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Sample records for cell specific adapter

  1. Identification of site-specific adaptations conferring increased neural cell tropism during human enterovirus 71 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Cordey

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is one of the most virulent enteroviruses, but the specific molecular features that enhance its ability to disseminate in humans remain unknown. We analyzed the genomic features of EV71 in an immunocompromised host with disseminated disease according to the different sites of infection. Comparison of five full-length genomes sequenced directly from respiratory, gastrointestinal, nervous system, and blood specimens revealed three nucleotide changes that occurred within a five-day period: a non-conservative amino acid change in VP1 located within the BC loop (L97R, a region considered as an immunogenic site and possibly important in poliovirus host adaptation; a conservative amino acid substitution in protein 2B (A38V; and a silent mutation in protein 3D (L175. Infectious clones were constructed using both BrCr (lineage A and the clinical strain (lineage C backgrounds containing either one or both non-synonymous mutations. In vitro cell tropism and competition assays revealed that the VP1₉₇ Leu to Arg substitution within the BC loop conferred a replicative advantage in SH-SY5Y cells of neuroblastoma origin. Interestingly, this mutation was frequently associated in vitro with a second non-conservative mutation (E167G or E167A in the VP1 EF loop in neuroblastoma cells. Comparative models of these EV71 VP1 variants were built to determine how the substitutions might affect VP1 structure and/or interactions with host cells and suggest that, while no significant structural changes were observed, the substitutions may alter interactions with host cell receptors. Taken together, our results show that the VP1 BC loop region of EV71 plays a critical role in cell tropism independent of EV71 lineage and, thus, may have contributed to dissemination and neurotropism in the immunocompromised patient.

  2. Adaptive Assessments Using Open Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Hector Barbosa; Garcia-Penalvo, Francisco J.; Rodriguez-Conde, Maria Jose; Morales, Erla M.; de Pablos, Patricia Ordonez

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation is a key element in formal education processes; it must be constructed in a way that the item questions within help students understand by adapting them to the learning style as well. The focus of the present research work specifically in the convenience to adapt an associated multimedia material in each single question besides the…

  3. Physiological and cell morphology adaptation of Bacillus subtilis at near-zero specific growth rates: a transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overkamp, Wout; Ercan, Onur; Herber, Martijn; van Maris, Antonius J A; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-02-01

    Nutrient scarcity is a common condition in nature, but the resulting extremely low growth rates (below 0.025 h(-1) ) are an unexplored research area in Bacillus subtilis. To understand microbial life in natural environments, studying the adaptation of B. subtilis to near-zero growth conditions is relevant. To this end, a chemostat modified for culturing an asporogenous B. subtilis sigF mutant strain at extremely low growth rates (also named a retentostat) was set up, and biomass accumulation, culture viability, metabolite production and cell morphology were analysed. During retentostat culturing, the specific growth rate decreased to a minimum of 0.00006 h(-1) , corresponding to a doubling time of 470 days. The energy distribution between growth and maintenance-related processes showed that a state of near-zero growth was reached. Remarkably, a filamentous cell morphology emerged, suggesting that cell separation is impaired under near-zero growth conditions. To evaluate the corresponding molecular adaptations to extremely low specific growth, transcriptome changes were analysed. These revealed that cellular responses to near-zero growth conditions share several similarities with those of cells during the stationary phase of batch growth. However, fundamental differences between these two non-growing states are apparent by their high viability and absence of stationary phase mutagenesis under near-zero growth conditions.

  4. Cell type-specific adaptation of cellular and nuclear volume in micro-engineered 3D environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Alexandra M; Klein, Franziska; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Richter, Benjamin; Striebel, Thomas; Wundari, Bayu G; Autenrieth, Tatjana J; Wegener, Martin; Franz, Clemens M; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Bio-functionalized three-dimensional (3D) structures fabricated by direct laser writing (DLW) are structurally and mechanically well-defined and ideal for systematically investigating the influence of three-dimensionality and substrate stiffness on cell behavior. Here, we show that different fibroblast-like and epithelial cell lines maintain normal proliferation rates and form functional cell-matrix contacts in DLW-fabricated 3D scaffolds of different mechanics and geometry. Furthermore, the molecular composition of cell-matrix contacts forming in these 3D micro-environments and under conventional 2D culture conditions is identical, based on the analysis of several marker proteins (paxillin, phospho-paxillin, phospho-focal adhesion kinase, vinculin, β1-integrin). However, fibroblast-like and epithelial cells differ markedly in the way they adapt their total cell and nuclear volumes in 3D environments. While fibroblast-like cell lines display significantly increased cell and nuclear volumes in 3D substrates compared to 2D substrates, epithelial cells retain similar cell and nuclear volumes in 2D and 3D environments. Despite differential cell volume regulation between fibroblasts and epithelial cells in 3D environments, the nucleus-to-cell (N/C) volume ratios remain constant for all cell types and culture conditions. Thus, changes in cell and nuclear volume during the transition from 2D to 3D environments are strongly cell type-dependent, but independent of scaffold stiffness, while cells maintain the N/C ratio regardless of culture conditions.

  5. Comparative proteome analysis reveals conserved and specific adaptation patterns of Staphylococcus aureus after internalization by different types of human non-professional phagocytic host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmann, Kristin; Michalik, Stephan; Hildebrandt, Petra; Gierok, Philipp; Depke, Maren; Brinkmann, Lars; Bernhardt, Jörg; Salazar, Manuela G; Sun, Zhi; Shteynberg, David; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Moritz, Robert L; Wollscheid, Bernd; Lalk, Michael; Völker, Uwe; Schmidt, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human pathogen that can cause a wide range of diseases. Although formerly regarded as extracellular pathogen, it has been shown that S. aureus can also be internalized by host cells and persist within these cells. In the present study, we comparatively analyzed survival and physiological adaptation of S. aureus HG001 after internalization by two human lung epithelial cell lines (S9 and A549), and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293). Combining enrichment of bacteria from host-pathogen assays by cell sorting and quantitation of the pathogen's proteome by mass spectrometry we characterized S. aureus adaptation during the initial phase between 2.5 h and 6.5 h post-infection. Starting with about 2 × 10(6) bacteria, roughly 1450 S. aureus proteins, including virulence factors and metabolic enzymes were identified by spectral comparison and classical database searches. Most of the bacterial adaptation reactions, such as decreased levels of ribosomal proteins and metabolic enzymes or increased amounts of proteins involved in arginine and lysine biosynthesis, enzymes coding for terminal oxidases and stress responsive proteins or activation of the sigma factor SigB were observed after internalization into any of the three cell lines studied. However, differences were noted in central carbon metabolism including regulation of fermentation and threonine degradation. Since these differences coincided with different intracellular growth behavior, complementary profiling of the metabolome of the different non-infected host cell types was performed. This revealed similar levels of intracellular glucose but host cell specific differences in the amounts of amino acids such as glycine, threonine or glutamate. With this comparative study we provide an impression of the common and specific features of the adaptation of S. aureus HG001 to specific host cell environments as a starting point for follow-up studies with different strain isolates and regulatory

  6. Comparative proteome analysis reveals conserved and specific adaptation patterns of Staphylococcus aureus after internalization by different types of human non-professional phagocytic host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin eSurmann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a human pathogen that can cause a wide range of diseases. Although formerly regarded as extracellular pathogen, it has been shown that S. aureus can also be internalized by host cells and persist within these cells. In the present study, we comparatively analyzed survival and physiological adaptation of S. aureus HG001 after internalization by two human lung epithelial cell lines (S9 and A549, and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293. Combining enrichment of bacteria from host-pathogen assays by cell sorting and quantitation of the pathogen´s proteome by mass spectrometry we characterized S. aureus adaptation during the initial phase between 2.5 h and 6.5 h post-infection. Starting with about 2x106 bacteria, roughly 1,450 S. aureus proteins, including virulence factors and metabolic enzymes were identified by spectral comparison and classical database searches. Most of the bacterial adaptation reactions, such as decreases in levels of ribosomal proteins and metabolic enzymes or increases in amounts of proteins involved in arginine and lysine biosynthesis, coding for terminal oxidases and stress responsive genes or activation of the sigma factor SigB were observed after internalization into any of the three cell lines studied. However, differences were noted in central carbon metabolism including regulation of fermentation and threonine degradation. Since these differences coincided with different intracellular growth behavior, complementary profiling of the metabolome of the different non-infected host cell types was performed. This revealed similar levels of intracellular glucose but host cell specific differences in the amounts of amino acids such as glycine, threonine or glutamate. With this comparative study we provide an impression of the common and specific features of the adaptation of S. aureus HG001 to specific host cell environments as a starting point for follow-up studies with different strain isolates and

  7. Comparative proteome analysis reveals conserved and specific adaptation patterns of Staphylococcus aureus after internalization by different types of human non-professional phagocytic host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmann, Kristin; Michalik, Stephan; Hildebrandt, Petra; Gierok, Philipp; Depke, Maren; Brinkmann, Lars; Bernhardt, Jörg; Salazar, Manuela G.; Sun, Zhi; Shteynberg, David; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Moritz, Robert L.; Wollscheid, Bernd; Lalk, Michael; Völker, Uwe; Schmidt, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human pathogen that can cause a wide range of diseases. Although formerly regarded as extracellular pathogen, it has been shown that S. aureus can also be internalized by host cells and persist within these cells. In the present study, we comparatively analyzed survival and physiological adaptation of S. aureus HG001 after internalization by two human lung epithelial cell lines (S9 and A549), and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293). Combining enrichment of bacteria from host-pathogen assays by cell sorting and quantitation of the pathogen's proteome by mass spectrometry we characterized S. aureus adaptation during the initial phase between 2.5 h and 6.5 h post-infection. Starting with about 2 × 106 bacteria, roughly 1450 S. aureus proteins, including virulence factors and metabolic enzymes were identified by spectral comparison and classical database searches. Most of the bacterial adaptation reactions, such as decreased levels of ribosomal proteins and metabolic enzymes or increased amounts of proteins involved in arginine and lysine biosynthesis, enzymes coding for terminal oxidases and stress responsive proteins or activation of the sigma factor SigB were observed after internalization into any of the three cell lines studied. However, differences were noted in central carbon metabolism including regulation of fermentation and threonine degradation. Since these differences coincided with different intracellular growth behavior, complementary profiling of the metabolome of the different non-infected host cell types was performed. This revealed similar levels of intracellular glucose but host cell specific differences in the amounts of amino acids such as glycine, threonine or glutamate. With this comparative study we provide an impression of the common and specific features of the adaptation of S. aureus HG001 to specific host cell environments as a starting point for follow-up studies with different strain isolates and regulatory

  8. Evaluation of specific humoral immune response in pigs vaccinated with cell culture adapted classical swine fever vaccine

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    Mrinal K. Nath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine an efficient vaccination schedule on the basis of the humoral immune response of cell culture adapted live classical swine fever virus (CSFV vaccinated pigs and maternally derived antibody (MDA in piglets of vaccinated sows. Materials and Methods: A cell culture adapted live CSFV vaccine was subjected to different vaccination schedule in the present study. Serum samples were collected before vaccination (day 0 and 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, 180, 194, 208, 270, 284 and 298 days after vaccination and were analyzed by liquid phase blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, MDA titre was detected in the serum of piglets at 21 and 42 days of age after farrowing of the vaccinated sows. Results: On 28 days after vaccination, serum samples of 83.33% vaccinated pigs showed the desirable level of antibody titer (log10 1.50 at 1:32 dilution, whereas 100% animals showed log10 1.50 at 1:32 dilution after 42 days of vaccination. Animals received a booster dose at 28 and 180 days post vaccination showed stable high-level antibody titre till the end of the study period. Further, piglets born from pigs vaccinated 1 month after conception showed the desirable level of MDA up to 42 days of age. Conclusion: CSF causes major losses in pig industry. Lapinised vaccines against CSFV are used routinely in endemic countries. In the present study, a cell culture adapted live attenuated vaccine has been evaluated. Based on the level of humoral immune response of vaccinated pigs and MDA titer in piglets born from immunized sows, it may be concluded that the more effective vaccination schedule for prevention of CSF is primary vaccination at 2 months of age followed by booster vaccination at 28 and 180 days post primary vaccination and at 1 month of gestation.

  9. Development of the Specific Adaptation Mobility Cane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrington, S.

    1995-01-01

    A travel cane was adapted for use by a 10-year-old boy with cortical blindness, severe mental retardation and cerebral palsy affecting his left arm and leg. The Specific Adaptation Mobility Cane utilizes the affected arm to hold the cane while leaving the other hand free for trailing walls, opening doors, carrying objects, and holding handrails.…

  10. Physiological and cell morphology adaptation of Bacillus subtilis at near-zero specific growth rates: a transcriptome analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overkamp, W.; Ercan, O.; Herber, M.; Maris, van A.J.; Kleerebezem, M.; Kuipers, O.P.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient scarcity is a common condition in nature, but the resulting extremely low growth rates (below 0.025 h-1) are an unexplored research area in B. subtilis. To understand microbial life in natural environments, studying the adaptation of B. subtilis to near-zero growth conditions is relevant. T

  11. RESEARCH ON DIALECT-SPECIFIC LEXICON ADAPTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Linquan

    2008-01-01

    With respect m dialectal-accented speech recognition, dialect-specific lexicon adaptation is an indispensable component to improve the performance. In this paper, a phone-based confusion matrix is adopted to obtain dialect-specific pronunciation variants. A weighting method, improved context-dependent weighting (ICDW) is proposed to characterize the pronunciation probability precisely by taking both the surface form left-context-dependency and the base form left-context-dependency into account. To make a much robust lexicon, a pruning criterion, syllable-dependent pruning (SDP), is also proposed which achieves the most effective result. In summary, the dialect-specific dialect adaptation reduces a 2.9% absolute and a 3.6% absolute in syllable error rate (SER) respectively on read speech and spontaneous speech from Shanghai-accented speakers.

  12. Comparative proteome analysis reveals conserved and specific adaptation patterns of Staphylococcus aureus after internalization by different types of human non-professional phagocytic host cells

    OpenAIRE

    Surmann, Kristin; Michalik, Stephan; Hildebrandt, Petra; Gierok, Philipp; Depke, Maren; Brinkmann, Lars; Bernhardt, Jörg; Salazar, Manuela G.; Sun, Zhi; Shteynberg, David; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Moritz, Robert L; Wollscheid, Bernd; Lalk, Michael; Völker, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human pathogen that can cause a wide range of diseases. Although formerly regarded as extracellular pathogen, it has been shown that S. aureus can also be internalized by host cells and persist within these cells. In the present study, we comparatively analyzed survival and physiological adaptation of S. aureus HG001 after internalization by two human lung epithelial cell lines (S9 and A549), and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293). Combining enrichment of bacter...

  13. Specificity, cross-talk and adaptation in Interferon signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilman, Anton

    Innate immune system is the first line of defense of higher organisms against pathogens. It coordinates the behavior of millions of cells of multiple types, achieved through numerous signaling molecules. This talk focuses on the signaling specificity of a major class of signaling molecules - Type I Interferons - which are also used therapeutically in the treatment of a number of diseases, such as Hepatitis C, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. Puzzlingly, different Interferons act through the same cell surface receptor but have different effects on the target cells. They also exhibit a strange pattern of temporal cross-talk resulting in a serious clinical problem - loss of response to Interferon therapy. We combined mathematical modeling with quantitative experiments to develop a quantitative model of specificity and adaptation in the Interferon signaling pathway. The model resolves several outstanding experimental puzzles and directly affects the clinical use of Type I Interferons in treatment of viral hepatitis and other diseases.

  14. Epigenetic Regulation of Adaptive NK Cell Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, Bianca; Schlums, Heinrich; Cichocki, Frank; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2016-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were previously considered to represent short-lived, innate lymphocytes. However, mouse models have revealed expansion and persistence of differentiated NK cell subsets in response to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, paralleling antigen-specific T cell differentiation. Congruently, analyses of humans have uncovered CMV-associated NK cell subsets characterized by epigenetic diversification processes that lead to altered target cell specificities and functional capacities. Here, focusing on responses to viruses, we review similarities and differences between mouse and human adaptive NK cells, identifying molecular analogies that may be key to transcriptional reprogramming and functional alterations. We discuss possible molecular mechanisms underlying epigenetic diversification and hypothesize that processes driving epigenetic diversification may represent a more widespread mechanism for fine-tuning and optimization of cellular immunity.

  15. CCL22-specific T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinenaite, Evelina; Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating macrophages produce the chemokine CCL22, which attracts regulatory T cells (Tregs) into the tumor microenvironment, decreasing anticancer immunity. Here, we investigated the possibility of targeting CCL22-expressing cells by activating specific T cells. We...... analyzed the CCL22 protein signal sequence, identifying a human leukocyte antigen A2- (HLA-A2-) restricted peptide epitope, which we then used to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) to expand populations of CCL22-specific T cells in vitro. T cells recognizing an epitope derived from...... the signal-peptide of CCL22 will recognize CCL22-expressing cells even though CCL22 is secreted out of the cell. CCL22-specific T cells recognized and killed CCL22-expressing cancer cells. Furthermore, CCL22-specific T cells lysed acute monocytic leukemia cells in a CCL22 expression-dependent manner. Using...

  16. The specificity of stimulus-specific adaptation in human auditory cortex increases with repeated exposure to the adapting stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley, Paul M; Krumbholz, Katrin

    2013-12-01

    The neural response to a sensory stimulus tends to be more strongly reduced when the stimulus is preceded by the same, rather than a different, stimulus. This stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA) is ubiquitous across the senses. In hearing, SSA has been suggested to play a role in change detection as indexed by the mismatch negativity. This study sought to test whether SSA, measured in human auditory cortex, is caused by neural fatigue (reduction in neural responsiveness) or by sharpening of neural tuning to the adapting stimulus. For that, we measured event-related cortical potentials to pairs of pure tones with varying frequency separation and stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA). This enabled us to examine the relationship between the degree of specificity of adaptation as a function of frequency separation and the rate of decay of adaptation with increasing SOA. Using simulations of tonotopic neuron populations, we demonstrate that the fatigue model predicts independence of adaptation specificity and decay rate, whereas the sharpening model predicts interdependence. The data showed independence and thus supported the fatigue model. In a second experiment, we measured adaptation specificity after multiple presentations of the adapting stimulus. The multiple adapters produced more adaptation overall, but the effect was more specific to the adapting frequency. Within the context of the fatigue model, the observed increase in adaptation specificity could be explained by assuming a 2.5-fold increase in neural frequency selectivity. We discuss possible bottom-up and top-down mechanisms of this effect.

  17. The Transformation of Adaptation Specificity to Whisker Identity from Brainstem to Thalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubran, Muna; Mohar, Boaz; Lampl, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    Stimulus specific adaptation has been studied extensively in different modalities. High specificity implies that deviant stimulus induces a stronger response compared to a common stimulus. The thalamus gates sensory information to the cortex, therefore, the specificity of adaptation in the thalamus must have a great impact on cortical processing of sensory inputs. We studied the specificity of adaptation to whisker identity in the ventral posteromedial nucleus of the thalamus (VPM) in rats using extracellular and intracellular recordings. We found that subsequent to repetitive stimulation that induced strong adaptation, the response to stimulation of the same, or any other responsive whisker was equally adapted, indicating that thalamic adaptation is non-specific. In contrast, adaptation of single units in the upstream brainstem principal trigeminal nucleus (PrV) was significantly more specific. Depolarization of intracellularly recorded VPM cells demonstrated that adaptation is not due to buildup of inhibition. In addition, adaptation increased the probability of observing complete synaptic failures to tactile stimulation. In accordance with short-term synaptic depression models, the evoked synaptic potentials in response to whisker stimulation, subsequent to a response failure, were facilitated. In summary, we show that local short-term synaptic plasticity is involved in the transformation of adaptation in the trigemino-thalamic synapse and that the low specificity of adaptation in the VPM emerges locally rather than cascades from earlier stages. Taken together we suggest that during sustained stimulation, local thalamic mechanisms equally suppress inputs arriving from different whiskers before being gated to the cortex. PMID:27445716

  18. Adaptive HIV-specific B cell-derived humoral immune defenses of the intestinal mucosa in children exposed to HIV via breast-feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Moussa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We evaluated whether B cell-derived immune defenses of the gastro-intestinal tract are activated to produce HIV-specific antibodies in children continuously exposed to HIV via breast-feeding. METHODS: Couples of HIV-1-infected mothers (n = 14 and their breastfed non HIV-infected (n = 8 and HIV-infected (n = 6 babies, and healthy HIV-negative mothers and breastfed babies (n = 10 as controls, were prospectively included at the Complexe Pédiatrique of Bangui, Central African Republic. Immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG and IgM and anti-gp160 antibodies from mother's milk and stools of breastfed children were quantified by ELISA. Immunoaffinity purified anti-gp160 antibodies were characterized functionally regarding their capacity to reduce attachment and/or infection of R5- and X4- tropic HIV-1 strains on human colorectal epithelial HT29 cells line or monocyte-derived-macrophages (MDM. RESULTS: The levels of total IgA and IgG were increased in milk of HIV-infected mothers and stools of HIV-exposed children, indicating the activation of B cell-derived mucosal immunity. Breast milk samples as well as stool samples from HIV-negative and HIV-infected babies exposed to HIV by breast-feeding, contained high levels of HIV-specific antibodies, mainly IgG antibodies, less frequently IgA antibodies, and rarely IgM antibodies. Relative ratios of excretion by reference to lactoferrin calculated for HIV-specific IgA, IgG and IgM in stools of HIV-exposed children were largely superior to 1, indicating active production of HIV-specific antibodies by the intestinal mucosa. Antibodies to gp160 purified from pooled stools of HIV-exposed breastfed children inhibited the attachment of HIV-1NDK on HT29 cells by 63% and on MDM by 77%, and the attachment of HIV-1JRCSF on MDM by 40%; and the infection of MDM by HIV-1JRCSF by 93%. CONCLUSIONS: The intestinal mucosa of children exposed to HIV by breast-feeding produces HIV-specific antibodies harbouring

  19. Design Patterns for Self-Adaptive RTE Systems Specification

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    Mouna Ben Said

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of self-adaptive real-time embedded (RTE systems is an increasingly hard task due to the growing complexity of both hardware and software and the high variability of the execution environment. Different approaches, platforms, and middleware have been proposed in the field, from low to high abstraction level. However, there is still a lack of generic and reusable designs for self-adaptive RTE systems that fit different system domains, lighten designers’ task, and decrease development cost. In this paper, we propose five design patterns for self-adaptive RTE systems modeling resulting from the generalization of relevant existing adaptation-related works. Combined together, the patterns form the design of an adaptation loop composed of five adaptation modules. The proposed solution offers a modular, reusable, and flexible specification of these modules and enables the separation of concerns. It also permits dealing with concurrency, real-time features, and adaptation cost relative to the adaptation activities. To validate our solution, we applied it to a complex case study, a cross-layer self-adaptive object tracking system, to show patterns utilization and prove the solution benefits.

  20. Adaptive feature-specific imaging: a face recognition example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baheti, Pawan K; Neifeld, Mark A

    2008-04-01

    We present an adaptive feature-specific imaging (AFSI) system and consider its application to a face recognition task. The proposed system makes use of previous measurements to adapt the projection basis at each step. Using sequential hypothesis testing, we compare AFSI with static-FSI (SFSI) and static or adaptive conventional imaging in terms of the number of measurements required to achieve a specified probability of misclassification (Pe). The AFSI system exhibits significant improvement compared to SFSI and conventional imaging at low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is shown that for M=4 hypotheses and desired Pe=10(-2), AFSI requires 100 times fewer measurements than the adaptive conventional imager at SNR= -20 dB. We also show a trade-off, in terms of average detection time, between measurement SNR and adaptation advantage, resulting in an optimal value of integration time (equivalent to SNR) per measurement.

  1. Non-specific Adaptive Reactions of Athletes: Evaluation and Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Naumova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work studies changes in non-specific adaptive reactions (NSAR of athletes who practice Wushu and Qigong and take Kladorod, a biological product made from plant material. The results of our study demonstrate the effectiveness of Kladorod as a remedy to enhance adaptive capacity with the possibility of application for training of athletes without any restrictions within the criteria of doping control.

  2. Context-specific adaptation of saccade gain in parabolic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelhamer, Mark; Clendaniel, Richard A.; Roberts, Dale C.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies established that vestibular reflexes can have two adapted states (e.g., gains) simultaneously, and that a context cue (e.g., vertical eye position) can switch between the two states. Our earlier work demonstrated this phenomenon of context-specific adaptation for saccadic eye movements: we asked for gain decrease in one context state and gain increase in another context state, and then determined if a change in the context state would invoke switching between the adapted states. Horizontal and vertical eye position and head orientation could serve, to varying degrees, as cues for switching between two different saccade gains. In the present study, we asked whether gravity magnitude could serve as a context cue: saccade adaptation was performed during parabolic flight, which provides alternating levels of gravitoinertial force (0 g and 1.8 g). Results were less robust than those from ground experiments, but established that different saccade magnitudes could be associated with different gravity levels.

  3. Report on Adaptive Force, a specific neuromuscular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Hoff

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In real life motions, as well as in sports, the adaptation of the neuromuscular systems to externally applied forces plays an important role. The term Adaptive Force (AF shall characterize the ability of the nerve-muscle-system to adapt to impacting external forces during isometric and eccentric muscle action. The focus in this paper is on the concept of this neuromuscular action, which is not yet described in this way. A measuring system was constructed and evaluated for this specific neuromuscular function, but only the main information of the evaluation of the measuring system and the preliminary reference values are mentioned here, while an article with detailed description will be published separately. This paper concentrates on the three following points: 1 What is the peculiarity of this neuromuscular function, introduced as AF? 2 Is the measuring system able to capture its specific characteristics and which phases of measurement occur? 3 It seems reasonable to discuss if AF can be distinguished and classified among the known force concepts. The article describes the measuring system and how it is able to capture special features of real life motions like submaximal intensities and the subjects’ option to react adequately on external varying forces. Furthermore, within one measurement the system records three different force qualities: the isometric submaximal Adaptive Force (AFiso, the maximal isometric Adaptive Force (AFisomax and the maximal eccentric Adaptive Force (AFeccmax. Each of these phases provide different and unique information on the nerve-muscle-system that are discussed in detail. Important, in terms of the Adaptive Force, seems to be the combination of conditional and coordinative abilities.

  4. Solar adaptive optics: specificities, lessons learned, and open alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montilla, I.; Marino, J.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Collados, M.; Montoya, L.; Tallon, M.

    2016-07-01

    First on sky adaptive optics experiments were performed on the Dunn Solar Telescope on 1979, with a shearing interferometer and limited success. Those early solar adaptive optics efforts forced to custom-develop many components, such as Deformable Mirrors and WaveFront Sensors, which were not available at that time. Later on, the development of the correlation Shack-Hartmann marked a breakthrough in solar adaptive optics. Since then, successful Single Conjugate Adaptive Optics instruments have been developed for many solar telescopes, i.e. the National Solar Observatory, the Vacuum Tower Telescope and the Swedish Solar Telescope. Success with the Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics systems for GREGOR and the New Solar Telescope has proved to be more difficult to attain. Such systems have a complexity not only related to the number of degrees of freedom, but also related to the specificities of the Sun, used as reference, and the sensing method. The wavefront sensing is performed using correlations on images with a field of view of 10", averaging wavefront information from different sky directions, affecting the sensing and sampling of high altitude turbulence. Also due to the low elevation at which solar observations are performed we have to include generalized fitting error and anisoplanatism, as described by Ragazzoni and Rigaut, as non-negligible error sources in the Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics error budget. For the development of the next generation Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics systems for the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope and the European Solar Telescope we still need to study and understand these issues, to predict realistically the quality of the achievable reconstruction. To improve their designs other open issues have to be assessed, i.e. possible alternative sensing methods to avoid the intrinsic anisoplanatism of the wide field correlation Shack-Hartmann, new parameters to estimate the performance of an adaptive optics solar system, alternatives to

  5. Beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a compensatory increase in beta cell mass. It is well established that somatolactogenic hormones contribute to the expansion both indirectly by their insulin antagonistic effects and directly by their mitogenic effects on the beta cells via receptors for prolactin...... and growth hormone expressed in rodent beta cells. However, the beta cell expansion in human pregnancy seems to occur by neogenesis of beta cells from putative progenitor cells rather than by proliferation of existing beta cells. Claes Hellerström has pioneered the research on beta cell growth for decades......, but the mechanisms involved are still not clarified. In this review the information obtained in previous studies is recapitulated together with some of the current attempts to resolve the controversy in the field: identification of the putative progenitor cells, identification of the factors involved...

  6. Task-specific neural adaptations to isoinertial resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckthorpe, M; Erskine, R M; Fletcher, G; Folland, J P

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to delineate the contribution of adaptations in agonist, antagonist, and stabilizer muscle activation to changes in isometric and isoinertial lifting strength after short-term isoinertial resistance training (RT). Following familiarization, 45 men (23.2 ± 2.8 years) performed maximal isometric and isoinertial strength tests of the elbow flexors of their dominant arms before and after 3 weeks of isoinertial RT. During these tasks, surface electromyography (EMG) amplitude was recorded from the agonist (biceps brachii short and long heads), antagonist (triceps brachii lateral head), and stabilizer (anterior deltoid, pectoralis major) muscles and normalized to either Mmax (agonists) or to maximum EMG during relevant reference tasks (antagonist, stabilizers). After training, there was more than a twofold greater increase in training task-specific isoinertial than isometric strength (17% vs 7%). There were also task-specific adaptations in agonist EMG, with greater increases during the isoinertial than isometric strength task [analysis of variance (ANOVA), training × task, P = 0.005]. A novel finding of this study was that training increased stabilizer muscle activation during all the elbow flexion strength tasks (P training effects. RT elicited specific neural adaptations to the training task that appeared to explain the greater increase in isoinertial than isometric strength.

  7. Heparin promotes suspension adaptation process of CHO-TS28 cells by eliminating cell aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Qin, Jun; Feng, Qiang; Tang, Hao; Liu, Rong; Xu, Liqing; Chen, Zhinan

    2011-01-01

    While heparin has been shown to eliminate cell aggregation in suspension adaptations of insect and HEK293 cells for virus-based cell cultures, the role of heparin in long period serum-free suspension adaptation of the anchorage-dependent Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines remains inconclusive. In this paper, we explore the potential application of heparin in suspension adaptation of CHO cell line which produces an anti-human chimeric antibody cHAb18. Heparin showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of CHO-TS28 cell-to-cell adhesion, with a significant inhibitory effect occurring when the concentration exceeded 250 μg/ml (P cell aggregation elimination role at all concentrations (P cell growth and antibody secretion, with the highest cell density ((99.83 ± 12.21) × 10(4) cells/ml, P = 0.034) and maximum antibody yield ((9.46 ± 0.94) mg/l, P cell aggregates were effectively dispersed by 250 μg/ml heparin and a single-cell suspension culture process was promoted. In suspension adapted CHO-TS28 cells, cell growth rates and specific antibody productivity were maintained; while antigen-binding activity improved slightly. Together, our results show that heparin may promote suspension adaptation of anchorage-depended CHO cells by resisting cell aggregation without reducing cell growth, antibody secretion, and antigen-binding activity.

  8. Dynamical Adaptation in Terrorist Cells/Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Ahmed, Zaki

    2010-01-01

    Typical terrorist cells/networks have dynamical structure as they evolve or adapt to changes which may occur due to capturing or killing of a member of the cell/network. Analytical measures in graph theory like degree centrality, betweenness and closeness centralities are very common and have long...

  9. Characterization of bortezomib-adapted I-45 mesothelioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peddaboina Chander

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bortezomib, a proteasome-specific inhibitor, has emerged as a promising cancer therapeutic agent. However, development of resistance to bortezomib may pose a challenge to effective anticancer therapy. Therefore, characterization of cellular mechanisms involved in bortezomib resistance and development of effective strategies to overcome this resistance represent important steps in the advancement of bortezomib-mediated cancer therapy. Results The present study reports the development of I-45-BTZ-R, a bortezomib-resistant cell line, from the bortezomib-sensitive mesothelioma cell line I-45. I-45-BTZ-R cells showed no cross-resistance to the chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin. Moreover, the bortezomib-adapted I-45-BTZ-R cells had decreased growth kinemics and did not over express proteasome subunit β5 (PSMB5 as compared to parental I-45 cells. I-45-BTZ-R cells and parental I-45 cells showed similar inhibition of proteasome activity, but I-45-BTZ-R cells exhibited much less accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins following exposure to 40 nm bortezomib. Further studies revealed that relatively low doses of bortezomib did not induce an unfolded protein response (UPR in the bortezomib-adapted cells, while higher doses induced UPR with concomitant cell death, as evidenced by higher expression of the mitochondrial chaperone protein Bip and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-related pro-apoptotic protein CHOP. In addition, bortezomib exposure did not induce the accumulation of the pro-apoptotic proteins p53, Mcl-1S, and noxa in the bortezomib-adapted cells. Conclusion These results suggest that UPR evasion, together with reduced pro-apoptotic gene induction, accounts for bortezomib resistance in the bortezomib-adapted mesothelioma cell line I-45-BTZ-R.

  10. Circadian control of antigen-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobis CC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloé C Nobis,1–3 Nathalie Labrecque,2–4 Nicolas Cermakian1,5–8 1Douglas Mental Health University Institute, 2Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre, 3Department of Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and Immunology, 4Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, 5Department of Psychiatry, 6Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 7Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, 8Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: The immune system is composed of two arms, the innate and the adaptive immunity. While the innate response constitutes the first line of defense and is not specific for a particular pathogen, the adaptive response is highly specific and allows for long-term memory of the pathogen encounter. T lymphocytes (or T cells are central players in the adaptive immune response. Various aspects of T cell functions vary according to the time of day. Circadian clocks located in most tissues and cell types generate 24-hour rhythms of various physiological processes. These clocks are based on a set of clock genes, and this timing mechanism controls rhythmically the expression of numerous other genes. Clock genes are expressed in cells of the immune system, including T cells. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian control of the adaptive immune response, with emphasis on T cells, including their development, trafficking, response to antigen, and effector functions. Keywords: circadian clock, adaptive immune response, T lymphocyte, antigen, cytokine, proliferation

  11. The role of adapter proteins in T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretzky, G A; Boerth, N J

    1999-12-01

    Engagement of antigen receptors on lymphocytes leads to a myriad of complex signal transduction cascades. Recently, work from several laboratories has led to the identification and characterization of novel adapter molecules, proteins with no intrinsic enzymatic activity but which integrate signal transduction pathways by mediating protein-protein interactions. Interestingly, it appears that many of these adapter proteins play as critical a role as the effector enzymes themselves in both lymphocyte development and activation. This review describes some of the biochemical and molecular features of several of these newly identified hematopoietic cell-specific adapter molecules highlighting their importance in regulating (both positively and negatively) signal transduction mediated by the T cell antigen receptor.

  12. Brine Organisms and the Question of Habitat Specific Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, B. Z.; Siegel, S. M.; Speitel, Thomas; Waber, Jack; Stoecker, Roy

    1984-12-01

    Among the well-known ultrasaline terrestrial habitats, the Dead Sea in the Jordan Rift Valley and Don Juan Pond in the Upper Wright Valley represent two of the most extreme. The former is a saturated sodium chloride-magnesium sulfate brine in a hot desert, the latter a saturated calcium chloride brine in an Antarctic desert. Both Dead Sea and Don Juan water bodies themselves are limited in microflora, but the saline Don Juan algal mat and muds contain abundant nutrients and a rich and varied microbiota, including Oscillatoria, Gleocapsa, Chlorella, diatoms, Penicillium and bacteria. In such environments, the existence of an array of specific adaptations is a common, and highly reasonable, presumption, at least with respect to habitat-obligate forms. Nevertheless, many years of ongoing study in our laboratory have demonstrated that lichens (e.g. Cladonia), algae (e.g. Nostoc) and fungi (e.g. Penicillium, Aspergillus) from the humid tropics can sustain metabolism down to -40°C and growth down to -10°C in simulated Dead Sea or Don Juan (or similar) media without benefit of selection or gradual acclimation. Non-selection is suggested in fungi by higher growth rates from vegetative inocula than spores. The importance of nutrient parameters was also evident in responses to potassium and reduced nitrogen compounds. In view of the saline performance of tropical Nostoc, and its presence in the Antarctic dry valley soils, its complete absence in our Don Juan mat samples was and remains a puzzle. We suggest that adaptive capability is already resident in many terrestrial life forms not currently in extreme habitats, a possible reflection of evolutionary selection for wide spectrum environmental adaptability.

  13. Plant Cell Adaptive Responses to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaev, Alexandr

    Microgravity is an abnormal environmental condition that plays no role in the functioning of biosphere. Nevertheless, the chronic effect of microgravity in space flight as an unfamiliar factor does not prevent the development of adaptive reactions at the cellular level. In real microgravity in space flight under the more or less optimal conditions for plant growing, namely temperature, humidity, CO2, light intensity and directivity in the hardware angiosperm plants perform an “reproductive imperative”, i.e. they flower, fruit and yield viable seeds. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part on reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of the identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and subcellular level in real and simulated microgravity is considered. Cytological studies of plants developing in real and simulated microgravity made it possible to establish that the processes of mitosis, cytokinesis, and tissue differentiation of vegetative and generative organs are largely normal. At the same time, under microgravity, essential reconstruction in the structural and functional organization of cell organelles and cytoskeleton, as well as changes in cell metabolism and homeostasis have been described. In addition, new interesting data concerning the influence of altered gravity on lipid peroxidation intensity, the level of reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant system activity, just like on the level of gene expression and synthesis of low-molecular and high-molecular heat shock proteins were recently obtained. So, altered gravity caused time-dependent increasing of the HSP70 and HSP90 levels in cells, that may indicate temporary strengthening of their functional loads that is necessary for re-establish a new cellular homeostasis. Relative qPCR results showed that

  14. Antigen-specific memory B cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHeyzer-Williams, Louise J; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G

    2005-01-01

    Helper T (Th) cell-regulated B cell immunity progresses in an ordered cascade of cellular development that culminates in the production of antigen-specific memory B cells. The recognition of peptide MHC class II complexes on activated antigen-presenting cells is critical for effective Th cell selection, clonal expansion, and effector Th cell function development (Phase I). Cognate effector Th cell-B cell interactions then promote the development of either short-lived plasma cells (PCs) or germinal centers (GCs) (Phase II). These GCs expand, diversify, and select high-affinity variants of antigen-specific B cells for entry into the long-lived memory B cell compartment (Phase III). Upon antigen rechallenge, memory B cells rapidly expand and differentiate into PCs under the cognate control of memory Th cells (Phase IV). We review the cellular and molecular regulators of this dynamic process with emphasis on the multiple memory B cell fates that develop in vivo.

  15. Specification and Generation of Adapters for System Integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, A.J.; Voorhoeve, M.

    2013-01-01

    Large systems-of-systems are developed by integrating several smaller systems that have been developed independently. System integration often requires adaptation mechanisms for bridging any technical incompatibilities between the systems. In order to develop adapters in a faster way, we study ways

  16. Molecular specificity, convergence and constraint shape adaptive evolution in nutrient-poor environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungeui Hong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the central goals of evolutionary biology is to explain and predict the molecular basis of adaptive evolution. We studied the evolution of genetic networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast populations propagated for more than 200 generations in different nitrogen-limiting conditions. We find that rapid adaptive evolution in nitrogen-poor environments is dominated by the de novo generation and selection of copy number variants (CNVs, a large fraction of which contain genes encoding specific nitrogen transporters including PUT4, DUR3 and DAL4. The large fitness increases associated with these alleles limits the genetic heterogeneity of adapting populations even in environments with multiple nitrogen sources. Complete identification of acquired point mutations, in individual lineages and entire populations, identified heterogeneity at the level of genetic loci but common themes at the level of functional modules, including genes controlling phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate metabolism and vacuole biogenesis. Adaptive strategies shared with other nutrient-limited environments point to selection of genetic variation in the TORC1 and Ras/PKA signaling pathways as a general mechanism underlying improved growth in nutrient-limited environments. Within a single population we observed the repeated independent selection of a multi-locus genotype, comprised of the functionally related genes GAT1, MEP2 and LST4. By studying the fitness of individual alleles, and their combination, as well as the evolutionary history of the evolving population, we find that the order in which these mutations are acquired is constrained by epistasis. The identification of repeatedly selected variation at functionally related loci that interact epistatically suggests that gene network polymorphisms (GNPs may be a frequent outcome of adaptive evolution. Our results provide insight into the mechanistic basis by which cells adapt to nutrient-limited environments

  17. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and later...... for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the Supplemental Data...

  18. Cell-Type-Specific Optogenetics in Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namboodiri, Vijay Mohan K; Stuber, Garret D

    2016-09-08

    The recent advent of technologies enabling cell-type-specific recording and manipulation of neuronal activity spurred tremendous progress in neuroscience. However, they have been largely limited to mice, which lack the richness in behavior of primates. Stauffer et al. now present a generalizable method for achieving cell-type specificity in monkeys.

  19. The specific role of gravitational accelerations for arterial adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias; Ducos, Michel; Mulder, Edwin; Herrera, Frankyn; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2013-02-01

    It is mostly agreed that arterial adaptations occur, among others, in response to changes in mechanical stimuli. Models like bed rest, spinal cord injury, or limb suspension have been applied to study vascular adaptations to unloading in humans. However, these models cannot distinguish the role of muscle contractions and the role of gravitational accelerations for arterial adaptation. The HEPHAISTOS orthosis allows normal ambulation, while it significantly reduces force generation in the lower leg muscles. Eleven subjects wore HEPHAISTOS unilaterally for 56 days and were followed up for another 4 wk. Arterial diameters, intima media thickness (IMT), flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and resting blood flow (BF(rest)) were measured using high-frequency ultrasonography. Arterial adaptations were investigated in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), the brachial artery (BA), and the carotid artery (CA). Mean SFA resting diameter was decreased from 6.57 mm (SD = 0.74 mm) at baseline to 5.77 mm (SD = 0.87 mm) at the end of the intervention (P muscular contractions for arterial diameter adaptations. Moreover, we propose that FMD and wall-to-lumen ratio are unaffected by ambulating with the HEPHAISTOS orthosis, which is suggestive of habitual acceleration profiles in the lower leg constituting an important stimulus for the maintenance of FMD and wall-to-lumen ratio.

  20. Finding recurrence networks' threshold adaptively for a specific time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, D.; Marwan, N.; Prasad, S.; Kurths, J.

    2014-11-01

    Recurrence-plot-based recurrence networks are an approach used to analyze time series using a complex networks theory. In both approaches - recurrence plots and recurrence networks -, a threshold to identify recurrent states is required. The selection of the threshold is important in order to avoid bias of the recurrence network results. In this paper, we propose a novel method to choose a recurrence threshold adaptively. We show a comparison between the constant threshold and adaptive threshold cases to study period-chaos and even period-period transitions in the dynamics of a prototypical model system. This novel method is then used to identify climate transitions from a lake sediment record.

  1. Trait-specific consequences of inbreeding on adaptive phenotypic plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Environmental changes may stress organisms and stimulate an adaptive phenotypic response. Effects of inbreeding often interact with the environment and can decrease fitness of inbred individuals exposed to stress more so than that of outbred individuals. Such an interaction may stem from a reduce...

  2. Context-specific adaptation of pursuit initiation in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, M.; Abe, H.; Hasegawa, S.; Usui, T.; Hasebe, H.; Miki, A.; Zee, D. S.; Shelhauser, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if multiple states for the initiation of pursuit, as assessed by acceleration in the "open-loop" period, can be learned and gated by context. METHODS: Four normal subjects were studied. A modified step-ramp paradigm for horizontal pursuit was used to induce adaptation. In an increasing paradigm, target velocity doubled 230 msec after onset; in a decreasing paradigm, it was halved. In the first experiment, vertical eye position (+/-5 degrees ) was used as the context cue, and the training paradigm (increasing or decreasing) changed with vertical eye position. In the second experiment, with vertical position constant, when the target was red, training was decreasing, and when green, increasing. The average eye acceleration in the first 100 msec of tracking was the index of open-loop pursuit performance. RESULTS: With vertical position as the cue, pursuit adaptation differed between up and down gaze. In some cases, the direction of adaptation was in exact accord with the training stimuli. In others, acceleration increased or decreased for both up and down gaze but always in correct relative proportion to the training stimuli. In contrast, multiple adaptive states were not induced with color as the cue. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple values for the relationship between the average eye acceleration during the initiation of pursuit and target velocity could be learned and gated by context. Vertical position was an effective contextual cue but not target color, implying that useful contextual cues must be similar to those occurring naturally, for example, orbital position with eye muscle weakness.

  3. E. coli cells adaptation to solar environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favre, A. [Institute J. Monod, Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Photo mutagenesis of E.coli cells exposed to solar light results essentially from the combined effect of its U V C, U V B and U V A components. The high photo mutagenic efficiency of UVC is known to be hampered when the cells have been pre illuminated with near UV light. Near UV light triggers the growth delay effect at sublethal fluences ( and reveals poorly mutagenic). The chromophore leading to this growth lag effect is a rare nucleoside, 4-thio uridine s4U, present only in position 8 of E. coli tRNAs. Upon photo activation s4U led to formation of an intramolecular 8-13 crosslink in a number of tRNA species, including tRNAphe and tRNApro. These two crosslinked Trna species can no more be efficiently acylated by their corresponding tRNa ligases and accumulate on the uncharged from thus preventing protein synthesis, and effect amplified by the so called stringent response. Accordingly nuvA mutant cells no more exhibit growth delay UVC induced mutagenesis involves activation of the inducible error-prone SOS system which requires protein synthesis. By compacting the level of expression of the SOS gene sfiA (using a sfiA:lacZ fusion) in wild-type and nuvA mutant cells submitted to combined UVC, UVA radiations, we have demonstrated that indeed 4-thio uridine behaves as an anti photo mutagenic device. Adaptation of E. coli cell to its solar environment will be discussed in the light of this finding

  4. Germ cell specification and regeneration in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmark, P A; Wang, Y; Chong, T

    2008-01-01

    In metazoans, two apparently distinct mechanisms specify germ cell fate: Determinate specification (observed in animals including Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, zebra fish, and Xenopus) uses cytoplasmic factors localized to specific regions of the egg, whereas epigenetic specification (observed in many basal metazoans, urodeles, and mammals) involves inductive interactions between cells. Much of our understanding of germ cell specification has emerged from studies of model organisms displaying determinate specification. In contrast, our understanding of epigenetic/inductive specification is less advanced and would benefit from studies of additional organisms. Freshwater planarians--widely known for their remarkable powers of regeneration--are well suited for studying the mechanisms by which germ cells can be induced. Classic experiments showed that planarians can regenerate germ cells from body fragments entirely lacking reproductive structures, suggesting that planarian germ cells could be specified by inductive signals. Furthermore, the availability of the genome sequence of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, coupled with the animal's susceptibility to systemic RNA interference (RNAi), facilitates functional genomic analyses of germ cell development and regeneration. Here, we describe recent progress in studies of planarian germ cells and frame some of the critical unresolved questions for future work.

  5. Differential Adaptive Response and Survival of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Planktonic and Biofilm Cells Exposed to Benzalkonium Chloride▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K.; Vidović, Sinisa; Korber, Darren R.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the adaptive response and survival of planktonic and biofilm phenotypes of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis adapted to benzalkonium chloride (BC). Planktonic cells and biofilms were continuously exposed to 1 μg ml−1 of BC for 144 h. The proportion of BC-adapted biofilm cells able to survive a lethal BC treatment (30 μg ml−1) was significantly higher (4.6-fold) than that of BC-adapted planktonic cells. Similarly, there were 18.3-fold more survivors among the BC-adapted biofilm cells than among their nonadapted (i.e., without prior BC exposure) cell counterparts at the lethal BC concentration, and this value was significantly higher than the value for BC-adapted planktonic cells versus nonadapted cells (3.2-fold). A significantly higher (P < 0.05) proportion of surviving cells was noticed among BC-adapted biofilm cells relative to BC-adapted planktonic cells following a 10-min heat shock at 55°C. Fatty acid composition was significantly influenced by phenotype (planktonic cells or biofilm) and BC adaptation. Cell surface roughness of biofilm cells was also significantly greater (P < 0.05) than that of planktonic cells. Key proteins upregulated in BC-adapted planktonic and biofilm cells included CspA, TrxA, Tsf, YjgF, and a probable peroxidase, STY0440. Nine and 17 unique proteins were upregulated in BC-adapted planktonic and biofilm cells, respectively. These results suggest that enhanced biofilm-specific upregulation of 17 unique proteins, along with the increased expression of CspA, TrxA, Tsf, YjgF, and a probable peroxidase, phenotype-specific alterations in cell surface roughness, and a shift in fatty acid composition conferred enhanced survival to the BC-adapted biofilm cell population relative to their BC-adapted planktonic cell counterparts. PMID:18663028

  6. Seeking help: B cells adapting to flu variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Most, Robbert G; Roman, François P; Innis, Bruce; Hanon, Emmanuel; Vaughn, David W; Gillard, Paul; Walravens, Karl; Wettendorff, Martine

    2014-07-23

    The study of influenza vaccines has revealed potential interactions between preexisting immunological memory and antigenic context and/or adjuvantation. In the face of antigenic diversity, the process of generating B cell adaptability is driven by cross-reactive CD4 memory cells, such as T follicular helper cells from previous infections or vaccinations. Although such "helped" B cells are capable of adapting to variant antigens, lack of CD4 help could lead to a suboptimal antibody response. Collectively, this indicates an interplay between CD4 T cells, adjuvant, and B cell adaptability.

  7. Transcriptome analysis in tardigrade species reveals specific molecular pathways for stress adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Frank; Beisser, Daniela; Grohme, Markus A; Liang, Chunguang; Mali, Brahim; Siegl, Alexander Matthias; Engelmann, Julia C; Shkumatov, Alexander V; Schokraie, Elham; Müller, Tobias; Schnölzer, Martina; Schill, Ralph O; Frohme, Marcus; Dandekar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades have unique stress-adaptations that allow them to survive extremes of cold, heat, radiation and vacuum. To study this, encoded protein clusters and pathways from an ongoing transcriptome study on the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum were analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared to expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from Hypsibius dujardini, revealing major pathways involved in resistance against extreme environmental conditions. ESTs are available on the Tardigrade Workbench along with software and databank updates. Our analysis reveals that RNA stability motifs for M. tardigradum are different from typical motifs known from higher animals. M. tardigradum and H. dujardini protein clusters and conserved domains imply metabolic storage pathways for glycogen, glycolipids and specific secondary metabolism as well as stress response pathways (including heat shock proteins, bmh2, and specific repair pathways). Redox-, DNA-, stress- and protein protection pathways complement specific repair capabilities to achieve the strong robustness of M. tardigradum. These pathways are partly conserved in other animals and their manipulation could boost stress adaptation even in human cells. However, the unique combination of resistance and repair pathways make tardigrades and M. tardigradum in particular so highly stress resistant.

  8. Hair-Cell Versus Afferent Adaptation in the Semicircular Canals

    OpenAIRE

    Rabbitt, R. D.; Boyle, R.; Holstein, G. R.; Highstein, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    The time course and extent of adaptation in semicircular canal hair cells was compared to adaptation in primary afferent neurons for physiological stimuli in vivo to study the origins of the neural code transmitted to the brain. The oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau, was used as the experimental model. Afferent firing-rate adaptation followed a double-exponential time course in response to step cupula displacements. The dominant adaptation time constant varied considerably among afferent fibers an...

  9. The geography of sex-specific selection, local adaptation, and sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connallon, Tim

    2015-09-01

    Local adaptation and sexual dimorphism are iconic evolutionary scenarios of intraspecific adaptive differentiation in the face of gene flow. Although theory has traditionally considered local adaptation and sexual dimorphism as conceptually distinct processes, emerging data suggest that they often act concurrently during evolutionary diversification. Here, I merge theories of local adaptation in space and sex-specific adaptation over time, and show that their confluence yields several new predictions about the roles of context-specific selection, migration, and genetic correlations, in adaptive diversification. I specifically revisit two influential predictions from classical studies of clinal adaptation and sexual dimorphism: (1) that local adaptation should decrease with distance from the species' range center and (2) that opposing directional selection between the sexes (sexual antagonism) should inevitably accompany the evolution of sexual dimorphism. I show that both predictions can break down under clinally varying selection. First, the geography of local adaptation can be sexually dimorphic, with locations of relatively high local adaptation differing profoundly between the sexes. Second, the intensity of sexual antagonism varies across the species' range, with subpopulations near the range center representing hotspots for antagonistic selection. The results highlight the context-dependent roles of migration versus sexual conflict as primary constraints to adaptive diversification.

  10. PD-L1-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Borch, Troels Holz; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    for targeting the tumor microenvironment and for boosting the clinical effects of additional anticancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes present information about PD-L1 as a T cell antigen, depicts the initial findings about the function of PD-L1-specific T cells in the adjustment of immune responses...

  11. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra ePesko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wildtype gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense nonsegmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales have specific genome architecture: 3′ UTR – core protein genes – envelope protein genes – RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene – 5′ UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV variants with the nucleocapsid (N gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N-gene translocation towards the 5’ end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function, especially on PC3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective

  12. Zinc finger recombinases with adaptable DNA sequence specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Proudfoot

    Full Text Available Site-specific recombinases have become essential tools in genetics and molecular biology for the precise excision or integration of DNA sequences. However, their utility is currently limited to circumstances where the sites recognized by the recombinase enzyme have been introduced into the DNA being manipulated, or natural 'pseudosites' are already present. Many new applications would become feasible if recombinase activity could be targeted to chosen sequences in natural genomic DNA. Here we demonstrate efficient site-specific recombination at several sequences taken from a 1.9 kilobasepair locus of biotechnological interest (in the bovine β-casein gene, mediated by zinc finger recombinases (ZFRs, chimaeric enzymes with linked zinc finger (DNA recognition and recombinase (catalytic domains. In the "Z-sites" tested here, 22 bp casein gene sequences are flanked by 9 bp motifs recognized by zinc finger domains. Asymmetric Z-sites were recombined by the concomitant action of two ZFRs with different zinc finger DNA-binding specificities, and could be recombined with a heterologous site in the presence of a third recombinase. Our results show that engineered ZFRs may be designed to promote site-specific recombination at many natural DNA sequences.

  13. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivetal, Jérémy, E-mail: jeremy.piv@netcmail.com [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Royet, David [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Ciuta, Georgeta [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Frenea-Robin, Marie [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Haddour, Naoufel [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Dempsey, Nora M. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric [Univ Limoges, CNRS, SPCTS UMR 7513, 12 Rue Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges (France); Simonet, Pascal [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France)

    2015-04-15

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications. - Highlights: 1.We report a new approach to selectively micropattern bacterial cells individually upon micro-magnet arrays. 2.Permanent micro-magnets of a size approaching that of bacteria could be fabricated using a Thermo-Magnetic Patterning process. 3.Bacterial cells were labeled using two different magnetic labeling strategies providing flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology.

  14. Kicking off adaptive immunity: the discovery of dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katsnelson, Alla

    2006-01-01

    In 1973, Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn discovered an unusual looking population of cells with an unprecedented ability to activate naive T cells. Dubbed “dendritic cells,” these cells are now known as the primary instigators of adaptive immunity.

  15. Learning LM Specificity for Ganglion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised learning models have been proposed based on experience (Ahumada and Mulligan, 1990;Wachtler, Doi, Lee and Sejnowski, 2007) that allow the cortex to develop units with LM specific color opponent receptive fields like the blob cells reported by Hubel and Wiesel on the basis of visual experience. These models used ganglion cells with LM indiscriminate wiring as inputs to the learning mechanism, which was presumed to occur at the cortical level.

  16. Multipotent glia-like stem cells mediate stress adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin de Celis, Maria F; Garcia-Martin, Ruben; Wittig, Dierk; Valencia, Gabriela D; Enikolopov, Grigori; Funk, Richard H; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Bornstein, Stefan R; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika

    2015-06-01

    The neural crest-derived adrenal medulla is closely related to the sympathetic nervous system; however, unlike neural tissue, it is characterized by high plasticity which suggests the involvement of stem cells. Here, we show that a defined pool of glia-like nestin-expressing progenitor cells in the adult adrenal medulla contributes to this plasticity. These glia-like cells have features of adrenomedullary sustentacular cells, are multipotent, and are able to differentiate into chromaffin cells and neurons. The adrenal is central to the body's response to stress making its proper adaptation critical to maintaining homeostasis. Our results from stress experiments in vivo show the activation and differentiation of these progenitors into new chromaffin cells. In summary, we demonstrate the involvement of a new glia-like multipotent stem cell population in adrenal tissue adaptation. Our data also suggest the contribution of stem and progenitor cells in the adaptation of neuroendocrine tissue function in general.

  17. Cellular plasticity enables adaptation to unforeseen cell-cycle rewiring challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Katzir

    Full Text Available The fundamental dynamics of the cell cycle, underlying cell growth and reproduction, were previously found to be robust under a wide range of environmental and internal perturbations. This property was commonly attributed to its network structure, which enables the coordinated interactions among hundreds of proteins. Despite significant advances in deciphering the components and autonomous interactions of this network, understanding the interfaces of the cell cycle with other major cellular processes is still lacking. To gain insight into these interfaces, we used the process of genome-rewiring in yeast by placing an essential metabolic gene HIS3 from the histidine biosynthesis pathway, under the exclusive regulation of different cell-cycle promoters. In a medium lacking histidine and under partial inhibition of the HIS3p, the rewired cells encountered an unforeseen multitasking challenge; the cell-cycle regulatory genes were required to regulate the essential histidine-pathway gene in concert with the other metabolic demands, while simultaneously driving the cell cycle through its proper temporal phases. We show here that chemostat cell populations with rewired cell-cycle promoters adapted within a short time to accommodate the inhibition of HIS3p and stabilized a new phenotypic state. Furthermore, a significant fraction of the population was able to adapt and grow into mature colonies on plates under such inhibiting conditions. The adapted state was shown to be stably inherited across generations. These adaptation dynamics were accompanied by a non-specific and irreproducible genome-wide transcriptional response. Adaptation of the cell-cycle attests to its multitasking capabilities and flexible interface with cellular metabolic processes and requirements. Similar adaptation features were found in our previous work when rewiring HIS3 to the GAL system and switching cells from galactose to glucose. Thus, at the basis of cellular plasticity is

  18. Arenavirus Variations Due to Host-Specific Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Zapata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Arenavirus particles are enveloped and contain two single-strand RNA genomic segments with ambisense coding. Genetic plasticity of the arenaviruses comes from transcription errors, segment reassortment, and permissive genomic packaging, and results in their remarkable ability, as a group, to infect a wide variety of hosts. In this review, we discuss some in vitro studies of virus genetic and phenotypic variation after exposure to selective pressures such as high viral dose, mutagens and antivirals. Additionally, we discuss the variation in vivo of selected isolates of Old World arenaviruses, particularly after infection of different animal species. We also discuss the recent emergence of new arenaviruses in the context of our observations of sequence variations that appear to be host-specific.

  19. Arenavirus variations due to host-specific adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan C; Salvato, Maria S

    2013-01-17

    Arenavirus particles are enveloped and contain two single-strand RNA genomic segments with ambisense coding. Genetic plasticity of the arenaviruses comes from transcription errors, segment reassortment, and permissive genomic packaging, and results in their remarkable ability, as a group, to infect a wide variety of hosts. In this review, we discuss some in vitro studies of virus genetic and phenotypic variation after exposure to selective pressures such as high viral dose, mutagens and antivirals. Additionally, we discuss the variation in vivo of selected isolates of Old World arenaviruses, particularly after infection of different animal species. We also discuss the recent emergence of new arenaviruses in the context of our observations of sequence variations that appear to be host-specific.

  20. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetal, Jérémy; Royet, David; Ciuta, Georgeta; Frenea-Robin, Marie; Haddour, Naoufel; Dempsey, Nora M.; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Simonet, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications.

  1. Virulent Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium evades adaptive immunity by preventing dendritic cells from activating T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar, Jaime A; Carreño, Leandro J; Bueno, Susan M; González, Pablo A; Mora, Jorge E; Quezada, Sergio A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2006-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) constitute the link between innate and adaptive immunity by directly recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in bacteria and by presenting bacterial antigens to T cells. Recognition of PAMPs renders DCs as professional antigen-presenting cells able to prime naïve T cells and initiate adaptive immunity against bacteria. Therefore, interfering with DC function would promote bacterial survival and dissemination. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that have evolved in virulent bacteria to evade activation of adaptive immunity requires the characterization of virulence factors that interfere with DC function. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the causative agent of typhoid-like disease in the mouse, can prevent antigen presentation to T cells by avoiding lysosomal degradation in DCs. Here, we show that this feature of virulent Salmonella applies in vivo to prevent activation of adaptive immunity. In addition, this attribute of virulent Salmonella requires functional expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS) and effector proteins encoded within the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). In contrast to wild-type virulent Salmonella, mutant strains carrying specific deletions of SPI-2 genes encoding TTSS components or effectors proteins are targeted to lysosomes and are no longer able to prevent DCs from activating T cells in vitro or in vivo. SPI-2 mutant strains are attenuated in vivo, showing reduced tissue colonization and enhanced T-cell activation, which confers protection against a challenge with wild-type virulent Salmonella. Our data suggest that impairment of DC function by the activity of SPI-2 gene products is crucial for Salmonella pathogenesis.

  2. Specificity and timescales of cortical adaptation as inferences about natural movie statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Michoel; Coen-Cagli, Ruben; Schwartz, Odelia

    2016-10-01

    Adaptation is a phenomenological umbrella term under which a variety of temporal contextual effects are grouped. Previous models have shown that some aspects of visual adaptation reflect optimal processing of dynamic visual inputs, suggesting that adaptation should be tuned to the properties of natural visual inputs. However, the link between natural dynamic inputs and adaptation is poorly understood. Here, we extend a previously developed Bayesian modeling framework for spatial contextual effects to the temporal domain. The model learns temporal statistical regularities of natural movies and links these statistics to adaptation in primary visual cortex via divisive normalization, a ubiquitous neural computation. In particular, the model divisively normalizes the present visual input by the past visual inputs only to the degree that these are inferred to be statistically dependent. We show that this flexible form of normalization reproduces classical findings on how brief adaptation affects neuronal selectivity. Furthermore, prior knowledge acquired by the Bayesian model from natural movies can be modified by prolonged exposure to novel visual stimuli. We show that this updating can explain classical results on contrast adaptation. We also simulate the recent finding that adaptation maintains population homeostasis, namely, a balanced level of activity across a population of neurons with different orientation preferences. Consistent with previous disparate observations, our work further clarifies the influence of stimulus-specific and neuronal-specific normalization signals in adaptation.

  3. Specificity and timescales of cortical adaptation as inferences about natural movie statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Michoel; Coen-Cagli, Ruben; Schwartz, Odelia

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation is a phenomenological umbrella term under which a variety of temporal contextual effects are grouped. Previous models have shown that some aspects of visual adaptation reflect optimal processing of dynamic visual inputs, suggesting that adaptation should be tuned to the properties of natural visual inputs. However, the link between natural dynamic inputs and adaptation is poorly understood. Here, we extend a previously developed Bayesian modeling framework for spatial contextual effects to the temporal domain. The model learns temporal statistical regularities of natural movies and links these statistics to adaptation in primary visual cortex via divisive normalization, a ubiquitous neural computation. In particular, the model divisively normalizes the present visual input by the past visual inputs only to the degree that these are inferred to be statistically dependent. We show that this flexible form of normalization reproduces classical findings on how brief adaptation affects neuronal selectivity. Furthermore, prior knowledge acquired by the Bayesian model from natural movies can be modified by prolonged exposure to novel visual stimuli. We show that this updating can explain classical results on contrast adaptation. We also simulate the recent finding that adaptation maintains population homeostasis, namely, a balanced level of activity across a population of neurons with different orientation preferences. Consistent with previous disparate observations, our work further clarifies the influence of stimulus-specific and neuronal-specific normalization signals in adaptation. PMID:27699416

  4. Cell-Specific Aptamers as Emerging Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Meyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short nucleic acids that bind to defined targets with high affinity and specificity. The first aptamers have been selected about two decades ago by an in vitro process named SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Since then, numerous aptamers with specificities for a variety of targets from small molecules to proteins or even whole cells have been selected. Their applications range from biosensing and diagnostics to therapy and target-oriented drug delivery. More recently, selections using complex targets such as live cells have become feasible. This paper summarizes progress in cell-SELEX techniques and highlights recent developments, particularly in the field of medically relevant aptamers with a focus on therapeutic and drug-delivery applications.

  5. Subfamily-specific adaptations in the structures of two penicillin-binding proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniil M Prigozhin

    Full Text Available Beta-lactam antibiotics target penicillin-binding proteins including several enzyme classes essential for bacterial cell-wall homeostasis. To better understand the functional and inhibitor-binding specificities of penicillin-binding proteins from the pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we carried out structural and phylogenetic analysis of two predicted D,D-carboxypeptidases, Rv2911 and Rv3330. Optimization of Rv2911 for crystallization using directed evolution and the GFP folding reporter method yielded a soluble quadruple mutant. Structures of optimized Rv2911 bound to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and Rv3330 bound to meropenem show that, in contrast to the nonspecific inhibitor, meropenem forms an extended interaction with the enzyme along a conserved surface. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Rv2911 and Rv3330 belong to different clades that emerged in Actinobacteria and are not represented in model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Clade-specific adaptations allow these enzymes to fulfill distinct physiological roles despite strict conservation of core catalytic residues. The characteristic differences include potential protein-protein interaction surfaces and specificity-determining residues surrounding the catalytic site. Overall, these structural insights lay the groundwork to develop improved beta-lactam therapeutics for tuberculosis.

  6. Cell Specific eQTL Analysis without Sorting Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harm-Jan Westra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The functional consequences of trait associated SNPs are often investigated using expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL mapping. While trait-associated variants may operate in a cell-type specific manner, eQTL datasets for such cell-types may not always be available. We performed a genome-environment interaction (GxE meta-analysis on data from 5,683 samples to infer the cell type specificity of whole blood cis-eQTLs. We demonstrate that this method is able to predict neutrophil and lymphocyte specific cis-eQTLs and replicate these predictions in independent cell-type specific datasets. Finally, we show that SNPs associated with Crohn's disease preferentially affect gene expression within neutrophils, including the archetypal NOD2 locus.

  7. Importance of Interaction between Integrin and Actin Cytoskeleton in Suspension Adaptation of CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Christa G; Whitfield, Robert; James, David C

    2016-04-01

    The biopharmaceutical production process relies upon mammalian cell technology where single cells proliferate in suspension in a chemically defined synthetic environment. This environment lacks exogenous growth factors, usually contributing to proliferation of fibroblastic cell types such as Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Use of CHO cells for production hence requires a lengthy 'adaptation' process to select clones capable of proliferation as single cells in suspension. The underlying molecular changes permitting proliferation in suspension are not known. Comparison of the non-suspension-adapted clone CHO-AD and a suspension-adapted propriety cell line CHO-SA by flow cytometric analysis revealed a highly variable bi-modal expression pattern for cell-to-cell contact proteins in contrast to the expression pattern seen for integrins. Those have a uni-modal expression on suspension and adherent cells. Integrins showed a conformation distinguished by regularly distributed clusters forming a sphere on the cell membrane of suspension-adapted cells. Actin cytoskeleton analysis revealed reorganisation from the typical fibrillar morphology found in adherent cells to an enforced spherical subcortical actin sheath in suspension cells. The uni-modal expression and specific clustering of integrins could be confirmed for CHO-S, another suspension cell line. Cytochalasin D treatment resulted in breakdown of the actin sheath and the sphere-like integrin conformation demonstrating the link between integrins and actin in suspension-adapted CHO cells. The data demonstrates the importance of signalling changes, leading to an integrin rearrangement on the cell surface, and the necessity of the reinforcement of the actin cytoskeleton for proliferation in suspension conditions.

  8. Adaptation to optimal cell growth through self-organized criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2012-05-18

    A simple cell model consisting of a catalytic reaction network is studied to show that cellular states are self-organized in a critical state for achieving optimal growth; we consider the catalytic network dynamics over a wide range of environmental conditions, through the spontaneous regulation of nutrient transport into the cell. Furthermore, we find that the adaptability of cellular growth to reach a critical state depends only on the extent of environmental changes, while all chemical species in the cell exhibit correlated partial adaptation. These results are in remarkable agreement with the recent experimental observations of the present cells.

  9. Optimal multitrial prediction combination and subject-specific adaptation for minimal training brain switch designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spyrou, L.; Blokland, Y.M.; Farquhar, J.D.R.; Bruhn, J.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interface systems are traditionally designed by taking into account user-specific data to enable practical use. More recently, subject independent (SI) classification algorithms have been developed which bypass the subject specific adaptation and enable rapid use of the system. A brai

  10. Across-ear stimulus-specific adaptation in the auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxiu eXu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to detect unexpected or deviant events in natural scenes is critical for survival. In the auditory system, neurons from the midbrain to cortex adapt quickly to repeated stimuli but this adaptation does not fully generalize to other, rare stimuli, a phenomenon called stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA. Most studies of SSA were conducted with pure tones of different frequencies, and it is by now well-established that SSA to tone frequency is strong and robust in auditory cortex. Here we tested SSA in the auditory cortex to the ear of stimulation using broadband noise. We show that cortical neurons adapt specifically to the ear of stimulation, and that the contrast between the responses to stimulation of the same ear when rare and when common depends on the binaural interaction class of the neurons.

  11. δ-OPIOID RECEPTOR ADAPTATION IN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D-M,Chuang; M.Belchers; J.Barg; J.Rowinski; G.Clark; C.A.Gloeckner; A.Ho; X-M.Gao; C.J.Coscia

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying tolerance and dependence arising from chronic opioid exposure are poorly understood. However, the development of neuroblastoma and neurohybrid cell culturea, has provided a simplified model for the atudy of opioid receptor adaptation. Using neuroblastoma NG108-15 cells,

  12. Most substrates suitable if you adapt the watering and fertiliser : take note of specific plants needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelink, E.; Kierkels, T.

    2012-01-01

    The diversity in substrates keeps growing. You can't say that one is better than the other if you take into account their characteristics and adapt the watering and fertilisation. But you also need take into account the specific requirements of the plant which we'll discuss in this article.

  13. Adaptive Web-Assisted Learning System for Students with Specific Learning Disabilities: A Needs Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Elif; Adiguzel, Tufan; Akgun, Ozcan Erkan

    2012-01-01

    Because there is, currently, no education system for primary school students in grades 1-3 who have specific learning disabilities in Turkey and because such students do not receive sufficient support from face-to-face counseling, a needs analysis was conducted in order to prepare an adaptive, web-assisted learning system according to variables…

  14. Contrast Adaptation Decreases Complexity in Retinal Ganglion Cell Spike Train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guang-Li; HUANG Shi-Yong; ZHANG Ying-Ying; LIANG Pei-Ji

    2007-01-01

    @@ The difference in temporal structures of retinal ganglion cell spike trains between spontaneous activity and firing activity after contrast adaptation is investigated. The Lempel-Ziv complexity analysis reveals that the complexity of the neural spike train decreases after contrast adaptation. This implies that the behaviour of the neuron becomes ordered, which may carry relevant information about the external stimulus. Thus, during the neuron activity after contrast adaptation, external information could be encoded in forms of some certain patterns in the temporal structure of spike train that is significantly different, compared to that of the spike train during spontaneous activity, although the firing rates in spontaneous activity and firing activity after contrast adaptation are sometime similar.

  15. Characterization of Adapter Protein NRBP as a Negative Regulator of T Cell Activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui; LIN Zhi-xin; WU Jun

    2008-01-01

    Adapter proteins can regulate the gene transcriptions in disparate signaling pathway by interacting with multiple signaling molecules, including T cell activation signaling. Nuclear receptor binding protein (NRBP), a novel adapter protein, represents a small family of evolutionarily conserved proteins with homologs in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), Drosophila melanogaster (D.melanogaster), mouse and human. Here, we demonstrated that overexpression of NRBP in Jurkat TAg cells specifically impairs T cell receptor (TCR) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)/ionomycin-mediated signaling leading to nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) promoter activation. Furthermore, the N-terminal of NRBP is necessary for its regulation of NFAT activation. Finally, we showed that NRBP has minimal effect on both TCR- and PMA-induced CD69 up-regulation in Jurkat TAg cells, which suggests that NRBP may function downstream of protein kinase C (PKC)/Ras pathway.

  16. Coping with loss: cell adaptation to cytoskeleton disruption

    OpenAIRE

    McGarry, David J.; Olson, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Unravelling the role of cytoskeleton regulators may be complicated by adaptations to experimental manipulations. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Cerikan et al. (2016) reveal how acute effects of DOCK6 RhoGEF depletion on RAC1 and CDC42 activation are reversed over time by compensatory mechanisms that re-establish cellular homeostasis.

  17. Monitoring changes in proteome during stepwise adaptation of a MDCK cell line from adherence to growth in suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Sabine; Benndorf, Dirk; Genzel, Yvonne; Scharfenberg, Klaus; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2015-08-20

    Adaptation of continuous cell lines to growth in suspension in a chemically defined medium has significant advantages for design and optimization in manufacturing of biologicals. In this work, changes in the protein expression level during a step-wise adaptation of an adherent Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line to suspension growth were analyzed. Therefore, three cell line adaptations were performed independently. Two adaptations were monitored closely to characterize short term changes in protein expression levels after serum deprivation. In addition, initial stages of suspension growth were analyzed for both adaptations. The third adaptation involved MDCK suspension cells (MDCKSUS2) grown over an extended time period to achieve robust growth characteristics. Here, cells of the final stage of adaptation were compared with their parental cell line (MDCKADH). A combination of two dimensional differential gel electrophoresis for relative protein quantification and tandem mass spectrometry for protein identification enabled insights into cellular physiology. The two closely monitored cell line adaptations followed different routes regarding specific changes in protein expression but resulted in similar proteome profiles at the initial stages of suspension growth analyzed. Compared to the MDCKADH cells more than 90% of all changes in the protein expression level were identified after serum deprivation and were related to cytoskeletal structure, genetic information processing and cellular metabolism. Myosin proteins, involved in cellular detachment by actin-myosin contractile mechanisms were also differentially expressed. Interestingly, for both of the two adaptations, proteins linked for tumorigenicity, like lactoylglutathione lyase and sulfotransferase 1A1 were differentially expressed. In contrast, none of these proteins were differentially expressed for the MDCKSUS2 cell line. Overall, proteomic monitoring allowed identification of key proteins involved in

  18. Stepwise adaptation of murine cytomegalovirus to cells of a foreign host for identification of host range determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Pawletko, Kerstin; Indenbirken, Daniela; Schumacher, Uwe; Brune, Wolfram

    2015-06-01

    Ever since their first isolation 60 years ago, cytomegaloviruses have been recognized as being highly species specific. They replicate only in cells of their own or a closely related host species, while cells of phylogenetically more distant hosts are usually not permissive for viral replication. For instance, human cytomegalovirus replicates in human and chimpanzee fibroblasts but not in rodent cells, and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) replicates in cells of mice and rats but not in primate cells. However, the viral and cellular factors determining the narrow host range of cytomegaloviruses have remained largely unknown. We show that MCMV can be adapted stepwise to replicate in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE-1) cells and human fibroblasts. The human RPE-1 cells used for the initial adaptation step showed a pronounced contact inhibition and produced very low level of interferon-β transcripts upon cytomegalovirus infection, suggesting that these cells provide a particularly favorable environment for adaptation. By whole genome sequencing of the 230 kbp viral genomes of several adapted mutants, a limited number of mutations were detected. Comparison of several human cell-adapted MCMV clones and introduction of specific mutations into the wild-type MCMV genome by site-directed mutagenesis allows for the identification of viral host range determinants and provides the basis for elucidating the molecular basis of the cytomegalovirus host species specificity.

  19. Mast cells in allergy and autoimmunity: implications for adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Gregory D; Brown, Melissa A

    2006-01-01

    As in the fashion industry, trends in a particular area of scientific investigation often are fleeting but then return with renewed and enthusiastic interest. Studies of mast cell biology are good examples of this. Although dogma once relegated mast cells almost exclusively to roles in pathological inflammation associated with allergic disease, these cells are emerging as important players in a number of other physiological processes. Consequently, they are quickly becoming the newest "trendy" cell, both within and outside the field of immunology. As sources of a large array of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, mast cells also express cell surface molecules with defined functions in lymphocyte activation and trafficking. Here, we provide an overview of the traditional and newly appreciated contributions of mast cells to both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  20. Retinal ganglion cell adaptation to small luminance fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel K; Graña, Gilberto; Passaglia, Christopher L

    2010-08-01

    To accommodate the wide input range over which the visual system operates within the narrow output range of spiking neurons, the retina adjusts its sensitivity to the mean light level so that retinal ganglion cells can faithfully signal contrast, or relative deviations from the mean luminance. Given the large operating range of the visual system, the majority of work on luminance adaptation has involved logarithmic changes in light level. We report that luminance gain controls are recruited for remarkably small fluctuations in luminance as well. Using spike recordings from the rat optic tract, we show that ganglion cell responses to a brief flash of light are modulated in amplitude by local background fluctuations as little as 15% contrast. The time scale of the gain control is rapid (retinal locus of adaptation precedes the ganglion cell spike generator because response gain changes of on cells were uncorrelated with firing rate. The mechanism seems to reside within the inner retinal network and not in the photoreceptors, because the adaptation profiles of on and off cells differed markedly. The response gain changes follow Weber's law, suggesting that network mechanisms of luminance adaptation described in previous work modulates retinal ganglion cell sensitivity, not just when we move between different lighting environments, but also as our eyes scan a visual scene. Finally, we show that response amplitude is uniformly reduced for flashes on a modulated background that has spatial contrast, indicating that another gain control that integrates luminance signals nonlinearly over space operates within the receptive field center of rat ganglion cells.

  1. CD1-Restricted T Cells at the Crossroad of Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Catia S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-specific T cells comprise a group of T cells that recognize lipids bound to the MHC class I-like CD1 molecules. There are four isoforms of CD1 that are expressed at the surface of antigen presenting cells and therefore capable of presenting lipid antigens: CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD1d. Each one of these isoforms has distinct structural features and cellular localizations, which promotes binding to a broad range of different types of lipids. Lipid antigens originate from either self-tissues or foreign sources, such as bacteria, fungus, or plants and their recognition by CD1-restricted T cells has important implications in infection but also in cancer and autoimmunity. In this review, we describe the characteristics of CD1 molecules and CD1-restricted lipid-specific T cells, highlighting the innate-like and adaptive-like features of different CD1-restricted T cell subtypes. PMID:28070524

  2. An Application Specific Instruction Set Processor (ASIP) for Adaptive Filters in Neural Prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yao; Li, Will X Y; Zhang, Zhaorui; Cheung, Ray C C; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W

    2015-01-01

    Neural coding is an essential process for neuroprosthetic design, in which adaptive filters have been widely utilized. In a practical application, it is needed to switch between different filters, which could be based on continuous observations or point process, when the neuron models, conditions, or system requirements have changed. As candidates of coding chip for neural prostheses, low-power general purpose processors are not computationally efficient especially for large scale neural population coding. Application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) do not have flexibility to switch between different adaptive filters while the cost for design and fabrication is formidable. In this research work, we explore an application specific instruction set processor (ASIP) for adaptive filters in neural decoding activity. The proposed architecture focuses on efficient computation for the most time-consuming matrix/vector operations among commonly used adaptive filters, being able to provide both flexibility and throughput. Evaluation and implementation results are provided to demonstrate that the proposed ASIP design is area-efficient while being competitive to commercial CPUs in computational performance.

  3. Induction of Specific CD8+ T Cells against Intracellular Bacteria by CD8+ T-Cell-Oriented Immunization Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshi Nagata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For protection against intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Listeria monocytogenes, the cellular arm of adaptive immunity is necessary. A variety of immunization methods have been evaluated and are reported to induce specific CD8+ T cells against intracellular bacterial infection. Modified BCG vaccines have been examined to enhance CD8+ T-cell responses. Naked DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce CD8+ T cells. In addition to this strategy, live attenuated intracellular bacteria such as Shigella, Salmonella, and Listeria have been utilized as carriers of DNA vaccines in animal models. Vaccination with dendritic cells pulsed with antigenic peptides or the cells introduced antigen genes by virus vectors such as retroviruses is also a powerful strategy. Furthermore, vaccination with recombinant lentivirus has been attempted to induce specific CD8+ T cells. Combinations of these strategies (prime-boost immunization have been studied for the efficient induction of intracellular bacteria-specific CD8+ T cells.

  4. Machine learning classification of cell-specific cardiac enhancers uncovers developmental subnetworks regulating progenitor cell division and cell fate specification

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Shaad M.; Busser, Brian W; Huang, Di; Cozart, Elizabeth J.; Michaud, Sébastien; Zhu, Xianmin; Jeffries, Neal; Aboukhalil, Anton; Bulyk, Martha L.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila heart is composed of two distinct cell types, the contractile cardial cells (CCs) and the surrounding non-muscle pericardial cells (PCs), development of which is regulated by a network of conserved signaling molecules and transcription factors (TFs). Here, we used machine learning with array-based chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and TF sequence motifs to computationally classify cell type-specific cardiac enhancers. Extensive testing of predicted enhancers at single-c...

  5. Necrosis: a specific form of programmed cell death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakov, Sergey Ya; Konoplyannikov, Anatoli G; Gabai, Vladimir L

    2003-02-01

    For a long time necrosis was considered as an alternative to programmed cell death, apoptosis. Indeed, necrosis has distinct morphological features and it is accompanied by rapid permeabilization of plasma membrane. However, recent data indicate that, in contrast to necrosis caused by very extreme conditions, there are many examples when this form of cell death may be a normal physiological and regulated (programmed) event. Various stimuli (e.g., cytokines, ischemia, heat, irradiation, pathogens) can cause both apoptosis and necrosis in the same cell population. Furthermore, signaling pathways, such as death receptors, kinase cascades, and mitochondria, participate in both processes, and by modulating these pathways, it is possible to switch between apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, antiapoptotic mechanisms (e.g., Bcl-2/Bcl-x proteins, heat shock proteins) are equally effective in protection against apoptosis and necrosis. Therefore, necrosis, along with apoptosis, appears to be a specific form of execution phase of programmed cell death, and there are several examples of necrosis during embryogenesis, a normal tissue renewal, and immune response. However, the consequences of necrotic and apoptotic cell death for a whole organism are quite different. In the case of necrosis, cytosolic constituents that spill into extracellular space through damaged plasma membrane may provoke inflammatory response; during apoptosis these products are safely isolated by membranes and then are consumed by macrophages. The inflammatory response caused by necrosis, however, may have obvious adaptive significance (i.e., emergence of a strong immune response) under some pathological conditions (such as cancer and infection). On the other hand, disturbance of a fine balance between necrosis and apoptosis may be a key element in development of some diseases.

  6. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-12-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection.

  7. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V S

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner.

  8. Machine learning classification of cell-specific cardiac enhancers uncovers developmental subnetworks regulating progenitor cell division and cell fate specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shaad M; Busser, Brian W; Huang, Di; Cozart, Elizabeth J; Michaud, Sébastien; Zhu, Xianmin; Jeffries, Neal; Aboukhalil, Anton; Bulyk, Martha L; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M

    2014-02-01

    The Drosophila heart is composed of two distinct cell types, the contractile cardial cells (CCs) and the surrounding non-muscle pericardial cells (PCs), development of which is regulated by a network of conserved signaling molecules and transcription factors (TFs). Here, we used machine learning with array-based chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and TF sequence motifs to computationally classify cell type-specific cardiac enhancers. Extensive testing of predicted enhancers at single-cell resolution revealed the added value of ChIP data for modeling cell type-specific activities. Furthermore, clustering the top-scoring classifier sequence features identified novel cardiac and cell type-specific regulatory motifs. For example, we found that the Myb motif learned by the classifier is crucial for CC activity, and the Myb TF acts in concert with two forkhead domain TFs and Polo kinase to regulate cardiac progenitor cell divisions. In addition, differential motif enrichment and cis-trans genetic studies revealed that the Notch signaling pathway TF Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] discriminates PC from CC enhancer activities. Collectively, these studies elucidate molecular pathways used in the regulatory decisions for proliferation and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells, implicate Su(H) in regulating cell fate decisions of these progenitors, and document the utility of enhancer modeling in uncovering developmental regulatory subnetworks.

  9. Optical Property Analyses of Plant Cells for Adaptive Optics Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamada, Yosuke; Murata, Takashi; Hattori, Masayuki; Oya, Shin; Hayano, Yutaka; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2014-04-01

    In astronomy, adaptive optics (AO) can be used to cancel aberrations caused by atmospheric turbulence and to perform diffraction-limited observation of astronomical objects from the ground. AO can also be applied to microscopy, to cancel aberrations caused by cellular structures and to perform high-resolution live imaging. As a step toward the application of AO to microscopy, here we analyzed the optical properties of plant cells. We used leaves of the moss Physcomitrella patens, which have a single layer of cells and are thus suitable for optical analysis. Observation of the cells with bright field and phase contrast microscopy, and image degradation analysis using fluorescent beads demonstrated that chloroplasts provide the main source of optical degradations. Unexpectedly, the cell wall, which was thought to be a major obstacle, has only a minor effect. Such information provides the basis for the application of AO to microscopy for the observation of plant cells.

  10. Effects of physical exercise on central nervous system functions: a review of brain region specific adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Julie A; Corrigan, Frances; Baune, Bernhard T

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies of central nervous system (CNS) functions are involved in prevalent conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, depression, and Parkinson's disease. Notable pathologies include dysfunctions of circadian rhythm, central metabolism, cardiovascular function, central stress responses, and movement mediated by the basal ganglia. Although evidence suggests exercise may benefit these conditions, the neurobiological mechanisms of exercise in specific brain regions involved in these important CNS functions have yet to be clarified. Here we review murine evidence about the effects of exercise on discrete brain regions involved in important CNS functions. Exercise effects on circadian rhythm, central metabolism, cardiovascular function, stress responses in the brain stem and hypothalamic pituitary axis, and movement are examined. The databases Pubmed, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for articles investigating regional brain adaptations to exercise. Brain regions examined included the brain stem, hypothalamus, and basal ganglia. We found evidence of multiple regional adaptations to both forced and voluntary exercise. Exercise can induce molecular adaptations in neuronal function in many instances. Taken together, these findings suggest that the regional physiological adaptations that occur with exercise could constitute a promising field for elucidating molecular and cellular mechanisms of recovery in psychiatric and neurological health conditions.

  11. REEPs are membrane shaping adapter proteins that modulate specific g protein-coupled receptor trafficking by affecting ER cargo capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Susann; Hurt, Carl M; Ho, Vincent K; Angelotti, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Receptor expression enhancing proteins (REEPs) were identified by their ability to enhance cell surface expression of a subset of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), specifically GPCRs that have proven difficult to express in heterologous cell systems. Further analysis revealed that they belong to the Yip (Ypt-interacting protein) family and that some REEP subtypes affect ER structure. Yip family comparisons have established other potential roles for REEPs, including regulation of ER-Golgi transport and processing/neuronal localization of cargo proteins. However, these other potential REEP functions and the mechanism by which they selectively enhance GPCR cell surface expression have not been clarified. By utilizing several REEP family members (REEP1, REEP2, and REEP6) and model GPCRs (α2A and α2C adrenergic receptors), we examined REEP regulation of GPCR plasma membrane expression, intracellular processing, and trafficking. Using a combination of immunolocalization and biochemical methods, we demonstrated that this REEP subset is localized primarily to ER, but not plasma membranes. Single cell analysis demonstrated that these REEPs do not specifically enhance surface expression of all GPCRs, but affect ER cargo capacity of specific GPCRs and thus their surface expression. REEP co-expression with α2 adrenergic receptors (ARs) revealed that this REEP subset interacts with and alter glycosidic processing of α2C, but not α2A ARs, demonstrating selective interaction with cargo proteins. Specifically, these REEPs enhanced expression of and interacted with minimally/non-glycosylated forms of α2C ARs. Most importantly, expression of a mutant REEP1 allele (hereditary spastic paraplegia SPG31) lacking the carboxyl terminus led to loss of this interaction. Thus specific REEP isoforms have additional intracellular functions besides altering ER structure, such as enhancing ER cargo capacity, regulating ER-Golgi processing, and interacting with select cargo proteins

  12. NPY receptor subtype specification for behavioral adaptive strategies during limited food access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pjetri, E; Adan, R A; Herzog, H; de Haas, R; Oppelaar, H; Spierenburg, H A; Olivier, B; Kas, M J

    2012-02-01

    The neuropeptide Y (NPY) system in the brain regulates a wide variety of behavioral, metabolic and hormonal homeostatic processes required for energy balance control. During times of limited food availability, NPY promotes behavioral hyperactivity necessary to explore and prepare for novel food resources. As NPY can act via 5 different receptor subtypes, we investigated the path through which NPY affects different behavioral components relevant for adaptation to such conditions. We tested NPY Y1 and Y2 receptor knockout mice and their wild-type littermate controls in a daily scheduled limited food access paradigm with unlimited access to running wheel. Here we show that NPY Y1 receptor deficient mice lack the expression of appetitive behavior and that NPY Y2 receptors control the level of hyperactive behavior under these conditions. Thus, receptor specificity determines the differential expression of NPY-mediated behavioral adaptations to overcome a negative energy status.

  13. Arginine Metabolism in Myeloid Cells Shapes Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Paulo C.; Ochoa, Augusto C.; Al-Khami, Amir A.

    2017-01-01

    Arginine metabolism has been a key catabolic and anabolic process throughout the evolution of the immune response. Accruing evidence indicates that arginine-catabolizing enzymes, mainly nitric oxide synthases and arginases, are closely integrated with the control of immune response under physiological and pathological conditions. Myeloid cells are major players that exploit the regulators of arginine metabolism to mediate diverse, although often opposing, immunological and functional consequences. In this article, we focus on the importance of arginine catabolism by myeloid cells in regulating innate and adaptive immunity. Revisiting this matter could result in novel therapeutic approaches by which the immunoregulatory nodes instructed by arginine metabolism can be targeted.

  14. Skin Biopsy and Patient-Specific Stem Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Nguyen, Huy V.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells permits the development of next-generation patient-specific systems biology models reflecting personalized genomics profiles to better understand pathophysiology. In this chapter, we describe how to create a patient-specific iPS cell line. There are three major steps: (1) performing a skin biopsy procedure on the patient; (2) extracting human fibroblast cells from the skin biopsy tissue; and (3) reprogramming patient-specific fibroblast cells into the pluripotent stem cell stage. PMID:26141312

  15. Generating a Domain Specific Inspection Evaluation Method through an Adaptive Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roobaea AlRoobaea

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The electronic information revolution and the use of computers as an essential part of everyday life are now more widespread than ever before, as the Internet is exploited for the speedy transfer of data and business. Social networking sites (SNSs, such as LinkedIn, Ecademy and Google+ are growing in use worldwide, and they present popular business channels on the Internet. However, they need to be continuously evaluated and monitored to measure their levels of efficiency, effectiveness and user satisfaction, ultimately to improve quality. Nearly all previous studies have used Heuristic Evaluation (HE and User Testing (UT methodologies, which have become the accepted methods for the usability evaluation of User Interface Design (UID; however, the former is general, and unlikely to encompass all usability attributes for all website domains. The latter is expensive, time consuming and misses consistency problems. To address this need, a new evaluation method is developed using traditional evaluations (HE and UT in novel ways. The lack of an adaptive methodological framework that can be used to generate a domain- specific evaluation method, which can then be used to improve the usability assessment process for a product in any chosen domain, represents a missing area in usability testing. This paper proposes an adaptive framework that is readily capable of adaptation to any domain, and then evaluates it by generating an evaluation method for assessing and improving the usability of products in a particular domain. The evaluation method is called Domain Specific Inspection (DSI, and it is empirically, analytically and statistically tested by applying it on three websites in the social networks domain. Our experiments show that the adaptive framework is able to build a formative and summative evaluation method that provides optimal results with regard to our newly identified set of comprehensive usability problem areas as well as relevant usability

  16. Stimulation of adult oligodendrogenesis by myelin-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted Nielsen, Helle; Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2011-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), myelin-specific T cells are normally associated with destruction of myelin and axonal damage. However, in acute MS plaque, remyelination occurs concurrent with T-cell infiltration, which raises the question of whether T cells might stimulate myelin repair. We...... investigated the effect of myelin-specific T cells on oligodendrocyte formation at sites of axonal damage in the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus. Infiltrating T cells specific for myelin proteolipid protein stimulated proliferation of chondroitin sulfate NG2-expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells early...... after induction via axonal transection, resulting in a 25% increase in the numbers of oligodendrocytes. In contrast, T cells specific for ovalbumin did not stimulate the formation of new oligodendrocytes. In addition, infiltration of myelin-specific T cells enhanced the sprouting response...

  17. Persistence and Adaptation in Immunity: T Cells Balance the Extent and Thoroughness of Search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Matthew Fricke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Effective search strategies have evolved in many biological systems, including the immune system. T cells are key effectors of the immune response, required for clearance of pathogenic infection. T cell activation requires that T cells encounter antigen-bearing dendritic cells within lymph nodes, thus, T cell search patterns within lymph nodes may be a crucial determinant of how quickly a T cell immune response can be initiated. Previous work suggests that T cell motion in the lymph node is similar to a Brownian random walk, however, no detailed analysis has definitively shown whether T cell movement is consistent with Brownian motion. Here, we provide a precise description of T cell motility in lymph nodes and a computational model that demonstrates how motility impacts T cell search efficiency. We find that both Brownian and Lévy walks fail to capture the complexity of T cell motion. Instead, T cell movement is better described as a correlated random walk with a heavy-tailed distribution of step lengths. Using computer simulations, we identify three distinct factors that contribute to increasing T cell search efficiency: 1 a lognormal distribution of step lengths, 2 motion that is directionally persistent over short time scales, and 3 heterogeneity in movement patterns. Furthermore, we show that T cells move differently in specific frequently visited locations that we call "hotspots" within lymph nodes, suggesting that T cells change their movement in response to the lymph node environment. Our results show that like foraging animals, T cells adapt to environmental cues, suggesting that adaption is a fundamental feature of biological search.

  18. Adaptation of CHO cells in serum-free conditions for erythropoietin production: Application of EVOP technique for process optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukić, Suzana; Bubenik, Dijana; Pavlović, Nediljko; Tušek, Ana Jurinjak; Srček, Višnja Gaurina

    2016-09-01

    Mammalian cell cultures are the preferred expression systems for the production of biopharmaceuticals requiring posttranslational processing. Usually, cell cultures are cultivated in medium supplemented with serum, which supports cell proliferation, viability, and productivity. However, due to scientific and regulatory concerns, serum-free conditions are required in recombinant protein production. Cell lines that are intended for commercial recombinant protein production have to adapt to serum- or protein-free conditions early in their development. This is a labor- and time-consuming process because of the specific cell requirements related to their adaptation in new microenvironment. In the present study, a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line producing glycosylated recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) was adapted for growth and rhEPO production in serum- and protein-free conditions. The physiology, growth parameters, and morphology of the CHO cells and rhEPO biosynthesis and structure were closely monitored during the adaptation process to avoid unwanted selection of cell subpopulations. The results showed that the CHO cells were successfully adapted to suspension growth and rhEPO production in the protein-free conditions and that the structure of rhEPO remained nearly unchanged. In addition, during rhEPO production in the protein-free suspension conditions, the agitation rate seem to be significant for optimal process performance in contrast to the initial cell concentration, evaluated through evolutionary operation method.

  19. Quasispecies of Hepatitis C Virus Participate in Cell-Specific Infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Takasuke; Yamamoto, Satomi; Ono, Chikako; Nakamura, Shota; Motooka, Daisuke; Mori, Hiroyuki; Kurihara, Takeshi; Sato, Asuka; Tamura, Tomokazu; Motomura, Takashi; Okamoto, Toru; Imamura, Michio; Ikegami, Toru; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Soejima, Yuji; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Chayama, Kazuaki; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2017-03-22

    It is well documented that a variety of viral quasispecies are found in the patients with chronic infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, the significance of quasispecies in the specific infectivity to individual cell types remains unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the role of quasispecies of the genotype 2a clone, JFH1 (HCVcc), in specific infectivity to the hepatic cell lines, Huh7.5.1 and Hep3B. HCV RNA was electroporated into Huh7.5.1 cells and Hep3B/miR-122 cells expressing miR-122 at a high level. Then, we adapted the viruses to Huh7 and Hep3B/miR-122 cells by serial passages and termed the resulting viruses HCVcc/Huh7 and HCVcc/Hep3B, respectively. Interestingly, a higher viral load was obtained in the homologous combination of HCVcc/Huh7 in Huh7.5.1 cells or HCVcc/Hep3B in Hep3B/miR-122 cells compared with the heterologous combination. By using a reverse genetics system and deep sequence analysis, we identified several adaptive mutations involved in the high affinity for each cell line, suggesting that quasispecies of HCV participate in cell-specific infectivity.

  20. Comparative genomics of rhizobia nodulating soybean suggests extensive recruitment of lineage-specific genes in adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chang Fu; Zhou, Yuan Jie; Zhang, Yan Ming; Li, Qin Qin; Zhang, Yun Zeng; Li, Dong Fang; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Jun; Gilbert, Luz B; Li, Ying Rui; Chen, Wen Xin

    2012-05-29

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis has been widely studied as the model of mutualistic evolution and the essential component of sustainable agriculture. Extensive genetic and recent genomic studies have led to the hypothesis that many distinct strategies, regardless of rhizobial phylogeny, contributed to the varied rhizobium-legume symbiosis. We sequenced 26 genomes of Sinorhizobium and Bradyrhizobium nodulating soybean to test this hypothesis. The Bradyrhizobium core genome is disproportionally enriched in lipid and secondary metabolism, whereas several gene clusters known to be involved in osmoprotection and adaptation to alkaline pH are specific to the Sinorhizobium core genome. These features are consistent with biogeographic patterns of these bacteria. Surprisingly, no genes are specifically shared by these soybean microsymbionts compared with other legume microsymbionts. On the other hand, phyletic patterns of 561 known symbiosis genes of rhizobia reflected the species phylogeny of these soybean microsymbionts and other rhizobia. Similar analyses with 887 known functional genes or the whole pan genome of rhizobia revealed that only the phyletic distribution of functional genes was consistent with the species tree of rhizobia. Further evolutionary genetics revealed that recombination dominated the evolution of core genome. Taken together, our results suggested that faithfully vertical genes were rare compared with those with history of recombination including lateral gene transfer, although rhizobial adaptations to symbiotic interactions and other environmental conditions extensively recruited lineage-specific shell genes under direct or indirect control through the speciation process.

  1. Integrating innate and adaptive immune cells: Mast cells as crossroads between regulatory and effector B and T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y; Frossi, Barbara; Mion, Francesca; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2016-05-05

    A diversity of immune mechanisms have evolved to protect normal tissues from infection, but from immune damage too. Innate cells, as well as adaptive cells, are critical contributors to the correct development of the immune response and of tissue homeostasis. There is a dynamic "cross-talk" between the innate and adaptive immunomodulatory mechanisms for an integrated control of immune damage as well as the development of the immune response. Mast cells have shown a great plasticity, modifying their behavior at different stages of immune response through interaction with effector and regulatory populations of adaptive immunity. Understanding the interplays among T effectors, regulatory T cells, B cells and regulatory B cells with mast cells will be critical in the future to assist in the development of therapeutic strategies to enhance and synergize physiological immune-modulator and -suppressor elements in the innate and adaptive immune system.

  2. Stimulus-specific adaptation and deviance detection in the rat auditory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevo Taaseh

    Full Text Available Stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA is the specific decrease in the response to a frequent ('standard' stimulus, which does not generalize, or generalizes only partially, to another, rare stimulus ('deviant'. Stimulus-specific adaptation could result simply from the depression of the responses to the standard. Alternatively, there may be an increase in the responses to the deviant stimulus due to the violation of expectations set by the standard, indicating the presence of true deviance detection. We studied SSA in the auditory cortex of halothane-anesthetized rats, recording local field potentials and multi-unit activity. We tested the responses to pure tones of one frequency when embedded in sequences that differed from each other in the frequency and probability of the tones composing them. The responses to tones of the same frequency were larger when deviant than when standard, even with inter-stimulus time intervals of almost 2 seconds. Thus, SSA is present and strong in rat auditory cortex. SSA was present even when the frequency difference between deviants and standards was as small as 10%, substantially smaller than the typical width of cortical tuning curves, revealing hyper-resolution in frequency. Strong responses were evoked also by a rare tone presented by itself, and by rare tones presented as part of a sequence of many widely spaced frequencies. On the other hand, when presented within a sequence of narrowly spaced frequencies, the responses to a tone, even when rare, were smaller. A model of SSA that included only adaptation of the responses in narrow frequency channels predicted responses to the deviants that were substantially smaller than the observed ones. Thus, the response to a deviant is at least partially due to the change it represents relative to the regularity set by the standard tone, indicating the presence of true deviance detection in rat auditory cortex.

  3. Organism-adapted specificity of the allosteric regulation of pyruvate kinase in lactic acid bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Veith

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase (PYK is a critical allosterically regulated enzyme that links glycolysis, the primary energy metabolism, to cellular metabolism. Lactic acid bacteria rely almost exclusively on glycolysis for their energy production under anaerobic conditions, which reinforces the key role of PYK in their metabolism. These organisms are closely related, but have adapted to a huge variety of native environments. They include food-fermenting organisms, important symbionts in the human gut, and antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In contrast to the rather conserved inhibition of PYK by inorganic phosphate, the activation of PYK shows high variability in the type of activating compound between different lactic acid bacteria. System-wide comparative studies of the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria are required to understand the reasons for the diversity of these closely related microorganisms. These require knowledge of the identities of the enzyme modifiers. Here, we predict potential allosteric activators of PYKs from three lactic acid bacteria which are adapted to different native environments. We used protein structure-based molecular modeling and enzyme kinetic modeling to predict and validate potential activators of PYK. Specifically, we compared the electrostatic potential and the binding of phosphate moieties at the allosteric binding sites, and predicted potential allosteric activators by docking. We then made a kinetic model of Lactococcus lactis PYK to relate the activator predictions to the intracellular sugar-phosphate conditions in lactic acid bacteria. This strategy enabled us to predict fructose 1,6-bisphosphate as the sole activator of the Enterococcus faecalis PYK, and to predict that the PYKs from Streptococcus pyogenes and Lactobacillus plantarum show weaker specificity for their allosteric activators, while still having fructose 1,6-bisphosphate play the main activator role in vivo. These differences in the specificity of allosteric

  4. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2014-06-17

    One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the "magic bullet" concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, "targeted therapy" that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges.

  5. The Influence of T Cell Development on Pathogen Specificity and Autoreactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2012-10-01

    T cells orchestrate adaptive immune responses upon activation. T cell activation requires sufficiently strong binding of T cell receptors on their surface to short peptides derived from foreign proteins bound to protein products of the major histocompatibility (MHC) gene products, which are displayed on the surface of antigen presenting cells. T cells can also interact with peptide-MHC complexes, where the peptide is derived from host (self) proteins. A diverse repertoire of relatively self-tolerant T cell receptors is selected in the thymus. We study a model, computationally and analytically, to describe how thymic selection shapes the repertoire of T cell receptors, such that T cell receptor recognition of pathogenic peptides is both specific and degenerate. We also discuss the escape probability of autoimmune T cells from the thymus.

  6. The influence of T cell development on pathogen specificity and autoreactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kosmrlj, Andrej; Chakraborty, Arup K

    2012-01-01

    T cells orchestrate adaptive immune responses upon activation. T cell activation requires sufficiently strong binding of T cell receptors on their surface to short peptides derived from foreign proteins bound to protein products of the major histocompatibility (MHC) gene products, which are displayed on the surface of antigen presenting cells. T cells can also interact with peptide-MHC complexes, where the peptide is derived from host (self) proteins. A diverse repertoire of relatively self-tolerant T cell receptors is selected in the thymus. We study a model, computationally and analytically, to describe how thymic selection shapes the repertoire of T cell receptors, such that T cell receptor recognition of pathogenic peptides is both specific and degenerate. We also discuss the escape probability of autoimmune T cells from the thymus.

  7. Host-specific parvovirus evolution in nature is recapitulated by in vitro adaptation to different carnivore species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B Allison

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Canine parvovirus (CPV emerged as a new pandemic pathogen of dogs in the 1970s and is closely related to feline panleukopenia virus (FPV, a parvovirus of cats and related carnivores. Although both viruses have wide host ranges, analysis of viral sequences recovered from different wild carnivore species, as shown here, demonstrated that>95% were derived from CPV-like viruses, suggesting that CPV is dominant in sylvatic cycles. Many viral sequences showed host-specific mutations in their capsid proteins, which were often close to sites known to control binding to the transferrin receptor (TfR, the host receptor for these carnivore parvoviruses, and which exhibited frequent parallel evolution. To further examine the process of host adaptation, we passaged parvoviruses with alternative backgrounds in cells from different carnivore hosts. Specific mutations were selected in several viruses and these differed depending on both the background of the virus and the host cells in which they were passaged. Strikingly, these in vitro mutations recapitulated many specific changes seen in viruses from natural populations, strongly suggesting they are host adaptive, and which were shown to result in fitness advantages over their parental virus. Comparison of the sequences of the transferrin receptors of the different carnivore species demonstrated that many mutations occurred in and around the apical domain where the virus binds, indicating that viral variants were likely selected through their fit to receptor structures. Some of the viruses accumulated high levels of variation upon passage in alternative hosts, while others could infect multiple different hosts with no or only a few additional mutations. Overall, these studies demonstrate that the evolutionary history of a virus, including how long it has been circulating and in which hosts, as well as its phylogenetic background, has a profound effect on determining viral host range.

  8. Population activity changes during a trial-to-trial adaptation of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Jing, Wei; Zhang, Pu-Ming; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-07-09

    A 'trial-to-trial adaptation' of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells in response to a repetitive light stimulus was investigated in the present study. Using the multielectrode recording technique, we studied the trial-to-trial adaptive properties of ganglion cells and explored the activity of population neurons during this adaptation process. It was found that the ganglion cells adapted with different degrees: their firing rates were decreased in different extents from early-adaptation to late-adaptation stage, and this was accompanied by a decrease in cross-correlation strength. In addition, adaptation behavior was different for ON-response and OFF-response, which implied that the mechanism of the trial-to-trial adaptation might involve bipolar cells and/or their synapses with other neurons and the stronger adaptation in the ganglion cells' OFF-responses might reflect the requirement to avoid possible saturation in the OFF circuit.

  9. Towards a Requirements Specification Multi-View Framework for Self-Adaptive Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Muñoz-Fernández

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of self-adaptive systems (SAS requirements involves addressing uncertainty from several sources. Despite advances in requirements for SAS, uncertainty remains an extremely difficult challenge. In this paper, we propose REFAS, a framework to model the requirements of self-adaptive software systems. Our aim with REFAS is to address and reduce uncertainty and to provide a language with sufficient power of expression to specify the different aspects of self-adaptive systems, relative to functional and non-functional requirements. The REFAS modeling language includes concepts closely related to these kind of requirements and their fulfillment, such as context variables, claims, and soft dependencies. Specifically, the paper´s contribution is twofold. First, REFAS supports different viewpoints and concerns related to requirements modeling, with key associations between them. Moreover, the modeler can define additional models and views by exploiting the REFAS meta-modeling capability, in order to capture additional aspects contributing to reduce uncertainty. Second, REFAS promotes in-depth analysis of all of the modeled concerns with aggregation and association capabilities, especially with context variables. Furthermore, we also define a process that enforces modeling requirements, considering different aspects of uncertainty. We demonstrate the applicability of REFAS by using the VariaMos software tool, which implements the REFAS meta-model, views, and process.

  10. Pancreatic β- and α-cell adaptation in response to metabolic changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbroek, Johanne Hendrike (Rianne)

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells are essential to maintain blood glucose levels within a narrow range. β-cells can adapt to an increased insulin demand by enhancing insulin secretion via increased β-cell function and/or increased β-cell mass. Inadequate β-cell adaptation leads to hyperglycemia a

  11. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  12. Adapting glycolysis to cancer cell proliferation: the MAPK pathway focuses on PFKFB3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños, Juan P

    2013-06-15

    Besides the necessary changes in the expression of cell cycle-related proteins, cancer cells undergo a profound series of metabolic adaptations focused to satisfy their excessive demand for biomass. An essential metabolic transformation of these cells is increased glycolysis, which is currently the focus of anticancer therapies. Several key players have been identified, so far, that adapt glycolysis to allow an increased proliferation in cancer. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Novellasdemunt and colleagues elegantly identify a novel mechanism by which MK2 [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-activated protein kinase 2], a key component of the MAPK pathway, up-regulates glycolysis in response to stress in cancer cells. The authors found that, by phosphorylating specific substrate residues, MK2 promotes both increased the gene transcription and allosteric activation of PFKFB3 (6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3), a key glycolysis-promoting enzyme. These results reveal a novel pathway through which MK2 co-ordinates metabolic adaptation to cell proliferation in cancer and highlight PFKFB3 as a potential therapeutic target in this devastating disease.

  13. The adapter protein ADAP is required for selected dendritic cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Togni Mauro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytosolic adaptor protein ADAP (adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein is expressed by T cells, natural killer cells, myeloid cells and platelets. ADAP is involved in T-cell-receptor-mediated inside-out signaling, which leads to integrin activation, adhesion and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, little is known about the role of ADAP in myeloid cells. In the present study, we analyzed the function of ADAP in bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs from ADAP-deficient mice. Results ADAP-deficient BMDCs showed almost normal levels of antigen uptake, adhesion, maturation, migration from the periphery to the draining lymph nodes, antigen-specific T-cell activation, and production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-∝. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the activation of signaling pathways after lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation are not affected by the loss of ADAP. In contrast, ADAP-deficient BMDCs showed defects in CD11c-mediated cellular responses, with significantly diminished production of IL-6, TNF-∝ and IL-10. Actin polymerization was enhanced after CD11c integrin stimulation. Conclusions In summary, we propose that the adapter molecule ADAP is critical for selected CD11c integrin-mediated functions of dendritic cells.

  14. Local genetic adaptation generates latitude-specific effects of warming on predator-prey interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Block, Marjan; Pauwels, Kevin; Van Den Broeck, Maarten; De Meester, Luc; Stoks, Robby

    2013-03-01

    Temperature effects on predator-prey interactions are fundamental to better understand the effects of global warming. Previous studies never considered local adaptation of both predators and prey at different latitudes, and ignored the novel population combinations of the same predator-prey species system that may arise because of northward dispersal. We set up a common garden warming experiment to study predator-prey interactions between Ischnura elegans damselfly predators and Daphnia magna zooplankton prey from three source latitudes spanning >1500 km. Damselfly foraging rates showed thermal plasticity and strong latitudinal differences consistent with adaptation to local time constraints. Relative survival was higher at 24 °C than at 20 °C in southern Daphnia and higher at 20 °C than at 24 °C, in northern Daphnia indicating local thermal adaptation of the Daphnia prey. Yet, this thermal advantage disappeared when they were confronted with the damselfly predators of the same latitude, reflecting also a signal of local thermal adaptation in the damselfly predators. Our results further suggest the invasion success of northward moving predators as well as prey to be latitude-specific. We advocate the novel common garden experimental approach using predators and prey obtained from natural temperature gradients spanning the predicted temperature increase in the northern populations as a powerful approach to gain mechanistic insights into how community modules will be affected by global warming. It can be used as a space-for-time substitution to inform how predator-prey interaction may gradually evolve to long-term warming.

  15. MUSCLE FIBER SPECIFIC ANTIOXIDATIVE SYSTEM ADAPTATION TO SWIM TRAINING IN RATS: INFLUENCE OF INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gonchar

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of intermittent hypoxia at rest and in combination with long-term high-intensity swimming exercise on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense system adaptation in skeletal muscles differing in fiber type composition. High-intensity chronic exercise was performed as swimming training with load that corresponded to ~ 75 % VO2max (30 min·day-1, 5 days·wk-1, for 4 wk. Intermittent hypoxic training (IHT consisted of repeated episodes of hypoxia (12%O2, 15 min, interrupted by equal periods of recovery (5 sessions/day, for 2 wk. Sessions of IHT were used during the first two weeks and during the last two weeks of chronic exercise. Oxidative (red gastrocnemius and soleus, mix and glycolytic (white gastrocnemius muscles were sampled. Our results indicated that high-intensity swim training in combination with sessions of IHT induced more profound antioxidative adaptations in skeletal muscles than the exercise training only. This adaptation has muscle fiber type specificity and is reflected in significantly elevated superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in highly oxidative muscle only. Training adaptation of GSH system (reduced glutathione content, activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, NADPH-supplying enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase occurred both in slow- and fast-twitch muscles. However, this process was more effective in oxidative muscles. IHT attenuated the increase in TBARS content induced by high-intensity swimming training. The test on exercise tolerance demonstrated a significant elevation of the swimming time to exhaustion after IHT at rest and after IHT in conjunction with high-intensity exercise in comparison with untrained and chronically exercised rats. These results confirmed that sessions of IHT might improve exercise tolerance and increase maximal work capacity

  16. Adaptive Evolution of cry Genes in Bacillus thuringiensis:Implications for Their Specificity Determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The cry gene family, produced during the late exponential phase of growth in Bacillus thuringiensis, is a large, still-growing family of homologous genes, in which each gene encodes a protein with strong specific activity against only one or a few insect species. Extensive studies are mostly focusing on the structural and functional relationships of Cry proteins, and have revealed several residues or domains that are important for the target recognition and receptor attachment. In this study,we have employed a maximum likelihood method to detect evidence of adaptive evolution in Cry proteins, and have identified 24 positively selected residues, which are all located in Domain Ⅱ or Ⅲ. Combined with known data from mutagenesis studies, the majority of these residues, at the molecular level, contribute much to the insect specificity determination. We postulate that the potential pressures driving the diversification of Cry proteins may be in an attempt to adapt for the "arm race" between δ-endotoxins and the targeted insects, or to enlarge their target spectra, hence result in the functional divergence. The sites identified to be under positive selection would provide targets for further structural and functional analyses on Cry proteins.

  17. Specific neural correlates of successful learning and adaptation during social exchanges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Collins, Adam P R; Fiorentini, Chiara; Kessler, Esther; Boyd, Harriet; Roberts, Fiona; Skuse, David H

    2013-12-01

    Cooperation and betrayal are universal features of social interactions, and knowing who to trust is vital in human society. Previous studies have identified brain regions engaged by decision making during social encounters, but the mechanisms supporting modification of future behaviour by utilizing social experience are not well characterized. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we show that cooperation and betrayal during social exchanges elicit specific patterns of neural activity associated with future behaviour. Unanticipated cooperation leads to greater behavioural adaptation than unexpected betrayal, and is signalled by specific neural responses in the striatum and midbrain. Neural responses to betrayal and willingness to trust novel partners both decrease as the number of individuals encountered during repeated social encounters increases. We propose that, as social groups increase in size, uncooperative or untrustworthy behaviour becomes progressively less surprising, with cooperation becoming increasingly important as a stimulus for social learning. Effects on reputation of non-trusting decisions may also act to drive pro-social behaviour. Our findings characterize the dynamic neural processes underlying social adaptation, and suggest that the brain is optimized to cooperate with trustworthy partners, rather than avoiding those who might betray us.

  18. Odor-Specific Habituation Arises from Interaction of Afferent Synaptic Adaptation and Intrinsic Synaptic Potentiation in Olfactory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linster, Christiane; Menon, Alka V.; Singh, Christopher Y.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    Segmentation of target odorants from background odorants is a fundamental computational requirement for the olfactory system and is thought to be behaviorally mediated by olfactory habituation memory. Data from our laboratory have shown that odor-specific adaptation in piriform neurons, mediated at least partially by synaptic adaptation between…

  19. Adaptation of mammalian auditory hair cell mechanotransduction is independent of calcium entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Anthony W; Effertz, Thomas; Ricci, Anthony J

    2013-11-20

    Adaptation is a hallmark of hair cell mechanotransduction, extending the sensory hair bundle dynamic range while providing mechanical filtering of incoming sound. In hair cells responsive to low frequencies, two distinct adaptation mechanisms exist, a fast component of debatable origin and a slow myosin-based component. It is generally believed that Ca(2+) entry through mechano-electric transducer channels is required for both forms of adaptation. This study investigates the calcium dependence of adaptation in the mammalian auditory system. Recordings from rat cochlear hair cells demonstrate that altering Ca(2+) entry or internal Ca(2+) buffering has little effect on either adaptation kinetics or steady-state adaptation responses. Two additional findings include a voltage-dependent process and an extracellular Ca(2+) binding site, both modulating the resting open probability independent of adaptation. These data suggest that slow motor adaptation is negligible in mammalian auditory cells and that the remaining adaptation process is independent of calcium entry.

  20. Coupled Flow-Structure-Biochemistry Simulations of Dynamic Systems of Blood Cells Using an Adaptive Surface Tracking Method

    OpenAIRE

    Hoskins, M.H.; Kunz, R.F.; Bistline, J.E.; Dong, C.

    2009-01-01

    A method for the computation of low Reynolds number dynamic blood cell systems is presented. The specific system of interest here is interaction between cancer cells and white blood cells in an experimental flow system. Fluid dynamics, structural mechanics, six-degree-of freedom motion control and surface biochemistry analysis components are coupled in the context of adaptive octree-based grid generation. Analytical and numerical verification of the quasi-steady assumption for the fluid mecha...

  1. The adaptive, cut-cell Cartesian approach (warts and all)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    Solution-adaptive methods based on cutting bodies out of Cartesian grids are gaining popularity now that the ways of circumventing the accuracy problems associated with small cut cells have been developed. Researchers are applying Cartesian-based schemes to a broad class of problems now, and, although there is still development work to be done, it is becoming clearer which problems are best suited to the approach (and which are not). The purpose of this paper is to give a candid assessment, based on applying Cartesian schemes to a variety of problems, of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach as it is currently implemented.

  2. A new hypothesis: some metastases are the result of inflammatory processes by adapted cells, especially adapted immune cells at sites of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriyari, Leili

    2016-01-01

    There is an old hypothesis that metastasis is the result of migration of tumor cells from the tumor to a distant site. In this article, we propose another mechanism for metastasis, for cancers that are initiated at the site of chronic inflammation. We suggest that cells at the site of chronic inflammation might become adapted to the inflammatory process, and these adaptations may lead to the initiation of an inflammatory tumor. For example, in an inflammatory tumor immune cells might be adapted to send signals of proliferation or angiogenesis, and epithelial cells might be adapted to proliferation (like inactivation of tumor suppressor genes). Therefore, we hypothesize that metastasis could be the result of an inflammatory process by adapted cells, especially adapted immune cells at the site of inflammation, as well as the migration of tumor cells with the help of activated platelets, which travel between sites of inflammation.  If this hypothesis is correct, then any treatment causing necrotic cell death may not be a good solution. Because necrotic cells in the tumor micro-environment or anywhere in the body activate the immune system to initiate the inflammatory process, and the involvement of adapted immune cells in the inflammatory processes leads to the formation and progression of tumors. Adapted activated immune cells send more signals of proliferation and/or angiogenesis than normal cells. Moreover, if there were adapted epithelial cells, they would divide at a much higher rate in response to the proliferation signals than normal cells. Thus, not only would the tumor come back after the treatment, but it would also grow more aggressively.

  3. Low power proton exchange membrane fuel cell system identification and adaptive control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yee-Pien; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Chang, Hsin-Ping; Ma, Ying-Wei; Weng, Biing-Jyh

    This paper proposes a systematic method of system identification and control of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. This fuel cell can be used for low-power communication devices involving complex electrochemical reactions of nonlinear and time-varying dynamic properties. From a system point of view, the dynamic model of PEM fuel cell is reduced to a configuration of two inputs, hydrogen and air flow rates, and two outputs, cell voltage and current. The corresponding transfer functions describe linearized subsystem dynamics with finite orders and time-varying parameters, which are expressed as discrete-time auto-regression moving-average with auxiliary input models for system identification by the recursive least square algorithm. In the experiments, a pseudo-random binary sequence of hydrogen or air flow rate is fed to a single fuel cell device to excite its dynamics. By measuring the corresponding output signals, each subsystem transfer function of reduced order is identified, while the unmodeled, higher-order dynamics and disturbances are described by the auxiliary input term. This provides a basis of adaptive control strategy to improve the fuel cell performance in terms of efficiency, as well as transient and steady state specifications. Simulation shows that adaptive controller is robust to the variation of fuel cell system dynamics, and it has proved promising from the experimental results.

  4. [Proliferation characteristics of a PK-15 cell-adapted strain of porcine parvovirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Fei; Zhu, Ling; Xu, Zhi-Wen; Fu, Meng-Jin; Chen, Lei; Yang, Ai-Guo; Guo, Wan-Zhu

    2013-06-01

    To study the proliferation characteristics of PPV in differently infected way and the variance of concentrations in different cells. A strain of porcine parvovirus(PPV) was adapted to PK-15 cells, and a Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR) assay was developed based on the specific region of the NS1 gene of PPV to quantify the PPV. The FQ-PCR was used to measure the viral concentration of virus-infected cells by simultaneous or step by step inoculation and plot one-step growth curves. The proliferation characteristics of PPV strain in different cells lines (HeLa, MDBK, PK-15 ,ST, F81, BHK-21 and Marc-145) was also compared. The results showed the PK-15 cell -adapted strain of PPV produced CPE after 12 passages, and maintained stable CPE at the following 10 messages. The one-step growth curve showed that the virus concentration of simultaneous inoculation was higher than that of the step-by-step inoculation, and the proliferation cycle of step-by-step inoculation was shorter. The proliferation ability of PPV strain in different cells showed that CPE appeared first inPK-15, followed by ST, HeLa and MDBK, and the virus concentration was highest in ST, followed byPK-15, MDBK and HeLa. NO proliferation was observed in F81, BHK-21 and Marc-145 cells. These findings lay a material foundation for the basic researches on PPV and the development of vaccine.

  5. Low power proton exchange membrane fuel cell system identification and adaptive control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yee-Pien; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Ma, Ying-Wei [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei (Taiwan); Chang, Hsin-Ping; Weng, Biing-Jyh [Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology (CSIST), Armaments Bureau, M.N.D. (Taiwan)

    2007-02-10

    This paper proposes a systematic method of system identification and control of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. This fuel cell can be used for low-power communication devices involving complex electrochemical reactions of nonlinear and time-varying dynamic properties. From a system point of view, the dynamic model of PEM fuel cell is reduced to a configuration of two inputs, hydrogen and air flow rates, and two outputs, cell voltage and current. The corresponding transfer functions describe linearized subsystem dynamics with finite orders and time-varying parameters, which are expressed as discrete-time auto-regression moving-average with auxiliary input models for system identification by the recursive least square algorithm. In the experiments, a pseudo-random binary sequence of hydrogen or air flow rate is fed to a single fuel cell device to excite its dynamics. By measuring the corresponding output signals, each subsystem transfer function of reduced order is identified, while the unmodeled, higher-order dynamics and disturbances are described by the auxiliary input term. This provides a basis of adaptive control strategy to improve the fuel cell performance in terms of efficiency, as well as transient and steady state specifications. Simulation shows that adaptive controller is robust to the variation of fuel cell system dynamics, and it has proved promising from the experimental results. (author)

  6. A single cell functions as a tissue-specific stem cell and the in vitro niche-forming cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Moumita; Helm, Karen M; Smith, Russell W; Giordanengo, Matthew S; Li, Bilan; Shen, Hongmei; Reynolds, Susan D

    2011-09-01

    Tissue-specific stem cell (TSC) behavior is determined by the stem cell niche. However, delineation of the TSC-niche interaction requires purification of both entities. We reasoned that the niche could be defined by the location of the TSC. We demonstrate that a single CD49f(bright)/Sca1(+)/ALDH(+) basal cell generates rare label-retaining cells and abundant label-diluting cells. Label-retaining and label-diluting cells were located in the rimmed domain of a unique clone type, the rimmed clone. The TSC property of self-renewal was tested by serial passage at clonal density and analysis of clone-forming cell frequency. A single clone could be passaged up to five times and formed only rimmed clones. Thus, rimmed clone formation was a cell-intrinsic property. Differentiation potential was evaluated in air-liquid interface cultures. Homogenous cultures of rimmed clones were highly mitotic but were refractory to standard differentiation signals. However, rimmed clones that were cocultured with unfractionated tracheal cells generated each of the cell types found in the tracheal epithelium. Thus, the default niche is promitotic: Multipotential differentiation requires adaptation of the niche. Because lung TSCs are typically evaluated after injury, the behavior of CD49f(bright)/Sca1(+)/ALDH(+) cells was tested in normal and naphthalene-treated mice. These cells were mitotically active in the normal and repaired epithelium, their proliferation rate increased in response to injury, and they retained label for 34 days. We conclude that the CD49f(bright)/Sca1(+)/ALDH(+) tracheal basal cell is a TSC, that it generates its own niche in vitro, and that it participates in tracheal epithelial homeostasis and repair.

  7. A xylogalacturonan epitope is specifically associated with plant cell detachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; McCartney, L.; Steele-King, C.G.;

    2004-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (LM8) was generated with specificity for xyloglacturonan (XGA) isolated from pea (Pisum sativum L.) testae. Characterization of the LM8 epitope indicates that it is a region of XGA that is highly substituted with xylose. Immunocytochemical analysis indicates that this epitop...... that is specifically associated with a plant cell separation process that results in complete cell detachment....

  8. The lineage-specific evolution of aquaporin gene clusters facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick Nigel Finn

    Full Text Available A major physiological barrier for aquatic organisms adapting to terrestrial life is dessication in the aerial environment. This barrier was nevertheless overcome by the Devonian ancestors of extant Tetrapoda, but the origin of specific molecular mechanisms that solved this water problem remains largely unknown. Here we show that an ancient aquaporin gene cluster evolved specifically in the sarcopterygian lineage, and subsequently diverged into paralogous forms of AQP2, -5, or -6 to mediate water conservation in extant Tetrapoda. To determine the origin of these apomorphic genomic traits, we combined aquaporin sequencing from jawless and jawed vertebrates with broad taxon assembly of >2,000 transcripts amongst 131 deuterostome genomes and developed a model based upon Bayesian inference that traces their convergent roots to stem subfamilies in basal Metazoa and Prokaryota. This approach uncovered an unexpected diversity of aquaporins in every lineage investigated, and revealed that the vertebrate superfamily consists of 17 classes of aquaporins (Aqp0 - Aqp16. The oldest orthologs associated with water conservation in modern Tetrapoda are traced to a cluster of three aqp2-like genes in Actinistia that likely arose >500 Ma through duplication of an aqp0-like gene present in a jawless ancestor. In sea lamprey, we show that aqp0 first arose in a protocluster comprised of a novel aqp14 paralog and a fused aqp01 gene. To corroborate these findings, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of five syntenic nuclear receptor subfamilies, which, together with observations of extensive genome rearrangements, support the coincident loss of ancestral aqp2-like orthologs in Actinopterygii. We thus conclude that the divergence of sarcopterygian-specific aquaporin gene clusters was permissive for the evolution of water conservation mechanisms that facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation.

  9. Rhizobia Indigenous to the Okavango Region in Sub-Saharan Africa: Diversity, Adaptations, and Host Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönemeyer, Jann L; Kulkarni, Ajinkya; Berkelmann, Dirk; Hurek, Thomas; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    The rhizobial community indigenous to the Okavango region has not yet been characterized. The isolation of indigenous rhizobia can provide a basis for the formulation of a rhizobial inoculant. Moreover, their identification and characterization contribute to the general understanding of species distribution and ecology. Isolates were obtained from nodules of local varieties of the pulses cowpea, Bambara groundnut, peanut, hyacinth bean, and common bean. Ninety-one of them were identified by BOX repetitive element PCR (BOX-PCR) and sequence analyses of the 16S-23S rRNA internally transcribed spacer (ITS) and the recA, glnII, rpoB, and nifH genes. A striking geographical distribution was observed. Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi dominated at sampling sites in Angola which were characterized by acid soils and a semihumid climate. Isolates from the semiarid sampling sites in Namibia were more diverse, with most of them being related to Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense and Bradyrhizobium daqingense. Host plant specificity was observed only for hyacinth bean, which was nodulated by rhizobia presumably representing yet-undescribed species. Furthermore, the isolates were characterized with respect to their adaptation to high temperatures, drought, and local host plants. The adaptation experiments revealed that the Namibian isolates shared an exceptionally high temperature tolerance, but none of the isolates showed considerable adaptation to drought. Moreover, the isolates' performance on different local hosts showed variable results, with most Namibian isolates inducing better nodulation on peanut and hyacinth bean than the Angolan strains. The local predominance of distinct genotypes implies that indigenous strains may exhibit a better performance in inoculant formulations.

  10. Comparative proteome profiling of bovine and human Staphylococcus epidermidis strains for screening specifically expressed virulence and adaptation proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljamäki, Pia; Varmanen, Pekka; Kankainen, Matti; Pyörälä, Satu; Karonen, Taru; Iivanainen, Antti; Auvinen, Petri; Paulin, Lars; Laine, Pia K; Taponen, Suvi; Simojoki, Heli; Sukura, Antti; Nyman, Tuula A; Savijoki, Kirsi

    2014-08-01

    The present study reports a comparative proteome cataloging of a bovine mastitis and a human-associated Staphylococcus epidermidis strain with a specific focus on surfome (cell-wall bound and extracellular) proteins. Protein identification by 1DE coupled with LC-MS/MS analyses resulted in 1400 and 1287 proteins from the bovine (PM221) and human (ATCC12228) strains, respectively, covering over 50% of all predicted and more than 30% of all predicted surfome proteins in both strains. Comparison of the identification results suggests elevated levels of proteins involved in adherence, biofilm formation, signal transduction, house-keeping functions, and immune evasion in PM221, whereas ATCC12228 was more effective in expressing host defense evasion proteases, skin adaptation lipases, hemagglutination, and heavy-metal resistance proteins. Phenotypic analyses showed that only PM221 displays protein- and DNA-mediated adherent growth, and that PM221 was more efficient in cleaving tributyrin, a natural compound of milk fat under low CO2 conditions. These findings are in line with the identification data and suggest that distinct expression of lipases and adhesive surfome proteins could lead to the observed phenotypes. This study is the first extensive survey of S. epidermidis proteomes to date, providing several protein candidates to be examined for their roles in adaptation and virulence in vivo. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000404 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000404).

  11. CLAss-Specific Subspace Kernel Representations and Adaptive Margin Slack Minimization for Large Scale Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yinan; Diamantaras, Konstantinos I; McKelvey, Tomas; Kung, Sun-Yuan

    2016-12-07

    In kernel-based classification models, given limited computational power and storage capacity, operations over the full kernel matrix becomes prohibitive. In this paper, we propose a new supervised learning framework using kernel models for sequential data processing. The framework is based on two components that both aim at enhancing the classification capability with a subset selection scheme. The first part is a subspace projection technique in the reproducing kernel Hilbert space using a CLAss-specific Subspace Kernel representation for kernel approximation. In the second part, we propose a novel structural risk minimization algorithm called the adaptive margin slack minimization to iteratively improve the classification accuracy by an adaptive data selection. We motivate each part separately, and then integrate them into learning frameworks for large scale data. We propose two such frameworks: the memory efficient sequential processing for sequential data processing and the parallelized sequential processing for distributed computing with sequential data acquisition. We test our methods on several benchmark data sets and compared with the state-of-the-art techniques to verify the validity of the proposed techniques.

  12. Adaptive Flow Simulation of Turbulence in Subject-Specific Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm on Massively Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Onkar; Jansen, Kenneth; Shephard, Mark; Taylor, Charles

    2007-11-01

    Flow within the healthy human vascular system is typically laminar but diseased conditions can alter the geometry sufficiently to produce transitional/turbulent flows in regions focal (and immediately downstream) of the diseased section. The mean unsteadiness (pulsatile or respiratory cycle) further complicates the situation making traditional turbulence simulation techniques (e.g., Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (RANSS)) suspect. At the other extreme, direct numerical simulation (DNS) while fully appropriate can lead to large computational expense, particularly when the simulations must be done quickly since they are intended to affect the outcome of a medical treatment (e.g., virtual surgical planning). To produce simulations in a clinically relevant time frame requires; 1) adaptive meshing technique that closely matches the desired local mesh resolution in all three directions to the highly anisotropic physical length scales in the flow, 2) efficient solution algorithms, and 3) excellent scaling on massively parallel computers. In this presentation we will demonstrate results for a subject-specific simulation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using stabilized finite element method on anisotropically adapted meshes consisting of O(10^8) elements over O(10^4) processors.

  13. Identification of the Adapter Molecule MTSS1 as a Potential Oncogene-Specific Tumor Suppressor in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirle Schemionek

    Full Text Available The adapter protein metastasis suppressor 1 (MTSS1 is implicated as a tumor suppressor or tumor promoter, depending on the type of solid cancer. Here, we identified Mtss1 expression to be increased in AML subsets with favorable outcome, while suppressed in high risk AML patients. High expression of MTSS1 predicted better clinical outcome of patients with normal-karyotype AML. Mechanistically, MTSS1 expression was negatively regulated by FLT3-ITD signaling but enhanced by the AML1-ETO fusion protein. DNMT3B, a negative regulator of MTSS1, showed strong binding to the MTSS1 promoter in PML-RARA positive but not AML1-ETO positive cells, suggesting that AML1-ETO leads to derepression of MTSS1. Pharmacological treatment of AML cell lines carrying the FLT3-ITD mutation with the specific FLT3 inhibitor PKC-412 caused upregulation of MTSS1. Moreover, treatment of acute promyelocytic cells (APL with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA increased MTSS1 mRNA levels. Taken together, our findings suggest that MTSS1 might have a context-dependent function and could act as a tumor suppressor, which is pharmacologically targetable in AML patients.

  14. A Model of Stimulus-Specific Adaptation in Neuromorphic Analog VLSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mill, R; Sheik, S; Indiveri, G; Denham, S L

    2011-10-01

    Stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA) is a phenomenon observed in neural systems which occurs when the spike count elicited in a single neuron decreases with repetitions of the same stimulus, and recovers when a different stimulus is presented. SSA therefore effectively highlights rare events in stimulus sequences, and suppresses responses to repetitive ones. In this paper we present a model of SSA based on synaptic depression and describe its implementation in neuromorphic analog very-large-scale integration (VLSI). The hardware system is evaluated using biologically realistic spike trains with parameters chosen to reflect those of the stimuli used in physiological experiments. We examine the effect of input parameters and stimulus history upon SSA and show that the trends apparent in the results obtained in silico compare favorably with those observed in biological neurons.

  15. Cell type-specific bipolar cell input to ganglion cells in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, S; Hüser, L; Ondreka, K; Auler, N; Haverkamp, S

    2016-03-01

    Many distinct ganglion cell types, which are the output elements of the retina, were found to encode for specific features of a visual scene such as contrast, color information or movement. The detailed composition of retinal circuits leading to this tuning of retinal ganglion cells, however, is apart from some prominent examples, largely unknown. Here we aimed to investigate if ganglion cell types in the mouse retina receive selective input from specific bipolar cell types or if they sample their synaptic input non-selectively from all bipolar cell types stratifying within their dendritic tree. To address this question we took an anatomical approach and immunolabeled retinae of two transgenic mouse lines (GFP-O and JAM-B) with markers for ribbon synapses and type 2 bipolar cells. We morphologically identified all green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing ganglion cell types, which co-stratified with type 2 bipolar cells and assessed the total number of bipolar input synapses and the proportion of synapses deriving from type 2 bipolar cells. Only JAM-B ganglion cells received synaptic input preferentially from bipolar cell types other than type 2 bipolar cells whereas the other analyzed ganglion cell types sampled their bipolar input most likely from all bipolar cell terminals within their dendritic arbor.

  16. Recent Visual Experience Shapes Visual Processing in Rats through Stimulus-Specific Adaptation and Response Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinken, Kasper; Vogels, Rufin; Op de Beeck, Hans

    2017-03-20

    From an ecological point of view, it is generally suggested that the main goal of vision in rats and mice is navigation and (aerial) predator evasion [1-3]. The latter requires fast and accurate detection of a change in the visual environment. An outstanding question is whether there are mechanisms in the rodent visual system that would support and facilitate visual change detection. An experimental protocol frequently used to investigate change detection in humans is the oddball paradigm, in which a rare, unexpected stimulus is presented in a train of stimulus repetitions [4]. A popular "predictive coding" theory of cortical responses states that neural responses should decrease for expected sensory input and increase for unexpected input [5, 6]. Despite evidence for response suppression and enhancement in noninvasive scalp recordings in humans with this paradigm [7, 8], it has proven challenging to observe both phenomena in invasive action potential recordings in other animals [9-11]. During a visual oddball experiment, we recorded multi-unit spiking activity in rat primary visual cortex (V1) and latero-intermediate area (LI), which is a higher area of the rodent ventral visual stream. In rat V1, there was only evidence for response suppression related to stimulus-specific adaptation, and not for response enhancement. However, higher up in area LI, spiking activity showed clear surprise-based response enhancement in addition to stimulus-specific adaptation. These results show that neural responses along the rat ventral visual stream become increasingly sensitive to changes in the visual environment, suggesting a system specialized in the detection of unexpected events.

  17. Peripheral NK cell phenotypes: multiple changing of faces of an adapting, developing cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perussia, Bice; Chen, Yingying; Loza, Matthew J

    2005-02-01

    We have defined the existence of developmental relationships among human peripheral NK cells with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics. These findings closely parallel the changes that occur in vivo during NK cell development, and in vitro in experimental culture systems supporting NK cell generation from hematopoietic progenitors. These new insights provide a simplified framework to understand NK cell immunobiology and the cellular bases for their roles in innate immunity, initiation and maintenance of immune responses via regulation of adaptive and accessory cell functions, and immune pathologies.

  18. Simultaneous expression of regulatory genes associated with specific drought-adaptive traits improves drought adaptation in peanut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Vemanna S; Swetha, Thavarekere N; Sheela, Shekarappa H; Babitha, Chandrashekar K; Rohini, Sreevathsa; Reddy, Malireddy K; Tuteja, Narendra; Reddy, Chandrashekar P; Prasad, Trichi Ganesh; Udayakumar, Makarla

    2016-03-01

    Adaptation of crops to drought-prone rain-fed conditions can be achieved by improving plant traits such as efficient water mining (by superior root characters) and cellular-level tolerance mechanisms. Pyramiding these drought-adaptive traits by simultaneous expression of genes regulating drought-adaptive mechanisms has phenomenal relevance in improving stress tolerance. In this study, we provide evidence that peanut transgenic plants expressing Alfalfa zinc finger 1 (Alfin1), a root growth-associated transcription factor gene, Pennisetum glaucum heat-shock factor (PgHSF4) and Pea DNA helicase (PDH45) involved in protein turnover and protection showed improved tolerance, higher growth and productivity under drought stress conditions. Stable integration of all the transgenes was noticed in transgenic lines. The transgenic lines showed higher root growth, cooler crop canopy air temperature difference (less CCATD) and higher relative water content (RWC) under drought stress. Low proline levels in transgenic lines substantiate the maintenance of higher water status. The survival and recovery of transgenic lines was significantly higher under gradual moisture stress conditions with higher biomass. Transgenic lines also showed significant tolerance to ethrel-induced senescence and methyl viologen-induced oxidative stress. Several stress-responsive genes such as heat-shock proteins (HSPs), RING box protein-1 (RBX1), Aldose reductase, late embryogenesis abundant-5 (LEA5) and proline-rich protein-2 (PRP2), a gene involved in root growth, showed enhanced expression under stress in transgenic lines. Thus, the simultaneous expression of regulatory genes contributing for drought-adaptive traits can improve crop adaptation and productivity under water-limited conditions.

  19. Generation of antigen-specific T cell immunity through T cell receptor gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coccoris, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells often escape the attack of immune cells because they originate from self-tissue. Through T cell receptor gene transfer it is possible to equip peripheral T cells with a desired specificity, and this strategy may be useful to generate tumor-specific T cells for the treatment of cancer in

  20. Functional adaptation of the human β-cells after frequent exposure to noradrenaline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    KEY POINTS: Trained people produce less insulin than untrained; there is an adaptation of the insulin-producing cells to the trained state. The mechanism behind this adaptation is not known, but some sort of memory must be introduced into the insulin-producing cells. Here it is shown...... in noradrenaline is most likely the stimulus that introduces a memory in the insulin-producing cells. ABSTRACT: Physical training decreases glucose- and arginine-stimulated insulin secretion. The mechanism by which the pancreatic β-cells adapt to the training status of the individual is not known. We hypothesized...... the adaptation of the β-cells seen in trained people....

  1. Freedom of expression: cell-type-specific gene profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Leo; Cheetham, Seth W; Brand, Andrea H

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate and behavior are results of differential gene regulation, making techniques to profile gene expression in specific cell types highly desirable. Many methods now enable investigation at the DNA, RNA and protein level. This review introduces the most recent and popular techniques, and discusses key issues influencing the choice between these such as ease, cost and applicability of information gained. Interdisciplinary collaborations will no doubt contribute further advances, including not just in single cell type but single-cell expression profiling.

  2. The selection and function of cell type-specific enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Sven; Romanoski, Casey E; Benner, Christopher; Glass, Christopher K

    2015-03-01

    The human body contains several hundred cell types, all of which share the same genome. In metazoans, much of the regulatory code that drives cell type-specific gene expression is located in distal elements called enhancers. Although mammalian genomes contain millions of potential enhancers, only a small subset of them is active in a given cell type. Cell type-specific enhancer selection involves the binding of lineage-determining transcription factors that prime enhancers. Signal-dependent transcription factors bind to primed enhancers, which enables these broadly expressed factors to regulate gene expression in a cell type-specific manner. The expression of genes that specify cell type identity and function is associated with densely spaced clusters of active enhancers known as super-enhancers. The functions of enhancers and super-enhancers are influenced by, and affect, higher-order genomic organization.

  3. Antigen-specific B cells reactivate an effective cytotoxic T cell response against phagocytosed Salmonella through cross-presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle de Wit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The eradication of facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens, like Salmonella typhi, requires the concerted action of both the humoral immune response and the cytotoxic CD8(+ T cell response. Dendritic cells (DCs are considered to orchestrate the cytotoxic CD8(+ T cell response via cross-presentation of bacterial antigens onto MHC class I molecules. Cross-presentation of Salmonella by DCs however, is accompanied by the induction of apoptosis in the DCs. Besides antibody production, B cells are required to clear Salmonella infection for other unknown reasons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that Salmonella-specific B cells that phagocytose Salmonella upon BCR-ligation reactivate human memory CD8(+ T cells via cross-presentation yielding a Salmonella-specific cytotoxic T cell response. The reactivation of CD8(+ T cells is dependent on CD4(+ T cell help. Unlike the DCs, B cell-mediated cross-presentation of Salmonella does not coincide with apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: B cells form a new player in the activation of the cytotoxic effector arm of the immune response and the generation of effective adaptive immunity in Salmonella infection.

  4. Pancreatic β- and α-cell adaptation in response to metabolic changes

    OpenAIRE

    Ellenbroek, Johanne Hendrike (Rianne)

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells are essential to maintain blood glucose levels within a narrow range. β-cells can adapt to an increased insulin demand by enhancing insulin secretion via increased β-cell function and/or increased β-cell mass. Inadequate β-cell adaptation leads to hyperglycemia and eventually diabetes mellitus. Therefore, it is critical to understand how the β-cell mass is regulated. We investigated β- and α-cell adaptation in response to different metabolic changes. We fo...

  5. Glow in the Dark: Fluorescent Proteins as Cell and Tissue-Specific Markers in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenzislava Ckurshumova; Adriana E. Caragea; Rochelle S. Goldstein; Thomas Berleth

    2011-01-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants,fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types,to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes,and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes.Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes.The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms.In developmental studies,the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical,where morphological markers of tissues,cell types,or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable.In this review,we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development.

  6. Three-dimensional hierarchical cultivation of human skin cells on bio-adaptive hybrid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planz, Viktoria; Seif, Salem; Atchison, Jennifer S; Vukosavljevic, Branko; Sparenberg, Lisa; Kroner, Elmar; Windbergs, Maike

    2016-07-11

    The human skin comprises a complex multi-scale layered structure with hierarchical organization of different cells within the extracellular matrix (ECM). This supportive fiber-reinforced structure provides a dynamically changing microenvironment with specific topographical, mechanical and biochemical cell recognition sites to facilitate cell attachment and proliferation. Current advances in developing artificial matrices for cultivation of human cells concentrate on surface functionalizing of biocompatible materials with different biomolecules like growth factors to enhance cell attachment. However, an often neglected aspect for efficient modulation of cell-matrix interactions is posed by the mechanical characteristics of such artificial matrices. To address this issue, we fabricated biocompatible hybrid fibers simulating the complex biomechanical characteristics of native ECM in human skin. Subsequently, we analyzed interactions of such fibers with human skin cells focusing on the identification of key fiber characteristics for optimized cell-matrix interactions. We successfully identified the mediating effect of bio-adaptive elasto-plastic stiffness paired with hydrophilic surface properties as key factors for cell attachment and proliferation, thus elucidating the synergistic role of these parameters to induce cellular responses. Co-cultivation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes on such fiber mats representing the specific cells in dermis and epidermis resulted in a hierarchical organization of dermal and epidermal tissue layers. In addition, terminal differentiation of keratinocytes at the air interface was observed. These findings provide valuable new insights into cell behaviour in three-dimensional structures and cell-material interactions which can be used for rational development of bio-inspired functional materials for advanced biomedical applications.

  7. Reversible adaptive plasticity: A mechanism for neuroblastoma cell heterogeneity and chemo-resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina eChakrabarti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel form of tumor cell plasticity characterized by reversible adaptive plasticity in murine and human neuroblastoma. Two cellular phenotypes were defined by their ability to exhibit adhered, anchorage dependent (AD or sphere forming, anchorage independent (AI growth. The tumor cells could transition back and forth between the two phenotypes and the transition was dependent on the culture conditions. Both cell phenotypes exhibited stem-like features such as expression of nestin, self-renewal capacity and mesenchymal differentiation potential. The AI tumorspheres were found to be more resistant to chemotherapy and proliferated slower in vitro compared to the AD cells. Identification of specific molecular markers like MAP2, β-catenin and PDGFRβ enabled us to characterize and observe both phenotypes in established mouse tumors. Irrespective of the phenotype originally implanted in mice, tumors grown in vivo show phenotypic heterogeneity in molecular marker signatures and are indistinguishable in growth or histologic appearance. Similar molecular marker heterogeneity was demonstrated in primary human tumor specimens. Chemotherapy or growth factor receptor inhibition slowed tumor growth in mice and promoted initial loss of AD or AI heterogeneity, respectively. Simultaneous targeting of both phenotypes led to further tumor growth delay with emergence of new unique phenotypes. Our results demonstrate that neuroblastoma cells are plastic, dynamic and may optimize their ability to survive by changing their phenotype. Phenotypic switching appears to be an adaptive mechanism to unfavorable selection pressure and could explain the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of neuroblastoma.

  8. Joint-Angle Specific Strength Adaptations Influence Improvements in Power in Highly Trained Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Matthew R.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of training at different ranges of motion during the squat exercise on joint-angle specific strength adaptations. Methods. Twenty eight men were randomly assigned to one of three training groups, differing only in the depth of squats (quarter squat, half squat, and full squat performed in 16-week training intervention. Strength measures were conducted in the back squat pre-, mid-, and post-training at all three depths. Vertical jump and 40-yard sprint time were also measured. Results. Individuals in the quarter and full squat training groups improved significantly more at the specific depth at which they trained when compared to the other two groups (p < 0.05. Jump height and sprint speed improved in all groups (p < 0.05; however, the quarter squat had the greatest transfer to both outcomes. Conclusions. Consistently including quarter squats in workouts aimed at maximizing speed and jumping power can result in greater improvements.

  9. Early specification of dopaminergic phenotype during ES cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Meng

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding how lineage choices are made during embryonic stem (ES cell differentiation is critical for harnessing strategies for controlled production of therapeutic somatic cell types for cell transplantation and pharmaceutical drug screens. The in vitro generation of dopaminergic neurons, the type of cells lost in Parkinson's disease patients' brains, requires the inductive molecules sonic hedgehog and FGF8, or an unknown stromal cell derived inducing activity (SDIA. However, the exact identity of the responding cells and the timing of inductive activity that specify a dopaminergic fate in neural stem/progenitors still remain elusive. Results Using ES cells carrying a neuroepithelial cell specific vital reporter (Sox1-GFP and FACS purification of Sox1-GFP neural progenitors, we have investigated the temporal aspect of SDIA mediated dopaminergic neuron specification during ES cell differentiation. Our results establish that SDIA induces a dopaminergic neuron fate in nascent neural stem or progenitor cells at, or prior to, Sox1 expression and does not appear to have further instructive role or neurotrophic activity during late neuronal differentiation of neural precursors. Furthermore, we show that dopaminergic neurons could be produced efficiently in a monolayer differentiation paradigm independent of SDIA activity or exogenous signalling molecules. In this case, the competence for dopaminergic neuron differentiation is also established at the level of Sox1 expression. Conclusion Dopaminergic neurons are specified early during mouse ES cell differentiation. The subtype specification seems to be tightly linked with the acquisition of a pan neuroectoderm fate.

  10. Detection of Avian Antigen-Specific T Cells Induced by Viral Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen. There is a particular interest in developing robust high-throughput assays as chicken vaccine trials usually comprise many individuals. In many respects, the avian immune system differs from the mammalian, and T cell assessment protocols must be adjusted accordingly to account for, e.g., differences in leukocyte subsets.The carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) method described in this chapter has been adapted to chicken cells. In this test, cells of interest are stained with CFSE. The succinimidyl ester group covalently binds to cellular amines forming fluorescent conjugates that are retained in the cells even throughout division. This leads to daughter cells containing half the fluorescence of their parents. When lymphocytes are loaded with CFSE prior to ex vivo stimulation with specific antigen, the measurement of serial halving of its fluorescence by flow cytometry identifies the cells responding to the stimulation. This method has been successfully applied to studies of chicken antigen-specific T cells.

  11. Culture adaptation alters transcriptional hierarchies among single human embryonic stem cells reflecting altered patterns of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Paul J; Au-Young, Janice K; Dadi, SriVidya; Keys, David N; Harrison, Neil J; Jones, Mark; Soneji, Shamit; Enver, Tariq; Sherlock, Jon K; Andrews, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    We have used single cell transcriptome analysis to re-examine the substates of early passage, karyotypically Normal, and late passage, karyotypically Abnormal ('Culture Adapted') human embryonic stem cells characterized by differential expression of the cell surface marker antigen, SSEA3. The results confirmed that culture adaptation is associated with alterations to the dynamics of the SSEA3(+) and SSEA3(-) substates of these cells, with SSEA3(-) Adapted cells remaining within the stem cell compartment whereas the SSEA3(-) Normal cells appear to have differentiated. However, the single cell data reveal that these substates are characterized by further heterogeneity that changes on culture adaptation. Notably the Adapted population includes cells with a transcriptome substate suggestive of a shift to a more naïve-like phenotype in contrast to the cells of the Normal population. Further, a subset of the Normal SSEA3(+) cells expresses genes typical of endoderm differentiation, despite also expressing the undifferentiated stem cell genes, POU5F1 (OCT4) and NANOG, whereas such apparently lineage-primed cells are absent from the Adapted population. These results suggest that the selective growth advantage gained by genetically variant, culture adapted human embryonic stem cells may derive in part from a changed substate structure that influences their propensity for differentiation.

  12. Mechanisms of cell protection by adaptation to chronic and acute hypoxia: molecular biology and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbucci, G G; Marchi, A; Lettieri, B; Luongo, C

    2005-11-01

    Several experimental and clinical studies have shown that specific biochemical and molecular pathways are involved in the myocardial and skeletal muscle cell tolerance to acute and/or chronic hypoxic injury. A number of different factors were proposed to play a role in the preservation of tissue viability, but to a few of them a pivotal role in the adaptive mechanisms to hypoxic stimuli could be ascribed. Starting from the observation that mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) enzymic complexes are the targets of oxygen reduced availability, most of data are compatible with a mechanism of enzymic adaptation in which the nitric oxide (NO) generation plays the major role. If the partial and reversible NO-induced inhibition of ETC enzymic complexes represents the most rapid and prominent adaptive mechanism in counteracting the damaging effects of hypoxia, the sarcolemmal and mitochondrial K+(ATP) channels activation results to be closely involved in cytoprotection. This process is depending on protein kinase C (PKC) isoform activation triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion and Ca++ overload. It is well known that all these factors are present in hypoxia-induced oxidative damage and mitochondrial Ca++ altered pools represent powerful stimuli in the damaging processes. The activation of mitochondrial K+(ATP) channels leads to a significant reduction of Ca++ influx and attenuation of mitochondrial Ca++ overload. Closely linked to these adaptive changes signal transduction pathways are involved in the nuclear DNA damage and repair mechanisms. On this context, an essential role is played by the hypoxia-induced factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) in terms of key transcription factor involved in oxygen-dependent gene regulation. The knowledge of the biochemical and molecular sequences involved in these adaptive processes call for a re-evaluation of the therapeutic approach to hypoxia-induced pathologies. On this light

  13. The effects of varying resistance-training loads on intermediate- and high-velocity-specific adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K; Bishop, P; Hunter, G; Fleisig, G

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in velocity-specific adaptations in moderately resistance-trained athletes who trained with either low or high resistances. The study used tests of sport-specific skills across an intermediate- to high-velocity spectrum. Thirty NCAA Division I baseball players were randomly assigned to either a low-resistance (40-60% 1 repetition maximum [1RM]) training group or a high-resistance (70-90% 1RM) training group. Both of the training groups intended to maximallv accelerate each repetition during the concentric phase (IMCA). The 10 weeks of training consisted of 4 training sessions a week using basic core exercises. Peak force, velocity, and power were evaluated during set angle and depth jumps as well as weighted jumps using 30 and 50% 1RM. Squat 1RMs were also tested. Although no interactions for any of the jump tests were found, trends supported the hypothesis of velocity-specific training. Percentage gains suggest that the combined use of heavier training loads (70-90% 1RM) and IMCA tend to increase peak force in the lower-body leg and hip extensors. Trends also show that the combined use of lighter training loads (40-60% 1RM) and IMCA tend to increase peak power and peak velocity in the lower-body leg and hip extensors. The high-resistance group improved squats more than the low-resistance group (p IMCA to increase 1RM strength in the lower bodies of resistance-trained athletes.

  14. Muscles-Specific MicroRNA-206 Targets Multiple Components in Dystrophic Skeletal Muscle Representing Beneficial Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirouche, Adel; Jahnke, Vanessa E; Lunde, John A; Koulmann, Nathalie; Freyssenet, Damien G; Jasmin, Bernard J

    2016-12-21

    Over the last several years, converging lines of evidence have indicated that miR-206 plays a pivotal role in promoting muscle differentiation and regeneration, thereby potentially impacting positively on the progression of neuromuscular disorders including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Despite several studies showing the regulatory function of miR-206 on target mRNAs in skeletal muscle cells, the effects of overexpression of miR-206 in dystrophic muscles remain to be established. Here, we found that miR-206 overexpression in mdx mouse muscles simultaneously targets multiple mRNAs and proteins implicated in satellite cell differentiation, muscle regeneration, and at the neuromuscular junction. Overexpression of miR-206 also increased the levels of several muscle-specific mRNAs/proteins while enhancing utrophin A expression at the sarcolemma. Finally, we also observed that the increase expression of miR-206 in dystrophin-deficient mouse muscle decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and infiltration of macrophages. Taken together, our results show that miR-206 acts as a pleiotropic regulator that targets multiple key mRNAs and proteins expected to provide beneficial adaptations in dystrophic muscle, thus highlighting its therapeutic potential for DMD.

  15. Species-Specific Adaptations of Trypanosome Morphology and Motility to the Mammalian Host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel L Bargul

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes thrive in the bloodstream and tissue spaces of a wide range of mammalian hosts. Infections of cattle cause an enormous socio-economic burden in sub-Saharan Africa. A hallmark of the trypanosome lifestyle is the flagellate's incessant motion. This work details the cell motility behavior of the four livestock-parasites Trypanosoma vivax, T. brucei, T. evansi and T. congolense. The trypanosomes feature distinct swimming patterns, speeds and flagellar wave frequencies, although the basic mechanism of flagellar propulsion is conserved, as is shown by extended single flagellar beat analyses. Three-dimensional analyses of the trypanosomes expose a high degree of dynamic pleomorphism, typified by the 'cellular waveform'. This is a product of the flagellar oscillation, the chirality of the flagellum attachment and the stiffness of the trypanosome cell body. The waveforms are characteristic for each trypanosome species and are influenced by changes of the microenvironment, such as differences in viscosity and the presence of confining obstacles. The distinct cellular waveforms may be reflective of the actual anatomical niches the parasites populate within their mammalian host. T. vivax displays waveforms optimally aligned to the topology of the bloodstream, while the two subspecies T. brucei and T. evansi feature distinct cellular waveforms, both additionally adapted to motion in more confined environments such as tissue spaces. T. congolense reveals a small and stiff waveform, which makes these parasites weak swimmers and destined for cell adherence in low flow areas of the circulation. Thus, our experiments show that the differential dissemination and annidation of trypanosomes in their mammalian hosts may depend on the distinct swimming capabilities of the parasites.

  16. Temporal properties of pattern adaptation of relay cells in the lateral geniculate nucleus of cats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The temporal properties of pattern adaptation of relay cells induced by repeated sinusoidal drifting grating were investigated in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) of cats. The results showed that the response amplitude declined and the response latency prolonged when relay cells were pattern-adapted in dLGN, like the similar fmdings in visual cortex. However, in contrast to the result in cortex,the response phase of relay cells advanced. This implies that an inhibition with relatively long latency may participate in the pattern adaptation of dLGN cells and the adaptation in dLGN may be via a mechanism different from that of visual cortex.``

  17. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible cells and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V; Burnett, John C; Rossi, John J

    2015-03-19

    The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T cells and macrophages that serves as a coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here, we combine the live-cell-based SELEX with high-throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as small interfering RNA [siRNA] delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5-expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4(+) T cells with a nanomolar inhibitory concentration 50%. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5-expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties.

  18. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  19. Type I interferon suppresses virus-specific B cell responses by modulating CD8+ T cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseman, E. Ashley; Wu, Tuoqi; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have established a role for T cells in resolving persistent viral infections, yet emerging evidence indicates that both T and B cells are required to control some viruses. During persistent infection, a marked lag or failure to generate neutralizing antibodies is commonly observed and likely contributes to an inability to control certain pathogens. Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) as a model, we have examined how a persistent viral infection can suppress neutralizing humoral immunity. By tracking the fate of virus-specific B cells in vivo, we report that LCMV-specific B cells were rapidly deleted within a few days of persistent infection, and this deletion was completely reversed by blockade of type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling. Early interference with IFN-I signaling promoted survival and differentiation of LCMV-specific B cells, which accelerated the generation of neutralizing antibodies. This marked improvement in antiviral humoral immunity did not rely on the cessation of IFN-I signaling in B cells but on alterations in the virus-specific CD8+ T cell response. Using two-photon microscopy and in vivo calcium imaging, we observed that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) productively engaged and killed LCMV-specific B cells in a perforin-dependent manner within the first few days of infection. Blockade of IFN-I signaling protected LCMV-specific B cells by promoting CTL dysfunction. Therapeutic manipulation of this pathway may facilitate efforts to promote humoral immunity during persistent viral infection in humans. Our findings illustrate how events that occur early after infection can disturb the resultant adaptive response and contribute to viral persistence.

  20. Proteome adaptation in cell reprogramming proceeds via distinct transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevento, Marco; Tonge, Peter D; Puri, Mira C; Hussein, Samer M I; Cloonan, Nicole; Wood, David L; Grimmond, Sean M; Nagy, Andras; Munoz, Javier; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-12-10

    The ectopic expression of Oct4, Klf4, c-Myc and Sox2 (OKMS) transcription factors allows reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The reprogramming process, which involves a complex network of molecular events, is not yet fully characterized. Here we perform a quantitative mass spectrometry-based analysis to probe in-depth dynamic proteome changes during somatic cell reprogramming. Our data reveal defined waves of proteome resetting, with the first wave occurring 48 h after the activation of the reprogramming transgenes and involving specific biological processes linked to the c-Myc transcriptional network. A second wave of proteome reorganization occurs in a later stage of reprogramming, where we characterize the proteome of two distinct pluripotent cellular populations. In addition, the overlay of our proteome resource with parallel generated -omics data is explored to identify post-transcriptionally regulated proteins involved in key steps during reprogramming.

  1. Stem cell lineage specification: you become what you eat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folmes, Clifford D L; Terzic, Andre

    2014-09-02

    Nutrient availability and intermediate metabolism are increasingly recognized to govern stem cell behavior. Oburoglu et al. (2014) now demonstrate that glutamine- and glucose-dependent nucleotide synthesis segregate erythroid versus myeloid differentiation during hematopoietic stem cell specification, implicating a metabolism-centric regulation of lineage choices.

  2. Selection of metastatic breast cancer cells based on adaptability of their metabolic state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balraj Singh

    Full Text Available A small subpopulation of highly adaptable breast cancer cells within a vastly heterogeneous population drives cancer metastasis. Here we describe a function-based strategy for selecting rare cancer cells that are highly adaptable and drive malignancy. Although cancer cells are dependent on certain nutrients, e.g., glucose and glutamine, we hypothesized that the adaptable cancer cells that drive malignancy must possess an adaptable metabolic state and that such cells could be identified using a robust selection strategy. As expected, more than 99.99% of cells died upon glutamine withdrawal from the aggressive breast cancer cell line SUM149. The rare cells that survived and proliferated without glutamine were highly adaptable, as judged by additional robust adaptability assays involving prolonged cell culture without glucose or serum. We were successful in isolating rare metabolically plastic glutamine-independent (Gln-ind variants from several aggressive breast cancer cell lines that we tested. The Gln-ind cells overexpressed cyclooxygenase-2, an indicator of tumor aggressiveness, and they were able to adjust their glutaminase level to suit glutamine availability. The Gln-ind cells were anchorage-independent, resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs doxorubicin and paclitaxel, and resistant to a high concentration of a COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The number of cells being able to adapt to non-availability of glutamine increased upon prior selection of cells for resistance to chemotherapy drugs or resistance to celecoxib, further supporting a linkage between cellular adaptability and therapeutic resistance. Gln-ind cells showed indications of oxidative stress, and they produced cadherin11 and vimentin, indicators of mesenchymal phenotype. Gln-ind cells were more tumorigenic and more metastatic in nude mice than the parental cell line as judged by incidence and time of occurrence. As we decreased the number of cancer cells in xenografts, lung metastasis

  3. Strategies for adaptation of mAb-producing CHO cells to serum-free medium

    OpenAIRE

    Costa A; Rodrigues M.; Henriques Mariana; Oliveira Rosário; Azeredo Joana

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale production of biopharmaceuticals commonly requires the use of serum-free medium, for safety and cost reasons. However, serum is essential to most mammalian cells growth, and its removal implies a very time-consuming process for cell adaptation. Thus, the aim of the study was to evaluate different strategies for cell adaptation to serum-free medium. Three cell types were used to assess the impact of transfection on adaptation: one common CHO-K1 cell line and two CHO-K1 cells tr...

  4. Adaptive and Pathogenic Responses to Stress by Stem Cells during Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Rappolee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular stress is the basis of a dose-dependent continuum of responses leading to adaptive health or pathogenesis. For all cells, stress leads to reduction in macromolecular synthesis by shared pathways and tissue and stress-specific homeostatic mechanisms. For stem cells during embryonic, fetal, and placental development, higher exposures of stress lead to decreased anabolism, macromolecular synthesis and cell proliferation. Coupled with diminished stem cell proliferation is a stress-induced differentiation which generates minimal necessary function by producing more differentiated product/cell. This compensatory differentiation is accompanied by a second strategy to insure organismal survival as multipotent and pluripotent stem cells differentiate into the lineages in their repertoire. During stressed differentiation, the first lineage in the repertoire is increased and later lineages are suppressed, thus prioritized differentiation occurs. Compensatory and prioritized differentiation is regulated by at least two types of stress enzymes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK which mediates loss of nuclear potency factors and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK that does not. SAPK mediates an increase in the first essential lineage and decreases in later lineages in placental stem cells. The clinical significance of compensatory and prioritized differentiation is that stem cell pools are depleted and imbalanced differentiation leads to gestational diseases and long term postnatal pathologies.

  5. Adaptive and Pathogenic Responses to Stress by Stem Cells during Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Ladan; Xie, Yufen; Rappolee, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stress is the basis of a dose-dependent continuum of responses leading to adaptive health or pathogenesis. For all cells, stress leads to reduction in macromolecular synthesis by shared pathways and tissue and stress-specific homeostatic mechanisms. For stem cells during embryonic, fetal, and placental development, higher exposures of stress lead to decreased anabolism, macromolecular synthesis and cell proliferation. Coupled with diminished stem cell proliferation is a stress-induced differentiation which generates minimal necessary function by producing more differentiated product/cell. This compensatory differentiation is accompanied by a second strategy to insure organismal survival as multipotent and pluripotent stem cells differentiate into the lineages in their repertoire. During stressed differentiation, the first lineage in the repertoire is increased and later lineages are suppressed, thus prioritized differentiation occurs. Compensatory and prioritized differentiation is regulated by at least two types of stress enzymes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) which mediates loss of nuclear potency factors and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) that does not. SAPK mediates an increase in the first essential lineage and decreases in later lineages in placental stem cells. The clinical significance of compensatory and prioritized differentiation is that stem cell pools are depleted and imbalanced differentiation leads to gestational diseases and long term postnatal pathologies.

  6. An animal model of adult T-cell leukemia: humanized mice with HTLV-1-specific immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, Kenta; Xun, Runze; Tei, Mami; Ueno, Takaharu; Tanaka, Masakazu; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-16

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is causally associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy with a poor prognosis. To elucidate ATL pathogenesis in vivo, a variety of animal models have been established; however, the mechanisms driving this disorder remain poorly understood due to deficiencies in each of these animal models. Here, we report a novel HTLV-1-infected humanized mouse model generated by intra-bone marrow injection of human CD133(+) stem cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγc null (NOG) mice (IBMI-huNOG mice). Upon infection, the number of CD4(+) human T cells in the periphery increased rapidly, and atypical lymphocytes with lobulated nuclei resembling ATL-specific flower cells were observed 4 to 5 months after infection. Proliferation was seen in both CD25(-) and CD25(+) CD4 T cells with identical proviral integration sites; however, a limited number of CD25(+)-infected T-cell clones eventually dominated, indicating an association between clonal selection of infected T cells and expression of CD25. Additionally, HTLV-1-specific adaptive immune responses were induced in infected mice and might be involved in the control of HTLV-1-infected cells. Thus, the HTLV-1-infected IBMI-huNOG mouse model successfully recapitulated the development of ATL and may serve as an important tool for investigating in vivo mechanisms of ATL leukemogenesis and evaluating anti-ATL drug and vaccine candidates.

  7. In Vitro Generation of Antigen-Specific T Cells from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Antigen-Specific T Cell Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from T lymphocyte (T-iPS cells) preserve the T cell receptor (TCR) α and β gene rearrangements identical to the original T cell clone. Re-differentiated CD8 single positive αβ T cells from the T-iPS cells exhibited antigen-specific cytotoxicity, improved proliferative response, and elongation of telomere indicating rejuvenation of antigen specific T cell immunity in vitro. To regenerate antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), first, we have optimized a method for reprogramming-resistant CD8 T cell clones into T-iPS cells by using sendaiviral vectors. Second, we have optimized stepwise differentiation methods for inducing hematopoietic progenitor cells, T cell progenitors, and functionally matured CD8 single positive CTL. These protocols provide useful in vitro tools and models both for research of antigen-specific T cell immunotherapy and for research of normal and pathological thymopoiesis.

  8. Epitope-Specific Vaccination Limits Clonal Expansion of Heterologous Naive T Cells during Viral Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lexus R. Johnson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite robust secondary T cell expansion primed by vaccination, the impact on primary immune responses to heterotypic antigens remains undefined. Here we show that secondary expansion of epitope-specific memory CD8+ T cells primed by prior infection with recombinant pathogens limits the primary expansion of naive CD8+ T cells with specificity to new heterologous antigens, dampening protective immunity against subsequent pathogen challenge. The degree of naive T cell repression directly paralleled the magnitude of the recall response. Suppressed primary T cell priming reflects competition for antigen accessibility, since clonal expansion was not inhibited if the primary and secondary epitopes were expressed on different dendritic cells. Interestingly, robust recall responses did not impact antigen-specific NK cells, suggesting that adaptive and innate lymphocyte responses possess different activation requirements or occur in distinct anatomical locations. These findings have important implications in pathogen vaccination strategies that depend on the targeting of multiple T cell epitopes.

  9. Efficient Culture Adaptation of Hepatitis C Virus Recombinants with Genotype-Specific Core-NS2 by Using Previously Identified Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels Kasper Høyer; Gottwein, Judith M; Carlsen, Thomas H R;

    2011-01-01

    ) but not to ED43 (4a). The mutations permitting robust virus production in Huh7.5 cells had no apparent effect on viral replication but allowed efficient assembly of intracellular infectious HCV for adapted novel or previously developed recombinants. In conclusion, previously identified mutations permitted......Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of chronic liver disease, and interferon-based therapy cures only 40 to 80% of patients, depending on HCV genotype. Research was accelerated by genotype 2a (strain JFH1) infectious cell culture systems. We previously developed viable JFH1-based...... recombinants encoding the structural proteins (core, E1, E2), p7, and NS2 of prototype isolates of the seven major HCV genotypes; most recombinants required adaptive mutations. To enable genotype-, subtype-, and isolate-specific studies, we developed efficient core-NS2 recombinants from additional genotype 1a...

  10. Underground Adaptation to a Hostile Environment: Acute Myeloid Leukemia vs. Natural Killer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulphy, Nicolas; Chrétien, Anne-Sophie; Khaznadar, Zena; Fauriat, Cyril; Nanbakhsh, Arash; Caignard, Anne; Chouaib, Salem; Olive, Daniel; Toubert, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies which incidence increases with age. The disease affects the differentiation of hematopoietic stem or precursor cells in the bone marrow and can be related to abnormal cytogenetic and/or specific mutational patterns. AML blasts can be sensitive to natural killer (NK) cell antitumor response. However, NK cells are frequently defective in AML patients leading to tumor escape. NK cell defects affect not only the expression of the activating NK receptors, including the natural cytotoxicity receptors, the NK group 2, member D, and the DNAX accessory molecule-1, but also cytotoxicity and IFN-γ release. Such perturbations in NK cell physiology could be related to the adaptation of the AML to the immune pressure and more generally to patient’s clinical features. Various mechanisms are potentially involved in the inhibition of NK-cell functions in AML, including defects in the normal lymphopoiesis, reduced expression of activating receptors through cell-to-cell contacts, and production of immunosuppressive soluble agents by leukemic blasts. Therefore, the continuous cross-talk between AML and NK cells participates to the leukemia immune escape and eventually to patient’s relapse. Methods to restore or stimulate NK cells seem to be attractive strategies to treat patients once the complete remission is achieved. Moreover, our capacity in stimulating the NK cell functions could lead to the development of preemptive strategies to eliminate leukemia-initiating cells before the emergence of the disease in elderly individuals presenting preleukemic mutations in hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:27014273

  11. Inherited adaptation of genome-rewired cells in response to a challenging environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Lior; Stolovicki, Elad; Haziz, Efrat; Braun, Erez

    2010-01-01

    Despite their evolutionary significance, little is known about the adaptation dynamics of genomically rewired cells in evolution. We have confronted yeast cells carrying a rewired regulatory circuit with a severe and unforeseen challenge. The essential HIS3 gene from the histidine biosynthesis pathway was placed under the exclusive regulation of the galactose utilization system. Glucose containing medium strongly represses the GAL genes including HIS3 and these rewired cells are required to operate this essential gene. We show here that although there were no adapted cells prior to the encounter with glucose, a large fraction of cells adapted to grow in this medium and this adaptation was stably inherited. The adaptation relied on individual cells that switched into an adapted state and, thus, the adaptation was due to a response of many individual cells to the change in environment and not due to selection of rare advantageous phenotypes. The adaptation of numerous individual cells by heritable phenotypic switching in response to a challenge extends the common evolutionary framework and attests to the adaptive potential of regulatory circuits. PMID:20811567

  12. Adaptive Remodeling of the Bacterial Proteome by Specific Ribosomal Modification Regulates Pseudomonas Infection and Niche Colonisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Richard H; Grenga, Lucia; Saalbach, Gerhard; Howat, Alexandra M; Pfeilmeier, Sebastian; Trampari, Eleftheria; Malone, Jacob G

    2016-02-01

    Post-transcriptional control of protein abundance is a highly important, underexplored regulatory process by which organisms respond to their environments. Here we describe an important and previously unidentified regulatory pathway involving the ribosomal modification protein RimK, its regulator proteins RimA and RimB, and the widespread bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (cdG). Disruption of rimK affects motility and surface attachment in pathogenic and commensal Pseudomonas species, with rimK deletion significantly compromising rhizosphere colonisation by the commensal soil bacterium P. fluorescens, and plant infection by the pathogens P. syringae and P. aeruginosa. RimK functions as an ATP-dependent glutamyl ligase, adding glutamate residues to the C-terminus of ribosomal protein RpsF and inducing specific effects on both ribosome protein complement and function. Deletion of rimK in P. fluorescens leads to markedly reduced levels of multiple ribosomal proteins, and also of the key translational regulator Hfq. In turn, reduced Hfq levels induce specific downstream proteomic changes, with significant increases in multiple ABC transporters, stress response proteins and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases seen for both ΔrimK and Δhfq mutants. The activity of RimK is itself controlled by interactions with RimA, RimB and cdG. We propose that control of RimK activity represents a novel regulatory mechanism that dynamically influences interactions between bacteria and their hosts; translating environmental pressures into dynamic ribosomal changes, and consequently to an adaptive remodeling of the bacterial proteome.

  13. Adaptive Remodeling of the Bacterial Proteome by Specific Ribosomal Modification Regulates Pseudomonas Infection and Niche Colonisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Little

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional control of protein abundance is a highly important, underexplored regulatory process by which organisms respond to their environments. Here we describe an important and previously unidentified regulatory pathway involving the ribosomal modification protein RimK, its regulator proteins RimA and RimB, and the widespread bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (cdG. Disruption of rimK affects motility and surface attachment in pathogenic and commensal Pseudomonas species, with rimK deletion significantly compromising rhizosphere colonisation by the commensal soil bacterium P. fluorescens, and plant infection by the pathogens P. syringae and P. aeruginosa. RimK functions as an ATP-dependent glutamyl ligase, adding glutamate residues to the C-terminus of ribosomal protein RpsF and inducing specific effects on both ribosome protein complement and function. Deletion of rimK in P. fluorescens leads to markedly reduced levels of multiple ribosomal proteins, and also of the key translational regulator Hfq. In turn, reduced Hfq levels induce specific downstream proteomic changes, with significant increases in multiple ABC transporters, stress response proteins and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases seen for both ΔrimK and Δhfq mutants. The activity of RimK is itself controlled by interactions with RimA, RimB and cdG. We propose that control of RimK activity represents a novel regulatory mechanism that dynamically influences interactions between bacteria and their hosts; translating environmental pressures into dynamic ribosomal changes, and consequently to an adaptive remodeling of the bacterial proteome.

  14. Differences in bill form of the oystercatcher haematopus ostralegus; a dynamic adaptation to specific foraging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swennen, C.; De Bruijn, L. L. M.; Duiven, P.; Leopold, M. F.; Marteijn, E. C. L.

    In wintering European oystercatchers 3 bill types: pointed, chisel-shaped, and blunt were found as well as their intermediates. The distribution of the different bill types varied widely in both time and space. Pointed bills had a larger mean length than both chisel-shaped and blunt bills, and occurred more often in young birds than in adults, and more often in females than in males. On an average, females had longer bills than males. In oystercatchers in the Wadden Sea area bill length was found to increase with age, but in the Delta area no increase was found. In semi-natural cage experiments each bill type proved to be most suitable for a specific manner of localization and handling of prey. Bills of individual oystercatchers were shown to change shape when the bird was forced to change its feeding method. A change in method accompanied by a gradual change in bill form only caused a temporary loss of feeding efficiency. It is concluded that differences in bill length influence prey choice and feeding method and hence induce different bill forms. Age- and sex-dependent differences in bill length and form, together with the ability of the individual to adapt bill form and feeding behaviour, enable the oystercatcher to lessen interspecific competition and to respond to changing environmental conditions.

  15. Learning an EMG Controlled Game: Task-Specific Adaptations and Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Ludger; van der Sluis, Corry K.; van Dijk, Hylke W.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2016-01-01

    Video games that aim to improve myoelectric control (myogames) are gaining popularity and are often part of the rehabilitation process following an upper limb amputation. However, direct evidence for their effect on prosthetic skill is limited. This study aimed to determine whether and how myogaming improves EMG control and whether performance improvements transfer to a prosthesis-simulator task. Able-bodied right-handed participants (N = 28) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. The intervention group was trained to control a video game (Breakout-EMG) using the myosignals of wrist flexors and extensors. Controls played a regular Mario computer game. Both groups trained 20 minutes a day for 4 consecutive days. Before and after training, two tests were conducted: one level of the Breakout-EMG game, and grasping objects with a prosthesis-simulator. Results showed a larger increase of in-game accuracy for the Breakout-EMG group than for controls. The Breakout-EMG group moreover showed increased adaptation of the EMG signal to the game. No differences were found in using a prosthesis-simulator. This study demonstrated that myogames lead to task-specific myocontrol skills. Transfer to a prosthesis task is therefore far from easy. We discuss several implications for future myogame designs. PMID:27556154

  16. Stimulus-specific adaptation and deviance detection in the inferior colliculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaneri eAguilar Ayala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deviancy detection in the continuous flow of sensory information into the central nervous system is of vital importance for animals. The task requires neuronal mechanisms that allow for an efficient representation of the environment by removing statistically redundant signals. Recently, the neuronal principles of auditory deviance detection have been approached by studying the phenomenon of stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA. SSA is a reduction in the responsiveness of a neuron to a common or repetitive sound while the neuron remains highly sensitive to rare sounds (Ulanovsky et al., 2003. This phenomenon could enhance the saliency of unexpected, deviant stimuli against a background of repetitive signals. SSA shares many similarities with the evoked potential known as the ‘mismatch negativity,’ and it has been linked to cognitive process such as auditory memory and scene analysis (Winkler et al., 2009 as well as to behavioral habituation (Netser et al., 2011. Neurons exhibiting SSA can be found at several levels of the auditory pathway, from the inferior colliculus (IC up to the auditory cortex (AC. In this review, we offer an account of the state-of-the art of SSA studies in the IC with the aim of contributing to the growing interest in the single-neuron electrophysiology of auditory deviance detection. The dependence of neuronal SSA on various stimulus features, e.g., probability of the deviant stimulus and repetition rate, and the roles of the AC and inhibition in shaping SSA at the level of the IC are addressed.

  17. Contributions of weather variables for specific adaptation of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell.- Arg clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshan P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific adaptation of 15 rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis clones was assessed by analyzing yield during a normal year (1997-98 and a year (1998-99 in which the yield was exceptional. Differences in yield in response to changes in weather conditions over the years were evident with clones RRII 203, RRIM 703, PB 5/51 and PB 235 which all exhibited a negative trend with increasing wind velocity during 1997-98, these clones also exhibited a negative correlation with minimum temperature during 1998-99. The prominent yield differences across the years made selection based on both yield and stability inevitable through computing weather variables and environmental index as covariant. To determine the contribution of variable(s to genotype-environment (GE interactions, the GE interaction was partitioned into heterogeneity and residual GE interaction. Heterogeneity only for environmental index was highly significant (p = 0.01, meaning that stability or instability of clones was due to a linear effect of the environmental index. The non-significant values of heterogeneity for the weather variables revealed that none of these factors individually was sufficient to explain heterogeneity. A QBASIC computer program called STABLE was used to select simultaneously for yield and stability. Clones PB 235, RRII 118, RRII 203, RRIM 703 and RRIM 600 were stable over the years investigated.

  18. Identification of tissue-specific cell death using methylation patterns of circulating DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Werman, Roni; Neiman, Daniel; Zemmour, Hai; Moss, Joshua; Magenheim, Judith; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Rubertsson, Sten; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty; Haller, Michael J; Wasserfall, Clive H; Schatz, Desmond A; Greenbaum, Carla J; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Markus; Zick, Aviad; Hubert, Ayala; Maoz, Myriam; Fendrich, Volker; Bartsch, Detlef K; Golan, Talia; Ben Sasson, Shmuel A; Zamir, Gideon; Razin, Aharon; Cedar, Howard; Shapiro, A M James; Glaser, Benjamin; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval

    2016-03-29

    Minimally invasive detection of cell death could prove an invaluable resource in many physiologic and pathologic situations. Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells is emerging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring cancer dynamics and graft failure. However, existing methods rely on differences in DNA sequences in source tissues, so that cell death cannot be identified in tissues with a normal genome. We developed a method of detecting tissue-specific cell death in humans based on tissue-specific methylation patterns in cfDNA. We interrogated tissue-specific methylome databases to identify cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures and developed a method to detect these signatures in mixed DNA samples. We isolated cfDNA from plasma or serum of donors, treated the cfDNA with bisulfite, PCR-amplified the cfDNA, and sequenced it to quantify cfDNA carrying the methylation markers of the cell type of interest. Pancreatic β-cell DNA was identified in the circulation of patients with recently diagnosed type-1 diabetes and islet-graft recipients; oligodendrocyte DNA was identified in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis; neuronal/glial DNA was identified in patients after traumatic brain injury or cardiac arrest; and exocrine pancreas DNA was identified in patients with pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that the tissue origins of cfDNA and thus the rate of death of specific cell types can be determined in humans. The approach can be adapted to identify cfDNA derived from any cell type in the body, offering a minimally invasive window for diagnosing and monitoring a broad spectrum of human pathologies as well as providing a better understanding of normal tissue dynamics.

  19. Allele-specific down-regulation of RPTOR expression induced by retinoids contributes to climate adaptations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Sun

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR pathway regulates cell growth, energy homeostasis, apoptosis, and immune response. The regulatory associated protein of MTOR encoded by the RPTOR gene is a key component of this pathway. A previous survey of candidate genes found that RPTOR contains multiple SNPs with strong correlations between allele frequencies and climate variables, consistent with the action of selective pressures that vary across environments. Using data from a recent genome scan for selection signals, we honed in on a SNP (rs11868112 26 kb upstream to the transcription start site of RPTOR that exhibits the strongest association with temperature variables. Transcription factor motif scanning and mining of recently mapped transcription factor binding sites identified a binding site for POU class 2 homeobox 1 (POU2F1 spanning the SNP and an adjacent retinoid acid receptor (RAR binding site. Using expression quantification, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, and reporter gene assays, we demonstrate that POU2F1 and RARA do bind upstream of the RPTOR gene to regulate its expression in response to retinoids; this regulation is affected by the allele status at rs11868112 with the derived allele resulting in lower expression levels. We propose a model in which the derived allele influences thermogenesis or immune response by altering MTOR pathway activity and thereby increasing fitness in colder climates. Our results show that signatures of genetic adaptations can identify variants with functional effects, consistent with the idea that selection signals may be used for SNP annotation.

  20. When genome integrity and cell cycle decisions collide: roles of polo kinases in cellular adaptation to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Diego; D'Amours, Damien

    2014-09-01

    The drive to proliferate and the need to maintain genome integrity are two of the most powerful forces acting on biological systems. When these forces enter in conflict, such as in the case of cells experiencing DNA damage, feedback mechanisms are activated to ensure that cellular proliferation is stopped and no further damage is introduced while cells repair their chromosomal lesions. In this circumstance, the DNA damage response dominates over the biological drive to proliferate, and may even result in programmed cell death if the damage cannot be repaired efficiently. Interestingly, the drive to proliferate can under specific conditions overcome the DNA damage response and lead to a reactivation of the proliferative program in checkpoint-arrested cells. This phenomenon is known as adaptation to DNA damage and is observed in all eukaryotic species where the process has been studied, including normal and cancer cells in humans. Polo-like kinases (PLKs) are critical regulators of the adaptation response to DNA damage and they play key roles at the interface of cell cycle and checkpoint-related decisions in cells. Here, we review recent progress in defining the specific roles of PLKs in the adaptation process and how this conserved family of eukaryotic kinases can integrate the fundamental need to preserve genomic integrity with effective cellular proliferation.

  1. Adaptive Immunity in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Phenotype and Functional Alterations of T-Cells before and during Infliximab Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Szalay

    2012-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to determine T-cell subsets in peripheral blood and their intracellular signaling during activation. The prevalence of Th2 and Th17 cells responsible for the regulation of adaptive immunity was higher in AS than in 9 healthy controls. Although IFX therapy improved patients' condition, immune phenotype did not normalize. Cytoplasmic and mitochondrial calcium responses of CD4+ and CD8+ cells to a specific activation were delayed, while NO generation was increased in AS. NO generation normalized sooner upon IFX than calcium response. These results suggest an abnormal immune phenotype with functional disturbances of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in AS.

  2. Regulator T cells: specific for antigen and/or antigen receptors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, B; de Durana, Y Diaz; Li, N; Sercarz, E E

    2003-05-01

    Adaptive immune responses are regulated by many different molecular and cellular effectors. Regulator T cells are coming to their rights again, and these T cells seem to have ordinary alpha/beta T-cell receptors (TCRs) and to develop in the thymus. Autoimmune responses are tightly regulated by such regulatory T cells, a phenomenon which is beneficial to the host in autoimmune situations. However, the regulation of autoimmune responses to tumour cells is harmful to the host, as this regulation delays the defence against the outgrowth of neoplastic cells. In the present review, we discuss whether regulatory T cells are specific for antigen and/or for antigen receptors. Our interest in these phenomena comes from the findings that T cells produce many more TCR-alpha and TCR-beta chains than are necessary for surface membrane expression of TCR-alphabeta heterodimers with CD3 complexes. Excess TCR chains are degraded by the proteasomes, and TCR peptides thus become available to the assembly pathway of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Consequently, do T cells express two different identification markers on the cell membrane, the TCR-alphabeta clonotype for recognition by B-cell receptors and clonotypic TCR-alphabeta peptides for recognition by T cells?

  3. T Cell Adaptive Immunity Proceeds through Environment-Induced Adaptation from the Exposure of Cryptic Genetic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, James M.; Lin, Joseph; Harding, Angus

    2011-01-01

    Evolution is often characterized as a process involving incremental genetic changes that are slowly discovered and fixed in a population through genetic drift and selection. However, a growing body of evidence is finding that changes in the environment frequently induce adaptations that are much too rapid to occur by an incremental genetic search process. Rapid evolution is hypothesized to be facilitated by mutations present within the population that are silent or “cryptic” within the first environment but are co-opted or “exapted” to the new environment, providing a selective advantage once revealed. Although cryptic mutations have recently been shown to facilitate evolution in RNA enzymes, their role in the evolution of complex phenotypes has not been proven. In support of this wider role, this paper describes an unambiguous relationship between cryptic genetic variation and complex phenotypic responses within the immune system. By reviewing the biology of the adaptive immune system through the lens of evolution, we show that T cell adaptive immunity constitutes an exemplary model system where cryptic alleles drive rapid adaptation of complex traits. In naive T cells, normally cryptic differences in T cell receptor reveal diversity in activation responses when the cellular population is presented with a novel environment during infection. We summarize how the adaptive immune response presents a well studied and appropriate experimental system that can be used to confirm and expand upon theoretical evolutionary models describing how seemingly small and innocuous mutations can drive rapid cellular evolution. PMID:22363338

  4. Dissection of T-cell antigen specificity in human melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Albæk Thrue, Charlotte; Junker, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) isolated from melanoma patients and expanded in vitro by interleukin (IL)-2 treatment can elicit therapeutic response after adoptive transfer, but the antigen specificities of the T cells transferred have not been determined. By compiling all known melanoma......-associated antigens and applying a novel technology for high-throughput analysis of T-cell responses, we dissected the composition of melanoma-restricted T-cell responses in 63 TIL cultures. T-cell reactivity screens against 175 melanoma-associated epitopes detected 90 responses against 18 different epitopes...... from different fragments of resected melanoma lesions. In summary, our findings provide an initial definition of T-cell populations contributing to tumor recognition in TILs although the specificity of many tumor-reactive TILs remains undefined....

  5. Limbal Stromal Tissue Specific Stem Cells and Their Differentiation Potential to Corneal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katikireddy, Kishore Reddy; Jurkunas, Ula V

    2016-01-01

    From the derivation of the first human embryonic stem (hES) cell line to the development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells; it has become evident that tissue specific stem cells are able to differentiate into a specific somatic cell types. The understanding of key processes such as the signaling pathways and the role of the microenvironment in epidermal/epithelial development has provided important clues for the derivation of specific epithelial cell types.Various differentiation protocols/methods were used to attain specific epithelial cell types. Here, we describe in detail the procedure to follow for isolation of tissue specific stem cells, mimicking their microenvironment to attain stem cell characteristics, and their potential differentiation to corneal epithelial cells.

  6. Using patient-specific phantoms to evaluate deformable image registration algorithms for adaptive radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Nick; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Kim, Jinkoo; Adams, Jeffrey; Li, Shunshan; Wen, Ning; Chetty, Indrin J; Zhong, Hualiang

    2013-11-04

    The quality of adaptive treatment planning depends on the accuracy of its underlying deformable image registration (DIR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of two DIR algorithms, B-spline-based deformable multipass (DMP) and deformable demons (Demons), implemented in a commercial software package. Evaluations were conducted using both computational and physical deformable phantoms. Based on a finite element method (FEM), a total of 11 computational models were developed from a set of CT images acquired from four lung and one prostate cancer patients. FEM generated displacement vector fields (DVF) were used to construct the lung and prostate image phantoms. Based on a fast-Fourier transform technique, image noise power spectrum was incorporated into the prostate image phantoms to create simulated CBCT images. The FEM-DVF served as a gold standard for verification of the two registration algorithms performed on these phantoms. The registration algorithms were also evaluated at the homologous points quantified in the CT images of a physical lung phantom. The results indicated that the mean errors of the DMP algorithm were in the range of 1.0 ~ 3.1 mm for the computational phantoms and 1.9 mm for the physical lung phantom. For the computational prostate phantoms, the corresponding mean error was 1.0-1.9 mm in the prostate, 1.9-2.4mm in the rectum, and 1.8-2.1 mm over the entire patient body. Sinusoidal errors induced by B-spline interpolations were observed in all the displacement profiles of the DMP registrations. Regions of large displacements were observed to have more registration errors. Patient-specific FEM models have been developed to evaluate the DIR algorithms implemented in the commercial software package. It has been found that the accuracy of these algorithms is patient dependent and related to various factors including tissue deformation magnitudes and image intensity gradients across the regions of interest. This may suggest that

  7. Cost of riparian buffer zones: A comparison of hydrologically adapted site-specific riparian buffers with traditional fixed widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, T.; Lundström, J.; Kuglerová, L.; Laudon, H.; Öhman, K.; Ågren, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Traditional approaches aiming at protecting surface waters from the negative impacts of forestry often focus on retaining fixed width buffer zones around waterways. While this method is relatively simple to design and implement, it has been criticized for ignoring the spatial heterogeneity of biogeochemical processes and biodiversity in the riparian zone. Alternatively, a variable width buffer zone adapted to site-specific hydrological conditions has been suggested to improve the protection of biogeochemical and ecological functions of the riparian zone. However, little is known about the monetary value of maintaining hydrologically adapted buffer zones compared to the traditionally used fixed width ones. In this study, we created a hydrologically adapted buffer zone by identifying wet areas and groundwater discharge hotspots in the riparian zone. The opportunity cost of the hydrologically adapted riparian buffer zones was then compared to that of the fixed width zones in a meso-scale boreal catchment to determine the most economical option of designing riparian buffers. The results show that hydrologically adapted buffer zones were cheaper per hectare than the fixed width ones when comparing the total cost. This was because the hydrologically adapted buffers included more wetlands and low productive forest areas than the fixed widths. As such, the hydrologically adapted buffer zones allows more effective protection of the parts of the riparian zones that are ecologically and biogeochemically important and more sensitive to disturbances without forest landowners incurring any additional cost than fixed width buffers.

  8. Regional specific adaptation of the endothelial glycocalyx dimension in tail-suspended rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongyan; Sun, Lianwen; Huang, Yunfei; Wang, Zhenze; Zhao, Ping; Fan, Yubo; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2015-06-01

    Previous animal studies by using tail-suspended hindlimb-unloaded rat model have shown that simulated microgravity-induced vessel structural and functional remodeling may be anatomic region dependent. However, little care has been taken to assess the structural adaptation of the endothelial glycocalyx, the apical surface of the endothelium, the key mechanosensor mediating nitric oxide (NO) production, and the natural protective barrier of the vasculature. Therefore, the present study extended simulated microgravity-induced vessel remodeling to the endothelial glycocalyx level. The percents of bone mineral density (BMD) change from both control and tail-suspended (TS) rats were measured by micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT). Structural parameters such as the luminal diameter (D), the thickness of each layer, the ratio of intima to media (IMR), the cross-sectional areas of the intima (CSAI) and media (CSAM) of vessels from three different regions (the common carotid artery, abdominal aorta, and femoral artery) were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Dimensions of the glycocalyx above, below, and away from the endothelial cell nucleus were examined by fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-FITC) binding to the cryosection of vessels. Our results show that 3-week tail suspension of rats increases the thickness and CSA of the abdominal aortic endothelium by 23.7 and 21.1%, respectively, thickens the media layer of the common carotid artery by 34.0%, and increases the luminal diameter, the CSA of the intima and media of the femoral artery by 75.7, 93, and 61.2%, respectively. Correspondingly, the dimension of the glycocalyx away from the common carotid arterial and the abdominal aortic endothelial cell nucleus from tail-suspended rats shows a 1.66- and 1.64-fold increase respectively, while it shows a 0.79-fold reduction on the top of the femoral endothelial cells. These results suggest that simulated microgravity induces vascular

  9. Nonconjugate adaptation of human saccades to anisometropic spectacles: Meridian-specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Lemij (Hans); H. Collewijn (Han)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Recently it has been demonstrated that saccades become different in size in the two eyes if a subject is adapted to anisometropic spectacles, which provide visual images of different magnitude to the two eyes. These nonconjugate adaptations adequately meet the requirements of th

  10. Adaptation of mammalian auditory hair cell mechanotransduction is independent of calcium entry

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, A.W.; Effertz, T.; Ricci, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation is a hallmark of hair cell mechanotransduction, extending the sensory hair bundle dynamic range while providing mechanical filtering of incoming sound. In hair cells responsive to low frequencies, two distinct adaptation mechanisms exist, a fast component of debatable origin and a slow myosin-based component. It is generally believed that Ca2+ entry through mechano-electric transducer channels is required for both forms of adaptation. This study investigates the calcium dependence ...

  11. Cell-specific monitoring of protein synthesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Kourtis

    Full Text Available Analysis of general and specific protein synthesis provides important information, relevant to cellular physiology and function. However, existing methodologies, involving metabolic labelling by incorporation of radioactive amino acids into nascent polypeptides, cannot be applied to monitor protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in live specimens. We have developed a novel approach for monitoring protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in vivo. Fluorescent reporter proteins such as GFP are expressed in specific cells and tissues of interest or throughout animals using appropriate promoters. Protein synthesis rates are assessed by following fluorescence recovery after partial photobleaching of the fluorophore at targeted sites. We evaluate the method by examining protein synthesis rates in diverse cell types of live, wild type or mRNA translation-defective Caenorhabditis elegans animals. Because it is non-invasive, our approach allows monitoring of protein synthesis in single cells or tissues with intrinsically different protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, it can be readily implemented in other organisms or cell culture systems.

  12. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Regulation of Adaptive Immune Dysfunction in Human Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christina L.; Li, Jian; LaPato, Melissa; Shapiro, Melanie R.; Glover, Sarah C.; Wallet, Mark A.; Wallet, Shannon M.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the initiation, progression, and maintenance of type 1 diabetes (T1D), although a single environmental trigger for disease has not been identified. Studies have documented the contribution of immunity within the gastrointestinal tract (GI) to the expression of autoimmunity at distal sites. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate local and systemic immunologic homeostasis through physical and biochemical interactions with innate and adaptive immune populations. We hypothesize that a loss in the tolerance-inducing nature of the GI tract occurs within T1D and is due to altered IECs’ innate immune function. As a first step in addressing this hypothesis, we contrasted the global immune microenvironment within the GI tract of individuals with T1D as well as evaluated the IEC-specific effects on adaptive immune cell phenotypes. The soluble and cellular immune microenvironment within the duodenum, the soluble mediator profile of primary IECs derived from the same duodenal tissues, and the effect of the primary IECs’ soluble mediator profile on T-cell expansion and polarization were evaluated. Higher levels of IL-17C and beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) mRNA in the T1D-duodenum were observed. Higher frequencies of type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1) and CD8+CXCR3+ T-cells (Tc1) were also observed in T1D-duodenal tissues, concomitant with lower frequencies of type 3 ILC (ILC3) and CD8+CCR6+ T-cells (Tc17). Higher levels of proinflammatory mediators (IL-17C and BD-2) in the absence of similar changes in mediators associated with homeostasis (interleukin 10 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) were also observed in T1D-derived primary IEC cultures. T1D-derived IEC culture supernatants induced more robust CD8+ T-cell proliferation along with enhanced polarization of Tc1 populations, at the expense of Tc17 polarization, as well as the expansion of CXCR3+CCR6+/− Tregs, indicative of a Th1-like and less regulatory phenotype. These data demonstrate

  13. A review of adaptive mechanisms in cell responses towards oxidative stress caused by dental resin monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krifka, Stephanie; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Schmalz, Gottfried; Schweikl, Helmut

    2013-06-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. Monomers like triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) or 2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA) are cytotoxic via apoptosis, induce genotoxic effects, and delay the cell cycle. Monomers also influence the response of cells of the innate immune system, inhibit specific odontoblast cell functions, or delay the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization processes in pulp-derived cells including stem cells. These observations indicate that resin monomers act as environmental stressors which inevitably disturb regulatory cellular networks through interference with signal transduction pathways. We hypothesize that an understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying these phenomena will provide a better estimation of the consequences associated with dental therapy using composite materials, and lead to innovative therapeutic strategies and improved materials being used at tissue interfaces within the oral cavity. Current findings strongly suggest that monomers enhance the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is most likely the cause of biological reactions activated by dental composites and resin monomers. The aim of the present review manuscript is to discuss adaptive cell responses to oxidative stress caused by monomers. The particular significance of a tightly controlled network of non-enzymatic as well as enzymatic antioxidants for the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis and antioxidant defense in monomer-exposed cells will be addressed. The expression of ROS-metabolizing antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1/2), and catalase in cells exposed to monomers will be discussed with particular emphasis on the role

  14. Galectin-3 Determines Tumor Cell Adaptive Strategies in Stressed Tumor Microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Andrade, Luciana Nogueira de Sousa; Bustos, Silvina Odete; Chammas, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a member of the β-galactoside-binding lectin family, whose expression is often dysregulated in cancers. While galectin-3 is usually an intracellular protein found in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, under certain conditions, galectin-3 can be secreted by an yet unknown mechanism. Under stressing conditions (e.g., hypoxia and nutrient deprivation) galectin-3 is upregulated, through the activity of transcription factors, such as HIF-1α and NF-κB. Here, we review evidence that indicates a positive role for galectin-3 in MAPK family signal transduction, leading to cell proliferation and cell survival. Galectin-3 serves as a scaffold protein, which favors the spatial organization of signaling proteins as K-RAS. Upon secretion, extracellular galectin-3 interacts with a variety of cell surface glycoproteins, such as growth factor receptors, integrins, cadherins, and members of the Notch family, among other glycoproteins, besides different extracellular matrix molecules. Through its ability to oligomerize, galectin-3 forms lectin lattices that act as scaffolds that sustain the spatial organization of signaling receptors on the cell surface, dictating its maintenance on the plasma membrane or their endocytosis. Galectin-3 induces tumor cell, endothelial cell, and leukocyte migration, favoring either the exit of tumor cells from a stressed microenvironment or the entry of endothelial cells and leukocytes, such as monocytes/macrophages into the tumor organoid. Therefore, galectin-3 plays homeostatic roles in tumors, as (i) it favors tumor cell adaptation for survival in stressed conditions; (ii) upon secretion, galectin-3 induces tumor cell detachment and migration; and (iii) it attracts monocyte/macrophage and endothelial cells to the tumor mass, inducing both directly and indirectly the process of angiogenesis. The two latter activities are potentially targetable, and specific interventions may be designed to counteract the protumoral role of extracellular

  15. Cancer Patient T Cells Genetically Targeted to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Specifically Lyse Prostate Cancer Cells and Release Cytokines in Response to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Gong

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The expression of immunoglobulin-based artificial receptors in normal T lymphocytes provides a means to target lymphocytes to cell surface antigens independently of major histocompatibility complex restriction. Such artificial receptors have been previously shown to confer antigen-specific tumoricidal properties in murine T cells. We constructed a novel ζ chain fusion receptor specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA termed Pz-1. PSMA is a cell-surface glycoprotein expressed on prostate cancer cells and the neovascular endothelium of multiple carcinomas. We show that primary T cells harvested from five of five patients with different stages of prostate cancer and transduced with the Pz-1 receptor readily lyse prostate cancer cells. Having established a culture system using fibroblasts that express PSMA, we next show that T cells expressing the Pz-1 receptor release cytokines in response to cell-bound PSMA. Furthermore, we show that the cytokine release is greatly augmented by B7.1-mediated costimulation. Thus, our findings support the feasibility of adoptive cell therapy by using genetically engineered T cells in prostate cancer patients and suggest that both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte functions can be synergistically targeted against tumor cells.

  16. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier.inra.fr/CBGP/software/baypass/.

  17. Cell-type specific four-component hydrogel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Aberle

    Full Text Available In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel, an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering.

  18. Growth parameter components of adaptive specificity during experimental evolution of the UVR-inducible mutator Pseudomonas cichorii 302959.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Weigand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutagenic DNA repair (MDR transiently increases mutation rate through the activation of low-fidelity repair polymerases in response to specific, DNA-damaging environmental stress conditions such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR exposure. These repair polymerases also confer UVR tolerance, intimately linking mutability and survival in bacteria that colone habitats subject to regular UVR exposure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we investigate adaptive specificity in experimental lineages of the highly UVR-mutable epiphytic plant pathogen Pseudomonas cichorii 302959. Relative fitness measurements of isolates and population samples from replicate lineages indicated that adaptive improvements emerged early in all lineages of our evolution experiment and specific increases in relative fitness correlated with distinct improvements in doubling and lag times. Adaptive improvements gained under UVR and non-UVR conditions were acquired preferentially, and differentially contributed to relative fitness under varied growth conditions. CONCLUSIONS: These results support our earlier observations that MDR activation may contribute to gains in relative fitness without impeding normal patterns of adaptive specificity in P. cichorii 302959.

  19. Lab-specific gene expression signatures in pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Aaron M; Cooper, James B

    2010-08-06

    Pluripotent stem cells derived from both embryonic and reprogrammed somatic cells have significant potential for human regenerative medicine. Despite similarities in developmental potential, however, several groups have found fundamental differences between embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced-pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines that may have important implications for iPSC-based medical therapies. Using an unsupervised clustering algorithm, we further studied the genetic homogeneity of iPSC and ESC lines by reanalyzing microarray gene expression data from seven different laboratories. Unexpectedly, this analysis revealed a strong correlation between gene expression signatures and specific laboratories in both ESC and iPSC lines. Nearly one-third of the genes with lab-specific expression signatures are also differentially expressed between ESCs and iPSCs. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that in vitro microenvironmental context differentially impacts the gene expression signatures of both iPSCs and ESCs.

  20. Nucleus- and cell-specific gene expression in monkey thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Karl D; Choudary, Prabhakara V; Jones, Edward G

    2007-02-06

    Nuclei of the mammalian thalamus are aggregations of neurons with unique architectures and input-output connections, yet the molecular determinants of their organizational specificity remain unknown. By comparing expression profiles of thalamus and cerebral cortex in adult rhesus monkeys, we identified transcripts that are unique to dorsal thalamus or to individual nuclei within it. Real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization analyses confirmed the findings. Expression profiling of individual nuclei microdissected from the dorsal thalamus revealed additional subsets of nucleus-specific genes. Functional annotation using Gene Ontology (GO) vocabulary and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis revealed overrepresentation of GO categories related to development, morphogenesis, cell-cell interactions, and extracellular matrix within the thalamus- and nucleus-specific genes, many involved in the Wnt signaling pathway. Examples included the transcription factor TCF7L2, localized exclusively to excitatory neurons; a calmodulin-binding protein PCP4; the bone extracellular matrix molecules SPP1 and SPARC; and other genes involved in axon outgrowth and cell matrix interactions. Other nucleus-specific genes such as CBLN1 are involved in synaptogenesis. The genes identified likely underlie nuclear specification, cell phenotype, and connectivity during development and their maintenance in the adult thalamus.

  1. Cancer specificity of promoters of the genes controlling cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkin, Kirill; Chernov, Igor; Stukacheva, Elena; Monastyrskaya, Galina; Uspenskaya, Natalya; Kopantzev, Eugene; Sverdlov, Eugene

    2015-02-01

    Violation of proliferation control is a common feature of cancer cells. We put forward the hypothesis that promoters of genes involved in the control of cell proliferation should possess intrinsic cancer specific activity. We cloned promoter regions of CDC6, POLD1, CKS1B, MCM2, and PLK1 genes into pGL3 reporter vector and studied their ability to drive heterologous gene expression in transfected cancer cells of different origin and in normal human fibroblasts. Each promoter was cloned in short (335-800 bp) and long (up to 2.3 kb) variants to cover probable location of core and whole promoter regulatory elements. Cloned promoters were significantly more active in cancer cells than in normal fibroblasts that may indicate their cancer specificity. Both versions of CDC6 promoters were shown to be most active while the activities of others were close to that of BIRC5 gene (survivin) gene promoter. Long and short variants of each cloned promoter demonstrated very similar cancer specificity with the exception of PLK1-long promoter that was substantially more specific than its short variant and other promoters under study. The data indicate that most of the important cis-regulatory transcription elements responsible for intrinsic cancer specificity are located in short variants of the promoters under study. CDC6 short promoter may serve as a promising candidate for transcription targeted cancer gene therapy.

  2. Adaptation Independent Modulation of Auditory Hair Cell Mechanotransduction Channel Open Probability Implicates a Role for the Lipid Bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Anthony W; Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Sachs, Frederick; Ricci, Anthony J

    2016-03-09

    The auditory system is able to detect movement down to atomic dimensions. This sensitivity comes in part from mechanisms associated with gating of hair cell mechanoelectric transduction (MET) channels. MET channels, located at the tops of stereocilia, are poised to detect tension induced by hair bundle deflection. Hair bundle deflection generates a force by pulling on tip-link proteins connecting adjacent stereocilia. The resting open probability (P(open)) of MET channels determines the linearity and sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Classically, P(open) is regulated by a calcium-sensitive adaptation mechanism in which lowering extracellular calcium or depolarization increases P(open). Recent data demonstrated that the fast component of adaptation is independent of both calcium and voltage, thus requiring an alternative explanation for the sensitivity of P(open) to calcium and voltage. Using rat auditory hair cells, we characterize a mechanism, separate from fast adaptation, whereby divalent ions interacting with the local lipid environment modulate resting P(open). The specificity of this effect for different divalent ions suggests binding sites that are not an EF-hand or calmodulin model. GsMTx4, a lipid-mediated modifier of cationic stretch-activated channels, eliminated the voltage and divalent sensitivity with minimal effects on adaptation. We hypothesize that the dual mechanisms (lipid modulation and adaptation) extend the dynamic range of the system while maintaining adaptation kinetics at their maximal rates.

  3. Adaptation and growth kinetics study of an Indian isolate of virulent duck enteritis virus in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, S; Kamble, Nitin M; Gaikwad, Satish S; Shukla, Sanjeev Kumar; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan

    2015-01-01

    Duck virus enteritis, also known as duck plague, is a viral infection of ducks caused by duck enteritis virus (DEV). The control of the disease is mainly done by vaccination with chicken embryo adapted live virus that is known to be poorly immunogenic and elicits only partial protection. Further, the embryo propagated vaccine virus pose a threat of harboring other infectious agents. Seeing these limitations, the present study reports for the first time regarding propagation and adaptation of a virulent Indian isolate of duck enteritis virus in Vero cell line. In this study isolation of an outbreak virus from Kerala state was done in chicken embryo fibroblast cell culture (CEF). Then adapted the DEV isolate in the Vero cell line. The characteristic cytopathic effects (CPE) of clumping and fusion of Vero cells were observed starting from the 7th passage onwards. The presence of the virus and its multiplication in Vero cells was confirmed by detection of viral specific DNA and antigen by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and indirect immuno fluorescent assay (IIFA), respectively. PCR detection of DEV using self designed primers for US4 (gD) and UL30 (DNA Polymerase) gene has been reported for the in the present study. The kinetics of DEV in Vero cells revealed a maximum infectivity titer of 10(5.6) TCID 50/ml after 48hr of viral infection. Compared to chicken embryo adapted DVE vaccine virus, the Vero cell culture system is free from other infectious agents. So it will be a good candidate for cultivation and propagation of duck enteritis virus vaccine strain. Further research studies are suggested to explore the feasibility of utilizing this Vero cell culture adapted DEV isolate for developing an attenuated vaccine virus against duck virus enteritis.

  4. Birth and rapid subcellular adaptation of a hominoid-specific CDC14 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Rosso

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication was prevalent during hominoid evolution, yet little is known about the functional fate of new ape gene copies. We characterized the CDC14B cell cycle gene and the functional evolution of its hominoid-specific daughter gene, CDC14Bretro. We found that CDC14B encodes four different splice isoforms that show different subcellular localizations (nucleus or microtubule-associated and functional properties. A microtubular CDC14B variant spawned CDC14Bretro through retroposition in the hominoid ancestor 18-25 million years ago (Mya. CDC14Bretro evolved brain-/testis-specific expression after the duplication event and experienced a short period of intense positive selection in the African ape ancestor 7-12 Mya. Using resurrected ancestral protein variants, we demonstrate that by virtue of amino acid substitutions in distinct protein regions during this time, the subcellular localization of CDC14Bretro progressively shifted from the association with microtubules (stabilizing them to an association with the endoplasmic reticulum. CDC14Bretro evolution represents a paradigm example of rapid, selectively driven subcellular relocalization, thus revealing a novel mode for the emergence of new gene function.

  5. CXCR3 Directs Antigen-Specific Effector CD4+ T Cell Migration to the Lung During Parainfluenza Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Jacob E; Cookenham, Tres; Miller, Shannon C;

    2009-01-01

    effector CD4(+) T cell migration to the lungs. To assess the role of CCR5 and CXCR3 in vivo, we directly compared the migration of Ag-specific wild-type and chemokine receptor-deficient effector T cells in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice during a parainfluenza virus infection. CXCR3-deficient effector CD4......Effector T cells are a crucial component of the adaptive immune response to respiratory virus infections. Although it was previously reported that the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3 affect trafficking of respiratory virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, it is unclear whether these receptors govern......(+) T cells were 5- to 10-fold less efficient at migrating to the lung compared with wild-type cells, whereas CCR5-deficient effector T cells were not impaired in their migration to the lung. In contrast to its role in trafficking, CXCR3 had no impact on effector CD4(+) T cell proliferation, phenotype...

  6. Cognitive Abilities, Social Adaptation, and Externalizing Behavior Problems in Childhood and Adolescence: Specific Cascade Effects Across Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racz, Sarah Jensen; Putnick, Diane L; Suwalsky, Joan T D; Hendricks, Charlene; Bornstein, Marc H

    2016-11-04

    Children's and adolescents' cognitive abilities, social adaptation, and externalizing behaviors are broadly associated with each other at the bivariate level; however, the direction, ordering, and uniqueness of these associations have yet to be identified. Developmental cascade models are particularly well-suited to (1) discern unique pathways among psychological domains and (2) model stability in and covariation among constructs, allowing for conservative tests of longitudinal associations. The current study aimed to identify specific cascade effects among children's cognitive abilities, social adaptation, and externalizing behaviors, beginning in preschool and extending through adolescence. Children (46.2 % female) and mothers (N = 351 families) provided data when children were 4, 10, and 14 years old. Cascade effects highlighted significant stability in these domains. Unique longitudinal associations were identified between (1) age-10 cognitive abilities and age-14 social adaptation, (2) age-4 social adaptation and age-10 externalizing behavior, and (3) age-10 externalizing behavior and age-14 social adaptation. These findings suggest that children's social adaptation in preschool and externalizing behavior in middle childhood may be ideal intervention targets to enhance adolescent well-being.

  7. Culturally specific adaptation of a prevention intervention: an international collaborative research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsarouk, Tatiana; Thompson, Elaine A; Herting, Jerald R; Walsh, Elaine; Randell, Brooke

    2007-08-01

    This study adapted a U.S. drug use prevention program for use with Russian at-risk adolescents, and explored directions for further development of programs addressing prevention of substance abuse and other health risk behaviors including risk of HIV infection. The adaptation process was conducted in phases, initially carried out in Seattle with 23 bilingual (English-Russian) youth and then further adapted in two Moscow schools with 44 "typical" youth. In the final phase, program adaptation for the Russian at-risk adolescents was achieved by conducting a pilot test of the adapted program lessons with Moscow at-risk adolescents (n=10), who met criteria of poor school performance and/or truancy. Observations and experience were used throughout to adapt and refine the program for at-risk youth. Modifications were made to represent more accurately colloquial Russian and to capture teen experiences common to Russian culture. Both U.S. and Russian youth characterized the lessons as engaging and valuable. They also expressed a need to learn about sexuality, drug use, and health; peer and romantic relationships; and problem-solving strategies.

  8. Adaptation Effects to Attractiveness of Face Photographs and Art Portraits are Domain-Specific

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    Gregor U. Hayn-Leichsenring

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied the neural coding of facial attractiveness by investigating effects of adaptation to attractive and unattractive human faces on the perceived attractiveness of veridical human face pictures (Experiment 1 and art portraits (Experiment 2. Experiment 1 revealed a clear pattern of contrastive aftereffects. Relative to a pre-adaptation baseline, the perceived attractiveness of faces was increased after adaptation to unattractive faces, and was decreased after adaptation to attractive faces. Experiment 2 revealed similar aftereffects when art portraits rather than face photographs were used as adaptors and test stimuli, suggesting that effects of adaptation to attractiveness are not restricted to facial photographs. Additionally, we found similar aftereffects in art portraits for beauty, another aesthetic feature that, unlike attractiveness, relates to the properties of the image (rather than to the face displayed. Importantly, Experiment 3 showed that aftereffects were abolished when adaptors were art portraits and face photographs were test stimuli. These results suggest that adaptation to facial attractiveness elicits aftereffects in the perception of subsequently presented faces, for both face photographs and art portraits, and that these effects do not cross image domains.

  9. Generic rules of mechano-regulation combined with subject specific loading conditions can explain bone adaptation after THA.

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    Tomasz D Szwedowski

    Full Text Available Bone adaptation after total hip arthroplasty is associated with the change in internal load environment, and can result in compromised bone stock, which presents a considerable challenge should a revision procedure be required. Under the assumption of a generic mechano-regulatory algorithm for governing bone adaptation, the aim of this study was to understand the contribution of subject specific loading conditions towards explaining the local periprosthetic remodelling variations in patients. CT scans of 3 consecutive THA patients were obtained and used for the construction of subject specific finite element models using verified musculoskeletal loading and physiological boundary conditions. Using either strain energy density or equivalent strain as mechano-transduction signals, predictions of bone adaptation were compared to DEXA derived BMD changes from 7 days to 12 months post-implantation. Individual changes in BMD of up to 33.6% were observed within the 12 month follow-up period, together with considerable inter-patient variability of up to 26%. Estimates of bone adaptation using equivalent strain and balanced loading conditions led to the best agreement with in vivo measured BMD, with RMS errors of only 3.9%, 7.3% and 7.3% for the individual subjects, compared to errors of over 10% when the loading conditions were simplified.This study provides evidence that subject specific loading conditions and physiological boundary constraints are essential for explaining inter-patient variations in bone adaptation patterns. This improved knowledge of the rules governing the adaptation of bone following THA helps towards understanding the interplay between mechanics and biology for better identifying patients at risk of excessive or problematic periprosthetic bone atrophy.

  10. Specific uptake of serotonin by murine lymphoid cells

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    Jackson, J.C.; Walker, R.F.; Brooks, W.H.; Roszman, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Recently the authors confirmed and extended earlier observations that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) can influence immune function. Both 5HT and its precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan inhibit the primary, in vivo antibody response to sheep red blood cells, in mice. Here, the authors report specific in vitro association of this amine with mouse splenocytes. Spleen cells from 6-8 week old CBA/J mice incorporated /sup 3/H-5HT(10/sup -8/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -6/M) in a saturable manner, at 37/sup 0/C. Specificity of uptake was indicated by competition with excess (10/sup -5/M) unlabelled 5HT and with 10/sup -5/M fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of active 5HT reuptake in rat brain. The 5HT receptor antagonists, methysergide and cyproheptadine, also blocked 5HT uptake. Cell lysis and displacement studies revealed largely intracellular accumulation of /sup 3/H-5HT with little membrane association, in splenocytes. Hofstee analysis of uptake kinetics yielded an apparent Km of 0.82 +/- 0.22 x 10/sup -7/M and Vmax of 501 +/- 108 pM/3 x 10/sup 6/ cells/10 min. Spleen cells fractionated on Sephadex G10 showed virtually no specific 5HT uptake while peritoneal exudate cells from thioglycollate treated mice displayed 5HT uptake kinetics similar to those of splenocytes. The site of specific /sup 3/H-5HT incorporation within a population of spleen cells and the functional significance of this phenomenon to immunomodulation by 5HT remain to be elucidated.

  11. Optimization Manufacture of Virus- and Tumor-Specific T Cells

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    Natalia Lapteva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although ex vivo expanded T cells are currently widely used in pre-clinical and clinical trials, the complexity of manufacture remains a major impediment for broader application. In this review we discuss current protocols for the ex vivo expansion of virus- and tumor-specific T cells and describe our experience in manufacture optimization using a gas-permeable static culture flask (G-Rex. This innovative device has revolutionized the manufacture process by allowing us to increase cell yields while decreasing the frequency of cell manipulation and in vitro culture time. It is now being used in good manufacturing practice (GMP facilities for clinical cell production in our institution as well as many others in the US and worldwide.

  12. Managing inter-cell interference with advanced receivers and rank adaptation in 5G small cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Catania, Davide;

    2015-01-01

    The use of receivers with interference suppression capabilities is expected to be a significant performance booster in 5th Generation (5G) ultra-dense small cell networks. In this respect, they could represent an alternative to traditional frequency reuse techniques, facilitating the inter-cell...... interference management. In this paper, we evaluate whether it is possible to rely on such advanced receivers as the main tool to deal with the inter-cell interference problem. We present a system-level performance evaluation in three different dense indoor small cell scenarios using a receiver model...... that includes both interference rejection combining (IRC) and successive interference cancellation (SIC) principles, as well as different rank adaptation strategies. Our results confirm that interference suppression receivers with a supportive system design can indeed represent a valid alternative to frequency...

  13. Topologically heterogeneous beta cell adaptation in response to high-fat diet in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbroek, J.H.; Tons, H.A.; de Graaf, N.; Loomans, C.J.; Engelse, M.A.; Vrolijk, H.; Voshol, P.J.; Rabelink, T.J.; Carlotti, F.; de Koning, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Beta cells adapt to an increased insulin demand by enhancing insulin secretion via increased beta cell function and/or increased beta cell number. While morphological and functional heterogeneity between individual islets exists, it is unknown whether regional differences in beta cell adaptati

  14. Specific organization of Golgi apparatus in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vildanova, M S; Wang, W; Smirnova, E A

    2014-09-01

    Microtubules, actin filaments, and Golgi apparatus are connected both directly and indirectly, but it is manifested differently depending on the cell organization and specialization, and these connections are considered in many original studies and reviews. In this review we would like to discuss what underlies differences in the structural organization of the Golgi apparatus in animal and plant cells: specific features of the microtubule cytoskeleton organization, the use of different cytoskeleton components for Golgi apparatus movement and maintenance of its integrity, or specific features of synthetic and secretory processes. We suppose that a dispersed state of the Golgi apparatus in higher plant cells cannot be explained only by specific features of the microtubule system organization and by the absence of centrosome as an active center of their organization because the Golgi apparatus is organized similarly in the cells of other organisms that possess the centrosome and centrosomal microtubules. One of the key factors determining the Golgi apparatus state in plant cells is the functional uniformity or functional specialization of stacks. The functional specialization does not suggest the joining of the stacks to form a ribbon; therefore, the disperse state of the Golgi apparatus needs to be supported, but it also can exist "by default". We believe that the dispersed state of the Golgi apparatus in plants is supported, on one hand, by dynamic connections of the Golgi apparatus stacks with the actin filament system and, on the other hand, with the endoplasmic reticulum exit sites distributed throughout the endoplasmic reticulum.

  15. Patient-Specific Pluripotent Stem Cells in Neurological Diseases

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    Serpen Durnaoglu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many human neurological diseases are not currently curable and result in devastating neurologic sequelae. The increasing availability of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from adult human somatic cells provides new prospects for cellreplacement strategies and disease-related basic research in a broad spectrum of human neurologic diseases. Patient-specific iPSC-based modeling of neurogenetic and neurodegenerative diseases is an emerging efficient tool for in vitro modeling to understand disease and to screen for genes and drugs that modify the disease process. With the exponential increase in iPSC research in recent years, human iPSCs have been successfully derived with different technologies and from various cell types. Although there remain a great deal to learn about patient-specific iPSC safety, the reprogramming mechanisms, better ways to direct a specific reprogramming, ideal cell source for cellular grafts, and the mechanisms by which transplanted stem cells lead to an enhanced functional recovery and structural reorganization, the discovery of the therapeutic potential of iPSCs offers new opportunities for the treatment of incurable neurologic diseases. However, iPSC-based therapeutic strategies need to be thoroughly evaluated in preclinical animal models of neurological diseases before they can be applied in a clinical setting.

  16. CELL DETACHMENT BY PROLYL-SPECIFIC ENDOPEPTIDASE FROM WOLFIPORIA COCOS

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    Katharina Cierpka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As requirements for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product (ATMP production differ from other production processes (e.g., therapeutic protein production, cell detachment is often a crucial step for the process success. In most cases, cell detachment is done enzymatically. Although many peptidases are established in cell culture in R&D, e.g., Trypsin as gold standard, many of them seem to be unsuitable in ATMP production processes. Therefore, the present study investigated a novel endopeptidase used in food biotechnology for its applicability in ATMP processes where cell detachment is needed. The Prolyl-specific Peptidase (PsP is of non-mammalian origin and considered as safe for humans. PsP was purified from the supernatant of the fungus Wolfiporia cocos. The isolation and purification resulted in an enzyme solution with 0.19 U mg-1 prolyl-specific activity. By in silico analysis it was confirmed that attachment-promoting proteins can be cleaved by PsP in a similar amount than with Trypsin. Further the proteolytic activity was determined for PsP and Trypsin by using the same enzymatic assay. Detachment with both enzymes was compared for cells used in typical therapeutic production processes namely a mesenchymal stem cell line (hMSC-TERT as a model for a cell therapeutic, Vero and MA104 cells used for viral therapeutic or vaccine production. The cell detachment experiments were performed with comparable enzyme activities (1.6 U mL-1. hMSC-TERT detachment was faster with PsP than with Trypsin. For Vero cells the detachment with PsP was not only faster but also more efficient. For MA104 cells the detachment rate with PsP was similar to Trypsin. For all cell types, detachment with PsP showed less influence on cell growth and metabolism compared to standard Trypsin.Thus, three cell types used in ATMP, viral therapeutics or vaccine production can be detached efficiently and gently with PsP. Therefore, PsP shows

  17. Specification of Region-Specific Neurons Including Forebrain Glutamatergic Neurons from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Taylor, Kristen; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Zheng; Park, Jung Woo; Zhan, Shuning; Kronenberg, Mark S.; Lichtler, Alexander; Liu, Hui-Xia; Chen, Fang-Ping; Yue, Lixia; Li, Xue-Jun; Xu, Ren-He

    2010-01-01

    Background Directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) into functional, region-specific neural cells is a key step to realizing their therapeutic promise to treat various neural disorders, which awaits detailed elucidation. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed neural differentiation from various hiPSC lines generated by others and ourselves. Although heterogeneity in efficiency of neuroepithelial (NE) cell differentiation was observed among different hiPSC lines, the NE differentiation process resembles that from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) in morphology, timing, transcriptional profile, and requirement for FGF signaling. NE cells differentiated from hiPSC, like those from hESC, can also form rostral phenotypes by default, and form the midbrain or spinal progenitors upon caudalization by morphogens. The rostrocaudal neural progenitors can further mature to develop forebrain glutamatergic projection neurons, midbrain dopaminergic neurons, and spinal motor neurons, respectively. Typical ion channels and action potentials were recorded in the hiPSC-derived neurons. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that hiPSC, regardless of how they were derived, can differentiate into a spectrum of rostrocaudal neurons with functionality, which supports the considerable value of hiPSC for study and treatment of patient-specific neural disorders. PMID:20686615

  18. Specification of region-specific neurons including forebrain glutamatergic neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Hui Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC into functional, region-specific neural cells is a key step to realizing their therapeutic promise to treat various neural disorders, which awaits detailed elucidation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed neural differentiation from various hiPSC lines generated by others and ourselves. Although heterogeneity in efficiency of neuroepithelial (NE cell differentiation was observed among different hiPSC lines, the NE differentiation process resembles that from human embryonic stem cells (hESC in morphology, timing, transcriptional profile, and requirement for FGF signaling. NE cells differentiated from hiPSC, like those from hESC, can also form rostral phenotypes by default, and form the midbrain or spinal progenitors upon caudalization by morphogens. The rostrocaudal neural progenitors can further mature to develop forebrain glutamatergic projection neurons, midbrain dopaminergic neurons, and spinal motor neurons, respectively. Typical ion channels and action potentials were recorded in the hiPSC-derived neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that hiPSC, regardless of how they were derived, can differentiate into a spectrum of rostrocaudal neurons with functionality, which supports the considerable value of hiPSC for study and treatment of patient-specific neural disorders.

  19. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  20. The impact of T cell intrinsic antigen adaptation on peripheral immune tolerance.

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    Nevil J Singh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Overlapping roles have been ascribed for T cell anergy, clonal deletion, and regulation in the maintenance of peripheral immunological tolerance. A measurement of the individual and additive impacts of each of these processes on systemic tolerance is often lacking. In this report we have used adoptive transfer strategies to tease out the unique contribution of T cell intrinsic receptor calibration (adaptation in the maintenance of tolerance to a systemic self-antigen. Adoptively transferred naïve T cells stably calibrated their responsiveness to a persistent self-antigen in both lymphopenic and T cell-replete hosts. In the former, this state was not accompanied by deletion or suppression, allowing us to examine the unique contribution of adaptation to systemic tolerance. Surprisingly, adapting T cells could chronically help antigen-expressing B cells, leading to polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia and pathology, in the form of mild arthritis. The helper activity mediated by CD40L and cytokines was evident even if the B cells were introduced after extended adaptation of the T cells. In contrast, in the T cell-replete host, neither arthritis nor autoantibodies were induced. The containment of systemic pathology required host T cell-mediated extrinsic regulatory mechanisms to synergize with the cell intrinsic adaptation process. These extrinsic mechanisms prevented the effector differentiation of the autoreactive T cells and reduced their precursor frequency, in vivo.

  1. A model of human nasal epithelial cells adapted for direct and repeated exposure to airborne pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Gaëlle; Achard, Sophie; Loret, Thomas; Desauziers, Valérie; Momas, Isabelle; Seta, Nathalie

    2014-08-17

    Airway epithelium lining the nasal cavity plays a pivotal role in respiratory tract defense and protection mechanisms. Air pollution induces alterations linked to airway diseases such as asthma. Only very few in vitro studies to date have succeeded in reproducing physiological conditions relevant to cellular type and chronic atmospheric pollution exposure. We therefore, set up an in vitro model of human Airway Epithelial Cells of Nasal origin (hAECN) close to real human cell functionality, specifically adapted to study the biological effects of exposure to indoor gaseous pollution at the environmental level. hAECN were exposed under air-liquid interface, one, two, or three-times at 24 h intervals for 1 h, to air or formaldehyde (200 μg/m(3)), an indoor air gaseous pollutant. All experiments were ended at day 4, when both cellular viability and cytokine production were assessed. Optimal adherence and confluence of cells were obtained 96 h after cell seeding onto collagen IV-precoated insert. Direct and repeated exposure to formaldehyde did not produce any cellular damage or IL-6 production change, although weak lower IL-8 production was observed only after the third exposure. Our model is significantly better than previous ones due to cell type and the repeated exposure protocol.

  2. An Argonaute 2 Switch Regulates Circulating miR-210 to Coordinate Hypoxic Adaptation across Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Andrew; Lee, Changjin; Annis, Sofia; Min, Pil-Ki; Pande, Reena; Creager, Mark A.; Julian, Colleen G.; Moore, Lorna G.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Hwang, Sarah J.; Kourembanas, Stella; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Complex organisms may coordinate molecular responses to hypoxia by specialized avenues of communication across multiple tissues, but these mechanisms are poorly understood. Plasma-based, extracellular microRNAs have been described, yet, their regulation and biological functions in hypoxia remain enigmatic. We found a unique pattern of release of the hypoxia-inducible microRNA-210 (miR-210) from hypoxic and reoxygenated cells. This microRNA is also elevated in human plasma in physiologic and pathologic conditions of altered oxygen demand and delivery. Released miR-210 can be delivered to recipient cells, and its direct suppression of its direct target ISCU and mitochondrial metabolism is primarily evident in hypoxia. To regulate these hypoxia-specific actions, prolyl-hydroxylation of Argonaute 2 acts as a molecular switch that reciprocally modulates miR-210 release and intracellular activity in source cells as well as regulates intracellular activity in recipient cells after miR-210 delivery. Therefore, Argonaute 2-dependent control of released miR-210 represents a unique communication system that integrates the hypoxic response across anatomically distinct cells, preventing unnecessary activity of delivered miR-210 in normoxia while still preparing recipient tissues for incipient hypoxic stress and accelerating adaptation. PMID:24983771

  3. Ex vivo expansion protocol for human tumor specific T cells for adoptive T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Anne-Marie; Borelli, Gabriel; Hoel, Hanna Julie; Lislerud, Kari; Gaudernack, Gustav; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Aarvak, Tanja

    2010-04-15

    Adoptive T cell therapy is a promising treatment strategy for patients with different types of cancer. The methods used for generation of high numbers of tumor specific T cells usually require long-term ex vivo culture, which frequently lead to generation of terminally differentiated effector cells, demonstrating low persistence in vivo. Therefore, optimization of protocols for generation of T cells for adoptive cell therapy is warranted. The aim of this work was to develop a protocol for expansion of antigen-specific T cells using Dynabeads CD3/CD28 to obtain T cells expressing markers important for in vivo persistence and survival. To achieve high numbers of antigen-specific T cells following expansion, we have tested the effect of depleting regulatory T cells using Dynabeads CD25 and including a pre-stimulation step with peptide prior to the non-specific expansion with Dynabeads. Our data demonstrate that virus- and tumor specific T cells can be expanded to high numbers using Dynabeads CD3/CD28 following optimization of the culture conditions. The expansion protocol presented here results in enrichment of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells with an early/intermediate memory phenotype. This is observed even when the antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells demonstrated a terminal effector phenotype prior to expansion. This protocol thus results in expanded T cells with a phenotypic profile which may increase the chance of retaining long-term persistence following adoptive transfer. Based on these data we have developed a cGMP protocol for expansion of tumor specific T cells for adoptive T cell therapy.

  4. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

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    Chansavath Phetsouphanh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  5. Cell-specific proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuet, Kai P; Doma, Meenakshi K; Ngo, John T; Sweredoski, Michael J; Graham, Robert L J; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Schuman, Erin M; Sternberg, Paul W; Tirrell, David A

    2015-03-03

    Proteomic analysis of rare cells in heterogeneous environments presents difficult challenges. Systematic methods are needed to enrich, identify, and quantify proteins expressed in specific cells in complex biological systems including multicellular plants and animals. Here, we have engineered a Caenorhabditis elegans phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase capable of tagging proteins with the reactive noncanonical amino acid p-azido-L-phenylalanine. We achieved spatiotemporal selectivity in the labeling of C. elegans proteins by controlling expression of the mutant synthetase using cell-selective (body wall muscles, intestinal epithelial cells, neurons, and pharyngeal muscle) or state-selective (heat-shock) promoters in several transgenic lines. Tagged proteins are distinguished from the rest of the protein pool through bioorthogonal conjugation of the azide side chain to probes that permit visualization and isolation of labeled proteins. By coupling our methodology with stable-isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), we successfully profiled proteins expressed in pharyngeal muscle cells, and in the process, identified proteins not previously known to be expressed in these cells. Our results show that tagging proteins with spatiotemporal selectivity can be achieved in C. elegans and illustrate a convenient and effective approach for unbiased discovery of proteins expressed in targeted subsets of cells.

  6. Dendritic Cells Coordinate the Development and Homeostasis of Organ-Specific Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Daniel S; Gilmore, Dana C; Berger, Julian M; Nishi, Saki; Lee, Victoria; Malchow, Sven; Kline, Douglas E; Kline, Justin; Vander Griend, Donald J; Huang, Haochu; Socci, Nicholas D; Savage, Peter A

    2016-04-19

    Although antigen recognition mediated by the T cell receptor (TCR) influences many facets of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell biology, including development and function, the cell types that present antigen to Treg cells in vivo remain largely undefined. By tracking a clonal population of Aire-dependent, prostate-specific Treg cells in mice, we demonstrated an essential role for dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating organ-specific Treg cell biology. We have shown that the thymic development of prostate-specific Treg cells required antigen presentation by DCs. Moreover, Batf3-dependent CD8α(+) DCs were dispensable for the development of this clonotype and had negligible impact on the polyclonal Treg cell repertoire. In the periphery, CCR7-dependent migratory DCs coordinated the activation of organ-specific Treg cells in the prostate-draining lymph nodes. Our results demonstrate that the development and peripheral regulation of organ-specific Treg cells are dependent on antigen presentation by DCs, implicating DCs as key mediators of organ-specific immune tolerance.

  7. Induced mutations in yeast cell populations adapting to an unforeseen challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lindsay S; Wei, Wu; Stolovicki, Elad; Benbenishty, Tamar; Wilkening, Stefan; Steinmetz, Lars M; Braun, Erez; David, Lior

    2014-01-01

    The modern evolutionary synthesis assumes that mutations occur at random, independently of the environment in which they confer an advantage. However, there are indications that cells facing challenging conditions can adapt rapidly, utilizing processes beyond selection of pre-existing genetic variation. Here, we show that a strong regulatory challenge can induce mutations in many independent yeast cells, in the absence of general mutagenesis. Whole genome sequencing of cell lineages reveals a repertoire of independent mutations within a single lineage that arose only after the cells were exposed to the challenging environment, while other cells in the same lineage adapted without any mutation in their genomes. Thus, our experiments uncovered multiple alternative routes for heritable adaptation that were all induced in the same lineage during a short time period. Our results demonstrate the existence of adaptation mechanisms beyond random mutation, suggesting a tight connection between physiological and genetic processes.

  8. Extracellular Vesicles from Ovarian Carcinoma Cells Display Specific Glycosignatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cells release vesicles to the extracellular environment with characteristic nucleic acid, protein, lipid, and glycan composition. Here we have isolated and characterized extracellular vesicles (EVs and total cell membranes (MBs from ovarian carcinoma OVMz cells. EVs were enriched in specific markers, including Tsg101, CD63, CD9, annexin-I, and MBs contained markers of cellular membrane compartments, including calnexin, GRASP65, GS28, LAMP-1, and L1CAM. The glycoprotein galectin-3 binding protein (LGALS3BP was strongly enriched in EVs and it contained sialylated complex N-glycans. Lectin blotting with a panel of lectins showed that EVs had specific glycosignatures relative to MBs. Furthermore, the presence of glycoproteins bearing complex N-glycans with α2,3-linked sialic acid, fucose, bisecting-GlcNAc and LacdiNAc structures, and O-glycans with the T-antigen were detected. The inhibition of N-glycosylation processing from high mannose to complex glycans using kifunensine caused changes in the composition of EVs and induced a decrease of several glycoproteins. In conclusion, the results showed that glycosignatures of EVs were specific and altered glycosylation within the cell affected the composition and/or dynamics of EVs release. Furthermore, the identified glycosignatures of EVs could provide novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer.

  9. Cell cycle regulation in human embryonic stem cells: links to adaptation to cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Tomas; Dolezalova, Dasa; Holubcova, Zuzana; Hampl, Ales

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle represents not only a tightly orchestrated mechanism of cell replication and cell division but it also plays an important role in regulation of cell fate decision. Particularly in the context of pluripotent stem cells or multipotent progenitor cells, regulation of cell fate decision is of paramount importance. It has been shown that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) show unique cell cycle characteristics, such as short doubling time due to abbreviated G1 phase; these properties change with the onset of differentiation. This review summarizes the current understanding of cell cycle regulation in hESCs. We discuss cell cycle properties as well as regulatory machinery governing cell cycle progression of undifferentiated hESCs. Additionally, we provide evidence that long-term culture of hESCs is accompanied by changes in cell cycle properties as well as configuration of several cell cycle regulatory molecules.

  10. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

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    Tozeren Aydin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative

  11. Specific binding of benzodiazepines to human breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinlich, A; Strohmeier, R; Kaufmann, M; Kuhl, H

    1999-01-01

    Binding of [3H]Ro5-4864, a peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) agonist, to BT-20 human, estrogen- (ER) and progesterone- (PR) receptor negative breast cancer cells was characterized. It was found to be specific, dose-dependent and saturable with a single population of binding sites. Dissociation constant (K(D)) was 8.5 nM, maximal binding capacity (Bmax) 339 fM/10(6) cells. Ro5-4864 (IC50 17.3 nM) and PK 11195 (IC50 12.3 nM) were able to compete with [3H]Ro5-4864 for binding, indicating specificity of interaction with PBR. Diazepam was able to displace [3H]Ro5-4864 from binding only at high concentrations (>1 microM), while ODN did not compete for PBR binding. Thymidine-uptake assay showed a biphasic response of cell proliferation. While low concentrations (100 nM) of Ro5-4864, PK 11195 and diazepam increased cell growth by 10 to 20%, higher concentrations (10-100 microM) significantly inhibited cell proliferation. PK 11195, a potent PBR ligand, was able to attenuate growth of BT-20 cells stimulated by 100 nM Ro5-4864 and to reverse growth reduction caused by 1 and 10 microM Ro5-4864, but not by 50 microM and 100 microM. This indicates that the antimitotic activity of higher concentrations of Ro5-4864 is independent of PBR binding. It is suggested, that PBR are involved in growth regulation of certain human breast cancer cell lines, possibly by supplying proliferating cells with energy, as their endogenous ligand is a polypeptide transporting Acyl-CoA.

  12. Stochastic adaptation and fold-change detection: from single-cell to population behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leier André

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cell signaling terminology, adaptation refers to a system's capability of returning to its equilibrium upon a transient response. To achieve this, a network has to be both sensitive and precise. Namely, the system must display a significant output response upon stimulation, and later on return to pre-stimulation levels. If the system settles at the exact same equilibrium, adaptation is said to be 'perfect'. Examples of adaptation mechanisms include temperature regulation, calcium regulation and bacterial chemotaxis. Results We present models of the simplest adaptation architecture, a two-state protein system, in a stochastic setting. Furthermore, we consider differences between individual and collective adaptive behavior, and show how our system displays fold-change detection properties. Our analysis and simulations highlight why adaptation needs to be understood in terms of probability, and not in strict numbers of molecules. Most importantly, selection of appropriate parameters in this simple linear setting may yield populations of cells displaying adaptation, while single cells do not. Conclusions Single cell behavior cannot be inferred from population measurements and, sometimes, collective behavior cannot be determined from the individuals. By consequence, adaptation can many times be considered a purely emergent property of the collective system. This is a clear example where biological ergodicity cannot be assumed, just as is also the case when cell replication rates are not homogeneous, or depend on the cell state. Our analysis shows, for the first time, how ergodicity cannot be taken for granted in simple linear examples either. The latter holds even when cells are considered isolated and devoid of replication capabilities (cell-cycle arrested. We also show how a simple linear adaptation scheme displays fold-change detection properties, and how rupture of ergodicity prevails in scenarios where transitions between

  13. Programmable Adaptive Spectral Imagers for Mission-Specific Application in Chemical/Biological Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    detection of chemical/biological agents. Extensive research into both passive remote chemical/biological sensors and active laser- based ( LIDAR ... photodetector (Fig. 1). Fig. 1. Adaptive spectrograph concept: light from a standoff spectral scene is dispersed, dynamically encoded with...the purpose. Data acquisition and processing software was developed for the control of the DMA, capturing data from the photodetectors , and for

  14. Identity-Specific Face Adaptation Effects: Evidence for Abstractive Face Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Graham

    2011-01-01

    The effects of selective adaptation on familiar face perception were examined. After prolonged exposure to photographs of a celebrity, participants saw a series of ambiguous morphs that were varying mixtures between the face of that person and a different celebrity. Participants judged fewer of the morphs to resemble the celebrity to which they…

  15. Coupled flow-structure-biochemistry simulations of dynamic systems of blood cells using an adaptive surface tracking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, M. H.; Kunz, R. F.; Bistline, J. E.; Dong, C.

    2009-07-01

    A method for the computation of low-Reynolds number dynamic blood cell systems is presented. The specific system of interest here is interaction between cancer cells and white blood cells in an experimental flow system. Fluid dynamics, structural mechanics, six-degree-of-freedom motion control, and surface biochemistry analysis components are coupled in the context of adaptive octree-based grid generation. Analytical and numerical verification of the quasi-steady assumption for the fluid mechanics is presented. The capabilities of the technique are demonstrated by presenting several three-dimensional cell system simulations, including the collision/interaction between a cancer cell and an endothelium adherent polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) cell in a shear flow.

  16. Specific Control of Immunity by Regulatory CD8 T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoleiTang; TrevorRFSmith

    2005-01-01

    T lymphocytes with dedicated suppressor function (Treg) play a crucial role in the homeostatic control of immunity in the periphery. Several Treg phenotypes have now been identified in the CD4 and CD8 T cell populations, suggesting their down-regulatory function in both human and animal models of autoimmunity, transplantation and tumor immunity. Here we will focus on the CD8 Treg population and their ability to specifically inhibit a pathogenic autoimmune response. This review will detail the current advances in the knowledge of CD8 Treg in the context of antigen specificity, phenotype, MHC restriction, mechanism of action, and priming. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):11-19.

  17. Specific Control of Immunity by Regulatory CD8 T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolei Tang; Trevor RF Smith; Vipin Kumar

    2005-01-01

    T lymphocytes with dedicated suppressor function (Treg) play a crucial role in the homeostatic control of immunity in the periphery. Several Treg phenotypes have now been identified in the CD4 and CD8 T cell populations,suggesting their down-regulatory function in both human and animal models of autoimmunity, transplantation and tumor immunity. Here we will focus on the CD8 Treg population and their ability to specifically inhibit a pathogenic autoimmune response. This review will detail the current advances in the knowledge of CD8 Treg in the context of antigen specificity, phenotype, MHC restriction, mechanism of action, and priming.

  18. [Establishment of hemophilia A patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells with urine cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiqing; Hu, Xuyun; Pang, Jialun; Wang, Xiaolin; Lin Peng, Siyuan; Li, Zhuo; Wu, Yong; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To generate hemophilia A (HA) patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induce endothelial differentiation. METHODS Tubular epithelial cells were isolated and cultured from the urine of HA patients. The iPSCs were generated by forced expression of Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4) using retroviruses and characterized by cell morphology, pluripotent marker staining and in vivo differentiation through teratoma formation. Induced endothelial differentiation of the iPSCs was achieved with the OP9 cell co-culture method. RESULTS Patient-specific iPSCs were generated from urine cells of the HA patients, which could be identified by cell morphology, pluripotent stem cell surface marker staining and in vivo differentiation of three germ layers. The teratoma experiment has confirmed that such cells could differentiate into endothelial cells expressing the endothelial-specific markers CD144, CD31 and vWF. CONCLUSION HA patient-specific iPSCs could be generated from urine cells and can differentiate into endothelial cells. This has provided a new HA disease modeling approach and may serve as an applicable autologous cell source for gene correction and cell therapy studies for HA.

  19. The Memories of NK Cells: Innate-Adaptive Immune Intrinsic Crosstalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gabrielli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although NK cells are considered part of the innate immune system, a series of evidences has demonstrated that they possess characteristics typical of the adaptive immune system. These NK adaptive features, in particular their memory-like functions, are discussed from an ontogenetic and evolutionary point of view.

  20. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  1. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Merkert

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies.

  2. Cell-specific information processing in segregating populations of Eph receptor ephrin-expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Sherman, Andrew; Chen, Ginny I;

    2009-01-01

    Cells have self-organizing properties that control their behavior in complex tissues. Contact between cells expressing either B-type Eph receptors or their transmembrane ephrin ligands initiates bidirectional signals that regulate cell positioning. However, simultaneously investigating how...... information is processed in two interacting cell types remains a challenge. We implemented a proteomic strategy to systematically determine cell-specific signaling networks underlying EphB2- and ephrin-B1-controlled cell sorting. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of mixed populations of EphB2......- and ephrin-B1-expressing cells that were labeled with different isotopes revealed cell-specific tyrosine phosphorylation events. Functional associations between these phosphotyrosine signaling networks and cell sorting were established with small interfering RNA screening. Data-driven network modeling...

  3. Generation of Transplantable Beta Cells for Patient-Specific Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation offers a potential cure for type 1 diabetes, but it is challenged by insufficient donor tissue and side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, alternative sources of insulin-producing cells and isletfriendly immunosuppression are required to increase the efficiency and safety of this procedure. Beta cells can be transdifferentiated from precursors or another heterologous (non-beta-cell source. Recent advances in beta cell regeneration from somatic cells such as fibroblasts could circumvent the usage of immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, generation of patient-specific beta cells provides the potential of an evolutionary treatment for patients with diabetes.

  4. Cell reprogramming for the creation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells by defined factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqun YIN; Heng WANG; Hongguo CAO; Yunhai ZHANG; Yong TAO; Xiaorong ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), characterized by being able to differentiate into various types of cells, are generally regarded as the most promising sources for cell replacement therapies. However, as typical PSCs, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are still far away from human clinics so far due to ethical issues and immune rejection response. One way to avoid such problems is to use stem cells derived from autologous somatic cells. Up to date, PSCs could be obtained by reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotent state with approaches including somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), fusion with stem cells, coculture with cells' extracts, and induction with defined factors. Among these, through reprogramming somatic cells directly by retroviral transduction of transcription factors, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been successfully generated in both mouse and human recently. These iPS cells shared similar morphology and growth properties to ESCs, could express ESCs marker genes, and could produce adult or germline-competent chimaeras and differentiate into a variety of cell types, including germ cells. Moreover, with iPS technique, patient specific PSCs could be derived more easily from handful somatic cells in human without immune rejection responses innately connected to ESCs. Consequently, generation of iPS cells would be of great help to further understand disease mechanisms, drug screening, and cell transplantation therapies as well.In summary,the recent progress in the study of cell reprogramming for the creation of patientspecific pluripotent stem cells, some existing problems, and research perspectives were suggested.

  5. ADAPTIVE LAYERED CARTESIAN CUT CELL METHOD FOR THE UNSTRUCTURED HEXAHEDRAL GRIDS GENERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Peining; TAN Jianrong; LIU Zhenyu

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive layered Cartesian cut cell method is presented to solve the difficulty of the unstructured hexahedral anisotropic Cartesian grids generation from the complex CAD model. Vertex merging algorithm based on relaxed AVL tree is investigated to construct topological structure for stereo lithography (STL) files, and a topology-based self-adaptive layered slicing algorithm with special features control strategy is brought forward. With the help of convex hull, a new points-in-polygon method is employed to improve the Cartesian cut cell method. By integrating the self-adaptive layered slicing algorithm and the improved Cartesian cut cell method, the adaptive layered Cartesian cut cell method gains the volume data of the complex CAD model in STL file and generates the unstructured hexahedral anisotropic Cartesian grids.

  6. Detection and specifity of class specific antibodies to whole bacteria cells using a solid phase radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerkinsky, C.; Rees, A.S.; Bergimeier, L.A.; Challacombe, S.J. (Guy' s Hospital Medical and Dental Schools, London (UK))

    1983-07-01

    A solid phase radioimmunoassay has been developed which can be used for the detection of isotype specific antibodies to whole bacteria and other particulate antigens, and is applicable to a variety of species. Bacteria are bound to the solid phase by the use either of antibodies, or of methyl glyoxal. Both methods result in a sensitive and reproducible assay, and bacteria do not appear to desorb from the solid phase. The specificity of antibodies to whole bacteria was examined by absorption of antisera with various species of bacteria and retesting, or by determining the binding of antisera to various bacteria bound to the solid phase. Both methods revealed specificity for the bacteria examined. Inhibition studies showed that antibodies to Streptococcus mutans whole cells could be inhibited by purified cell surface antigens glucosyltransferase and antigen I/II, but only minimally by lipoteichoic acid, c polysaccharide or dextran. In murine antisera antibodies of the IgG, IgM, and IgA classes could be detected at amounts of less than 1 ng/ml.

  7. Adaptive responses to dasatinib-treated lung squamous cell cancer cells harboring DDR2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yun; Kim, Jae-Young; Watters, January M; Fang, Bin; Kinose, Fumi; Song, Lanxi; Koomen, John M; Teer, Jamie K; Fisher, Kate; Chen, Yian Ann; Rix, Uwe; Haura, Eric B

    2014-12-15

    DDR2 mutations occur in approximately 4% of lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) where the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib has emerged as a new therapeutic option. We found that ERK and AKT phosphorylation was weakly inhibited by dasatinib in DDR2-mutant lung SCC cells, suggesting that dasatinib inhibits survival signals distinct from other oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) and/or compensatory signals exist that dampen dasatinib activity. To gain better insight into dasatinib's action in these cells, we assessed altered global tyrosine phosphorylation (pY) after dasatinib exposure using a mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics approach. Overlaying protein-protein interaction relationships upon this dasatinib-regulated pY network revealed decreased phosphorylation of Src family kinases and their targets. Conversely, dasatinib enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation in a panel of RTK and their signaling adaptor complexes, including EGFR, MET/GAB1, and IGF1R/IRS2, implicating a RTK-driven adaptive response associated with dasatinib. To address the significance of this observation, these results were further integrated with results from a small-molecule chemical library screen. We found that dasatinib combined with MET and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) inhibitors had a synergistic effect, and ligand stimulation of EGFR and MET rescued DDR2-mutant lung SCC cells from dasatinib-induced loss of cell viability. Importantly, we observed high levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated EGFR and MET in a panel of human lung SCC tissues harboring DDR2 mutations. Our results highlight potential RTK-driven adaptive-resistant mechanisms upon DDR2 targeting, and they suggest new, rationale cotargeting strategies for DDR2-mutant lung SCC.

  8. Cell theory, specificity, and reproduction, 1837-1870.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2010-09-01

    The cell is not only the structural, physiological, and developmental unit of life, but also the reproductive one. So far, however, this aspect of the cell has received little attention from historians and philosophers of biology. I will argue that cell theory had far-reaching consequences for how biologists conceptualized the reproductive relationships between germs and adult organisms. Cell theory, as formulated by Theodor Schwann in 1839, implied that this relationship was a specific and lawful one, that is, that germs of a certain kind, all else being equal, would produce adult organisms of the same kind, and vice versa. Questions of preformation and epigenesis took on a new meaning under this presupposition. The question then became one of whether cells could be considered as autonomous agents producing adult organisms of a given species, or whether they were the product of external, organizing forces and thus only a stage in the development of the whole organism. This question became an important issue for nineteenth-century biology. As I will demonstrate, it was the view of cells as autonomous agents which helped both Charles Darwin and Gregor Mendel to think of inheritance as a lawful process.

  9. Transcriptome analysis in tardigrade species reveals specific molecular pathways for stress adaptations

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Förster; Daniela Beisser; Grohme, Markus A.; Chunguang Liang; Brahim Mali; Alexander Matthias Siegl; Engelmann, Julia C.; Shkumatov, Alexander V; Elham Schokraie; Tobias Müller; Martina Schnölzer; Schill, Ralph O.; Marcus Frohme; Thomas Dandekar

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades have unique stress-adaptations that allow them to survive extremes of cold, heat, radiation and vacuum. To study this, encoded protein clusters and pathways from an ongoing transcriptome study on the tardigrade \\(Milnesium\\) \\(tardigradum\\) were analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared to expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from \\(Hypsibius\\) \\(dujardini\\), revealing major pathways involved in resistance against extreme environmental conditions. ESTs are available on the Tardig...

  10. New method for selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted bifidobacteria cells using continuous culture and immobilized cell technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meile Leo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress can severely compromise viability of bifidobacteria. Exposure of Bifidobacterium cells to oxygen causes accumulation of reactive oxygen species, mainly hydrogen peroxide, leading to cell death. In this study, we tested the suitability of continuous culture under increasing selective pressure combined with immobilized cell technology for the selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted Bifidobacterium cells. Cells of B. longum NCC2705 were immobilized in gellan-xanthan gum gel beads and used to continuously ferment MRS medium containing increasing concentration of H2O2 from 0 to 130 ppm. Results At the beginning of the culture, high cell density of 1013 CFU per litre of reactor was tested. The continuous culture gradually adapted to increasing H2O2 concentrations. However, after increasing the H2O2 concentration to 130 ppm the OD of the culture decreased to 0. Full wash out was prevented by the immobilization of the cells in gel matrix. Hence after stopping the stress, it was possible to re-grow the cells that survived the highest lethal dose of H2O2 and to select two adapted colonies (HPR1 and HPR2 after plating of the culture effluent. In contrast to HPR1, HPR2 showed stable characteristics over at least 70 generations and exhibited also higher tolerance to O2 than non adapted wild type cells. Preliminary characterization of HPR2 was carried out by global genome expression profile analysis. Two genes coding for a protein with unknown function and possessing trans-membrane domains and an ABC-type transporter protein were overexpressed in HPR2 cells compared to wild type cells. Conclusions Our study showed that continuous culture with cell immobilization is a valid approach for selecting cells adapted to hydrogen peroxide. Elucidation of H2O2 adaptation mechanisms in HPR2 could be helpful to develop oxygen resistant bifidobacteria.

  11. Specific insulin binding in bovine chromaffin cells; demonstration of preferential binding to adrenalin-storing cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serck-Hanssen, G.; Soevik, O.

    1987-12-28

    Insulin binding was studied in subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells enriched in adrenalin-producing cells (A-cells) or noradrenalin-producing cells (NA-cells). Binding of /sup 125/I-insulin was carried out at 15/sup 0/C for 3 hrs in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled hormone. Four fractions of cells were obtained by centrifugation on a stepwise bovine serum albumin gradient. The four fractions were all shown to bind insulin in a specific manner and the highest binding was measured in the cell layers of higher densities, containing mainly A-cells. The difference in binding of insulin to the four subpopulations of chromaffin cells seemed to be related to differences in numbers of receptors as opposed to receptor affinities. The authors conclude that bovine chromaffin cells possess high affinity binding sites for insulin and that these binding sites are mainly confined to A-cells. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  12. Catalysis of Protein Folding by Chaperones Accelerates Evolutionary Dynamics in Adapting Cell Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Cetinbaş; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly f...

  13. Impact of host cell line adaptation on quasispecies composition and glycosylation of influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Verena Roedig

    Full Text Available The genome of influenza A viruses is constantly changing (genetic drift resulting in small, gradual changes in viral proteins. Alterations within antibody recognition sites of the viral membrane glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA result in an antigenetic drift, which requires the seasonal update of human influenza virus vaccines. Generally, virus adaptation is necessary to obtain sufficiently high virus yields in cell culture-derived vaccine manufacturing. In this study detailed HA N-glycosylation pattern analysis was combined with in-depth pyrosequencing analysis of the virus genomic RNA. Forward and backward adaptation from Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK cells to African green monkey kidney (Vero cells was investigated for two closely related influenza A virus PR/8/34 (H1N1 strains: from the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC or the Robert Koch Institute (RKI. Furthermore, stability of HA N-glycosylation patterns over ten consecutive passages and different harvest time points is demonstrated. Adaptation to Vero cells finally allowed efficient influenza A virus replication in Vero cells. In contrast, during back-adaptation the virus replicated well from the very beginning. HA N-glycosylation patterns were cell line dependent and stabilized fast within one (NIBSC-derived virus or two (RKI-derived virus successive passages during adaptation processes. However, during adaptation new virus variants were detected. These variants carried "rescue" mutations on the genomic level within the HA stem region, which result in amino acid substitutions. These substitutions finally allowed sufficient virus replication in the new host system. According to adaptation pressure the composition of the virus populations varied. In Vero cells a selection for "rescue" variants was characteristic. After back-adaptation to MDCK cells some variants persisted at indifferent frequencies, others slowly diminished and even

  14. Immune Adaptation to Environmental Influence: The Case of NK Cells and HCMV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rölle, Alexander; Brodin, Petter

    2016-03-01

    The immune system of an individual human is determined by heritable traits and a continuous process of adaptation to a broad variety of extrinsic, non-heritable factors such as viruses, bacteria, dietary components and more. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) successfully infects the majority of the human population and establishes latency, thereby exerting a life-long influence on the immune system of its host. CMV has been shown to influence the majority of immune parameters in healthy individuals. Here we focus on adaptive changes induced by CMV in subsets of Natural Killer (NK) cells, changes that question our very definition of adaptive and innate immunity by suggesting that adaptations of immune cells to environmental influences occur across the entire human immune system and not restricted to the classical adaptive branch of the immune system.

  15. Stem/progenitor cells: a potential source of retina-specific cells for retinal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yong-Yan; Feng, Dong-Fu; Pan, Dong-Chao

    2009-11-01

    Retinal injury generally results in permanent visual disturbance or even blindness. Any effort to restore vision in such condition would require replacement of the highly specialized retinal cells. Stem/progenitor cells have been proposed as a potential source of new retina-specific cells to replace those lost due to retina injury. Evidence to date suggests that continued development of stem cell therapies may ultimately lead to viable treatment options for retina injury. A wide range of stem/progenitor cells from various sources is currently being investigated for the treatment of retinal injury. This article reviews the recent achievements about stem/progenitor cell source for retinal repair.

  16. GPU accelerated cell-based adaptive mesh refinement on unstructured quadrilateral grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xisheng; Wang, Luying; Ran, Wei; Qin, Fenghua

    2016-10-01

    A GPU accelerated inviscid flow solver is developed on an unstructured quadrilateral grid in the present work. For the first time, the cell-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is fully implemented on GPU for the unstructured quadrilateral grid, which greatly reduces the frequency of data exchange between GPU and CPU. Specifically, the AMR is processed with atomic operations to parallelize list operations, and null memory recycling is realized to improve the efficiency of memory utilization. It is found that results obtained by GPUs agree very well with the exact or experimental results in literature. An acceleration ratio of 4 is obtained between the parallel code running on the old GPU GT9800 and the serial code running on E3-1230 V2. With the optimization of configuring a larger L1 cache and adopting Shared Memory based atomic operations on the newer GPU C2050, an acceleration ratio of 20 is achieved. The parallelized cell-based AMR processes have achieved 2x speedup on GT9800 and 18x on Tesla C2050, which demonstrates that parallel running of the cell-based AMR method on GPU is feasible and efficient. Our results also indicate that the new development of GPU architecture benefits the fluid dynamics computing significantly.

  17. Mobilizing forces -CD4~+ helper T cells script adaptive immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frédérick Masson; Gabrielle T Belz

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, CD4~+ T cells have been understood to play a key role in 'helping' CD8~+ T cells undergo efficient activation and proliferation in response to foreign pathogens. This has been thought to be directed primarily by CD4~+ T cell interactions with dendritic cells (DCs) [1, 2] that convert 'unlicenced' DCs into DCs capable of implementing a full blown immune response ('licenced' DCs).

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains exhibit differential and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mvubu, Nontobeko Eunice; Pillay, Balakrishna; Gamieldien, Junaid; Bishai, William; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-12-01

    Although pulmonary epithelial cells are integral to innate and adaptive immune responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, global transcriptomic changes in these cells remain largely unknown. Changes in gene expression induced in pulmonary epithelial cells infected with M. tuberculosis F15/LAM4/KZN, F11, F28, Beijing and Unique genotypes were investigated by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform generated 50 bp reads that were mapped to the human genome (Hg19) using Tophat (2.0.10). Differential gene expression induced by the different strains in infected relative to the uninfected cells was quantified and compared using Cufflinks (2.1.0) and MeV (4.0.9), respectively. Gene expression varied among the strains with the total number of genes as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (1187), Beijing (1252), F11 (1639), F28 (870), Unique (886) and H37Rv (1179). A subset of 292 genes was commonly induced by all strains, where 52 genes were down-regulated while 240 genes were up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes were compared among the strains and the number of induced strain-specific gene signatures were as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (138), Beijing (52), F11 (255), F28 (55), Unique (186) and H37Rv (125). Strain-specific molecular gene signatures associated with functional pathways were observed only for the Unique and H37Rv strains while certain biological functions may be associated with other strain signatures. This study demonstrated that strains of M. tuberculosis induce differential gene expression and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells. Specific signatures induced by clinical strains of M. tuberculosis can be further explored for novel host-associated biomarkers and adjunctive immunotherapies.

  19. Liver-specific gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells is induced by liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudia Lange; Philipp Bassler; Michael V. Lioznov; Helge Bruns; Dietrich Kluth; Axel R. Zander; Henning C. Fiegel

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The origin of putative liver cells from distinct bone marrow stem cells, e.g. hematopoietic stem cells or multipotent adult progenitor cells was found in recent in vitro studies. Cell culture experiments revealed a key role of growth factors for the induction of liver-specific genes in stem cell cultures. We investigated the potential of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from bone marrow to differentiate into hepatocytic cells in vitro. Furthermore,we assessed the influence of cocultured liver cells on induction of liver-specific gene expression.METHODS: Mesenchymal stem cells were marked with green fluorescent protein (GFP) by retroviral gene transduction. Clonal marked MSC were either cultured under liver stimulating conditions using fibronectin-coated culture dishes and medium supplemented with SCF, HGF,EGF, and FGF-4 alone, or in presence of freshly isolated rat liver cells. Cells in cocultures were harvested and GFP+ or GFP- cells were separated using fluorescence activated cell sorting. RT-PCR analysis for the stem cell marker Thy1 and the hepatocytic markers CK-18, albumin, CK-19,and AFP was performed in the different cell populations.RESULTS: Under the specified culture conditions, rat MSC cocultured with liver cells expressed albumin-, CK-18,CK-19, and AFP-RNA over 3 weeks, whereas MSC cultured alone did not show liver specific gene expression.CONCLUSION: The results indicate that (1) rat MSC from bone marrow can differentiate towards hepatocytic lineage in vitro, and (2) that the microenvironment plays a decisive role for the induction of hepatic differentiation of rMSC.

  20. Lipoxin A₄ modulates adaptive immunity by decreasing memory B-cell responses via an ALX/FPR2-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Serhan, Charles N; Phipps, Richard P

    2014-02-01

    Specialized proresolving mediators are endogenous bioactive lipid molecules that play a fundamental role in the regulation of inflammation and its resolution. Lipoxins and other specialized proresolving mediators have been identified in important immunological tissues including bone marrow, spleen, and blood. Lipoxins regulate functions of the innate immune system including the promotion of monocyte recruitment and increase macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. A major knowledge gap is whether lipoxins influence adaptive immune cells. Here, we analyzed the actions of lipoxin A₄ (LXA₄) and its receptor ALX/FPR2 on human and mouse B cells. LXA₄ decreased IgM and IgG production on activated human B cells through ALX/FPR2-dependent signaling, which downregulated NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. LXA₄ also inhibited human memory B-cell antibody production and proliferation, but not naïve B-cell function. Lastly, LXA₄ decreased antigen-specific antibody production in an OVA immunization mouse model. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the actions of lipoxins on human B cells, demonstrating a link between resolution signals and adaptive immunity. Regulating antibody production is crucial to prevent unwanted inflammation. Harnessing the ability of lipoxins to decrease memory B-cell antibody production can be beneficial to threat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders.

  1. Satellite cell activation induced by aerobic muscle adaptation in response to endurance exercise in humans and rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Phablo; Mendes, Sávio Victor Diógenes; Ceccatto, Vânia Marilande; Hirabara, Sandro Massao

    2017-02-01

    Although the requirement of satellite cells activation and expansion following injury, mechanical load or growth stimulus provoked by resistance exercise has been well established, their function in response to aerobic exercise adaptation remains unclear. A clear relationship between satellite cell expansion in fiber-type specific myosin heavy chain and aerobic performance has been related, independent of myonuclear accretion or muscle growth. However, the trigger for this activation process is not fully understood yet and it seems to be a multi-faceted and well-orchestrated process. Emerging in vitro studies suggest a role for metabolic pathways and oxygen availability for satellite cell activation, modulating the self-renewal potential and cell fate control. The goal of this review is to describe and discuss the current knowledge about the satellite cell activation and expansion in response to aerobic exercise adaptation in human and rodent models. Additionally, findings about the in vitro metabolic control, which seems be involved in the satellite cell activation and cell fate control, are presented and discussed.

  2. Highly efficient site-specific transgenesis in cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Iacovos P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenes introduced into cancer cell lines serve as powerful tools for identification of genes involved in cancer. However, the random nature of genomic integration site of a transgene highly influences the fidelity, reliability and level of its expression. In order to alleviate this bottleneck, we characterized the potential utility of a novel PhiC31 integrase-mediated site-specific insertion system (PhiC31-IMSI for introduction of transgenes into a pre-inserted docking site in the genome of cancer cells. Methods According to this system, a “docking-site” was first randomly inserted into human cancer cell lines and clones with a single copy were selected. Subsequently, an “incoming” vector containing the gene of interest was specifically inserted in the docking-site using PhiC31. Results Using the Pc-3 and SKOV-3 cancer cell lines, we showed that transgene insertion is reproducible and reliable. Furthermore, the selection system ensured that all surviving stable transgenic lines harbored the correct integration site. We demonstrated that the expression levels of reporter genes, such as green fluorescent protein and luciferase, from the same locus were comparable among sister, isogenic clones. Using in vivo xenograft studies, we showed that the genetically altered cancer cell lines retain the properties of the parental line. To achieve temporal control of transgene expression, we coupled our insertion strategy with the doxycycline inducible system and demonstrated tight regulation of the expression of the antiangiogenic molecule sFlt-1-Fc in Pc-3 cells. Furthermore, we introduced the luciferase gene into the insertion cassette allowing for possible live imaging of cancer cells in transplantation assays. We also generated a series of Gateway cloning-compatible intermediate cassettes ready for high-throughput cloning of transgenes and demonstrated that PhiC31-IMSI can be achieved in a high throughput 96-well plate

  3. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  4. Human prostate tumor antigen-specific CD8+ regulatory T cells are inhibited by CTLA-4 or IL-35 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Brian M; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Becker, Jordan T; Vignali, Dario A A; Burlingham, William J; McNeel, Douglas G

    2012-12-15

    Regulatory T cells play important roles in cancer development and progression by limiting the generation of innate and adaptive anti-tumor immunity. We hypothesized that in addition to natural CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor Ag-specific Tregs interfere with the detection of anti-tumor immunity after immunotherapy. Using samples from prostate cancer patients immunized with a DNA vaccine encoding prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and a trans-vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity (tvDTH) assay, we found that the detection of PAP-specific effector responses after immunization was prevented by the activity of PAP-specific regulatory cells. These regulatory cells were CD8(+)CTLA-4(+), and their suppression was relieved by blockade of CTLA-4, but not IL-10 or TGF-β. Moreover, Ag-specific CD8(+) Tregs were detected prior to immunization in the absence of PAP-specific effector responses. These PAP-specific CD8(+)CTLA-4(+) suppressor T cells expressed IL-35, which was decreased after blockade of CTLA-4, and inhibition of either CTLA-4 or IL-35 reversed PAP-specific suppression of tvDTH response. PAP-specific CD8(+)CTLA-4(+) T cells also suppressed T cell proliferation in an IL-35-dependent, contact-independent fashion. Taken together, these findings suggest a novel population of CD8(+)CTLA-4(+) IL-35-secreting tumor Ag-specific Tregs arise spontaneously in some prostate cancer patients, persist during immunization, and can prevent the detection of Ag-specific effector responses by an IL-35-dependent mechanism.

  5. Conformational adaptation of Asian macaque TRIMCyp directs lineage specific antiviral activity.

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    Laura M J Ylinen

    Full Text Available TRIMCyps are anti-retroviral proteins that have arisen independently in New World and Old World primates. All TRIMCyps comprise a CypA domain fused to the tripartite domains of TRIM5alpha but they have distinct lentiviral specificities, conferring HIV-1 restriction in New World owl monkeys and HIV-2 restriction in Old World rhesus macaques. Here we provide evidence that Asian macaque TRIMCyps have acquired changes that switch restriction specificity between different lentiviral lineages, resulting in species-specific alleles that target different viruses. Structural, thermodynamic and viral restriction analysis suggests that a single mutation in the Cyp domain, R69H, occurred early in macaque TRIMCyp evolution, expanding restriction specificity to the lentiviral lineages found in African green monkeys, sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees. Subsequent mutations have enhanced restriction to particular viruses but at the cost of broad specificity. We reveal how specificity is altered by a scaffold mutation, E143K, that modifies surface electrostatics and propagates conformational changes into the active site. Our results suggest that lentiviruses may have been important pathogens in Asian macaques despite the fact that there are no reported lentiviral infections in current macaque populations.

  6. Cancer cells that survive checkpoint adaptation contain micronuclei that harbor damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cody W; Golsteyn, Roy M

    2016-11-16

    We have examined the relationship between checkpoint adaptation (mitosis with damaged DNA) and micronuclei. Micronuclei in cancer cells are linked to genomic change, and may induce chromothripsis (chromosome shattering). We measured the cytotoxicity of the cancer drug cisplatin in M059K (glioma fibroblasts, IC50 15 μM). Nearly 100% of M059K cells were positive for histone γH2AX staining after 48 h treatment with a cytotoxic concentration of cisplatin. The proportion of micronucleated cells, as confirmed by microscopy using DAPI and lamin A/C staining, increased from 24% to 48%, and the total micronuclei in surviving cells accumulated over time. Promoting entry into mitosis with a checkpoint inhibitor increased the number of micronuclei in cells whereas blocking checkpoint adaptation with a Cdk inhibitor reduced the number of micronuclei. Interestingly, some micronuclei underwent asynchronous DNA replication, relative to the main nuclei, as measured by deoxy-bromo-uracil (BrdU) staining. These micronuclei stained positive for histone γH2AX, which was linked to DNA replication, suggesting that micronuclei arise from checkpoint adaptation and that micronuclei may continue to damage DNA. By contrast the normal cell line WI-38 did not undergo checkpoint adaptation when treated with cisplatin and did not show changes in micronuclei number. These data reveal that the production of micronuclei by checkpoint adaptation is part of a process that contributes to genomic change.

  7. Sensory Adaptation in Naive Peripheral CD4 T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Katy; Seddon, Benedict; Purbhoo, Marco A.; Zamoyska, Rose; Fisher, Amanda G.; Merkenschlager, Matthias

    2001-01-01

    T cell receptor interactions with peptide/major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligands control the selection of T cells in the thymus as well as their homeostasis in peripheral lymphoid organs. Here we show that pMHC contact modulates the expression of CD5 by naive CD4 T cells in a process that requires the continued expression of p56lck. Reduced CD5 levels in T cells deprived of pMHC contact are predictive of elevated Ca2+ responses to subsequent TCR engagement by anti-CD3 or nominal anti...

  8. Role of gastric blood flow, neutrophil infiltration, and mucosal cell proliferation in gastric adaptation to aspirin in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, S J; Brzozowski, T; Stachura, J; Dembinski, A; Majka, J

    1994-01-01

    Gastric mucosa exhibits the ability to adapt to ulcerogenic action of aspirin but the mechanism of this phenomenon is unknown. In this study, acute gastric lesions were produced by single or repeated doses of acidified aspirin in rats with intact or resected salivary glands and with intact or suppressed synthase of nitric oxide. A single oral dose of aspirin produced a dose dependent increase in gastric lesions accompanied by considerable blood neutrophilia and mucosal neutrophil infiltration, significant reduction in gastric blood flow, and almost complete suppression of biosynthesis of prostaglandins. After rechallenge with aspirin, the mucosal damage became smaller and progressively declined with repeated aspirin insults. Gastric adaptation to aspirin was accompanied by a significant rise in gastric blood flow, reduction in both blood neutrophilia and mucosal neutrophil infiltration, and a remarkable increase in mucosal cell regeneration and mucosal content of epidermal growth factor. Salivectomy, which reduced the mucosal content of epidermal growth factor, aggravated the initial mucosal damage induced by the first exposure to acidified aspirin but did not prevent the adaptation of this mucosa to repeated aspirin insults. Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), a specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, eliminated the hyperaemic response to repeated aspirin but did not abolish the development of adaptation to aspirin showing that the maintenance of the gastric blood flow plays little part in this adaptation. In conclusion, the stomach adapts readily to repeated aspirin insults and this is accompanied by a considerable reduction in blood neutrophilia and the severity of neutrophil infiltration and by an extensive proliferation of mucosal cells possibly involving epidermal growth factor. PMID:7525421

  9. Natural killer cells facilitate PRAME-specific T-cell reactivity against neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap-Jan; van der Steen, Dirk M; Blokland, Nina J G; van Noesel, Max M; Molenaar, Jan J; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Boes, Marianne; Nierkens, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children with an estimated 5-year progression free survival of 20-40% in stage 4 disease. Neuroblastoma actively avoids recognition by natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although immunotherapy has gained traction for neuroblastoma treatment, these immune escape mechanisms restrain clinical results. Therefore, we aimed to improve neuroblastoma immunogenicity to further the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against neuroblastoma. We found that neuroblastoma cells significantly increase surface expression of MHC I upon exposure to active NK cells which thereby readily sensitize neuroblastoma cells for recognition by CTLs. We show that oncoprotein PRAME serves as an immunodominant antigen for neuroblastoma as NK-modulated neuroblastoma cells are recognized by PRAMESLLQHLIGL/A2-specific CTL clones. Furthermore, NK cells induce MHC I upregulation in neuroblastoma through contact-dependent secretion of IFNγ. Our results demonstrate remarkable plasticity in the peptide/MHC I surface expression of neuroblastoma cells, which is reversed when neuroblastoma cells experience innate immune attack by sensitized NK cells. These findings support the exploration of NK cells as adjuvant therapy to enforce neuroblastoma-specific CTL responses.

  10. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Kerry M.; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R.; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-09-19

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (viatransinteractions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (viacisinteractions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition betweencisandtransinteractions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions.

  11. CD8 T Cell Sensory Adaptation Dependent on TCR Avidity for Self-Antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquez, M.-E.; Ellmeier, W.; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa Maria;

    2005-01-01

    Adaptation of the T cell activation threshold may be one mechanism to control autoreactivity. To investigate its occurrence in vivo, we engineered a transgenic mouse model with increased TCR-dependent excitability by expressing a Zap70 gain-of-function mutant (ZAP-YEEI) in postselection CD8...... ZAP-YEEI cells were enhanced. Our data provide support for central and peripheral sensory T cell adaptation induced as a function of TCR avidity for self-ligands and signaling level. This may contribute to buffer excessive autoreactivity while optimizing TCR repertoire usage....... thymocytes and T cells. Increased basal phosphorylation of the Zap70 substrate linker for activation of T cells was detected in ZAP-YEEI-bearing CD8 T cells. However, these cells were not activated, but had reduced levels of TCR and CD5. Moreover, they produced lower cytokine amounts and showed faster...

  12. Adapting human pluripotent stem cells to high-throughput and high-content screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbordes, Sabrina C; Studer, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) as a source of cells for drug discovery, cytotoxicity assessment and disease modeling requires their adaptation to large-scale culture conditions and screening formats. Here, we describe a simple and robust protocol for the adaptation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to high-throughput screening (HTS). This protocol can also be adapted to human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and high-content screening (HCS). We also describe a 7-d assay to identify compounds with an effect on hESC self-renewal and differentiation. This assay can be adapted to a variety of applications. The procedure involves the culture expansion of hESCs, their adaptation to 384-well plates, the addition of small molecules or other factors, and finally data acquisition and processing. In this protocol, the optimal number of hESCs plated in 384-well plates has been adapted to HTS/HCS assays of 7 d.

  13. Robustness and adaptation reveal plausible cell cycle controlling subnetwork in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiun-Yan; Huang, Chi-Wei; Kao, Kuo-Ching; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2013-04-10

    Biological systems are often organized spatially and temporally by multi-scale functional subsystems (modules). A specific subcellular process often corresponds to a subsystem composed of some of these interconnected modules. Accurate identification of system-level modularity organization from the large scale networks can provide valuable information on subsystem models of subcellular processes or physiological phenomena. Computational identification of functional modules from the large scale network is the key approach to solve the complexity of modularity in the past decade, but the overlapping and multi-scale nature of modules often renders unsatisfactory results in these methods. Most current methods for modularity detection are optimization-based and suffered from the drawback of size resolution limit. It is difficult to trace the origin of the unsatisfactory results, which may be due to poor data, inappropriate objective function selection or simply resulted from natural evolution, and hence no system-level accurate modular models for subcellular processes can be offered. Motivated by the idea of evolution with robustness and adaption as guiding principles, we propose a novel approach that can identify significant multi-scale overlapping modules that are sufficiently accurate at the system and subsystem levels, giving biological insights for subcellular processes. The success of our evolution strategy method is demonstrated by applying to the yeast protein-protein interaction network. Functional subsystems of important physiological phenomena can be revealed. In particular, the cell cycle controlling network is selected for detailed discussion. The cell cycle subcellular processes in yeast can be successfully dissected into functional modules of cell cycle control, cell size check point, spindle assembly checkpoint, and DNA damage check point in G2/M and S phases. The interconnections between check points and cell cycle control modules provide clues on the

  14. Constant Power Control of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell through Adaptive Fuzzy Sliding Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minxiu Yan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fuel cell is a device that converts the chemical energy from a fuel into electricity through a chemical reaction with oxygen or another oxidizing agent. The paper describes a mathematical model of proton exchange membrane fuel cells by analyzing the working mechanism of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Furthermore, an adaptive fuzzy sliding mode controller is designed for the constant power output of PEMFC system. Simulation results prove that adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control has better control effect than conventional fuzzy sliding mode control.

  15. A Distributed Taxation Based Rank Adaptation Scheme for 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catania, Davide; Cattoni, Andrea Fabio; Mahmood, Nurul Huda

    2015-01-01

    The further densification of small cells impose high and undesirable levels of inter-cell interference. Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) systems along with advanced receiver techniques provide us with extra degrees of freedom to combat such a problem. With such tools, rank adaptation algorit...

  16. Modeling of a HTPEM fuel cell using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Kristian Kjær; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Sahlin, Simon Lennart

    2015-01-01

    In this work an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model of the voltage of a fuel cell is developed. The inputs of this model are the fuel cell temperature, current density and the carbon monoxide concentration of the anode supply gas. First an identification experiment which spans...

  17. Highly adaptable triple-negative breast cancer cells as a functional model for testing anticancer agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balraj Singh

    Full Text Available A major obstacle in developing effective therapies against solid tumors stems from an inability to adequately model the rare subpopulation of panresistant cancer cells that may often drive the disease. We describe a strategy for optimally modeling highly abnormal and highly adaptable human triple-negative breast cancer cells, and evaluating therapies for their ability to eradicate such cells. To overcome the shortcomings often associated with cell culture models, we incorporated several features in our model including a selection of highly adaptable cancer cells based on their ability to survive a metabolic challenge. We have previously shown that metabolically adaptable cancer cells efficiently metastasize to multiple organs in nude mice. Here we show that the cancer cells modeled in our system feature an embryo-like gene expression and amplification of the fat mass and obesity associated gene FTO. We also provide evidence of upregulation of ZEB1 and downregulation of GRHL2 indicating increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition in metabolically adaptable cancer cells. Our results obtained with a variety of anticancer agents support the validity of the model of realistic panresistance and suggest that it could be used for developing anticancer agents that would overcome panresistance.

  18. Adaptively Refined Euler and Navier-Stokes Solutions with a Cartesian-Cell Based Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A Cartesian-cell based scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions has been developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies were generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells were created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid was stored in a binary-tree data structure which provided a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations were solved on the resulting grids using an upwind, finite-volume formulation. The inviscid fluxes were found in an upwinded manner using a linear reconstruction of the cell primitives, providing the input states to an approximate Riemann solver. The viscous fluxes were formed using a Green-Gauss type of reconstruction upon a co-volume surrounding the cell interface. Data at the vertices of this co-volume were found in a linearly K-exact manner, which ensured linear K-exactness of the gradients. Adaptively-refined solutions for the inviscid flow about a four-element airfoil (test case 3) were compared to theory. Laminar, adaptively-refined solutions were compared to accepted computational, experimental and theoretical results.

  19. Adapt or die: how eukaryotic cells respond to prolonged activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossio, Valentina; Galati, Elena; Piatti, Simonetta

    2010-12-01

    Many cancer-treating compounds used in chemotherapies, the so-called antimitotics, target the mitotic spindle. Spindle defects in turn trigger activation of the SAC (spindle assembly checkpoint), a surveillance mechanism that transiently arrests cells in mitosis to provide the time for error correction. When the SAC is satisfied, it is silenced. However, after a variable amount of time, cells escape from the mitotic arrest, even if the SAC is not satisfied, through a process called adaptation or mitotic slippage. Adaptation weakens the killing properties of antimitotics, ultimately giving rise to resistant cancer cells. We summarize here the mechanisms underlying this process and propose a strategy to identify the factors involved using budding yeast as a model system. Inhibition of factors involved in SAC adaptation could have important therapeutic applications by potentiating the ability of antimitotics to cause cell death.

  20. Adaptation of influenza A viruses to cells expressing low levels of sialic acid leads to loss of neuraminidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, M T; McGregor, M; Suzuki, T; Suzuki, Y; Kawaoka, Y

    2001-04-01

    Influenza A viruses possess two virion surface proteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The HA binds to sialyloligosaccharide viral receptors, while the NA removes sialic acids from the host cell and viral sialyloligosaccarides. Alterations of the HA occur during adaptation of influenza viruses to new host species, as in the 1957 and 1968 influenza pandemics. To gain a better understanding of the contributions of the HA and possibly the NA to this process, we generated cell lines expressing reduced levels of the influenza virus receptor determinant, sialic acid, by selecting Madin-Darby canine kidney cells resistant to a lectin specific for sialic acid linked to galactose by alpha(2-3) or alpha(2-6) linkages. One of these cell lines had less than 1/10 as much N-acetylneuraminic acid as its parent cell line. When serially passaged in this cell line, human H3N2 viruses lost sialidase activity due to a large internal deletion in the NA gene, without alteration of the HA gene. These findings indicate that NA mutations can contribute to the adaptation of influenza A virus to new host environments and hence may play a role in the transmission of virus across species.

  1. Proteome adaptation in cell reprogramming proceeds via distinct transcriptional networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benevento, Marco; Tonge, Peter D; Puri, Mira C; Hussein, Samer M I; Cloonan, Nicole; Wood, David L; Grimmond, Sean M; Nagy, Andras; Munoz, Javier; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-01-01

    The ectopic expression of Oct4, Klf4, c-Myc and Sox2 (OKMS) transcription factors allows reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The reprogramming process, which involves a complex network of molecular events, is not yet fully characterized. Here we perform a quan

  2. Sensory Adaptation of Dictyostelium discoideum Cells to Chemotactic Signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1983-01-01

    Postvegetative Dictyostelium discoideum cells react chemotactically to gradients of cAMP, folic acid, and pterin. In the presence of a constant concentration of 10-5 M cAMP cells move at random. They still are able to respond to superimposed gradients of cAMP, although the response is less efficient

  3. The MRL proteins: adapting cell adhesion, migration and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coló, Georgina P; Lafuente, Esther M; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    MIG-10, RIAM and Lamellipodin (Lpd) are the founding members of the MRL family of multi-adaptor molecules. These proteins have common domain structures but display distinct functions in cell migration and adhesion, signaling, and in cell growth. The binding of RIAM with active Rap1 and with talin provides these MRL molecules with important regulatory roles on integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, RIAM and Lpd can regulate actin dynamics through their binding to actin regulatory Ena/VASP proteins. Recent data generated with the Drosophila MRL ortholog called Pico and with RIAM in melanoma cells indicate that these proteins can also regulate cell growth. As MRL proteins represent a relatively new family, many questions on their structure-function relationships remain unanswered, including regulation of their expression, post-translational modifications, new interactions, involvement in signaling and their knockout mice phenotype.

  4. Kinetics of antigen specific and non-specific polyclonal B-cell responses during lethal Plasmodium yoelii malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Rolland

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the kinetics and composition of the polyclonal B-cell activation associated to malaria infection, antigen-specific and non-specific B-cell responses were evaluated in the spleens of mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii 17 XL or injected with lysed erythrocytes or plasma from P. yoelii infected mice or with P. falciparum culture supernatants. Spleen/body weigth ratio, numbers of nucleated spleen cells and Immunoglobulin-containing and Immunoglobulin-secreting cells increased progressively during the course of infection,in parallel to the parasitemia. A different pattern of kinetics was observed when anti-sheep red blood cell and anti-trinitrophenylated-sheep red blood cell plaque forming cells response were studied: maximum values were observed at early stages of infection, whereas the number of total Immunoglobulin-containing and Immunoglobulin-secreting cells were not yet altered. Conversely, at the end of infection, when these latter values reached their maximum, the anti-sheep red blood cell and anti-trinitrophenylated-sheep red blood cell specific responses were normal or even infranormal. In mice injected with Plasmodium-derived material, a higher increase in antigen-specific PFC was observed, as compared to the increase of Immunoglobulin-containing and Immunoglobulin-secreting cell numbers. This suggested a "preferential" (antigen-plus mitogen-induced stimulation of antigen-specific cells rather than a generalized non-specific (mitogen-induced triggering of B-lymphocytes. On the basis of these and previous results, it is suggested that polyclonal B-cell activation that takes place during the course of infection appears as a result of successive waves of antigen-specific B-cell activation.

  5. Generation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells and directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells for regenerative medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minyue Ma; Jiahao Sha; Zuomin Zhou; Qi Zhou; Qingzhang Li

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem(ES) cells are pluripotent cells that can give rise to derivatives of all three embryonic germ layers. Due to its characteristics, the patient-specific ES cells are of great potential for transplantation therapies. Several strategies can reprogramme somatic cells back to pluripotent stem cells: nuclear transfer, fusion with ES cells, treatment with cell extract and induction by specific factors. Considering the future clinical use, the differentiation from ES to neurons, cardiomyocytes and many other types of cell scurrently provide basic cognition and experience to regenerative medicine. This article will review two courses, the reprogramming of differentiated cells and the differentiation of ES cells to specific cell types.

  6. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  7. Bistable cell fate specification as a result of stochastic fluctuations and collective spatial cell behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Stockholm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In culture, isogenic mammalian cells typically display enduring phenotypic heterogeneity that arises from fluctuations of gene expression and other intracellular processes. This diversity is not just simple noise but has biological relevance by generating plasticity. Noise driven plasticity was suggested to be a stem cell-specific feature. RESULTS: Here we show that the phenotypes of proliferating tissue progenitor cells such as primary mononuclear muscle cells can also spontaneously fluctuate between different states characterized by the either high or low expression of the muscle-specific cell surface molecule CD56 and by the corresponding high or low capacity to form myotubes. Although this capacity is a cell-intrinsic property, the cells switch their phenotype under the constraints imposed by the highly heterogeneous microenvironment created by their own collective movement. The resulting heterogeneous cell population is characterized by a dynamic equilibrium between "high CD56" and "low CD56" phenotype cells with distinct spatial distribution. Computer simulations reveal that this complex dynamic is consistent with a context-dependent noise driven bistable model where local microenvironment acts on the cellular state by encouraging the cell to fluctuate between the phenotypes until the low noise state is found. CONCLUSIONS: These observations suggest that phenotypic fluctuations may be a general feature of any non-terminally differentiated cell. The cellular microenvironment created by the cells themselves contributes actively and continuously to the generation of fluctuations depending on their phenotype. As a result, the cell phenotype is determined by the joint action of the cell-intrinsic fluctuations and by collective cell-to-cell interactions.

  8. A balanced JA/ABA status may correlate with adaptation to osmotic stress in Vitis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Seo, Mitsunori; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kamiya, Yuji; Nick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Water-related stress is considered a major type of plant stress. Osmotic stress, in particular, represents the common part of all water-related stresses. Therefore, plants have evolved different adaptive mechanisms to cope with osmotic-related disturbances. In the current work, two grapevine cell lines that differ in their osmotic adaptability, Vitis rupestris and Vitis riparia, were investigated under mannitol-induced osmotic stress. To dissect signals that lead to adaptability from those related to sensitivity, osmotic-triggered responses with respect to jasmonic acid (JA) and its active form JA-Ile, abscisic acid (ABA), and stilbene compounds, as well as the expression of their related genes were observed. In addition, the transcript levels of the cellular homeostasis gene NHX1 were examined. The data are discussed with a hypothesis suggesting that a balance of JA and ABA status might correlate with cellular responses, either guiding cells to sensitivity or to progress toward adaptation.

  9. Rare earth fluorescent nanoparticles for specific cancer cell targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanakis, Dimitrios; Ghanotakis, Demetrios F.

    2016-07-01

    Terbium layered hydroxide nanoparticles (Tb2(OH)5NO3) were synthesized by a one-pot coprecipitation method. The characterization of this preparation revealed highly oriented fluorescent nanoparticles. An attempt to improve the properties of Tb2(OH)5NO3 resulted in the preparation of two optimized nanoparticles. In particular, Tb2(OH)5NO3:Eu and Tb2(OH)5NO3-FA were prepared when Tb2(OH)5NO3 was doped with Europium and when the surface was modified with folic acid (FA), respectively. The size of the above nanoparticles was below 100 nm, and thus they have the potential to be used for biomedical applications. The interaction of nanoparticles with human cells was studied using confocal microscopy. This study revealed that only the nanoparticles modified with folic acid have the ability to be targeted to HeLa cells. This specific identification of cancer cells, in combination with the fluorescent properties of Tb2(OH)5NO3, could render these nanoparticles appropriate for biomedical applications.

  10. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klier Ulrike

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. Methods We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. Results The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4+, activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested could be observed. Conclusion Cellular fusions of MSI+ carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These

  11. Adaptation of HIV-1 Depends on the Host-Cell Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Opijnen, Tim; de Ronde, Anthony; Boerlijst, Maarten C.; Berkhout, Ben

    2007-01-01

    Many viruses have the ability to rapidly develop resistance against antiviral drugs and escape from the host immune system. To which extent the host environment affects this adaptive potential of viruses is largely unknown. Here we show that for HIV-1, the host-cell environment is key to the adaptive potential of the virus. We performed a large-scale selection experiment with two HIV-1 strains in two different T-cell lines (MT4 and C8166). Over 110 days of culture, both virus strains adapted rapidly to the MT4 T-cell line. In contrast, when cultured on the C8166 T-cell line, the same strains did not show any increase in fitness. By sequence analyses and infections with viruses expressing either yellow or cyan fluorescent protein, we were able to show that the absence of adaptation was linked to a lower recombination rate in the C8166 T-cell line. Our findings suggest that if we can manipulate the host-cellular factors that mediate viral evolution, we may be able to significantly retard viral adaptability. PMID:17342205

  12. Efficient generation of lens progenitor cells from cataract patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodi Qiu

    Full Text Available The development of a technique to induce the transformation of somatic cells to a pluripotent state via the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors was a transformational event in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of this technique also impacted ophthalmology, as patient-specific induced pluripotent stemcells (iPSCs may be useful resources for some ophthalmological diseases. The lens is a key refractive element in the eye that focuses images of the visual world onto the retina. To establish a new model for drug screening to treat lens diseases and investigating lens aging and development, we examined whether human lens epithelial cells (HLECs could be induced into iPSCs and if lens-specific differentiation of these cells could be achieved under defined chemical conditions. We first efficiently reprogrammed HLECs from age-related cataract patients to iPSCs with OCT-4, SOX-2, and KLF-4. The resulting HLEC-derived iPS (HLE-iPS colonies were indistinguishable from human ES cells with respect to morphology, gene expression, pluripotent marker expression and their ability to generate all embryonic germ-cell layers. Next, we performed a 3-step induction procedure: HLE-iPS cells were differentiated into large numbers of lens progenitor-like cells with defined factors (Noggin, BMP and FGF2, and we determined that these cells expressed lens-specific markers (PAX6, SOX2, SIX3, CRYAB, CRYAA, BFSP1, and MIP. In addition, HLE-iPS-derived lens cells exhibited reduced expression of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT markers compared with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Our study describes a highly efficient procedure for generating lens progenitor cells from cataract patient HLEC-derived iPSCs. These patient-derived pluripotent cells provide a valuable model for studying the developmental and molecular biological mechanisms that underlie cell determination in lens development and cataract

  13. No Evidence for a Low Linear Energy Transfer Adaptive Response in Irradiated RKO Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, Marianne B.; Goetz, Wilfried; Baulch, Janet E.; Lewis, Adam J.; Morgan, William F.

    2011-01-06

    It has become increasingly evident from reports in the literature that there are many confounding factors that are capable of modulating radiation induced non-targeted responses such as the bystander effect and the adaptive response. In this paper we examine recent data that suggest that the observation of non-targeted responses may not be universally observable for differing radiation qualities. We have conducted a study of the adaptive response following low LET exposures for human colon carcinoma cells and failed to observe adaption for the endpoints of clonogenic survival or micronucleus formation.

  14. Specific localization and measurement of hydrogen peroxide in Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspensions and protoplasts elicited by COS-OGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Quentin; Van Cutsem, Pierre; Markό, Istvan E; Veys, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    H2O2 acts as an important signaling molecule during plant/pathogen interactions but its study remains a challenge due to the current shortcomings in H2O2-responsive probes. In this work, ContPY1, a new molecular probe developed to specifically detect H2O2 was used to study the elicitation of Arabidopsis thaliana cells by a complex of chitosan oligomers (COS) and oligogalacturonides (OGA). The comparison of cell suspensions, protoplasts of cell suspensions and leaf protoplasts treated with different inhibitors gave indications on the potential sources of hydrogen peroxide in plant cells. The relative contribution of the cell wall, of membrane dehydrogenases and of peroxidases depended on cell type and treatment and proved to be variable. Our present protocol can be used to study hydrogen peroxide production in a large variety of plant species by simple protocol adaptation.

  15. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium's Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarmistha Devi Aribam

    Full Text Available Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria.

  16. Tissue-specific defense and thermo-adaptive mechanisms of soybean seedlings under heat stress revealed by proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Nagib; Donnart, Tifenn; Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2010-08-06

    A comparative proteomic approach was employed to explore tissue-specific protein expression patterns in soybean seedlings under heat stress. The changes in the protein expression profiles of soybean seedling leaves, stems, and roots were analyzed after exposure to high temperatures. A total of 54, 35, and 61 differentially expressed proteins were identified from heat-treated leaves, stems, and roots, respectively. Differentially expressed heat shock proteins (HSPs) and proteins involved in antioxidant defense were mostly up-regulated, whereas proteins associated with photosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and amino acid and protein biosynthesis were down-regulated in response to heat stress. A group of proteins, specifically low molecular weight HSPs and HSP70, were up-regulated and expressed in a similar manner in all tissues. Proteomic analysis indicated that the responses of HSP70, CPN-60 beta, and ChsHSP were tissue specific, and this observation was validated by immunoblot analysis. The heat-responsive sHSPs were not induced by other stresses such as cold and hydrogen peroxide. Taken together, these results suggest that to cope with heat stress soybean seedlings operate tissue-specific defenses and adaptive mechanisms, whereas a common defense mechanism associated with the induction of several HSPs was employed in all three tissues. In addition, tissue-specific proteins may play a crucial role in defending each type of tissues against thermal stress.

  17. Age-Related, Sport-Specific Adaptions of the Shoulder Girdle in Elite Adolescent Tennis Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, Ann M.; Palmans, Tanneke; Johansson, Fredrik R.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Tennis requires repetitive overhead movements that can lead to upper extremity injury. The scapula and the shoulder play a vital role in injury-free playing. Scapular dysfunction and glenohumeral changes in strength and range of motion (ROM) have been associated with shoulder injury in the overhead athlete. Objective: To compare scapular position and strength and shoulder ROM and strength between Swedish elite tennis players of 3 age categories (16 years). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Tennis training sports facilities. Patients or Other Participants: Fifty-nine adolescent Swedish elite tennis players (ages 10–20 years) selected based on their national ranking. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used a clinical screening protocol with a digital inclinometer and a handheld dynamometer to measure scapular upward rotation at several angles of arm elevation, isometric scapular muscle strength, glenohumeral ROM, and isometric rotator cuff strength. Results: Players older than 16 years showed less scapular upward rotation on the dominant side at 90° and 180° (P < .05). Although all absolute scapular muscle strength values increased with age, there was no change in the body-weight–normalized strength of the middle (P = .9) and lower (P = .81) trapezius or serratus anterior (P = .17). Glenohumeral internal-rotation ROM and total ROM tended to decrease, but this finding was not statistically significant (P = .052 and P = .06, respectively). Whereas normalized internal-rotator strength increased from 14 to 16 years to older than 16 years (P = .009), normalized external-rotator and supraspinatus strength remained unchanged. Conclusions: Age-related changes in shoulder and scapular strength and ROM were apparent in elite adolescent tennis players. Future authors should examine the association of these adaptations with performance data and injury incidence. PMID:25098662

  18. Part II-mechanism of adaptation: A549 cells adapt to high concentration of nitric oxide through bypass of cell cycle checkpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqil, Madeeha; Deliu, Zane; Elseth, Kim M; Shen, Grace; Xue, Jiaping; Radosevich, James A

    2014-03-01

    Previous work has shown enhanced survival capacity in high nitric oxide (HNO)-adapted tumor cells. In Part I of this series of manuscripts, we have shown that A549-HNO cells demonstrate an improved growth profile under UV and X-ray radiation treatment. These cells exhibit increased expression of proteins involved in DNA damage recognition and repair pathway, both the non-homologous end joining pathway and homologous recombination. These include Ku80, DNA-PK, XLF ligase and MRN complex proteins. Further, the A549-HNO cells show high levels of ATM, ATR, Chk1 and Chk2, and phospho-p53. Activation of these molecules may lead to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis due to DNA damage. This is observed in parent A549 cells in response to NO donor treatment; however, the A549-HNO cells proliferate and inhibit apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis showed slowed progression through S phase which will allow time for DNA repair. Thus, to better understand the increased growth rate in A549-HNO when compared to the parent cell line A549, we studied molecular mechanisms involved in cell cycle regulation in A549-HNO cells. During the initial time period of NO donor treatment, we observe high levels of cyclin/Cdk complexes involved in regulating various stages of the cell cycle. This would lead to bypass of G1-S and G2-M checkpoints. The HNO cells also show much higher expression of Cdc25A. Cdc25A activates Cdk molecules involved in different phases of the cell cycle. In addition, there is enhanced phosphorylation of the Rb protein in HNO cells. This leads to inactivation of Rb/E2F checkpoint regulating G1-S transition. This may lead to faster progression in S phase. Thus, all of these perturbations in HNO cells lead to accelerated cell cycle progression and a higher growth rate. We also assessed expression of cell cycle inhibitors in HNO cells. Interestingly, the HNO cells show a significant decline in p21CIP1 at initial time points, but with prolonged exposure, the levels were much higher

  19. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  20. NK cells require antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells to mediate superior effector functions during HSV-2 recall responses in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Branson; Lee, Amanda J; Chew, Marianne V; Ashkar, Ali A

    2016-12-14

    Natural killer (NK) cells have an important role in mounting protective innate responses against genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections. However their role as effectors in adaptive immune responses against HSV-2 is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that NK cells from C57BL/6 mice in an ex vivo splenocyte culture produce significantly more interferon γ (IFN-γ) upon re-exposure to HSV-2 antigens in a mouse model of genital HSV-2 immunization. We find that naïve NK cells do not require any prior stimulation or priming to be activated to produce IFN-γ. Our results demonstrate that HSV-2-experienced CD4(+) T cells have a crucial role in coordinating NK cell activation and that their presence during HSV-2 antigen presentation is required to activate NK cells in this model of secondary immune response. We also examined the requirement of cell-to-cell contacts for both CD4(+) T cells and NK cells. NK cells are dependent on direct interactions with other HSV-2-experienced splenocytes, and CD4(+) T cells need to be in close proximity to NK cells to activate them. This study revealed that NK cells do not exhibit any memory toward HSV-2 antigens and, in fact, require specific interactions with HSV-2-experienced CD4(+) T cells to produce IFN-γ.

  1. Regulatory Domain Selectivity in the Cell-Type Specific PKN-Dependence of Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvie Lachmann; Amy Jevons; Manu De Rycker; Adele Casamassima; Simone Radtke; Alejandra Collazos; Peter J Parker

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian protein kinase N (PKN) family of Serine/Threonine kinases comprises three isoforms, which are targets for Rho family GTPases. Small GTPases are major regulators of the cellular cytoskeleton, generating interest in the role(s) of specific PKN isoforms in processes such as cell migration and invasion. It has been reported that PKN3 is required for prostate tumour cell invasion but not PKN1 or 2. Here we employ a cell model, the 5637 bladder tumour cell line where PKN2 is relativel...

  2. Human antigen-specific regulatory T cells generated by T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Brusko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapies directed at augmenting regulatory T cell (Treg activities in vivo as a systemic treatment for autoimmune disorders and transplantation may be associated with significant off-target effects, including a generalized immunosuppression that may compromise beneficial immune responses to infections and cancer cells. Adoptive cellular therapies using purified expanded Tregs represents an attractive alternative to systemic treatments, with results from animal studies noting increased therapeutic potency of antigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal populations. However, current methodologies are limited in terms of the capacity to isolate and expand a sufficient quantity of endogenous antigen-specific Tregs for therapeutic intervention. Moreover, FOXP3+ Tregs fall largely within the CD4+ T cell subset and are thus routinely MHC class II-specific, whereas class I-specific Tregs may function optimally in vivo by facilitating direct tissue recognition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel means for generating large numbers of antigen-specific Tregs involving lentiviral T cell receptor (TCR gene transfer into in vitro expanded polyclonal natural Treg populations. Tregs redirected with a high-avidity class I-specific TCR were capable of recognizing the melanoma antigen tyrosinase in the context of HLA-A*0201 and could be further enriched during the expansion process by antigen-specific reactivation with peptide loaded artificial antigen presenting cells. These in vitro expanded Tregs continued to express FOXP3 and functional TCRs, and maintained the capacity to suppress conventional T cell responses directed against tyrosinase, as well as bystander T cell responses. Using this methodology in a model tumor system, murine Tregs designed to express the tyrosinase TCR effectively blocked antigen-specific effector T cell (Teff activity as determined by tumor cell growth and luciferase reporter

  3. Ancestral Protein Reconstruction Yields Insights into Adaptive Evolution of Binding Specificity in Solute-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Ben E; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-02-18

    The promiscuous functions of proteins are an important reservoir of functional novelty in protein evolution, but the molecular basis for binding promiscuity remains elusive. We used ancestral protein reconstruction to experimentally characterize evolutionary intermediates in the functional expansion of the polar amino acid-binding protein family, which has evolved to bind a variety of amino acids with high affinity and specificity. High-resolution crystal structures of an ancestral arginine-binding protein in complex with l-arginine and l-glutamine show that the promiscuous binding of l-glutamine is enabled by multi-scale conformational plasticity, water-mediated interactions, and selection of an alternative conformational substate productive for l-glutamine binding. Evolution of specialized glutamine-binding proteins from this ancestral protein was achieved by displacement of water molecules from the protein-ligand interface, reducing the entropic penalty associated with the promiscuous interaction. These results provide a structural and thermodynamic basis for the co-option of a promiscuous interaction in the evolution of binding specificity.

  4. Adaptive memory: the survival scenario enhances item-specific processing relative to a moving scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Daniel J; Hart, Joshua; Griffith, Samantha E; Burns, Amy D

    2013-01-01

    Nairne, Thompson, and Pandeirada (2007) found that retention of words rated for their relevance to survival is superior to that of words encoded under numerous other deep processing conditions. They suggested that our memory systems might have evolved to confer an advantage for survival-relevant information. Burns, Burns, and Hwang (2011) suggested a two-process explanation of the proximate mechanisms responsible for the survival advantage. Whereas most control tasks encourage only one type of processing, the survival task encourages both item-specific and relational processing. They found that when control tasks encouraged both types of processing, the survival processing advantage was eliminated. However, none of their control conditions included non-survival scenarios (e.g., moving, vacation, etc.), so it is not clear how this two-process explanation would explain the survival advantage when scenarios are used as control conditions. The present experiments replicated the finding that the survival scenario improves recall relative to a moving scenario in both a between-lists and within-list design and also provided evidence that this difference was accompanied by an item-specific processing difference, not a difference in relational processing. The implications of these results for several existing accounts of the survival processing effect are discussed.

  5. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1-1% O2), physioxia or physoxia (∼1-13%), and normoxia (∼20%) are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia) or excess oxygen (hyperoxia) could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude) and pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation, solid tumor formation, lung disease, or myocardial infarction). Hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of heart disease, cancers, stroke, and other causes of mortality. Hypoxia inducible factor(s) (HIFs) are key oxygen sensors that mediate the ability of the cell to cope with decreased oxygen tension. These transcription factors regulate cellular adaptation to hypoxia and protect cells by responding acutely and inducing production of endogenous metabolites and proteins to promptly regulate metabolic pathways. Here, we review the role of the HIF pathway as a metabolic adaptation pathway and how this pathway plays a role in cell survival. We emphasize the roles of the HIF pathway in physiological adaptation, cell death, pH regulation, and adaptation during exercise.

  6. Recombinant spider silk with cell binding motifs for specific adherence of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhe, Mona; Johansson, Ulrika; Hillerdahl, Carl-Olof; Hedhammar, My

    2013-11-01

    Silk matrices have previously been shown to possess general properties governing cell viability. However, many cell types also require specific adhesion sites for successful in vitro culture. Herein, we have shown that cell binding motifs can be genetically fused to a partial spider silk protein, 4RepCT, without affecting its ability to self-assemble into stable matrices directly in a physiological-like buffer. The incorporated motifs were exposed in the formed matrices, and available for binding of integrins. Four different human primary cell types; fibroblasts, keratinocytes, endothelial cells and Schwann cells, were applied to the matrices and investigated under serum-free culture conditions. Silk matrices with cell binding motifs, especially RGD, were shown to promote early adherence of cells, which formed stress fibers and distinct focal adhesion points. Schwann cells acquired most spread-out morphology on silk matrices with IKVAV, where significantly more viable cells were found, also when compared to wells coated with laminin. This strategy is thus suitable for development of matrices that allow screening of various cell binding motifs and their effect on different cell types.

  7. Cross-cultural adaptation and initial validation of the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale into the Yoruba language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinpelu, Aderonke O; Odetunde, Marufat O; Odole, Adesola C

    2012-12-01

    Stroke-Specific Quality of Life 2.0 (SS-QoL 2.0) scale is used widely and has been cross-culturally adapted to many languages. This study aimed at the cross-cultural adaptation of SS-QoL 2.0 to Yoruba, the indigenous language of south-western Nigeria, and to carry out an initial investigation on its validity. English SS-QoL 2.0 was first adapted to Yoruba language by including Yoruba culture-specific examples in items SC4, UE2 and UE6. The adapted English version (AEV) was independently translated into Yoruba by two language experts who later agreed on a consensus translation, which was then back translated, subjected to an expert committee review and pretested; a cognitive debriefing interview was also carried out to generate the Yoruba translated version (YTV). Thirty-five stroke survivors completed the AEV and Yoruba version (YV) in English and Yoruba. The order of administration was randomized. Data were analysed using Spearman's rank order correlation and Wilcoxon's signed-rank test at a P value less than 0.05. The mean age of the participants (23 men, 12 women) was 58.5±11.3 years. The domain scores of the participants on AEV and YV did not differ significantly, except in the work/productivity domain. In both versions, the mean domain score of the participants was the highest in the language domain [22.6±3.8 (AEV) and 22.7±3.4 (YV)] and the lowest in the work domain [9.0±3.7 (AEV) and 8.0±3.3 (YTV)]. Domain scores on both versions correlated significantly (P<0.05). Participants' ratings of their current state and prestroke state correlated significantly (P<0.01) in all the general areas, except energy and mood. The YTV of SS-QoL 2.0 fulfilled the initial criteria for validity.

  8. Enteroendocrine cells are specifically marked by cell surface expression of claudin-4 in mouse small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Nagatake

    Full Text Available Enteroendocrine cells are solitary epithelial cells scattered throughout the gastrointestinal tract and produce various types of hormones, constituting one of the largest endocrine systems in the body. The study of these rare epithelial cells has been hampered by the difficulty in isolating them because of the lack of specific cell surface markers. Here, we report that enteroendocrine cells selectively express a tight junction membrane protein, claudin-4 (Cld4, and are efficiently isolated with the use of an antibody specific for the Cld4 extracellular domain and flow cytometry. Sorted Cld4+ epithelial cells in the small intestine exclusively expressed a chromogranin A gene (Chga and other enteroendocrine cell-related genes (Ffar1, Ffar4, Gpr119, and the population was divided into two subpopulations based on the activity of binding to Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1. A Cld4+UEA-1- cell population almost exclusively expressed glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide gene (Gip, thus representing K cells, whereas a Cld4+UEA-1+ cell population expressed other gut hormone genes, including glucagon-like peptide 1 (Gcg, pancreatic polypeptide-like peptide with N-terminal tyrosine amide (Pyy, cholecystokinin (Cck, secretin (Sct, and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1. In addition, we found that orally administered luminal antigens were taken up by the solitary Cld4+ cells in the small intestinal villi, raising the possibility that enteroendocrine cells might also play a role in initiation of mucosal immunity. Our results provide a useful tool for the cellular and functional characterization of enteroendocrine cells.

  9. Virtual stenting workflow with vessel-specific initialization and adaptive expansion for neurovascular stents and flow diverters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Nikhil; Yu, Hongyu; Xu, Jinhui; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Yang, Xinjian; Li, Haiyun; Meng, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Endovascular intervention using traditional neurovascular stents and densely braided flow diverters (FDs) have become the preferred treatment strategies for traditionally challenging intracranial aneurysms. Modeling stent and FD deployment in patient-specific aneurysms and its flow modification results prior to the actual intervention can potentially predict the patient outcome and treatment optimization. We present a clinically focused, streamlined virtual stenting workflow that efficiently simulates stent and FD treatment in patient-specific aneurysms based on expanding a simplex mesh structure. The simplex mesh is generated using an innovative vessel-specific initialization technique, which uses the patient's parent artery diameter to identify the initial position of the simplex mesh inside the artery. A novel adaptive expansion algorithm enables the acceleration of deployment process by adjusting the expansion forces based on the distance of the simplex mesh from the parent vessel. The virtual stenting workflow was tested by modeling the treatment of two patient-specific aneurysms using the Enterprise stent and the Pipeline Embolization Device (commercial FD). Both devices were deployed in the aneurysm models in a few seconds. Computational fluid dynamics analyses of pre- and post-treatment aneurysmal hemodynamics show flow reduction in the aneurysmal sac in treated aneurysms, with the FD diverting more flow than the Enterprise stent. The test results show that this workflow can rapidly simulate clinical deployment of stents and FDs, hence paving the way for its future clinical implementation.

  10. On the cell biology of pit cells, the liver-specific NK cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dian Zhong Luo; David Vermijlen; Bülent Ahishali; Vasilis Triantis; Georgia Plakoutsi; Filip Braet; Karin Vanderkerken; Eddie Wisse

    2000-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Natural killer (NK) cells are functionally defined by their ability to kill certain tumor cells and virusinfected cells without prior sensitization[1]. NK cells comprise about 10% to 15% of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and most of these cells in human and rat have the morphology of large granular lymphocytes ( LGL )[2]. However, recent studies have demonstrated that small agranular lymphocytes, lacking CD3 expression, have cytolytic activity comparable to NK cells[3].

  11. Adaptability and variability of the cell functions to the environmental factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Tadatoshi [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1995-02-01

    Adaptive phenomenon of the cells to the environmental factors is one of the most important functions of cells. In the initial research program, yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as model species of eukaryote was selected to use for the experiments and copper sulfate was adopted as one of the ideal environmental factors, and then adaptation mechanisms of yeast cells in the environment surrounded by copper ions were analyzed metabolically and morphologically. Furthermore, in the relationships between environmental factors and the cells, the researches performed were as follows: (1) Induced mutation in the extranuclear-inheritable system: Mutagenic effect of ethidium bromide on mitochondria and plastids. (2) Induction of gene expression by light exposure in the early development of chloroplast in Chlamydomonas reinhardi. (3) Some features of RNA and protein syntheses in thermophilic alga Cyanidium caldarium. (4) Satellite DNA of Ochromonas danica. (5) Analyses of cell functions using various kinds of radiations. (6) Novel methionine requirement of radiation resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans. (author).

  12. Establishment of human cell type-specific iPS cells with enhanced chondrogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzo, Rosa M; Scanlon, Vanessa; Sanjay, Archana; Xu, Ren-He; Drissi, Hicham

    2014-12-01

    The propensity of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to differentiate into specific lineages may be influenced by a number of factors, including the selection of the somatic cell type used for reprogramming. Herein we report the generation of new iPS cells, which we derived from human articular chondrocytes and from cord blood mononucleocytes via lentiviral-mediated delivery of Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and cMyc. Molecular, cytochemical, and cytogenic analyses confirmed the acquisition of hallmark features of pluripotency, as well as the retention of normal karyotypes following reprogramming of both the human articular chondrocytes (AC) and the cord blood (CB) cells. In vitro and in vivo functional analyses formally established the pluripotent differentiation capacity of all cell lines. Chondrogenic differentiation assays comparing iPS cells derived from AC, CB, and a well established dermal fibroblast cell line (HDFa-Yk26) identified enhanced proteoglycan-rich matrix formation and cartilage-associated gene expression from AC-derived iPS cells. These findings suggest that the tissue of origin may impact the fate potential of iPS cells for differentiating into specialized cell types, such as chondrocytes. Thus, we generated new cellular tools for the identification of inherent features driving high chondrogenic potential of reprogrammed cells.

  13. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher; Waldron, Levi;

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression...... changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein...... interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two...

  14. Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis of ESGP, an Embryonic Stem Cell and Germ Cell Specific Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Mei CHEN; Zhong-Wei DU; Zhen YAO

    2005-01-01

    Several putative Oct-4 downstream genes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells have been identified using the suppression-subtractive hybridization method. In this study, one of the novel genes encoding an ES cell and germ cell specific protein (ESGP) was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends.ESGP contains 801 bp encoding an 84 amino acid small protein and has no significant homology to any known genes. There is a signal peptide at the N-terminal of ESGP protein as predicted by SeqWeb (GCG)(SeqWeb version 2.0.2, http://gcg.biosino.org:8080/). The result of immunofluorescence assay suggested that ESGP might encode a secretory protein. The expression pattern of ESGP is consistent with the expression of Oct-4 during embryonic development. ESGP protein was detected in fertilized oocyte, from 3.5 day postcoital (dpc) blastocyst to 17.5 dpc embryo, and was only detected in testis and ovary tissues in adult. In vitro, ESGP was only expressed in pluripotent cell lines, such as embryonic stem cells, embryonic carcinoma cells and embryonic germ cells, but not in their differentiated progenies. Despite its specific expression,forced expression of ESGP is not indispensable for the effect of Oct-4 on ES cell self-renewal, and does not affect the differentiation to three germ layers.

  15. Multi-omic profiling -of EPO-producing Chinese hamster ovary cell panel reveals metabolic adaptation to heterologous protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Daniel; Seresht, Ali Kazemi; Engmark, Mikael; Magdenoska, Olivera; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-11-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred production host for many therapeutic proteins. The production of heterologous proteins in CHO cells imposes a burden on the host cell metabolism and impact cellular physiology on a global scale. In this work, a multi-omics approach was applied to study the production of erythropoietin (EPO) in a panel of CHO-K1 cells under growth-limited and unlimited conditions in batch and chemostat cultures. Physiological characterization of the EPO-producing cells included global transcriptome analysis, targeted metabolome analysis, including intracellular pools of glycolytic intermediates, NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) , adenine nucleotide phosphates (ANP), and extracellular concentrations of sugars, organic acids, and amino acids. Potential impact of EPO expression on the protein secretory pathway was assessed at multiple stages using quantitative PCR (qPCR), reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blots (WB), and global gene expression analysis to assess EPO gene copy numbers, EPO gene expression, intracellular EPO retention, and differentially expressed genes functionally related to secretory protein processing, respectively. We found no evidence supporting the existence of production bottlenecks in energy metabolism (i.e., glycolytic metabolites, NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) and ANPs) in batch culture or in the secretory protein production pathway (i.e., gene dosage, transcription and post-translational processing of EPO) in chemostat culture at specific productivities up to 5 pg/cell/day. Time-course analysis of high- and low-producing clones in chemostat culture revealed rapid adaptation of transcription levels of amino acid catabolic genes in favor of EPO production within nine generations. Interestingly, the adaptation was followed by an increase in specific EPO productivity.

  16. Effects of pattern shape on adaptation of dLGN cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Jianzhong; XU Pengjing; LI Xiangrui; ZHOU Yifeng

    2003-01-01

    Pattern adaptation is one of the fundamental sensory processes in the visual system. In this study, we compared pattern adaptation induced by two types of sinusoidal drifting grating in dLGN cells of cat. The two types ofgrating have the same parameters (e.g. spatial frequency, temporal frequency and contrast) except their pattern shapes, one of which is normal grating and the other annular grating. The results suggested that the annular grating elicited stronger response and stronger pattern adaptation than the normal grating. This is consistent with the adaptation and aftereffect to the two types of drifting gratings seen in psychology and may reflect the subcortical neural mechanism underlying these psychological phenomena.

  17. Robust Cell Detection of Histopathological Brain Tumor Images Using Sparse Reconstruction and Adaptive Dictionary Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hai; Xing, Fuyong; Yang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Successful diagnostic and prognostic stratification, treatment outcome prediction, and therapy planning depend on reproducible and accurate pathology analysis. Computer aided diagnosis (CAD) is a useful tool to help doctors make better decisions in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Accurate cell detection is often an essential prerequisite for subsequent cellular analysis. The major challenge of robust brain tumor nuclei/cell detection is to handle significant variations in cell appearance and to split touching cells. In this paper, we present an automatic cell detection framework using sparse reconstruction and adaptive dictionary learning. The main contributions of our method are: 1) A sparse reconstruction based approach to split touching cells; 2) An adaptive dictionary learning method used to handle cell appearance variations. The proposed method has been extensively tested on a data set with more than 2000 cells extracted from 32 whole slide scanned images. The automatic cell detection results are compared with the manually annotated ground truth and other state-of-the-art cell detection algorithms. The proposed method achieves the best cell detection accuracy with a F1 score = 0.96.

  18. Effects of Copper-phenanthroline on Pentschlorophenol-induced Adaptation and Cell Death of Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE-WEN ZHANG; RONG-GUI LI; XIN WANG; SHUAN-HU ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of copper-phenanthroline (CuOP) on pentachlorophenol (PCP)-induced adaptation and cell death of Escherichia coli. Methods Bacterial growth and adaptation to PCP were monitored spectrophotometrically at 600 nm. Inactivation of bacterial cells was determined from colony count on agar dishes. Cellular ATP content and accumulation of PCP were assessed by chemiluminescence and HPLC analysis respectively. The formation of PCP-Cu-OP complex was shown by UV-visible spectra. Results Escherichia coli (E. coli) could adapt to PCP, a wood preservative and insecticide used in agriculture. The adaptation of E. coli to PCP prevented its death to the synergistic cytotoxicity of CuOP plus PCP and declined cellular accumulation and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylafion of PCP. Furthermore, CuOP and PCP neither produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) nor had a synergistic effect on uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation in E.coli. The synergistic cytotoxicity of CuOP and PCP in E. coli might be due to the formation of lipophillc PCP-Cu-OP complex.Conclsion Our data suggested that adaptation of E. coli to PCP decreased the synergistic effects of CuOP and PCP on prokaryotic cell death due to the formation of lipophilic PCP-Cu-OP complex, but it had no effect on the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation and production of reactive oxygen species in E. coli.

  19. Human pregnancy-specific glycoprotein 1a (PSG1a) induces alternative activation in human and mouse monocytes and suppresses the accessory cell-dependent T cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motrán, Claudia Cristina; Díaz, Fernando López; Gruppi, Adriana; Slavin, Daniela; Chatton, Bruno; Bocco, José Luis

    2002-09-01

    It has been proposed that pregnancy-specific factors induce the suppression of a specific arm of the maternal response accompanied by activation of the nonspecific, innate immune system. The aim of this study was to determine whether pregnancy-specific glycoprotein 1a (PSG1a), the major variant of PSG polypeptides, is able to modulate the monocyte/macrophage (Mo) metabolism to regulate T cell activation and proliferation. Using the recombinant form of this glycoprotein (rec-PSG1a), expressed in mammalian cells with a vaccinia-based expression vector, we have demonstrated that human PSG1a induces arginase activity in peripheral blood human Mo and human and murine Mo cell lines. In addition, rec-PSG1a is able to induce alternative activation because it up-regulates the arginase activity and inhibits the nitric oxide production in Mo activated by lipopolysaccharides. We also observed that rec-PSG1a is an important accessory cells-dependent T cell suppressor factor that causes partial growth arrest at the S/G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Additionally, an impaired T cell proliferative response induced by mitogens and specific antigen was observed in BALB/c mice upon in vivo expression of PSG1a. Our results suggest that PSG1a function contributes to the immunomodulation during pregnancy, having opposite effects on maternal innate and adaptative systems.

  20. Genome-Scale Analysis of Cell-Specific Regulatory Codes Using Nuclear Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have made it possible for biologists to generate genome-wide profiles of chromatin features at the nucleotide resolution. Enzymes such as nucleases or transposes have been instrumental as a chromatin-probing agent due to their ability to target accessible chromatin for cleavage or insertion. On the scale of a few hundred base pairs, preferential action of the nuclear enzymes on accessible chromatin allows mapping of cell state-specific accessibility in vivo. Such accessible regions contain functionally important regulatory sites, including promoters and enhancers, which undergo active remodeling for cells adapting in a dynamic environment. DNase-seq and the more recent ATAC-seq are two assays that are gaining popularity. Deep sequencing of DNA libraries from these assays, termed genomic footprinting, has been proposed to enable the comprehensive construction of protein occupancy profiles over the genome at the nucleotide level. Recent studies have discovered limitations of genomic footprinting which reduce the scope of detectable proteins. In addition, the identification of putative factors that bind to the observed footprints remains challenging. Despite these caveats, the methodology still presents significant advantages over alternative techniques such as ChIP-seq or FAIRE-seq. Here we describe computational approaches and tools for analysis of chromatin accessibility and genomic footprinting. Proper experimental design and assay-specific data analysis ensure the detection sensitivity and maximize retrievable information. The enzyme-based chromatin profiling approaches represent a powerful and evolving methodology which facilitates our understanding of how the genome is regulated.

  1. Species-specific differences in adaptive phenotypic plasticity in an ecologically relevant trophic trait: hypertrophic lips in Midas cichlid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Henning, Frederico; Meyer, Axel

    2014-07-01

    The spectacular species richness of cichlids and their diversity in morphology, coloration, and behavior have made them an ideal model for the study of speciation and adaptive evolution. Hypertrophic lips evolved repeatedly and independently in African and Neotropical cichlid radiations. Cichlids with hypertrophic lips forage predominantly in rocky crevices and it has been hypothesized that mechanical stress caused by friction could result in larger lips through phenotypic plasticity. To test the influence of the environment on the size and development of lips, we conducted a series of breeding and feeding experiments on Midas cichlids. Full-sibs of Amphilophus labiatus (thick-lipped) and Amphilophus citrinellus (thin-lipped) each were split into a control group which was fed food from the water column and a treatment group whose food was fixed to substrates. We found strong evidence for phenotypic plasticity on lip area in the thick-lipped species, but not in the thin-lipped species. Intermediate phenotypic values were observed in hybrids from thick- and thin-lipped species reared under "control" conditions. Thus, both a genetic, but also a phenotypic plastic component is involved in the development of hypertrophic lips in Neotropical cichlids. Moreover, species-specific adaptive phenotypic plasticity was found, suggesting that plasticity is selected for in recent thick-lipped species.

  2. GFP-specific CD8 T cells enable targeted cell depletion and visualization of T-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, Judith; Ruzo, Albert; Park, Eun Sook; Sweeney, Robert; Kana, Veronika; Wu, Meng; Zhao, Yong; Egli, Dieter; Merad, Miriam; Brown, Brian D

    2015-12-01

    There are numerous cell types with scarcely understood functions, whose interactions with the immune system are not well characterized. To facilitate their study, we generated a mouse bearing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-specific CD8(+) T cells. Transfer of the T cells into EGFP reporter animals can be used to kill EGFP-expressing cells, allowing selective depletion of desired cell types, or to interrogate T-cell interactions with specific populations. Using this system, we eliminate a rare EGFP-expressing cell type in the heart and demonstrate its role in cardiac function. We also show that naive T cells are recruited into the mouse brain by antigen-expressing microglia, providing evidence of an immune surveillance pathway in the central nervous system. The just EGFP death-inducing (Jedi) T cells enable visualization of a T-cell antigen. They also make it possible to utilize hundreds of existing EGFP-expressing mice, tumors, pathogens and other tools, to study T-cell interactions with many different cell types, to model disease states and to determine the functions of poorly characterized cell populations.

  3. Chromatin remodeling regulates catalase expression during cancer cells adaptation to chronic oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Christophe; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Dejeans, Nicolas; Garbe, James C; Dieu, Marc; Verrax, Julien; Renard, Patricia; Huang, Peng; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2016-10-01

    Regulation of ROS metabolism plays a major role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress in cancer cells, but the molecular mechanism that regulates catalase, a key antioxidant enzyme responsible for conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen, remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the transcriptional regulatory mechanism controlling catalase expression in three human mammary cell lines: the normal mammary epithelial 250MK primary cells, the breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and an experimental model of MCF-7 cells resistant against oxidative stress resulting from chronic exposure to H2O2 (Resox), in which catalase was overexpressed. Here we identify a novel promoter region responsible for the regulation of catalase expression at -1518/-1226 locus and the key molecules that interact with this promoter and affect catalase transcription. We show that the AP-1 family member JunB and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) mediate catalase transcriptional activation and repression, respectively, by controlling chromatin remodeling through a histone deacetylases-dependent mechanism. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in redox adaptation to chronic exposure to H2O2 in breast cancer cells. Our study suggests that cancer adaptation to oxidative stress may be regulated by transcriptional factors through chromatin remodeling, and reveals a potential new mechanism to target cancer cells.

  4. Adaptive resistance to immunotherapy directed against p53 can be overcome by global expression of tumor antigens in dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaz eHumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy of cancer utilizes dendritic cells (DC for antigen presentation and the induction of tumor-specific immune responses. However, the therapeutic induction of anti-tumor immunity is limited by tumor escape mechanisms. In this study immortalized dendritic D2SC/1 cells were transduced with a mutated version of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, p53M234I or p53C132F/E164G, which are overexpressed in MethA fibrosarcoma tumor cells. In addition, D2SC/1 cells were fused with MethA tumor cells to generate a vaccine that potentially expresses a large repertoire of tumor antigens. Cellular vaccines were transplanted onto Balb/c mice and MethA tumor growth and anti-tumor immune responses were examined in vaccinated animals. D2SC/1-p53M234I and D2SC/1-p53C132F/E168G cells induced strong therapeutic and protective MethA tumor immunity upon transplantation in Balb/c mice. However, in a fraction of immunized mice MethA tumor growth resumed after an extended latency period. Analysis of these tumors indicated loss of p53 expression. Mice, pre-treated with fusion hybrids generated from D2SC/1 and MethA tumor cells, suppressed MethA tumor growth and averted adaptive immune escape. Polyclonal B-cell responses directed against various MethA tumor proteins could be detected in the sera of D2SC/1-MethA inoculated mice. Athymic nude mice and Balb/c mice depleted of CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells were not protected against MethA tumor cell growth after immunization with D2SC/1-MethA hybrids. Our results highlight a potential drawback of cancer immunotherapy by demonstrating that the induction of a specific anti-tumor response favours the acquisition of tumor phenotypes promoting immune evasion. In contrast, the application of DC/tumor cell fusion hybrids prevents adaptive immune escape by a T-cell dependent mechanism and provides a simple strategy for personalized anti-cancer treatment without the need of selectively priming the host immune system.

  5. Optimality and adaptation of phenotypically switching cells in fluctuating environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belete, Merzu Kebede; Balázsi, Gábor

    2015-12-01

    Stochastic switching between alternative phenotypic states is a common cellular survival strategy during unforeseen environmental fluctuations. Cells can switch between different subpopulations that proliferate at different rates in different environments. Optimal population growth is typically assumed to occur when phenotypic switching rates match environmental switching rates. However, it is not well understood how this optimum behaves as a function of the growth rates of phenotypically different cells. In this study, we use mathematical and computational models to test how the actual parameters associated with optimal population growth differ from those assumed to be optimal. We find that the predicted optimum is practically always valid if the environmental durations are long. However, the regime of validity narrows as environmental durations shorten, especially if subpopulation growth rate differences differ from each other (are asymmetric) in two environments. Furthermore, we study the fate of mutants with switching rates previously predicted to be optimal. We find that mutants which match their phenotypic switching rates with the environmental ones can only sweep the population if the assumed optimum is valid, but not otherwise.

  6. Optimality and adaptation of phenotypically switching cells in fluctuating environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belete, Merzu Kebede; Balázsi, Gábor

    2015-12-01

    Stochastic switching between alternative phenotypic states is a common cellular survival strategy during unforeseen environmental fluctuations. Cells can switch between different subpopulations that proliferate at different rates in different environments. Optimal population growth is typically assumed to occur when phenotypic switching rates match environmental switching rates. However, it is not well understood how this optimum behaves as a function of the growth rates of phenotypically different cells. In this study, we use mathematical and computational models to test how the actual parameters associated with optimal population growth differ from those assumed to be optimal. We find that the predicted optimum is practically always valid if the environmental durations are long. However, the regime of validity narrows as environmental durations shorten, especially if subpopulation growth rate differences differ from each other (are asymmetric) in two environments. Furthermore, we study the fate of mutants with switching rates previously predicted to be optimal. We find that mutants which match their phenotypic switching rates with the environmental ones can only sweep the population if the assumed optimum is valid, but not otherwise.

  7. Highly sensitive and adaptable fluorescence-quenched pair discloses the substrate specificity profiles in diverse protease families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreba, Marcin; Szalek, Aleksandra; Rut, Wioletta; Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Snipas, Scott J.; Itoh, Yoshifumi; Turk, Dusan; Turk, Boris; Overall, Christopher M.; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Salvesen, Guy S.; Drag, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Internally quenched fluorescent (IQF) peptide substrates originating from FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer) are powerful tool for examining the activity and specificity of proteases, and a variety of donor/acceptor pairs are extensively used to design individual substrates and combinatorial libraries. We developed a highly sensitive and adaptable donor/acceptor pair that can be used to investigate the substrate specificity of cysteine proteases, serine proteases and metalloproteinases. This novel pair comprises 7-amino-4-carbamoylmethylcoumarin (ACC) as the fluorophore and 2,4-dinitrophenyl-lysine (Lys(DNP)) as the quencher. Using caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-8, neutrophil elastase, legumain, and two matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2 and MMP9), we demonstrated that substrates containing ACC/Lys(DNP) exhibit 7 to 10 times higher sensitivity than conventional 7-methoxy-coumarin-4-yl acetic acid (MCA)/Lys(DNP) substrates; thus, substantially lower amounts of substrate and enzyme can be used for each assay. We therefore propose that the ACC/Lys(DNP) pair can be considered a novel and sensitive scaffold for designing substrates for any group of endopeptidases. We further demonstrate that IQF substrates containing unnatural amino acids can be used to investigate protease activities/specificities for peptides containing post-translationally modified amino acids. Finally, we used IQF substrates to re-investigate the P1-Asp characteristic of caspases, thus demonstrating that some human caspases can also hydrolyze substrates after glutamic acid. PMID:28230157

  8. Caste- and sex-specific adaptations within the olfactory pathway in the brain of the ant Camponotus floridanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zube, Christina; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2008-11-01

    Olfaction plays a key role in mediating ant behavior, and ant societies are characterized by caste- and sex-specific division of labor. We propose that caste- and sex-specific adaptations in the olfactory pathway promote differences in olfactory behavior. This study compares olfactory centers in the brain of large (major) workers, small (minor) workers, virgin queens, and males of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus. The number of glomeruli in the antennal lobe was similar in the female castes, although the glomerular volumes differed. Males had approximately 45% fewer glomeruli compared to females (approximately 258 and approximately 434) and one antennal sensory tract was absent. A dual output pathway to the mushroom bodies was present in males. In contrast to females, however, the number of glomeruli connected to the medial antennocerebral tract was substantially smaller than those associated with the lateral tract. All glomeruli in the male antennal lobe contained serotonergic processes, whereas in the female castes glomeruli in the large tract six cluster lacked serotonergic innervations. We conclude that differences in general glomerular organization are subtle among the female castes, but sex-specific differences in the number, connectivity and neuromodulatory innervation of glomeruli are substantial and likely to underlie differences in olfactory processing and learning.

  9. Adaptive sliding mode control of interleaved parallel boost converter for fuel cell energy generation system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fadil, H.; Giri, F.; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of controlling energy generation systems including fuel cells (FCs) and interleaved boost power converters. The proposed nonlinear adaptive controller is designed using sliding mode control (SMC) technique based on the system nonlinear model. The latter accounts...... for the boost converter large-signal dynamics as well as for the fuel-cell nonlinear characteristics. The adaptive nonlinear controller involves online estimation of the DC bus impedance ‘seen’ by the converter. The control objective is threefold: (i) asymptotic stability of the closed loop system, (ii) output...... voltage regulation under bus impedance uncertainties and (iii) equal current sharing between modules. It is formally shown, using theoretical analysis and simulations, that the developed adaptive controller actually meets its control objectives....

  10. Specific targeting of whole lymphoma cells to dendritic cells ex vivo provides a potent antitumor vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocikat Ralph

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DC pulsed with tumor-derived antigenic material have widely been used in antitumor vaccination protocols. However, the optimal strategy of DC loading has not yet been established. Our aim was to define requirements of optimal DC vaccines in terms of in vivo protection in a murine B-cell lymphoma model. Methods We compare various loading reagents including whole parental and modified tumor cells and a single tumor-specific antigen, namely the lymphoma idiotype (Id. Bone marrow-derived DC were pulsed in vitro and used for therapy of established A20 lymphomas. Results We show that a vaccine with superior antitumor efficacy can be generated when DC are loaded with whole modified tumor cells which provide both (i antigenic polyvalency and (ii receptor-mediated antigen internalization. Uptake of cellular material was greatly enhanced when the tumor cells used for DC pulsing were engineered to express an anti-Fc receptor immunoglobulin specificity. Upon transfer of these DC, established tumor burdens were eradicated in 50% of mice. By contrast, pulsing DC with unmodified lymphoma cells or with the lymphoma Id, even when it was endowed with the anti-Fc receptor binding arm, was far less effective. A specific humoral anti-Id response could be detected, particularly following delivery of Id protein-pulsed DC, but it was not predictive of tumor protection. Instead a T-cell response was pivotal for successful tumor protection. Interaction of the transferred DC with CD8+ T lymphocytes seemed to play a role for induction of the immune response but was dispensable when DC had received an additional maturation stimulus. Conclusion Our analyses show that the advantages of specific antigen redirection and antigenic polyvalency can be combined to generate DC-based vaccines with superior antitumor efficacy. This mouse model may provide information for the standardization of DC-based vaccination protocols.

  11. A complete range of hyaluronic acid filler with distinctive physical properties specifically designed for optimal tissue adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Sandrine; Anthonioz, Lise; Fuchez, Fabien; Herbage, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    A new range of hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal fillers has been designed using Optimal Balance Technology™, which centers around three main parameters: the degree of cross-linking, the size of gel calibration and the HA concentration. The five different products in the range (HA E Touch, HA E Classic, HA E Lips, HA E Deep and HA E Volume) have the same concentration of HA (20 mg/mL) and various degrees of cross-linking and gel calibration, in order to have distinctive physical properties adapted to their specific indications. HA E Classic, HA E Deep, HA E Lips and HA E Volume are available in two different formulations either with or without lidocaine. The efficacy, safety and patient satisfaction of the HA E range in various indications have been assessed in several classical studies. In this study, the rheological measurements of HA E Deep being the firmest gel within the range. Addition of lidocaine did not change the rheological properties of the HA E fillers. HA E fillers have three different degrees of gel calibration, with HA E Touch, HA E Classic and HA E Lips having the same smallest gel calibration and HA E Volume having the largest gel calibration within the range. Injection of all HA E fillers was smooth, regular, and required low extrusion force when using the Ultra Thin Wall (UTW)needle provided for each product. In summary, the HA E fillers have distinctive physical properties in terms of gel firmness and gel calibration, which were designed to adapt to their specific indications.

  12. Adaptive evolution of the symbiotic gene NORK is not correlated with shifts of rhizobial specificity in the genus Medicago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronfort Joëlle

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NODULATION RECEPTOR KINASE (NORK gene encodes a Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR-containing receptor-like protein and controls the infection by symbiotic rhizobia and endomycorrhizal fungi in Legumes. The occurrence of numerous amino acid changes driven by directional selection has been reported in this gene, using a limited number of messenger RNA sequences, but the functional reason of these changes remains obscure. The Medicago genus, where changes in rhizobial associations have been previously examined, is a good model to test whether the evolution of NORK is influenced by rhizobial interactions. Results We sequenced a region of 3610 nucleotides (encoding a 392 amino acid-long region of the NORK protein in 32 Medicago species. We confirm that positive selection in NORK has occurred within the Medicago genus and find that the amino acid positions targeted by selection occur in sites outside of solvent-exposed regions in LRRs, and other sites in the N-terminal region of the protein. We tested if branches of the Medicago phylogeny where changes of rhizobial symbionts occurred displayed accelerated rates of amino acid substitutions. Only one branch out of five tested, leading to M. noeana, displays such a pattern. Among other branches, the most likely for having undergone positive selection is not associated with documented shift of rhizobial specificity. Conclusion Adaptive changes in the sequence of the NORK receptor have involved the LRRs, but targeted different sites than in most previous studies of LRR proteins evolution. The fact that positive selection in NORK tends not to be associated to changes in rhizobial specificity indicates that this gene was probably not involved in evolving rhizobial preferences. Other explanations (e.g. coevolutionary arms race must be tested to explain the adaptive evolution of NORK.

  13. Construction of cell type-specific logic models of signaling networks using CellNOpt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Melody K; Melas, Ioannis; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models are useful tools for understanding protein signaling networks because they provide an integrated view of pharmacological and toxicological processes at the molecular level. Here we describe an approach previously introduced based on logic modeling to generate cell-specific, mechanistic and predictive models of signal transduction. Models are derived from a network encoding prior knowledge that is trained to signaling data, and can be either binary (based on Boolean logic) or quantitative (using a recently developed formalism, constrained fuzzy logic). The approach is implemented in the freely available tool CellNetOptimizer (CellNOpt). We explain the process CellNOpt uses to train a prior knowledge network to data and illustrate its application with a toy example as well as a realistic case describing signaling networks in the HepG2 liver cancer cell line.

  14. Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronical epithelial cells exposed to zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to zincJenna M. Currier1,2, Wan-Yun Cheng1, Rory Conolly1, Brian N. Chorley1Zinc is a ubiquitous contaminant of ambient air that presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung...

  15. Emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in the adaptive response of tumour cells to microenvironmental stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Kucharzewska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells are constantly subjected to various types of endogenous and exogenous stressful stimuli, which can cause serious and even permanent damage. The ability of a cell to sense and adapt to environmental alterations is thus vital to maintain tissue homeostasis during development and adult life. Here, we review some of the major phenotypic characteristics of the hostile tumour microenvironment and the emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in these events.

  16. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44(high)CD24(low)HER2(low) cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells.

  17. Recombinant scorpion insectotoxin AaIT kills specifically insect cells but not human cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence deduced from the amino acid sequence of the scorpion insectotoxin AaIT was chemically synthesized and was expressed in Escherichia coli. The authenticity of this in vitro expressed peptide was confirmed by N-terminal peptide sequencing. Two groups of bioassays, artificial diet incorporation assay and contact insecticidal effect assay, were carried out separately to verify the toxicity of this recombinant toxin. At the end of a 24 h experimental period, more than 60% of the testing diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) larvae were killed in both groups with LCs0 value of 18.4 uM and 0.70 μM respectively. Cytotoxicity assay using cultured Sf9 insect cells and MCF-7 human cells demonstrated that the toxin AaIT had specific toxicity against insect cells but not human cells. Only 0.13 μM recombinant toxin was needed to kill 50% of cultured insect cells while as much as 1.3μM toxin had absolutely no effect on human cells. Insect cells produced obvious intrusions from their plasma membrane before broken up. We infer that toxin AaIT bind to a putative sodium channel in these insect cells and open the channel persistently, which would result in Na+ influx and finally cause destruction of insect cells.

  18. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean D. Owens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89% were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection.

  19. Cell-type specific requirements for thiol/disulfide exchange during HIV-1 entry and infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stantchev Tzanko S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of disulfide bond remodeling in HIV-1 infection is well described, but the process still remains incompletely characterized. At present, the data have been predominantly obtained using established cell lines and/or CXCR4-tropic laboratory-adapted virus strains. There is also ambiguity about which disulfide isomerases/ reductases play a major role in HIV-1 entry, as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI and/or thioredoxin (Trx have emerged as the two enzymes most often implicated in this process. Results We have extended our previous findings and those of others by focusing on CCR5-using HIV-1 strains and their natural targets - primary human macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found that the nonspecific thiol/disulfide exchange inhibitor, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB, significantly reduced HIV-1 entry and infection in cell lines, human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM, and also phytohemagglutinin (PHA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Subsequent studies were performed using specific anti-PDI or Trx monoclonal antibodies (mAb in HIV-1 envelope pseudotyped and wild type (wt virus infection systems. Although human donor-to-donor variability was observed as expected, Trx appeared to play a greater role than PDI in HIV-1 infection of MDM. In contrast, PDI, but not Trx, was predominantly involved in HIV-1 entry and infection of the CD4+/CCR5+ T cell line, PM-1, and PHA-stimulated primary human T lymphocytes. Intriguingly, both PDI and Trx were present on the surface of MDM, PM-1 and PHA-stimulated CD4+ T cells. However, considerably lower levels of Trx were detected on freshly isolated CD4+ lymphocytes, compared to PHA-stimulated cells. Conclusions Our findings clearly demonstrate the role of thiol/disulfide exchange in HIV-1 entry in primary T lymphocytes and MDM. They also establish a cell-type specificity regarding the involvement of particular disulfide isomerases/reductases in this

  20. Tissue-specific stem cells: friend or foe?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joerg Huelsken

    2009-01-01

    @@ In the face of a hostile environ-ment, the integrity of many tissues in the adult organism is maintained by a constant replacement of cells. This involves a hierarchical organization of the tissue with rare multi-potent stem cells giving rise to proliferating cells of limited proliferative capacity which in turn produce differentiating cells.

  1. A Comprehensive, Ethnically Diverse Library of Sickle Cell Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seonmi; Gianotti-Sommer, Andreia; Molina-Estevez, Francisco Javier; Vanuytsel, Kim; Skvir, Nick; Leung, Amy; Rozelle, Sarah S; Shaikho, Elmutaz Mohammed; Weir, Isabelle; Jiang, Zhihua; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Chui, David H K; Figueiredo, Maria Stella; Alsultan, Abdulraham; Al-Ali, Amein; Sebastiani, Paola; Steinberg, Martin H; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Murphy, George J

    2017-04-11

    Sickle cell anemia affects millions of people worldwide and is an emerging global health burden. As part of a large NIH-funded NextGen Consortium, we generated a diverse, comprehensive, and fully characterized library of sickle-cell-disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients of different ethnicities, β-globin gene (HBB) haplotypes, and fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels. iPSCs stand to revolutionize the way we study human development, model disease, and perhaps eventually, treat patients. Here, we describe this unique resource for the study of sickle cell disease, including novel haplotype-specific polymorphisms that affect disease severity, as well as for the development of patient-specific therapeutics for this phenotypically diverse disorder. As a complement to this library, and as proof of principle for future cell- and gene-based therapies, we also designed and employed CRISPR/Cas gene editing tools to correct the sickle hemoglobin (HbS) mutation.

  2. A Comprehensive, Ethnically Diverse Library of Sickle Cell Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonmi Park

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia affects millions of people worldwide and is an emerging global health burden. As part of a large NIH-funded NextGen Consortium, we generated a diverse, comprehensive, and fully characterized library of sickle-cell-disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patients of different ethnicities, β-globin gene (HBB haplotypes, and fetal hemoglobin (HbF levels. iPSCs stand to revolutionize the way we study human development, model disease, and perhaps eventually, treat patients. Here, we describe this unique resource for the study of sickle cell disease, including novel haplotype-specific polymorphisms that affect disease severity, as well as for the development of patient-specific therapeutics for this phenotypically diverse disorder. As a complement to this library, and as proof of principle for future cell- and gene-based therapies, we also designed and employed CRISPR/Cas gene editing tools to correct the sickle hemoglobin (HbS mutation.

  3. Lineage-specific reprogramming as a strategy for cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, Radbod; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2008-06-15

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are endowed with extensive ability for self renewal and differentiation. These features make them a promising candidate for cell therapy. However, despite the enthusiasm and hype surrounding the potential therapeutic use of human ES cells and more recently induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, to date few reports have documented successful therapeutic outcome with ES-derived cell populations. This is probably due to two main caveats associated with ES cells, their capacity to form teratomas and the challenge of isolating the appropriate therapeutic cell population from differentiating ES cells. We have focused our efforts on the derivation of skeletal muscle progenitors from ES cells and here we will discuss the strategy of reprogramming lineage choices by overexpression of a master regulator, which has proven successful for the generation of the skeletal myogenic lineage from mouse ES cells.

  4. Targeted Gene Deletion Using DNA-Free RNA-Guided Cas9 Nuclease Accelerates Adaptation of CHO Cells to Suspension Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namil; Shin, JongOh; Park, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Gyun Min; Cho, Suhyung; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-11-18

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred host for the production of a wide array of biopharmaceuticals. Thus, efficient and rational CHO cell line engineering methods have been in high demand to improve quality and productivity. Here, we provide a novel genome engineering platform for increasing desirable phenotypes of CHO cells based upon the integrative protocol of high-throughput RNA sequencing and DNA-free RNA-guided Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein9) nuclease-based genome editing. For commercial production of therapeutic proteins, CHO cells have been adapted for suspension culture in serum-free media, which is highly beneficial with respect to productivity and economics. To engineer CHO cells for rapid adaptation to a suspension culture, we exploited strand-specific RNA-seq to identify genes differentially expressed according to their adaptation trajectory in serum-free media. More than 180 million sequencing reads were generated and mapped to the currently available 109,152 scaffolds of the CHO-K1 genome. We identified significantly downregulated genes according to the adaptation trajectory and then verified their effects using the genome editing method. Growth-based screening and targeted amplicon sequencing revealed that the functional deletions of Igfbp4 and AqpI gene accelerate suspension adaptation of CHO-K1 cells. The availability of this strand-specific transcriptome sequencing and DNA-free RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease mediated genome editing facilitates the rational design of the CHO cell genome for efficient production of high quality therapeutic proteins.

  5. [Phospholipids and structural modification of tissues and cell membranes for adaptation in high altitude mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovlev, V M; Vishnevskiĭ, A A; Shanazarov, A S

    2012-01-01

    The nature of the impact of physical factors of high altitudes (3200 m) on the lipids of tissues and membranes of animals was researched. It was established that the adaptation process in Wistar rats was followed by peroxide degradation and subsequent modification of the phospholipids' structure of tissues and microsomal membranes. Adaptive phospholipids reconstruction takes place in microsomal membranes in the tissues of the lungs, brain, liver and skeletal muscles. Together with this, the amount of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid accumulates, indicating that the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol-4, 5 biphosphate to diacylglycerol and secondary messenger--inositol triphosphate, occurs. A decrease in temperature adaptation (+10 degrees C) leads to a more noticeable shift in peroxide oxidation of lipids, phospholipid structure in the tissues and membranes rather than adaptation in thermoneutral conditions (+30 degrees C). Modification of lipid composition of tissues and cell membranes in the highlands obviously increases the adaptive capabilities of cells of the whole body: physical performance and resistance to hypoxia increases in animals.

  6. Regulatory domain selectivity in the cell-type specific PKN-dependence of cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, Sylvie; Jevons, Amy; De Rycker, Manu; Casamassima, Adele; Radtke, Simone; Collazos, Alejandra; Parker, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian protein kinase N (PKN) family of Serine/Threonine kinases comprises three isoforms, which are targets for Rho family GTPases. Small GTPases are major regulators of the cellular cytoskeleton, generating interest in the role(s) of specific PKN isoforms in processes such as cell migration and invasion. It has been reported that PKN3 is required for prostate tumour cell invasion but not PKN1 or 2. Here we employ a cell model, the 5637 bladder tumour cell line where PKN2 is relatively highly expressed, to assess the potential redundancy of these isoforms in migratory responses. It is established that PKN2 has a critical role in the migration and invasion of these cells. Furthermore, using a PKN wild-type and chimera rescue strategy, it is shown that PKN isoforms are not simply redundant in supporting migration, but appear to be linked through isoform specific regulatory domain properties to selective upstream signals. It is concluded that intervention in PKNs may need to be directed at multiple isoforms to be effective in different cell types.

  7. Regulatory domain selectivity in the cell-type specific PKN-dependence of cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Lachmann

    Full Text Available The mammalian protein kinase N (PKN family of Serine/Threonine kinases comprises three isoforms, which are targets for Rho family GTPases. Small GTPases are major regulators of the cellular cytoskeleton, generating interest in the role(s of specific PKN isoforms in processes such as cell migration and invasion. It has been reported that PKN3 is required for prostate tumour cell invasion but not PKN1 or 2. Here we employ a cell model, the 5637 bladder tumour cell line where PKN2 is relatively highly expressed, to assess the potential redundancy of these isoforms in migratory responses. It is established that PKN2 has a critical role in the migration and invasion of these cells. Furthermore, using a PKN wild-type and chimera rescue strategy, it is shown that PKN isoforms are not simply redundant in supporting migration, but appear to be linked through isoform specific regulatory domain properties to selective upstream signals. It is concluded that intervention in PKNs may need to be directed at multiple isoforms to be effective in different cell types.

  8. Relation of spontaneous transformation in cell culture to adaptive growth and clonal heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, A L; Yao, A; Rubin, H

    1990-01-01

    Cell transformation in culture is marked by the appearance of morphologically altered cells that continue to multiply to form discrete foci in confluent sheets when the surrounding cells are inhibited. These foci occur spontaneously in early-passage NIH 3T3 cells grown to confluency in 10% calf serum (CS) but are not seen in cultures grown to confluency in 2% CS. However, repeated passage of the cells at low density in 2% CS gives rise to an adapted population that grows to increasingly higher saturation densities and produces large numbers of foci in 2% CS. The increased saturation density of the adapted population in 2% CS is retained upon repeated passage in 10% CS, but the number and size of the foci produced in 2% CS gradually decrease under this regime. Clonal analysis confirms that the focus-forming potential of most if not all of the cells in a population increases in response to a continuously applied growth constraint, although only a small fraction of the population may actually form foci in a given assay. The acquired capacity for focus formation varies widely in clones derived from the adapted population and changes in diverse ways upon further passage of the clones. We propose that the adaptive changes result from progressive selection of successive phenotypic variations in growth capacity that occur spontaneously. The process designated progressive state selection resolves the apparent dichotomy between spontaneous mutation with selection on the one hand and induction on the other, by introducing selection among fluctuating states or metabolic patterns rather than among genetically altered cells.

  9. A comparative pan-genome perspective of niche-adaptable cell-surface protein phenotypes in Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kant

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a ubiquitously adaptable Gram-positive bacterium and as a typical commensal can be recovered from various microbe-accessible bodily orifices and cavities. Then again, other isolates are food-borne, with some of these having been long associated with naturally fermented cheeses and yogurts. Additionally, because of perceived health benefits to humans and animals, numerous L. rhamnosus strains have been selected for use as so-called probiotics and are often taken in the form of dietary supplements and functional foods. At the genome level, it is anticipated that certain genetic variances will have provided the niche-related phenotypes that augment the flexible adaptiveness of this species, thus enabling its strains to grow and survive in their respective host environments. For this present study, we considered it functionally informative to examine and catalogue the genotype-phenotype variation existing at the cell surface between different L. rhamnosus strains, with the presumption that this might be relatable to habitat preferences and ecological adaptability. Here, we conducted a pan-genomic study involving 13 genomes from L. rhamnosus isolates with various origins. In using a benchmark strain (gut-adapted L. rhamnosus GG for our pan-genome comparison, we had focused our efforts on a detailed examination and description of gene products for certain functionally relevant surface-exposed proteins, each of which in effect might also play a part in niche adaptability among the other strains. Perhaps most significantly of the surface protein loci we had analyzed, it would appear that the spaCBA operon (known to encode SpaCBA-called pili having a mucoadhesive phenotype is a genomic rarity and an uncommon occurrence in L. rhamnosus. However, for any of the so-piliated L. rhamnosus strains, they will likely possess an increased niche-specific fitness, which functionally might presumably be manifested by a protracted transient

  10. Sequence adaptations during growth of rescued classical swine fever viruses in cell culture and within infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne; Friis, Martin Barfred; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    RNA could be detected. However, the animals inoculated with these mutant viruses seroconverted against CSFV. Thus, these mutant viruses were highly attenuated in vivo. All 4 rescued viruses were also passaged up to 20 times in cell culture. Using full genome sequencing, the same two adaptations within...... adaptation and to identify key determinants of viral replication efficiency in cells and within host animals....

  11. Adaptation of WHOQOL as health-related quality of life instrument to develop a vision-specific instrument.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandona Lalit

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The WHOQOL instrument was adapted as a health-related QOL instrument for a population-based epidemiologic study of eye diseases in southern India, the Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study (APEDS. A follow-up question was added to each item in WHOQOL to determine whether the decrease in QOL was due to any health reasons including eye-related reasons. Modifications in WHOQOL and translation in local language were done through the use of the focus groups including health professionals and people not related to health care. The modified instrument has 28 items across 6 domains of the WHOQOL and was translated into the local language, Telugu, using the pragmatic approach. It takes 10-20 minutes to be administered by a trained interviewer. Reliability was within acceptable range. This health-related QOL instrument is being used in the population-based study APEDS to develop a vision-specific QOL instrument which could potentially be used to assess the impact of visual impairment on QOL across different cultures and for use in evaluating eye-care interventions. This health-related QOL instrument could also be used to develop other disease-specific instruments as it allows assessment of the extent to which various aspects of QOL are affected by a variety of health problems.

  12. Adaptation of WHOQOL as health-related quality of life instrument to develop a vision-specific instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandona, R; Dandona, L; McCarty, C A; Rao, G N

    2000-03-01

    The WHOQOL instrument was adapted as a health-related QOL instrument for a population-based epidemiologic study of eye diseases in southern India, the Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study (APEDS). A follow-up question was added to each item in WHOQOL to determine whether the decrease in QOL was due to any health reasons including eye-related reasons. Modifications in WHOQOL and translation in local language were done through the use of the focus groups including health professionals and people not related to health care. The modified instrument has 28 items across 6 domains of the WHOQOL and was translated into the local language, Telugu, using the pragmatic approach. It takes 10-20 minutes to be administered by a trained interviewer. Reliability was within acceptable range. This health-related QOL instrument is being used in the population-based study APEDS to develop a vision-specific QOL instrument which could potentially be used to assess the impact of visual impairment on QOL across different cultures and for use in evaluating eye-care interventions. This health-related QOL instrument could also be used to develop other disease-specific instruments as it allows assessment of the extent to which various aspects of QOL are affected by a variety of health problems.

  13. Direct evidence of specific localization of sesquiterpenes and marchantin A in oil body cells of Marchantia polymorpha L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Esaki, T; Kenmoku, H; Koeduka, T; Kiyoyama, Y; Masujima, T; Asakawa, Y; Matsui, K

    2016-10-01

    Liverworts are a rich source of a diverse array of specialized metabolites, such as terpenoids and benzenoids, which are potentially useful for pharmaceutical or agrochemical applications, and also provide clues to elucidate the strategy by which liverworts adapt to the terrestrial environment. Liverworts, belonging to orders Marchantiales and Jungermanniales, possess oil bodies. In Marchantia polymorpha L., oil bodies are confined to scattered idioblastic oil body cells. It has been assumed that the specialized metabolites in M. polymorpha specifically accumulate in the oil bodies in oil body cells; however, no direct evidence was previously available for this specific accumulation. In this study, direct evidence was obtained using micromanipulation techniques coupled with MS analysis that demonstrated the specific accumulation of sesquiterpenoids and marchantin A in the oil body cells of M. polymorpha thalli. It was also observed that the number of oil body cells increased in thalli grown in low-mineral conditions. The amounts of sesquiterpenoids and marchantin A detected in crude extract prepared from the whole thallus were roughly proportional to the number of oil body cells found in a given volume of thallus, suggesting that oil body cell differentiation and sesquiterpenoid and marchantin A biosynthetic pathways are coordinated with each other.

  14. Structural insights into the adaptation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) from Haloferax volcanii to a high-salt environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgunova, Ekaterina, E-mail: ekaterina.morgunova@ki.se [Karolinska Institutet, NOVUM, Centre of Structural Biochemistry, S-14157 Huddinge (Sweden); Gray, Fiona C. [Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaløes Vej 5, 2200 Copenhagen (Denmark); MacNeill, Stuart A. [Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaløes Vej 5, 2200 Copenhagen (Denmark); Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST,Scotland (United Kingdom); Ladenstein, Rudolf [Karolinska Institutet, NOVUM, Centre of Structural Biochemistry, S-14157 Huddinge (Sweden)

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of PCNA from the halophilic archaeon H. volcanii reveals specific features of the charge distribution on the protein surface that reflect adaptation to a high-salt environment and suggests a different type of interaction with DNA in halophilic PCNAs. The sliding clamp proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays vital roles in many aspects of DNA replication and repair in eukaryotic cells and in archaea. Realising the full potential of archaea as a model for PCNA function requires a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches. In order to provide a platform for subsequent reverse genetic analysis, PCNA from the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii was subjected to crystallographic analysis. The gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein was purified by affinity chromatography and crystallized by the vapour-diffusion technique. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined at 3.5 Å resolution to a final R factor of 23.7% (R{sub free} = 25%). PCNA from H. volcanii was found to be homotrimeric and to resemble other homotrimeric PCNA clamps but with several differences that appear to be associated with adaptation of the protein to the high intracellular salt concentrations found in H. volcanii cells.

  15. Effects of low-dose heavy ion irradiation on male germ cell adaptation and genetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong; LI Wen-Jian; ZHENG Rong-Liang

    2005-01-01

    The heavy ions with high linear energy transfer and high relative biological effectiveness are much more deleterious on the male germ cells, ones of the most radiosensitive cells of the body, than low-LET ionizing radiation such as X-ray or gamma-ray. The effects of low-dose heavy ion irradiation on male germ cell adaptation and genetics and the possible mechanism of this adaptation are summarized in our laboratory. Our results showed that the heavy ion irradiation significantly increased the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in spermatogonia and spermatocytes of mice, the low dose heavy ion irradiation could induce significant adaptative response on mouse testes and human sperm, and pre-exposure of mouse testes with low-dose heavy ion can markedly alleviate damage effects induced by subsequent high-dose irradiation. The increase of SOD activity and decrease of lipid peroxidation levels induced by low-dose ionizing radiation may be involved in this adaptative response mechanism. These studies may provide useful theoretical and clinical bases for radioprotection of reproductive potential and assessment of genetic risks for human exposed to heavy ions in radiotherapy and in outer space environment.

  16. Synchronization of cells with activator-inhibitor pathways through adaptive environment-mediated coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghomsi, P. Guemkam; Moukam Kakmeni, F. M.; Tchawoua, C.; Kofane, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we report the synchronized dynamics of cells with activator-inhibitor pathways via an adaptive environment-mediated coupling scheme with feedbacks and control mechanisms. The adaptive character of the extracellular medium is modeled via its damping parameter as a physiological response aiming at annihilating the cellular differentiation existing between the chaotic biochemical pathways of the cells, in order to preserve homeostasis. We perform an investigation on the existence and stability of the synchronization manifold of the coupled system under the proposed coupling pattern. Both mathematical and computational tools suggest the accessibility of conducive prerequisites (conditions) for the emergence of a robust synchronous regime. The relevance of a phase-synchronized dynamics is appraised and several numerical indicators advocate for the prevalence of this fascinating phenomenon among the interacting cells in the phase space.

  17. Fine tuning of the threshold of T cell selection by the Nck adapters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Schmitt, Sabine; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-12-15

    Thymic selection shapes the T cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage against pathogens while preventing autoimmunity. Recognition of self-peptides in the context of peptide-MHC complexes by the TCR is central to this process, which remains partially understood at the molecular level. In this study we provide genetic evidence that the Nck adapter proteins are essential for thymic selection. In vivo Nck deletion resulted in a reduction of the thymic cellularity, defective positive selection of low-avidity T cells, and impaired deletion of thymocytes engaged by low-potency stimuli. Nck-deficient thymocytes were characterized by reduced ERK activation, particularly pronounced in mature single positive thymocytes. Taken together, our findings identify a crucial role for the Nck adapters in enhancing TCR signal strength, thereby fine-tuning the threshold of thymocyte selection and shaping the preimmune T cell repertoire.

  18. Spontaneous presence of FOXO3-specific T cells in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stine Kiaer; Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Idorn, Manja

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we describe forkhead box O3 (FOXO3)-specific, cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells existent among peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cancer patients. FOXO3 immunogenicity appears specific, as we did not detect reactivity toward FOXO3 among T cells in healthy individuals. FOXO3...... may naturally serve as a target antigen for tumor-reactive T cells as it is frequently over-expressed in cancer cells. In addition, expression of FOXO3 plays a critical role in immunosuppression mediated by tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs). Indeed, FOXO3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs......) were able to specifically recognize and kill both FOXO3-expressing cancer cells as well as dendritic cells. Thus, FOXO3 was processed and presented by HLA-A2 on the cell surface of both immune cells and cancer cells. As FOXO3 programs TADCs to become tolerogenic, FOXO3 signaling thereby comprises...

  19. Tissue-specific designs of stem cell hierarchies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visvader, Jane E; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the field of stem cell biology suggests that there is no single design for an adult tissue stem cell hierarchy, and that different tissues employ distinct strategies to meet their self-renewal and repair requirements. Stem cells may be multipotent or unipotent, and can exist in quiesc

  20. Regeneration of adenovirus specific T-cells after allogeneic, hematopietic stem cell transplantation in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, and control of infection seems to require antigen-specific T cells. Aim of this Work was to estimate the Regeneration of Adenovirus-specific T-cells In 26 children (Age 8 months -25 years) over 6 months after HSCT and to investigate the effects of the transplantations parameter, Virus reactivation and the Transplantations complications on the adv-specific cell...

  1. Pan-genome analyses identify lineage- and niche-specific markers of evolution and adaptation in Epsilonproteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eZhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly increasing availability of complete bacterial genomes has created new opportunities for reconstructing bacterial evolution, but it has also highlighted the difficulty to fully understand the genomic and functional variations occurring among different lineages. Using the class Epsilonproteobacteria as a case study, we investigated the composition, flexibility, and function of its pan-genomes. Models were constructed to extrapolate the expansion of pan-genomes at three different taxonomic levels. The results show that, for Epsilonproteobacteria the seemingly large genome variations among strains of the same species are less noticeable when compared with groups at higher taxonomic ranks, indicating that genome stability is imposed by the potential existence of taxonomic boundaries. The analyses of pan-genomes has also defined a set of universally conserved core genes, based on which a phylogenetic tree was constructed to confirm that thermophilic species from deep-sea hydrothermal vents represent the most ancient lineages of Epsilonproteobacteria. Moreover, by comparing the flexible genome of a chemoautotrophic deep-sea vent species to 1 genomes of species belonging to the same genus, but inhabiting different environments, and 2 genomes of other vent species, but belonging to different genera, we were able to delineate the relative importance of lineage-specific versus niche-specific genes. This result not only emphasizes the overall importance of phylogenetic proximity in shaping the variable part of the genome, but also highlights the adaptive functions of niche-specific genes. Overall, by modeling the expansion of pan-genomes and analyzing core and flexible genes, this study provides snapshots on how the complex processes of gene acquisition, conservation, and removal affect the evolution of different species, and contribute to the metabolic diversity and versatility of Epsilonproteobacteria.

  2. Cell-Specific Cre Strains For Genetic Manipulation in Salivary Glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri O Maruyama

    Full Text Available The secretory acinar cells of the salivary gland are essential for saliva secretion, but are also the cell type preferentially lost following radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. The source of replacement acinar cells is currently a matter of debate. There is evidence for the presence of adult stem cells located within specific ductal regions of the salivary glands, but our laboratory recently demonstrated that differentiated acinar cells are maintained without significant stem cell contribution. To enable further investigation of salivary gland cell lineages and their origins, we generated three cell-specific Cre driver mouse strains. For genetic manipulation in acinar cells, an inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER was targeted to the prolactin-induced protein (Pip gene locus. Targeting of the Dcpp1 gene, encoding demilune cell and parotid protein, labels intercalated duct cells, a putative site of salivary gland stem cells, and serous demilune cells of the sublingual gland. Duct cell-specific Cre expression was attempted by targeting the inducible Cre to the Tcfcp2l1 gene locus. Using the R26Tomato Red reporter mouse, we demonstrate that these strains direct inducible, cell-specific expression. Genetic tracing of acinar cells using PipGCE supports the recent finding that differentiated acinar cells clonally expand. Moreover, tracing of intercalated duct cells expressing DcppGCE confirms evidence of duct cell proliferation, but further analysis is required to establish that renewal of secretory acinar cells is dependent on stem cells within these ducts.

  3. Cell-Specific Cre Strains For Genetic Manipulation in Salivary Glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Eri O; Aure, Marit H; Xie, Xiaoling; Myal, Yvonne; Gan, Lin; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2016-01-01

    The secretory acinar cells of the salivary gland are essential for saliva secretion, but are also the cell type preferentially lost following radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. The source of replacement acinar cells is currently a matter of debate. There is evidence for the presence of adult stem cells located within specific ductal regions of the salivary glands, but our laboratory recently demonstrated that differentiated acinar cells are maintained without significant stem cell contribution. To enable further investigation of salivary gland cell lineages and their origins, we generated three cell-specific Cre driver mouse strains. For genetic manipulation in acinar cells, an inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER) was targeted to the prolactin-induced protein (Pip) gene locus. Targeting of the Dcpp1 gene, encoding demilune cell and parotid protein, labels intercalated duct cells, a putative site of salivary gland stem cells, and serous demilune cells of the sublingual gland. Duct cell-specific Cre expression was attempted by targeting the inducible Cre to the Tcfcp2l1 gene locus. Using the R26Tomato Red reporter mouse, we demonstrate that these strains direct inducible, cell-specific expression. Genetic tracing of acinar cells using PipGCE supports the recent finding that differentiated acinar cells clonally expand. Moreover, tracing of intercalated duct cells expressing DcppGCE confirms evidence of duct cell proliferation, but further analysis is required to establish that renewal of secretory acinar cells is dependent on stem cells within these ducts.

  4. Dendritic Cells under Hypoxia: How Oxygen Shortage Affects the Linkage between Innate and Adaptive Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winning, Sandra; Fandrey, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as one of the main regulators of immune responses. They collect antigens, process them, and present typical antigenic structures to lymphocytes, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response. All these processes take place under conditions of oxygen shortage (hypoxia) which is often not considered in experimental settings. This review highlights how deeply hypoxia modulates human as well as mouse immature and mature dendritic cell functions. It tries to link in vitro results to actual in vivo studies and outlines how hypoxia-mediated shaping of dendritic cells affects the activation of (innate) immunity.

  5. Dendritic Cells under Hypoxia: How Oxygen Shortage Affects the Linkage between Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Winning

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are considered as one of the main regulators of immune responses. They collect antigens, process them, and present typical antigenic structures to lymphocytes, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response. All these processes take place under conditions of oxygen shortage (hypoxia which is often not considered in experimental settings. This review highlights how deeply hypoxia modulates human as well as mouse immature and mature dendritic cell functions. It tries to link in vitro results to actual in vivo studies and outlines how hypoxia-mediated shaping of dendritic cells affects the activation of (innate immunity.

  6. Context and location dependence of adaptive Foxp3+ regulatory T cell formation during immunopathological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Heiber, Joshua F.; Geiger, Terrence L

    2012-01-01

    Circulating Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) may arise in the thymus (natural Treg, nTreg) or through the adaptive upregulation of Foxp3 after T cell activation (induced Treg, iTreg). In this brief review, we explore evidence for the formation and function of iTreg during pathologic conditions. Determining the ontogeny and function of Treg populations has relied on the use of manipulated systems in which either iTreg or nTreg are absent, or lineage tracing of T cell clones through repertoire ...

  7. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  8. Equal modulation of endothelial cell function by four distinct tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can generate multiple end-stage mesenchymal cell types and constitute a promising population of cells for regenerative therapies. Additionally, there is increasing evidence supporting other trophic activities of MSCs, including the ability to enable formation of vasculature in vivo. Although MSCs were originally isolated from the bone marrow, the presence of these cells in the stromal vascular fraction of multiple adult tissues has been recently recognized. However, it is unknown whether the capacity to modulate vasculogenesis is ubiquitous to all MSCs regardless of their tissue of origin. Here, we demonstrated that tissue-resident MSCs isolated from four distinct tissues have equal capacity to modulate endothelial cell function, including formation of vascular networks in vivo. MSCs were isolated from four murine tissues, including bone marrow, white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and myocardium. In culture, all four MSC populations secreted a plethora of pro-angiogenic factors that unequivocally induced proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs). In vivo, co-implantation of MSCs with ECFCs into mice generated an extensive network of blood vessels with ECFCs specifically lining the lumens and MSCs occupying perivascular positions. Importantly, there were no differences among all four MSCs evaluated. Our studies suggest that the capacity to modulate the formation of vasculature is a ubiquitous property of all MSCs, irrespective of their original anatomical location. These results validate multiple tissues as potential sources of MSCs for future cell-based vascular therapies.

  9. Implications for the offspring of circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalla, Amarnadh; Ringholm, Lene; Søstrup, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown an increase in beta cell mass during pregnancy. Somatolactogenic hormones are known to stimulate the proliferation of existing beta cells in rodents whereas the mechanism in humans is still unclear. We hypothesize that in addition to somatolactogenic hormones...... there are other circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. This study aimed at screening for potential pregnancy-associated circulating beta cell growth factors. SAMPLES: Serum samples from nonpregnant and pregnant women. METHODS: The effect of serum from pregnant women...... for mitogenic activity in INS-1E cells. Proteins and peptides in mitogenic active serum fractions were identified by amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Presence of circulating beta cell proliferating factors. RESULTS: Late gestational pregnancy serum significantly increased...

  10. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, John C.; Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  11. An engineered approach to stem cell culture: automating the decision process for real-time adaptive subculture of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ker, Dai Fei Elmer; Weiss, Lee E; Junkers, Silvina N; Chen, Mei; Yin, Zhaozheng; Sandbothe, Michael F; Huh, Seung-il; Eom, Sungeun; Bise, Ryoma; Osuna-Highley, Elvira; Kanade, Takeo; Campbell, Phil G

    2011-01-01

    Current cell culture practices are dependent upon human operators and remain laborious and highly subjective, resulting in large variations and inconsistent outcomes, especially when using visual assessments of cell confluency to determine the appropriate time to subculture cells. Although efforts to automate cell culture with robotic systems are underway, the majority of such systems still require human intervention to determine when to subculture. Thus, it is necessary to accurately and objectively determine the appropriate time for cell passaging. Optimal stem cell culturing that maintains cell pluripotency while maximizing cell yields will be especially important for efficient, cost-effective stem cell-based therapies. Toward this goal we developed a real-time computer vision-based system that monitors the degree of cell confluency with a precision of 0.791±0.031 and recall of 0.559±0.043. The system consists of an automated phase-contrast time-lapse microscope and a server. Multiple dishes are sequentially imaged and the data is uploaded to the server that performs computer vision processing, predicts when cells will exceed a pre-defined threshold for optimal cell confluency, and provides a Web-based interface for remote cell culture monitoring. Human operators are also notified via text messaging and e-mail 4 hours prior to reaching this threshold and immediately upon reaching this threshold. This system was successfully used to direct the expansion of a paradigm stem cell population, C2C12 cells. Computer-directed and human-directed control subcultures required 3 serial cultures to achieve the theoretical target cell yield of 50 million C2C12 cells and showed no difference for myogenic and osteogenic differentiation. This automated vision-based system has potential as a tool toward adaptive real-time control of subculturing, cell culture optimization and quality assurance/quality control, and it could be integrated with current and developing robotic cell

  12. Manufacture of clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells stably expressing chimeric antigen receptor using Sleeping Beauty system and artificial antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjeet Singh

    Full Text Available Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28 that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC in the presence of interleukin (IL-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT. We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼10(10 T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion.

  13. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alysia M. Birkholz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells, are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer.

  14. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer.

  15. Specific activation of dendritic cells enhances clearance of Bacillus anthracis following infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain J T Thompson

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are potent activators of the immune system and have a key role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses. In the current study we have used ex vivo pulsed bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC in a novel adoptive transfer strategy to protect against challenge with Bacillus anthracis, in a murine model. Pre-pulsing murine BMDC with either recombinant Protective Antigen (PA or CpG significantly upregulated expression of the activation markers CD40, CD80, CD86 and MHC-II. Passive transfusion of mice with pulsed BMDC, concurrently with active immunisation with rPA in alum, significantly enhanced (p<0.001 PA-specific splenocyte responses seven days post-immunisation. Parallel studies using ex vivo DCs expanded from human peripheral blood and activated under the same conditions as the murine DC, demonstrated that human DCs had a PA dose-related significant increase in the markers CD40, CD80 and CCR7 and that the increases in CD40 and CD80 were maintained when the other activating components, CpG and HK B. anthracis were added to the rPA in culture. Mice vaccinated on a single occasion intra-muscularly with rPA and alum and concurrently transfused intra-dermally with pulsed BMDC, demonstrated 100% survival following lethal B. anthracis challenge and had significantly enhanced (p<0.05 bacterial clearance within 2 days, compared with mice vaccinated with rPA and alum alone.

  16. A spin-adapted size-extensive state-specific multi-reference perturbation theory. I. Formal developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shuneng; Cheng, Lan; Liu, Wenjian; Mukherjee, Debashis

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper a comprehensive formulation of a spin-adapted size-extensive state-specific multi-reference second-order perturbation theory (SA-SSMRPT2) as a tool for applications to molecular states of arbitrary complexity and generality. The perturbative theory emerges in the development as a result of a physically appealing quasi-linearization of a rigorously size-extensive state-specific multi-reference coupled cluster (SSMRCC) formalism [U. S. Mahapatra, B. Datta, and D. Mukherjee, J. Chem. Phys. 110, 6171 (1999), 10.1063/1.478523]. The formulation is intruder-free as long as the state-energy is energetically well-separated from the virtual functions. SA-SSMRPT2 works with a complete active space (CAS), and treats each of the model space functions on the same footing. This thus has the twin advantages of being capable of handling varying degrees of quasi-degeneracy and of ensuring size-extensivity. This strategy is attractive in terms of the applicability to bigger systems. A very desirable property of the parent SSMRCC theory is the explicit maintenance of size-extensivity under a variety of approximations of the working equations. We show how to generate both the Rayleigh-Schrödinger (RS) and the Brillouin-Wigner (BW) versions of SA-SSMRPT2. Unlike the traditional naive formulations, both the RS and the BW variants are manifestly size-extensive and both share the avoidance of intruders in the same manner as the parent SSMRCC. We discuss the various features of the RS as well as the BW version using several partitioning strategies of the hamiltonian. Unlike the other CAS based MRPTs, the SA-SSMRPT2 is intrinsically flexible in the sense that it is constructed in a manner that it can relax the coefficients of the reference function, or keep the coefficients frozen if we so desire. We delineate the issues pertaining to the spin-adaptation of the working equations of the SA-SSMRPT2, starting from SSMRCC, which would allow us to incorporate essentially

  17. The Mechanism of Adaptation of Breast Cancer Cells to Hypoxia: Role of AMPK/mTOR Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, D V; Scherbakov, A M; Yakushina, I A; Semina, S E; Gudkova, M V; Krasil'nikov, M A

    2016-02-01

    We studied the mechanisms of adaptation of human breast cancer cells MCF-7 to hypoxia and analyzed the role of AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway in the maintenance of cell proliferation under hypoxic conditions. It was found that long-term culturing (30 days or more) of MCF-7 cells under hypoxic conditions induced their partial adaptation to hypoxia. Cell adaptation to hypoxia was associated with attenuation of hypoxia-dependent AMPK induction with simultaneous constitutive activation of mTOR and Akt. These findings suggest that these proteins can be promising targets for targeted therapy of tumors developing under hypoxic conditions.

  18. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Martin H; Serrano, Luis

    2016-02-09

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer.

  19. Sendai virus utilizes specific sialyloligosaccharides as host cell receptor determinants.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Purified sialyltransferases (CMP-N-acetyl-neuraminate:D-galactosyl-glycoprotein N-acetylneuraminyl-transferase, EC 2.4.99.1) in conjunction with neuraminidase (acylneuraminyl hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.18) were used to produce cell surface sialyloligosaccharides of defined sequence to investigate their role in paramyxovirus infection of host cells. Infection of Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells by Sendai virus was monitored by hemagglutination titer of the virus produced and by changes in morphologica...

  20. Cell type-specific responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, C; Diendorf, J; Gessmann, J; Simon, T; Habijan, T; Eggeler, G; Schildhauer, T A; Epple, M; Köller, M

    2011-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are increasingly used in biomedical applications because of their remarkable antimicrobial activity. In biomedicine, Ag-NP are coated onto or embedded in wound dressings, surgical instruments and bone substitute biomaterials, such as silver-containing calcium phosphate cements. Free Ag-NP and silver ions are released from these coatings or after the degradation of a biomaterial, and may come into close contact with blood cells. Despite the widespread use of Ag-NP as an antimicrobial agent, there is a serious lack of information on the biological effects of Ag-NP on human blood cells. In this study, the uptake of Ag-NP by peripheral monocytes and lymphocytes (T-cells) was analyzed, and the influence of nanosilver on cell biological functions (proliferation, the expression of adhesion molecules, cytokine release and the generation of reactive oxygen species) was studied. After cell culture in the presence of monodispersed Ag-NP (5-30μgml(-1) silver concentration), agglomerates of nanoparticles were detected within monocytes (CD14+) but not in T-cells (CD3+) by light microscopy, flow cytometry and combined focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy. The uptake rate of nanoparticles was concentration dependent, and the silver agglomerates were typically found in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, a concentration-dependent activation (e.g. an increased expression of adhesion molecule CD54) of monocytes at Ag-NP concentrations of 10-15μgml(-1) was observed, and cytotoxicity of Ag-NP-treated monocytes was observed at Ag-NP levels of 25μgml(-1) and higher. However, no modulation of T-cell proliferation was observed in the presence of Ag-NP. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence for a cell-type-specific uptake of Ag-NP by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the resultant cellular responses after exposure.

  1. Allergen-specific Th2 cells as targets for immune intervention in allergic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan E. de Vries

    1996-01-01

    Finally, it is shown that IL-4-driven allergen-specific Th2 cell differentiation can be redirected into a Th0 and Thl cell differentiation pathway by stimulating these IL-4-driven allergen-specific Th cell populations in the presence of IL-12, or by co-stimulating these cells via a novel T cell receptor, designated signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM. The clinical implications of these approaches are discussed.

  2. Adaptation of the "Dynamic Method" for measuring the specific respiration rate in oxygen transfer systems through diffusion membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamboukian, Marilena Martins; Pereira, Carlos Augusto; Augusto, Elisabeth de Fatima Pires; Tonso, Aldo

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring the specific respiration rate (Q(O2)) is a valuable tool to evaluate cell growth and physiology. However, for low Q(O2) values the accuracy may depend on the measurement methodology, as it is the case in animal cell culture. The widely used "Dynamic Method" imposes serious difficulties concerning oxygen transfer cancellation, especially through membrane oxygenation. This paper presents an improved procedure to this method, through an automated control of the gas inlet composition that can minimize the residual oxygen transfer driving force during the Q(O2) measurement phase. The improved technique was applied to animal cell cultivation, particularly three recombinant S2 (Drosophila melanogaster) insect cell lines grown in a membrane aeration bioreactor. The average measurements of the proposed method reached 98% of stationary liquid phase balance method, taken as a reference, compared to 21% when the traditional method was used. Furthermore, this methodology does not require knowledge of the volumetric transfer coefficient k(L)a, which may vary during growth.

  3. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Tissue-Specific Progenitor Cells: Their Role in Tissue Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Klimczak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs reside in many human organs and comprise heterogeneous population of cells with self-renewal ability. These cells can be isolated from different tissues, and their morphology, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential are dependent on their tissue of origin. Each organ contains specific population of stromal cells which maintain regeneration process of the tissue where they reside, but some of them have much more wide plasticity and differentiate into multiple cells lineage. MSCs isolated from adult human tissues are ideal candidates for tissue regeneration and tissue engineering. However, MSCs do not only contribute to structurally tissue repair but also MSC possess strong immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties and may influence in tissue repair by modulation of local environment. This paper is presenting an overview of the current knowledge of biology of tissue-resident mesenchymal stromal and progenitor cells (originated from bone marrow, liver, skeletal muscle, skin, heart, and lung associated with tissue regeneration and tissue homeostasis.

  4. A mucin-like peptide from Fasciola hepatica instructs dendritic cells with parasite specific Th1-polarizing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noya, Verónica; Brossard, Natalie; Rodríguez, Ernesto; Dergan-Dylon, L Sebastián; Carmona, Carlos; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Freire, Teresa

    2017-01-12

    Fasciolosis is a trematode zoonosis of interest in public health and cattle production. We report here the immunostimulatory effect of a 66 mer mucin-like peptide from Fasciola hepatica (Fhmuc), which synergizes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to promote dendritic cell (DC) maturation, endowing these cells with Th1-polarizing capacity. Exposure of DCs to Fhmuc in presence of LPS induced enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and expression of co-stimulatory molecules by DCs, promoting their T cell stimulatory capacity and selectively augmenting IFN-γ secretion by allogeneic T cells. Furthermore, exposure of DCs to Fhmuc augmented LPS-induced Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 expression on the cell surface. Finally, Fhmuc-conditioned DCs induced parasite specific-adaptive immunity with increased levels of IFN-γ secreted by splenocytes from vaccinated animals, and higher parasite-specific IgG antibodies. However, Fhmuc-treated DC conferred modest protection against F. hepatica infection highlighting the potent immuno-regulatory capacity of the parasite. In summary, this work highlights the capacity of a mucin-derived peptide from F. hepatica to enhance LPS-maturation of DCs and induce parasite-specific immune responses with potential implications in vaccination and therapeutic strategies.

  5. A mucin-like peptide from Fasciola hepatica instructs dendritic cells with parasite specific Th1-polarizing activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noya, Verónica; Brossard, Natalie; Rodríguez, Ernesto; Dergan-Dylon, L. Sebastián; Carmona, Carlos; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Freire, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Fasciolosis is a trematode zoonosis of interest in public health and cattle production. We report here the immunostimulatory effect of a 66 mer mucin-like peptide from Fasciola hepatica (Fhmuc), which synergizes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to promote dendritic cell (DC) maturation, endowing these cells with Th1-polarizing capacity. Exposure of DCs to Fhmuc in presence of LPS induced enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and expression of co-stimulatory molecules by DCs, promoting their T cell stimulatory capacity and selectively augmenting IFN-γ secretion by allogeneic T cells. Furthermore, exposure of DCs to Fhmuc augmented LPS-induced Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 expression on the cell surface. Finally, Fhmuc-conditioned DCs induced parasite specific-adaptive immunity with increased levels of IFN-γ secreted by splenocytes from vaccinated animals, and higher parasite-specific IgG antibodies. However, Fhmuc-treated DC conferred modest protection against F. hepatica infection highlighting the potent immuno-regulatory capacity of the parasite. In summary, this work highlights the capacity of a mucin-derived peptide from F. hepatica to enhance LPS-maturation of DCs and induce parasite-specific immune responses with potential implications in vaccination and therapeutic strategies. PMID:28079156

  6. Specificity of islet cell autoantibodies and coexistence with other organ specific autoantibodies in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirogianni, Alexandra; Pipi, Elena; Soufleros, Konstantinos

    2009-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has been shown to be a disease characterized by immune-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing islet beta-cells (beta-cells) in the pancreas. Intensive studies, in both patients and animal models are trying to elucidate the specific antigenic targets that are responsible for islet cell autoimmunity. So far, the most important molecules that have been recognized are the native insulin, the 65-kDa form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD(65)) and the insulinoma-antigen 2 (IA-2). Identification of those specific autoantibodies that are involved in the primary immunological events of the autoimmune disease process will allow the development of novel diagnostic procedures for early detection and initiation of potential therapy prior to irreversible loss of beta-cells. Within the framework of polyglandular disorders, T1DM may coexist with other organ specific autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD), autoimmune gastritis (AG), celiac disease (CD) and Addison's disease (AD), which are associated with the production of organ-specific autoantibodies. So, as a subset of patients with those autoantibodies will develop clinical disease, screening T1DM patients could prognosticate morbidity relative to unrecognised clinical entities. The close follow-up of patients with organ-specific autoantibodies could lead to seasonable identification of those requiring therapy.

  7. Sendai virus utilizes specific sialyloligosaccharides as host cell receptor determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwell, M A; Paulson, J C

    1980-10-01

    Purified sialyltransferases (CMP-N-acetyl-neuraminate:D-galactosyl-glycoprotein N-acetylneuraminyl-transferase, EC 2.4.99.1) in conjunction with neuraminidase (acylneuraminyl hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.18) were used to produce cell surface sialyloligosaccharides of defined sequence to investigate their role in paramyxovirus infection of host cells. Infection of Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells by Sendai virus was monitored by hemagglutination titer of the virus produced and by changes in morphological characteristics. By either criterion, treatment of the cells with Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase to remove cell surface sialic acids rendered them resistant to infection by Sendai virus. Endogenous replacement of receptors by the cell occurred slowly but supported maximal levels of infection within 6 hr. In contrast, sialylation during a 20-min incubation with CMP-sialic acid and beta-galactoside alpha 2,3-sialytransferase restored full susceptibility to infection. This enzyme elaborates the NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal beta 1,3GalNAc (NeuAc, N-acetylneuraminic acid) sequence on glycoproteins and glycolipids. No restoration of infectivity was observed when neuraminidase-treated cells were sialylated by using beta-galactoside alpha 2,6-sialytransferase, which elaborates the NeuAc-alpha 2,6Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc sequence. These results suggest that sialyloligosaccharide receptor determinants of defined sequence are required for Sendai virus infection of host cells.

  8. Adaptation of Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium dimerum to the specific aquatic environment provided by the water systems of hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Christian; Laurent, Julie; Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Barbezant, Marie; Sixt, Nathalie; Dalle, Frédéric; Aho, Serge; Bonnin, Alain; Hartemann, Philippe; Sautour, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Members of the Fusarium group were recently detected in water distribution systems of several hospitals in the world. An epidemiological investigation was conducted over 2 years in hospital buildings in Dijon and Nancy (France) and in non-hospital buildings in Dijon. The fungi were detected only within the water distribution systems of the hospital buildings and also, but at very low concentrations, in the urban water network of Nancy. All fungi were identified as Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC) and Fusarium dimerum species complex (FDSC) by sequencing part of the translation elongation factor 1-alpha (TEF-1α) gene. Very low diversity was found in each complex, suggesting the existence of a clonal population for each. Density and heterogeneous distributions according to buildings and variability over time were explained by episodic detachments of parts of the colony from biofilms in the pipes. Isolates of these waterborne populations as well as soilborne isolates were tested for their ability to grow in liquid medium in the presence of increasing concentrations of sodium hypochlorite, copper sulfate, anti-corrosion pipe coating, at various temperatures (4°-42 °C) and on agar medium with amphotericin B and voriconazole. The waterborne isolates tolerated higher sodium hypochlorite and copper sulfate concentrations and temperatures than did soilborne isolates but did not show any specific resistance to fungicides. In addition, unlike waterborne isolates, soilborne isolates did not survive in water even supplemented with glucose, while the former developed in the soil as well as soilborne isolates. We concluded the existence of homogeneous populations of FOSC and FDSC common to all contaminated hospital sites. These populations are present at very low densities in natural waters, making them difficult to detect, but they are adapted to the specific conditions offered by the complex water systems of public hospitals in Dijon and Nancy and probably other

  9. Insect chymotrypsins: chloromethyl ketone inactivation and substrate specificity relative to possible coevolutional adaptation of insects and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Adriana R; Sato, Paloma M; Terra, Walter R

    2009-03-01

    Insect digestive chymotrypsins are present in a large variety of insect orders but their substrate specificity still remains unclear. Four insect chymotrypsins from 3 different insect orders (Dictyoptera, Coleoptera, and two Lepidoptera) were isolated using affinity chromatography. Enzymes presented molecular masses in the range of 20 to 31 kDa and pH optima in the range of 7.5 to 10.0. Kinetic characterization using different colorimetric and fluorescent substrates indicated that insect chymotrypsins differ from bovine chymotrypsin in their primary specificity toward small substrates (like N-benzoyl-L-Tyr p-nitroanilide) rather than on their preference for large substrates (exemplified by Succynil-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide). Chloromethyl ketones (TPCK, N- alpha-tosyl-L-Phe chloromethyl ketone and Z-GGF-CK, N- carbobenzoxy-Gly-Gly-Phe-CK) inactivated all chymotrypsins tested. Inactivation rates follow apparent first-order kinetics with variable second order rates (TPCK, 42 to 130 M(-1) s(-1); Z-GGF-CK, 150 to 450 M(-1) s(-1)) that may be remarkably low for S. frugiperda chymotrypsin (TPCK, 6 M(-1) s(-1); Z-GGF-CK, 6.1 M(-1) s(-1)). Homology modelling and sequence alignment showed that in lepidopteran chymotrypsins, differences in the amino acid residues in the neighborhood of the catalytic His 57 may affect its pKa value. This is proposed as the cause of the decrease in His 57 reactivity toward chloromethyl ketones. Such amino acid replacement in the active site is proposed to be an adaptation to the presence of dietary ketones.

  10. Genomics-Based Exploration of Virulence Determinants and Host-Specific Adaptations of Pseudomonas syringae Strains Isolated from Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudnik, Alexey; Dudler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Pseudomonas syringae species complex has recently been named the number one plant pathogen, due to its economic and environmental impacts, as well as for its role in scientific research. The bacterium has been repeatedly reported to cause outbreaks on bean, cucumber, stone fruit, kiwi and olive tree, as well as on other crop and non-crop plants. It also serves as a model organism for research on the Type III secretion system (T3SS) and plant-pathogen interactions. While most of the current work on this pathogen is either carried out on one of three model strains found on dicot plants with completely sequenced genomes or on isolates obtained from recent outbreaks, not much is known about strains isolated from grasses (Poaceae). Here, we use comparative genomics in order to identify putative virulence-associated genes and other Poaceae-specific adaptations in several newly available genome sequences of strains isolated from grass species. All strains possess only a small number of known Type III effectors, therefore pointing to the importance of non-Type III secreted virulence factors. The implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:25437611

  11. Brazilian cross-cultural translation and adaptation of the "Questionnaire of Life Quality Specific for Myasthenia Gravis - 15 items"

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    Aline Mansueto Mourao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To translate and to perform the cross-cultural adaptation of the “Questionnaire of Life Quality Specific for Myasthenia Gravis - 15 items” (MG-QOL15. Method The original English version of the questionnaire was translated into Portuguese. This version was revised and translated back into English. Later, both English versions were compared and the divergences were corrected in the Portuguese text. At a second stage, ten patients with MG followed at the Neuromuscular Diseases Clinic from the University Hospital, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais answered the questionnaire. The authors analyzed the difficulties and misunderstandings in the application of the questionnaire. Results The questions 8, 13 and 15 were considered difficult to understand and were modified in the final Portuguese version. Most patients (70% had a total score above 25, and the statements 3, 8 and 9 showed the highest scores. Conclusion The Brazilian version of the questionnaire MG-QOL15 seems to be a promising tool for the assessment of Brazilian patients with MG.

  12. Stage-Specific Changes in Plasmodium Metabolism Required for Differentiation and Adaptation to Different Host and Vector Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anubhav; Philip, Nisha; Hughes, Katie R.; Georgiou, Konstantina; MacRae, James I.; Barrett, Michael P.; McConville, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) encounter markedly different (nutritional) environments during their complex life cycles in the mosquito and human hosts. Adaptation to these different host niches is associated with a dramatic rewiring of metabolism, from a highly glycolytic metabolism in the asexual blood stages to increased dependence on tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism in mosquito stages. Here we have used stable isotope labelling, targeted metabolomics and reverse genetics to map stage-specific changes in Plasmodium berghei carbon metabolism and determine the functional significance of these changes on parasite survival in the blood and mosquito stages. We show that glutamine serves as the predominant input into TCA metabolism in both asexual and sexual blood stages and is important for complete male gametogenesis. Glutamine catabolism, as well as key reactions in intermediary metabolism and CoA synthesis are also essential for ookinete to oocyst transition in the mosquito. These data extend our knowledge of Plasmodium metabolism and point towards possible targets for transmission-blocking intervention strategies. Furthermore, they highlight significant metabolic differences between Plasmodium species which are not easily anticipated based on genomics or transcriptomics studies and underline the importance of integration of metabolomics data with other platforms in order to better inform drug discovery and design. PMID:28027318

  13. Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase from the Cold Adapted Microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii: A Low Temperature Active Enzyme with Broad Substrate Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Pascarella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the psychrophilic microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a His-tag fusion protein. The enzyme was characterized with respect to its spectroscopic, catalytic, and thermodynamic properties. The properties of the psychrophilic enzyme have been contrasted with the characteristics of the homologous counterpart from E. coli, which has been structurally and functionally characterized in depth and with which it shares 75% sequence identity. Spectroscopic measures confirmed that the psychrophilic enzyme displays structural properties almost identical to those of the mesophilic counterpart. At variance, the P. ingrahamii enzyme showed decreased thermostability and high specific activity at low temperature, both of which are typical features of cold adapted enzymes. Furthermore, it was a more efficient biocatalyst compared to E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT particularly for side reactions. Many β-hydroxy-α-amino acids are SHMT substrates and represent important compounds in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and food additives. Thanks to these attractive properties, this enzyme could have a significant potential for biotechnological applications.

  14. Auditory responses and stimulus-specific adaptation in rat auditory cortex are preserved across NREM and REM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Yuval; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V; Cirelli, Chiara; Banks, Matthew I; Tononi, Giulio

    2015-05-01

    Sleep entails a disconnection from the external environment. By and large, sensory stimuli do not trigger behavioral responses and are not consciously perceived as they usually are in wakefulness. Traditionally, sleep disconnection was ascribed to a thalamic "gate," which would prevent signal propagation along ascending sensory pathways to primary cortical areas. Here, we compared single-unit and LFP responses in core auditory cortex as freely moving rats spontaneously switched between wakefulness and sleep states. Despite robust differences in baseline neuronal activity, both the selectivity and the magnitude of auditory-evoked responses were comparable across wakefulness, Nonrapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (pairwise differences sleep and wakefulness using an oddball paradigm. Robust stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA) was observed following the onset of repetitive tones, and the strength of SSA effects (13-20%) was comparable across vigilance states. Thus, responses in core auditory cortex are preserved across sleep states, suggesting that evoked activity in primary sensory cortices is driven by external physical stimuli with little modulation by vigilance state. We suggest that sensory disconnection during sleep occurs at a stage later than primary sensory areas.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eGiannattasio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications.

  16. Acute myeloid dendritic cell leukaemia with specific cutaneous involvement: a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, M; Gallardo, F; Ferrer, A M; Salar, A; Pérez-Vila, E; Juanpere, N; Salgado, R; Espinet, B; Orfao, A; Florensa, L; Pujol, R M

    2008-05-01

    Myeloid or type 1 dendritic cell leukaemia is an exceedingly rare haematopoietic neoplasm characterized by a specific immunophenotypic profile close to plasmacytoid dendritic cell and acute myelogenous leukaemia. A 77-year-old man presenting specific cutaneous infiltration by myeloid dendritic cell leukaemia is reported. The clinical features as well as the cutaneous histopathological and immunohistochemical features led to the initial diagnosis of CD4+/CD56+ haematodermic neoplasm. However, extensive immunophenotypic studies performed from peripheral blood blasts disclosed that leukaemic cells expressed myeloid dendritic cell markers, confirming the diagnosis. The diagnostic difficulties of specific cutaneous involvement by myeloid dendritic cell leukaemia on the basis of routine histopathological and immunohistochemical features are highlighted.

  17. Adaptive Cell Segmentation and Tracking for Volumetric Confocal Microscopy Images of a Developing Plant Meristem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Liu; Anirban Chakraborty; Damanpreet Singh; Ram Kishor Yadav; Gopi Meenakshisundaram; G. Venugopala Reddy; Amit Roy-Chowdhury

    2011-01-01

    Automated segmentation and tracking of cells in actively developing tissues can provide high-throughput and quantitative spatiotemporal measurements of a range of cell behaviors; cell expansion and cell-division kinetics leading to a better understanding of the underlying dynamics of morphogenesis.Here,we have studied the problem of constructing cell lineages in time-lapse volumetric image stacks obtained using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM).The novel contribution of the work lies in its ability to segment and track cells in densely packed tissue,the shoot apical meristem (SAM),through the use of a close-loop,adaptive segmentation,and tracking approach.The tracking output acts as an indicator of the quality of segmentation and,in turn,the segmentation can be improved to obtain better tracking results.We construct an optimization function that minimizes the segmentation error,which is,in turn,estimated from the tracking results.This adaptive approach significantly improves both tracking and segmentation when compared to an open loop framework in which segmentation and tracking modules operate separately.

  18. CXCL12 retargeting of an adenovirus vector to cancer cells using a bispecific adapter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Shilpa Bhatia,1 Samia M O’Bryan,1 Angel A Rivera,2 David T Curiel,3 J Michael Mathis1 1Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 2Departments of Pathology and Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Ad vectors are promising delivery vehicles for cancer therapeutic interventions. However, their application is limited by promiscuous tissue tropism and hepatotoxicity. This limitation can be avoided by altering the native tropism of Ads so that they can be redirected to the target cells through alternate cellular receptors. The CXCR4 chemokine receptor belongs to a large superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors and is known to be upregulated in a wide variety of cancers, including breast cancer and melanoma. These receptors have been associated with cancer cell survival, progression, and metastasis. In the current study, an Ad to cancer cells overexpressing CXCR4 by using a bispecific adapter, sCAR-CXCL12, was retargeted. The sCAR-CXCL12 adapter contained the soluble ectodomain form of the native Ad5 receptor (sCAR, which was fused to a mature human chemokine ligand, CXCL12, through a short peptide linker. A dramatic increase in the infectivity of cancer cells using a targeted Ad vector compared with an untargeted vector was observed. Furthermore, sCAR-CXCL12 attenuated Ad infection of liver ex vivo and in vivo and enhanced Ad vector infection of xenograft tumors implanted in immunodeficient SCID-bg mice. Thus, the sCAR-CXCL12 adapter could be used to retarget Ad vectors to chemokine receptor-positive tumors. Keywords: adapter, adenovirus serotype 5, cancer, hCAR, human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor, chemokine receptor, CXCL12, CXCR4, gene therapy, retargeting, viral vector

  19. Development of Adaptive Tilt Tracker that Utilizes QUAD-cell Detector to Track Extended Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-17

    21] K. Ogata , Discrete-Time Control Systems 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1995 [22] R. McGuigan, “Effect of Coudé...Tracker/QUAD-cell Control Problem ..................................132 5.1.5 Recommending Adaptive Tracker Capabilities...detector’s frame rate and the control loop gain to reduce tracker error in real-time [2]. In 2010, the SOR upgraded its tilt tracker system along with the

  20. Adherence and invasion of mouse-adapted H pylori in different epithelial cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao-Jun Zhang; Fan-Liang Meng; Xiao-Yun Ji; Li-Hua He; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the adhesion and invasion abilities of different mouse adapted H pylori strains in different cell lines in vitro and investigate their effects on the virulence factors cagA and vacA.METHODS: The adherence and invasion abilities of different H pylori strains in different epithelial cell lines were examined by the gentamycin protection assay. The null mutants of cagA and vacA were processed by direct PCR mutation method. The morphologic changes of different cell lines after H pylori attachment were examined by microscopy.RESULTS: The densities of adherence to and invasion into cells in vitro were different from those in the mouse infection experiments. 88-3887 strain could invade and adhere to cells stronger than SSI and X47. All tested strains had better adhering and invasive abilities in SCG-7901 cell. CagA and vacA minus mutants had the same invasion and adherent abilities as their wild types. In all strains and cell lines tested, only AGS cell had the significant hummingbird phenotype after inoculation with the 88-3887 wild-type.CONCLUSION: Both the host cells and the bacteria play important parts in the invasion and adhesion abilities of H pylori. CagA and VacA are not related to the ability of invasion and adhesion of Hpylori in different cell lines in vitro.

  1. Cells determine cell density using a small protein bound to a unique tissue-specific phospholipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Petzold

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell density is the critical parameter controlling tendon morphogenesis. Knowing its neighbors allows a cell to regulate correctly its proliferation and collagen production. A missing link to understanding this process is a molecular description of the sensing mechanism. Previously, this mechanism was shown in cell culture to rely on a diffusible factor (SNZR [sensor] with an affinity for the cell layer. This led to purifying conditioned medium over 4 columns and analyzing the final column fractions for band intensity on SDS gels versus biological activity – a 16 kD band strongly correlated between assays. N-terminal sequencing – EPLAVVDL – identified a large gene (424 AA, extremely conserved between chicken and human. In this paper we probe whether this is the correct gene. Can the predicted large protein be cleaved to a smaller protein? EPLAVVDL occurs towards the C-terminus and cleavage would create a small 94 AA protein. This protein would run at ∼10 kD, so what modifications or cofactor binding accounts for its running at 16 kD on SDS gels? This protein has no prominent hydrophobic regions, so can it be secreted? To validate its role, the chicken cDNA for this gene was tagged with myc and his and transfected into a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS. U2OS cells expressed the gene but not passively: differentiating into structures resembling spongy bone and expressing alkaline phosphatase, an early bone marker. Intracellularly, two bands were observed by Western blotting: the full length protein and a smaller form (26 kD. Outside the cell, a small band (28 kD was detected, although it was 40% larger than expected, as well as multiple larger bands. These larger forms could be converted to the predicted smaller protein (94 AA + tags by changing salt concentrations and ultrafiltering – releasing a cofactor to the filtrate while leaving a protein factor in the retentate. Using specific degradative enzymes and mass spectrometry, the

  2. Adaptive increases in expression and vasodilator activity of estrogen receptor subtypes in a blood vessel-specific pattern during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Karina M; Li, Wei; Reslan, Ossama M; Siddiqui, Waleed T; Opsasnick, Lauren A; Khalil, Raouf A

    2015-11-15

    Normal pregnancy is associated with adaptive hemodynamic, hormonal, and vascular changes, and estrogen (E2) may promote vasodilation during pregnancy; however, the specific E2 receptor (ER) subtype, post-ER signaling mechanism, and vascular bed involved are unclear. We tested whether pregnancy-associated vascular adaptations involve changes in the expression/distribution/activity of distinct ER subtypes in a blood vessel-specific manner. Blood pressure (BP) and plasma E2 were measured in virgin and pregnant (day 19) rats, and the thoracic aorta, carotid artery, mesenteric artery, and renal artery were isolated for measurements of ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [G protein-coupled ER (GPER)] expression and tissue distribution in parallel with relaxation responses to E2 (all ERs) and the specific ER agonist 4,4',4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)-tris-phenol (PPT; ERα), diarylpropionitrile (DPN; ERβ), and G1 (GPER). BP was slightly lower and plasma E2 was higher in pregnant versus virgin rats. Western blots revealed increased ERα and ERβ in the aorta and mesenteric artery and GPER in the aorta of pregnant versus virgin rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the increases in ERs were mainly in the intima and media. In phenylephrine-precontracted vessels, E2 and PPT caused relaxation that was greater in the aorta and mesenteric artery but similar in the carotid and renal artery of pregnant versus virgin rats. DPN- and G1-induced relaxation was greater in the mesenteric and renal artery than in the aorta and carotid artery, and aortic relaxation to G1 was greater in pregnant versus virgin rats. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester with or without the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin with or without the EDHF blocker tetraethylammonium or endothelium removal reduced E2, PPT, and G1-induced relaxation in the aorta of pregnant rats, suggesting an endothelium-dependent mechanism, but did not affect E2-, PPT

  3. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinbaş, Murat; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI) network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics.

  4. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Cetinbaş

    Full Text Available Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics.

  5. Alkanols and chlorophenols cause different physiological adaptive responses on the level of cell surface properties and membrane vesicle formation in Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Vazquez, José; Bastisch, Christian; Veron, Wilfried; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Nietzsche, Sandor; Wick, Lukas Y; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2012-01-01

    In order to cope with the toxicity imposed by the exposure to environmental hydrocarbons, many bacteria have developed specific adaptive responses such as modifications in the cell envelope. Here we compared the influence of n-alkanols and chlorophenols on the surface properties of the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E. In the presence of toxic concentrations of n-alkanols, this strain significantly increased its cell surface charge and hydrophobicity with changes depending on the chain length of the added n-alkanols. The adaptive response occurred within 10 min after the addition of the solvent and was demonstrated to be of physiological nature. Contrary to that, chlorophenols of similar hydrophobicity and potential toxicity as the corresponding alkanols caused only minor effects in the surface properties. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of differences in the cellular adaptive response of bacteria to compound classes of quasi equal hydrophobicity and toxicity. The observed adaptation of the physico-chemical surface properties of strain DOT-T1E to the presence of alkanols was reversible and correlated with changes in the composition of the lipopolysaccharide content of the cells. The reaction is explained by previously described reactions allowing the release of membrane vesicles that was demonstrated for cells affected by 1-octanol and heat shock, whereas no membrane vesicles were released after the addition of chlorophenols.

  6. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells mediate intestinal selection of commensal bacteria-specific CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Matthew R.; Fung, Thomas C.; Masur, Samuel H.; Kelsen, Judith R.; McConnell, Fiona M.; Dubrot, Juan; Withers, David R.; Hugues, Stephanie; Farrar, Michael A.; Reith, Walter; Eberl, Gerard; Baldassano, Robert N.; Laufer, Terri M.; Elson, Charles O.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory CD4+ T cell responses to self or commensal bacteria underlie the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), respectively. While selection of self-specific T cells in the thymus limits responses to tissue antigens, the mechanisms that control selection of commensal bacteria-specific T cells remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that group 3 innate lymphoid cell (ILC3)-intrinsic expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) is regulated similarly to thymic epithelial cells, and that MHCII+ ILC3s directly induce cell death of activated commensal bacteria-specific T cells. Further, MHCII on human colonic ILC3s was reduced in pediatric IBD patients. Collectively, these results define a selection pathway for commensal bacteria-specific CD4+ T cells in the intestine, and suggest that this process is dysregulated in human IBD. PMID:25908663

  7. Fibre-specific responses to endurance and low volume high intensity interval training: striking similarities in acute and chronic adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisha D Scribbans

    Full Text Available The current study involved the completion of two distinct experiments. Experiment 1 compared fibre specific and whole muscle responses to acute bouts of either low-volume high-intensity interval training (LV-HIT or moderate-intensity continuous endurance exercise (END in a randomized crossover design. Experiment 2 examined the impact of a six-week training intervention (END or LV-HIT; 4 days/week, on whole body and skeletal muscle fibre specific markers of aerobic and anaerobic capacity. Six recreationally active men (Age: 20.7 ± 3.8 yrs; VO2peak: 51.9 ± 5.1 mL/kg/min reported to the lab on two separate occasions for experiment 1. Following a muscle biopsy taken in a fasted state, participants completed an acute bout of each exercise protocol (LV-HIT: 8, 20-second intervals at ∼ 170% of VO2peak separated by 10 seconds of rest; END: 30 minutes at ∼ 65% of VO2peak, immediately followed by a muscle biopsy. Glycogen content of type I and IIA fibres was significantly (p<0.05 reduced, while p-ACC was significantly increased (p<0.05 following both protocols. Nineteen recreationally active males (n = 16 and females (n = 3 were VO2peak-matched and assigned to either the LV-HIT (n = 10; 21 ± 2 yrs or END (n = 9; 20.7 ± 3.8 yrs group for experiment 2. After 6 weeks, both training protocols induced comparable increases in aerobic capacity (END: Pre: 48.3 ± 6.0, Mid: 51.8 ± 6.0, Post: 55.0 ± 6.3 mL/kg/min LV-HIT: Pre: 47.9 ± 8.1, Mid: 50.4 ± 7.4, Post: 54.7 ± 7.6 mL/kg/min, fibre-type specific oxidative and glycolytic capacity, glycogen and IMTG stores, and whole-muscle capillary density. Interestingly, only LV-HIT induced greater improvements in anaerobic performance and estimated whole-muscle glycolytic capacity. These results suggest that 30 minutes of END exercise at ∼ 65% VO2peak or 4 minutes of LV-HIT at ∼ 170% VO2peak induce comparable changes in the intra-myocellular environment (glycogen content and signaling activation

  8. Experimental Evaluation of Interference Suppression Receivers and Rank Adaptation in 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assefa, Dereje; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Catania, Davide;

    2015-01-01

    Advanced receivers are a key component of the 5th Generation (5G) ultra-dense small cells concept given their capability of efficiently dealing with the ever-increasing problem of inter-cell interference. In this paper, we evaluate the potential of interference suppression receivers in real network...... the Interference Rejection Combining (IRC) and Successive Interference Cancellation (SIC) receivers and different rank adaptation approaches. Each node in our software defined radio (SDR) testbed features a 22 MIMO transceiver built with the USRP N200 hardware by Ettus Research. Our experimental results confirm...

  9. TNF-α induces apoptosis of Molt-4 cells and cell cycle specificity of Bcl-2 phosphyrylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changyong Yang; Huijie Zhao; Jianping Gong

    2010-01-01

    Objective:The aim of the study was to observe the expression of Bcl-2 and its phosphorylation in Molt-4 cells induced by tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α),and to investigate the possible mechanism of cell cycle specificity of apoptosis.Methods:Exponentially growing Molt-4 cells were treated with TNF-α.Apoptosis was detected by DNA fragmentation assay.API method was applied to illustrate the cell cycle specificity of apoptotic cells.Cells of sub-phases were sorted by FACSvantage flow cytometer and then submitted to immunoblot.Results:Molt-4 cells which were treated with TNF-α went to apoptosis and showed a DNA ladder pattern.Most apoptosis happened in G1-phase of cell cycle.Bcl-2 expression increased for the Molt-4 cells treated with TNF-α.The phosphorylation state of Bcl-2 was only presented in G1-phase cells,in accordance with the specified time and cell cycle phase of apoptosis.Conclusion:The phosphorylation of Bcl-2 in the Molt-4 cells treated with TNF-α happened with the same cell cycle specificity as cell apoptosis.The cell cycle specificity of Bcl-2 phosphorylation was one of the mechanisms of receptor-mediated apoptosis.The cell cycle machine can trigger the apoptosis program.

  10. CD8+ T cells specific for the islet autoantigen IGRP are restricted in their T cell receptor chain usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Yannick F.; Eugster, Anne; Dietz, Sevina; Sebelefsky, Christian; Kühn, Denise; Wilhelm, Carmen; Lindner, Annett; Gavrisan, Anita; Knoop, Jan; Dahl, Andreas; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2017-01-01

    CD8+ T cells directed against beta cell autoantigens are considered relevant for the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Using single cell T cell receptor sequencing of CD8+ T cells specific for the IGRP265-273 epitope, we examined whether there was expansion of clonotypes and sharing of T cell receptor chains in autoreactive CD8+ T cell repertoires. HLA-A*0201 positive type 1 diabetes patients (n = 19) and controls (n = 18) were analysed. TCR α- and β-chain sequences of 418 patient-derived IGRP265-273-multimer+ CD8+ T cells representing 48 clonotypes were obtained. Expanded populations of IGRP265-273-specific CD8+ T cells with dominant clonotypes that had TCR α-chains shared across patients were observed. The SGGSNYKLTF motif corresponding to TRAJ53 was contained in 384 (91.9%) cells, and in 20 (41.7%) patient-derived clonotypes. TRAJ53 together with TRAV29/DV5 was found in 15 (31.3%) clonotypes. Using next generation TCR α-chain sequencing, we found enrichment of one of these TCR α-chains in the memory CD8+ T cells of patients as compared to healthy controls. CD8+ T cell clones bearing the enriched motifs mediated antigen-specific target cell lysis. We provide the first evidence for restriction of T cell receptor motifs in the alpha chain of human CD8+ T cells with specificity to a beta cell antigen. PMID:28300170

  11. Contrast adaptation contributes to contrast-invariance of orientation tuning of primate V1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel G Nowak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies in rodents and carnivores have shown that orientation tuning width of single neurons does not change when stimulus contrast is modified. However, in these studies, stimuli were presented for a relatively long duration (e. g., 4 seconds, making it possible that contrast adaptation contributed to contrast-invariance of orientation tuning. Our first purpose was to determine, in marmoset area V1, whether orientation tuning is still contrast-invariant with the stimulation duration is comparable to that of a visual fixation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed extracellular recordings and examined orientation tuning of single-units using static sine-wave gratings that were flashed for 200 msec. Sixteen orientations and three contrast levels, representing low, medium and high values in the range of effective contrasts for each neuron, were randomly intermixed. Contrast adaptation being a slow phenomenon, cells did not have enough time to adapt to each contrast individually. With this stimulation protocol, we found that the tuning width obtained at intermediate contrast was reduced to 89% (median, and that at low contrast to 76%, of that obtained at high contrast. Therefore, when probed with briefly flashed stimuli, orientation tuning is not contrast-invariant in marmoset V1. Our second purpose was to determine whether contrast adaptation contributes to contrast-invariance of orientation tuning. Stationary gratings were presented, as previously, for 200 msec with randomly varying orientations, but the contrast was kept constant within stimulation blocks lasting >20 sec, allowing for adaptation to the single contrast in use. In these conditions, tuning widths obtained at low contrast were still significantly less than at high contrast (median 85%. However, tuning widths obtained with medium and high contrast stimuli no longer differed significantly. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Orientation tuning does not appear to be contrast

  12. A Multiscale Adaptive Mesh Refinement Approach to Architectured Steel Specification in the Design of a Frameless Stressed Skin Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholas, Paul; Stasiuk, David; Nørgaard, Esben

    2015-01-01

    and material. Adaptive mesh refinement is used to support localised variance in resolution and information flow across these scales. The adaptation of mesh resolution is linked to structural analysis, panelisation, local geometric formation, connectivity, and the calculation of forming strains and material...

  13. Gender Specific Mutation Incidence and Survival Associations in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (CCRCC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Ricketts

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is diagnosed in >200,000 individuals worldwide each year, accounting for ~2% of all cancers, but the spread of this disease amongst genders is distinctly uneven. In the U.S. the male:female incidence ratio is approximately 2:1. A potential hypothesis is mutation spectra may differ between tumors dependent upon the gender of the patient, such as mutations of X chromosome encoded genes being more prevalent in male-derived tumors. Combined analysis of three recent large-scale clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC mutation sequencing projects identified a significantly increased mutation frequency of PBRM1 and the X chromosome encoded KDM5C in tumors from male patients and BAP1 in tumors from female patients. Mutation of BAP1 had previously been significantly associated with poorer overall survival; however, when stratified by gender, mutation of BAP1 only significantly affected overall survival in female patients. Mutation of chromatin remodeling genes alters gene regulation, but the overall effect of these alterations may also be modified by the presence of other gender specific factors. Thus, the combination of gender and mutation of a specific gene, such as BAP1, may have implications not only for prognosis but also for understanding the role of chromatin remodeling gene mutations in kidney cancer progression.

  14. Cell-specific Regulation of APOBEC3F by Interferons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songcheng YING; Xuzhao ZHANG; Phuong Thi Nguyen SARKIS; Rongzhen XU; Xiaofang YU

    2007-01-01

    Human cytidine deaminase APOBEC3F (A3F) has broad anti-viral activity against hepatitis B virus and retroviruses including human immunodeficiency virus type 1. However, its regulation in viral natural target cells such CD4+ T lymphocytes, macrophages, and primary liver cells has not been well studied. Here we showed that A3F was up-regulated by interferon (IFN)-α in primary hepatocytes and multiple liver cell lines as well as macrophages. Although the IFN-α signaling pathway was active in T lymphoid cells and induction of other IFN stimulated genes such as PKR was detected, A3F and APOBEC3G (A3G) were not induced by IFN-o in these cells. Thus, additional factors other than known IFN-stimulated genes also regulated IFN-α-induced A3F expression distinctly. A3F and A3G expression levels in primary hepatocytes, especially after IFN-α stimulation, were comparable to those in CD4+ T lymphocytes in some individuals. Significant variations of A3F and A3G expression in primary hepatocytes from various subjects were observed. Individual variations in A3F and/or A3G regulation and expression might influence the clinical outcomes of hepatitis B infection.

  15. Cell type-specific neuroprotective activity of untranslocated prion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Restelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A key pathogenic role in prion diseases was proposed for a cytosolic form of the prion protein (PrP. However, it is not clear how cytosolic PrP localization influences neuronal viability, with either cytotoxic or anti-apoptotic effects reported in different studies. The cellular mechanism by which PrP is delivered to the cytosol of neurons is also debated, and either retrograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum or inefficient translocation during biosynthesis has been proposed. We investigated cytosolic PrP biogenesis and effect on cell viability in primary neuronal cultures from different mouse brain regions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mild proteasome inhibition induced accumulation of an untranslocated form of cytosolic PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, but not in cerebellar granules. A cyclopeptolide that interferes with the correct insertion of the PrP signal sequence into the translocon increased the amount of untranslocated PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, and induced its synthesis in cerebellar neurons. Untranslocated PrP boosted the resistance of cortical and hippocampal neurons to apoptotic insults but had no effect on cerebellar cells. SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate cell type-dependent differences in the efficiency of PrP translocation, and argue that cytosolic PrP targeting might serve a physiological neuroprotective function.

  16. Biomechanical cell regulatory networks as complex adaptive systems in relation to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Liviu; Khammissa, Razia Abdool Gafaar; Lemmer, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Physiological structure and function of cells are maintained by ongoing complex dynamic adaptive processes in the intracellular molecular pathways controlling the overall profile of gene expression, and by genes in cellular gene regulatory circuits. Cytogenetic mutations and non-genetic factors such as chronic inflammation or repetitive trauma, intrinsic mechanical stresses within extracellular matrix may induce redirection of gene regulatory circuits with abnormal reactivation of embryonic developmental programmes which can now drive cell transformation and cancer initiation, and later cancer progression and metastasis. Some of the non-genetic factors that may also favour cancerization are dysregulation in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, in cell-to-cell communication, in extracellular matrix turnover, in extracellular matrix-to-cell interactions and in mechanotransduction pathways. Persistent increase in extracellular matrix stiffness, for whatever reason, has been shown to play an important role in cell transformation, and later in cancer cell invasion. In this article we review certain cell regulatory networks driving carcinogenesis, focussing on the role of mechanical stresses modulating structure and function of cells and their extracellular matrices.

  17. A fully automatic framework for cell segmentation on non-confocal adaptive optics images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianfei; Dubra, Alfredo; Tam, Johnny

    2016-03-01

    By the time most retinal diseases are diagnosed, macroscopic irreversible cellular loss has already occurred. Earlier detection of subtle structural changes at the single photoreceptor level is now possible, using the adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). This work aims to develop a fully automatic segmentation framework to extract cell boundaries from non-confocal split-detection AOSLO images of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in the living human eye. Significant challenges include anisotropy, heterogeneous cell regions arising from shading effects, and low contrast between cells and background. To overcome these challenges, we propose the use of: 1) multi-scale Hessian response to detect heterogeneous cell regions, 2) convex hulls to create boundary templates, and 3) circularlyconstrained geodesic active contours to refine cell boundaries. We acquired images from three healthy subjects at eccentric retinal regions and manually contoured cells to generate ground-truth for evaluating segmentation accuracy. Dice coefficient, relative absolute area difference, and average contour distance were 82±2%, 11±6%, and 2.0±0.2 pixels (Mean±SD), respectively. We find that strong shading effects from vessels are a main factor that causes cell oversegmentation and false segmentation of non-cell regions. Our segmentation algorithm can automatically and accurately segment photoreceptor cells on non-confocal AOSLO images, which is the first step in longitudinal tracking of cellular changes in the individual eye over the time course of disease progression.

  18. Induction of type I IFN is required for overcoming tumor-specific T-cell tolerance after stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horkheimer, Ian; Quigley, Michael; Zhu, Jiangao; Huang, Xiaopei; Chao, Nelson J; Yang, Yiping

    2009-05-21

    Tumor-specific T-cell tolerance represents one major mechanism of tumor-induced immune evasion. Myeloablative chemotherapy with stem cell transplantation may offer the best chance of achieving a state of minimal residual disease and, thus, minimize tumor-induced immune evasion. However, studies have shown that tumor-specific T-cell tolerance persists after transplantation. Here, we showed that CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (T(Reg)) cells play a critical role in tumor-specific CD8(+) T-cell tolerance after transplantation. Removal of T(Reg) cells from the donor lymphocyte graft did not overcome this tolerance because of rapid conversion of donor CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells into CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T(Reg) cells in recipients after transplantation, and depletion of T(Reg) cells in recipients was necessary for the reversal of tumor-specific tolerance. These results suggest that strategies capable of overcoming T-cell tolerance in recipients are required to promote antitumor immunity after transplantation. Toward this goal, we showed that dendritic cell (DC) vaccines coadministered with the TLR9 ligand, CpG could effectively overcome tumor-specific tolerance, leading to significant prolongation of tumor-free survival after transplantation. We further showed that CpG-induced type I interferon was critical for the reversal of tumor-specific tolerance in vivo. Collectively, these results may suggest effective immunotherapeutic strategies for treating cancer after stem cell transplantation.

  19. Stimulation of HIV-specific T cell clonotypes using allogeneic HLA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Coral-Ann; van Miert, Paula; O'Driscoll, Kane; Zoet, Yvonne M; Chopra, Abha; Watson, Mark; de Santis, Dianne; Witt, Campbell; John, Mina; Claas, Frans H J; D'Orsogna, Lloyd J

    2017-03-28

    We hypothesized that HIV-specific CD8 T cell clonotypes can be stimulated by allogeneic HLA molecules. Multiple HIV-specific CD8 T cell clones were derived from 12 individuals with chronic HIV infection, specific for 13 different HIV Gag antigens and restricted to 7 different HLA molecules. The generated T cell clones were assayed for alloreactivity against a panel of single HLA class I expressing cell lines (SALs). HIV-specific T cells recognising at least one allogeneic HLA molecule could be identified from 7 of 12 patients tested. Allorecognition was associated with IFNγ cytokine production, CD137 upregulation and cytotoxicity, suggesting high avidity allo-stimulation. Allo-HLA recognition by HIV-specific T cells was specific to the HIV target peptide/HLA restriction and TCR TRBV usage of the T cells. HIV-specific T cells do crossreact against allogeneic HLA molecules in an epitope and TRBV specific manner. Therefore allo-HLA stimulation could be exploited to induce or augment HIV-specific T cell responses.

  20. Cell-type-specific profiling of protein-DNA interactions without cell isolation using targeted DamID with next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Owen J; Southall, Tony D; Cheetham, Seth W; Brand, Andrea H

    2016-09-01

    This protocol is an extension to: Nat. Protoc. 2, 1467-1478 (2007); doi:10.1038/nprot.2007.148; published online 7 June 2007The ability to profile transcription and chromatin binding in a cell-type-specific manner is a powerful aid to understanding cell-fate specification and cellular function in multicellular organisms. We recently developed targeted DamID (TaDa) to enable genome-wide, cell-type-specific profiling of DNA- and chromatin-binding proteins in vivo without cell isolation. As a protocol extension, this article describes substantial modifications to an existing protocol, and it offers additional applications. TaDa builds upon DamID, a technique for detecting genome-wide DNA-binding profiles of proteins, by coupling it with the GAL4 system in Drosophila to enable both temporal and spatial resolution. TaDa ensures that Dam-fusion proteins are expressed at very low levels, thus avoiding toxicity and potential artifacts from overexpression. The modifications to the core DamID technique presented here also increase the speed of sample processing and throughput, and adapt the method to next-generation sequencing technology. TaDa is robust, reproducible and highly sensitive. Compared with other methods for cell-type-specific profiling, the technique requires no cell-sorting, cross-linking or antisera, and binding profiles can be generated from as few as 10,000 total induced cells. By profiling the genome-wide binding of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), TaDa can also identify transcribed genes in a cell-type-specific manner. Here we describe a detailed protocol for carrying out TaDa experiments and preparing the material for next-generation sequencing. Although we developed TaDa in Drosophila, it should be easily adapted to other organisms with an inducible expression system. Once transgenic animals are obtained, the entire experimental procedure-from collecting tissue samples to generating sequencing libraries-can be accomplished within 5 d.

  1. Visualization of specific DNA sequences in living mouse embryonic stem cells with a programmable fluorescent CRISPR/Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Tobias; Bultmann, Sebastian; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Markaki, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Labeling and tracing of specific sequences in living cells has been a major challenge in studying the spatiotemporal dynamics of native chromatin. Here we repurposed the prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas adaptive immunity system to specifically detect endogenous genomic loci in mouse embryonic stem cells. We constructed a catalytically inactive version of the Cas9 endonuclease, fused it with eGFP (dCas9-eGFP) and co-expressed small guide RNAs (gRNAs) to target pericentric, centric, and telomeric repeats, which are enriched in distinct nuclear structures. With major satellite specific gRNAs we obtained a characteristic chromocenter (CC) pattern, while gRNAs targeting minor satellites and telomeres highlighted smaller foci coinciding with centromere protein B (CENP-B) and telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2), respectively. DNA sequence specific labeling by gRNA/dCas9-eGFP complexes was directly shown with 3D-fluorescent in situ hybridization (3D-FISH). Structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) of gRNA/dCas9-eGFP expressing cells revealed chromatin ultrastructures and demonstrated the potential of this approach for chromatin conformation studies by super resolution microscopy. This programmable dCas9 labeling system opens new perspectives to study functional nuclear architecture.

  2. Expression of maturation-specific nuclear antigens in differentiating human myeloid leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murao, S.; Epstein, A.L.; Clevenger, C.V.; Huberman, E.

    1985-02-01

    The expression of three myeloid-specific nuclear antigens was studied by indirect immunofluorescence with murine monoclonal antibodies in human myeloid (HL-60, ML-2, KG-1, and B-II) leukemia cells treated with chemical inducers of cell differentiation. Treatment of the promyelocytic HL-60 cells with dimethyl sulfoxide or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin DT induced the cells to acquire a phenotype that resembled that of granulocytes and monocytesmacrophages, respectively. These phenotypes were characterized by changes in cell growth, cell morphology, expression of specific cell surface antigens, and activities of lysozyme and nonspecific esterase enzymes. Induction of these differentiation markers in the HL-60 cells was associated with induction of the myeloid-specific nuclear antigens. The ML-2 cells, which are arrested at the myeloblast-promyelocyte stage, were also susceptible to the induction of cell differentiation and to changes in the expression of the nuclear antigens, but the degree of susceptibility was less than in the HL-60 cells. The less-differentiated KG-1 and B-II myeloid cells were either not responsive or responded only in a limited degree to the induction of cell differentiation or to changes in the expression of the nuclear antigens. The authors suggest that the reactivity of cells with monoclonal antibodies to specific nuclear antigens can be used as a maturational marker in cell differentiation studies. Furthermore, nuclear antigens expressed early in cellular differentiation may provide information about changes in regulatory elements in normal and malignant cells. 40 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  3. The relative magnitude of transgene-specific adaptive immune responses induced by human and chimpanzee adenovirus vectors differs between laboratory animals and a target species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicks, Matthew D J; Guzman, Efrain; Spencer, Alexandra J; Gilbert, Sarah C; Charleston, Bryan; Hill, Adrian V S; Cottingham, Matthew G

    2015-02-25

    Adenovirus vaccine vectors generated from new viral serotypes are routinely screened in pre-clinical laboratory animal models to identify the most immunogenic and efficacious candidates for further evaluation in clinical human and veterinary settings. Here, we show that studies in a laboratory species do not necessarily predict the hierarchy of vector performance in other mammals. In mice, after intramuscular immunization, HAdV-5 (Human adenovirus C) based vectors elicited cellular and humoral adaptive responses of higher magnitudes compared to the chimpanzee adenovirus vectors ChAdOx1 and AdC68 from species Human adenovirus E. After HAdV-5 vaccination, transgene specific IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cell responses reached peak magnitude later than after ChAdOx1 and AdC68 vaccination, and exhibited a slower contraction to a memory phenotype. In cattle, cellular and humoral immune responses were at least equivalent, if not higher, in magnitude after ChAdOx1 vaccination compared to HAdV-5. Though we have not tested protective efficacy in a disease model, these findings have important implications for the selection of candidate vectors for further evaluation. We propose that vaccines based on ChAdOx1 or other Human adenovirus E serotypes could be at least as immunogenic as current licensed bovine vaccines based on HAdV-5.

  4. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists. PMID:26407887

  5. Metabolic adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to oxygen stress by cell-to-cell clumping and flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.

  6. Monitoring of Pathogen-Specific T-Cell Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Shigeo; Kapp, Markus; Einsele, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The clinical outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been significantly improved during the last decades with regard to the reduction in organ failure, infection, and severe acute graft-versus-host disease. However, severe complications due to infectious diseases are still one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic HSCT, in particular in patients receiving haploidentical HSCT or cord blood transplant due to a slow and often incomplete immune reconstitution. In order to improve the immune control of pathogens without an increased risk of alloreactivity, adoptive immunotherapy using highly enriched pathogen-specific T cells offers a promising approach. In order to identify patients who are at high risk for infectious diseases, several monitoring assays have been developed with potential for the guidance of immunosuppressive drugs and adoptive immunotherapy in clinical practice. In this article, we aim to give a comprehensive overview regarding current developments of T-cell monitoring techniques focusing on T cells against viruses and fungi. In particular, we will focus on rather simple, fast, non-labor-intensive, cellular assays which could be integrated in routine clinical screening approaches. PMID:24062744

  7. The role of auxin in cell specification during arabidopsis embryogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokerse, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Auxin is a structurally simple molecule, yet it elicits many different responses in plants. In Chapter 1 we have reviewed how specificity in the output of auxin signaling could be generated by distinct regulation and the unique properties of the members of the Aux/IAA and ARF transcription factor fa

  8. Isolation and adaptation of bovine herpes virus Type 1 in embryonated chicken eggs and in Madin–Darby bovine kidney cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrath, Devprabha; Shakya, Sanjay; Rawat, Nidhi; Gilhare, Varsha Rani; Singh, Fateh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Objective of the present study was to isolate bovine herpes virus Type 1 (BHV-1) from semen of infected bull and to adapt it onto embryonated eggs and Madin–Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cell line. Further, the virus was identified by agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test. Materials and Methods: Semen samples were collected from five BHV-1 positive bulls previously confirmed for the presence of antibodies against BHV-1 using avidin-biotin enzyme linked immunosorbent assay test. The virus from semen samples was adapted in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of 11-day-old embryonated chickens eggs and in MDBK cell line. The presence of BHV-1 in infected CAM and cell culture fluid was confirmed by AGID test. Results: Virus infected CAM showed edema, congestion and thickening at first passage level. Small foci ranged from 1 to 2 mm in diameter, scattered all over the membrane were observed at first passage. More severe changes were observed in CAM after serial passaging. The large pock lesions, round in shape with opaque raised edge and depressed gray central area of necrosis ranged from 3 to 5 mm in diameter were developed at fourth passage. Blind passages in MDBK cell culture were made. The MDBK cell line at second passage level showed characteristic cytopathic effect viz. rounding of cells with shrinkage, followed by aggregation or clumping of cells which progressed rapidly and appeared as “bunch of grapes” at 72 h post inoculation. Few cells become elongated when compared with uninfected controls. A homogenate of CAM with distinct pock lesions and infected cell culture fluid developed precipitation line within 48 h against specific anti-BHV-1 immune serum by AGID test. Conclusion: BHV-1 was easily adapted in CAM of chicken embryos and in MDBK cell line. Virus infected CAM and cell culture fluid showed precipitin band by AGID test. PMID:27051213

  9. Isolation and adaptation of bovine herpes virus Type 1 in embryonated chicken eggs and in Madin–Darby bovine kidney cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devprabha Samrath

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Objective of the present study was to isolate bovine herpes virus Type 1 (BHV-1 from semen of infected bull and to adapt it onto embryonated eggs and Madin–Darby bovine kidney (MDBK cell line. Further, the virus was identified by agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID test. Materials and Methods: Semen samples were collected from five BHV-1 positive bulls previously confirmed for the presence of antibodies against BHV-1 using avidin-biotin enzyme linked immunosorbent assay test. The virus from semen samples was adapted in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM of 11-day-old embryonated chickens eggs and in MDBK cell line. The presence of BHV-1 in infected CAM and cell culture fluid was confirmed by AGID test. Results: Virus infected CAM showed edema, congestion and thickening at first passage level. Small foci ranged from 1 to 2 mm in diameter, scattered all over the membrane were observed at first passage. More severe changes were observed in CAM after serial passaging. The large pock lesions, round in shape with opaque raised edge and depressed gray central area of necrosis ranged from 3 to 5 mm in diameter were developed at fourth passage. Blind passages in MDBK cell culture were made. The MDBK cell line at second passage level showed characteristic cytopathic effect viz. rounding of cells with shrinkage, followed by aggregation or clumping of cells which progressed rapidly and appeared as “bunch of grapes” at 72 h post inoculation. Few cells become elongated when compared with uninfected controls. A homogenate of CAM with distinct pock lesions and infected cell culture fluid developed precipitation line within 48 h against specific anti-BHV-1 immune serum by AGID test. Conclusion: BHV-1 was easily adapted in CAM of chicken embryos and in MDBK cell line. Virus infected CAM and cell culture fluid showed precipitin band by AGID test.

  10. B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia: a specific subgroup of mantle cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Vincent H J; Hoogeveen, Patricia G; de Ridder, Dick; Schindler-van der Struijk, Magdalena; van Zelm, Menno C; Sanders, Mathijs; Karsch, Dennis; Beverloo, H Berna; Lam, King; Orfao, Alberto; Lugtenburg, Pieternella J; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Langerak, Anton W; Kappers-Klunne, Mies; van Lom, Kirsten

    2014-07-17

    B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (B-PLL) is a rare mature B-cell malignancy that may be hard to distinguish from mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). B-PLL cases with a t(11;14) were redefined as MCL in the World Health Organization 2008 classification. We evaluated 13 B-PLL patients [7 being t(11;14)-positive (B-PLL+) and 6 negative (B-PLL-)] and compared them with MCL and CLL patients. EuroFlow-based immunophenotyping showed significant overlap between B-PLL+ and B-PLL-, as well as between B-PLL and MCL, whereas CLL clustered separately. Immunogenotyping showed specific IGHV gene usage partly resembling MCL. Gene expression profiling showed no separation between B-PLL+ and B-PLL- but identified 3 subgroups. One B-PLL subgroup clustered close to CLL and another subgroup clustered with leukemic MCL; both were associated with prolonged survival. A third subgroup clustered close to nodal MCL and was associated with short survival. Gene expression profiles of both B-PLL+ and B-PLL- showed best resemblance with normal immunoglobulin M-only B-cells. Our data confirm that B-PLL+ is highly comparable to MCL, indicate that B-PLL- also may be considered as a specific subgroup of MCL, and suggest that B-PLL is part of a spectrum, ranging from CLL-like B-PLL, to leukemic MCL-like B-PLL, to nodal MCL-like B-PLL.

  11. Prostate Cell Specific Regulation of Androgen Receptor Phosphorylation in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    immunoprecipitation; CRE, cAMP-responsive element; CREB, CRE-binding pro- tein; DMSO, dimethylsulfoxide ; EGF, epidermal growth fac- tor; EGFR, EGF...inhibitor, or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) ve- hicle control for 4 h and examined ART-27 mRNA levels. TSA increases ART-27 mRNA levels in 293 cells but does not

  12. Control of sporulation-specific cell division in Streptomyces coelicolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noens, Elke

    2007-01-01

    During developmental cell division in sporulation-committed aerial hyphae of streptomycetes, up to a hundred septa are simultaneously produced, in close harmony with synchromous chromosome condensation and segregation. Several unique protein families are involved in the control of this process, incl

  13. Specificity, pathogenicity, and clinical value of antiendothelial cell antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belizna, C; Tervaert, JWC

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the putative target antigens for antiendothelial cell antibodies (AECA), the possible pathophysiological role of AECA, and the clinical value of these antibodies as markers of disease activity, Methods: A structured literature search was done using Medline in combination w

  14. Cell-specific expression of TLR9 isoforms in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kelly J; Highton, John; Hessian, Paul A

    2011-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key pattern recognition receptors during an immune response. With five isoforms of human TLR9 described, we hypothesised that differential expression of TLR9 isoforms in different cell types would result in variable contributions to the overall input from TLR9 during inflammation. We assessed the molecular expression of the TLR9 isoforms, TLR9-A, -C and -D. In normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, B-lymphocytes express ∼100-fold more TLR9-A transcript than monocytes or T-lymphocytes, which predominantly express the TLR9-C transcript. Switches in isoform predominance accompany B-lymphocyte development. TLR9 protein expression in rheumatoid inflammatory lesions reflected the TLR9 isoform expression by immune cells. Herein we suggest that B-lymphocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute the ∼3-fold higher TLR9-A transcript levels observed in inflamed synovium when compared to subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules. In contrast, macrophages and T-lymphocytes contribute the ∼4-fold higher TLR9-C transcript levels seen in nodules, compared to synovia. From protein sequence, predictions of subcellular localisation suggest TLR9-B may locate to the mitochondria, whereas TLR9-D adopts an opposing orientation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Consistent with this, structure models raise the possibility of alternative ligands for the TLR9-B and TLR9-D variants. Our results highlight differences in the expression of human TLR9 isoforms in normal and inflamed tissues, with differing contributions to inflammation.

  15. Targeting inflammation with autoantigen-specific T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, T.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic autoimmune diseases are driven by cells that respond to tissue components of the body. Inflammation in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes or multiple sclerosis, can be suppressed by drug therapy. However, the broad range of immunosuppressive action of these drugs often does not res

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC PEPTIDE LIGANDS FOR B-LYMPHOMA CELL AND ITS EFFECT ON TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION AND CELL APOPTOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋良文; 马宪梅; 崔雪梅; 李扬; 王晓民

    2004-01-01

    Objective To search novel method for diagnosis and therapy of B-lymphoma, specific small molecular peptide ligands against binding site of tumor cells were screened and its effects on signal transduction and cell apoptosis were tested. Methods Specific peptide ligands were screened by binding with site of human B lymphoma cell (OC1LY8) using peptide-bead libraries. The identified peptides were characterized with responsible cells by rebinding test. The role of tyrosine phosphorylation of peptide ligand was tested by Western blot;and its apoptosispromoting role was observed by confocal fluorescent microscope. Results Specific peptide ligand was able to bind specifically to site on cell surface and enter into cytoplasm. Tetrameric peptide ligand was able to strongly trigger signal transduction resulting in tyrosine phosphorylation and cellular apoptosis in OC1LY8 cell line.Conclusion Screened peptide ligand can effectively bind with OC1LY8 cell, stimulate cellular tyrosine phosphorylation and induce cellular apoptosis.

  17. Molecular beacon-enabled purification of living cells by targeting cell type-specific mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wile, Brian M; Ban, Kiwon; Yoon, Young-Sup; Bao, Gang

    2014-10-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are dual-labeled oligonucleotides that fluoresce only in the presence of complementary mRNA. The use of MBs to target specific mRNAs allows sorting of specific cells from a mixed cell population. In contrast to existing approaches that are limited by available surface markers or selectable metabolic characteristics, the MB-based method enables the isolation of a wide variety of cells. For example, the ability to purify specific cell types derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is important for basic research and therapeutics. In addition to providing a general protocol for MB design, validation and nucleofection into cells, we describe how to isolate a specific cell population from differentiating PSCs. By using this protocol, we have successfully isolated cardiomyocytes differentiated from mouse or human PSCs (hPSCs) with ∼ 97% purity, as confirmed by electrophysiology and immunocytochemistry. After designing MBs, their ordering and validation requires 2 weeks, and the isolation process requires 3 h.

  18. Adaptation and failure of pancreatic beta cells in murine models with different degrees of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Gomez, Gema; Yetukuri, Laxman; Velagapudi, Vidya; Campbell, Mark; Blount, Margaret; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Ros, Manuel; Oresic, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The events that contribute to the expansion of beta-cell mass and enhanced beta-cell function in insulin-resistant states have not been elucidated fully. Recently, we showed that beta-cell adaptation failed dramatically in adult, insulin-resistant POKO mice, which contrasts with the appropriate expansion of beta cells in their ob/ob littermates. Thus, we hypothesised that characterisation of the islets in these mouse models at an early age should provide a unique opportunity to: (1) identify mechanisms involved in sensing insulin resistance at the level of the beta cells, (2) identify molecular effectors that contribute to increasing beta-cell mass and function, and (3) distinguish primary events from secondary events that are more likely to be present at more advanced stages of diabetes. Our results define the POKO mouse as a model of early lipotoxicity. At 4 weeks of age, it manifests with inappropriate beta-cell function and defects in proliferation markers. Other well-recognised pathogenic effectors that were observed previously in 16-week-old mice, such as increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), macrophage infiltration and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, are also present in both young POKO and young ob/ob mice, indicating the lack of predictive power with regards to the severity of beta-cell failure. Of interest, the relatively preserved lipidomic profile in islets from young POKO mice contrasted with the large changes in lipid composition and the differences in the chain length of triacylglycerols in the serum, liver, muscle and adipose tissue in adult POKO mice. Later lipotoxic insults in adult beta cells contribute to the failure of the POKO beta cell. Our results indicate that the rapid development of insulin resistance and beta-cell failure in POKO mice makes this model a useful tool to study early molecular events leading to insulin resistance and beta-cell failure. Furthermore, comparisons with ob/ob mice might reveal important adaptive mechanisms

  19. Tumor Antigen Specific Activation of Primary Human T-Cells Expressing a Virally Encoded Chimeric T-Cell Receptor Specific for p185HER2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建民; MichaelSFRIEDMAN; ChristopherMREYNOLDS; MarianneTHUBEN; LeeWILKE; JenniferFULLER; 李桥; ZeligESHHAR; JamesJMULE; KevimTMCDONAGH

    2004-01-01

    We have developed and tested chimeric T-cell receptors (TCR) specific for p185HER2. In these experiments,retroviral vectors expressing the N297 or N29ξ receptors were constructed in pRET6. Amphotropic viral producer cells were established in the GALV-based PG13 packaging cell line. Ficoll purified human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were vitally transduced using an optimized protocol incorporating activation with immobilized anti-CD3/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies, followed by viral infection in the presence of fibronectin fragment CH296. Transduced cells were co-cultured with human tumor cell lines that overexpress (SK-OV-3) or underexpress (MCF7) p185HER2 to assay for antigen specific immune responses. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells transduced with the N297 or N29ξ chTCR demonstrated HER2-specific antigen responses, as determined by release of Th1 like cytokines, and cellular cytotoxicity assays. Our results support the feasibility of adoptive immunothempy with genetically modified T-cells expressing a chTCR specific for p185HER2.

  20. A chemical genetics approach for specific differentiation of stem cells to somatic cells: a new promising therapeutical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachinidis, Agapios; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Seelig, Bianca; Berkessel, Albrecht; Hescheler, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy of severe degenerative diseases such as diabetes, myocardial infarction and Parkinson's disease through transplantation of somatic cells generated from embryonic stem (ES) cells is currently receiving considerable attention for the therapeutic applications. ES cells harvested from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the early embryo, can proliferate indefinitely in vitro while retaining the ability to differentiate into all somatic cells thereby providing an unlimited renewable source of somatic cells. In this context, identifying soluble factors, in particular chemically synthesized small molecules, and signal cascades involved in specific differentiation processes toward a defined tissue specific cell type are crucial for optimizing the generation of somatic cells in vitro for therapeutic approaches. However, experimental models are required allowing rapid and "easy-to-handle" parallel screening of chemical libraries to achieve this goal. Recently, the forward chemical genetic screening strategy has been postulated to screen small molecules in cellular systems for a specific desired phenotypic effect. The current review is focused on the progress of ES cell research in the context of the chemical genetics to identify small molecules promoting specific differentiation of ES cells to desired cell phenotype. Chemical genetics in the context of the cell ES-based cell replacement therapy remains a challenge for the near future for several scientific fields including chemistry, molecular biology, medicinal physics and robotic technologies.

  1. CXCL10 and trafficking of virus-specific T cells during coronavirus-induced demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Linda N; Liu, Michael T; Kane, Joy A C; Lane, Thomas E

    2009-09-01

    Chronic expression of CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) in the central nervous system (CNS) following infection with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) is associated with an immune-mediated demyelinating disease. Treatment of mice with anti-CXCL10 neutralizing antibody results in limited CD4+ T cell infiltration into the CNS accompanied by a reduction in white matter damage. The current study determines the antigen-specificity of the T lymphocytes present during chronic disease and evaluates how blocking CXCL10 signaling affects retention of virus-specific T cells within the CNS. CXCL10 neutralization selectively reduced accumulation and/or retention of virus-specific CD4+ T cells, yet exhibited limited effect on virus-specific CD8+ T cells. The response of CXCL10 neutralization on virus-specific T cell subsets is not due to differential expression of the CXCL10 receptor CXCR3 on T cells as there was no appreciable difference in receptor expression on virus-specific T cells during either acute or chronic disease. These findings emphasize the importance of virus-specific CD4+ T cells in amplifying demyelination in JHMV-infected mice. In addition, differential signals are required for trafficking and retention of virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during chronic demyelination in JHMV-infected mice.

  2. The effect of radio-adaptive doses on HT29 and GM637 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hell Roswitha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shape of the dose-response curve at low doses differs from the linear quadratic model. The effect of a radio-adaptive response is the centre of many studies and well known inspite that the clinical applications are still rarely considered. Methods We studied the effect of a low-dose pre-irradiation (0.03 Gy – 0.1 Gy alone or followed by a 2.0 Gy challenging dose 4 h later on the survival of the HT29 cell line (human colorectal cancer cells and on the GM637 cell line (human fibroblasts. Results 0.03 Gy given alone did not have a significant effect on both cell lines, the other low doses alone significantly reduced the cell survival. Applied 4 h before the 2.0 Gy fraction, 0.03 Gy led to a significant induced radioresistance in GM637 cells, but not in HT29 cells, and 0.05 Gy led to a significant hyperradiosensitivity in HT29 cells, but not in GM637 cells. Conclusion A pre-irradiation with 0.03 Gy can protect normal fibroblasts, but not colorectal cancer cells, from damage induced by an irradiation of 2.0 Gy and the application of 0.05 Gy prior to the 2.0 Gy fraction can enhance the cell killing of colorectal cancer cells while not additionally damaging normal fibroblasts. If these findings prove to be true in vivo as well this may optimize the balance between local tumour control and injury to normal tissue in modern radiotherapy.

  3. Resistance to acetohydroxamate acquired by slow adaptive increases in urease in cultured tobacco cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaya, T.; Filner, P.

    1981-06-01

    Urease activity of tobacco XD cells (1U cells) had undergone a 4-fold increase (4U cells) during a year of growth on urea. A clone of 4U cells gave rise to 12U cells during another year of growth on urea. The doubling time of 12U cells on urea is 2.2 days, compared to about 4 days for 1U cells, while 1U and 12U cells double in 2 days on nitrate. Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), a specific inhibitor/reversible inactivator of jack bean urease, affects tobacco cells urease similarly. Fifty per cent inhibition of growth by AHA occurred at 20 micromolar in 1U cells growing on urea and at 165 micromolar in 12U cells growing on urea, but at 600 micromolar for either 1U or 12U cells growing on nitrate. When 12U cells were grown on urea with 100 micromolar AHA, extractable urease activity decreased 80% within 2.5 hours and remained at this level for 2 weeks; the doubling time increased to 3.7 days, and intracellular urea rose 2-fold, compared to 12U cells grown on urea without AHA. Urease of 12U cells inactivated by AHA in vivo could be reactivated to its pre-AHA level by incubation at 30 C after extraction and separation from free AHA. AHA inhibited incorporation of /sup 15/N from (/sup 15/N) urea into Kjeldahl nitrogen in the cells, in spite of the increased intracellular urea. These results indicate that AHA acts primarily by inhibiting urease action, rather than by inhibition of formation of urease protein or of uptake of urea. Because 12U cells are 8 times more tolerant of AHA than 1U cells, it is likely that growth on urea in the presence of AHA should select strongly for cells with high urease.

  4. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Boothman

    1999-08-11

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed.

  5. Permissivity of primary human hepatocytes and different hepatoma cell lines to cell culture adapted hepatitis C virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Helle

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in Hepatitis C virus (HCV culture since the JFH1 strain cloning. However, developing efficient and physiologically relevant culture systems for all viral genotypes remains an important goal. In this work, we aimed at producing a high titer JFH1 derived virus to test different hepatic cells' permissivity. To this end, we performed successive infections and obtained a JFH1 derived virus reaching high titers. Six potential adaptive mutations were identified (I599V in E2, R1373Q and M1611T in NS3, S2364P and C2441S in NS5A and R2523K in NS5B and the effect of these mutations on HCV replication and infectious particle production was investigated. This cell culture adapted virus enabled us to efficiently infect primary human hepatocytes, as demonstrated using the RFP-NLS-IPS reporter protein and intracellular HCV RNA quantification. However, the induction of a strong type III interferon response in these cells was responsible for HCV inhibition. The disruption of this innate immune response led to a strong infection enhancement and permitted the detection of viral protein expression by western blotting as well as progeny virus production. This cell culture adapted virus also enabled us to easily compare the permissivity of seven hepatoma cell lines. In particular, we demonstrated that HuH-7, HepG2-CD81, PLC/PRF/5 and Hep3B cells were permissive to HCV entry, replication and secretion even if the efficiency was very low in PLC/PRF/5 and Hep3B cells. In contrast, we did not observe any infection of SNU-182, SNU-398 and SNU-449 hepatoma cells. Using iodixanol density gradients, we also demonstrated that the density profiles of HCV particles produced by PLC/PRF/5 and Hep3B cells were different from that of HuH-7 and HepG2-CD81 derived virions. These results will help the development of a physiologically relevant culture system for HCV patient isolates.

  6. MHC-based detection of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Sine Reker; Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii

    2010-01-01

    The hallmark of adaptive immunity is its ability to recognise a wide range of antigens and technologies that capture this diversity are therefore of substantial interest. New methods have recently been developed that allow the parallel analysis of T cell reactivity against vast numbers of differe...

  7. Receptors for T cell-replacing factor/interleukin 5. Specificity, quantitation, and its implication

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    T cell-replacing factor (TRF)/IL-5 is a glycosylated polypeptide that acts as a key factor for B cell growth and differentiation. Since IL-5 action is probably mediated by specific cell surface receptor(s), we have characterized the binding of IL-5 to cells using biosynthetically [35S]methionine-labeled IL-5 and 125I-IL-5 that had been prepared using Bolton-Hunter reagent. The radiolabeled IL-5 binds specifically to BCL1- B20 (in vitro line) (a murine chronic B cell leukemic cell line previou...

  8. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous....... This review describes and discusses the current status of the application of gene therapy in relation to SCLC Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...... DNA into malignant cells causing them to die. Since SCLC is a highly disseminated malignancy, the gene therapeutic agent must be administered systemically, obligating a high level of targeting of tumor tissue and the use of delivery vehicles designed for systemic circulation of the therapeutic DNA...

  9. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform ...

  10. An engineered approach to stem cell culture: automating the decision process for real-time adaptive subculture of stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Fei Elmer Ker

    Full Text Available Current cell culture practices are dependent upon human operators and remain laborious and highly subjective, resulting in large variations and inconsistent outcomes, especially when using visual assessments of cell confluency to determine the appropriate time to subculture cells. Although efforts to automate cell culture with robotic systems are underway, the majority of such systems still require human intervention to determine when to subculture. Thus, it is necessary to accurately and objectively determine the appropriate time for cell passaging. Optimal stem cell culturing that maintains cell pluripotency while maximizing cell yields will be especially important for efficient, cost-effective stem cell-based therapies. Toward this goal we developed a real-time computer vision-based system that monitors the degree of cell confluency with a precision of 0.791±0.031 and recall of 0.559±0.043. The system consists of an automated phase-contrast time-lapse microscope and a server. Multiple dishes are sequentially imaged and the data is uploaded to the server that performs computer vision processing, predicts when cells will exceed a pre-defined threshold for optimal cell confluency, and provides a Web-based interface for remote cell culture monitoring. Human operators are also notified via text messaging and e-mail 4 hours prior to reaching this threshold and immediately upon reaching this threshold. This system was successfully used to direct the expansion of a paradigm stem cell population, C2C12 cells. Computer-directed and human-directed control subcultures required 3 serial cultures to achieve the theoretical target cell yield of 50 million C2C12 cells and showed no difference for myogenic and osteogenic differentiation. This automated vision-based system has potential as a tool toward adaptive real-time control of subculturing, cell culture optimization and quality assurance/quality control, and it could be integrated with current and

  11. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the disease specific questionnaire OQLQ in Serbian patients with malocclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vucic Ljiljana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dentofacial disorders may potentially significantly affect the quality of life. Objectives of this study were to validate translated and culturally adapted Orthognatic Quality of Life Questionnaire (OQLQ on a cohort of Serbian patients with malocclusions.

  12. Cytotoxicity of tumor antigen specific human T cells is unimpaired by arginine depletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Munder

    Full Text Available Tumor-growth is often associated with the expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells that lead to local or systemic arginine depletion via the enzyme arginase. It is generally assumed that this arginine deficiency induces a global shut-down of T cell activation with ensuing tumor immune escape. While the impact of arginine depletion on polyclonal T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion is well documented, its influence on chemotaxis, cytotoxicity and antigen specific activation of human T cells has not been demonstrated so far. We show here that chemotaxis and early calcium signaling of human T cells are unimpaired in the absence of arginine. We then analyzed CD8(+ T cell activation in a tumor peptide as well as a viral peptide antigen specific system: (i CD8(+ T cells with specificity against the MART-1aa26-35*A27L tumor antigen expanded with in vitro generated dendritic cells, and (ii clonal CMV pp65aa495-503 specific T cells and T cells retrovirally transduced with a CMV pp65aa495-503 specific T cell receptor were analyzed. Our data demonstrate that human CD8(+ T cell antigen specific cytotoxicity and perforin secretion are completely preserved in the absence of arginine, while antigen specific proliferation as well as IFN-γ and granzyme B secretion are severely compromised. These novel results highlight the complexity of antigen specific T cell activation and demonstrate that human T cells can preserve important activation-induced effector functions in the context of arginine deficiency.

  13. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs.

  14. Temperature modeling and control of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell based on adaptive neural fuzzy technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Zhidong; Zhu Xinjian; Cao Guangyi

    2006-01-01

    Aiming at on-line controlling of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack, an adaptive neural fuzzy inference technology is adopted in the modeling and control of DMFC temperature system. In the modeling process, an Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) identification model of DMFC stack temperature is developed based on the input-output sampled data, which can avoid the internal complexity of DMFC stack. In the controlling process, with the network model trained well as the reference model of the DMFC control system, a novel fuzzy genetic algorithm is used to regulate the parameters and fuzzy rules of a neural fuzzy controller. In the simulation, compared with the nonlinear Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) and traditional fuzzy algorithm, the improved neural fuzzy controller designed in this paper gets better performance, as demonstrated by the simulation results.

  15. Focused specificity of intestinal TH17 cells towards commensal bacterial antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Torchinsky, Miriam B; Gobert, Michael; Xiong, Huizhong; Xu, Mo; Linehan, Jonathan L; Alonzo, Francis; Ng, Charles; Chen, Alessandra; Lin, Xiyao; Sczesnak, Andrew; Liao, Jia-Jun; Torres, Victor J; Jenkins, Marc K; Lafaille, Juan J; Littman, Dan R

    2014-06-05

    T-helper-17 (TH17) cells have critical roles in mucosal defence and in autoimmune disease pathogenesis. They are most abundant in the small intestine lamina propria, where their presence requires colonization of mice with microbiota. Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are sufficient to induce TH17 cells and to promote TH17-dependent autoimmune disease in animal models. However, the specificity of TH17 cells, the mechanism of their induction by distinct bacteria, and the means by which they foster tissue-specific inflammation remain unknown. Here we show that the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire of intestinal TH17 cells in SFB-colonized mice has minimal overlap with that of other intestinal CD4(+) T cells and that most TH17 cells, but not other T cells, recognize antigens encoded by SFB. T cells with antigen receptors specific for SFB-encoded peptides differentiated into RORγt-expressing TH17 cells, even if SFB-colonized mice also harboured a strong TH1 cell inducer, Listeria monocytogenes, in their intestine. The match of T-cell effector function with antigen specificity is thus determined by the type of bacteria that produce the antigen. These findings have significant implications for understanding how commensal microbiota contribute to organ-specific autoimmunity and for developing novel mucosal vaccines.

  16. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence reveals stage specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells during Arabidopsis embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Ricardo I; Mercado, Ana V; Meisel, Lee A

    2010-01-01

    The basic body plan of a plant is established early in embryogenesis when cells differentiate, giving rise to the apical and basal regions of the embryo. Using chlorophyll fluorescence as a marker for chloroplasts, we have detected specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells at specific stages of embryogenesis. Non-randomly distributed chloroplast-containing cells are seen as early as the globular stage of embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. In the heart stage of embryogenesis, chloroplast containing cells are detected in epidermal cells as well as a central region of the heart stage embryo, forming a triangular septum of chloroplast-containing cells that divides the embryo into three equal sectors. Torpedo stage embryos have chloroplast-containing epidermal cells and a central band of chloroplast-containing cells in the cortex layer, just below the shoot apical meristem. In the walking-stick stage of embryogenesis, chloroplasts are present in the epidermal, cortex and endodermal cells. The chloroplasts appear reduced or absent from the provascular and columella cells of walking-stick stage embryos. These results suggest that there is a tight regulation of plastid differentiation during embryogenesis that generates specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells in specific cell layers at specific stages of embryogenesis.

  17. General approach for in vivo recovery of cell type-specific effector gene sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, Julius C; Tu, Qiang; Davidson, Eric H

    2014-05-01

    Differentially expressed, cell type-specific effector gene sets hold the key to multiple important problems in biology, from theoretical aspects of developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to various practical applications. Although individual cell types of interest have been recovered by various methods and analyzed, systematic recovery of multiple cell type-specific gene sets from whole developing organisms has remained problematic. Here we describe a general methodology using the sea urchin embryo, a material of choice because of the large-scale GRNs already solved for this model system. This method utilizes the regulatory states expressed by given cells of the embryo to define cell type and includes a fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) procedure that results in no perturbation of transcript representation. We have extensively validated the method by spatial and qualitative analyses of the transcriptome expressed in isolated embryonic skeletogenic cells and as a consequence, generated a prototypical cell type-specific transcriptome database.

  18. 89 Is Basophil Specific Response to Hymenoptera Venom Related to T Regulatory Cells?

    OpenAIRE

    Kucera, Petr; Hulikova, Katarina; Cvackova, Milada; Planska, Daniela; Riegerova, Kamila

    2012-01-01

    Background The exact mechanism of systemic hypersensitivity to venom is not exactly understood. It is suggested T cells with regulatory potential can downregulate other T cell subsets and effector cells, ex. mast cell or basophils. We focused on relationship of specific basophil reactivity in relationship to proportion of regulatory T cells. Methods Forty-five patients with history of systemic symptoms of allergy to Hymenoptera venom were included. Basophil reactivity before the treatment and...

  19. Mathematical modeling of the specific T cell response to a viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bidot, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    T cell is one of the most important cells in specific immunity. In order to devise a tool for understanding and predicting some mechanisms of the immune system, a model for T cell response is proposed. The T lymphocyte activation by the recognition of a peptide carried by an antigen presenting cell is an essential step of this immune response. T cell activation was modelled by a system of ordinary differential equations of chemical kinetics type, representing the temporal evolution of the con...

  20. Specific of adaptation foreign student with different health and physical preparedness level to employments on physical education in Kharkov National Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukavenko H.G.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The specific of adaptation of foreign students is considered to Ukrainian university reality. Researches were conducted with participation 762 students from 62 countries. Possibilities of teaching of all objects are rotined in English language. The results of questionnaire of students of the first course are presented. Attitude of students is exposed toward an object and their level of physical preparedness. Traditions and departmental of other countries teaching are rotined. Methods and facilities of reduction of adaptation period are presented the increase of level of physical and mental capacity.

  1. The Role of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses against Alpha Herpes Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Schuster

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1999, two independent groups identified plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC as major type I interferon- (IFN- producing cells in the blood. Since then, evidence is accumulating that PDC are a multifunctional cell population effectively coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses. This paper focuses on the role of different immune cells and their interactions in the surveillance of alpha herpes virus infections, summarizes current knowledge on PDC surface receptors and their role in direct cell-cell contacts, and develops a risk factor model for the clinical implications of herpes simplex and varicella zoster virus reactivation. Data from studies involving knockout mice and cell-depletion experiments as well as human studies converge into a “spider web”, in which the direct and indirect crosstalk between many cell populations tightly controls acute, latent, and recurrent alpha herpes virus infections. Notably, cells involved in innate immune regulations appear to shape adaptive immune responses more extensively than previously thought.

  2. Contribution of Herpesvirus Specific CD8 T Cells to Anti-Viral T Cell Response in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Sandalova; Diletta Laccabue; Carolina Boni; Tan, Anthony T; Katja Fink; Eng Eong Ooi; Robert Chua; Bahar Shafaeddin Schreve; Carlo Ferrari; Antonio Bertoletti

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 1...