive neurons in the dish.

  14. Foxp3 expression in human cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourgoulianis Konstantinos I

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3 specifically characterizes the thymically derived naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs. Limited evidence indicates that it is also expressed, albeit to a lesser extent, in tissues other than thymus and spleen, while, very recently, it was shown that Foxp3 is expressed by pancreatic carcinoma. This study was scheduled to investigate whether expression of Foxp3 transcripts and mature protein occurs constitutively in various tumor types. Materials and methods Twenty five tumor cell lines of different tissue origins (lung cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, melanoma, erythroid leukemia, acute T-cell leukemia were studied. Detection of Foxp3 mRNA was performed using both conventional RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR while protein expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, using different antibody clones. Results Foxp3 mRNA as well as Foxp3 protein was detected in all tumor cell lines, albeit in variable levels, not related to the tissue of origin. This expression correlated with the expression levels of IL-10 and TGFb1. Conclusion We offer evidence that Foxp3 expression, characterizes tumor cells of various tissue origins. The biological significance of these findings warrants further investigation in the context of tumor immune escape, and especially under the light of current anti-cancer efforts interfering with Foxp3 expression.

  15. Heterogeneity in gamma-glutamyltransferase mRNA expression and glycan structures. Search for tumor-specific variants in human liver metastases and colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Ingvild; Andersen, Jeanette Hammer; Bjornland, Kristin; Mathisen, Øystein; Bremnes, Roy; Wellman, Maria; Visvikis, Athanase; Huseby, Nils-Erik

    2003-05-30

    The enzyme gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells and tissues and has significant utility as a cancer marker. Significant heterogeneity of the enzyme has been described due to both transcriptional and post-translational variations. For possible use in diagnosis and follow-up of patients with colorectal cancer, a search was performed for specific mRNA subtypes and glycan structures of the enzyme in liver metastases. We found no differences in the distribution of three GGT mRNA subtypes (fetal liver, HepG2, placenta) in metastatic tissue and normal liver tissue. Furthermore, the three subtypes were present in leukocytes isolated from both normal individuals and cancer patients. Two colon carcinoma cell lines (Colo 205 and HCC 2998) also displayed the three forms and no consistent changes in mRNA composition were noted after butyrate-induced differentiation of the cells. Thus, neither of the GGT mRNA subforms appear to be tumor-specific, although some qualitative and quantitative variations were noted. Two distinct glycosylation features were detected for GGT in metastatic tissue in contrast to normal liver GGT; an extreme sialic acid heterogeneity and a significant increase in beta1,6GlcNAc branching. The GGT glycans from the two colon carcinoma cell lines also possessed these features. As butyrate treatment of the cells resulted in an increased sialic acid content and a reduced beta1,6GlcNAc branching, the described carbohydrate structures appear to be part of a tumor-related pattern. We were, however, unable to identify such GGT isoforms in serum from patients with advanced colorectal cancer. This indicates that their usefulness in diagnostic use is doubtful. PMID:12758164

  16. Computational deconvolution of genome wide expression data from Parkinson's and Huntington's disease brain tissues using population-specific expression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurro, Alberto; Bodea, Liviu-Gabriel; Schaefer, Patrick; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Perreau, Victoria M.

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of molecular changes in diseased tissues gives insight into pathophysiological mechanisms and is important for therapeutic development. Genome-wide gene expression analysis has proven valuable for identifying biological processes in neurodegenerative diseases using post mortem human brain tissue and numerous datasets are publically available. However, many studies utilize heterogeneous tissue samples consisting of multiple cell types, all of which contribute to global gene expression values, confounding biological interpretation of the data. In particular, changes in numbers of neuronal and glial cells occurring in neurodegeneration confound transcriptomic analyses, particularly in human brain tissues where sample availability and controls are limited. To identify cell specific gene expression changes in neurodegenerative disease, we have applied our recently published computational deconvolution method, population specific expression analysis (PSEA). PSEA estimates cell-type-specific expression values using reference expression measures, which in the case of brain tissue comprises mRNAs with cell-type-specific expression in neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia. As an exercise in PSEA implementation and hypothesis development regarding neurodegenerative diseases, we applied PSEA to Parkinson's and Huntington's disease (PD, HD) datasets. Genes identified as differentially expressed in substantia nigra pars compacta neurons by PSEA were validated using external laser capture microdissection data. Network analysis and Annotation Clustering (DAVID) identified molecular processes implicated by differential gene expression in specific cell types. The results of these analyses provided new insights into the implementation of PSEA in brain tissues and additional refinement of molecular signatures in human HD and PD. PMID:25620908

  17. A hierarchy of ECM-mediated signalling tissue-specific gene expression regulates tissue-specific gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskelley, Calvin D; Srebrow, Anabella; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-10-07

    A dynamic and reciprocal flow of information between cells and the extracellular matrix contributes significantly to the regulation of form and function in developing systems. Signals generated by the extracellular matrix do not act in isolation. Instead, they are processed within the context of global signalling hierarchies whose constituent inputs and outputs are constantly modulated by all the factors present in the cell's surrounding microenvironment. This is particularly evident in the mammary gland, where the construction and subsequent destruction of such a hierarchy regulates changes in tissue-specific gene expression, morphogenesis and apoptosis during each developmental cycle of pregnancy, lactation and involution.

  18. Cell type-specific transcriptome profiling in mammalian brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVerso, Peter R; Cui, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mammalian brain contains numerous types of cells. Advances in neuroscience in the past decade allow us to identify and isolate neural cells of interest from mammalian brains. Recent developments in high-throughput technologies, such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing (NGS), provide detailed information on gene expression in pooled cells on a genomic scale. As a result, many novel genes have been found critical in cell type-specific transcriptional regulation. These differentially expressed genes can be used as molecular signatures, unique to a particular class of neural cells. Use of this gene expression-based approach can further differentiate neural cell types into subtypes, potentially linking some of them with neurological diseases. In this article, experimental techniques used to purify neural cells are described, followed by a review on recent microarray- or NGS-based transcriptomic studies of common neural cell types. The future prospects of cell type-specific research are also discussed. PMID:27100485

  19. BAY 50-4798, a novel, high-affinity receptor-specific recombinant interleukin-2 analog, induces dose-dependent increases in CD25 expression and proliferation among unstimulated, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lynn; Chapman, Sherita; Ramchandani, Meena S; Lane, H Clifford; Davey, Richard T; Sereti, Irini

    2004-12-01

    Interleukin-2 administration induces CD4 T cell expansion in HIV-infected patients, however, toxicity can limit dosing. BAY 50-4798 is a recombinant IL-2 analog with >1000-fold specificity for the high-affinity IL-2 receptor. The effects of this compound on unstimulated human PBMC were evaluated. PBMC from HIV(-) and HIV(+) donors were cultured in vitro with incremental doses of BAY 50-4798 or aldesleukin. CD25 expression and proliferation were evaluated with flow cytometry. Cytokine levels were measured by ELISA in culture supernatants. BAY 50-4798 induced dose-dependent increases in CD25 expression and proliferation of T cells, NK, and B cells and showed selectivity for CD4 T cells expressing CD25. Induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines was also dose-dependent and was observed at the concentrations of BAY 50-4798 with the highest biologic activity. These data suggest that BAY 50-4798 can induce proliferation of unstimulated T cells but loss of T cell selectivity and induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines occur at concentrations exerting the highest biologic activity. PMID:15507389

  20. An expression profile analysis of ES cell-derived definitive endodermal cells and Pdx1-expressing cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kume Kazuhiko

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We developed an efficient in vitro method to differentiate mouse ES cells into the definitive endoderm (DE and then Pdx1-expressing pancreatic lineages using mesodermal-derived supporting cells, M15. Using this method, resulting ES cell-derived DE and Pdx1-expressing cells were isolated by cell sorting, and their gene expression profiles were investigated with DNA microarray. Genes that were specifically expressed in DE and/or in Pdx1-expressing cells were extracted and their expression patterns in normal embryonic development were studied. Results Genes whose expression increased in DE and Pdx1 positive cells compared to the undifferentiated ES cells were chosen and in situ hybridizations were performed. Out of 54 genes examined, 27 were expressed in the DE of E8.5 mouse embryos and 15 genes were expressed in distinct domains in the pancreatic buds of E14.5 embryos. Among those genes expressed were Foxq1, CpM, Foxp4, Pcdh1, and Zmiz1, which were previously reported in other endodermal tissues. Genes, such as Parm1, Tmem184a, Hipk2 and Sox4 were reported to be expressed during early pancreatic development. Nptx2, C2cd4b, Tcf7l2 and Kiss1r were reported to be associated with beta cell or pancreatic functions in the adult. Akr1c19, Aebp2, Pbxip1 and Creb3l1, were novel and have not been described as being expressed either in DE or the pancreas. Conclusions We identified 27 genes, including 4 novel genes expressed in DE and pancreatic progenitor cells during normal development using an ES cell in vitro differentiation system. These results showed that DE cells and Pdx1/GFP-expressing cells obtained from our M15 based differentiation method mimic cells during the normal developmental processes. Additionally, ES cells are an excellent model for studies of early developmental processes.

  1. Specific expression of bioluminescence reporter gene in cardiomyocyte regulated by tissue specific promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the human heart is not capable of regenerating the great numbers of cardiac cells that are lost after myocardial infarction, impaired cardiac function is the inevitable result of ischemic disease. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have gained popularity as a potentially ideal cell candidate for tissue regeneration. In particular, hESCs are capable of cardiac lineage-specific differentiation and confer improvement of cardiac function following transplantation into animal models. Although such data are encouraging, the specific strategy for in vivo and non-invasive detection of differentiated cardiac lineage is still limited. Therefore, in the present study, we established the gene construction in which the optical reporter gene Firefly luciferase was controlled by Myosin Heavy Chain promoter for specific expressing in heart cells. The vector consisting of - MHC promoter and a firefly luciferase coding sequence flanked by full-length bovine growth hormone (BGH) 3'-polyadenylation sequence based on pcDNA3.1- vector backbone. To test the specific transcription of this promoter in g of MHC-Fluc or CMV-Flue (for control) plasmid DNA in myocardial tissue, 20 phosphate-buffered saline was directly injected into mouse myocardium through a midline sternotomy and liver. After 1 week of injection, MHC-Fluc expression was detected from heart region which was observed under cooled CCD camera of in vivo imaging system but not from liver. In control group injected with CMV-Flue, the bioluminescence was detected from all these organs. The expression of Flue under control of Myosin Heavy Chain promoter may become a suitable optical reporter gene for stem cell-derived cardiac lineage differentiation study

  2. Specific expression of bioluminescence reporter gene in cardiomyocyte regulated by tissue specific promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Vu Hong; Tae, Seong Ho; Le, Nguyen Uyen Chi; Min, Jung Joon [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    As the human heart is not capable of regenerating the great numbers of cardiac cells that are lost after myocardial infarction, impaired cardiac function is the inevitable result of ischemic disease. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have gained popularity as a potentially ideal cell candidate for tissue regeneration. In particular, hESCs are capable of cardiac lineage-specific differentiation and confer improvement of cardiac function following transplantation into animal models. Although such data are encouraging, the specific strategy for in vivo and non-invasive detection of differentiated cardiac lineage is still limited. Therefore, in the present study, we established the gene construction in which the optical reporter gene Firefly luciferase was controlled by Myosin Heavy Chain promoter for specific expressing in heart cells. The vector consisting of - MHC promoter and a firefly luciferase coding sequence flanked by full-length bovine growth hormone (BGH) 3'-polyadenylation sequence based on pcDNA3.1- vector backbone. To test the specific transcription of this promoter in g of MHC-Fluc or CMV-Flue (for control) plasmid DNA in myocardial tissue, 20 phosphate-buffered saline was directly injected into mouse myocardium through a midline sternotomy and liver. After 1 week of injection, MHC-Fluc expression was detected from heart region which was observed under cooled CCD camera of in vivo imaging system but not from liver. In control group injected with CMV-Flue, the bioluminescence was detected from all these organs. The expression of Flue under control of Myosin Heavy Chain promoter may become a suitable optical reporter gene for stem cell-derived cardiac lineage differentiation study.

  3. Transactivation-Competent Bovine Papillomavirus E2 Protein Is Specifically Required for Efficient Repression of Human Papillomavirus Oncogene Expression and for Acute Growth Inhibition of Cervical Carcinoma Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Edward C.; Naeger, Lisa Kay; Breiding, David E.; Androphy, Elliot J.; DiMaio, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The papillomavirus E2 proteins can function as sequence-specific transactivators or transrepressors of transcription and as cofactors in viral DNA replication. We previously demonstrated that acute expression of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) E2 protein in HeLa and HT-3 cervical carcinoma cell lines greatly reduced cellular proliferation by imposing a specific G1/S phase growth arrest. In this report, we analyzed the effects of a panel of point mutations in the BPV1 E2 protein to ide...

  4. Cell-specific DNA methylation patterns of retina-specific genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannath L Merbs

    Full Text Available Many studies have demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms are important in the regulation of gene expression during embryogenesis, gametogenesis, and other forms of tissue-specific gene regulation. We sought to explore the possible role of epigenetics, specifically DNA methylation, in the establishment and maintenance of cell type-restricted gene expression in the retina. To assess the relationship between DNA methylation status and expression level of retinal genes, bisulfite sequence analysis of the 1000 bp region around the transcription start sites (TSS of representative rod and cone photoreceptor-specific genes and gene expression analysis were performed in the WERI and Y79 human retinoblastoma cell lines. Next, the homologous genes in mouse were bisulfite sequenced in the retina and in non-expressing tissues. Finally, bisulfite sequencing was performed on isolated photoreceptor and non-photoreceptor retinal cells isolated by laser capture microdissection. Differential methylation of rhodopsin (RHO, retinal binding protein 3 (RBP3, IRBP cone opsin, short-wave-sensitive (OPN1SW, cone opsin, middle-wave-sensitive (OPN1MW, and cone opsin, long-wave-sensitive (OPN1LW was found in the retinoblastoma cell lines that inversely correlated with gene expression levels. Similarly, we found tissue-specific hypomethylation of the promoter region of Rho and Rbp3 in mouse retina as compared to non-expressing tissues, and also observed hypomethylation of retinal-expressed microRNAs. The Rho and Rbp3 promoter regions were unmethylated in expressing photoreceptor cells and methylated in non-expressing, non-photoreceptor cells from the inner nuclear layer. A third regional hypomethylation pattern of photoreceptor-specific genes was seen in a subpopulation of non-expressing photoreceptors (Rho in cones from the Nrl -/- mouse and Opn1sw in rods. These results demonstrate that a number of photoreceptor-specific genes have cell-specific differential DNA

  5. Channel catfish granzyme-like I is a highly specific serine protease with metase activity that is expressed by fish NK-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Michael; Akula, Srinivas; Hellman, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Here we present the extended cleavage specificity of catfish granzyme-like I, previously identified in fish NK-like cells. This protease has been characterised using substrate phage display and further validated by using a panel of recombinant substrates. A strict preference for Met in the P1 (cleavage) position, indicating metase specificity was observed. A screening of potential in vivo substrates was performed based on the derived P5-P3' consensus: Arg-Val-Thr-Gly-Met(↓)Ser-Leu-Val. Channel catfish caspase 6 was one very interesting potential target identified. This site was present in an adjacent position to the classic caspase activation site (Asp179 in human caspase 6). Cleavage of this site (hence potential activation) by the catfish granzyme-like I could reveal a novel mechanism of caspase 6 activation. This poses an interesting idea that the role of granzyme-like proteases in the activation of caspase dependent apoptosis mechanisms has been conserved for over 400 million years. PMID:27216028

  6. Endothelium specific matrilysin (MMP-7) expression in human cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sier, C.F.M.; Hawinkels, L.J.A.C.; Zijlmans, H.J.M.A.A.; Zuidwijk, K.; Jonge de; Muller, E.S.M.; Ferreira, V.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Mulder-Stapel, A.A.; Kenter, G.G.; Verspaget, H.W.; Gorter, A.

    2008-01-01

    Over-expression of matrilysin (MMP-7) is predominantly associated with epithelial (pre)malignant cells. In the present study MMP-7 expression is also found in endothelial cells in various human cancer types. Endothelial MMP-7 was associated with CD34 and/or CD105 expression. These immunohistochemica

  7. Effects of Shen-Fu Injection on the Expression of T-Cell-Specific Transcription Factors T-bet/Gata-3 in Porcine Postresuscitation Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shen-Fu injection (SFI derived from the ancient traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, the effects of SFI on the expression of T-bet/GATA-3 and its potential mechanisms causing the shift of T cells from Th2 to Th1 on postresuscitation lung injury were examined in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. 30 pigs were randomly divided into SHAM ( and three return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC groups ( per group; 24 pigs were subjected to 8 min of electrically induced cardiac arrest and 2 min of basic life support, which received central venous injection of Shen-Fu (SFI, epinephrine (EP or saline (SA. After successful ROSC, 18 surviving pigs were sacrificed at 24 h after ROSC ( per group. The levels of serum and lung tissue interleukin (IL-4 and interferon (IFN-γ were measured by ELISA, and the protein and mRNA levels of GATA-3 and T-bet in the lung tissue were determined by western blotting and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Compared with the EP and SA groups, SFI treatment reduced the levels of IL-4 (, increased levels of IFN-γ (, and induced T-bet mRNA upregulation and GATA-3 mRNA downregulation (. SFI attenuated lung injury and regulated lung immune disorders. Therefore, SFI could protect postresuscitation lung injury by modulating a Th1/Th2 imbalance.

  8. The cell-specific pattern of cholecystokinin peptides in endocrine cells versus neurons is governed by the expression of prohormone convertases 1/3, 2, and 5/6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, J.R.; Hannibal, J.; Zhu, X.;

    2008-01-01

    neuroendocrine prohormone convertases (PC) 1/3, PC2, and PC5/6 by measurement of proCCK, processing intermediates and bioactive, alpha-amidated, and O-sulfated CCK peptides in cerebral and jejunal extracts of null mice, controls, and in the PC5/6-expressing SK-N-MC cell-line. In PC1/3 null mice, the synthesis of...... affected. SK-N-MC cells, which express neither PC1/3 nor PC2, synthesized alone the processing intermediate, glycine-extended CCK-22. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that intestinal endocrine CCK cells in wild-type mice express PC1/3 but not PC2. In contrast, cerebral CCK neurons contain PC2 and only little......Most peptide hormone genes are, in addition to endocrine cells, also expressed in neurons. The peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) is expressed in different molecular forms in cerebral neurons and intestinal endocrine cells. To understand this difference, we examined the roles of the...

  9. AB112. Expression of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 and association with p53, microvessel density and vascular endothelial growth factor in the tissue of human bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dawei; Hu, Hailong; Wu, Changli

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1) was initially described in 1997, and there have since been a number of studies on its expression in different types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression levels of BAI1 in bladder transitional cell carcinoma (BTCC) at different stages and the mechanism by which it inhibits tumor endothelial cell proliferation. Methods Normal bladder mucosa biopsy specimens were obtained as the control group, and human BTCC biopsy specimens were used as the study group. Immunohistochemical assays were used to detect the expression levels of BAI1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mutant p53, in addition to microvessel density (MVD) in the tissues. Western blotting was used to analyze the differential expression of BAI1 in the two samples. Results Statistical analysis was performed, which indicated that BAI1 expression levels in the normal bladder mucosa group were significantly higher than those in the BTCC group and were associated with clinical staging. BAI1 levels in the T1 stage BTCC tissues were higher than those in the T2–4 stage BTCC tissues (P<0.05). BAI1 expression levels were negatively correlated with those of VEGF (r=−0.661, P<0.001), mutant p53 (r=−0.406, P=0.002) and with the MVD (r=−0.675, P<0.001). Conclusions BAI1 may be involved in the negative regulation of BTCC microvascular proliferation, and its expression may be associated with a reduction in p53 mutations.

  10. 3T3 cell lines stably expressing Pax6 or Pax6(5a--a new tool used for identification of common and isoform specific target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Kiselev

    Full Text Available Pax6 and Pax6(5a are two isoforms of the evolutionary conserved Pax6 gene often co-expressed in specific stochiometric relationship in the brain and the eye during development. The Pax6(5a protein differs from Pax6 by having a 14 amino acid insert in the paired domain, causing the two proteins to have different DNA binding specificities. Difference in functions during development is proven by the fact that mutations in the 14 amino acid insertion for Pax6(5a give a slightly different eye phenotype than the one described for Pax6. Whereas quite many Pax6 target genes have been published during the last years, few Pax6(5a specific target genes have been reported on. However, target genes identified by Pax6 knockout studies can probably be Pax6(5a targets as well, since this isoform also will be affected by the knockout. In order to identify new Pax6 target genes, and to try to distinguish between genes regulated by Pax6 and Pax6(5a, we generated FlpIn-3T3 cell lines stably expressing Pax6 or Pax6(5a. RNA was harvested from these cell lines and used in gene expression microarrays where we identified a number of genes differentially regulated by Pax6 and Pax6(5a. A majority of these were associated with the extracellular region. By qPCR we verified that Ncam1, Ngef, Sphk1, Dkk3 and Crtap are Pax6(5a specific target genes, while Tgfbi, Vegfa, EphB2, Klk8 and Edn1 were confirmed as Pax6 specific target genes. Nbl1, Ngfb and seven genes encoding different glycosyl transferases appeared to be regulated by both. Direct binding to the promoters of Crtap, Ctgf, Edn1, Dkk3, Pdgfb and Ngef was verified by ChIP. Furthermore, a change in morphology of the stably transfected Pax6 and Pax6(5a cells was observed, and the Pax6 expressing cells were shown to have increased proliferation and migration capacities.

  11. Age-specific changes of mesenchymal stem cells are paralleled by upregulation of CD106 expression as a response to an inflammatory environment

    OpenAIRE

    Jamnig, A.; Fehrer, C.; Kloss, F.; Laschober, G.; Lepperdinger, G.; Brunauer, R.; Gassner, R.; Singh, S; Hafen, U.

    2011-01-01

    AbstractRegeneration, tissue remodeling and organ repair after injury which rely on theregulated activity of tissue-borne stem cells become increasingly compromised withadvancing age.Mesenchymal stroma cells were isolated from bone of differently aged healthydonors. The rare population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) contained in theprimary cell isolates, barely declined in number, yet relative to the donor age thestem cells displayed diminished long-term proliferation potential. The expressi...

  12. Expression of a flower-specific Myb protein in leaf cells using a viral vector causes ectopic activation of a target promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablowski, R W; Baulcombe, D C; Bevan, M

    1995-07-18

    The promoter of the bean PAL2 gene (encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase; EC 4.3.1.5) is a model for studies of tissue-restricted gene expression in plants. Petal epidermis is one of the tissues in which this promoter is activated in tobacco. Previous work suggested that a major factor establishing the pattern of PAL2 expression in tobacco petals is the tissue distribution of a protein closely related to Myb305, which is a Myb-like transcriptional activator from snapdragon. In the present work, we show that Myb305 expression in tobacco leaves causes ectopic activation of the PAL2 promoter. To achieve Myb305 expression in planta, a viral expression vector was used. This approach combines the utility of transient assays with the possibility of direct biochemical detection of the introduced factor and may have wider application for studying the function of plant transcription factors. PMID:7624340

  13. Up-regulation of HLA class-I antigen expression and antigen-specific CTL response in cervical cancer cells by the demethylating agent hydralazine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizano-Soberón Marcela

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation are epigenetic events that contribute to the absence or downregulated expression of different components of the tumor recognition complex. These events affect the processing and presentation of antigenic peptides to CTLs by HLA class-I molecules. In this work evaluated the effect of the DNA hypomethylating agent hydralazine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid, on the expression of HLA class-I molecules and on the antigen-specific immune recognition of cervical cancer cells. Methods Cell lines C33A (HPV-, CaSki (HPV-16+ and MS751 (HPV-18+ were treated with hydralazine and valproic acid to assess the expression of HLA class-I molecules by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Promoter methylation of HLA class-I -A, -B and C, was also evaluated by Methylation-Specific PCR. Primary cervical tumors of four HLA-A*0201 allele patients were typed for HPV and their CTL's stimulated in vitro with the T2 cell line previously loaded with 50 μM of the HPV peptides. Cytotoxicity of stimulated CTL's was assayed against Caski and MS751 cells pre-treated with hydralazine and valproic acid. Results Valproic acid and hydralazine/valproic acid up-regulated the constitutive HLA class-I expression as evaluated by flow cytometry and RT-PCR despite constitutive promoter demethylation at these loci. Hydralazine and valproic acid in combination but no IFN-gamma hyperacetylated histone H4 as evaluated by ChiP assay. The antigenic immune recognition of CaSki and MS751 cells by CTLs specific to HPV-16/18 E6 and E7-derived epitopes, was increased by VA and H/VA and the combination of H/VA/IFN-gamma. Conclusion These results support the potential use of hydralazine and valproic acid as an adjuvant for immune intervention in cervical cancer patients whenever clinical protocols based on tumor antigen recognition is desirable, like in those cases where the application of E6 and E7 based therapeutic vaccines

  14. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  15. Proteome-wide screening reveals immunodominance in the CD8 T cell response against classical swine fever virus with antigen-specificity dependent on MHC class I haplotype expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Franzoni

    Full Text Available Vaccination with live attenuated classical swine fever virus (CSFV vaccines induces a rapid onset of protection which has been associated with virus-specific CD8 T cell IFN-γ responses. In this study, we assessed the specificity of this response, by screening a peptide library spanning the CSFV C-strain vaccine polyprotein to identify and characterise CD8 T cell epitopes. Synthetic peptides were pooled to represent each of the 12 CSFV proteins and used to stimulate PBMC from four pigs rendered immune to CSFV by C-strain vaccination and subsequently challenged with the virulent Brescia strain. Significant IFN-γ expression by CD8 T cells, assessed by flow cytometry, was induced by peptide pools representing the core, E2, NS2, NS3 and NS5A proteins. Dissection of these antigenic peptide pools indicated that, in each instance, a single discrete antigenic peptide or pair of overlapping peptides was responsible for the IFN-γ induction. Screening and titration of antigenic peptides or truncated derivatives identified the following antigenic regions: core₂₄₁₋₂₅₅ PESRKKLEKALLAWA and NS3₁₉₀₂₋₁₉₁₂ VEYSFIFLDEY, or minimal length antigenic peptides: E2₉₉₆₋₁₀₀₃ YEPRDSYF, NS2₁₂₂₃₋₁₂₃₀ STVTGIFL and NS5A₃₀₇₀₋₃₀₇₈ RVDNALLKF. The epitopes are highly conserved across CSFV strains and variable sequence divergence was observed with related pestiviruses. Characterisation of epitope-specific CD8 T cells revealed evidence of cytotoxicity, as determined by CD107a mobilisation, and a significant proportion expressed TNF-α in addition to IFN-γ. Finally, the variability in the antigen-specificity of these immunodominant CD8 T cell responses was confirmed to be associated with expression of distinct MHC class I haplotypes. Moreover, recognition of NS₁₂₂₃₋₁₂₃₀ STVTGIFL and NS3₁₉₀₂₋₁₉₁₂ VEYSFIFLDEY by a larger group of C-strain vaccinated animals showed

  16. Divergence of zebrafish and mouse lymphatic cell fate specification pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Impel, Andreas; Zhao, Zhonghua; Hermkens, Dorien M A;

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 acts as the central regulator of lymphatic cell fate. Its restricted expression in a subset of cardinal vein cells leads to a switch towards lymphatic specification and hence represents a prerequisite for the initiation of lymphangiogenesis. ...

  17. Human monoclonal antibodies as a tool for the detection of HLA class I allele-specific expression loss in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma and corresponding lymph node metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, Geert; Mulder, Arend; van der Ven, Kevin; Eijsink, Chantal; Franke, Marry; Slootweg, Piet; Claas, Frans; Tilanus, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression is important for the elimination of tumor cells by the immune system and immunotherapy. Activated T cells directed against tumor-associated antigens are fully capable of recognizing and eradicating neoplastic cells. Therefore, HLA expression loss is considere

  18. Expression Profiling of Intestinal Tissues Implicates Tissue-Specific Genes and Pathways Essential for Thyroid Hormone-Induced Adult Stem Cell Development

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Guihong; Heimeier, Rachel A; Fu, Liezhen; Hasebe, Takashi; Das, Biswajit; Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2013-01-01

    The study of the epithelium during development in the vertebrate intestine touches upon many contemporary aspects of biology: to name a few, the formation of the adult stem cells (ASCs) essential for the life-long self-renewal and the balance of stem cell activity for renewal vs cancer development. Although extensive analyses have been carried out on the property and functions of the adult intestinal stem cells in mammals, little is known about their formation during development due to the di...

  19. Predicting tissue-specific expressions based on sequence characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Paik, Hyojung

    2011-04-30

    In multicellular organisms, including humans, understanding expression specificity at the tissue level is essential for interpreting protein function, such as tissue differentiation. We developed a prediction approach via generated sequence features from overrepresented patterns in housekeeping (HK) and tissue-specific (TS) genes to classify TS expression in humans. Using TS domains and transcriptional factor binding sites (TFBSs), sequence characteristics were used as indices of expressed tissues in a Random Forest algorithm by scoring exclusive patterns considering the biological intuition; TFBSs regulate gene expression, and the domains reflect the functional specificity of a TS gene. Our proposed approach displayed better performance than previous attempts and was validated using computational and experimental methods.

  20. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe map1 gene encodes an SRF/MCM1-related protein required for P-cell specific gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Friis, T; Kjaerulff, S;

    1996-01-01

    Cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergo mating and meiosis when starved for a nitrogen source. In this process a P and and M cell first mate to generate a diploid zygote, which subsequently enters meiosis and sporulates. The P mating type is controlled by the mat1-Pc gene at the mating type...

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells with high telomerase expression do not actively restore their chromosome arm specific telomere length pattern after exposure to ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graakjaer, Jesper; Christensen, Rikke; Kølvrå, Steen;

    2007-01-01

    investigate the existence and maintenance of the telomere length pattern in stem cells. For this aim we studied telomere length in primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and their telomerase-immortalised counterpart (hMSC-telo1) during extended proliferation as well as after irradiation. Telomere lengths...

  2. Specific expression of miR-17-5p and miR-127 in testicular and central nervous system diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robertus, Jan-Lukas; Harms, Geert; Blokzijl, Tjasso; Booman, Marije; de Jong, Daphne; van Imhoff, Gustaaf; Rosati, Stefano; Schuuring, Ed; Kluin, Philip; van den Berg, Anke

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that certain non-coding short RNAs, called miRNAs, play an important role in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma have great diversity in both clinical characteristics, site of presentation and outcome. The aim of our study is to valid

  3. Gene expression-signature of belinostat in cell lines is specific for histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment, with a corresponding signature in xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monks, A.; Hose, C.D.; Pezzoli, P.; Kondapaka, S.; Vansant, G.; Petersen, K.D.; Sehested, M.; Monforte, J.; Shoemaker, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    Belinostat is a hydroxamate-type histone deactylase inhibitor (HDACi), which has recently entered phase I and II clinical trials. Microarray-based analysis of belinostat-treated cell lines showed an impact on genes associated with the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and downregulation of the aurora ...

  4. Increased efficacy of an adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease capsid subunit vaccine expressing nonstructural protein 2B is associated with a specific T cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    We previously demonstrated that an adenovirus-based FMDV serotype A24 subunit vaccine, Ad5-A24, expressed under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter (CMV) can protect swine and bovines against homologous challenge, but swine vaccinated with an Ad5-vectored FMDV O1 Campos vaccine, Ad5-O1Campos (...

  5. New Strategies for Designing Inexpensive but Selective Bioadsorbants for Environmental Pollutants: Selection of specific Ligands and Their Cell Surface Expression; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Broad, long term objective of the research plan is to develop exquisitely selective polypeptide metal chelators for the remediation of aqueous systems. A variety of polypeptide chelators will be developed and optimized ranging from antibodies to small peptides. Then, through unique molecular engineering approaches developed in our laboratories, the polypeptide chelators will be anchored directly on the surface of the cells that produce them. Thus, instead of using isolated biomolecules we will employ inexpensive genetically engineered whole cell adsorbents. Following a simple, easily scaleable treatment, the engineered cells can be used to manufacture an inexpensive, particulate adsorbent for metal removal

  6. Global gene expression analyses of hematopoietic stem cell-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundeberg Joakim

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 in murine hematopoietic cells allows for the generation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC-like cell lines. To address the molecular basis of Lhx2 function, we generated HSC-like cell lines where Lhx2 expression is regulated by a tet-on system and hence dependent on the presence of doxycyclin (dox. These cell lines efficiently down-regulate Lhx2 expression upon dox withdrawal leading to a rapid differentiation into various myeloid cell types. Results Global gene expression of these cell lines cultured in dox was compared to different time points after dox withdrawal using microarray technology. We identified 267 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the genes overlapping with HSC-specific databases were those down-regulated after turning off Lhx2 expression and a majority of the genes overlapping with those defined as late progenitor-specific genes were the up-regulated genes, suggesting that these cell lines represent a relevant model system for normal HSCs also at the level of global gene expression. Moreover, in situ hybridisations of several genes down-regulated after dox withdrawal showed overlapping expression patterns with Lhx2 in various tissues during embryonic development. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis of HSC-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression has identified genes putatively linked to self-renewal / differentiation of HSCs, and function of Lhx2 in organ development and stem / progenitor cells of non-hematopoietic origin.

  7. Computational dissection of tissue contamination for identification of colon cancer-specific expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türeci, Ozlem; Ding, Jiayi; Hilton, Holly; Bian, Hongjin; Ohkawa, Hitomi; Braxenthaler, Michael; Seitz, Gerhard; Raddrizzani, Laura; Friess, Helmut; Buchler, Markus; Sahin, Ugur; Hammer, Juergen

    2003-03-01

    Microarray profiles of bulk tumor tissues reflect gene expression corresponding to malignant cells as well as to many different types of contaminating normal cells. In this report, we assess the feasibility of querying baseline multitissue transcriptome databases to dissect disease-specific genes. Using colon cancer as a model tumor, we show that the application of Boolean operators (AND, OR, BUTNOT) for database searches leads to genes with expression patterns of interest. The BUTNOT operator for example allows the assignment of "expression signatures" to normal tissue specimens. These expression signatures were then used to computationally identify contaminating cells within conventionally dissected tissue specimens. The combination of several logic operators together with an expression database based on multiple human tissue specimens can resolve the problem of tissue contamination, revealing novel cancer-specific gene expression. Several markers, previously not known to be colon cancer associated, are provided. PMID:12631577

  8. Genome-wide analysis of the mouse lung transcriptome reveals novel molecular gene interaction networks and cell-specific expression signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Williams Robert W; Lu Lu; Alberts Rudi; Schughart Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The lung is critical in surveillance and initial defense against pathogens. In humans, as in mice, individual genetic differences strongly modulate pulmonary responses to infectious agents, severity of lung disease, and potential allergic reactions. In a first step towards understanding genetic predisposition and pulmonary molecular networks that underlie individual differences in disease vulnerability, we performed a global analysis of normative lung gene expression level...

  9. Genome-wide analysis of the mouse lung transcriptome reveals novel molecular gene interaction networks and cell-specific expression signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Alberts, Rudi; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W.; Schughart, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Background The lung is critical in surveillance and initial defense against pathogens. In humans, as in mice, individual genetic differences strongly modulate pulmonary responses to infectious agents, severity of lung disease, and potential allergic reactions. In a first step towards understanding genetic predisposition and pulmonary molecular networks that underlie individual differences in disease vulnerability, we performed a global analysis of normative lung gene expression levels in inbr...

  10. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe;

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled...... later for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and...

  11. New strategies for designing inexpensive but selective bioadsorbants for environmental pollutants: Selection of specific ligands and their cell surface expression. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The broad, long term objective of the research plan is to develop exquisitely selective polypeptide metal chelators for the remediation of aqueous systems. A variety of polypeptide chelators will be developed and optimized ranging from antibodies to small peptides. Then, through unique molecular engineering approaches developed in the laboratories, the polypeptide chelators will be anchored directly on the surface of the cells that produce them. Thus, instead of using isolated biomolecules the authors will employ inexpensive genetically engineered whole cell adsorbents. Following a simple, easily scaleable treatment, the engineered cells can be used to manufacture an inexpensive, particulate adsorbent for metal removal. The authors are currently in year two of a three year program. Work has been focused on preparing the molecular biology constructs needed to carry out the optimization of a metal complex binding antibody, and on the isolation of a metal binding peptide.'

  12. Isolating specific embryonic cells of the sea urchin by FACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Celina; Swartz, S Zachary; Wessel, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Isolating cells based on specific gene expression enables a focused biochemical and molecular analysis. While cultured cells and hematopoietic cells, for example, are routinely isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), early embryonic cells are a relatively untapped source for FACS applications often because the embryos of many animals are quite limiting. Furthermore, many applications require genetic model organisms in which cells can be labeled by fluorescent transgenes, or antibodies against cell surface antigens. Here we define conditions in the sea urchin embryo for isolation of embryonic cells based on expression of specific proteins. We use the sea urchin embryo for which a nearly unlimited supply of embryonic cells is available and demonstrate the conditions for separation of the embryo into single cells, fixation of the cells for antibody penetration into the cells, and conditions for FACS of a rare cell type in the embryo. This protocol may be adapted for analysis of mRNA, chromatin, protein, or carbohydrates and depends only on the probe availability for the cell of interest. We anticipate that this protocol will be broadly applicable to embryos of other species. PMID:24567215

  13. Characterization of the transgenic CA-AhR mouse - cell specific expression of the CA-AhR using CYP1A1 as a marker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunnberg, S.; Lindstam, M.; Andersson, P.; Hanberg, A. [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Poellinger, L. [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    The risk assessments of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs performed by WHO and EU lead to major concerns. The tolerable daily intake for humans has been assessed to be within the range of human exposures occurring in the general population today. Dioxins are known to adversely impair reproduction and affect development of reproductive organs, as well as the early development of the immune and the nervous systems. The Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) mediates most toxic effects of dioxins, such as 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and PCBs. In order to study the mechanisms of toxicity of ligands of the Ah receptor we have created a transgenic mouse model expressing a constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-AhR). The mutant Ah receptor is expressed and functionally active in most (or all) organs. Consequently, the CA-AhR mice show several of the well-known effects of dioxin exposure. Since the CA-AhR is continuously active at a relatively low level and from early development, this model resembles the human exposure scenario and is thus suitable for studies on mechanisms of action of Ah receptor ligands.

  14. Early specification of dopaminergic phenotype during ES cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Meng

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding how lineage choices are made during embryonic stem (ES cell differentiation is critical for harnessing strategies for controlled production of therapeutic somatic cell types for cell transplantation and pharmaceutical drug screens. The in vitro generation of dopaminergic neurons, the type of cells lost in Parkinson's disease patients' brains, requires the inductive molecules sonic hedgehog and FGF8, or an unknown stromal cell derived inducing activity (SDIA. However, the exact identity of the responding cells and the timing of inductive activity that specify a dopaminergic fate in neural stem/progenitors still remain elusive. Results Using ES cells carrying a neuroepithelial cell specific vital reporter (Sox1-GFP and FACS purification of Sox1-GFP neural progenitors, we have investigated the temporal aspect of SDIA mediated dopaminergic neuron specification during ES cell differentiation. Our results establish that SDIA induces a dopaminergic neuron fate in nascent neural stem or progenitor cells at, or prior to, Sox1 expression and does not appear to have further instructive role or neurotrophic activity during late neuronal differentiation of neural precursors. Furthermore, we show that dopaminergic neurons could be produced efficiently in a monolayer differentiation paradigm independent of SDIA activity or exogenous signalling molecules. In this case, the competence for dopaminergic neuron differentiation is also established at the level of Sox1 expression. Conclusion Dopaminergic neurons are specified early during mouse ES cell differentiation. The subtype specification seems to be tightly linked with the acquisition of a pan neuroectoderm fate.

  15. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard B.; Balish, Rebecca S.; Tehryung, Kim; McKinney, Elizabeth C.

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  16. Identification of Vulnerable Cell Types in Major Brain Disorders Using Single Cell Transcriptomes and Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Skene, Nathan G.; Grant, Seth G.N.

    2016-01-01

    The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment ...

  17. Identification of vulnerable cell types in major brain disorders using single cell transcriptomes and expression weighted cell type enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Skene, Nathan G.; Grant, Seth G.N.

    2016-01-01

    The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment ...

  18. Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells maintain effector and memory tumor-specific CD8+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Sarah E; Jensen, Shawn M; Antony, Paul A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Fox, Bernard A

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapies that augment antitumor T cells have had recent success for treating patients with cancer. Here we examined whether tumor-specific CD4+ T cells enhance CD8+ T-cell adoptive immunotherapy in a lymphopenic environment. Our model employed physiological doses of tyrosinase-related protein 1-specific CD4+ transgenic T cells-CD4+ T cells and pmel-CD8+ T cells that when transferred individually were subtherapeutic; however, when transferred together provided significant (p ≤ 0.001) therapeutic efficacy. Therapeutic efficacy correlated with increased numbers of effector and memory CD8+ T cells with tumor-specific cytokine expression. When combined with CD4+ T cells, transfer of total (naïve and effector) or effector CD8+ T cells were highly effective, suggesting CD4+ T cells can help mediate therapeutic effects by maintaining function of activated CD8+ T cells. In addition, CD4+ T cells had a pronounced effect in the early posttransfer period, as their elimination within the first 3 days significantly (p < 0.001) reduced therapeutic efficacy. The CD8+ T cells recovered from mice treated with both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells had decreased expression of PD-1 and PD-1-blockade enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of pmel-CD8 alone, suggesting that CD4+ T cells help reduce CD8+ T-cell exhaustion. These data support combining immunotherapies that elicit both tumor-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells for treatment of patients with cancer. PMID:24114780

  19. Small RNA expression and strain specificity in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bruijn Ewart

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital gene expression (DGE profiling has become an established tool to study RNA expression. Here, we provide an in-depth analysis of small RNA DGE profiles from two different rat strains (BN-Lx and SHR from six different rat tissues (spleen, liver, brain, testis, heart, kidney. We describe the expression patterns of known and novel micro (miRNAs and piwi-interacting (piRNAs. Results We confirmed the expression of 588 known miRNAs (54 in antisense orientation and identified 56 miRNAs homologous to known human or mouse miRNAs, as well as 45 new rat miRNAs. Furthermore, we confirmed specific A to I editing in brain for mir-376a/b/c and identified mir-377 as a novel editing target. In accordance with earlier findings, we observed a highly tissue-specific expression pattern for all tissues analyzed. The brain was found to express the highest number of tissue-specific miRNAs, followed by testis. Notably, our experiments also revealed robust strain-specific differential miRNA expression in the liver that is caused by genetic variation between the strains. Finally, we identified two types of germline-specific piRNAs in testis, mapping either to transposons or in strand-specific clusters. Conclusions Taken together, the small RNA compendium described here advances the annotation of small RNAs in the rat genome. Strain and tissue-specific expression patterns furthermore provide a strong basis for studying the role of small RNAs in regulatory networks as well as biological process like physiology and neurobiology that are extensively studied in this model system.

  20. Expressive versus Receptive Language Skills in Specific Reading Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovik, Vesna; Riddell, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Despite ample research into the language skills of children with specific reading disorder no studies so far have investigated whether there may be a difference between expressive and receptive language skills in this population. Yet, neuro-anatomical models would predict that children who have specific reading disorder which is not associated…

  1. Redirecting T Cell Specificity Using T Cell Receptor Messenger RNA Electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Sarene; Shimasaki, Noriko; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Autologous T lymphocytes genetically modified to express T cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors have shown great promise in the treatment of several cancers, including melanoma and leukemia. In addition to tumor-associated antigens and tumor-specific neoantigens, tumors expressing viral peptides can also be recognized by specific T cells and are attractive targets for cell therapy. Hepatocellular carcinoma cells often have hepatitis B virus DNA integration and can be targeted by hepatitis B virus-specific T cells. Here, we describe a method to engineer hepatitis B virus-specific T cell receptors in primary human T lymphocytes based on electroporation of hepatitis B virus T cell receptor messenger RNA. This method can be extended to a large scale therapeutic T cell production following current good manufacturing practice compliance and is applicable to the redirection of T lymphocytes with T cell receptors of other virus specificities such as Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and chimeric receptors specific for other antigens expressed on cancer cells. PMID:27236807

  2. From specification to realization: implementing the express transfer protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Irey, Philip Musser IV

    1989-01-01

    The research described in this thesis deals with effective protocol specification. The primary question addressed is whether the Express Transfer Protocol (XTP), a "real-time" Transport layer protocol, is sufficiently specified or are there "holes" in its specification? A new protocol evaluation process is formulated and applied to XTP in order to answer this question. The evaluation process combines a detailed analysis of the XTP specification with an attempt to implement parts of the protoc...

  3. High epitope expression levels increase competition between T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almut Scherer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Both theoretical predictions and experimental findings suggest that T cell populations can compete with each other. There is some debate on whether T cells compete for aspecific stimuli, such as access to the surface on antigen-presenting cells (APCs or for specific stimuli, such as their cognate epitope ligand. We have developed an individual-based computer simulation model to study T cell competition. Our model shows that the expression level of foreign epitopes per APC determines whether T cell competition is mainly for specific or aspecific stimuli. Under low epitope expression, competition is mainly for the specific epitope stimuli, and, hence, different epitope-specific T cell populations coexist readily. However, if epitope expression levels are high, aspecific competition becomes more important. Such between-specificity competition can lead to competitive exclusion between different epitope-specific T cell populations. Our model allows us to delineate the circumstances that facilitate coexistence of T cells of different epitope specificity. Understanding mechanisms of T cell coexistence has important practical implications for immune therapies that require a broad immune response.

  4. Apoptin: Specific killer of tumor cells?

    OpenAIRE

    Tavassoli, M; Guelen, L.; Luxon, B. A.; Gäken, J

    2005-01-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.1 These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apo...

  5. Human cyclin T1 expression ameliorates a T-cell-specific transcriptional limitation for HIV in transgenic rats, but is not sufficient for a spreading infection of prototypic R5 HIV-1 strains ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littman Dan R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cells derived from native rodents have limits at distinct steps of HIV replication. Rat primary CD4 T-cells, but not macrophages, display a profound transcriptional deficit that is ameliorated by transient trans-complementation with the human Tat-interacting protein Cyclin T1 (hCycT1. Results Here, we generated transgenic rats that selectively express hCycT1 in CD4 T-cells and macrophages. hCycT1 expression in rat T-cells boosted early HIV gene expression to levels approaching those in infected primary human T-cells. hCycT1 expression was necessary, but not sufficient, to enhance HIV transcription in T-cells from individual transgenic animals, indicating that endogenous cellular factors are critical co-regulators of HIV gene expression in rats. T-cells from hCD4/hCCR5/hCycT1-transgenic rats did not support productive infection of prototypic wild-type R5 HIV-1 strains ex vivo, suggesting one or more significant limitation in the late phase of the replication cycle in this primary rodent cell type. Remarkably, we identify a replication-competent HIV-1 GFP reporter strain (R7/3 YU-2 Env that displays characteristics of a spreading, primarily cell-to-cell-mediated infection in primary T-cells from hCD4/hCCR5-transgenic rats. Moreover, the replication of this recombinant HIV-1 strain was significantly enhanced by hCycT1 transgenesis. The viral determinants of this so far unique replicative ability are currently unknown. Conclusion Thus, hCycT1 expression is beneficial to de novo HIV infection in a transgenic rat model, but additional genetic manipulations of the host or virus are required to achieve full permissivity.

  6. Cell-Specific Aptamers as Emerging Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Cindy Meyer; Ulrich Hahn; Andrea Rentmeister

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are short nucleic acids that bind to defined targets with high affinity and specificity. The first aptamers have been selected about two decades ago by an in vitro process named SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment). Since then, numerous aptamers with specificities for a variety of targets from small molecules to proteins or even whole cells have...

  7. Advantages and Applications of CAR-Expressing Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang eGlienke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to donor T cells, natural killer (NK cells are known to mediate anti-cancer effects without the risk of inducing graft-versus-host disease (GvHD. In order to improve cytotoxicity against resistant cancer cells, auspicious efforts have been made with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR expressing T- and NK cells. These CAR-modified cells express antigen receptors against tumor-associated surface antigens, thus redirecting the effector cells and enhancing tumor-specific immunosurveillance. However, many cancer antigens are also expressed on healthy tissues, potentially leading to off tumor/ on target toxicity by CAR-engineered cells. In order to control such potentially severe side effects, the insertion of suicide genes into CAR-modified effectors can provide a means for efficient depletion of these cells. While CAR-expressing T cells have entered successfully clinical trials, experience with CAR-engineered NK cells is mainly restricted to pre-clinical investigations and predominantly to NK cell lines. In this review we summarize the data on CAR expressing NK cells focusing on the possible advantage using these short-lived effector cells and discuss the necessity of suicide switches. Furthermore, we address the compliance of such modified NK cells with regulatory requirements as a new field in cellular immunotherapy.

  8. Nidogen-1 regulates laminin-1-dependent mammary-specific gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujuguet, Philippe; Simian, Marina; Liaw, Jane; Timpl, Rupert; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J..

    2000-02-01

    Nidogen-1 (entactin) acts as a bridge between the extracellular matrix molecules laminin-1 and type IV collagen, and thus participates in the assembly of basement membranes. To investigate the role of nidogen-1 in regulating cell-type-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium, we designed a culture microecosystem in which each component, including epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, lactogenic hormones and extracellular matrix, could be controlled. We found that primary and established mesenchymal and myoepithelial cells synthesized and secreted nidogen-1, whereas expression was absent in primary and established epithelial cells. In an epithelial cell line containing mesenchymal cells, nidogen-1 was produced by the mesenchymal cells but deposited between the epithelial cells. In this mixed culture, mammary epithelial cells express b-casein in the presence of lactogenic hormones. Addition of either laminin-1 plus nidogen-1, or laminin-1 alone to mammary epithelial cells induced b- casein production. We asked whether recombinant nidogen-1 alone could signal directly for b-casein. Nidogen-1 did not induce b-casein synthesis in epithelial cells, but it augmented the inductive capacity of laminin-1. These data suggest that nidogen-1 can cooperate with laminin-1 to regulate b-casein expression. Addition of full length nidogen-1 to the mixed cultures had no effect on b-casein gene expression; however, a nidogen-1 fragment containing the laminin-1 binding domain, but lacking the type IV collagen-binding domain, had a dominant negative effect on b-casein expression. These data point to a physiological role for nidogen-1 in the basement membrane-induced gene expression by epithelial cells.

  9. Spontaneous Expression of Interleukin-2 In Vivo in Specific Tissues of Young Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rothenberg, Ellen V.; Yang-Snyder, Julia A.

    1998-01-01

    In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the spectrum of tissues in which interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA and protein are found in healthy, normal young mice. In neonatal animals, IL-2 is expressed specifically by distinct, isolated cells at three major sites: the thymus, skin, and gut. Based on morphology and distribution, the IL-2-expressing cells resemble CD3ε + T cells that are also present in all these locations. Within the thymus of postweanling animals, both TcRα...

  10. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative

  11. Learning LM Specificity for Ganglion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised learning models have been proposed based on experience (Ahumada and Mulligan, 1990;Wachtler, Doi, Lee and Sejnowski, 2007) that allow the cortex to develop units with LM specific color opponent receptive fields like the blob cells reported by Hubel and Wiesel on the basis of visual experience. These models used ganglion cells with LM indiscriminate wiring as inputs to the learning mechanism, which was presumed to occur at the cortical level.

  12. Chemokine receptor expression by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juremalm, Mikael; Nilsson, Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the role of chemokines and their receptors in the determination of mast cell tissue localization and how chemokines regulate mast cell function. At least nine chemokine receptors (CXCR1, CXCR2, CXCR3, CXCR4, CX3CR1, CCR1, CCR3, CCR4 and CCR5) have been described to be expressed by human mast cells of different origins. Seven chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL5, CXCL8, CXCL14, CX3CL1, CCL5 and CCL11) have been shown to act on some of these receptors and to induce mast cell migration. Mast cells have a unique expression pattern of CCR3, CXCR1 and CXCR2. These receptors are mainly expressed intracellularly on cytoplasmic membranes. Upon an allergic activation, CCR3 expression is increased on the cell surface and the cell becomes vulnerable for CCL11 treatment. Chemokines do not induce mast cell degranulation but CXCL14 causes secretion of de novo synthesized CXCL8. Because of the expression of CCR3, CCR5 and CXCR4 on mast cell progenitors, these cells are susceptible to HIV infection and mast cells might therefore be a persistent HIV reservoir in AIDS. In this review, we summarize the knowledge about chemokine receptor expression and function on mast cells. PMID:16107768

  13. Geometry of the Gene Expression Space of Individual Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Korem

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a revolution in the ability to analyze gene expression of single cells in a tissue. To understand this data we must comprehend how cells are distributed in a high-dimensional gene expression space. One open question is whether cell types form discrete clusters or whether gene expression forms a continuum of states. If such a continuum exists, what is its geometry? Recent theory on evolutionary trade-offs suggests that cells that need to perform multiple tasks are arranged in a polygon or polyhedron (line, triangle, tetrahedron and so on, generally called polytopes in gene expression space, whose vertices are the expression profiles optimal for each task. Here, we analyze single-cell data from human and mouse tissues profiled using a variety of single-cell technologies. We fit the data to shapes with different numbers of vertices, compute their statistical significance, and infer their tasks. We find cases in which single cells fill out a continuum of expression states within a polyhedron. This occurs in intestinal progenitor cells, which fill out a tetrahedron in gene expression space. The four vertices of this tetrahedron are each enriched with genes for a specific task related to stemness and early differentiation. A polyhedral continuum of states is also found in spleen dendritic cells, known to perform multiple immune tasks: cells fill out a tetrahedron whose vertices correspond to key tasks related to maturation, pathogen sensing and communication with lymphocytes. A mixture of continuum-like distributions and discrete clusters is found in other cell types, including bone marrow and differentiated intestinal crypt cells. This approach can be used to understand the geometry and biological tasks of a wide range of single-cell datasets. The present results suggest that the concept of cell type may be expanded. In addition to discreet clusters in gene-expression space, we suggest a new possibility: a continuum of states within a

  14. Systemic Inflammation Affects Human Osteocyte-Specific Protein and Cytokine Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Janak L; Bakker, Astrid D; Luyten, Frank P; Verschueren, Patrick; Lems, Willem F; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Bravenboer, Nathalie

    2016-06-01

    Bone remodeling can be disturbed in active rheumatoid arthritis (RA), possibly as a result of elevated levels of circulating inflammatory cytokines. Osteocyte-specific proteins and cytokines play a vital role in bone remodeling by orchestrating bone formation and/or bone resorption. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effect of RA-serum or inflammatory cytokines on expression of human osteocyte-specific proteins and cytokines. Human trabecular bone chips were cultured with RA-serum or inflammatory cytokines for 7-days. Live-dead staining was performed to assess cell viability. Gene expression of osteocyte-specific proteins and cytokines was analyzed by qPCR. Immuno-staining was performed for osteocyte-specific markers. Approximately 60 % of the osteocytes on the bone chips were alive at day-7. Cells in or on the bone chips did express the gene for osteocyte markers SOST, FGF23, DMP1, and MEPE, and the cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα at day 0 and 7. Active RA-serum treatment enhanced IL-1β, TNFα, SOST, and DKK1 gene expression. IL-1β treatment enhanced IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, IL-8, FGF23, and SOST gene expression. TNFα treatment enhanced IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, IL-8, and FGF23 gene expression. IL-8 treatment enhanced TNFα, IL-8, and FGF23 gene expression. A combination of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα treatment synergistically upregulated IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 gene expression, as well as enhanced TNFα, OPG, SOST, and FGF23, and inhibited DKK1 gene expression. In conclusion, gene expression of human osteocyte-specific proteins and cytokines was affected by RA-serum, and exogenous recombinant cytokines treatment suggesting that osteocytes could provide a new target to prevent systemic inflammation-induced bone loss in RA. PMID:26887974

  15. Towards an understanding of cell-specific functions of signal-dependent transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dawn X.; Glass, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to regulate gene expression in a cell-specific manner is a feature of many broadly expressed signal-dependent transcription factors, including nuclear hormone receptors and transcription factors that are activated by cell surface receptors for extracellular signals. As the most plastic cells of the hematopoietic system, macrophages are responsive to a wide spectrum of regulatory molecules and provide a robust model system for investigation of the basis for cell-specific transcript...

  16. SMG-ly knocking out gene expression in specific cells: an educational primer for use with "a novel strategy for cell-autonomous gene knockdown in caenorhabditis elegans defines a cell-specific function for the G-protein subunit GOA-1".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneely, Philip M; Bloom, Jordana C

    2013-12-01

    A recent article by Maher et al. in GENETICS introduces an alternative approach to cell-type-specific gene knockdown in Caenorhabditis elegans, using nonsense-mediated decay. This strategy has the potential to be applicable to other organisms (this strategy requires that animals can survive without nonsense-mediated decay-not all can). This Primer article provides a guide and resource for educators and students by describing different gene knockdown methodologies, by assisting with the technically difficult portions of the Maher et al. article, and by providing conceptual questions relating to the article. PMID:24302743

  17. Expression of CD44 in Cultured Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongguo Li; Hong Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Purpose:To determine whether cultured human trabecular meshwork cells express CD44 and to discuss their possible relationship with primary open angle glaucoma.Methods:Human trabecular meshwork cells were cultured in DMEM/F12 media. Total RNAs from the cells were extracted with Trizol reagent. Messenger RNA expression of CD44 in human trabecular meshwork cells was examined by using reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction ( RT-PCR ) analysis. Expression of CD44 was confirmed by Western-blotting and immunofiuorescent microscopy. Effect of CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide on adhesion of trabecular meshwork cells to hyaluronate was determined by MTT assay.Results:A single RT-PCR product whose size was 471bp was obtained.A band about 80kD was stained by Western-blot. Immunofiuorescent examination of expression of CD44 on the cell surface was positive and reactions were mainly localized in cell membranes.Adhesion of trabecular meshwork cells to hyaluronate was inhibited by CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide.Conclusions: Cultured human trabecular meshwork cells express CD44. CD44 may play a role in pathogenesis of primary open angle glaucoma. Eye Science 2004;20:52-56.

  18. Chondrocytes-Specific Expression of Osteoprotegerin Modulates Osteoclast Formation in Metaphyseal Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Baoli Wang; Hongting Jin; Bing Shu; Ranim R. Mira; Di Chen

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells/osteoblasts were originally thought to be the major player in regulating osteoclast differentiation through expressing RANKL/OPG cytokines. Recent studies have established that chondrocytes also express RANKL/OPG and support osteoclast formation. Till now, the in vivo function of chondrocyte-produced OPG in osteoclast formation and postnatal bone growth has not been directly investigated. In this study, chondrocyte-specific Opg transgenic mice were generated by using...

  19. Inhibition of a novel specific neuroglial integrin signaling pathway increases STAT3-mediated CNTF expression

    OpenAIRE

    Keasey, Matthew P.; Kang, Seong Su; Lovins, Chiharu; Hagg, Theo

    2013-01-01

    Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) expression is repressed in astrocytes by neuronal contact in the CNS and is rapidly induced by injury. Here, we defined an inhibitory integrin signaling pathway. Results The integrin substrates laminin, fibronectin and vitronectin, but not collagen, thrombospondin or fibrinogen, reduced CNTF expression in C6 astroglioma cells. Antibodies against αv and β5, but not α6 or β1, integrin induced CNTF. Together, the ligand and antibody specificity sugge...

  20. The expression and regulation of pregnancy-specific glycoproteins in the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, John Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy-Specific Glycoproteins (PSG) are the most abundant fetally expressed proteins in the maternal bloodstream at term. This multigene family are immunoglobulin superfamily members and are predominantly expressed in the syncytiotrophoblast of human placenta and in giant cells and spongiotrophoblast of rodent placenta. PSGs are encoded by seventeen genes in the mouse and ten genes in the human. Little is known about the function of this gene family, although they have been implicated in i...

  1. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothi Thyagabhavan Mony

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS. The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS. The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4+ T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells. Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4+ T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 7.7% of CD4+ T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8+ T cells. CD8+ T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4+ T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6+ and CXCR3+ CD4+ T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8+ T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4+ T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6+ cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE.

  2. Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis of ESGP, an Embryonic Stem Cell and Germ Cell Specific Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Mei CHEN; Zhong-Wei DU; Zhen YAO

    2005-01-01

    Several putative Oct-4 downstream genes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells have been identified using the suppression-subtractive hybridization method. In this study, one of the novel genes encoding an ES cell and germ cell specific protein (ESGP) was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends.ESGP contains 801 bp encoding an 84 amino acid small protein and has no significant homology to any known genes. There is a signal peptide at the N-terminal of ESGP protein as predicted by SeqWeb (GCG)(SeqWeb version 2.0.2, http://gcg.biosino.org:8080/). The result of immunofluorescence assay suggested that ESGP might encode a secretory protein. The expression pattern of ESGP is consistent with the expression of Oct-4 during embryonic development. ESGP protein was detected in fertilized oocyte, from 3.5 day postcoital (dpc) blastocyst to 17.5 dpc embryo, and was only detected in testis and ovary tissues in adult. In vitro, ESGP was only expressed in pluripotent cell lines, such as embryonic stem cells, embryonic carcinoma cells and embryonic germ cells, but not in their differentiated progenies. Despite its specific expression,forced expression of ESGP is not indispensable for the effect of Oct-4 on ES cell self-renewal, and does not affect the differentiation to three germ layers.

  3. Human Neuroepithelial Cells Express NMDA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappell B

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, binds to both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In certain parts of the brain the BBB contains two normally impermeable barriers: 1 cerebral endothelial barrier and 2 cerebral epithelial barrier. Human cerebral endothelial cells express NMDA receptors; however, to date, human cerebral epithelial cells (neuroepithelial cells have not been shown to express NMDA receptor message or protein. In this study, human hypothalamic sections were examined for NMDA receptors (NMDAR expression via immunohistochemistry and murine neuroepithelial cell line (V1 were examined for NMDAR via RT-PCR and Western analysis. We found that human cerebral epithelium express protein and cultured mouse neuroepithelial cells express both mRNA and protein for the NMDA receptor. These findings may have important consequences for neuroepithelial responses during excitotoxicity and in disease.

  4. Cell-Specific Aptamers as Emerging Therapeutics

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    Cindy Meyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short nucleic acids that bind to defined targets with high affinity and specificity. The first aptamers have been selected about two decades ago by an in vitro process named SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Since then, numerous aptamers with specificities for a variety of targets from small molecules to proteins or even whole cells have been selected. Their applications range from biosensing and diagnostics to therapy and target-oriented drug delivery. More recently, selections using complex targets such as live cells have become feasible. This paper summarizes progress in cell-SELEX techniques and highlights recent developments, particularly in the field of medically relevant aptamers with a focus on therapeutic and drug-delivery applications.

  5. Global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences in rice evolution result in two contrasting types of differentially expressed genes

    KAUST Repository

    Horiuchi, Youko

    2015-12-23

    Background Since the development of transcriptome analysis systems, many expression evolution studies characterized evolutionary forces acting on gene expression, without explicit discrimination between global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences. However, different types of gene expression alteration should have different effects on an organism, the evolutionary forces that act on them might be different, and different types of genes might show different types of differential expression between species. To confirm this, we studied differentially expressed (DE) genes among closely related groups that have extensive gene expression atlases, and clarified characteristics of different types of DE genes including the identification of regulating loci for differential expression using expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analysis data. Results We detected differentially expressed (DE) genes between rice subspecies in five homologous tissues that were verified using japonica and indica transcriptome atlases in public databases. Using the transcriptome atlases, we classified DE genes into two types, global DE genes and changed-tissues DE genes. Global type DE genes were not expressed in any tissues in the atlas of one subspecies, however changed-tissues type DE genes were expressed in both subspecies with different tissue specificity. For the five tissues in the two japonica-indica combinations, 4.6 ± 0.8 and 5.9 ± 1.5 % of highly expressed genes were global and changed-tissues DE genes, respectively. Changed-tissues DE genes varied in number between tissues, increasing linearly with the abundance of tissue specifically expressed genes in the tissue. Molecular evolution of global DE genes was rapid, unlike that of changed-tissues DE genes. Based on gene ontology, global and changed-tissues DE genes were different, having no common GO terms. Expression differences of most global DE genes were regulated by cis-eQTLs. Expression

  6. A functional proteogenomic analysis of endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas using reverse phase protein array and mutation analysis: protein expression is histotype-specific and loss of ARID1A/BAF250a is associated with AKT phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovarian cancer is now recognized as a number of distinct diseases primarily defined by histological subtype. Both clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCC) and ovarian endometrioid carcinomas (EC) may arise from endometriosis and frequently harbor mutations in the ARID1A tumor suppressor gene. We studied the influence of histological subtype on protein expression with reverse phase protein array (RPPA) and assessed proteomic changes associated with ARID1A mutation/BAF250a expression in EC and CCC. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for BAF250a expression was performed on 127 chemotherapy-naive ovarian carcinomas (33 CCC, 29 EC, and 65 high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSC)). Whole tumor lysates were prepared from frozen banked tumor samples and profiled by RPPA using 116 antibodies. ARID1A mutations were identified by exome sequencing, and PIK3CA mutations were characterized by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. SAM (Significance Analysis of Microarrays) was performed to determine differential protein expression by histological subtype and ARID1A mutation status. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the impact of ARID1A mutation status/BAF250a expression on AKT phosphorylation (pAKT). PIK3CA mutation type and PTEN expression were included in the model. BAF250a knockdown was performed in 3 clear cell lines using siRNA to ARID1A. Marked differences in protein expression were observed that are driven by histotype. Compared to HGSC, SAM identified over 50 proteins that are differentially expressed in CCC and EC. These included PI3K/AKT pathway proteins, those regulating the cell cycle, apoptosis, transcription, and other signaling pathways including steroid hormone signaling. Multivariate models showed that tumors with loss of BAF250a expression showed significantly higher levels of AKT-Thr308 and AKT-Ser473 phosphorylation (p < 0.05). In 31 CCC cases, pAKT was similarly significantly increased in tumors with BAF250a loss on IHC. Knockdown of BAF250a by siRNA in three

  7. Cell-specific monitoring of protein synthesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Kourtis

    Full Text Available Analysis of general and specific protein synthesis provides important information, relevant to cellular physiology and function. However, existing methodologies, involving metabolic labelling by incorporation of radioactive amino acids into nascent polypeptides, cannot be applied to monitor protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in live specimens. We have developed a novel approach for monitoring protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in vivo. Fluorescent reporter proteins such as GFP are expressed in specific cells and tissues of interest or throughout animals using appropriate promoters. Protein synthesis rates are assessed by following fluorescence recovery after partial photobleaching of the fluorophore at targeted sites. We evaluate the method by examining protein synthesis rates in diverse cell types of live, wild type or mRNA translation-defective Caenorhabditis elegans animals. Because it is non-invasive, our approach allows monitoring of protein synthesis in single cells or tissues with intrinsically different protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, it can be readily implemented in other organisms or cell culture systems.

  8. Turning on Myogenin in Muscle: A Paradigm for Understanding Mechanisms of Tissue-Specific Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herve Faralli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the myogenin (Myog gene is restricted to skeletal muscle cells where the transcriptional activator turns on a gene expression program that permits the transition from proliferating myoblasts to differentiating myotubes. The strict temporal and spatial regulation on Myog expression in the embryo makes it an ideal gene to study the developmental regulation of tissue-specific expression. Over the last 20 years, our knowledge of the regulation of Myog expression has evolved from the identification of the minimal promoter elements necessary for the gene to be transcribed in muscle, to a mechanistic understanding of how the proteins that bind these DNA elements work together to establish transcriptional competence. Here we present our current understanding of the developmental regulation of gene expression gained from studies of the Myog gene.

  9. The use of genetic transformation in the study of ovarian-specific gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are using genetic and molecular approaches to understand the mechanisms controlling the establishment of the cellular specificity of expression during oogenesis. Female-sterile mutations have been isolated and the molecular analysis is revealing interesting cell-cell interaction systems that work not only during oogenesis but also at other developmental stages. We will review in this paper our most recent studies on genes involved in ovarian development. (author)

  10. Common and cell type-specific responses of human cells to mitochondrial dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In yeast, mitochondrial dysfunction activates a specific pathway, termed retrograde regulation, which alters the expression of specific nuclear genes and results in increased replicative life span. In mammalian cells, the specific nuclear genes induced in response to loss of mitochondrial function are less well defined. This study characterizes responses in nuclear gene expression to loss of mitochondrial DNA sequences in three different human cell types: T143B, an osteosarcoma-derived cell line; ARPE19, a retinal pigment epithelium cell line; and GMO6225, a fibroblast cell population from an individual with Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS). Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to measure gene expression of a selection of glycolysis, TCA cycle, mitochondrial, peroxisomal, extracellular matrix, stress response, and regulatory genes. Gene expression changes that were common to all three cell types included up-regulation of GCK (glucokinase), CS (citrate synthase), HOX1 (heme oxygenase 1), CKMT2 (mitochondrial creatine kinase 2), MYC (v-myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog), and WRN (Werner syndrome helicase), and down-regulation of FBP1 (fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase 1) and COL4A1 (collagen, type IV, alpha 1). RNA interference experiments show that induction of MYC is important in ρ0 cells for the up-regulation of glycolysis. In addition, a variety of cell type-specific gene changes was detected and most likely depended upon the differentiated functions of the individual cell types. These expression changes may help explain the response of different tissues to the loss of mitochondrial function due to aging or disease

  11. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies. PMID:17855129

  12. Exogenous Restoration of TUSC2 Expression Induces Responsiveness to Erlotinib in Wildtype Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR Lung Cancer Cells through Context Specific Pathways Resulting in Enhanced Therapeutic Efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingbing Dai

    Full Text Available Expression of the tumor suppressor gene TUSC2 is reduced or absent in most lung cancers and is associated with worse overall survival. In this study, we restored TUSC2 gene expression in several wild type EGFR non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines resistant to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib and analyzed their sensitivity to erlotinib in vitro and in vivo. A significant inhibition of cell growth and colony formation was observed with TUSC2 transient and stable expression. TUSC2-erlotinib cooperativity in vitro could be reproduced in vivo in subcutaneous tumor growth and lung metastasis formation lung cancer xenograft mouse models. Combination treatment with intravenous TUSC2 nanovesicles and erlotinib synergistically inhibited tumor growth and metastasis, and increased apoptotic activity. High-throughput qRT-PCR array analysis enabling multi-parallel expression profile analysis of eighty six receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinase genes revealed a significant decrease of FGFR2 expression level, suggesting a potential role of FGFR2 in TUSC2-enhanced sensitivity to erlotinib. Western blots showed inhibition of FGFR2 by TUSC2 transient transfection, and marked increase of PARP, an apoptotic marker, cleavage level after TUSC2-erlotinb combined treatment. Suppression of FGFR2 by AZD4547 or gene knockdown enhanced sensitivity to erlotinib in some but not all tested cell lines. TUSC2 inhibits mTOR activation and the latter cell lines were responsive to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin combined with erlotinib. These results suggest that TUSC2 restoration in wild type EGFR NSCLC may overcome erlotinib resistance, and identify FGFR2 and mTOR as critical regulators of this activity in varying cellular contexts. The therapeutic activity of TUSC2 could extend the use of erlotinib to lung cancer patients with wildtype EGFR.

  13. Cell-type specific four-component hydrogel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Aberle

    Full Text Available In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel, an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering.

  14. Cell-type specific four-component hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Timo; Franke, Katrin; Rist, Elke; Benz, Karin; Schlosshauer, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin) to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel), an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering. PMID:24475174

  15. A BAC-based transgenic mouse specifically expresses an inducible Cre in the urothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Huai Shen

    Full Text Available Cre-loxp mediated conditional knockout strategy has played critical roles for revealing functions of many genes essential for development, as well as the causal relationships between gene mutations and diseases in the postnatal adult mice. One key factor of this strategy is the availability of mice with tissue- or cell type-specific Cre expression. However, the success of the traditional molecular cloning approach to generate mice with tissue specific Cre expression often depends on luck. Here we provide a better alternative by using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC-based recombineering to insert iCreERT2 cDNA at the ATG start of the Upk2 gene. The BAC-based transgenic mice express the inducible Cre specifically in the urothelium as demonstrated by mRNA expression and staining for LacZ expression after crossing with a Rosa26 reporter mouse. Taking into consideration the size of the gene of interest and neighboring genes included in a BAC, this method should be widely applicable for generation of mice with tissue specific gene expression or deletions in a more specific manner than previously reported.

  16. Differential Expression of Specific Dermatan Sulfate Domains in Renal Pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost F M Lensen

    Full Text Available Dermatan sulfate (DS, also known as chondroitin sulfate (CS-B, is a member of the linear polysaccharides called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. The expression of CS/DS and DS proteoglycans is increased in several fibrotic renal diseases, including interstitial fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy, mesangial sclerosis and nephrosclerosis. Little, however, is known about structural alterations in DS in renal diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the renal expression of two different DS domains in renal transplant rejection and glomerular pathologies. DS expression was evaluated in normal renal tissue and in kidney biopsies obtained from patients with acute interstitial or vascular renal allograft rejection, patients with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA, and from patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, membranous glomerulopathy (MGP or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, using our unique specific anti-DS antibodies LKN1 and GD3A12. Expression of the 4/2,4-di-O-sulfated DS domain recognized by antibody LKN1 was decreased in the interstitium of transplant kidneys with IF/TA, which was accompanied by an increased expression of type I collagen, decorin and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β, while its expression was increased in the interstitium in FSGS, MGP and SLE. Importantly, all patients showed glomerular LKN1 staining in contrast to the controls. Expression of the IdoA-Gal-NAc4SDS domain recognized by GD3A12 was similar in controls and patients. Our data suggest a role for the DS domain recognized by antibody LKN1 in renal diseases with early fibrosis. Further research is required to delineate the exact role of different DS domains in renal fibrosis.

  17. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated domain (TAD) repositioning and alterations of tissue-restricted genomic neighborhoods and chromatin loops, effectively erasing the somatic-cell-specific genome structures while establishing an embryonic stem-cell-like 3D genome. Yet, early passage iPSCs carry topological hallmarks that enable recognition of their cell of origin. These hallmarks are not remnants of somatic chromosome topologies. Instead, the distinguishing topological features are acquired during reprogramming, as we also find for cell-of-origin-dependent gene expression patterns. PMID:26971819

  18. [Inhibition of adenovirus reproduction in cell culture by specific antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povnytsia, O Iu; Nosach, L M; Zhovnovata, V L; Zahorodnia, S D; Vantsak, N P; Tokarchuk, L V; Polishchuk, O M; Diachenko, N S

    2009-01-01

    The capacity of specific antibodies to inhibit the reproduction of homo- and heterologous adenoviruses in Hela cell added to culture medium after virus adsorption was studied. The inhibiting effect of polyclonal antivirus and monospecific antihexone antibodies to homo- and heterologous adenoviruses was shown. The effect was more expressed when using antibodies to homologous antibodies. The intensity of inhibition depended on antibodies concentration in the medium and infecting dose of the virus. Essential reduction of the quantity of infected cells and a decrease of the titer of adenovirus synthesized in the presence of homo- and heterologous antibodies was shown but adenovirus reproduction was not inhibited completely. PMID:19663330

  19. Targeting Vault Nanoparticles to Specific Cell Surface Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Han, Muri; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Poderycki, Michael J.; Moniz, Raymond J.; Vaccari, Dana; Silvestry, Mariena; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Kelly, Kathleen A.; Rome, Leonard H.

    2009-01-01

    As a naturally occurring nanocapsule abundantly expressed in nearly all-eukaryotic cells, the barrel-shaped vault particle is perhaps an ideal structure to engineer for targeting to specific cell types. Recombinant vault particles self-assemble from 96 copies of the major vault protein (MVP), have dimensions of 72.5 × 41 nm, and have a hollow interior large enough to encapsulate hundreds of proteins. In this study, three different tags were engineered onto the C-terminus of MVP: an 11 amino a...

  20. Targeting vault nanoparticles to specific cell surface receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Han, Muri; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Poderycki, Michael J; Moniz, Raymond J; Vaccari, Dana; Silvestry, Mariena; Stewart, Phoebe L; Kelly, Kathleen A; Rome, Leonard H

    2009-01-27

    As a naturally occurring nanocapsule abundantly expressed in nearly all-eukaryotic cells, the barrel-shaped vault particle is perhaps an ideal structure to engineer for targeting to specific cell types. Recombinant vault particles self-assemble from 96 copies of the major vault protein (MVP), have dimensions of 72.5 x 41 nm, and have a hollow interior large enough to encapsulate hundreds of proteins. In this study, three different tags were engineered onto the C-terminus of MVP: an 11 amino acid epitope tag, a 33 amino acid IgG-binding peptide, and the 55 amino acid epidermal growth factor (EGF). These modified vaults were produced using a baculovirus expression system. Our studies demonstrate that recombinant vaults assembled from MVPs containing C-terminal peptide extensions display these tags at the top and bottom of the vault on the outside of the particle and can be used to specifically bind the modified vaults to epithelial cancer cells (A431) via the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), either directly (EGF modified vaults) or as mediated by a monoclonal antibody (anti-EGFR) bound to recombinant vaults containing the IgG-binding peptide. The ability to target vaults to specific cells represents an essential advance toward using recombinant vaults as delivery vehicles. PMID:19206245

  1. Construction of neuron specific vector of human antisense noggin gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengnian Zhou; Chengshan Li; Xiansen Wei; Liqing Liu; Zhengda Zhang

    2010-01-01

    The noggin gene is present in the central nervous system in embryonic and postnatal mammals,and plays an important role in maintaining nervous system development and physiological function.A 0.76-kb sequence of human noggin gene was cloned by polymerase chain reaction with the digestion site of Hind Ⅲ and Xba l on the 5' end.The cloned fragment was reversely inserted into pCS2+[Tα1]-GFP plasmid,an neural cell-specific antisense eukaryotic expression vector.The plasmid expresses antisense for human noggin specifically in neurons,which may facilitate understanding of the physiological function of noggin.

  2. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  3. Gene expressions changes in bronchial epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remy, S.; Verstraelen, S.; Van Den Heuvel, R.;

    2014-01-01

    cells were exposed during 6, 10, and 24 h to 4 respiratory sensitizers and 6 non-respiratory sensitizers (3 skin sensitizers and 3 respiratory irritants) at a concentration inducing 20% cell viability loss after 24 h. Changes in gene expression were evaluated using Agilent Whole Human Genome 4 x 44 K...... differentially expressed compared to vehicle control for each chemical. The results show that the NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response is activated in the cell line after stimulation with all of the chemicals that were selected in our study, and that - at the level of gene expression - this pathway shows no...

  4. Snorc is a novel cartilage specific small membrane proteoglycan expressed in differentiating and articular chondrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, J; Taipaleenmäki, H; Roering, P; Takatalo, M; Harkness, L; Sandholm, J; Uusitalo-Järvinen, H; Kassem, M; Kiviranta, I; Laitala-Leinonen, T; Säämänen, A-M

    2011-01-01

    expressed in Cos7 cells, and the cell lysate was studied for putative glycosaminoglycan attachment by digestion with chondroitinase ABC and Western blotting. RESULTS: The predicted molecule is a small, 121 amino acids long type I single-pass transmembrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, that contains ER...... signal peptide, lumenal/extracellular domain with several threonines/serines prone to O-N-acetylgalactosamine modification, and a cytoplasmic tail with a Ying-yang site prone to phosphorylation or O-N-acetylglucosamine modification. It is highly conserved in mammals with orthologs in all vertebrate...... models demonstrated similar expression profiles with Sox9, Acan and Col2a1 and up-regulation by BMP-2. Based on its cartilage specific expression, the molecule was named Snorc, (Small NOvel Rich in Cartilage). CONCLUSION: A novel cartilage specific molecule was identified which marks the differentiating...

  5. Specific expression of a β-tubulin gene (GhTub1) in developing cotton fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李园莉; 孙杰; 李春红; 朱勇清; 夏桂先

    2003-01-01

    A cDNA library was constructed using poly (A)+ RNA isolated from -1-15 DPA fibers of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). The cDNA encoding a β-tubulin isoform (designated as GhTub1) was identified through EST search. Northern blot analysis using 3′-UTR of the cDNA as a gene-specific probe was performed to investigate the expression levels of GhTub1 in various organs and in the developing fibers. The results showed that GhTub1 gene was specifically expressed in cotton fiber cells. During fiber development, GhTub1 transcripts accumulated highlyat the stage of cell rapid elongation with the highest expression appearing at the time when fiber expansion reaches the peak rate. To probe the in vivo function of GhTub1, its cDNA was cloned in the yeast expression vector pREP1 and transformed into the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Overexpression of GhTub1 in yeast cells caused severe changes in the cell morphology. These results suggest that GhTub1 may play a role in the polar elongation of cotton fibers. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the fiber-specific transcript accumulation of a cotton β-tubulin gene.

  6. The roles of ERAS during cell lineage specification of mouse early embryonic development

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Zhen-Ao; Yu, Yang; Ma, Huai-Xiao; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Lu, Xukun; Zhai, Yanhua; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Wang, Haibin; Li, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Eras encodes a Ras-like GTPase protein that was originally identified as an embryonic stem cell-specific Ras. ERAS has been known to be required for the growth of embryonic stem cells and stimulates somatic cell reprogramming, suggesting its roles on mouse early embryonic development. We now report a dynamic expression pattern of Eras during mouse peri-implantation development: its expression increases at the blastocyst stage, and specifically decreases in E7.5 mesoderm. In accordance with it...

  7. Cell-specific synaptic plasticity induced by network oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnadze, Shota; Bäuerle, Peter; Santos-Torres, Julio; Böhm, Claudia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Geiger, Jörg Rp; Dugladze, Tamar; Gloveli, Tengis

    2016-01-01

    Gamma rhythms are known to contribute to the process of memory encoding. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and network levels. Using local field potential recording in awake behaving mice and concomitant field potential and whole-cell recordings in slice preparations we found that gamma rhythms lead to activity-dependent modification of hippocampal networks, including alterations in sharp wave-ripple complexes. Network plasticity, expressed as long-lasting increases in sharp wave-associated synaptic currents, exhibits enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in pyramidal cells that is induced postsynaptically and depends on metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 activation. In sharp contrast, alteration of inhibitory synaptic strength is independent of postsynaptic activation and less pronounced. Further, we found a cell type-specific, directionally biased synaptic plasticity of two major types of GABAergic cells, parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. Thus, we propose that gamma frequency oscillations represent a network state that introduces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in a cell-specific manner. PMID:27218453

  8. Cell reprogramming for the creation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells by defined factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqun YIN; Heng WANG; Hongguo CAO; Yunhai ZHANG; Yong TAO; Xiaorong ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), characterized by being able to differentiate into various types of cells, are generally regarded as the most promising sources for cell replacement therapies. However, as typical PSCs, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are still far away from human clinics so far due to ethical issues and immune rejection response. One way to avoid such problems is to use stem cells derived from autologous somatic cells. Up to date, PSCs could be obtained by reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotent state with approaches including somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), fusion with stem cells, coculture with cells' extracts, and induction with defined factors. Among these, through reprogramming somatic cells directly by retroviral transduction of transcription factors, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been successfully generated in both mouse and human recently. These iPS cells shared similar morphology and growth properties to ESCs, could express ESCs marker genes, and could produce adult or germline-competent chimaeras and differentiate into a variety of cell types, including germ cells. Moreover, with iPS technique, patient specific PSCs could be derived more easily from handful somatic cells in human without immune rejection responses innately connected to ESCs. Consequently, generation of iPS cells would be of great help to further understand disease mechanisms, drug screening, and cell transplantation therapies as well.In summary,the recent progress in the study of cell reprogramming for the creation of patientspecific pluripotent stem cells, some existing problems, and research perspectives were suggested.

  9. Neurohypophysial Receptor Gene Expression by Thymic T Cell Subsets and Thymic T Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hansenne

    2004-01-01

    transcribed in thymic epithelium, while immature T lymphocytes express functional neurohypophysial receptors. Neurohypophysial receptors belong to the G protein-linked seven-transmembrane receptor superfamily and are encoded by four distinct genes, OTR, V1R, V2R and V3R. The objective of this study was to identify the nature of neurohypophysial receptor in thymic T cell subsets purified by immunomagnetic selection, as well as in murine thymic lymphoma cell lines RL12-NP and BW5147. OTR is transcribed in all thymic T cell subsets and T cell lines, while V3R transcription is restricted to CD4+ CD8+ and CD8+ thymic cells. Neither V1R nor V2R transcripts are detected in any kind of T cells. The OTR protein was identified by immunocytochemistry on thymocytes freshly isolated from C57BL/6 mice. In murine fetal thymic organ cultures, a specific OTR antagonist does not modify the percentage of T cell subsets, but increases late T cell apoptosis further evidencing the involvement of OT/OTR signaling in the control of T cell proliferation and survival. According to these data, OTR and V3R are differentially expressed during T cell ontogeny. Moreover, the restriction of OTR transcription to T cell lines derived from thymic lymphomas may be important in the context of T cell leukemia pathogenesis and treatment.

  10. Acquisition of docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells reveals upregulation of ABCB1 expression as a key mediator of resistance accompanied by discrete upregulation of other specific genes and pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ninel Hansen, Stine; Westergaard, David; Borg Houlberg Thomsen, Mathilde;

    2015-01-01

    analysis singled out ABCB1, which encodes permeability glycoprotein (Pgp), as the top upregulated gene in both MCF7RES and MDARES. Functional validation revealed Pgp as a key resistance mediator at low docetaxel concentrations (first-phase response), whereas additional resistance mechanisms appeared to be...... resistance and thereby identify key molecular mechanisms and predictive molecular characteristics to docetaxel resistance. Two docetaxel-resistant cell lines, MCF7RES and MDARES, were generated from their respective parental cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 by stepwise selection in docetaxel dose increments...... prominent at higher docetaxel concentrations (second-phase response). Additional resistance mechanisms were indicated by gene expression profiling, including genes in the interferon-inducible protein family in MCF7RES and cancer testis antigen family in MDARES. Also, upregulated expression of various ABC...

  11. Fundamentals of Expression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Expression of proteins in mammalian cells is a key technology important for many functional studies on human and higher eukaryotic genes. Studies include the mapping of protein interactions, solving protein structure by crystallization and X-ray diffraction or solution phase NMR and the generation of antibodies to enable a range of studies to be performed including protein detection in vivo. In addition the production of therapeutic proteins and antibodies, now a multi billion dollar industry, has driven major advances in cell line engineering for the production of grams per liter of active proteins and antibodies. Here the key factors that need to be considered for successful expression in HEK293 and CHO cells are reviewed including host cells, expression vector design, transient transfection methods, stable cell line generation and cultivation conditions. PMID:27165328

  12. Runx-CBFβ complexes control Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rudra, Dipayan; Egawa, Takeshi; Chong, Mark M.W.; Treuting, Piper; Dan R. Littman; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2009-01-01

    Foxp3 plays an indispensable role in establishing stable transcriptional and functional programs of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Loss of Foxp3 expression in mature Treg cells results in a failure of suppressor function, yet the molecular mechanisms ensuring steady heritable Foxp3 expression in the Treg cell lineage remain unknown. Using Treg cell-specific gene targeting we found that Runx-CBFβ complexes were required for maintenance of Foxp3 mRNA and protein expression in Treg cells. Consequent...

  13. Mechanism(S) Involved in the Colon-Specific Expression of the Thiamine Pyrophosphate (Tpp) Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokina, Svetlana M.; Ramos, Mel Brendan; Said, Hamid M.

    2016-01-01

    Microbiota of the large intestine synthesizes considerable amount of vitamin B1 (thiamine) in the form of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). We have recently demonstrated the existence of an efficient and specific carrier-mediated uptake process for TPP in human colonocytes, identified the TPP transporter (TPPT) involved (product of the SLC44A4 gene), and shown that expression of TPPT along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is restricted to the colon. Our aim in this study was to determine the molecular basis of the colon-specific expression of TPPT focusing on a possible epigenetic mechanism. Our results showed that the CpG island predicted in the SLC44A4 promoter is non-methylated in the human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells, but is hyper-methylated in the human duodenal epithelial HuTu80 cells (as well as in the human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE19 cells). In the mouse (where TPPT expression in the GI tract is also restricted to the colon), the CpG island predicted in the Slc44a4 promoter is non-methylated in both the jejunum and colon, thus arguing against possible contribution of DNA methylation in the colon-specific expression of TPPT. A role for histone modifications in the tissue-specific pattern of Slc44a4 expression, however, was suggested by the findings that in mouse colon, histone H3 in the 5’-regulatory region of Slc44a4 is tri-methylated at lysine 4 and acetylated at lysine 9, whereas the tri-methylation at lysine 27 modification was negligible. In contrast, in the mouse jejunum, histone H3 is hyper-trimethylated at lysine 27 (repressor mark). Similarly, possible involvement of miRNA(s) in the tissue-specific expression of TPPT was also suggested by the findings that the 3’-UTR of SLC44A4 is targeted by specific miRNAs/RNA binding proteins in non-colonic, but not in colonic, epithelial cells. These studies show, for the first time, epigenetic mechanisms (histone modifications) play a role in determining the tissue-specific pattern of expression of

  14. Tissue specific characterisation of Lim-kinase 1 expression during mouse embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Nils O; Neves, Carlos; McIntosh, Rebecca; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Vargesson, Neil; Collinson, J Martin

    2011-01-01

    The Lim-kinase (LIMK) proteins are important for the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, in particular the control of actin nucleation and depolymerisation via regulation of cofilin, and hence may control a large number of processes during development, including cell tensegrity, migration, cell cycling, and axon guidance. LIMK1/LIMK2 knockouts disrupt spinal cord morphogenesis and synapse formation but other tissues and developmental processes that require LIMK are yet to be fully determined. To identify tissues and cell-types that may require LIMK, we characterised the pattern of LIMK1 protein during mouse embryogenesis. We showed that LIMK1 displays an expression pattern that is temporally dynamic and tissue-specific. In several tissues LIMK1 is detected in cell-types that also express Wilms' tumour protein 1 and that undergo transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal states, including the pleura, epicardium, kidney nephrons, and gonads. LIMK1 was also found in a subset of cells in the dorsal retina, and in mesenchymal cells surrounding the peripheral nerves. This detailed study of the spatial and temporal expression of LIMK1 shows that LIMK1 expression is more dynamic than previously reported, in particular at sites of tissue-tissue interactions guiding multiple developmental processes. PMID:21167960

  15. Type-specific cell line models for type-specific ovarian cancer research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Anglesio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: OVARIAN CARCINOMAS CONSIST OF AT LEAST FIVE DISTINCT DISEASES: high-grade serous, low-grade serous, clear cell, endometrioid, and mucinous. Biomarker and molecular characterization may represent a more biologically relevant basis for grouping and treating this family of tumors, rather than site of origin. Molecular characteristics have become the new standard for clinical pathology, however development of tailored type-specific therapies is hampered by a failure of basic research to recognize that model systems used to study these diseases must also be stratified. Unrelated model systems do offer value for study of biochemical processes but specific cellular context needs to be applied to assess relevant therapeutic strategies. METHODS: We have focused on the identification of clear cell carcinoma cell line models. A panel of 32 "ovarian cancer" cell lines has been classified into histotypes using a combination of mutation profiles, IHC mutation-surrogates, and a validated immunohistochemical model. All cell lines were identity verified using STR analysis. RESULTS: Many described ovarian clear cell lines have characteristic mutations (including ARID1A and PIK3CA and an overall molecular/immuno-profile typical of primary tumors. Mutations in TP53 were present in the majority of high-grade serous cell lines. Advanced genomic analysis of bona-fide clear cell carcinoma cell lines also support copy number changes in typical biomarkers such at MET and HNF1B and a lack of any recurrent expressed re-arrangements. CONCLUSIONS: As with primary ovarian tumors, mutation status of cancer genes like ARID1A and TP53 and a general immuno-profile serve well for establishing histotype of ovarian cancer cell We describe specific biomarkers and molecular features to re-classify generic "ovarian carcinoma" cell lines into type specific categories. Our data supports the use of prototype clear cell lines, such as TOV21G and JHOC-5, and questions the use of

  16. Specification for dispersed fuel-cell generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, L. M.; Cohen, R.

    1981-11-01

    A general description and performance definition for a standard 11-mw fuel cell power plant designed for electric utility dispersed-generation applications are provided. Additional features available at the option of the purchaser are also described. The power plant can operate singly or grouped with other power plants to produce larger mutli-megawatt power stations. A 33-mw station is discussed as representative of multiple power plant installations. The power plant specification defines power rating, heat rate, fuels, operating modes, siting characteristics, and available options. A general description included in the attachments covers equipment, typical site arrangement, auxiliary subsystems, maintenance, fuel flexibility, and general fluid and electrical schematics.

  17. A versatile expression vector system for mammalian cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    The development of the field of mammalian cell factories requests fast and high-throughput methods which means high need for simpler and more efficient cloning techniques. This project applies the ligation-free USERTM (uracil-specific excision reagent) cloning technique to construct mammalian...... expression vectors with maximum flexibility....

  18. Sleeping Beauty system to redirect T-cell specificity for human applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Dawson, Margaret; Figliola, Matthew; Olivares, Simon; Rao, Pullavathi; Jue, Yi; Multani, Asha; Yang, Ge; Zhang, Ling; Kellar, Denise; Ang, Sonny; Torikai, Hiroki; Rabinovich, Brian; Lee, Dean A.; Kebriaei, Partow; Hackett, Perry; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase DNA plasmid system is used to genetically modify cells for long-term transgene expression. We adapted the SB system for human application and generated T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for CD19. Electro-transfer of CD19-specific SB DNA plasmids in PBMC and propagation on CD19+ artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) was used to numerically expand CD3+ T cells expressing CAR. By Day 28 of co-culture >90% of expanded CD3+ T cells expressed CAR. CAR+ T cells specifically killed CD19+ target cells and consisted of subsets expressing biomarkers consistent with central memory, ieffector memory, and effector phenotypes. CAR+ T cells contracted numerically in the absence of CD19 antigen, did not express SB11 transposase, and maintained a polyclonal TCRVα and TCRVβ repertoire. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH) revealed that CAR+ T cells preserved telomere length. Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) and FISH showed CAR transposon integrated on average once per T-cell genome. CAR+ T cells in peripheral blood can be detected by Q-PCR at a sensitivity of 0.01%. These findings lay the groundwork as the basis of our first-in-human clinical trials of the non-viral SB system for the investigational treatment of CD19+ B-cell malignancies (currently under three INDs #: 14193, 14577, and 14739). PMID:23377665

  19. Impaired cell surface expression of HLA-B antigens on mesenchymal stem cells and muscle cell progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Nehlin, Jan; Sabir, Hardee Jawad;

    2010-01-01

    HLA class-I expression is weak in embryonic stem cells but increases rapidly during lineage progression. It is unknown whether all three classical HLA class-I antigens follow the same developmental program. In the present study, we investigated allele-specific expression of HLA-A, -B, and -C...... at the mRNA and protein levels on human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue as well as striated muscle satellite cells and lymphocytes. Using multicolour flow cytometry, we found high cell surface expression of HLA-A on all stem cells and PBMC examined. Surprisingly, HLA-B was either...... undetectable or very weakly expressed on all stem cells protecting them from complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) using relevant human anti-B and anti-Cw sera. IFNgamma stimulation for 48-72 h was required to induce full HLA-B protein expression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed that IFNgamma induced...

  20. Identification and Characterization of a Rat Novel Gene RSEP4 Expressed Specifically in Central Nervous System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Dao WANG; Ling-Wei KONG; Zhi-Qin XIE; Yu-Qiu ZHANG; Zhi-Xin LIN; Zhi-Qi ZHAO; Lei YU; Nai-He JING

    2004-01-01

    The low-abundantly expressed genes composed the majorities of the mRNAs expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), and were thought to be important for the normal brain functions. Through differential screening a low-abundance cDNA sublibrary with mRNA from neuropathic pain of chronic constriction injury (CCI) model, we have identified a novel rat gene, rat spinal-cord expression protein 4 gene (RSEP4). The total length ofRSEP4 cDNA is 2006 bp, with a 501 nucleotide open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a 167 amino acid polypeptide. Northern blot revealed that RSEP4 was expressed specifically in the CNS. In situ hybridization showed that the mRNA of RSEP4 was strongly expressed in the CA1, CA2, CA3 and DG regions of hippocampus, the Purkinje cells of cerebellum, and the small sensory neurons of dorsal horn and large motor neurons of ventral horn of spinal cord. Over-expression of RSEP4-EGFP fusion protein in the human embryonic kidney 293T cells showed that RSEP4 protein was mainly localized in the cell cytoplasm. These results suggest that RSEP4 may play some roles in the CNS.

  1. Fractalkine expression induces endothelial progenitor cell lysis by natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilyana Todorova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circulating CD34(+ cells, a population that includes endothelial progenitors, participate in the maintenance of endothelial integrity. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate their survival is crucial to improve their regenerative activity in cardiovascular and renal diseases. Chemokine-receptor cross talk is critical in regulating cell homeostasis. We hypothesized that cell surface expression of the chemokine fractalkine (FKN could target progenitor cell injury by Natural Killer (NK cells, thereby limiting their availability for vascular repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that CD34(+-derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFC can express FKN in response to TNF-α and IFN-γ inflammatory cytokines and that FKN expression by ECFC stimulates NK cell adhesion, NK cell-mediated ECFC lysis and microparticles release in vitro. The specific involvement of membrane FKN in these processes was demonstrated using FKN-transfected ECFC and anti-FKN blocking antibody. FKN expression was also evidenced on circulating CD34(+ progenitor cells and was detected at higher frequency in kidney transplant recipients, when compared to healthy controls. The proportion of CD34(+ cells expressing FKN was identified as an independent variable inversely correlated to CD34(+ progenitor cell count. We further showed that treatment of CD34(+ circulating cells isolated from adult blood donors with transplant serum or TNF-α/IFN-γ can induce FKN expression. CONCLUSIONS: Our data highlights a novel mechanism by which FKN expression on CD34(+ progenitor cells may target their NK cell mediated killing and participate to their immune depletion in transplant recipients. Considering the numerous diseased contexts shown to promote FKN expression, our data identify FKN as a hallmark of altered progenitor cell homeostasis with potential implications in better evaluation of vascular repair in patients.

  2. Defining cell-type specificity at the transcriptional level in human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Wenjun; Greene, Casey S; Eichinger, Felix; Nair, Viji; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Bitzer, Markus; Lee, Young-Suk; Zhu, Qian; Kehata, Masami; Li, Min; Jiang, Song; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Cohen, Clemens D; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Kretzler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Cell-lineage–specific transcripts are essential for differentiated tissue function, implicated in hereditary organ failure, and mediate acquired chronic diseases. However, experimental identification of cell-lineage–specific genes in a genome-scale manner is infeasible for most solid human tissues. We developed the first genome-scale method to identify genes with cell-lineage–specific expression, even in lineages not separable by experimental microdissection. Our machine-learning–based approa...

  3. Glucocorticoids Enhance CD163 Expression in Placental Hofbauer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Zhonghua; Niven-Fairchild, Tracy; Tadesse, Serkalem; Errol R Norwitz; Buhimschi, Catalin S; Buhimschi, Irina A.; Guller, Seth

    2012-01-01

    Periplacental levels of glucocorticoid (GC) peak at parturition, and synthetic GC is administered to women at risk for preterm delivery. However, little is known concerning cell-type-specific effects of GC in placenta. Hofbauer cells (HBCs) are fetal macrophages that are located adjacent to fetal capillaries in placenta. The goal of the current study was to determine whether GC treatment altered HBC gene expression and function. Western blotting and flow cytometry revealed CD163 and folate re...

  4. A chimeric fusion of the hASH1 and EZH2 promoters mediates high and specific reporter and suicide gene expression and cytotoxicity in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T.T.; Pedersen, N.; Juel, H.;

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy is a promising experimental modality for treatment of systemic malignancies such as small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We have identified the human achaete-scute homolog 1 (hASH1) and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) genes as highly upregulated in SCLC compared...

  5. Expression of Muscle-Specific Ribosomal Protein L3-Like Impairs Myotube Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillou, Thomas; Zhang, Xiping; McCarthy, John J

    2016-09-01

    The ribosome has historically been considered to have no cell-specific function but rather serve in a "housekeeping" capacity. This view is being challenged by evidence showing that heterogeneity in the protein composition of the ribosome can lead to the functional specialization of the ribosome. Expression profiling of different tissues revealed that ribosomal protein large 3-like (Rpl3l) is exclusively expressed in striated muscle. In response to a hypertrophic stimulus, Rpl3l expression in skeletal muscle was significantly decreased by 82% whereas expression of the ubiquitous paralog Rpl3 was significantly increased by ∼fivefold. Based on these findings, we developed the hypothesis that Rpl3l functions as a negative regulator of muscle growth. To test this hypothesis, we used the Tet-On system to express Rpl3l in myoblasts during myotube formation. In support of our hypothesis, RPL3L expression significantly impaired myotube growth as assessed by myotube diameter (-23%) and protein content (-14%). Further analysis showed that the basis of this impairment was caused by a significant decrease in myoblast fusion as the fusion index was significantly lower (-17%) with RPL3L expression. These findings are the first evidence to support the novel concept of ribosome specialization in skeletal muscle and its role in the regulation of skeletal muscle growth. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1894-1902, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26684695

  6. The expression of ADAMTS13 in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anyou; Duan, Qiaohong; Wu, Jingsheng; Liu, Xin; Sun, Zimin

    2016-06-01

    ADAMTS13, as a specific von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease, prevents microvascular thrombosis of VWF/platelet thrombi. It has been reported that human vascular endothelial cells could also synthesize and secrete ADAMTS13, and these reports were focused in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Considering the particularity of its huge quantity and structure of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) in the body, whether ADAMTS13 is expressed in HMECs also needs to be confirmed. To investigate whether ADAMTS13 is expressed in HMECs. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) amplification detected ADAMTS13 mRNA in HMEC-1 cell line. The expression and distribution of ADAMTS13 protein and VWF were detected by fluorescence immunoassay and western blot. We observed the expression and distribution of ADAMTS13 in HMECs. We confirmed the expression of ADAMTS13 mRNA in HMEC-1, and found that there were some partly common distributions of ADAMTS13 protein and VWF. This study provides the evidence that HMECs also express ADAMTS13. HMECs might also be a primary source for human plasma ADAMTS13. The overlap region for the distribution of ADAMTS13 and VWF suggests that ADAMTS13 might have a potential regulation role for VWF inside cells. PMID:26366828

  7. Molecular targeting of intracellular compartments specifically in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Hetal; Gibo, Denise M; Debinski, Waldemar

    2010-05-01

    We have implemented a strategy in which a genetically engineered, single-chain protein specifically recognizes cancer cells and is trafficked to a targeted subcellular compartment, such as the nucleus. The recombinant protein termed IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS has a triple functional property: (1) it binds a cancer-associated receptor, interleukin 13 receptor alpha 2 (IL-13Rα2), using modified IL-13 ligand, IL-13.E13K; (2) it exports its C-terminal portion out of the endosomal compartment using Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) translocation domain (D2); and (3) it travels to and accumulates in the nucleus guided by the nuclear localization signal (NLS). Here, we have demonstrated that this protein is transported into the brain tumor cells' nucleus, using 3 different methods of protein conjugation to dyes for the purpose of direct visualization of the protein's intracellular trafficking. IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS, and not the controls such as IL-13.E13K-D2, IL-13.E13K-NLS, or IL-13.E13K, accumulated in nuclei very efficiently, which increased with the time the cells were exposed to the protein. Also, IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS did not exhibit nuclear transport in cells with low expression levels of IL-13Rα2. Thus, it is possible to recognize cancer cells through their specific receptors and deliver a conjugated protein that travels specifically to the nucleus. Hence, our molecular targeting strategy succeeded in generating a single-chain proteinaceous agent capable of delivering drugs/labels needed to be localized to the cells' nuclei or potentially any other subcellular compartment, for their optimal efficacy or ability to exert their specific action. PMID:20740056

  8. CNPase Expression in Olfactory Ensheathing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Radtke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large body of work supports the proposal that transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs into nerve or spinal cord injuries can promote axonal regeneration and remyelination. Yet, some investigators have questioned whether the transplanted OECs associate with axons and form peripheral myelin, or if they recruit endogenous Schwann cells that form myelin. Olfactory bulbs from transgenic mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP under the control of the 2-3-cyclic nucleotide 3-phosphodiesterase (CNPase promoter were studied. CNPase is expressed in myelin-forming cells throughout their lineage. We examined CNPase expression in both in situ in the olfactory bulb and in vitro to determine if OECs express CNPase commensurate with their myelination potential. eGFP was observed in the outer nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. Dissociated OECs maintained in culture had both intense eGFP expression and CNPase immunostaining. Transplantation of OECs into transected peripheral nerve longitudinally associated with the regenerated axons. These data indicate that OECs in the outer nerve layer of the olfactory bulb of CNPase transgenic mice express CNPase. Thus, while OECs do not normally form myelin on olfactory nerve axons, their expression of CNPase is commensurate with their potential to form myelin when transplanted into injured peripheral nerve.

  9. Keratin 34betaE12/keratin7 expression is a prognostic factor of cancer-specific and overall survival in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen Ege; Holst, Rene;

    2016-01-01

    proliferation, migration, and possibly cancer invasion, factors impacting prognosis in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Tumor tissue from a retrospective Danish cohort of 177 patients with completely resected NSCLC, stage I-IIIA tumors, were analyzed for keratin 7 (K7) and......BACKGROUND: Carcinomas and their metastases often retain the keratin patterns of their epithelial origin, and are therefore useful as lineage-specific markers in diagnostic pathology. Recently, it has become clear that intermediate filaments composed by keratins play a role in modulation of cell...

  10. LINC00507 Is Specifically Expressed in the Primate Cortex and Has Age-Dependent Expression Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, James D; Ward, Melanie; Chen, Bei Jun; Iyer, Anand M; Aronica, Eleonora; Janitz, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decade, there has been an increase in the appreciation of the role of non-coding RNA in the development of organism phenotype. It is possible to divide the non-coding elements of the transcriptome into three categories: short non-coding RNAs, circular RNAs and long non-coding RNAs. Long non-coding RNAs are those transcripts that are greater than 200 nts in length and lack any significant open reading frames that produce proteins greater then 100 amino acids. Long intervening non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a subclass of long non-coding RNAs. In contrast to protein coding RNAs, lincRNAs are expressed in a more tissue- and species-specific manner. In particular, many lincRNAs are only conserved amongst higher primates. This coupled with the propensity of many lincRNAs to be expressed in the brain, suggests that they are in fact one of the major drivers of organism complexity. We analysed 39 lincRNAs that are expressed in the frontal cortex and identified LINC00507 as being expressed in a cortex-specific manner in non-human primates and humans. The expression patterns of LINC00507 appear to be age-dependent, suggesting it may be involved in brain development of higher primates. Moreover, the analysis of LINC00507 potential to bind ribosomes revealed that this previously identified non-coding transcript may harbour a micropeptide. PMID:27059230

  11. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states. PMID:24299736

  12. Analysis of expression profiles of MAGE-A antigens in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reichert Torsten E

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immunological response to solid tumours is insufficient. Therefore, tumour specific antigens have been explored to facilitate the activation of the immune system. The cancer/testis antigen class of MAGE-A antigens is a possible target for vaccination. Their differential expression profiles also modulate the course of the cancer disease and its response to antineoplastic drugs. Methods The expression profiles of MAGE-A2, -A3, -A4, -A6 and -A10 in five own oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were characterised by rt-PCR, qrt-PCR and immunocytochemistry with a global MAGE-A antibody (57B and compared with those of an adult keratinocyte cell line (NHEK. Results All tumour cell lines expressed MAGE-A antigens. The antigens were expressed in groups with different preferences. The predominant antigens expressed were MAGE-A2, -A3 and -A6. MAGE-A10 was not expressed in the cell lines tested. The MAGE-A gene products detected in the adult keratinocyte cell line NHEK were used as a reference. Conclusion MAGE-A antigens are expressed in oral squamous cell carcinomas. The expression profiles measured facilitate distinct examinations in forthcoming studies on responses to antineoplastic drugs or radiation therapy. MAGE-A antigens are still an interesting aim for immunotherapy.

  13. Specificity Protein 1 Expression Contributes to Bcl-w-Induced Aggressiveness in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Woo Sang; Kwon, Junhye; Yun, Dong Ho; Lee, Young Nam; Woo, Eun Young; Park, Myung-Jin; Lee, Jae-Seon; Han, Young-Hoon; Bae, In Hwa

    2014-01-01

    We already had reported that Bcl-w promotes invasion or migration in gastric cancer cells and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) by activating matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) via specificity protein 1 (Sp1) or β-cateinin, respectively. High expression of Bcl-w also has been reported in GBM which is the most common malignant brain tumor and exhibits aggressive and invasive behavior. These reports propose that Bcl-w-induced signaling is strongly associated with aggressive characteristic of GBM. W...

  14. Aspergillus nidulans wetA activates spore-specific gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, M. A.; Timberlake, W E

    1991-01-01

    The Aspergillus nidulans wetA gene is required for synthesis of cell wall layers that make asexual spores (conidia) impermeable. In wetA mutant strains, conidia take up water and autolyze rather than undergoing the final stages of maturation. wetA is activated during conidiogenesis by sequential expression of the brlA and abaA regulatory genes. To determine whether wetA regulates expression of other sporulation-specific genes, its coding region was fused to a nutritionally regulated promoter ...

  15. Isolation of specific neurons from C. elegans larvae for gene expression profiling.

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    W Clay Spencer

    Full Text Available The simple and well-described structure of the C. elegans nervous system offers an unprecedented opportunity to identify the genetic programs that define the connectivity and function of individual neurons and their circuits. A correspondingly precise gene expression map of C. elegans neurons would facilitate the application of genetic methods toward this goal. Here we describe a powerful new approach, SeqCeL (RNA-Seq of C. elegans cells for producing gene expression profiles of specific larval C. elegans neurons.We have exploited available GFP reporter lines for FACS isolation of specific larval C. elegans neurons for RNA-Seq analysis. Our analysis showed that diverse classes of neurons are accessible to this approach. To demonstrate the applicability of this strategy to rare neuron types, we generated RNA-Seq profiles of the NSM serotonergic neurons that occur as a single bilateral pair of cells in the C. elegans pharynx. These data detected >1,000 NSM enriched transcripts, including the majority of previously known NSM-expressed genes.This work offers a simple and robust protocol for expression profiling studies of post-embryonic C. elegans neurons and thus provides an important new method for identifying candidate genes for key roles in neuron-specific development and function.

  16. Complex genetic findings in a female patient with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency: Null mutations in the PDHX gene associated with unusual expression of the testis-specific PDHA2 gene in her somatic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Ana; Silva, Maria João; Pavlu-Pereira, Hana; Florindo, Cristina; Barroso, Madalena; Marques, Bárbara; Correia, Hildeberto; Oliveira, Anabela; Gaspar, Ana; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Rivera, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes a key step in the generation of cellular energy and is composed by three catalytic elements (E1, E2, E3), one structural subunit (E3-binding protein), and specific regulatory elements, phosphatases and kinases (PDKs, PDPs). The E1α subunit exists as two isoforms encoded by different genes: PDHA1 located on Xp22.1 and expressed in somatic tissues, and the intronless PDHA2 located on chromosome 4 and only detected in human spermatocytes and s...

  17. Loss of LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1) suppresses growth and alters gene expression of human colon cancer cells in a p53- and DNMT1(DNA methyltransferase 1)-independent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Lihua; Hanigan, Christin L.; Wu, Yu; Wang, Wei; Park, Ben Ho; Woster, Patrick M.; Casero, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of gene expression is important in cancer. Aberrant DNA CpG island hypermethylation and histone modifications are involved in the aberrant silencing of tumour-suppressor genes. LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1) is a H3K4 (histone H3 Lys4) demethylase associated with gene repression and is overexpressed in multiple cancer types. LSD1 has also been implicated in targeting p53 and DNMT1 (DNA methyltransferase 1), with data suggesting that the demethylating activity of LSD...

  18. Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells express neuronal phenotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨立业; 刘相名; 孙兵; 惠国桢; 费俭; 郭礼和

    2004-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) can be greatly expanded in vitro, and induced to differentiate into multiple mesenchymal cell types, including osteogenic, chondrogenic, myogenic, and adipogenic cells. This study was designed to investigate the possibility of ADSCs differentiating into neurons.Methods Adipose tissue from rats was digested with collagenase, and adherent stromal cells were cultured. A medium containing a low concentration of fetal bovine serum was adopted to induce the cells to differentiate. ADSCs were identified by immunocytochemistry, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR was applied to detect mRNA expression of neurofilament 1 (NF1), nestin, and neuron-specific enolase (NSE).Results Nestin-positive cells were found occasionally among ADSCs. ADSCs were found to express NSE mRNA and nestin mRNA, but not NF1 mRNA. ADSCs could differentiate into neuron-like cells in a medium composed of a low concentration of fetal bovine serum, and these differentiated cells displayed complicated neuron-like morphologies.Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that adipose tissue contains stem cells capable of differentiating into neurons. These stem cells can overcome their mesenchymal commitment, and may represent an alternative autologous stem cell source for CNS cell transplantation.

  19. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

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    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  20. Subtype specific elevated expression of hyaluronidase-1 (HYAL-1 in epithelial ovarian cancer.

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    Paule Héléna Yoffou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC is morphologically heterogeneous being classified as serous, endometrioid, clear cell, or mucinous. Molecular genetic analysis has suggested a role for tumor suppressor genes located at chromosome 3p in serous EOC pathogenesis. Our objective was to evaluate the expression of HYAL1, located at chromosome 3p21.3, in these EOC subtypes, and to investigate its correlation with the expression of steroid hormone receptors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined the mRNA expression of HYAL1, estrogen receptor (ER-α, ERβ and progesterone receptor (PR in EOC tumor samples and cell lines using quantitative RT-PCR. We also examined the expression of these genes in a publicly available microarray dataset. HYAL-1 enzyme activity was measured in EOC cell lines and in plasma samples from patients. We found that HYAL1 mRNA expression was elevated in clear cell and mucinous EOC tissue samples, but not in serous and endometrioid samples, normal ovaries or benign tumors. Similar results were obtained by two different techniques and with tissue sample cohorts from two independent institutions. Concordantly, HYAL1 mRNA levels and enzymatic activity were elevated only in EOC cell lines derived from clear cell and mucinous subtypes. We also showed that HYAL1 mRNA was inversely correlated to that of ERα specifically in clear cell and mucinous EOCs. Additionally, ectopic expression of ERα in a clear cell EOC cell line (ER- and PR-negative induced 50% reduction of HYAL1 mRNA expression, supporting a role of ERα in HYAL1 gene regulation. Significantly, HYAL-1 activity was also high in the plasma of patients with these EOC subtypes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report showing high HYAL-1 levels in EOC and demonstrating HYAL1 gene repression by ERα. Our results identify Hyaluronidase-1 as a potential target/biomarker for clear cell and mucinous EOCs and especially in tumors with low ERα levels.

  1. Specific-sized hyaluronan fragments promote expression of human β-defensin 2 in intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David R; Kessler, Sean P; Rho, Hyunjin K; Cowman, Mary K; de la Motte, Carol A

    2012-08-31

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in the extracellular matrix of virtually all mammalian tissues. Recent work has suggested a role for small, fragmented HA polymers in initiating innate defense responses in immune cells, endothelium, and epidermis through interaction with innate molecular pattern recognition receptors, such as TLR4. Despite these advances, little is known regarding the effect of fragmented HA at the intestinal epithelium, where numerous pattern recognition receptors act as sentinels of an innate defense response that maintains epithelial barrier integrity in the presence of abundant and diverse microbial challenges. Here we report that HA fragments promote expression of the innate antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 (HβD2) in intestinal epithelial cells. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with HA fragment preparations resulted in time- and dose-dependent up-regulated expression of HβD2 protein in a fragment size-specific manner, with 35-kDa HA fragment preparations emerging as the most potent inducers of intracellular HβD2. Furthermore, oral administration of specific-sized HA fragments promotes the expression of an HβD2 ortholog in the colonic epithelium of both wild-type and CD44-deficient mice but not in TLR4-deficient mice. Together, our observations suggest that a highly size-specific, TLR4-dependent, innate defense response to fragmented HA contributes to intestinal epithelium barrier defense through the induction of intracellular HβD2 protein. PMID:22761444

  2. TCR repertoire and Foxp3 expression define functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ Treg cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Kuczma, Michal; Pawlikowska, Iwona; Kopij, Magdalena; Podolsky, Robert; Rempala, Grzegorz A.; Kraj, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Despite extensive research efforts to characterize peripheral regulatory T cells (Treg) expressing transcription factor Foxp3, their subset complexity, phenotypic characteristics, TCR repertoire and antigen specificities remain ambiguous. Here, we identify and define two subsets of peripheral Treg cells differing in Foxp3 expression level and TCR repertoires. Treg cells expressing a high level of Foxp3 and TCRs not utilized by naive CD4+ T cells present a stable suppressor phenotype and domin...

  3. Protein Expression Profiling in the Spectrum of Renal Cell Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Valera, Elsa Li-Ning-T, Beatriz A Walter, David D. Roberts, W M Linehan, Maria J Merino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to evaluate the protein expression profile of a spectrum of renal cell carcinomas (RCC to find potential biomarkers for disease onset and progression and therefore, prospective therapeutic targets. A 2D-gel based proteomic analysis was used to outline differences in protein levels among different subtypes of renal cell carcinomas, including clear cell carcinomas, papillary lesions, chromophobe tumors and renal oncocytomas. Spot pattern was compared to the corresponding normal kidney from the same patients and distinctive, differentially expressed proteins were characterized by mass spectrometry. Twenty-one protein spots were found differentially expressed between clear cell RCC and normal tissue and 38 spots were found expressed in chromophobe tumors. Eleven proteins were identified, with most differentially expressed -by fold change- between clear cell tumors and the corresponding normal tissue. Two of the identified proteins, Triosephosphate isomerase 1 (TPI-1 and Heat Shock protein 27 (Hsp27, were further validated in a separate set of tumors by immunohistochemistry and expression levels were correlated with clinicopathologic features of the patients. Hsp27 was highly expressed in 82% of the tumors used for validation, and all cases showed strong immunoreactivity for TPI-1. In both Hsp27 and TPI-1, protein expression positively correlated with histologic features of the disease. Our results suggest that the subjacent cytogenetic abnormalities seen in different histological types of RCC are followed by specific changes in protein expression. From these changes, Hsp27 and TPI-1 emerged as potential candidates for the differentiation and prognosis in RCC.

  4. Use of RUNX2 Expression to Identify Osteogenic Progenitor Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li Zou; Fahad K. Kidwai; Ross A. Kopher; Jason Motl; Cory A. Kellum; Jennifer J. Westendorf; Dan S. Kaufman

    2015-01-01

    Summary We generated a RUNX2-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) reporter system to study osteogenic development from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Our studies demonstrate the fidelity of YFP expression with expression of RUNX2 and other osteogenic genes in hESC-derived osteoprogenitor cells, as well as the osteogenic specificity of YFP signal. In vitro studies confirm that the hESC-derived YFP+ cells have similar osteogenic phenotypes to osteoprogenitor cells generated from bone-marrow me...

  5. A Novel Protein Is Lower Expressed in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruili Guan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Engrailed-2 (EN2 has been identified as a candidate oncogene in breast cancer and prostate cancer. It is usually recognized as a mainly nuclear staining in the cells. However, recent studies showed a cytoplasmic staining occurred in prostate cancer, bladder cancer and clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The inconsistency makes us confused. To clarify the localization and expression of EN2 in renal cell carcinoma, anti-EN2 antibody (ab28731 and anti-EN2 antibody (MAB2600 were used for immunohistochemistry (IHC respectively. Interestingly, we found that EN2 detected by ab28731 was mainly presented in cytoplasm while EN2 detected by MAB2600 was mainly presented in nucleus. To further investigate the different patterns observed above, lysates from full-length EN2 over expression in HEK293T cells were used to identify which antibody the EN2 molecule bound by western blot. Results showed ab28731 did not react with the lysates. For this reason, the novel specific protein detected by ab28731 was not the EN2 molecule and was named nonEN2. Then using the renal carcinoma tissue microarray and renal tissues, we found that the protein expression levels of nonEN2 in kidney tumor tissues was significantly lower than that in kidney normal tissues (p < 0.05, so was in renal cell lines. Taken together, nonEN2 is lower expressed and may play an important role in renal cell carcinoma.

  6. Control of renin secretion from rat juxtaglomerular cells by cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla G; Jensen, Boye L; Sethi, Shala;

    2002-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that cGMP stimulates renin release through inhibition of the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) in isolated rat juxtaglomerular (JG) cells. In addition, we assessed the involvement of PDE4 in JG-cell function. JG cells expressed PDE3A and PDE3B, and the PDE3 inhibit...

  7. CD11b expression as a marker to distinguish between recently activated effector CD8(+) T cells and memory cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Ørding Andreasen, Susanne; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard;

    2001-01-01

    subset. Polyclonal virus-specific effector and memory CD8(+) T cells from lymphocytic choriomeningitis- and vesicular stomatitis virus-infected mice were visualized through staining for intracellular IFN-gamma or binding of MHC-peptide tetramers, and Mac-1 expression was evaluated. Naive T cells and most......CD8(+) T cells in different activation states have been difficult to identify phenotypically. In this study we have investigated whether Mac-1 (CD11b) expression can be used as a criterion to distinguish between recently activated effector cells and memory cells belonging to the CD8(+) T cell...... virus-specific memory CD8(+) T cells express little or no Mac-1 independent of the virus model employed. In contrast, the majority of CD8(+) T cells present during acute infection express a significant level of Mac-1 and, similarly, Mac-1 expression is found on secondary effectors generated in response...

  8. HIPSTR and thousands of lncRNAs are heterogeneously expressed in human embryos, primordial germ cells and stable cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusov, Dinar; Anderson, Leticia; DaSilva, Lucas Ferreira; Wysocka, Joanna; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, R. Michael; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are transcribed into numerous regulatory long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Compared to mRNAs, lncRNAs display higher developmental stage-, tissue-, and cell-subtype-specificity of expression, and are generally less abundant in a population of cells. Despite the progress in single-cell-focused research, the origins of low population-level expression of lncRNAs in homogeneous populations of cells are poorly understood. Here, we identify HIPSTR (Heterogeneously expressed from the Intronic Plus Strand of the TFAP2A-locus RNA), a novel lncRNA gene in the developmentally regulated TFAP2A locus. HIPSTR has evolutionarily conserved expression patterns, its promoter is most active in undifferentiated cells, and depletion of HIPSTR in HEK293 and in pluripotent H1BP cells predominantly affects the genes involved in early organismal development and cell differentiation. Most importantly, we find that HIPSTR is specifically induced and heterogeneously expressed in the 8-cell-stage human embryos during the major wave of embryonic genome activation. We systematically explore the phenomenon of cell-to-cell variation of gene expression and link it to low population-level expression of lncRNAs, showing that, similar to HIPSTR, the expression of thousands of lncRNAs is more highly heterogeneous than the expression of mRNAs in the individual, otherwise indistinguishable cells of totipotent human embryos, primordial germ cells, and stable cell lines. PMID:27605307

  9. Chondrocytes-Specific Expression of Osteoprotegerin Modulates Osteoclast Formation in Metaphyseal Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoli; Jin, Hongting; Shu, Bing; Mira, Ranim R; Chen, Di

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells/osteoblasts were originally thought to be the major player in regulating osteoclast differentiation through expressing RANKL/OPG cytokines. Recent studies have established that chondrocytes also express RANKL/OPG and support osteoclast formation. Till now, the in vivo function of chondrocyte-produced OPG in osteoclast formation and postnatal bone growth has not been directly investigated. In this study, chondrocyte-specific Opg transgenic mice were generated by using type II collagen promoter. The Col2-Opg transgenic mice showed delayed formation of secondary ossification center and localized increase of bone mass in proximal metaphysis of tibiae. TRAP staining showed that osteoclast numbers were reduced in both secondary ossification center and proximal metaphysis. This finding was further confirmed by in vitro chondrocyte/spleen cell co-culture assay. In contrast, the mineral apposition rates were not changed in Col2-Opg transgenic mice. TUNEL staining revealed more apoptotic hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate of Col2-Opg mice. Flow cytometry analysis showed fewer RANK-expressing cells in the marrow of Col2a1-Opg mice, suggesting the role of OPG in blocking the differentiation of early mesenchymal progenitors into RANK-expressing pre-osteoclasts. Our results demonstrated that OPG expression in chondrocyte increases bone mass in the proximal metaphysis of tibiae through negative regulation of osteoclast formation. PMID:26329493

  10. Differences in gene expression of human xylosyltransferases and determination of acceptor specificities for various proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The xylosyltransferase (XT) isoforms XT-I and XT-II initiate the posttranslational glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis. Here, we determined the relative expression of both isoforms in 33 human cell lines. The majority of tested cell lines showed dominant XYLT2 gene expression, while only in 23132/87, JAR, NCI-H510A and THP-1 was the XT-I mRNA expression higher. Nearly equal expression levels were detected in six cell lines. Additionally, to shed light on putative differences in acceptor specificities the acceptor properties of potential acceptor sequences were determined. Peptides were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing putative or known GAG attachment sites of in vivo proteoglycans. Kinetic analysis showed that Km and Vmax values for XT-I mediated xylosylation were slightly higher than those for XT-II, and that XT-I showed a lesser stringency concerning the acceptor sequence. Mutagenesis of the bikunin peptide sequence in the G-S-G attachment site and flanking regions generated potential acceptor molecules. Here, mutations on the N-terminal side and the attachment site were found to be more susceptible to a loss of acceptor function than mutations in the C-terminus. Altogether the known consensus sequence a-a-a-a-G-S-G-a-a/G-a ('a' representing Asp or Glu) for XT-I mediated xylosylation could be approved and additionally extended to apply to XT-II as well.

  11. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  12. The effects of supplementing specific amino acids on the expression of elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hun-Su; Park, Ji-Eun; Kim, Dong-Myung; Kim, Byung-Gee; Won, Jong-In

    2010-12-01

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) made from the repeating pentapeptides (Val-Pro-Gly-Xaa-Gly) are protein based biopolymers that contain useful properties, including the ability to self-assemble, biocompatibility, and stimuli sensitivity. However, due to the repeated consumption of specific amino acids, long ELPs generally have low expression yields in in vitro and in vivo systems. This is because of the lack of specific amino acids during the translation process. In this study, ELP fusion proteins of various lengths were prepared by recursive directional ligation (RDL) and expressed in a cell-free protein synthesis system. By measuring TCA-precipitated radioactivity with a liquid scintillation counter, their expression profiles were investigated. The expression levels of an ELP fusion protein were improved by almost 2-fold by adding specific amino acids. Additionally, we determined that the amount of increase in expression levels depends on the length of the ELPs. This study suggests a useful strategy to improve the yield of longer repetitive polypeptides such as ELPs or silk-like polypeptides (SLPs). PMID:20667475

  13. OsRRM,a Spen-like rice gene expressed specifically in the endosperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Yan Chen; Zong-Yang Wang; Xiu-Ling Cai

    2007-01-01

    We used the promoter trap technique to identify a rice plant, named 107, in which the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene was expressed specifically in the endosperm. A single copy of the T-DNA was inserted into the plant genome, and a candidate gene OsRRM was identified by the insertion. The OsRRM promoter directed GUS expression specifically in rice endosperm, analogous to the GUS expression pattern observed in 107#. OsRRM is a single-copy gene in rice and encodes a nuclear protein containing 1 005 amino-acid residues with two RNA recognition motifs and one Spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal domain. Western blot analysis confirmed that the OsRRM protein was specifically expressed in rice endosperm. Ectopic expression of OsRRM in transgenic plants led to abnormalities, such as short stature, retarded growth and low fructification rates. Our data, in conjunction with the reported function of Spen genes, implicated OsRRM in the regulation of cell development in rice endosperm.

  14. Regulation of histone gene expression during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshi, T; Taoka, K I; Iwabuchi, M

    2000-08-01

    The steady-state level of histone mRNAs fluctuates coordinately with chromosomal DNA synthesis during the cell cycle. Such an S phase-specific expression pattern results from transcriptional activation of histone genes coupled with the onset of replication and from transcriptional repression of the genes as well as specific destabilization of histone mRNAs around the end of the S phase. Proliferation-coupled and S phase-specific expression of histone genes is primarily achieved by the activities of the proximal promoter regions, where several conserved cis-acting elements have been identified. Among them, three kinds of Oct-containing composite elements (OCEs) play a pivotal role in S phase-specific transcriptional activation. Other ones, such as Nona, solo-Oct, and CCGTC motifs, appear to modulate the functions of OCEs to enhance or repress the transcriptional level, possibly depending on the state of the cells. Here, we review the growing evidence concerning the regulatory mechanisms by which plant histone genes are expressed S phase-specifically in proliferating cells. PMID:11089867

  15. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito;

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that tumors arising from tissues such as kidney, pancreas, liver and stomach are particularly refractory to treatment. Searching for new anticancer drugs using cells in culture has yielded some effective therapies, but these refractory tumors remain intractable. Studies that...... survival might, therefore, act through such a matrix-to-cell suppression of apoptosis. Indeed, correlative mining of gene expression and patient survival databases suggests that poor survival in patients with metastatic cancer correlates highly with tumor expression of a common theme: the genes involved in...

  16. Cell-specific expression and immunolocalization of nitric oxide synthase isoforms and the related nitric oxide/cyclic GMP signaling pathway in the ovaries of neonatal and immature rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei ZHANG; Quan-wei WEI; Zheng-chao WANG; Wei DING; Wei WANG; Fang-xiong SHI

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study is designed to investigate the cellular expressions and immunolocalizations of three different nitric oxide synthase(NOS)isoforms and the related nitric oxide(NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate(cGMP)signaling pathway in the ovaries of neonatal and immature rats.Methods: The ovaries were obtained from ICR(Institute for Cancer Research)female Sprague-Dawley rats at postnatal days 1,5,7,10,and 19.Then we carried out the histologic examination,immunohistochemistry,measurement of NOS activity,and modifications within the NO/cGMP pathway.Results: During postnatal days 1,5,7,10,and 19,all three isoforms of NOS were mainly localized to the oocytes and expressed as a gradual increase in granulosa cells and theca cells within the growing follicle.The ovarian total NOS activities and NO levels were increased at postnatal days 7 and 10 compared with other days.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the locally produced NO and the NO/NOS signaling systems are involved in the follicular development to puberty.

  17. Transitional cell carcinoma express vitamin D receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    Recently, vitamin D analogues have shown antineoplastic effect in several diseases. Vitamin D analogues exert its effect by interacting with the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Studies of VDR in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) have not been reported. The purpose of the present study was therefore.......05). Similarly, also tumor grade appeared to be related to the number of cells expressing the receptor. Normal urothlium also expressed VDR but only with low intensity. Our study shows that TCC cells possess the VDR receptor which may make them capable to respond to stimulation with vitamin D, but functional...... studies of vitamin D's effect on TCC cells in vitro are necessary before the efficacy of treatment with vitamin D analogues in TCC can be evaluated in patients....

  18. Cytotoxic effects and specific gene expression alterations induced by I-125-labeled triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Dahmen, Volker; Kriehuber, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFO) bind to the DNA double helix in a sequence-specific manner. Therefore, TFO seem to be a suitable carrier for Auger electron emitters to damage exclusively targeted DNA sequences, e.g., in tumor cells. We studied the influence of I-125 labeled TFO with regard to cell survival and induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) using TFO with different genomic targets and target numbers. Furthermore, the ability of TFO to alter the gene expression of ...

  19. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression

  20. FE65 binds Teashirt, inhibiting expression of the primate-specific caspase-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Kajiwara

    Full Text Available The Alzheimer disease (AD amyloid protein precursor (APP can bind the FE65 adaptor protein and this complex can regulate gene expression. We carried out yeast two-hybrid studies with a PTB domain of FE65, focusing on those genes that might be involved in nuclear signaling, and identified and validated Teashirt proteins as FE65 interacting proteins in neurons. Using reporter systems, we observed that FE65 could simultaneously recruit SET, a component of the inhibitor of acetyl transferase, and Teashirt, which in turn recruited histone deacetylases, to produce a powerful gene-silencing complex. We screened stable cell lines with a macroarray focusing on AD-related genes and identified CASP4, encoding caspase-4, as a target of this silencing complex. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed a direct interaction of FE65 and Teashirt3 with the promoter region of CASP4. Expression studies in postmortem samples demonstrated decreasing expression of Teashirt and increasing expression of caspase-4 with progressive cognitive decline. Importantly, there were significant increases in caspase-4 expression associated with even the earliest neuritic plaque changes in AD. We evaluated a case-control cohort and observed evidence for a genetic association between the Teashirt genes TSHZ1 and TSHZ3 and AD, with the TSHZ3 SNP genotype correlating with expression of Teashirt3. The results were consistent with a model in which reduced expression of Teashirt3, mediated by genetic or other causes, increases caspase-4 expression, leading to progression of AD. Thus the cell biological, gene expression and genetic data support a role for Teashirt/caspase-4 in AD biology. As caspase-4 shows evidence of being a primate-specific gene, current models of AD and other neurodegenerative conditions may be incomplete because of the absence of this gene in the murine genome.

  1. Myogenic differentiation of FSHD patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bosnakovski, Darko

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells overcome several disadvantages of human embryonic stem cells, including host specificity and ethical issues. Patient-specific IPS cells can be generated from every donor by using different cell types, making them a suitable tool for autologous cell therapy and tissue engineering. IPS cells generated from patients with genetic disorders capture the disease genotype in the cell, making them a good model for studying the pathology of the diseas...

  2. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klier Ulrike

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. Methods We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. Results The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4+, activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested could be observed. Conclusion Cellular fusions of MSI+ carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These

  3. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4+, activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested) could be observed. Cellular fusions of MSI+ carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These hybrid cells may have great potential for cellular immunotherapy and

  4. Noninvasive monitoring of placenta-specific transgene expression by bioluminescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujun Fan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Placental dysfunction underlies numerous complications of pregnancy. A major obstacle to understanding the roles of potential mediators of placental pathology has been the absence of suitable methods for tissue-specific gene manipulation and sensitive assays for studying gene functions in the placentas of intact animals. We describe a sensitive and noninvasive method of repetitively tracking placenta-specific gene expression throughout pregnancy using lentivirus-mediated transduction of optical reporter genes in mouse blastocysts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Zona-free blastocysts were incubated with lentivirus expressing firefly luciferase (Fluc and Tomato fluorescent fusion protein for trophectoderm-specific infection and transplanted into day 3 pseudopregnant recipients (GD3. Animals were examined for Fluc expression by live bioluminescence imaging (BLI at different points during pregnancy, and the placentas were examined for tomato expression in different cell types on GD18. In another set of experiments, blastocysts with maximum photon fluxes in the range of 2.0E+4 to 6.0E+4 p/s/cm(2/sr were transferred. Fluc expression was detectable in all surrogate dams by day 5 of pregnancy by live imaging, and the signal increased dramatically thereafter each day until GD12, reaching a peak at GD16 and maintaining that level through GD18. All of the placentas, but none of the fetuses, analyzed on GD18 by BLI showed different degrees of Fluc expression. However, only placentas of dams transferred with selected blastocysts showed uniform photon distribution with no significant variability of photon intensity among placentas of the same litter. Tomato expression in the placentas was limited to only trophoblast cell lineages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results, for the first time, demonstrate the feasibility of selecting lentivirally-transduced blastocysts for uniform gene expression in all placentas of the same litter and early

  5. Cell-free protein expression based on extracts from CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brödel, Andreas K; Sonnabend, Andrei; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Protein expression systems are widely used in biotechnology and medicine for the efficient and economic production of therapeutic proteins. Today, cultivated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the market dominating mammalian cell-line for the production of complex therapeutic proteins. Despite this outstanding potential of CHO cells, no high-yield cell-free system based on translationally active lysates from these cells has been reported so far. To date, CHO cell extracts have only been used as a foundational research tool for understanding mRNA translation (Lodish et al., 1974; McDowell et al., 1972). In the present study, we address this fact by establishing a novel cell-free protein expression system based on extracts from cultured CHO cells. Lysate preparation, adaptation of in vitro reaction conditions and the construction of particular expression vectors are considered for high-yield protein production. A specific in vitro expression vector, which includes an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) from the intergenic region (IGR) of the Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), has been constructed in order to obtain optimal performance. The IGR IRES is supposed to bind directly to the eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunit thereby bypassing the process of translation initiation, which is often a major bottleneck in cell-free systems. The combination of expression vector and optimized CHO cell extracts enables the production of approximately 50 µg/mL active firefly luciferase within 4 h. The batch-type cell-free coupled transcription-translation system has the potential to perform post-translational modifications, as shown by the glycosylation of erythropoietin. Accordingly, the system contains translocationally active endogenous microsomes, enabling the co-translational incorporation of membrane proteins into biological membranes. Hence, the presented in vitro translation system is a powerful tool for the fast and convenient optimization of expression constructs, the

  6. Specific inhibition of hepatitis B virus gene expression by an antisense oligonucleotide in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was previously shown that a number of antisense oligonucleotides against hepatitis B virus (HBV) mRNAa were highly effective in inhibition of HBV gene expression. Here, using radioisotope techniques, we report a specific inhibition of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) production in vitro by 2.2.15 cells (Hep-G2 cells transfected with HBV genome) by the antisense oligonucleotide 15-S-asON, a 15-mer phosphorothioate analogue complementary to the cap site of the SPII promoter of HBV mRNA, ar a concentration of 2 - 5 :m:mol/l. After 24 and 48 hours of incubation of cells with 15-S-asON, the intracellular concentration of the latter rose to 69.4 and 75.8 nmol/l, respectively, and the HBsAg level assayed by ELISA was reduced by 50.0% and 70.6%, respectively. The results were checked by use of the radio-immunoprecipitation method: 2.2.15 cells exposed to 15-S-asON and labelled with [35S]-methionine for 48 hours showed a decrease of the HBsAg level by 81.26% but almost none of the total proteins. No cytotoxicity of the 15-S-asON was observed with regard to the cell morphology and growth. These results indicate that the tested antisense oligonucleotide specifically inhibits the HBV gene expression. (author)

  7. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher; Waldron, Levi;

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression...... changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein...... interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two...

  8. Single-cell PCR profiling of gene expression in hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, José; Enver, Tariq; Pina, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis of gene expression offers the possibility of exploring cellular and molecular heterogeneity in stem and developmental cell systems, including cancer, to infer routes of cellular specification and their respective gene regulatory modules. PCR-based technologies, although limited to the analysis of a predefined set of genes, afford a cost-effective balance of throughput and biological information and have become a method of choice in stem cell laboratories. Here we describe an experimental and analytical protocol based on the Fluidigm microfluidics platform for the simultaneous expression analysis of 48 or 96 genes in multiples of 48 or 96 cells. We detail wet laboratory procedures and describe clustering, principal component analysis, correlation, and classification tools for the inference of cellular pathways and gene networks. PMID:25062620

  9. Tissue-specific mRNA expression profiling in grape berry tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cramer Grant R

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Berries of grape (Vitis vinifera contain three major tissue types (skin, pulp and seed all of which contribute to the aroma, color, and flavor characters of wine. The pericarp, which is composed of the exocarp (skin and mesocarp (pulp, not only functions to protect and feed the developing seed, but also to assist in the dispersal of the mature seed by avian and mammalian vectors. The skin provides volatile and nonvolatile aroma and color compounds, the pulp contributes organic acids and sugars, and the seeds provide condensed tannins, all of which are important to the formation of organoleptic characteristics of wine. In order to understand the transcriptional network responsible for controlling tissue-specific mRNA expression patterns, mRNA expression profiling was conducted on each tissue of mature berries of V. vinifera Cabernet Sauvignon using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Vitis oligonucleotide microarray ver. 1.0. In order to monitor the influence of water-deficit stress on tissue-specific expression patterns, mRNA expression profiles were also compared from mature berries harvested from vines subjected to well-watered or water-deficit conditions. Results Overall, berry tissues were found to express approximately 76% of genes represented on the Vitis microarray. Approximately 60% of these genes exhibited significant differential expression in one or more of the three major tissue types with more than 28% of genes showing pronounced (2-fold or greater differences in mRNA expression. The largest difference in tissue-specific expression was observed between the seed and pulp/skin. Exocarp tissue, which is involved in pathogen defense and pigment production, showed higher mRNA abundance relative to other berry tissues for genes involved with flavonoid biosynthesis, pathogen resistance, and cell wall modification. Mesocarp tissue, which is considered a nutritive tissue, exhibited a higher mRNA abundance of genes involved in cell

  10. ADAM17 deletion in thymic epithelial cells alters aire expression without affecting T cell developmental progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Gravano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular interactions between thymocytes and thymic stromal cells are critical for normal T cell development. Thymic epithelial cells (TECs are important stromal niche cells that provide essential growth factors, cytokines, and present self-antigens to developing thymocytes. The identification of genes that mediate cellular crosstalk in the thymus is ongoing. One candidate gene, Adam17, encodes a metalloprotease that functions by cleaving the ectodomain of several transmembrane proteins and regulates various developmental processes. In conventional Adam17 knockout mice, a non-cell autonomous role for ADAM17 in adult T cell development was reported, which strongly suggested that expression of ADAM17 in TECs was required for normal T cell development. However, knockdown of Adam17 results in multisystem developmental defects and perinatal lethality, which has made study of the role of Adam17 in specific cell types difficult. Here, we examined T cell and thymic epithelial cell development using a conditional knockout approach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated an Adam17 conditional knockout mouse in which floxed Adam17 is deleted specifically in TECs by Cre recombinase under the control of the Foxn1 promoter. Normal T cell lineage choice and development through the canonical αβ T cell stages was observed. Interestingly, Adam17 deficiency in TECs resulted in reduced expression of the transcription factor Aire. However, no alterations in the patterns of TEC phenotypic marker expression and thymus morphology were noted. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In contrast to expectation, our data clearly shows that absence of Adam17 in TECs is dispensable for normal T cell development. Differentiation of TECs is also unaffected by loss of Adam17 based on phenotypic markers. Surprisingly, we have uncovered a novel genetic link between Adam17and Aire expression in vivo. The cell type in which ADAM17 mediates its non-cell autonomous impact and

  11. Tissue factor expression by endothelial cells in sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Solovey, A; Gui, L; Key, N. S.; Hebbel, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the vascular endothelium in activation of the coagulation system, a fundamental homeostatic mechanism of mammalian biology, is uncertain because there is little evidence indicating that endothelial cells in vivo express tissue factor (TF), the system's triggering mechanism. As a surrogate for vessel wall endothelium, we examined circulating endothelial cells (CEC) from normals and patients with sickle cell anemia, a disease associated with activation of coagulation. We find that s...

  12. Recombinant scorpion insectotoxin AaIT kills specifically insect cells but not human cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence deduced from the amino acid sequence of the scorpion insectotoxin AaIT was chemically synthesized and was expressed in Escherichia coli. The authenticity of this in vitro expressed peptide was confirmed by N-terminal peptide sequencing. Two groups of bioassays, artificial diet incorporation assay and contact insecticidal effect assay, were carried out separately to verify the toxicity of this recombinant toxin. At the end of a 24 h experimental period, more than 60% of the testing diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) larvae were killed in both groups with LCs0 value of 18.4 uM and 0.70 μM respectively. Cytotoxicity assay using cultured Sf9 insect cells and MCF-7 human cells demonstrated that the toxin AaIT had specific toxicity against insect cells but not human cells. Only 0.13 μM recombinant toxin was needed to kill 50% of cultured insect cells while as much as 1.3μM toxin had absolutely no effect on human cells. Insect cells produced obvious intrusions from their plasma membrane before broken up. We infer that toxin AaIT bind to a putative sodium channel in these insect cells and open the channel persistently, which would result in Na+ influx and finally cause destruction of insect cells.

  13. Cell-type specific light-mediated transcript regulation in the multicellular alga Volvox carteri

    OpenAIRE

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2014-01-01

    Background The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri makes use of none less than 13 photoreceptors, which are mostly expressed in a cell-type specific manner. This gives reason to believe that trasncriptome pattern of each cell type could change differentially in response to environmental light. Here, the cell-type specific changes of various transcripts from different pathways in response to blue, red and far-red light were analyzed. Results In response to different light qualities, distin...

  14. Transcriptional Profiling of Ectoderm Specification to Keratinocyte Fate in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Mafalda Baptista Tadeu; Samantha Lin; Lin Hou; Lisa Chung; Mei Zhong; Hongyu Zhao; Valerie Horsley

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have shed light into the processes that regulate epidermal specification and homeostasis. We previously showed that a broad-spectrum γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT promoted early keratinocyte specification in human embryonic stem cells triggered to undergo ectoderm specification. Here, we show that DAPT accelerates human embryonic stem cell differentiation and induces expression of the ectoderm protein AP2. Furthermore, we utilize RNA sequencing to identify severa...

  15. Tissue specific promoters improve the localization of radiation-inducible gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Site-specific activation of gene expression can be achieved by the use of a promoter that is induced by physical agents such as x-rays. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether site-specific activation of gene therapy can also be achieved within the vascular endothelium by use of radiation-inducible promoters. We studied induction of promoter-reporter gene constructs using previously identified radiation-promoters from c-jun, c-fos, Egr-1, ICAM-1, ELAM-1 after transfection into in the vascular endothelium. Methods: The following radiation-inducible genetic constructs were created: The ELAM-1 promoter fragment was cloned into pOGH to obtain the pE-sel(-587 +35)GH reporter construct. The ICAM-1 promoter fragment (-1162/+1) was cloned upstream of the CAT coding region of the pCAT-plasmid (Promega) after removal of the SV40 promoter by Bgl2/Stu1 digestion to create the pBS-CAT plasmid. The 132 to +170 bp segment of the 5' untranslated region of the c-jun promoter was cloned to the CAT reporter gene to create the -132/+170 cjun-CAT. The Egr-1 promoter fragment (-425/+75) was cloned upstream of the CAT coding region to create the pE425-CAT plasmid. Tandem repeats of the AP-1 binding site were cloned upstream of the CAT coding region (3 xTRE-CAT). Tandem repeats of the Egr binding site (EBS) were cloned upstream of the CAT coding region (EBS-CAT). Human vascular endothelial cells from both large vessel and small vessel origin (HUVEC and HMEC), as well as human tumor cell lines were transfected with plasmids -132/+170 cjun-CAT, pE425-CAT, 3 xTRE-CAT, EBS-CAT, pE-sel-GH and pBS-CAT by use of liposomes. Humor tumor cell lines included SQ20B (squamous), RIT3 (sarcoma), and HL525 (leukemia). Each plasmid was cotransfected with a plasmid containing a CMV promoter linked to the LacZ gene (1 μg). Transfected cells were treated with mock irradiation or x-rays. Cell extracts were assayed for reporter gene expression. Results: Radiation-induced gene

  16. Endocytosis, oxidative stress and IL-8 expression in human lung epithelial cells upon treatment with fine and ultrafine TiO2: Role of the specific surface area and of surface methylation of the particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhaled ultrafine particles show considerably stronger pulmonary inflammatory effects when tested at equal mass dose with their fine counterparts. However, the responsible mechanisms are not yet fully understood. We investigated the role of particle size and surface chemistry in initiating pro-inflammatory effects in vitro in A549 human lung epithelial cells on treatment with different model TiO2 particles. Two samples of TiO2, i.e. fine (40-300 nm) and ultrafine (20-80 nm) were tested in their native forms as well as upon surface methylation, as was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Radical generation during cell treatment was determined by electron paramagnetic resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide or 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl. Interleukin-8 mRNA expression/release was determined by RT-PCR and ELISA, whereas particle uptake was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. TiO2 particles were rapidly taken up by the cells, generally as membrane bound aggregates and large intracellular aggregates in vesicles, vacuoles and lamellar bodies. Aggregate size tended to be smaller for the ultrafine samples and was also smaller for methylated fine TiO2 when compared to non-methylated fine TiO2. No particles were observed inside nuclei or any other vital organelle. Both ultrafine TiO2 samples but not their fine counterparts elicited significantly stronger oxidant generation and IL-8 release, despite their aggregation state and irrespective of their methylation. The present data indicate that ultrafine TiO2, even as aggregates/agglomerates, can trigger inflammatory responses that appear to be driven by their large surface area. Furthermore, our results indicate that these effects result from oxidants generated during particle-cell interactions through a yet to be elucidated mechanism(s)

  17. CONSTRUCTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF EUKARYOTIC VECTOR EXPRESSING SIRNA SPECIFIC FOR BACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To generate eukaryotic expression vector of siRNA specific for β-site APP cleaving enzyme(BACE),and detect the interfering effect to the expression of BACE. Methods To clone the BACE targeting siRNA gene by PCR, the PCR products was inserted into the pUC19/EGFP-U6 plasmid. Then it was sub-cloned into the vector named pLXSN. The resultant plasmid was named pLXSN/EGFP-U6-siBACE, it was packaged into AmphoPack-293 cells by calcium phosphate transfection and collected the virus supernatant. The neuroblastoma cells SK-N-SH was infected with the pLXSN/EGFP-U6-siBACE retroviral vector, immunohistochemistry method was used to detect whether the pLXSN/EGFP-U6-siBACE infection can inhibit the expression of BACE of the neuroblastoma cells. Results The pLXSN/EGFP-U6-siBACE retroviral vector was constructed successfully and the siBACE can inhibit the BACE of the neuroblastma effectively. Conclusion The siRNA can inhibit the expression of the BACE gene, the endogenous production of BACE protein was decreased. It will lay the important foundation for using RNA technology to prevent the Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Pineal expression-promoting element (PIPE), a cis-acting element, directs pineal-specific gene expression in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Asaoka, Yoichi; Mano, Hiroaki; Kojima, Daisuke; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2002-01-01

    The pineal gland, sharing morphological and biochemical similarities with the retina, plays a unique and central role in the photoneuroendocrine system. The unique development of the pineal gland is directed by a specific combination of the expressed genes, but little is known about the regulatory mechanism underlying the pineal-specific gene expression. We isolated a 1.1-kbp fragment upstream of the zebrafish exo-rhodopsin (exorh) gene, which is expressed specifically in the pineal gland. Tr...

  19. Activation of GATA4 gene expression at the early stage of cardiac specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, Ayse; Hamilton, Alison; Wang, Yingjian; Mach, Hymn; Lacroix, Natascha; Davis, Darryl; Chen, Jihong; LI, Qiao

    2014-03-01

    Currently, there are no effective treatments to directly repair damaged heart tissue after cardiac injury since existing therapies focus on rescuing or preserving reversibly damaged tissue. Cell-based therapies using cardiomyocytes generated from stem cells present a promising therapeutic approach to directly replace damaged myocardium with new healthy tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the commitment of stem cells into cardiomyocytes are not fully understood and will be critical to guide this new technology into the clinic. Since GATA4 is a critical regulator of cardiac differentiation, we examined the molecular basis underlying the early activation of GATA4 gene expression during cardiac differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Our studies demonstrate the direct involvement of histone acetylation and transcriptional coactivator p300 in the regulation of GATA4 gene expression. More importantly, we show that histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity is important for GATA4 gene expression with the use of curcumin, a HAT inhibitor. In addition, the widely used histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances both histone acetylation and cardiac specification.

  20. MEMBRANE LEc EXPRESSION IN BREAST CANCER CELLS

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    Ya. A. Udalova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Affine chromatography was used to isolate Lec antibodies from the sera of a healthy female donor with the high titers of these anti- bodies, which were labeled with biotin. The study enrolled 51 patients with primary breast cancer (BC. Antigen expression was found by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. With these two techniques being used, the detection rate of Lec expression in BC cells was 65% (33/51; the antigen was most frequently found by flow cytometry as compared with immunohistochemistry: 72 and 58% of cases, respectively.

  1. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  2. Novel method for isolation of murine clara cell secretory protein-expressing cells with traces of stemness.

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    Xiao-Yang Wang

    Full Text Available Clara cells are non-ciliated, secretory bronchiolar epithelial cells that serve to detoxify harmful inhaled substances. Clara cells also function as stem/progenitor cells for repair in the bronchioles. Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP is specifically expressed in pulmonary Clara cells and is widely used as a Clara cell marker. In addition CCSP promoter is commonly used to direct gene expression into the lung in transgenic models. The discovery of CCSP immunoreactivity in plasma membranes of airway lining cells prompted us to explore the possibility of enriching Clara cells by flow cytometry. We established a novel and simple method for the isolation of CCSP-expressing cell Clara cells using a combination of mechanical and enzymatic dissociation followed by flow cytometry sorting technology. We showed that ∼25% of dissociated cells from whole lung expressed CCSP. In the resulting preparation, up to 98% of cells expressed CCSP. Notably, we found that several common stem cell markers including CD44, CD133, Sca-1 and Sox2 were expressed in CCSP(+ cells. Moreover, CCSP(+ cells were able to form spheroid colonies in vitro with 0.97‰ efficiency. Parallel studies in vivo confirmed that a small population of CCSP(-expressing cells in mouse airways also demonstrates stem cell-like properties such as label retention and harboring rare bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs in terminal bronchioles (TBs. We conclude that CCSP(+ cells exhibit a number of stem cell-like features including stem cell marker expression, bronchosphere colony formation and self-renewal ability. Clara cell isolation by flow cytometry sorting is a useful method for investigating the function of primary Clara cells in stem cell research and mouse models.

  3. Hypoxia- and radiation-inducible, breast cell-specific targeting of retroviral vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To facilitate a more efficient radiation and chemotherapy of mammary tumours, synthetic enhancer elements responsive to hypoxia and ionizing radiation were coupled to the mammary-specific minimal promoter of the murine whey acidic protein (WAP) encoding gene. The modified WAP promoter was introduced into a retroviral promoter conversion (ProCon) vector. Expression of a transduced reporter gene in response to hypoxia and radiation was analysed in stably infected mammary cancer cell lines and an up to 9-fold increase in gene expression demonstrated in comparison to the respective basic vector. Expression analyses in vitro, moreover, demonstrated a widely preserved mammary cell-specific promoter activity. For in vivo analyses, xenograft tumours consisting of infected human mammary adenocarcinoma cells were established in SCID/beige mice. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a hypoxia-specific, markedly increased WAP promoter-driven expression in these tumours. Thus, this retroviral vector will facilitate a targeted gene therapeutic approach exploiting the unique environmental condition in solid tumours

  4. Antigen expression on recurrent meningioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meningiomas are intracranial brain tumours that frequently recur. Recurrence rates up to 20% in 20 years for benign meningiomas, up to 80% for atypical meningiomas and up to 100% for malignant meningiomas, have been reported. The most important prognostic factors for meningioma recurrence are meningioma grade, meningioma invasiveness and radicality of neurosurgical resection. The aim of our study was to evaluate the differences in antigenic expression on the surface of meningioma cells between recurrent and non-recurrent meningiomas. 19 recurrent meningiomas and 35 non-recurrent meningiomas were compared regarding the expression of MIB-1 antigen, progesterone receptors, cathepsin B and cathepsin L, using immunohistochemistry. MIB-1 antigen expression was higher in the recurrent meningioma group (p=0.001). No difference in progesterone receptor status between recurrent and non-recurrent meningiomas was confirmed. Immunohistochemical intensity scores for cathepsin B (p= 0.007) and cathepsin L (p<0.001) were both higher in the recurrent than in the non-recurrent meningioma group. MIB-1 antigen expression is higher in recurrent compared to non-recurrent meningiomas. There is no difference in expression of progesterone receptors between recurrent and non-recurrent meningiomas. Cathepsins B and L are expressed more in recurrent meningiomas

  5. Expression of bacterial luciferase in eukaryotic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expression of Bacterial luciferase enzyme (lux) in mammalian cells would be a powerful bioreporter protein system for in vivo imaging because eukaryotic luciferases need expensive substrates. However, only a few efforts have been made to express bacterial luciferase enzyme in mammalian cells. As the result of this, we attempted to construct bicistronic vector including two bacterial luciferase genes (LuxA and LuxB) for assessing the potential to be visualized in vitro or in vivo by optical imaging system after transfection to mammalian cells. We designed and synthesized luxA and luxB genes from Photorhabdus Luminescens. To co-express both luxA and luxB genes from a single promoter, we cloned as a bicistronic transcript fused with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). This bicistronic transcript was transfected by Superfect to HEK 293T cell line. We also transfected lux A and lux B vector to HEK 293T cells separately. To evaluate gene expression, n-decanal and FMNH2 were supplemented to transfected HEK 293T cell lines which were measured by In Vivo Imaging System. The luxA gene was cloned into the MCS(A) of pIRESGFP via the 5' SalI and 3' EcoRI restriction sites to generate pIRESluxA. The luxB gene was cleaved via a 5' NcoI and 3' NotI site from luxB and cloned into the MCS(B) of pIRESluxA to generate pIRESluxAB. LuxA and B genes was cleaved by 5' EcoRI and 3' SpeI and cloned into the pcDNA3.1 mammalian expression vector to create pcDNALuxA and pcDNALuxB. We constructed bicistronic vector system which is composed of bacterial luciferase genes (lux A and B) on the single reading frame. These results hold a promise of an available development of an autonomous light generating lux reporter system in mammalian cells

  6. Human vascular smooth muscle cells express a urate transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Karen L; Sautin, Yuri Y; Long, David A; Zhang, Li; Miyazaki, Hiroki; Mu, Wei; Endou, Hitoshi; Johnson, Richard J

    2006-07-01

    An elevated serum uric acid is associated with the development of hypertension and renal disease. Renal regulation of urate excretion is largely controlled by URAT1 (SLC22A12), a member of the organic anion transporter superfamily. This study reports the specific expression of URAT1 on human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, as assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis. Expression of URAT1 was localized to the cell membrane. Evidence that the URAT1 transporter was functional was provided by the finding that uptake of 14C-urate was significantly inhibited in the presence of probenecid, an organic anion transporter inhibitor. It is proposed that URAT1 may provide a mechanism by which uric acid enters the human vascular smooth muscle cell, a finding that may be relevant to the role of uric acid in cardiovascular disease. PMID:16775029

  7. Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Di Talia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle.

  8. Characterization of cell subpopulations expressing progenitor cell markers in porcine cardiac valves.

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    Huan Wang

    Full Text Available Valvular interstitial cells (VICs are the main population of cells found in cardiac valves. These resident fibroblastic cells play important roles in maintaining proper valve function, and their dysregulation has been linked to disease progression in humans. Despite the critical functions of VICs, their cellular composition is still not well defined for humans and other mammals. Given the limited availability of healthy human valves and the similarity in valve structure and function between humans and pigs, we characterized porcine VICs (pVICs based on expression of cell surface proteins and sorted a specific subpopulation of pVICs to study its functions. We found that small percentages of pVICs express the progenitor cell markers ABCG2 (~5%, NG2 (~5% or SSEA-4 (~7%, whereas another subpopulation (~5% expresses OB-CDH, a type of cadherin expressed by myofibroblasts or osteo-progenitors. pVICs isolated from either aortic or pulmonary valves express most of these protein markers at similar levels. Interestingly, OB-CDH, NG2 and SSEA-4 all label distinct valvular subpopulations relative to each other; however, NG2 and ABCG2 are co-expressed in the same cells. ABCG2(+ cells were further characterized and found to deposit more calcified matrix than ABCG2(- cells upon osteogenic induction, suggesting that they may be involved in the development of osteogenic VICs during valve pathology. Cell profiling based on flow cytometry and functional studies with sorted primary cells provide not only new and quantitative information about the cellular composition of porcine cardiac valves, but also contribute to our understanding of how a subpopulation of valvular cells (ABCG2(+ cells may participate in tissue repair and disease progression.

  9. Multiple melanocortin receptors are expressed in bone cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qing; Sridhar, Supriya; Ruan, Ling; Ding, Ke-Hong; Xie, Ding; Insogna, Karl; Kang, Baolin; Xu, Jianrui; Bollag, Roni J.; Isales, Carlos M.

    2005-01-01

    Melanocortin receptors belong to the seven transmembrane domain, G-protein coupled family of receptors. There are five members of this receptor family labeled MC1R-MC5R. These receptors are activated by fragments derived from a larger molecule, proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and include ACTH, alpha beta and gamma-MSH and beta-endorphin. Because of in vitro and in vivo data suggesting direct effects of these POMC molecules on bone and bone turnover, we examined bone and bone derived cells for the presence of the various members of the melanocortin receptor family. We report that the five known melanocortin receptors are expressed to varying degrees in osteoblast-like and osteoclastic cells. POMC fragments increased proliferation and expression of a variety of genes in osteoblastic cells. Furthermore, POMC mRNA was detected in osteoclastic cells. These data demonstrate that POMC-derived peptide hormones acting through high affinity melanocortin receptors have specific effects on bone cells. Thus, in addition to the indirect effects of POMC-derived hormones on bone turnover through their modulation of steroid hormone secretion, POMC fragments may have direct and specific effects on bone cell subpopulations.

  10. Estrogen and inflammation modulate estrogen receptor alpha expression in specific tissues of the temporomandibular joint

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    Bellinger Larry L

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen is known to play role in temporomandibular joint (TMJ disorders and estrogen effects can be mediated by estrogen receptor (ER alpha present in the TMJ. Cells expressing the estrogen receptor ERalpha are present in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ but changes in expression due to estrogen and inflammation have not been characterized. In this study, ERalpha protein content and the number of cells expressing ERalpha was measured in 17 beta-estradiol-treated rats after inflammation was induced in the TMJ. Methods Sixteen ovariectomized female rats were divided into two groups such that one group received 17 beta estradiol (E2 and the other was given vehicle (VEH. Groups were then subdivided further, one received injections of saline and the other received Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA within the superior joint space of the TMJ. Thus the four groups include no E2/saline, E2/saline, no E2/CFA and E2/CFA. After treatment, the rats were sacrificed, and the TMJ anterior, disc, retrodiscal and synovial tissues were analyzed by western blot and immunocytochemistry. Positive stained cells were counted using a Nikon epifluorescent microscope. Results The western blot showed that ERalpha protein significantly decreased with inflammation. The number of ERalpha-positive cells in the TMJ was not affected by inflammation or 17 beta-estradiol with exception of the retrodiscal tissue. In the retrodiscal tissue 17 beta-estradiol significantly decreased the number of ERalpha-positive cells but only in a non-inflamed joint. Conclusions In conclusion, inflammation and 17 beta-estradiol can modulate ERalpha expression in the TMJ but the effects are tissue specific.

  11. Co-Expression of Cancer Stem Cell Markers Corresponds to a Pro-Tumorigenic Expression Profile in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoda, Jan; Hermanova, Marketa; Loja, Tomas; Nemec, Pavel; Neradil, Jakub; Karasek, Petr; Veselska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. Its dismal prognosis is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that have been identified in PDAC using various markers. However, the co-expression of all of these markers has not yet been evaluated. Furthermore, studies that compare the expression levels of CSC markers in PDAC tumor samples and in cell lines derived directly from those tumors are lacking. Here, we analyzed the expression of putative CSC markers—CD24, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD133, and nestin—by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and quantitative PCR in 3 PDAC-derived cell lines and by immunohistochemistry in 3 corresponding tumor samples. We showed high expression of the examined CSC markers among all of the cell lines and tumor samples, with the exception of CD24 and CD44, which were enriched under in vitro conditions compared with tumor tissues. The proportions of cells positive for the remaining markers were comparable to those detected in the corresponding tumors. Co-expression analysis using flow cytometry revealed that CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells represented a significant population of the cells (range, 43 to 72%) among the cell lines. The highest proportion of CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells was detected in the cell line derived from the tumor of a patient with the shortest survival. Using gene expression profiling, we further identified the specific pro-tumorigenic expression profile of this cell line compared with the profiles of the other two cell lines. Together, CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells are present in PDAC cell lines derived from primary tumors, and their increased proportion corresponds with a pro-tumorigenic gene expression profile. PMID:27414409

  12. Co-Expression of Cancer Stem Cell Markers Corresponds to a Pro-Tumorigenic Expression Profile in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoda, Jan; Hermanova, Marketa; Loja, Tomas; Nemec, Pavel; Neradil, Jakub; Karasek, Petr; Veselska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. Its dismal prognosis is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that have been identified in PDAC using various markers. However, the co-expression of all of these markers has not yet been evaluated. Furthermore, studies that compare the expression levels of CSC markers in PDAC tumor samples and in cell lines derived directly from those tumors are lacking. Here, we analyzed the expression of putative CSC markers-CD24, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD133, and nestin-by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and quantitative PCR in 3 PDAC-derived cell lines and by immunohistochemistry in 3 corresponding tumor samples. We showed high expression of the examined CSC markers among all of the cell lines and tumor samples, with the exception of CD24 and CD44, which were enriched under in vitro conditions compared with tumor tissues. The proportions of cells positive for the remaining markers were comparable to those detected in the corresponding tumors. Co-expression analysis using flow cytometry revealed that CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells represented a significant population of the cells (range, 43 to 72%) among the cell lines. The highest proportion of CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells was detected in the cell line derived from the tumor of a patient with the shortest survival. Using gene expression profiling, we further identified the specific pro-tumorigenic expression profile of this cell line compared with the profiles of the other two cell lines. Together, CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells are present in PDAC cell lines derived from primary tumors, and their increased proportion corresponds with a pro-tumorigenic gene expression profile. PMID:27414409

  13. Germ Cell Nuclear Factor (GCNF) Represses Oct4 Expression and Globally Modulates Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem (hES) Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongran; Wang, Xiaohong; Xu, Xueping; Kyba, Michael; Cooney, Austin J.

    2016-01-01

    Oct4 is considered a key transcription factor for pluripotent stem cell self-renewal. It binds to specific regions within target genes to regulate their expression and is downregulated upon induction of differentiation of pluripotent stem cells; however, the mechanisms that regulate the levels of human Oct4 expression remain poorly understood. Here we show that expression of human Oct4 is directly repressed by germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF), an orphan nuclear receptor, in hES cells. Knockdown of GCNF by siRNA resulted in maintenance of Oct4 expression during RA-induced hES cell differentiation. While overexpression of GCNF promoted repression of Oct4 expression in both undifferentiated and differentiated hES cells. The level of Oct4 repression was dependent on the level of GCNF expression in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA microarray analysis demonstrated that overexpression of GCNF globally regulates gene expression in undifferentiated and differentiated hES cells. Within the group of altered genes, GCNF down-regulated 36% of the genes, and up-regulated 64% in undifferentiated hES cells. In addition, GCNF also showed a regulatory gene pattern that is different from RA treatment during hES cell differentiation. These findings increase our understanding of the mechanisms that maintain hES cell pluripotency and regulate gene expression during the differentiation process. PMID:26769970

  14. Aberrant expression of metallothioneins in clear cell renal cell carcinomas

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    Rymar V. I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To find candidate tumor suppressor genes among metallothioneins for clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Methods. Analysis of the microarray data, quantitative PCR. Results. We found three genes encoding metallothioneines that showed reduced expression in different types of renal tumors, using protocol of the cross-platform meta-analysis of microarray data with normalization on several reference genes. Decreased expression of the MT1G, MT1F, and MT1H genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma was confirmed by qPCR. Conclusions. The MT1G, MT1F and MT1H genes as well as may be considered as the candidate tumor suppressor genes for ccRCC.

  15. Molecular mechanisms involved in casein gene expression and secretion in mouse mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMEC) secrete a group of milk-specific proteins including various caseins and whey proteins. Dissociated mammary epithelial cells maintain expression of most of their differentiated functions only if cells are plated on a suitable substratum. Casein production and section, cell morphology, and production of α-lactalbumin have been used as markers to assess the degree of differentiation of mammary cells in culture. The general consensus is that cells express their differentiated properties at high levels and for longer periods of time on such substrata. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that modulation of the expression of caseins by floating collagen gels is manifested at several regulatory points