WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell spatial temperature

  1. Spatial Dependence of DNA Damage in Bacteria due to Low-Temperature Plasma Application as Assessed at the Single Cell Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privat-Maldonado, Angela; O’Connell, Deborah; Welch, Emma; Vann, Roddy; van der Woude, Marjan W.

    2016-10-01

    Low temperature plasmas (LTPs) generate a cocktail of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS) with bactericidal activity. The RNOS however are spatially unevenly distributed in the plasma. Here we test the hypothesis that this distribution will affect the mechanisms underpinning plasma bactericidal activity focussing on the level of DNA damage in situ. For the first time, a quantitative, single cell approach was applied to assess the level of DNA damage in bacteria as a function of the radial distance from the centre of the plasma jet. Salmonella enterica on a solid, dry surface was treated with two types of LTP: an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet (charged and neutral species) and a radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (neutral species). In both cases, there was an inverse correlation between the degree of DNA damage and the radial distance from the centre of the plasma, with the highest DNA damage occurring directly under the plasma. This trend was also observed with Staphylococcus aureus. LTP-generated UV radiation was eliminated as a contributing factor. Thus valuable mechanistic information can be obtained from assays on biological material, which can inform the development of LTP as a complementary or alternative therapy for (topical) bacterial infections.

  2. A physically based analytical spatial air temperature and humidity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Yang; Theodore A. Endreny; David J. Nowak

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation of urban surface air temperature and humidity influences human thermal comfort, the settling rate of atmospheric pollutants, and plant physiology and growth. Given the lack of observations, we developed a Physically based Analytical Spatial Air Temperature and Humidity (PASATH) model. The PASATH model calculates spatial solar radiation and heat...

  3. Interpolation of spatial temperature profiles by sensor networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jedermann, Reiner; Palafox-Albarran, Javier; BARREIRO ELORZA, PILAR; Ruiz García, Luis; Robla Villalba, José Ignacio; Lang, Walter

    2012-01-01

    The monitoring of spatial profiles of a physical property such as temperature becomes feasible with the decreasing cost of wireless sensor nodes. But to obtain a temperature value for each point in space, it is necessary to interpolate between the existing sensor positions. Accurate spatial temperature supervision is a crucial precondition for maintaining high quality standards in the transportation of food products. The Kriging method was programmed for the ARM processor of the iMote2 sensor...

  4. Spatial correlation of temperature in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haramina, T; Tilgner, A

    2006-12-01

    A cubic Rayleigh-Bénard cell is operated at a Rayleigh number of 1.5x10(9) and a Prandtl number of 6.1. The cell is equipped with thermistors placed along the vertical line through the center of the cell. The spatial correlation of temperature is deduced from simultaneous temperature recordings from these thermistors. The correlation function is well fitted by the sum of two exponentials. There is no cascade in the temperature field as only two characteristic length scales appear. The direct measurement of spatial correlations allows us to test the validity of Taylor's hypothesis in this flow.

  5. Spatial interpolation of monthly mean air temperature data for Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniskevich, Svetlana

    2016-04-01

    Temperature data with high spatial resolution are essential for appropriate and qualitative local characteristics analysis. Nowadays the surface observation station network in Latvia consists of 22 stations recording daily air temperature, thus in order to analyze very specific and local features in the spatial distribution of temperature values in the whole Latvia, a high quality spatial interpolation method is required. Until now inverse distance weighted interpolation was used for the interpolation of air temperature data at the meteorological and climatological service of the Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Centre, and no additional topographical information was taken into account. This method made it almost impossible to reasonably assess the actual temperature gradient and distribution between the observation points. During this project a new interpolation method was applied and tested, considering auxiliary explanatory parameters. In order to spatially interpolate monthly mean temperature values, kriging with external drift was used over a grid of 1 km resolution, which contains parameters such as 5 km mean elevation, continentality, distance from the Gulf of Riga and the Baltic Sea, biggest lakes and rivers, population density. As the most appropriate of these parameters, based on a complex situation analysis, mean elevation and continentality was chosen. In order to validate interpolation results, several statistical indicators of the differences between predicted values and the values actually observed were used. Overall, the introduced model visually and statistically outperforms the previous interpolation method and provides a meteorologically reasonable result, taking into account factors that influence the spatial distribution of the monthly mean temperature.

  6. Optofluidic intracavity spectroscopy for spatially, temperature, and wavelength dependent refractometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindt, Joel D.

    A microfluidic refractometer was designed based on previous optofluidic intracavity spectroscopy (OFIS) chips utilized to distinguish healthy and cancerous cells. The optofluidic cavity is realized by adding high reflectivity dielectric mirrors to the top and bottom of a microfluidic channel. This creates a plane-plane Fabry-Perot optical cavity in which the resonant wavelengths are highly dependent on the optical path length inside the cavity. Refractometry is a useful method to determine the nature of fluids, including the concentration of a solute in a solvent as well as the temperature of the fluid. Advantages of microfluidic systems are the easy integration with lab-on-chip devices and the need for only small volumes of fluid. The unique abilities of the microfluidic refractometer in this thesis include its spatial, temperature, and wavelength dependence. Spatial dependence of the transmission spectrum is inherent through a spatial filtering process implemented with an optical fiber and microscope objective. A sequence of experimental observations guided the change from using the OFIS chip as a cell discrimination device to a complimentary refractometer. First, it was noted the electrode structure within the microfluidic channel, designed to trap and manipulate biological cells with dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces, caused the resonant wavelengths to blue-shift when the electrodes were energized. This phenomenon is consistent with the negative dn/dT property of water and water-based solutions. Next, it was necessary to develop a method to separate the optical path length into physical path length and refractive index. Air holes were placed near the microfluidic channel to exclusively measure the cavity length with the known refractive index of air. The cavity length was then interpolated across the microfluidic channel, allowing any mechanical changes to be taken into account. After the separation of physical path length and refractive index, it was of interest

  7. Spatially resolved remote measurement of temperature by neutron resonance absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kockelmann, W.; Pooley, D.E. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, ISIS Facility, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Feller, W.B. [NOVA Scientific, Inc., 10 Picker Road, Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States)

    2015-12-11

    Deep penetration of neutrons into most engineering materials enables non-destructive studies of their bulk properties. The existence of sharp resonances in neutron absorption spectra enables isotopically-resolved imaging of elements present in a sample, as demonstrated by previous studies. At the same time the Doppler broadening of resonance peaks provides a method of remote measurement of temperature distributions within the same sample. This technique can be implemented at a pulsed neutron source with a short initial pulse allowing for the measurement of the energy of each registered neutron by the time of flight technique. A neutron counting detector with relatively high timing and spatial resolution is used to demonstrate the possibility to obtain temperature distributions across a 100 µm Ta foil with ~millimeter spatial resolution. Moreover, a neutron transmission measurement over a wide energy range can provide spatially resolved sample information such as temperature, elemental composition and microstructure properties simultaneously.

  8. Spatial stochastic dynamics enable robust cell polarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Lawson

    Full Text Available Although cell polarity is an essential feature of living cells, it is far from being well-understood. Using a combination of computational modeling and biological experiments we closely examine an important prototype of cell polarity: the pheromone-induced formation of the yeast polarisome. Focusing on the role of noise and spatial heterogeneity, we develop and investigate two mechanistic spatial models of polarisome formation, one deterministic and the other stochastic, and compare the contrasting predictions of these two models against experimental phenotypes of wild-type and mutant cells. We find that the stochastic model can more robustly reproduce two fundamental characteristics observed in wild-type cells: a highly polarized phenotype via a mechanism that we refer to as spatial stochastic amplification, and the ability of the polarisome to track a moving pheromone input. Moreover, we find that only the stochastic model can simultaneously reproduce these characteristics of the wild-type phenotype and the multi-polarisome phenotype of a deletion mutant of the scaffolding protein Spa2. Significantly, our analysis also demonstrates that higher levels of stochastic noise results in increased robustness of polarization to parameter variation. Furthermore, our work suggests a novel role for a polarisome protein in the stabilization of actin cables. These findings elucidate the intricate role of spatial stochastic effects in cell polarity, giving support to a cellular model where noise and spatial heterogeneity combine to achieve robust biological function.

  9. SAGA GIS based processing of spatial high resolution temperature data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlitz, Lars; Bechtel, Benjamin; Kawohl, Tobias; Boehner, Juergen [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geography; Zaksek, Klemen [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geophysics

    2013-07-01

    Many climate change impact studies require surface and near surface temperature data with high spatial and temporal resolution. The resolution of state of the art climate models and remote sensing data is often by far to coarse to represent the meso- and microscale distinctions of temperatures. This is particularly the case for regions with a huge variability of topoclimates, such as mountainous or urban areas. Statistical downscaling techniques are promising methods to refine gridded temperature data with limited spatial resolution, particularly due to their low demand for computer capacity. This paper presents two downscaling approaches - one for climate model output and one for remote sensing data. Both are methodically based on the FOSS-GIS platform SAGA. (orig.)

  10. Can spatial statistical river temperature models be transferred between catchments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Faye L.; Fryer, Robert J.; Hannah, David M.; Malcolm, Iain A.

    2017-09-01

    There has been increasing use of spatial statistical models to understand and predict river temperature (Tw) from landscape covariates. However, it is not financially or logistically feasible to monitor all rivers and the transferability of such models has not been explored. This paper uses Tw data from four river catchments collected in August 2015 to assess how well spatial regression models predict the maximum 7-day rolling mean of daily maximum Tw (Twmax) within and between catchments. Models were fitted for each catchment separately using (1) landscape covariates only (LS models) and (2) landscape covariates and an air temperature (Ta) metric (LS_Ta models). All the LS models included upstream catchment area and three included a river network smoother (RNS) that accounted for unexplained spatial structure. The LS models transferred reasonably to other catchments, at least when predicting relative levels of Twmax. However, the predictions were biased when mean Twmax differed between catchments. The RNS was needed to characterise and predict finer-scale spatially correlated variation. Because the RNS was unique to each catchment and thus non-transferable, predictions were better within catchments than between catchments. A single model fitted to all catchments found no interactions between the landscape covariates and catchment, suggesting that the landscape relationships were transferable. The LS_Ta models transferred less well, with particularly poor performance when the relationship with the Ta metric was physically implausible or required extrapolation outside the range of the data. A single model fitted to all catchments found catchment-specific relationships between Twmax and the Ta metric, indicating that the Ta metric was not transferable. These findings improve our understanding of the transferability of spatial statistical river temperature models and provide a foundation for developing new approaches for predicting Tw at unmonitored locations across

  11. Spatial Statistical Estimation for Massive Sea Surface Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Y.; Vazquez, J.; Nguyen, H.; Braverman, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We combine several large remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) datasets to create a single high-resolution SST dataset that has no missing data and provides an uncertainty associated with each value. This high resolution dataset will optimize estimates of SST in critical parts of the world's oceans, such as coastal upwelling regions. We use Spatial Statistical Data Fusion (SSDF), a statistical methodology for predicting global spatial fields by exploiting spatial correlations in the data. The main advantages of SSDF over spatial smoothing methodologies include the provision of probabilistic uncertainties, the ability to incorporate multiple datasets with varying footprints, measurement errors and biases, and estimation at any desired resolution. In order to accommodate massive input and output datasets, we introduce two modifications of the existing SSDF algorithm. First, we compute statistical model parameters based on coarse resolution aggregated data. Second, we use an adaptive spatial grid that allows us to perform estimation in a specified region of interest, but incorporate spatial dependence between locations in that region and all locations globally. Finally, we demonstrate with a case study involving estimations on the full globe at coarse resolution grid (30 km) and a high resolution (1 km) inset for the Gulf Stream region.

  12. HIGH TEMPERATURE POLYMER FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Qingfeng, Li; He, Ronghuan

    2003-01-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200°C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working...

  13. Spatial-temperature high resolution map for early cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriloaia, Gheorghe V.; Hurduc, Anca; Ghimigean, Ana-Maria; Fumarel, Radu

    2009-02-01

    Heat is one of the most important parameters of living beings. Skin temperature is not the same on the entire body and so, a thermal signature can be got. Infrared map on serial imaging can constitute an early sign of an abnormality. Thermography detects changes in tissue that appear before and accompany many diseases including cancer. As this map has a better resolution an early cancer diagnosis can be done. The temperature of neoplasic tissue is different up to 1.5 °C than that of the healthy tissue as a result of the specific metabolic rate. The infrared camera images show very quickly the heat transferred by radiation. A lot of factors disturb the temperature conversion to pixel intensity. A sensitive temperature sensor with a 10 Mpixels video camera, showing its spatial position, and a computer fusion program were used for the map with high spatial-temperature resolution. A couple of minutes are necessary to get a high resolution map. The asymmetry and borders were the main parameters analyzed. The right cancer diagnosis was for about 78.4% of patients with thyroid cancer, and more than 89.6% from patients with breast cancer. In the near future, the medical prognosis will be improved by fractal analysis.

  14. Influence of spatial temperature distribution on high accuracy interferometric metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yongqiang; Miao, Erlong; Yan, Feng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Huaijiang

    2010-10-01

    We calculate the influence of temperature change on the refractive index of air, establish a model of air temperature distribution and analyze the effect of different temperature distribution on the high accuracy interferometric metrology. First, a revised Edlen formula is employed to acquire the relation between temperature and refractive index of air, followed by introducing the fixed temperature gradient distribution among the spatial grid within the optical cavity between the reference flat and the test flat of the Fizeau interferometer, accompanied by a temperature change random function within each grid. Finally, all the rays through the air layer with different incident angles are traced by Matlab program in order to obtain the final output position, angle and OPD for each ray. The influence of different temperature distribution and the length of the optical cavity in on the testing accuracy can be analyzed through the RMS value that results from repeatable rays tracing. As a result, the horizontal distribution (vertical to optical axis) has a large effect on the testing accuracy. Thus, to realize the high accuracy figure metrology, the horizontal distribution of temperature must be rigorously controlled as well as to shorten the length of the optical cavity to a large extent. The results from our simulation are of great significant for the accuracy analysis of interferometric testing and the research of manufacturing a interferometer.

  15. Spatial interpolation methods for monthly rainfalls and temperatures in Basilicata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrara A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial interpolated climatic data on grids are important as input in forest modeling because climate spatial variability has a direct effect on productivity and forest growth. Maps of climatic variables can be obtained by different interpolation methods depending on data quality (number of station, spatial distribution, missed data etc. and topographic and climatic features of study area. In this paper four methods are compared to interpolate monthly rainfall at regional scale: 1 inverse distance weighting (IDW; 2 regularized spline with tension (RST; 3 ordinary kriging (OK; 4 universal kriging (UK. Besides, an approach to generate monthly surfaces of temperatures over regions of complex terrain and with limited number of stations is presented. Daily data were gathered from 1976 to 2006 period and then gaps in the time series were filled in order to obtain monthly mean temperatures and cumulative precipitation. Basic statistics of monthly dataset and analysis of relationship of temperature and precipitation to elevation were performed. A linear relationship was found between temperature and altitude, while no relationship was found between rainfall and elevation. Precipitations were then interpolated without taking into account elevation. Based on root mean squared error for each month the best method was ranked. Results showed that universal kriging (UK is the best method in spatial interpolation of rainfall in study area. Then cross validation was used to compare prediction performance of tree different variogram model (circular, spherical, exponential using UK algorithm in order to produce final maps of monthly precipitations. Before interpolating temperatures were referred to see level using the calculated lapse rate and a digital elevation model (DEM. The result of interpolation with RST was then set to originally elevation with an inverse procedure. To evaluate the quality of interpolated surfaces a comparison between interpolated and

  16. Cell culture device using spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Chung-Jen; Shen, Ching-I.; Ou, Chung-Ming

    2009-07-01

    Spatial light modulator is introduced for cell culturing and related illumination experiment. Two kinds of designs were used. The first type put the cell along with the bio-medium directly on top of the analyzer of the microdisplay and set a cover glass on it to retain the medium environment, which turned the microdisplay into a bio-container. The second type introduced an optical lens system placed below the spatial light modulator to focus the light spots on specific position. Details of the advantages and drawbacks for the two different approaches are discussed, and the human melanocyte cell (HMC) is introduced to prove the feasibility of the concept. Results indicate that the second type is much more suitable than the first for precision required application.

  17. Spatially and temporally resolved temperature measurement in laser media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Jörg; Yue, Fangxin; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte C

    2016-06-01

    A technique to measure the spatially resolved temperature distribution in a laser medium is presented. It is based on the temperature dependence of the absorption cross section close to the zero-phonon line of the active medium. Since other materials in the beam path exhibit a high (and constant) transmission at this wavelength, the method can easily be applied in realistic amplifier setups. The method was successfully tested on three different samples, which were pumped by a pulsed laser diode with up to 150 W average power: side-cooled Yb:YAG and Yb:fluoride-phosphate glass at room temperature and face-cooled Yb:CaF2 at 120 K.

  18. HIGH TEMPERATURE POLYMER FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Qingfeng, Li; He, Ronghuan

    2003-01-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200°C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working...... temperature allows for utilization of the excess heat for fuel processing. Moreover, it provides an excellent CO tolerance of several percent, and the system needs no purification of hydrogen from a reformer. Continuous service for over 6 months at 150°C has been demonstrated....

  19. Spatial organization of transcription in bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiaoli; Xiao, Jie

    2014-07-01

    Prokaryotic transcription has been extensively studied over the past half a century. However, there often exists a gap between the structural, mechanistic description of transcription obtained from in vitro biochemical studies, and the cellular, phenomenological observations from in vivo genetic studies. It is now accepted that a living bacterial cell is a complex entity; the heterogeneous cellular environment is drastically different from the homogenous, well-mixed situation in vitro. Where molecules are inside a cell may be important for their function; hence, the spatial organization of different molecular components may provide a new means of transcription regulation in vivo, possibly bridging this gap. In this review, we survey current evidence for the spatial organization of four major components of transcription [genes, transcription factors, RNA polymerase (RNAP) and RNAs] and critically analyze their biological significance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Spatial Variation of the Correlated Color Temperature of Lightning Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Shimoji, Nobuaki; Sakihama, Singo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the spatial variation of the correlated color temperature (CCT) of lightning channel. We also discussed the energy of lightning channels relating to the CCT . First we applied digital image processing techniques to lightning images. In order to reduce the chromatic aberration, we created the reduction technique algorithm of the chromatic aberration on digital still images. We applied the reduction technique of the chromatic aberration to digital still images, and then the obtained results was mapped to the xy-chromaticity diagram. The CCT of the lightning channel was decided on the xy-chromaticity diagram. From results, the spatial variation of the CCT of the lightning channel was confirmed. Then the energy associated with the the CCT was discussed.

  1. Spatial patterns in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. H. Holmes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the structural difference in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC over land resulting from choice of measuring device or model framework. It is shown that the timing can be reliably estimated from temporally sparse observations acquired from a constellation of low Earth orbiting satellites given record lengths of at least three months. Based on a year of data, the spatial patterns of mean DTC timing are compared between Ka-band temperature estimates, geostationary thermal infrared (TIR temperature estimates and numerical weather prediction model output from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO. It is found that the spatial patterns can be explained by vegetation effects, sensing depth differences and more speculatively the orientation of orographic relief features. In absolute terms, the GMAO model puts the peak of the DTC on average at 12:50 local solar time, 23 min before TIR with a peak temperature at 13:13. Since TIR is the shallowest observation of the land surface, this small difference represents a structural error that possibly affects the models ability to assimilate observations that are closely tied to the DTC. For non-desert areas, the Ka-band observations have only a small delay of about 15 min with the TIR observations which is in agreement with their respective theoretical sensing depth. The results of this comparison provide insights into the structural differences between temperature measurements and models, and can be used as a first step to account for these differences in a coherent way.

  2. Spatial patterns in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. H. Holmes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the structural difference in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC over land resulting from choice of measuring device or model framework. It is shown that the timing can be reliably estimated from temporally sparse observations acquired from a constellation of low Earth-orbiting satellites given record lengths of at least three months. Based on a year of data, the spatial patterns of mean DTC timing are compared between temperature estimates from microwave Ka-band, geostationary thermal infrared (TIR, and numerical weather prediction model output from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO. It is found that the spatial patterns can be explained by vegetation effects, sensing depth differences and more speculatively the orientation of orographic relief features. In absolute terms, the GMAO model puts the peak of the DTC on average at 12:50 local solar time, 23 min before TIR with a peak temperature at 13:13 (both averaged over Africa and Europe. Since TIR is the shallowest observation of the land surface, this small difference represents a structural error that possibly affects the model's ability to assimilate observations that are closely tied to the DTC. The equivalent average timing for Ka-band is 13:44, which is influenced by the effect of increased sensing depth in desert areas. For non-desert areas, the Ka-band observations lag the TIR observations by only 15 min, which is in agreement with their respective theoretical sensing depth. The results of this comparison provide insights into the structural differences between temperature measurements and models, and can be used as a first step to account for these differences in a coherent way.

  3. Determining Outdoor CPV Cell Temperature (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, M.

    2011-04-01

    An accurate method is needed for determining cell temperature when measuring CPV modules outdoors. It has been suggested that cell temperature can be calculated though a procedure that shutters sunlight to the cells while measuring the transients in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and heat sink temperature. This presentation documents application of this shutter procedure to multiple CPV modules at NREL. The challenges and limitations are presented along with an alternate approach to measuring CPV cell operating temperature.

  4. Materials for low-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley; Yan, Yushan; Lu, Max

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in Low-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in low-temperature fuel cells. A related book will cover key materials in high-temperature fuel cells. The two books form part

  5. Spatial Information Research for Temperature and Precipitation Climate Data in Hengduan Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the spatial information of temperature and precipitation data in Hengduan mountains. [Method] Considering GIS spatial interpolation and numerical statistics theory, spatial prediction were carried out to the ten years average temperature and precipitation flux observation data in 109 sparse meteorological stations in Hengduan Mountains. Based on the spatial range of geographic position of Hengduan Mountains, and 1∶1 000 000 scale DEM as data sources, and using trend surface ...

  6. Spatially controlled cell adhesion on three-dimensional substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Christine; Reinhardt, Martina; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Leisen, Daniel; Trouillet, Vanessa; Truckenmüller, Roman; Blau, Axel; Ziegler, Christiane; Welle, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    The microenvironment of cells in vivo is defined by spatiotemporal patterns of chemical and biophysical cues. Therefore, one important goal of tissue engineering is the generation of scaffolds with defined biofunctionalization in order to control processes like cell adhesion and differentiation. Mimicking extrinsic factors like integrin ligands presented by the extracellular matrix is one of the key elements to study cellular adhesion on biocompatible scaffolds. By using special thermoformable polymer films with anchored biomolecules micro structured scaffolds, e.g. curved and micro-patterned substrates, can be fabricated. Here, we present a novel strategy for the fabrication of micro-patterned scaffolds based on the "Substrate Modification and Replication by Thermoforming" (SMART) technology: The surface of a poly lactic acid membrane, having a low forming temperature of 60 degrees C and being initially very cell attractive, was coated with a photopatterned layer of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and hyaluronic acid (VAHyal) to gain spatial control over cell adhesion. Subsequently, this modified polymer membrane was thermoformed to create an array of spherical microcavities with diameters of 300 microm for 3D cell culture. Human hepatoma cells (HepG2) and mouse fibroblasts (L929) were used to demonstrate guided cell adhesion. HepG2 cells adhered and aggregated exclusively within these cavities without attaching to the passivated surfaces between the cavities. Also L929 cells adhering very strongly on the pristine substrate polymer were effectively patterned by the cell repellent properties of the hyaluronic acid based hydrogel. This is the first time cell adhesion was controlled by patterned functionalization of a polymeric substrate with UV curable PLL-VAHyal in thermoformed 3D microstructures.

  7. Assessment of a Solar Cell Panel Spatial Arrangement Influence on Electricity Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, I. A.; Burakova, L. N.; Burakova, A. D.; Burakova, O. D.

    2017-05-01

    The research evaluates the impact of the spatial arrangement of solar cell panels on the amount of electricity generated (power generated by solar cell panel) in Tyumen. Dependences of the power generated by the solar panel on the time of day, air temperature, weather conditions and the spatial arrangement are studied. Formulas for the calculation of the solar cell panel inclination angle which provides electricity to urban infrastructure are offered. Based on the data in the future, changing of inclination angle of solar cell panel will be confirmed experimentally during the year in Tyumen, and recommendations for installing solar cell panels in urban infrastructure will be developed.

  8. Materials for high-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, San Ping; Lu, Max

    2013-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in High-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in high-temperature fuel cells with emphasis on the most important solid oxide fuel cells. A related book will cover key mater

  9. Detection of Temperature Difference in Neuronal Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tanimoto, Ryuichi; Hiraiwa, Takumi; Nakai, Yuichiro; Shindo, Yutaka; Oka, Kotaro; Hiroi, Noriko; Funahashi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    .... Several methods for detecting intracellular temperature have recently been established. Here we develop a novel method for sensing temperature in living cells based on the imaging technique of fluorescence of quantum dots...

  10. Dynamic Model of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2007-01-01

    cathode air cooled 30 cell HTPEM fuel cell stack developed at the Institute of Energy Technology at Aalborg University. This fuel cell stack uses PEMEAS Celtec P-1000 membranes, runs on pure hydrogen in a dead end anode configuration with a purge valve. The cooling of the stack is managed by running...... conduction through stack insulation, cathode air convection and heating of the inlet gasses in manifold. Various measurements are presented to validate the model predictions of the stack temperatures....

  11. Long-term sea surface temperature baselines - time series, spatial covariation and implications for biological processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Brian; Schiedek, D.

    2007-01-01

    questions at large spatial scales, such as the response of species distributions and phenologies to climate change. In this study we investigate the spatial synchrony of long-term sea surface temperatures in the North Sea-Baltic Sea region as measured daily at four coastal sites (Marsdiep, Netherlands...... assessments of how species and ecosystems have responded to past temperature changes and how they may react to future temperature changes. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. Effect of temperature on the evolution of bright and dark screening-photovoltaic spatial solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘劲松; 郝中华

    2002-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the temperature effects on the evolution of both bright and dark screening-photovoltaicoptical spatial solitons in biased photovoltaic-photorefractive crystals in the case of neglecting the diffusion process. Fora stable bright or dark screening-photovoltaic soliton originally formed in a crystal at a given temperature, when thecrystal temperature changes, it will evolve into another stable screening-photovoltaic soliton if the change is quite small,whereas it will become unstable or break down if the temperature change is large enough. The spatial shape of a stablescreening-photovoltaic soliton can be reshaped by appropriately adjusting the crystal temperature.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Bias HAST System Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Kent B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Furrer, III, Clint T [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandoval, Paul Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garrett, Stephen E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pfeifer, Nathaniel Bryant [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    High-reliability components for high-consequence systems require detailed testing of operation after having undergone highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) under unusual conditions of high-temperature and humidity. This paper describes the design and operation of a system called "Wormwood" that is a highly multiplexed temperature measurement system that is designed to operate under HAST conditions to allow measurement of the temperature as a function of time and position in a HAST chamber. HAST chambers have single-point temperature measurements that can be traceable to NIST standards. The objective of these "Wormwood" measurements is to verify the uniformity and stability of the remaining volume of the HAST chamber with respect to the single traceable standard.

  14. Spatial organization and correlations of cell nuclei in brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiao

    Full Text Available Accepting the hypothesis that cancers are self-organizing, opportunistic systems, it is crucial to understand the collective behavior of cancer cells in their tumorous heterogeneous environment. In the present paper, we ask the following basic question: Is this self-organization of tumor evolution reflected in the manner in which malignant cells are spatially distributed in their heterogeneous environment? We employ a variety of nontrivial statistical microstructural descriptors that arise in the theory of heterogeneous media to characterize the spatial distributions of the nuclei of both benign brain white matter cells and brain glioma cells as obtained from histological images. These descriptors, which include the pair correlation function, structure factor and various nearest neighbor functions, quantify how pairs of cell nuclei are correlated in space in various ways. We map the centroids of the cell nuclei into point distributions to show that while commonly used local spatial statistics (e.g., cell areas and number of neighboring cells cannot clearly distinguish spatial correlations in distributions of normal and abnormal cell nuclei, their salient structural features are captured very well by the aforementioned microstructural descriptors. We show that the tumorous cells pack more densely than normal cells and exhibit stronger effective repulsions between any pair of cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that brain gliomas are organized in a collective way rather than randomly on intermediate and large length scales. The existence of nontrivial spatial correlations between the abnormal cells strongly supports the view that cancer is not an unorganized collection of malignant cells but rather a complex emergent integrated system.

  15. Improving spatial resolution in fiber Raman distributed temperature sensor by using deconvolution algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhang; Xue Feng; Wei Zhang; Xiaoming Liu

    2009-01-01

    The deconvolution algorithm is adopted on the fiber Raman distributed temperature sensor (FRDTS) to improve the spatial resolution without reducing the pulse width of the light source. Numerical simulation shows that the spatial resolution is enhanced by four times using the frequency-domain deconvolution algorithm with high temperature accuracy. In experiment, a spatial resolution of 15 m is realized using a master oscillator power amplifier light source with 300-ns pulse width. In addition, the dispersion-induced limitation of the minimum spatial resolution achieved by deconvolution algorithm is analyzed. The results indicate that the deconvolution algorithm is a beneficial complement for the FRDTS to realize accurate locating and temperature monitoring for sharp temperature variations.

  16. Spatial Statistical Network Models for Stream and River Temperature in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional temperature models are needed for characterizing and mapping stream thermal regimes, establishing reference conditions, predicting future impacts and identifying critical thermal refugia. Spatial statistical models have been developed to improve regression modeling techn...

  17. Spatial Modeling Tools for Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    34 iv Figure 5.1: Computational results for a diffusion problem on planar square thin film............ 36 Figure 5.2... Wisc . Open Microscopy Env. Pre-CoBi Model Lib. CFDRC CoBi Tools CFDRC CoBi Tools Simulation Environment JigCell Tools Figure 4.1: Cell biology

  18. Assessment of Temperature and Elevation Controls on Spatial Variability of Rainfall in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Javari

    2017-01-01

    With rainfall changes, hydrological process variability increases. This study predicts the potential effects of temperature and topography characteristics on rainfall spatial variability. Temperature and topography were considered as two effective factors that may influence monthly rainfall. This study uses rainfall and temperature data from 174 synoptic and climatic stations and 39,055 rain, elevation and temperature points extracted by ArcGIS10.3 over the 40 years (1975–2014). In this study...

  19. Intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Daniel J L; Atkinson, Alan; Brandon, Nigel P; Skinner, Stephen J

    2008-08-01

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), typified by developers such as Siemens Westinghouse and Rolls-Royce, operate in the temperature region of 850-1000 degrees C. For such systems, very high efficiencies can be achieved from integration with gas turbines for large-scale stationary applications. However, high temperature operation means that the components of the stack need to be predominantly ceramic and high temperature metal alloys are needed for many balance-of-plant components. For smaller scale applications, where integration with a heat engine is not appropriate, there is a trend to move to lower temperatures of operation, into the so-called intermediate temperature (IT) range of 500-750 degrees C. This expands the choice of materials and stack geometries that can be used, offering reduced system cost and, in principle, reducing the corrosion rate of stack and system components. This review introduces the IT-SOFC and explains the advantages of operation in this temperature regime. The main advances made in materials chemistry that have made IT operation possible are described and some of the engineering issues and the new opportunities that reduced temperature operation affords are discussed. This tutorial review examines the advances being made in materials and engineering that are allowing solid oxide fuel cells to operate at lower temperature. The challenges and advantages of operating in the so-called 'intermediate temperature' range of 500-750 degrees C are discussed and the opportunities for applications not traditionally associated with solid oxide fuel cells are highlighted. This article serves as an introduction for scientists and engineers interested in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells and the challenges and opportunities of reduced temperature operation.

  20. Spatial Variation of the Correlated Color Temperature of Lightning Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Shimoji, Nobuaki; Aoyama, Ryoma

    2014-01-01

    In present work, we propose the analysis method of lightning based on the color analysis. We analyzed the digital still images in which the cloud-to-ground (CG) and intracloud (IC) lightning flashes are shown. Applying some digital image processing techniques, we extracted lightning channels. Then, the correlated color temperature (CCT) of the extracted lightning channels was obtained by mapping digital pixels of the extracted lightning channels to CIE 1931 xy-chromaticity diagram. Our result...

  1. Small-Scale Spatial Analysis of In Situ Sea Temperature throughout a Single Coral Patch Reef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin D. Gorospe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal stress can cause geographically widespread bleaching events, during which corals become decoupled from their symbiotic algae. Bleaching, however, also can occur on smaller, spatially patchy scales, with corals on the same reef exhibiting varying bleaching responses. Thus, to investigate fine spatial scale sea temperature variation, temperature loggers were deployed on a 4 m grid on a patch reef in Kāne'ohe Bay, Oahu, Hawai‘i to monitor in situ, benthic temperature every 50 minutes at 85 locations for two years. Temperature variation on the reef was characterized using several summary indices related to coral thermal stress. Results show that stable, biologically significant temperature variation indeed exists at small scales and that depth, relative water flow, and substrate cover and type were not significant drivers of this variation. Instead, finer spatial and temporal scale advection processes at the benthic boundary layer are likely responsible. The implications for coral ecology and conservation are discussed.

  2. High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleige, Michael

    This thesis presents the development and application of electrochemical half-cell setups to study the catalytic reactions taking place in High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (HTPEM-FCs): (i) a pressurized electrochemical cell with integrated magnetically coupled rotating disk electrode...... (RDE) and (ii) a gas diffusion electrode (GDE) setup designed for experiments in conc. H3PO4. The pressurized cell is demonstrated by tests on polycrystalline platinum electrodes up to 150 ºC. Functionality of the RDE system is proved studying the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at temperatures up...... to 140 ºC and oxygen pressures up to ~100 bar at room temperature. The GDE cell is successfully tested at 130 ºC by means of direct oxidation of methanol and ethanol, respectively. In the second part of the thesis, the emphasis is put on the ORR in H3PO4 with particular focus on the mass transport...

  3. The role of spatial scale and background climate in the latitudinal temperature response to deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; De Noblet-Ducoudré, Nathalie; Davin, Edouard L.; Motesharrei, Safa; Zeng, Ning; Li, Shuangcheng; Kalnay, Eugenia

    2016-03-01

    Previous modeling and empirical studies have shown that the biophysical impact of deforestation is to warm the tropics and cool the extratropics. In this study, we use an earth system model of intermediate complexity to investigate how deforestation on various spatial scales affects ground temperature, with an emphasis on the latitudinal temperature response and its underlying mechanisms. Results show that the latitudinal pattern of temperature response depends nonlinearly on the spatial extent of deforestation and the fraction of vegetation change. Compared with regional deforestation, temperature change in global deforestation is greatly amplified in temperate and boreal regions but is dampened in tropical regions. Incremental forest removal leads to increasingly larger cooling in temperate and boreal regions, while the temperature increase saturates in tropical regions. The latitudinal and spatial patterns of the temperature response are driven by two processes with competing temperature effects: decrease in absorbed shortwave radiation due to increased albedo and decrease in evapotranspiration. These changes in the surface energy balance reflect the importance of the background climate in modifying the deforestation impact. Shortwave radiation and precipitation have an intrinsic geographical distribution that constrains the effects of biophysical changes and therefore leads to temperature changes that are spatially varying. For example, wet (dry) climate favors larger (smaller) evapotranspiration change; thus, warming (cooling) is more likely to occur. Our analysis reveals that the latitudinal temperature change largely results from the climate conditions in which deforestation occurs and is less influenced by the magnitude of individual biophysical changes such as albedo, roughness, and evapotranspiration efficiency.

  4. Tannat grape composition responses to spatial variability of temperature in an Uruguay's coastal wine region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourment, Mercedes; Ferrer, Milka; González-Neves, Gustavo; Barbeau, Gérard; Bonnardot, Valérie; Quénol, Hervé

    2017-05-01

    Spatial variability of temperature was studied in relation to the berry basic composition and secondary compounds of the Tannat cultivar at harvest from vineyards located in Canelones and Montevideo, the most important wine region of Uruguay. Monitoring of berries and recording of temperature were performed in 10 commercial vineyards of Tannat situated in the southern coastal wine region of the country for three vintages (2012, 2013, and 2014). Results from a multivariate correlation analysis between berry composition and temperature over the three vintages showed that (1) Tannat responses to spatial variability of temperature were different over the vintages, (2) correlations between secondary metabolites and temperature were higher than those between primary metabolites, and (3) correlation values between berry composition and climate variables increased when ripening occurred under dry conditions (below average rainfall). For a particular studied vintage (2013), temperatures explained 82.5% of the spatial variability of the berry composition. Daily thermal amplitude was found to be the most important spatial mode of variability with lower values recorded at plots nearest to the sea and more exposed to La Plata River. The highest levels in secondary compounds were found in berries issued from plots situated as far as 18.3 km from La Plata River. The increasing knowledge of temperature spatial variability and its impact on grape berry composition contributes to providing possible issues to adapt grapevine to climate change.

  5. Modelling of tandem cell temperature coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, D.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the temperature dependence of the basic solar-cell operating parameters for a GaInP/GaAs series-connected two-terminal tandem cell. The effects of series resistance and of different incident solar spectra are also discussed.

  6. The kinetics of low-temperature spatial atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poodt, P.W.G.; Illiberi, A.; Roozeboom, F.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial atomic layer deposition can be used as a high-throughput manufacturing technique in functional thin film deposition for applications such as flexible electronics. This, however, requires low-temperature deposition processes. We have investigated the kinetics of low-temperature (< 100 C) spat

  7. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600

  8. Spatial distribution of temperature in the low-temperature geothermal Euganean field (NE Italy): a simulated annealing approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, Paolo; Trevisani, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Geologia, Paleontologia e Geofisica, Universita degli Studi di Padova, via Giotto 1, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2005-10-01

    The spatial distribution of groundwater temperatures in the low-temperature (60-86{sup o}C) geothermal Euganean field of northeastern Italy has been studied using a geostatistical approach. The data set consists of 186 temperatures measured in a fractured limestone reservoir, over an area of 8km{sup 2}. Investigation of the spatial continuity by means of variographic analysis revealed the presence of anisotropies that are apparently related to the particular geologic structure of the area. After inference of variogram models, a simulated annealing procedure was used to perform conditional simulations of temperature in the domain being studied. These simulations honor the data values and reproduce the spatial continuity inferred from the data. Post-processing of the simulations permits an assessment of temperature uncertainties. Maps of estimated temperatures, interquartile range, and of the probability of exceeding a prescribed 80{sup o}C threshold were also computed. The methodology described could prove useful when siting new wells in a geothermal area. (author)

  9. A spatially resolved ion temperature diagnostic for the National Ignition Facilitya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, G. P.; Finch, J. P.; King, N. S. P.; Morgan, G. L.; Oertel, J. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Johnson, D. E.

    2008-10-01

    The concepts and initial development efforts for a spatially resolved ion temperature diagnostic are described. The diagnostic is intended for Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility and is an integration of neutron aperture imaging and ion temperature techniques. The neutron imaging technique is extended by recording tomographic projections of the radiation-to-light converter on a streak camera. The streak record is used to calculate images at multiple times during the arrival of the thermally broadened 14.1MeV neutron flux. The resulting set of images is used to determine the spatially resolved ion temperature.

  10. A spatially resolved ion temperature diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, G P; Finch, J P; King, N S P; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C; Johnson, D E

    2008-10-01

    The concepts and initial development efforts for a spatially resolved ion temperature diagnostic are described. The diagnostic is intended for Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility and is an integration of neutron aperture imaging and ion temperature techniques. The neutron imaging technique is extended by recording tomographic projections of the radiation-to-light converter on a streak camera. The streak record is used to calculate images at multiple times during the arrival of the thermally broadened 14.1 MeV neutron flux. The resulting set of images is used to determine the spatially resolved ion temperature.

  11. Spatially patterned matrix elasticity directs stem cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; DelRio, Frank W.; Ma, Hao; Killaars, Anouk R.; Basta, Lena P.; Kyburz, Kyle A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the functional role of matrix mechanics in regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation processes. However, it is largely unknown how subcellular, spatial mechanical variations in the local extracellular environment mediate intracellular signal transduction and direct cell fate. Here, the effect of spatial distribution, magnitude, and organization of subcellular matrix mechanical properties on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) function was investigated. Exploiting a photodegradation reaction, a hydrogel cell culture substrate was fabricated with regions of spatially varied and distinct mechanical properties, which were subsequently mapped and quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The variations in the underlying matrix mechanics were found to regulate cellular adhesion and transcriptional events. Highly spread, elongated morphologies and higher Yes-associated protein (YAP) activation were observed in hMSCs seeded on hydrogels with higher concentrations of stiff regions in a dose-dependent manner. However, when the spatial organization of the mechanically stiff regions was altered from a regular to randomized pattern, lower levels of YAP activation with smaller and more rounded cell morphologies were induced in hMSCs. We infer from these results that irregular, disorganized variations in matrix mechanics, compared with regular patterns, appear to disrupt actin organization, and lead to different cell fates; this was verified by observations of lower alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and higher expression of CD105, a stem cell marker, in hMSCs in random versus regular patterns of mechanical properties. Collectively, this material platform has allowed innovative experiments to elucidate a novel spatial mechanical dosing mechanism that correlates to both the magnitude and organization of spatial stiffness.

  12. Imaging Cells in Flow Cytometer Using Spatial-Temporal Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuanyuan; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2015-08-18

    Flow cytometers measure fluorescence and light scattering and analyze multiple physical characteristics of a large population of single cells as cells flow in a fluid stream through an excitation light beam. Although flow cytometers have massive statistical power due to their single cell resolution and high throughput, they produce no information about cell morphology or spatial resolution offered by microscopy, which is a much wanted feature missing in almost all flow cytometers. In this paper, we invent a method of spatial-temporal transformation to provide flow cytometers with cell imaging capabilities. The method uses mathematical algorithms and a spatial filter as the only hardware needed to give flow cytometers imaging capabilities. Instead of CCDs or any megapixel cameras found in any imaging systems, we obtain high quality image of fast moving cells in a flow cytometer using PMT detectors, thus obtaining high throughput in manners fully compatible with existing cytometers. To prove the concept, we demonstrate cell imaging for cells travelling at a velocity of 0.2 m/s in a microfluidic channel, corresponding to a throughput of approximately 1,000 cells per second.

  13. The role of spatial scale and background climate in the latitudinal temperature response to deforestation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y.; N. de Noblet-Ducoudré; E. L. Davin; Zeng, N.; S. Motesharrei; Li, S.C.; Kalnay, E.

    2015-01-01

    Previous modeling and empirical studies have shown that the biophysical impact of deforestation is to warm the tropics and cool the extra-tropics. In this study, we use an earth system model to investigate how deforestation at various spatial scales affects ground temperature, with an emphasis on the latitudinal temperature response and its underlying mechanisms. Results show that the latitudinal pattern of temperature response depends non-linearly on the s...

  14. Regression-based air temperature spatial prediction models: an example from Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Szymanowski

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A Geographically Weighted Regression ? Kriging (GWRK algorithm, based on the local Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR, is applied for spatial prediction of air temperature in Poland. Hengl's decision tree for selecting a suitable prediction model is extended for varying spatial relationships between the air temperature and environmental predictors with an assumption of existing environmental dependence of analyzed temperature variables. The procedure includes the potential choice of a local GWR instead of the global Multiple Linear Regression (MLR method for modeling the deterministic part of spatial variation, which is usual in the standard regression (residual kriging model (MLRK. The analysis encompassed: testing for environmental correlation, selecting an appropriate regression model, testing for spatial autocorrelation of the residual component, and validating the prediction accuracy. The proposed approach was performed for 69 air temperature cases, with time aggregation ranging from daily to annual average air temperatures. The results show that, irrespective of the level of data aggregation, the spatial distribution of temperature is better fitted by local models, and hence is the reason for choosing a GWR instead of the MLR for all variables analyzed. Additionally, in most cases (78% there is spatial autocorrelation in the residuals of the deterministic part, which suggests that the GWR model should be extended by ordinary kriging of residuals to the GWRK form. The decision tree used in this paper can be considered as universal as it encompasses either spatially varying relationships of modeled and explanatory variables or random process that can be modeled by a stochastic extension of the regression model (residual kriging. Moreover, for all cases analyzed, the selection of a method based on the local regression model (GWRK or GWR does not depend on the data aggregation level, showing the potential versatility of the technique.

  15. Exploring the relation between spatial configuration of buildings and remotely sensed temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, S. W.; Zheng, B.; Kaplan, S.; Huang, H.

    2013-12-01

    While the relationship between fractional cover of buildings and the UHI has been well studied, relationships of how spatial arrangements (e.g., clustered, dispersed) of buildings influence urban warming are not well understood. Since a diversity of spatial patterns can be observed under the same percentage of buildings cover, it is of great interest and importance to investigate the amount of variation in certain urban thermal feature such as surface temperature that is accounted for by the inclusion of spatial arrangement component. The various spatial arrangements of buildings cover can give rise to different urban thermal behaviors that may not be uncovered with the information of buildings fraction only, but can be captured to some extent using spatial analysis. The goal of this study is to examine how spatial arrangements of buildings influence and shape surface temperature in different urban settings. The study area selected is the Las-Vegas metropolitan area in Nevada, located in the Mojave Desert. An object-oriented approach was used to identify buildings using a Geoeye-1 image acquired on October 12, 2011. A spatial autocorrelation technique (i.e., Moran's I) that can measure spatial pattern (clustered, dispersed) was used to determine spatial configuration of buildings. A daytime temperature layer in degree Celsius, generated from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image, was integrated with Moran's I values of building cover and building fractions to achieve the goals set in the study. To avoid uncertainty and properly evaluate if spatial pattern of buildings has an impact on urban warming, the relation between Moran's I values and surface temperatures was observed at different levels according to their fractions (e.g., 0-0.1, 0.5-0.6, 0.9-1). There is a negative correlation exists between spatial pattern of buildings and surface temperatures implying that dispersed building arrangements elevate surface temperatures

  16. High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleige, Michael

    This thesis presents the development and application of electrochemical half-cell setups to study the catalytic reactions taking place in High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (HTPEM-FCs): (i) a pressurized electrochemical cell with integrated magnetically coupled rotating disk electrode...... of dissolved oxygen. A potential step method (hydrodynamic chronocoulometry) is evaluated for simultaneous measurement of diffusivity and solubility of oxygen by means of RDE. Finally, the ORR tests are extended to conc. H3PO4 at more relevant working temperatures and under increased oxygen pressure. Direct...... of platinumphosphoric acid. At room temperature, a relative slow ORR hindering process is active, which requires using a fast method (cyclic voltammetry with high scan rate / hydrodynamic chronocoulometry) to accurately measure the diffusion limited currents, and thus, oxygen diffusivity and solubility. In conc. H3PO4...

  17. Understanding the complexity of temperature dynamics in Xinjiang, China, from multitemporal scale and spatial perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Yaning; Li, Weihong; Liu, Zuhan; Wei, Chunmeng; Tang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Based on the observed data from 51 meteorological stations during the period from 1958 to 2012 in Xinjiang, China, we investigated the complexity of temperature dynamics from the temporal and spatial perspectives by using a comprehensive approach including the correlation dimension (CD), classical statistics, and geostatistics. The main conclusions are as follows (1) The integer CD values indicate that the temperature dynamics are a complex and chaotic system, which is sensitive to the initial conditions. (2) The complexity of temperature dynamics decreases along with the increase of temporal scale. To describe the temperature dynamics, at least 3 independent variables are needed at daily scale, whereas at least 2 independent variables are needed at monthly, seasonal, and annual scales. (3) The spatial patterns of CD values at different temporal scales indicate that the complex temperature dynamics are derived from the complex landform.

  18. Understanding the Complexity of Temperature Dynamics in Xinjiang, China, from Multitemporal Scale and Spatial Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the observed data from 51 meteorological stations during the period from 1958 to 2012 in Xinjiang, China, we investigated the complexity of temperature dynamics from the temporal and spatial perspectives by using a comprehensive approach including the correlation dimension (CD, classical statistics, and geostatistics. The main conclusions are as follows (1 The integer CD values indicate that the temperature dynamics are a complex and chaotic system, which is sensitive to the initial conditions. (2 The complexity of temperature dynamics decreases along with the increase of temporal scale. To describe the temperature dynamics, at least 3 independent variables are needed at daily scale, whereas at least 2 independent variables are needed at monthly, seasonal, and annual scales. (3 The spatial patterns of CD values at different temporal scales indicate that the complex temperature dynamics are derived from the complex landform.

  19. Local temperatures inferred from plant communities suggest strong spatial buffering of climate warming across Northern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenoir, Jonathan; Graae, Bente Jessen; Aarrestad, Per Arild

    2013-01-01

    data, Ellenberg temperature indicator values, locally measured temperatures (LmT) and globally interpolated temperatures (GiT) in a modelling framework to infer biologically relevant temperature conditions from plant assemblages within T). We...... then assessed: (1) CiT range (thermal variability) within 1-km(2) units; (2) the relationship between CiT range and topographically and geographically derived predictors at 1-km resolution; and (3) whether spatial turnover in CiT is greater than spatial turnover in GiT within 100-km(2) units. Ellenberg...... temperature indicator values in combination with plant assemblages explained 46-72% of variation in LmT and 92-96% of variation in GiT during the growing season (June, July, August). Growing-season CiT range within 1-km(2) units peaked at 60-65°N and increased with terrain roughness, averaging 1.97 °C (SD = 0...

  20. Spatial validation of large scale land surface models against monthly land surface temperature patterns using innovative performance metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Julian; Siemann, Amanda; Stisen, Simon; Sheffield, Justin

    2016-04-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are a key tool to enhance process understanding and to provide predictions of the terrestrial hydrosphere and its atmospheric coupling. Distributed LSMs predict hydrological states and fluxes, such as land surface temperature (LST) or actual evapotranspiration (aET), at each grid cell. LST observations are widely available through satellite remote sensing platforms that enable comprehensive spatial validations of LSMs. In spite of the availability of LST data, most validation studies rely on simple cell to cell comparisons and thus do not regard true spatial pattern information. This study features two innovative spatial performance metrics, namely EOF- and connectivity-analysis, to validate predicted LST patterns by three LSMs (Mosaic, Noah, VIC) over the contiguous USA. The LST validation dataset is derived from global High-Resolution-Infrared-Radiometric-Sounder (HIRS) retrievals for a 30 year period. The metrics are bias insensitive, which is an important feature in order to truly validate spatial patterns. The EOF analysis evaluates the spatial variability and pattern seasonality, and attests better performance to VIC in the warm months and to Mosaic and Noah in the cold months. Further, more than 75% of the LST variability can be captured by a single pattern that is strongly driven by air temperature. The connectivity analysis assesses the homogeneity and smoothness of patterns. The LSMs are most reliable at predicting cold LST patterns in the warm months and vice versa. Lastly, the coupling between aET and LST is investigated at flux tower sites and compared against LSMs to explain the identified LST shortcomings.

  1. Development of Spatial Distribution Patterns by Biofilm Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Bak Christensen, Bjarke

    2015-01-01

    Confined spatial patterns of microbial distribution are prevalent in nature, such as in microbial mats, soil communities, and water stream biofilms. The symbiotic two-species consortium of Pseudomonas putida and Acinetobacter sp. C6, originally isolated from a creosote-polluted aquifer, has evolved...... a distinct spatial organization in the laboratory that is characterized by an increased fitness and productivity. In this consortium, P. putida is reliant on microcolonies formed by Acinetobacter sp. C6 — to which it attaches. Here we describe the processes that lead to the microcolony......-pattern by Acinetobacter sp. C6. Ecological spatial pattern analyses revealed that the microcolonies were not entirely randomly distributed, and instead arranged in a uniform pattern. Detailed time-lapse confocal microscopy at the single cell level demonstrated that the spatial pattern was the result of an intriguing self...

  2. Summer Temperature and Spatial Variability of all-Cause Mortality in Surat City, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, S K; Desai, V K; Jariwala, P; Desai, H; Naik, A; Joseph, A

    2017-01-01

    Ample information is available on extreme heat associated mortality for few Indian cities, but scant literature is available on effect of temperature on spatial variability of all-cause mortality for coastal cities. To assess the effect of daily maximum temperature, relative humidity and heat index on spatial variability of all-cause mortality for summer months (March to May) from 2014 to 2015 for the urban population of Surat (coastal) city. Retrospective analysis of the all-cause mortality data with temperature and humidity was performed on a total of 9,237 deaths for 184 summer days (2014-2015). Climatic and all-cause mortality data were obtained through Tutiempo website and Surat Municipal Corporation respectively. Bivariate analysis performed through SPSS. Mean daily mortality was estimated at 50.2 ± 8.5 for the study period with a rise of 20% all-cause mortality at temperature ≥ 40°C and rise of 10% deaths per day during extreme danger level (HI: > 54°C) days. Spatial (Zone wise) analysis revealed rise of 61% all-cause mortality for Southeast and 30% for East zones at temperature ≥ 40°C. All-cause mortality increased on high summer temperature days. Presence of spatial variation in all-cause mortality provided the evidence for high risk zones. Findings may be helpful in designing the interventions at micro level.

  3. Summer temperature and spatial variability of all-cause mortality in Surat city, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Rathi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ample information is available on extreme heat associated mortality for few Indian cities, but scant literature is available on effect of temperature on spatial variability of all-cause mortality for coastal cities. Objective: To assess the effect of daily maximum temperature, relative humidity and heat index on spatial variability of all-cause mortality for summer months (March to May from 2014 to 2015 for the urban population of Surat (coastal city. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of the all-cause mortality data with temperature and humidity was performed on a total of 9,237 deaths for 184 summer days (2014-2015. Climatic and all-cause mortality data were obtained through Tutiempo website and Surat Municipal Corporation respectively. Bivariate analysis performed through SPSS. Observations: Mean daily mortality was estimated at 50.2 ± 8.5 for the study period with a rise of 20% all-cause mortality at temperature ≥ 40°C and rise of 10% deaths per day during extreme danger level (HI: > 54°C days. Spatial (Zone wise analysis revealed rise of 61% all-cause mortality for Southeast and 30% for East zones at temperature ≥ 40°C. Conclusions: All-cause mortality increased on high summer temperature days. Presence of spatial variation in all-cause mortality provided the evidence for high risk zones. Findings may be helpful in designing the interventions at micro level.

  4. Spatial Variation of Temperature and Precipitation in Bhutan and Links to Vegetation and Land Cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugyen Dorji

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bhutan, located in the Himalayas in the South Asian monsoon region, has extremely high variation in elevation, climatic conditions, and land cover despite its small geographical area, as well as great biodiversity. This paper provides the first comprehensive description of climatic conditions in Bhutan. It assesses the spatial variation of temperature and precipitation across the country and evaluates the causes for this variation based on daily data from 70 meteorological stations that have been recording data for time spans ranging from 3 to 21 years. Temperature and precipitation show contrasting spatial variation, with temperature primarily affected by elevation and precipitation by latitude. Models were developed using mixed linear regression models to predict seasonal and annual mean temperature and precipitation based on geographical location. Using linear regression we found that temperatures changed by about 0.5°C for every 100 m of change in elevation, with lapse rates being highest in February, March, and November and lowest from June to August. The lapse rate was highest for minimum temperatures and lowest for maximum temperatures, with the greatest difference during winter. The spatial distribution of precipitation was mainly controlled by latitude, having a quadratic relationship, with the highest rates in the southern foothills of the Himalayan range and the lowest at midlatitudes. The land cover is affected by topography and local climate, with variations in temperature being a main deciding factor for vegetation types; most human settlements and associated land uses are concentrated at lower elevations.

  5. Cell Matrix Remodeling Ability Shown by Image Spatial Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Li Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling is a critical step of many biological and pathological processes. However, most of the studies to date lack a quantitative method to measure ECM remodeling at a scale comparable to cell size. Here, we applied image spatial correlation to collagen second harmonic generation (SHG images to quantitatively evaluate the degree of collagen remodeling by cells. We propose a simple statistical method based on spatial correlation functions to determine the size of high collagen density area around cells. We applied our method to measure collagen remodeling by two breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, which display different degrees of invasiveness, and a fibroblast cell line (NIH/3T3. We found distinct collagen compaction levels of these three cell lines by applying the spatial correlation method, indicating different collagen remodeling ability. Furthermore, we quantitatively measured the effect of Latrunculin B and Marimastat on MDA-MB-231 cell line collagen remodeling ability and showed that significant collagen compaction level decreases with these treatments.

  6. Spatial colonization of microbial cells on the rhizoplane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Xavier; Eickhorst, Thilo; Nunan, Naoise; Kaiser, Christina; Woebken, Dagmar; Schmidt, Hannes

    2017-04-01

    The rhizoplane is the region where the root surface is in contact with soil and corresponds to the inner limit of the rhizosphere. At the rhizoplane level, plants exchange elements with the surrounding soil and the rhizoplane can therefore be considered as the region that drives nutrient movement and transformation in the rhizosphere. The rhizoplane differs in many respects from the bulk soil due to the far larger supply of substrates derived from the roots, with far greater microbial cell densities and reduced levels of diversity (Philippot et al., 2013). This is likely to result in completely different interaction profiles among microorganisms which may affect rhizosphere biogeochemistry. While the diversity of microorganisms associated with the rhizosphere and on the rhizoplane is getting increasing attention, knowledge on the spatial organisation of this diversity is still scarce. We therefore aimed at investigating the spatial arrangement of microbial rhizoplane colonization to increase our understanding of potential interaction dynamics within soil-microbe-plant interfaces. To study the spatial distribution of microbial cells on roots we cultivated rice plants in water-logged paddy soil. Root samples were taken three months after germination. After removing adhering rhizosphere soil the root samples were chemically fixed and prepared for CARD-FISH (Schmidt & Eickhorst, 2014). For hybridization, the oligonucleotide probes EUB I-III (Daims et al., 1999) were applied to cover the majority of bacteria colonizing the rhizoplane. Root segments were then subjected to confocal laser scanning microscopy where triplicate image stacks of 10 µm thickness (0.5 µm layer distance) were acquired per region of interest (ROI). ROIs were defined as distances from the root tip (0, 5, 10, 15 mm) and corresponded to the root tip, elongation zone, and zone of maturation. Image stacks were processed using ImageJ software to extract microbial cells spatial coordinates, as well as

  7. High temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Scott; M. Mamlouk

    2006-01-01

    One of the major issues limiting the introduction of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is the low temperature of operation which makes platinum-based anode catalysts susceptible to poisoning by the trace amount of CO, inevitably present in reformed fuel. In order to alleviate the problem of CO poisoning and improve the power density of the cell, operating at temperature above 100 ℃ is preferred. Nafion(R) -type perfluorosulfonated polymers have been typically used for PEMFC. However, the conductivity of Nafion(R) -type polymers is not high enough to be used for fuel cell operations at higher temperature ( > 90 ℃) and atmospheric pressure because they dehydrate under these condition.An additional problem which faces the introduction of PEMFC technology is that of supplying or storing hydrogen for cell operation,especially for vehicular applications. Consequently the use of alternative fuels such as methanol and ethanol is of interest, especially if this can be used directly in the fuel cell, without reformation to hydrogen. A limitation of the direct use of alcohol is the lower activity of oxidation in comparison to hydrogen, which means that power densities are considerably lower. Hence to improve activity and power output higher temperatures of operation are preferable. To achieve this goal, requires a new polymer electrolyte membrane which exhibits stability and high conductivity in the absence of liquid water.Experimental data on a polybenzimidazole based PEMFC were presented. A simple steady-state isothermal model of the fuel cell is also used to aid in fuel cell performance optimisation. The governing equations involve the coupling of kinetic, ohmic and mass transport. This paper also considers the advances made in the performance of direct methanol and solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells and considers their limitations in relation to the source and type of fuels to be used.

  8. Spatial organization and time dependence of Jupiter's tropospheric temperatures, 1980-1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn S.; Friedson, A. James; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padmavati A.; Caldwell, John; Hammel, Heidi B.; Baines, Kevin H.; Bergstralh, Jay T.; Martin, Terry Z.; West, Robert A.; Veeder, Glenn J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The spatial organization and time dependence of Jupiter's temperature near 250-millibar pressure were measured through a jovian year by imaging thermal emission at 18 micrometers. The temperature field is influenced by seasonal radiative forcing, and its banded organization is closely correlated with the visible cloud field. Evidence was found for a quasi-periodic oscillation of temperatures in the Equatorial Zone, a correlation between tropospheric and stratospheric waves in the North Equatorial Belt, and slowly moving thermal features in the North and South Equatorial Belts. There appears to be no common relation between temporal changes of temperature and changes in the visual albedo of the various axisymmetric bands.

  9. On the spatial behavior in two-temperature generalized thermoelastic theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranville, Alain; Quintanilla, Ramon

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the spatial behavior of the solutions of two generalized thermoelastic theories with two temperatures. To be more precise, we focus on the Green-Lindsay theory with two temperatures and the Lord-Shulman theory with two temperatures. We prove that a Phragmén-Lindelöf alternative of exponential type can be obtained in both cases. We also describe how to obtain a bound on the amplitude term by means of the boundary conditions for the Green-Lindsay theory with two temperatures.

  10. The role of spatial scale and background climate in the latitudinal temperature response to deforestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous modeling and empirical studies have shown that the biophysical impact of deforestation is to warm the tropics and cool the extra-tropics. In this study, we use an earth system model to investigate how deforestation at various spatial scales affects ground temperature, with an emphasis on the latitudinal temperature response and its underlying mechanisms. Results show that the latitudinal pattern of temperature response depends non-linearly on the spatial extent of deforestation and the fraction of vegetation change. Compared with regional deforestation, temperature change in global deforestation is greatly amplified in temperate and boreal regions, but is dampened in tropical regions. Incremental forest removal leads to increasingly larger cooling in temperate and boreal regions, while the temperature increase saturates in tropical regions. The latitudinal and spatial patterns of the temperature response are driven by two processes with competing temperature effects: decreases in absorbed shortwave radiation due to increased albedo and decreases in evapotranspiration. These changes in the surface energy balance reflect the importance of the background climate on modifying the deforestation impact. Shortwave radiation and precipitation have an intrinsic geographical distribution that constrains the effects of biophysical changes and therefore leads to temperature changes that are spatially varying. For example, wet (dry climate favors larger (smaller evapotranspiration change, thus warming (cooling is more likely to occur. Further analysis on the contribution of individual biophysical factors (albedo, roughness, and evapotranspiration efficiency reveals that the latitudinal signature embodied in the temperature change probably result from the background climate conditions rather than the initial biophysical perturbation.

  11. Spatial analysis of future East Asian seasonal temperature using two regional climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yura; Jun, Mikyoung; Min, Seung-Ki; Suh, Myoung-Seok; Kang, Hyun-Suk

    2016-05-01

    CORDEX-East Asia, a branch of the coordinated regional climate downscaling experiment (CORDEX) initiative, provides high-resolution climate simulations for the domain covering East Asia. This study analyzes temperature data from regional climate models (RCMs) participating in the CORDEX - East Asia region, accounting for the spatial dependence structure of the data. In particular, we assess similarities and dissimilarities of the outputs from two RCMs, HadGEM3-RA and RegCM4, over the region and over time. A Bayesian functional analysis of variance (ANOVA) approach is used to simultaneously model the temperature patterns from the two RCMs for the current and future climate. We exploit nonstationary spatial models to handle the spatial dependence structure of the temperature variable, which depends heavily on latitude and altitude. For a seasonal comparison, we examine changes in the winter temperature in addition to the summer temperature data. We find that the temperature increase projected by RegCM4 tends to be smaller than the projection of HadGEM3-RA for summers, and that the future warming projected by HadGEM3-RA tends to be weaker for winters. Also, the results show that there will be a warming of 1-3°C over the region in 45 years. More specifically, the warming pattern clearly depends on the latitude, with greater temperature increases in higher latitude areas, which implies that warming may be more severe in the northern part of the domain.

  12. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowrishankar, T R; Stewart, Donald A; Martin, Gregory T; Weaver, James C

    2004-11-17

    Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1) surface contact heating and (2) spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42 degrees C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45 degrees C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. The heat transport system model of the skin was solved by exploiting the mathematical

  13. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gregory T

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. Methods We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1 surface contact heating and (2 spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42°C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. Results The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45°C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. Conclusions The heat transport system model of the

  14. High temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is a comprehensive review of high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). PEMFCs are the preferred fuel cells for a variety of applications such as automobiles, cogeneration of heat and power units, emergency power and portable electronics. The first 5 chapters...... of the book describe rationalization and illustration of approaches to high temperature PEM systems. Chapters 6 - 13 are devoted to fabrication, optimization and characterization of phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole membranes, the very first electrolyte system that has demonstrated the concept...... of and motivated extensive research activity in the field. The last 11 chapters summarize the state-of-the-art of technological development of high temperature-PEMFCs based on acid doped PBI membranes including catalysts, electrodes, MEAs, bipolar plates, modelling, stacking, diagnostics and applications....

  15. Spatial variation in near-ground radiation and low temperature. Interactions with forest vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennow, K.

    1997-10-01

    Low temperature has a large impact on the survival and distribution of plants. Interactive effects with high irradiance lead to cold-induced photo inhibition, which may impact on the establishment and growth of tree seedlings. In this thesis, novel approaches are applied for relating the spatial variability in low temperature and irradiance to photosynthetic performance and growth of tree seedlings, and for modelling the micro- and local-scale spatial variations in low temperature for heterogeneous terrain. The methodologies include the development and use of a digital image analysis system for hemispherical photographs, the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and statistical methods, field data acquisition of meteorological elements, plant structure, growth and photosynthetic performance. Temperature and amounts of intercepted direct radiant energy for seedlings on clear days (IDRE) were related to chlorophyll a fluorescence, and the dry weight of seedlings. The combination of increased IDRE with reduced minimum temperatures resulted in persistent and strong photo inhibition as the season progressed, with likely implications for the establishment of tree seedlings at forest edges, and within shelter wood. For models of spatial distribution of low air temperature, the sky view factor was used to parameterize the radiative cooling, whilst drainage, ponding and stagnation of cold air, and thermal properties of the ground were all considered. The models hint at which scales and processes govern the development of spatial variations in low temperature for the construction of corresponding mechanistic models. The methodology is well suited for detecting areas that will be frost prone after clearing of forest and for comparing the magnitudes of impacts on low air temperature of forest management practices, such as shelter wood and soil preparation. The results can be used to formulate ground rules for use in practical forestry 141 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  16. Spatial Evolutionary Games of Interaction among Generic Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Lars Arve; Sumpter, David J.T.; Alsner, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Evolutionary game models of cellular interactions have shown that heterogeneity in the cellular genotypic composition is maintained through evolution to stable coexistence of growth-promoting and non-promoting cell types. We generalise these mean-field models and relax the assumption of perfect...... mixing of cells by instead implementing an individual-based model that includes the stochastic and spatial effects likely to occur in tumours. The scope for coexistence of genotypic strategies changed with the inclusion of explicit space and stochasticity. The spatial models show some interesting...... deviations from their mean-field counterparts, for example the possibility of altruistic (paracrine) cell strategies to thrive. Such effects can however, be highly sensitive to model implementation and the more realistic models with semi-synchronous and stochastic updating do not show evolution of altruism...

  17. GIS based spatial distribution of Temperature and Chlorophyll-a along Kalpakkam, southeast coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthulakshmi.AL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly describes the status of Temperature and Chlorophyll-a trend in Kalpakkam Coast, discusses its ecological and temperature impacts recommending measures to achieve long term sustainability using advanced tools like Geographic Information System (GIS. Present study reveals the monthly spatial distribution of Temperature and Chlorophyll-a at Kalpakkam. Transect based in-situ Temperature and Chlorophyll-a collected at 200m, 500m and 1 km distance into the sea was interpolated using the Inverse Distance Weightage (IDW method in ARC GIS. Data revealed the extent of spatial distribution of thermal effluent in Kalpakkam. It could be found that temperature range of 26.2 – 31.9°C provided substantial Chlorophyll-a concentration between 0.8 – 2.9 mg/m3 for surface and bottom waters. Further, increase of Chlorophyll-a levels did not lead to higher productivity. Combined temperature and chlorophyll a showed little synergistic effects. It is concluded that the effect of thermal discharge from the power plant into the receiving water body is quite localized and productivity of the coastal waters are not affected. From the results obtained, the spatial data has been found to be useful in determining zones of safe use of seawater and to understand the extent of relationship between the relatable parameters.

  18. Spatial-temporal analysis of building surface temperatures in Hung Hom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ying; Shen, Yueqian

    2015-12-01

    This thesis presents a study on spatial-temporal analysis of building surface temperatures in Hung Hom. Observations were collected from Aug 2013 to Oct 2013 at a 30-min interval, using iButton sensors (N=20) covering twelve locations in Hung Hom. And thermal images were captured in PolyU from 05 Aug 2013 to 06 Aug 2013. A linear regression model of iButton and thermal records is established to calibrate temperature data. A 3D modeling system is developed based on Visual Studio 2010 development platform, using ArcEngine10.0 component, Microsoft Access 2010 database and C# programming language. The system realizes processing data, spatial analysis, compound query and 3D face temperature rendering and so on. After statistical analyses, building face azimuths are found to have a statistically significant relationship with sun azimuths at peak time. And seasonal building temperature changing also corresponds to the sun angle and sun azimuth variations. Building materials are found to have a significant effect on building surface temperatures. Buildings with lower albedo materials tend to have higher temperatures and larger thermal conductivity material have significant diurnal variations. For the geographical locations, the peripheral faces of campus have higher temperatures than the inner faces during day time and buildings located at the southeast are cooler than the western. Furthermore, human activity is found to have a strong relationship with building surface temperatures through weekday and weekend comparison.

  19. Nanometer thickness laser ablation for spatial control of cell attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thissen, H.; Hayes, J. P.; Kingshott, P.; Johnson, G.; Harvey, E. C.; Griesser, H. J.

    2002-10-01

    We demonstrate here a new method to control the location of cells on surfaces in two dimensions, which can be applied to a number of biomedical applications including diagnostic tests and tissue engineered medical devices. Two-dimensional control over cell attachment is achieved by generation of a spatially controlled surface chemistry that allows control over protein adsorption, a process which mediates cell attachment. Here, we describe the deposition of thin allylamine plasma polymer coatings on silicon wafer and perfluorinated poly(ethylene-co-propylene) substrates, followed by grafting of a protein resistant layer of poly(ethylene oxide). Spatially controlled patterning of the surface chemistry was achieved in a fast, one-step procedure by nanometer thickness controlled laser ablation using a 248 nm excimer laser. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to confirm the production of surface chemistry patterns with a resolution of approximately 1 µm, which is significantly below the dimensions of a single mammalian cell. Subsequent adsorption of the extracellular matrix proteins collagen I and fibronectin followed by cell culture experiments using bovine corneal epithelial cells confirmed that cell attachment is controlled by the surface chemistry pattern. The method is an effective tool for use in a number of in vitro and in vivo applications.

  20. Spatial patterns in temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in China: Estimation with inverse modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Tao; SHI PeiJun; HUI DaFeng; LUO YiQi

    2009-01-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q_(10)) is an important parameter in modeling the effects of global warming on ecosystem carbon release. Experimental studies of soil respiration have ubiquitously indicated that Q_(10) has high spatial heterogeneity. However, most biogeochemical models still use a constant Q_(10) in projecting future climate change and no spatial pattern of Q_(10) values at large scales has been derived. In this study, we conducted an inverse modeling analysis to retrieve the spatial pattern of Q_(10) in China at 8 km spatial resolution by assimilating data of soil organic carbon into a process-based terrestrial carbon model (CASA model). The results indicate that the optimized Q_(10) values are spatially heterogeneous and consistent to the values derived from soil respiration observations. The mean Q_(10). values of different soil types range from 1.09 to 2.38, with the highest value in volcanic soil,and the lowest value in cold brown calcic soil. The spatial pattern of Q_(10) is related to environmental factors, especially precipitation and top soil organic carbon content. This study demonstrates that inverse modeling is a useful tool in deriving the spatial pattern of Q_(10) at large scales, with which being incorporated into biogeochemical models, uncertainty in the projection of future carbon dynamics could be potentially reduced.

  1. Spatial patterns in temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in China: Estimation with inverse modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q10) is an important parameter in modeling the effects of global warming on ecosystem carbon release. Experimental studies of soil respiration have ubiquitously indicated that Q10 has high spatial heterogeneity. However, most biogeochemical models still use a constant Q10 in projecting future climate change and no spatial pattern of Q10 values at large scales has been derived. In this study, we conducted an inverse modeling analysis to retrieve the spatial pattern of Q10 in China at 8 km spatial resolution by assimilating data of soil organic carbon into a proc-ess-based terrestrial carbon model (CASA model). The results indicate that the optimized Q10 values are spatially heterogeneous and consistent to the values derived from soil respiration observations. The mean Q10 values of different soil types range from 1.09 to 2.38, with the highest value in volcanic soil, and the lowest value in cold brown calcic soil. The spatial pattern of Q10 is related to environmental factors, especially precipitation and top soil organic carbon content. This study demonstrates that inverse modeling is a useful tool in deriving the spatial pattern of Q10 at large scales, with which being incorporated into biogeochemical models, uncertainty in the projection of future carbon dynamics could be potentially reduced.

  2. Development of Spatial Distribution Patterns by Biofilm Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagensen, Janus A J; Hansen, Susse K; Christensen, Bjarke B; Pamp, Sünje J; Molin, Søren

    2015-09-01

    Confined spatial patterns of microbial distribution are prevalent in nature, such as in microbial mats, soil communities, and water stream biofilms. The symbiotic two-species consortium of Pseudomonas putida and Acinetobacter sp. strain C6, originally isolated from a creosote-polluted aquifer, has evolved a distinct spatial organization in the laboratory that is characterized by an increased fitness and productivity. In this consortium, P. putida is reliant on microcolonies formed by Acinetobacter sp. C6, to which it attaches. Here we describe the processes that lead to the microcolony pattern by Acinetobacter sp. C6. Ecological spatial pattern analyses revealed that the microcolonies were not entirely randomly distributed and instead were arranged in a uniform pattern. Detailed time-lapse confocal microscopy at the single-cell level demonstrated that the spatial pattern was the result of an intriguing self-organization: small multicellular clusters moved along the surface to fuse with one another to form microcolonies. This active distribution capability was dependent on environmental factors (carbon source and oxygen) and historical contingency (formation of phenotypic variants). The findings of this study are discussed in the context of species distribution patterns observed in macroecology, and we summarize observations about the processes involved in coadaptation between P. putida and Acinetobacter sp. C6. Our results contribute to an understanding of spatial species distribution patterns as they are observed in nature, as well as the ecology of engineered communities that have the potential for enhanced and sustainable bioprocessing capacity.

  3. Spatial control of the energy metabolism of yeast cells through electrolytic generation of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnke, Christian; Mair, Thomas; Witte, Hartmut; Reiher, Antje; Hauser, Marcus J B; Krost, Alois

    2009-11-03

    The metabolic dynamics of yeast cells is controlled by electric pulses delivered through a spatially extended yeast cell/Au electrode interface. Concomitant with voltage pulses, oxygen is generated electrolytically at the electrode surface and delivered to the cells. The generation of oxygen was investigated in dependence of the applied voltage, width of the voltage pulses and temperature of the electrolytic solution. The local oxygen pulses at the electrodes lead to a transient activation of the aerobic energy metabolism of the yeast cells causing a perturbation in their energy balance. The effect of these local perturbations on the temporal dynamics of glycolysis in yeast cells is quantified in dependence of the energy state of cells.

  4. Novel Low Temperature Solid State Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chonglin [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Nash, Patrick [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Liu, Jian [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Collins, Gregory [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2010-03-23

    We have successfully fabricated (PrBa)Co2O5+δ and (LaBa)Co2O5+δ epitaxial thin film on various single crystal substrates. Physical and electrochemical properties characterizations were carried out. Highly conductive oxygen-deficient double perovskite LnBaCo2O5+ thin films were grown on single crystal (001) SrTiO3 (STO), (001) MgO, (001) LaAlO3 and (110) NdGaO3} substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Microstructure studies from synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. High temperature transport properties was carried in different atmosphere (O2,Air, N2) up to ~900K. Resistance response of (LaBa)Co2O5+δ epitaxial thin film was characterized in oxygen, nitrogen and 4% hydrogen over a wide range of temperature from 400 C up to 800 C. To determine the electrode performance and oxygen exchange kinetics of PrBaCo2O5+δ, multi-layered thin film based half cell was deposited on LaAlO3(001) substrate. The temperature dependence of the resistance of this half cell structure was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) within different temperature and gas environments. Anode supported fuel cells, with GCO:YSZ multilayer thin film as electrolyte and PBCO thin film as electrode, are fabricated on tape casted NiO/YSZ substrate. Full cell performance is characterized up to 800 C.

  5. Modelling cell polarization driven by synthetic spatially graded Rac activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Holmes

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Rac is known to be an important regulator of cell polarization, cytoskeletal reorganization, and motility of mammalian cells. In recent microfluidic experiments, HeLa cells endowed with appropriate constructs were subjected to gradients of the small molecule rapamycin leading to synthetic membrane recruitment of a Rac activator and direct graded activation of membrane-associated Rac. Rac activation could thus be triggered independent of upstream signaling mechanisms otherwise responsible for transducing activating gradient signals. The response of the cells to such stimulation depended on exceeding a threshold of activated Rac. Here we develop a minimal reaction-diffusion model for the GTPase network alone and for GTPase-phosphoinositide crosstalk that is consistent with experimental observations for the polarization of the cells. The modeling suggests that mutual inhibition is a more likely mode of cell polarization than positive feedback of Rac onto its own activation. We use a new analytical tool, Local Perturbation Analysis, to approximate the partial differential equations by ordinary differential equations for local and global variables. This method helps to analyze the parameter space and behaviour of the proposed models. The models and experiments suggest that (1 spatially uniform stimulation serves to sensitize a cell to applied gradients. (2 Feedback between phosphoinositides and Rho GTPases sensitizes a cell. (3 Cell lengthening/flattening accompanying polarization can increase the sensitivity of a cell and stabilize an otherwise unstable polarization.

  6. Permafrost temperature and active-layer thickness of Yakutia with 0.5 degree spatial resolution for model evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Beer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on the map of landscapes and permafrost conditions in Yakutia (Merzlotno-landshaftnaya karta Yakutskoi0 ASSR, Gosgeodeziya SSSR, 1991, rasterized maps of permafrost temperature and active-layer thickness of Yakutia, East Siberia were derived. The mean and standard deviation at 0.5 degree grid cell size are estimated by assigning a probability density function at 0.001 degree spatial resolution. The gridded datasets can be accessed at the PANGAEA repository (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.808240. Spatial pattern of both variables are dominated by a climatic gradient from north to south, and by mountains and the soil type distribution. Uncertainties are highest in mountains and in the isolated permafrost zone in the south. The maps are best suited as a benchmark for land surface models which include a permafrost module.

  7. Permafrost temperature and active-layer thickness of Yakutia with 0.5-degree spatial resolution for model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, C.; Fedorov, A. N.; Torgovkin, Y.

    2013-09-01

    Based on the map of landscapes and permafrost conditions in Yakutia (Merzlotno-landshaftnaya karta Yakutskoi0 ASSR, Gosgeodeziya SSSR, 1991), rasterized maps of permafrost temperature and active-layer thickness of Yakutia, East Siberia were derived. The mean and standard deviation at 0.5-degree grid cell size are estimated by assigning a probability density function at 0.001-degree spatial resolution. The gridded datasets can be accessed at the PANGAEA repository (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.808240). Spatial pattern of both variables are dominated by a climatic gradient from north to south, and by mountains and the soil type distribution. Uncertainties are highest in mountains and in the sporadic permafrost zone in the south. The maps are best suited as a benchmark for land surface models which include a permafrost module.

  8. Polysilicon-based flexible temperature sensor for brain monitoring with high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhizhen; Li, Chunyan; Hartings, Jed; Ghosh, Sthitodhi; Narayan, Raj; Ahn, Chong

    2017-02-01

    Temperature is one of the most important variables in brain monitoring, since changes of focal brain temperature are closely coupled to cerebral physiology and pathophysiological phenomena in injured brain. In this work, a highly accurate temperature sensor with polysilicon thermistors has been developed on flexible polyimide for monitoring brain temperature with high spatial resolution. The temperature sensors have a response time of 1.5 s and sensitivity of  -0.0031 °C-1. Thermal hysteresis of the sensor in the physiological temperature range of 30-45 °C was found to be less than 0.1 °C. With silicon nitride as the passivation layer, the temperature sensor exhibits drift of less than 0.3 °C for 3 d in water. In vivo tests of the sensor show a low noise level of 0.025  ±  0.03 °C, and the expected transient increases in cortical temperature associated with cortical spreading depolarization. The temperature sensor developed in this work is suitable for monitoring brain temperature with the desired high sensitivity and resolution.

  9. Spatial temperature mapping within polymer nanocomposites undergoing ultrafast photothermal heating via gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Somsubhra; Wu, Wei-Chen; Xu, Chao; Tracy, Joseph B.; Gundogdu, Kenan; Bochinski, Jason R.; Clarke, Laura I.

    2014-11-01

    Heat emanates from gold nanorods (GNRs) under ultrafast optical excitation of the localized surface plasmon resonance. The steady state nanoscale temperature distribution formed within a polymer matrix embedded with GNRs undergoing pulsed femtosecond photothermal heating is determined experimentally using two independent ensemble optical techniques. Physical rotation of the nanorods reveals the average local temperature of the polymer melt in the immediate spatial volume surrounding each rod while fluorescence of homogeneously-distributed perylene molecules monitors temperature over sample regions at larger distances from the GNRs. Polarization-sensitive fluorescence measurements of the perylene probes provide an estimate of the average size of the quasi-molten region surrounding each nanorod (that is, the boundary between softened polymer and solid material as the temperature decreases radially away from each particle) and distinguishes the steady state temperature in the solid and melt regions. Combining these separate methods enables nanoscale spatial mapping of the average steady state temperature distribution caused by ultrafast excitation of the GNRs. These observations definitively demonstrate the presence of a steady-state temperature gradient and indicate that localized heating via the photothermal effect within materials enables nanoscale thermal manipulations without significantly altering the bulk sample temperature in these systems. These quantitative results are further verified by re-orienting nanorods within a solid polymer nanofiber without inducing any morphological changes to the highly temperature-sensitive nanofiber surface. Temperature differences of 70-90 °C were observed over a distances of ~100 nm.Heat emanates from gold nanorods (GNRs) under ultrafast optical excitation of the localized surface plasmon resonance. The steady state nanoscale temperature distribution formed within a polymer matrix embedded with GNRs undergoing pulsed

  10. High spatial resolution Land Surface Temperature estimation over urban areas with uncertainty indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitraka, Zina; Lazzarini, Michele; Doxani, Georgia; Del Frate, Fabio; Ghedira, Hosni

    2014-05-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable for studying land surface processes and interactions with the atmosphere and it is listed in the Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) identified by international organizations like Global Climate Observing System. It is a valuable source of information for a range of topics in earth sciences and essential for urban climatology studies. Detailed, frequent and accurate LST mapping may support various urban applications, like the monitoring of urban heat island. Currently, no spaceborne instruments provide frequent thermal imagery at high spatial resolution, thus there is a need for synergistic algorithms that combine different kinds of data for LST retrieval. Moreover, knowing the confidence level of any satellite-derived product is highly important to the users, especially when referred to the urban environment, which is extremely heterogenic. The developed method employs spatial-spectral unmixing techniques for improving the spatial resolution of thermal measurements, combines spectral library information for emissivity estimation and applies a split-window algorithm to estimate LST with an uncertainty estimation inserted in the final product. A synergistic algorithm that utilizes the spatial information provided by visible and near-infrared measurements with more frequent low resolution thermal measurements provides excellent means for high spatial resolution LST estimation. Given the low spatial resolution of thermal infrared sensors, the measured radiation is a combination of radiances of different surface types. High spatial resolution information is used to quantify the different surface types in each pixel and then the measured radiance of each pixel is decomposed. The several difficulties in retrieving LST from space measurements, mainly related to the temperature-emissivity coupling and the atmospheric contribution to the thermal measurements, and the measurements themselves, introduce uncertainties in the final

  11. Intensity, frequency and spatial configuration of winter temperature inversions in the closed La Brevine valley, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitasse, Yann; Klein, Geoffrey; Kirchner, James W.; Rebetez, Martine

    2016-09-01

    Some of the world's valleys are famous for having particularly cold microclimates. The La Brevine valley, in the Swiss Jura Mountains, holds the record for the lowest temperature ever measured in an inhabited location in Switzerland. We studied cold air pools (CAPs) in this valley during the winter of 2014-2015 using 44 temperature data loggers distributed between 1033 and 1293 m asl. Our goals were to (i) describe the climatic conditions under which CAPs form in the valley, (ii) examine the spatial configuration and the temperature structure of the CAPs and (iii) quantify how often temperature inversions occur in winter using long-term series of temperature from the valley floor. Our results show that CAPs occurred every second night, on average, during the winter of 2014-2015 and were typically formed under cloudless, windless and high-pressure conditions. Strong temperature inversions up to 28 °C were detected between the valley floor and the surrounding hills. The spatial temperature structure of the CAPs varies among the different inversion days, with the upper boundary of the cold pool generally situated at about 1150 m asl. Although mean temperatures have increased in this area over the period 1960-2015 in connection with climate change, the occurrences of extreme cold temperatures did not decrease in winter and are highly correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation and the East Atlantic indices. This suggests that CAPs in sheltered valleys are largely decoupled from the free atmosphere temperature and will likely continue to occur in the next decades under warmer conditions.

  12. Spatial Characteristics of Geothermal Spring Temperatures and Discharge Rates in the Tatun Volcanic Area, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, C. S.; Liu, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    The Tatun volcanic area is the only potential volcanic geothermal region in the Taiwan island, and abundant in hot spring resources owing to stream water mixing with fumarolic gases. According to the Meinzer's classification, spring temperatures and discharge rates are the most important properties for characterizing spring classifications. This study attempted to spatially characterize spring temperatures and discharge rates in the Tatun volcanic area, Taiwanusing indicator kriging (IK). First, data on spring temperatures and discharge rates, which were collected from surveyed data of the Taipei City Government, were divided into high, moderate and low categories according to spring classification criteria, and the various categories were regarded as estimation thresholds. Then, IK was adopted to model occurrence probabilities of specified temperatures and discharge rates in springs, and to determine their classifications based on estimated probabilities. Finally, nine combinations were obtained from the classifications of temperatures and discharge rates in springs. Moreover, the combinations and features of spring water were spatially quantified according to seven sub-zones of spring utilization. A suitable and sustainable development strategy of the spring area was proposed in each sub-zone based on probability-based combinations and features of spring water.The research results reveal that the probability-based classifications using IK provide an excellent insight in exploring the uncertainty of spatial features in springs, and can provide Taiwanese government administrators with detailed information on sustainable spring utilization and conservation in the overexploited spring tourism areas. The sub-zones BT (Beitou), RXY (Rd. Xingyi), ZSL (Zhongshanlou) and LSK (Lengshuikeng) with high or moderate discharge rates are suitable to supply spring water for tourism hotels.Local natural hot springs should be planned in the sub-zones DBT (Dingbeitou), ZSL, XYK

  13. Spatial distribution of temperature extremes changes in Poland in 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jędruszkiewicz, Joanna

    2013-04-01

    There is a general agreement that changes in the frequency or intensity of extreme weather and climate events have profound impacts on both human society and the economy. In the recent years a numerous weather events have affected human health and caused enormous economic losses. A long-lasting heat waves influence society far more than rare occurred extreme high temperature. On the other hand a winter warming and frequent exceedance of 0°C during winter will be disruptive i.e. for the wheel transport and roads condition in Poland. This work is focused on the study of the spatial diversity of minimum and maximum temperature in 21st century in Poland. Firstly the shift in distribution (PDF) and cumulative distribution (CDF) of the daily maximum temperature in summer and minimum temperature in winter between control and scenario periods was compared among different part of the country. Secondly the changes in the characteristic percentiles of the temperature extremes were analyzed. Furthermore the spatial changes in the duration and frequency of the heat waves in Poland were studied. Moreover the future prediction of changes in characteristic days as hot days (Tmax≥30°C), summer days (Tmax≥25°C), tropical nights (Tmin≥20°C), frost days (Tmin<0°C), etc. were spatially compared. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) is expected to change remarkably in 21st century depending on the area of Poland. The daily minimum and maximum 2-meter temperature date have been obtained from seven different regional climate models and corrected by quintile mapping method afterwards. The Polish station data for the control period have been gained from the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management, National Research Institute.

  14. Comparison of different statistical modelling approaches for deriving spatial air temperature patterns in an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Annette; Beck, Christoph; Breitner, Susanne; Cyrys, Josef; Geruschkat, Uta; Jacobeit, Jucundus; Kühlbach, Benjamin; Kusch, Thomas; Richter, Katja; Schneider, Alexandra; Umminger, Robin; Wolf, Kathrin

    2017-04-01

    Frequently spatial variations of air temperature of considerable magnitude occur within urban areas. They correspond to varying land use/land cover characteristics and vary with season, time of day and synoptic conditions. These temperature differences have an impact on human health and comfort directly by inducing thermal stress as well as indirectly by means of affecting air quality. Therefore, knowledge of the spatial patterns of air temperature in cities and the factors causing them is of great importance, e.g. for urban planners. A multitude of studies have shown statistical modelling to be a suitable tool for generating spatial air temperature patterns. This contribution presents a comparison of different statistical modelling approaches for deriving spatial air temperature patterns in the urban environment of Augsburg, Southern Germany. In Augsburg there exists a measurement network for air temperature and humidity currently comprising 48 stations in the city and its rural surroundings (corporately operated by the Institute of Epidemiology II, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health and the Institute of Geography, University of Augsburg). Using different datasets for land surface characteristics (Open Street Map, Urban Atlas) area percentages of different types of land cover were calculated for quadratic buffer zones of different size (25, 50, 100, 250, 500 m) around the stations as well for source regions of advective air flow and used as predictors together with additional variables such as sky view factor, ground level and distance from the city centre. Multiple Linear Regression and Random Forest models for different situations taking into account season, time of day and weather condition were applied utilizing selected subsets of these predictors in order to model spatial distributions of mean hourly and daily air temperature deviations from a rural reference station. Furthermore, the different model setups were

  15. Cartographic system for spatial distribution analysis of corneal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkidi, G; Márquez, J; García-Ruiz, M; Díaz-Cintra, S; Graue, E

    1994-07-01

    A combined cartographic and morphometric endothelium analyser has been developed by integrating the HISTO 2000 histological imaging and analysis system with a prototype human corneal endothelium analyser. The complete system allows the elaboration and analysis of cartographies of corneal endothelial tissue, and hence the in vitro study of the spatial distribution of corneal endothelial cells, according to their regional morphometric characteristics (cell size and polygonality). The global cartographic reconstruction is obtained by sequential integration of the data analysed for each microscopic field. Subsequently, the location of each microscopically analysed field is referred to its real position on the histologic preparation by means of X-Y co-ordinates; both are provided by micrometric optoelectronic sensors installed on the optical microscope stage. Some cartographies of an excised human corneal keratoconus button in vitro are also presented. These cartographic images allow a macroscopic view of endothelial cells analysed microscopically. Parametric colour images show the spatial distribution of endothelial cells, according to their specific morphometric parameters, and exhibit the variability in size and cellular shape which depend on the analysed area.

  16. Seasonal Spatial Patterns of Surface Water Temperature, Surface Heat Fluxes and Meteorological Forcing Over Lake Geneva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani Rahaghi, A.; Lemmin, U.; Bouffard, D.; Riffler, M.; Wunderle, S.; Barry, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    In many lakes, surface heat flux (SHF) is the most important component controlling the lake's energy content. Accurate methods for the determination of SHF are valuable for water management, and for use in hydrological and meteorological models. Large lakes, not surprisingly, are subject to spatially and temporally varying meteorological conditions, and hence SHF. Here, we report on an investigation for estimating the SHF of a large European lake, Lake Geneva. We evaluated several bulk formulas to estimate Lake Geneva's SHF based on different data sources. A total of 64 different surface heat flux models were realized using existing representations for different heat flux components. Data sources to run the models included meteorological data (from an operational numerical weather prediction model, COSMO-2) and lake surface water temperature (LSWT, from satellite imagery). Models were calibrated at two points in the lake for which regular depth profiles of temperature are available, and which enabled computation of the total heat content variation. The latter, computed for 03.2008-12.2012, was the metric used to rank the different models. The best calibrated model was then selected to calculate the spatial distribution of SHF. Analysis of the model results shows that evaporative and convective heat fluxes are the dominant terms controlling the spatial pattern of SHF. The former is significant in all seasons while the latter plays a role only in fall and winter. Meteorological observations illustrate that wind-sheltering, and to some extent relative humidity variability, are the main reasons for the observed large-scale spatial variability. In addition, both modeling and satellite observations indicate that, on average, the eastern part of the lake is warmer than the western part, with a greater temperature contrast in spring and summer than in fall and winter whereas the SHF spatial splitting is stronger in fall and winter. This is mainly due to negative heat flux

  17. Temporal and spatial variation in temperature experienced by macrofauna at Main Endeavour hydrothermal vent field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond W.; Robert, Katleen; Matabos, Marjolaine; Bates, Amanda E.; Juniper, S. Kim

    2015-12-01

    A significant focus of hydrothermal vent ecological studies has been to understand how species cope with various stressors through physiological tolerance and biochemical resistance. Yet, the environmental conditions experienced by vent species have not been well characterized. This objective requires continuous observations over time intervals that can capture environmental variability at scales that are relevant to animals. We used autonomous temperature logger arrays (four roughly parallel linear arrays of 12 loggers spaced every 10-12 cm) to study spatial and temporal variations in the thermal regime experienced by hydrothermal vent macrofauna at a diffuse flow vent. Hourly temperatures were recorded over eight months from 2010 to 2011 at Grotto vent in the Main Endeavour vent field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, a focus area of the Ocean Networks Canada cabled observatory. The conspicuous animal assemblages in video footage contained Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms, gastropods (primarily Lepetodrilus fucensis), and polychaetes (polynoid scaleworms and the palm worm Paralvinella palmiformis). Two dimensional spatial gradients in temperature were generally stable over the deployment period. The average temperature recorded by all arrays, and in some individual loggers, revealed distinctive fluctuations in temperature that often corresponded with the tidal cycle. We postulate that this may be related to changes in bottom currents or fluctuations in vent discharge. A marked transient temperature increase lasting over a period of days was observed in April 2011. While the distributions and behavior of Juan de Fuca Ridge vent invertebrates may be partially constrained by environmental temperature and temperature tolerance, except for the one transient high-temperature event, observed fluid temperatures were generally similar to the thermal preferences for some species, and typically well below lethal temperatures for all species. Average temperatures of the four arrays

  18. A study of temperature's spatial distribution in Neuquen River valley through satellite imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Gloria Cogliati

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks into the spatial distribution of brightness and surface temperature through the use of LAND SAT7 ETM+ and NO AA-AVHRR satellite imagery in the cultivated valley of the Neuquén river. Studying the spatial distribution of temperatures in an area with a somewhat complex terrain requires the use of a great density of meteorological measurements. It is often impossible to obtain the right density of the argometeorological network due to the high installation and maintenance costs. Remote sensors provide a large flow of information in various resolutions, at considerably lower costs. Determining the valley's warm and cold zones would allow for more efficient irrigation and frost-protection methods, and it would provide tools to improve the area's productive planning.

  19. Nonuniformity correction of infrared cameras by reading radiance temperatures with a spatially nonhomogeneous radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutschwager, Berndt; Hollandt, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel method of nonuniformity correction (NUC) of infrared cameras and focal plane arrays (FPA) in a wide optical spectral range by reading radiance temperatures and by applying a radiation source with an unknown and spatially nonhomogeneous radiance temperature distribution. The benefit of this novel method is that it works with the display and the calculation of radiance temperatures, it can be applied to radiation sources of arbitrary spatial radiance temperature distribution, and it only requires sufficient temporal stability of this distribution during the measurement process. In contrast to this method, an initially presented method described the calculation of NUC correction with the reading of monitored radiance values. Both methods are based on the recording of several (at least three) images of a radiation source and a purposeful row- and line-shift of these sequent images in relation to the first primary image. The mathematical procedure is explained in detail. Its numerical verification with a source of a predefined nonhomogeneous radiance temperature distribution and a thermal imager of a predefined nonuniform FPA responsivity is presented.

  20. Flux trapping in superconducting accelerating cavities during cooling down with a spatial temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    During the cool-down of a superconducting accelerating cavity, a magnetic flux is trapped as quantized vortices, which yield additional dissipation and contribute to the residual resistance. Recently, cooling down with a large spatial temperature gradient attracts much attention for successful reductions of trapped vortices. The purpose of the present paper is to propose a model to explain the observed efficient flux expulsions and the role of spatial temperature gradient during the cool-down of cavity. In the vicinity of a region with a temperature close to the critical temperature Tc,the critical fields are strongly suppressed and can be smaller than the ambient magnetic field. A region with a lower critical field smaller than the ambient field is in the vortex state. As a material is cooled down, a region with a temperature close Tc associating the vortex state domain sweeps and passes through the material. In this process, vortices contained in the vortex state domain are trapped by pinning centers that r...

  1. Temporally increasing spatial synchrony of North American temperature and bird populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Walter D.; Liebhold, Andrew M.

    2016-06-01

    The ecological impacts of modern global climate change are detectable in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from shifts in species ranges to changes in community composition and human disease dynamics. So far, however, little attention has been given to temporal changes in spatial synchrony--the coincident change in abundance or value across the landscape--despite the importance of environmental synchrony as a driver of population trends and the central role of environmental variability in population rescue and extinction. Here we demonstrate that across North America, spatial synchrony of a significant proportion of 49 widespread North American wintering bird species has increased over the past 50 years--the period encompassing particularly intense anthropogenic effects in climate--paralleling significant increases in spatial synchrony of mean maximum air temperature. These results suggest the potential for increased spatial synchrony in environmental factors to be affecting a wide range of ecological phenomena. These effects are likely to vary, but for North American wildlife species, increased spatial synchrony driven by environmental factors may be the basis for a previously unrecognized threat to their long-term persistence in the form of more synchronized population dynamics reducing the potential for demographic rescue among interacting subpopulations.

  2. Spatial dependence of diurnal temperature range trends on precipitation from 1950 to 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Liming [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Dai, Aiguo [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Dai, Yongjiu [Beijing Normal University, School of Geography, Beijing (China); Vose, Russell S. [National Climatic Data Center, Climate Analysis Branch, Asheville, NC (United States); Zou, Cheng-Zhi [NOAA/NESDIS, Office of Research and Applications, Camp Springs, MD (United States); Tian, Yuhong [IMSG at NOAA/NESDIS, Camp Springs, MD (United States); Chen, Haishan [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Nanjing (China)

    2009-02-15

    This paper analyzes the spatial dependence of annual diurnal temperature range (DTR) trends from 1950-2004 on the annual climatology of three variables: precipitation, cloud cover, and leaf area index (LAI), by classifying the global land into various climatic regions based on the climatological annual precipitation. The regional average trends for annual minimum temperature (T{sub min}) and DTR exhibit significant spatial correlations with the climatological values of these three variables, while such correlation for annual maximum temperature (T{sub max}) is very weak. In general, the magnitude of the downward trend of DTR and the warming trend of T{sub min} decreases with increasing precipitation amount, cloud cover, and LAI, i.e., with stronger DTR decreasing trends over drier regions. Such spatial dependence of T{sub min} and DTR trends on the climatological precipitation possibly reflects large-scale effects of increased global greenhouse gases and aerosols (and associated changes in cloudiness, soil moisture, and water vapor) during the later half of the twentieth century. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of dynamically downscaled extreme temperature using a spatially-aggregated generalized extreme value (GEV) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Han, Yuefeng; Stein, Michael L.; Kotamarthi, Veerabhadra R.; Huang, Whitney K.

    2016-11-01

    The weather research and forecast (WRF) model downscaling skill in extreme maximum daily temperature is evaluated by using the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution. While the GEV distribution has been used extensively in climatology and meteorology for estimating probabilities of extreme events, accurately estimating GEV parameters based on data from a single pixel can be difficult, even with fairly long data records. This work proposes a simple method assuming that the shape parameter, the most difficult of the three parameters to estimate, does not vary over a relatively large region. This approach is applied to evaluate 31-year WRF-downscaled extreme maximum temperature through comparison with North American regional reanalysis (NARR) data. Uncertainty in GEV parameter estimates and the statistical significance in the differences of estimates between WRF and NARR are accounted for by conducting a novel bootstrap procedure that makes no assumption of temporal or spatial independence within a year, which is especially important for climate data. Despite certain biases over parts of the United States, overall, WRF shows good agreement with NARR in the spatial pattern and magnitudes of GEV parameter estimates. Both WRF and NARR show a significant increase in extreme maximum temperature over the southern Great Plains and southeastern United States in January and over the western United States in July. The GEV model shows clear benefits from the regionally constant shape parameter assumption, for example, leading to estimates of the location and scale parameters of the model that show coherent spatial patterns.

  4. Spatial Distribution and Pattern Persistence of Surface Soil Moisture and Temperature Over Prairie from Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daoyi; Engman, Edwin T.; Brutsaert, Wilfried

    1997-01-01

    Images remotely sensed aboard aircraft during FIFE, namely, PBMR (microwave) soil moisture and NS001 thermal infrared surface temperature, were mapped on the same coordinate system covering the 20 km x 20 km experimental site. For both kinds of image data, the frequency distributions were close to symmetric, and the area average compared reasonably well with the ground based measurements. For any image on any given day, the correlation between the remotely sensed values and collocated ground based measurements over the area was usually high in the case of NS001 surface temperature but low in the case of PBMR soil moisture. On the other hand, at any given flux station the correlation between the PBMR and gravimetric soil moisture over all available days was usually high. The correlation pixel by pixel between images of PBMR on different days was generally high. The preservation of the spatial patterns of soil moisture was also evaluated by considering the correlation station by station between ground-based soil moisture measurements on different days; no persistence of spatial pattern was apparent during wet periods, but a definite pattern gradually established itself toward the end of each drying episode. The spatial patterns of surface temperature revealed by NS001 were not preserved even within a single day. The cross-correlations among the two kinds of images and the vegetation index NDVI were normally poor. This suggests that different processes of vegetation growth, and of the near-surface soil water and energy budgets.

  5. Bivariate spatial analysis of temperature and precipitation from general circulation models and observation proxies

    KAUST Repository

    Philbin, R.

    2015-05-22

    This study validates the near-surface temperature and precipitation output from decadal runs of eight atmospheric ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) against observational proxy data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis temperatures and Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) precipitation data. We model the joint distribution of these two fields with a parsimonious bivariate Matérn spatial covariance model, accounting for the two fields\\' spatial cross-correlation as well as their own smoothnesses. We fit output from each AOGCM (30-year seasonal averages from 1981 to 2010) to a statistical model on each of 21 land regions. Both variance and smoothness values agree for both fields over all latitude bands except southern mid-latitudes. Our results imply that temperature fields have smaller smoothness coefficients than precipitation fields, while both have decreasing smoothness coefficients with increasing latitude. Models predict fields with smaller smoothness coefficients than observational proxy data for the tropics. The estimated spatial cross-correlations of these two fields, however, are quite different for most GCMs in mid-latitudes. Model correlation estimates agree well with those for observational proxy data for Australia, at high northern latitudes across North America, Europe and Asia, as well as across the Sahara, India, and Southeast Asia, but elsewhere, little consistent agreement exists.

  6. On spatial distribution of proton radiation belt from solar cell degradation of Akebono satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, W.; Miyoshi, Y.; Matsuoka, A.

    2013-12-01

    Solar cells on any satellite degrade gradually due to severe space radiation environment. We found a fair correlation between the decrease rate of solar cell output current of Akebono satellite orbiting in the inner magnetosphere and trapped proton flux from AP8 model between 1989 and 1992. After 1993, presumably as a result of long-term degradation, variation of solar cell output seems more susceptible to other causes such as high temperature effect, and simple monthly averaged data show no significant relation between them. One of possible causes for the temperature variation of the solar cells is terrestrial heat radiation with changing orientation of solar cell panels towards the earth and another is solar radiation varied with eccentric earth's orbit around the sun. In order to remove the possible temperature effect, we sort the data expected to be least affected by the terrestrial heat radiation from the orbit conditions, and also analyze difference of the output current for a month from that for the same month in the previous year. The analysis method leads us to successfully track a continuous correlation between the decease rate of solar cell output and energetic trapped proton flux up to 1996. We also discuss the best-fitted spatial distribution of energetic protons from comparison with model calculations.

  7. Spatial and temporal modeling of wetland surface temperature using Landsat-8 imageries in Sulduz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Eisavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wetland Surface Temperature (WST maps are an increasingly important parameter to understand the extensive range of existing processes in wetlands. The Wetlands placed in neighborhoods of agricultural and industrial lands are exposed to more chemical pollutants and pesticides that can lead to spatial and temporal variations of their surface temperature. Therefore, more studies are required for temperature modeling and the management and conservation of these variations in their ecosystem. Landsat 8 time series data of Sulduz region, Western Azerbaijan province, Iran were used in this study. The WST was derived using a mono-window algorithm after implementation of atmospheric correction. The NDVI (Normalized Differential Vegetation Index threshold method was also employed to determine the surface emissivity. Our findings show that the WST experienced extensive spatial and temporal variations. It reached its maximum value in June and also experienced the highest mean in the same month. In this research, August (2013.12.08 had a lowest spatial standard deviation regarding surface temperature and June (2013.06.28 had the highest one. Wetlands' watersides adjacent to industrial zones have a higher surface temperature than the middle lands of these places. The map obtained from the WST variance over time can be exploited to reveal thermal stable and unstable zones. The outcome demonstrates that land use, land cover effectively contribute to wetland ecosystem health. The results are useful in the water management, preventive efforts against drying of wetland and evapotranspiration modeling. The approach employed in this research indicates that remote sensing is a valuable, low-cost and stable tool for thermal monitoring of wetlands health.

  8. Near surface spatially averaged air temperature and wind speed determined by acoustic travel time tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Raabe

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic travel time tomography is presented as a possibility for remote monitoring of near surface airtemperature and wind fields. This technique provides line-averaged effective sound speeds changing with temporally and spatially variable air temperature and wind vector. The effective sound speed is derived from the travel times of sound signals which propagate at defined paths between different acoustic sources and receivers. Starting with the travel time data a tomographic algorithm (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique, SIRT is used to calculate area-averaged air temperature and wind speed. The accuracy of the experimental method and the tomographic inversion algorithm is exemplarily demonstrated for one day without remarkable differences in the horizontal temperature field, determined by independent in situ measurements at different points within the measuring field. The differences between the conventionally determined air temperature (point measurement and the air temperature determined by tomography (area-averaged measurement representative for the area of the measuring field 200m x 260m were below 0.5 K for an average of 10 minutes. The differences obtained between the wind speed measured at a meteorological mast and calculated from acoustic measurements are not higher than 0.5 ms-1 for the same averaging time. The tomographically determined area-averaged distribution of air temperature (resolution 50 m x 50 m can be used to estimate the horizontal gradient of air temperature as a pre-condition to detect horizontal turbulent fluxes of sensible heat.

  9. Using spatially explicit indicators to investigate watershed characteristics and stream temperature relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Zbigniew J; Watson, Eric; Chang, Heejun

    2016-05-01

    We generate a series of novel indicators of spatially explicit watershed permeability and runoff characteristics to examine the relationship between land cover and water temperature parameters in a rapidly urbanizing watershed. Our framework provides a readily adaptable method to examine the thermal sensitivity of streams based upon the underlying geomorphological and surface characteristics of drainage basins. Using four model groups each using a different landscape characteristic weighting scheme (Model Group 1: areal averages; Model Group 2: inverse distance by total flow length; Model Group 3: overland distance to stream network and distance squared; Model Group 4: proportional flow accumulation), we examined the predictive capacity of 19 variables, including combinations of simplified land cover, elevation, slope, and flow accumulation, on five stream thermal properties: seven day moving average of daily minimum and maximum, seasonal mean temperature, a novel metric of thermal 'flashiness', and total days with maximum temperature exceeding 17.8°C. We find that the use of spatially explicit landscape indicators combining watershed processes improves the performance of regressions for predicting a number of ecologically relevant stream temperature variables. Improved indicators of watershed condition lend themselves for rapid investigation of the relationship between stream thermal conditions and landscape characteristics in watersheds modified by human land uses, ultimately providing a more hydrologically meaningful indicator for the impacts of landscape change.

  10. A comparison of spatial interpolation methods for soil temperature over a complex topographical region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Tang, Xiao-Ping; Ma, Xue-Qing; Liu, Hong-Bin

    2016-08-01

    Soil temperature variability data provide valuable information on understanding land-surface ecosystem processes and climate change. This study developed and analyzed a spatial dataset of monthly mean soil temperature at a depth of 10 cm over a complex topographical region in southwestern China. The records were measured at 83 stations during the period of 1961-2000. Nine approaches were compared for interpolating soil temperature. The accuracy indicators were root mean square error (RMSE), modelling efficiency (ME), and coefficient of residual mass (CRM). The results indicated that thin plate spline with latitude, longitude, and elevation gave the best performance with RMSE varying between 0.425 and 0.592 °C, ME between 0.895 and 0.947, and CRM between -0.007 and 0.001. A spatial database was developed based on the best model. The dataset showed that larger seasonal changes of soil temperature were from autumn to winter over the region. The northern and eastern areas with hilly and low-middle mountains experienced larger seasonal changes.

  11. Silicon (BSFR) solar cell AC parameters at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R Anil; Suresh, M.S. [ISRO Satellite Center, Bangalore- 560 017 (India); Nagaraju, J. [Solar Energy and Thermodynamic Laboratory, Department of Instrumentation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore- 560 012 (India)

    2005-01-31

    The AC parameters of back surface field reflected (BSFR) silicon solar cell are measured at different cell temperatures (198-348K) both in forward and reverse bias under dark condition using impedance spectroscopy technique. It is found that cell capacitance increases with temperature whereas cell resistance decreases, in forward bias voltage. Beyond maximum power point voltage, the cell inductance (0.28{mu}H) is measured, as the inductive reactance is comparable with cell series resistance. The measured cell parameters (cell capacitance, dynamic resistance, etc) are used to calculate the mean carrier lifetime and diode factor at different cell temperatures.

  12. Thermal maps of Jupiter - Spatial organization and time dependence of stratospheric temperatures, 1980 to 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn S.; Friedson, A. James; Baines, Kevin H.; Martin, Terry Z.; West, Robert A.; Caldwell, John; Hammel, Heidi B.; Bergstralh, Jay T.; Malcolm, Michael E.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial organization and time dependence of Jupiter's stratospheric temperatures have been measured by observing thermal emission from the 7.8-micrometer CH4 band. These temperatures, observed through the greater part of a Jovian year, exhibit the influence of seasonal radiative forcing. Distinct bands of high temperature are located at the poles and midlatitudes, while the equator alternates between warm and cold with a period of approximately 4 years. Substantial longitudinal variability is often observed within the warm midlatitude bands, and occasionally elsewhere on the planet. This variability includes small, localized structures, as well as large-scale waves with wavelengths longer than about 30,000 kilometers. The amplitudes of the waves vary on a time scale of about 1 month; structures on a smaller scale may have lifetimes of only days. Waves observed in 1985, 1987, and 1988 propagated with group velocities less than + or - 30 meters/sec.

  13. Long spatial coherence times a few micro-meters from a room temperature surface

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Shuyu; Keil, Mark; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The search for quantum coherence based on isolated atoms integrated with a room temperature solid state device (so-called atomchip [1-3]) has been intensifying in the last decade, with advances being made towards applications such as clocks, quantum information processing, surface probing and acceleration and gravitational field sensors. Such a device will also enable (and to some extent has already enabled) novel experiments in fundamental physics (e.g., [4-7]). Here we report on the trapping and maintenance of spatial coherence of atoms (in a Bose-Einstein Condensate -- BEC) about 5$\\mu$m from a room temperature surface, reducing significantly the distance previously achieved between the spatially coherent atoms and their classical environment [8-12], and most importantly entering the regime where atomic circuits are enabled. In addition, we enter the interesting regime in which the distance to the surface is much smaller than the probed coherence length, a regime in which the spatial dephasing reaches its ...

  14. Temperature-dependent rate models of vascular cambium cell mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Edward A. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    We use two rate-process models to describe cell mortality at elevated temperatures as a means of understanding vascular cambium cell death during surface fires. In the models, cell death is caused by irreversible damage to cellular molecules that occurs at rates that increase exponentially with temperature. The models differ in whether cells show cumulative effects of...

  15. Spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Mochizuki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation is a key regulator of tissue morphogenesis. We examined cell proliferation and cell division in zebrafish lens epithelium by visualizing cell-cycle phases and nuclear positions, using fluorescent-labeled geminin and histone proteins. Proliferation was low in the anterior region of lens epithelium and higher in the marginal zone anterior to the equator, suggesting that the proliferation zone, called the germinative zone, is formed in zebrafish lens. Interestingly, cell-division orientation was biased longitudinally in the anterior region, shifted from longitudinal to circumferential along the anterior–posterior axis of lens sphere, and was biased circumferentially in the peripheral region. These data suggest that cell-division orientation is spatially regulated in zebrafish lens epithelium. The Hertwig rule indicates that cells tend to divide along their long axes. Orientation of long axes and cell division were biased similarly in zebrafish lens epithelium, suggesting that cell geometry correlates with cell-division orientation. A cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, is expressed in lens epithelium. In a zebrafish e-cadherin mutant, the long axes and cell-division orientation were shifted more longitudinally. These data suggest that E-cadherin is required for the spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium.

  16. Spatially Resolved Temperature and Water Vapor Concentration Distributions in Supersonic Combustion Facilities by TDLAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busa, K. M.; McDaniel J. C.; Diskin, G. S.; DePiro, M. J.; Capriotti, D. P.; Gaffney, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the internal structure of high-enthalpy flows can provide valuable insight to the performance of scramjet combustors. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) is often employed to measure temperature and species concentration. However, TDLAS is a path-integrated line-of-sight (LOS) measurement, and thus does not produce spatially resolved distributions. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Tomography (TDLAT) is a non-intrusive measurement technique for determining two-dimensional spatially resolved distributions of temperature and species concentration in high enthalpy flows. TDLAT combines TDLAS with tomographic image reconstruction. More than 2500 separate line-of-sight TDLAS measurements are analyzed in order to produce highly resolved temperature and species concentration distributions. Measurements have been collected at the University of Virginia's Supersonic Combustion Facility (UVaSCF) as well as at the NASA Langley Direct-Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility (DCSCTF). Due to the UVaSCF s unique electrical heating and ability for vitiate addition, measurements collected at the UVaSCF are presented as a calibration of the technique. Measurements collected at the DCSCTF required significant modifications to system hardware and software designs due to its larger measurement area and shorter test duration. Tomographic temperature and water vapor concentration distributions are presented from experimentation on the UVaSCF operating at a high temperature non-reacting case for water vitiation level of 12%. Initial LOS measurements from the NASA Langley DCSCTF operating at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 are also presented. Results show the capability of TDLAT to adapt to several experimental setups and test parameters.

  17. Control of cell division and the spatial localization of assembled gene products in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments are described that examine the role of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in the regulation of cell division in Caulobacter crescentus; and the spatial localization of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) in C. crescentus swarmer and predivisional cells. In the analysis of PBP function, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus PBPs with (/sup 3/H) penicillin G in wild type strain CB15, in a series of conditional cell division mutants and in new temperature sensitive cephalosporin C resistant mutants PC8002 and PC8003. 14 PBPs are characterized and a high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1B) that is required for cell division is identified. PBP 1B competes for ..beta..-lactams that induce filament formation and may be a high affinity binding protein. A second high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1C) is also associated with defective cell division. The examination of PBP patterns in synchronous swarmer cells reveals that the in vivo activity of PBP 1B and PBP 1C increases at the time that the cell division pathway is initiated. None of the PBPs, however, appear to be differentially localized in the C. crescentus cell. In the analysis of MCP localization, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus MCPs with methyl-/sup 3/H. MCPs are examined in flagellated and non-flagellated vesicles prepared from cells by immunoaffinity chromatography.

  18. Spatial and temporal variation of soil temperature of Taxodium Distichum Shelterbelts in south China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Ma, Ding

    2017-01-01

    Start your abstract here With the global environmental change, more attention was paid to the effect of farmland shelterbelt. In this study, spatial and temporal patterns of soil temperature in shelterbelts of Taxodium distichum in South China was monitored using gradient observed method through observation plots placed in Taxodium distichum shelterbelts, sugarcane field and blank field (open site) in January, April, July, and October, respectively. It was found that soil temperature changed with time in a day with a single peak in all the four phases among three sites. However, compared with blank field, the vertical patterns of soil temperature of Taxodium distichum shelterbelts and sugarcane field showed special characteristic. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD showed soil temperature was significantly different with annual and seasons among Taxodium distichum shelterbelts, sugarcane field and blank field along a seasonal dynamic (P < 0.05). Effective measures should be taken to regulate the soil temperature in order to satisfy the needs of growth of sugarcane.

  19. Improving the spatial estimation of evapotranspiration by assimilating land surface temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Matthias; Samaniego, Luis; Cuntz, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    A combined investigation of the water and energy balance in hydrologic models might lead to a more accurate estimation of hydrological fluxes and state variables, such as evapotranspiration ET and soil moisture. Hydrologic models are usually calibrated against discharge measurements, and thus are only trained on the integrated signal at few points within a catchment. This procedure does not take into account any spatial variability of fluxes or state variables. Satellite data are a useful source of information to incorporate spatial information into hydrologic models. The objective of this study is to improve the estimation of evapotranspiration in the spatial domain by using satellite derived land surface temperature Ts for the calibration of the distributed hydrological model mHM. The satellite products are based on data of Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) and are provided by the Land Surface Analysis - Satellite Application Facility (LSA-SAF). mHM simulations of Ts are obtained by solving the energy balance wherein evapotranspiration is determined by closing the water balance. Net radiation is calculated by using incoming short- and longwave radiation, albedo and emissivity data provided by LSA-SAF. The Multiscale Parameter Regionalization technique (MPR, Samaniego et al. 2010) is applied to determine the aerodynamic resistance among other parameters. The optimization is performed for the year 2009 using three objective functions that consider (1) only discharge, (2) only Ts, and (3) both discharge and Ts. For the spatial comparison of satellite derived and estimated Ts fields, a new measure accounting for local spatial variabilities is introduced. The proposed method is applied to seven major German river basins, i.e. Danube, Ems, Main, Mulde, Neckar, Saale, and Weser. The results of the Ts simulations show a bias of 4.1 K compared to the satellite data. We hypothesize that this bias is inherent to the satellite data rather than to the model simulations. This

  20. Upper thermospheric neutral wind and temperature measurements from an extended spatial field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, E.M.; Aruliah, A.L.; McWhirter, I.; Yiu, H.C.I.; Charalambous, A. [University College London (United Kingdom). Atmospheric Physics Lab.; McCrea, I. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom). EISCAT Support Group

    2008-07-01

    First results are presented from a Scanning Doppler Imager (SCANDI) installed at the Nordlysstasjonen optical observatory near Longyearbyen, Svalbard (78.2 N, 15.8 E). Observations of the atomic oxygen 630 nm red line emission, originating in the upper thermosphere at around 250 km, have been used to determine neutral winds and temperatures from multiple zones within an extended spatial field. The instrument utilises all-sky optics to achieve multiple simultaneous measurements, compared to the standard Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) procedure of separate line-of-sight samples within a sequence of narrow angle look directions. SCANDI is colocated with such a standard FPI and comparison of neutral wind velocities between the instruments on the night of 15 March 2007 has revealed detailed and consistent structure in the wind field. Southward meridional wind enhancements of several hundred m/s are observed simultaneously with both instruments, revealing structure on scales not currently considered in thermospheric general circulation models (GCMs). The data from this night also demonstrate the influence of discrete auroral events on thermospheric behaviour. High intensities observed by SCANDI in the presence of auroral arcs coincide with a drop in measured neutral temperatures. This is interpreted as a result of the effective altitude of the 630 nm emission being lowered under conditions of soft auroral precipitation. The optical instruments as a consequence sample a region of lower temperature. This effect has been observed previously with lower thermospheric atomic oxygen emissions at 557.7 nm. The EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR) provides ion temperatures and electron densities for the night which confirm the influence of precipitation and heating during the auroral events. The minima of ion temperatures through the pre-midnight period provide a good match to the neutral temperatures measured with SCANDI, and to the colocated FPI temperatures. (orig.)

  1. Explaining growth variation over large spatial scales: Effects of temperature and food on walleye growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosgaard, Thomas; Venturelli, Paul; Lester, Nigel P.

    2012-01-01

    for among-lake variation in growth (e.g., food and temperature) has proved very difficult. Here, we use length at age and temperature data from hundreds of water bodies between 44⁰N to 53⁰N latitude to explain variation in immature growth of walleye (Sander vitreus), one of the most economically valuable...... the variation is productivity and a negative relationship indicates density-dependence. We found that variation in walleye growth among water bodies is largely explained by food productivity - not density-dependence. These results suggest that we can’t detect density-dependence among lakes when density......Most fishes exhibit strong spatial variation in growth. Because fish growth and production are tightly linked, quantifying and explaining variation in growth can mean the difference between successful management and unforeseen collapse. However, disentangling the factors that are responsible...

  2. Spatial temperature distribution in human hairy and glabrous skin after infrared CO2 laser radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frahm, Ken Steffen; Andersen, Ole K.; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Background: CO(2) lasers have been used for several decades as an experimental non-touching pain stimulator. The laser energy is absorbed by the water content in the most superficial layers of the skin. The deeper located nociceptors are activated by passive conduction of heat from superficial...... to deeper skin layers. Methods: In the current study, a 2D axial finite element model was developed and validated to describe the spatial temperature distribution in the skin after infrared CO(2) laser stimulation. The geometry of the model was based on high resolution ultrasound scans. The simulations were...... compared to the subjective pain intensity ratings from 16 subjects and to the surface skin temperature distributions measured by an infrared camera. Results: The stimulations were sensed significantly slower and less intense in glabrous skin than they were in hairy skin (MANOVA, p

  3. Spatial proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance under bromomethane poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana V.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; St-Pierre, Jean

    2017-02-01

    The poisoning effects of 5 ppm CH3Br in the air on the spatial performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) were studied using a segmented cell system. The presence of CH3Br caused performance loss from 0.650 to 0.335 V at 1 A cm-2 accompanied by local current density redistribution. The observed behavior was explained by possible bromomethane hydrolysis with the formation of Br-. Bromide and bromomethane negatively affected the oxygen reduction efficiency over a wide range of potentials because of their adsorption on Pt, which was confirmed by XPS. Moreover, the PEMFC exposure to CH3Br led to a decrease in the anode and cathode electrochemical surface area (∼52-57%) due to the growth of Pt particles through agglomeration and Ostwald ripening. The PEMFC did not restore its performance after stopping bromomethane introduction to the air stream. However, the H2/N2 purge of the anode/cathode and CV scans almost completely recovered the cell performance. The observed final loss of ∼50 mV was due to an increased activation overpotential. PEMFC exposure to CH3Br should be limited to concentrations much less than 5 ppm due to serious performance loss and lack of self-recovery.

  4. Influence of spatial and temporal variability of subsurface soil moisture and temperature on vapour intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Dawit N.; Naidu, Ravi; Chadalavada, Sreenivasulu

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive field study was conducted at a site contaminated with chlorinated solvents, mainly trichloroethylene (TCE), to investigate the influence of subsurface soil moisture and temperature on vapour intrusion (VI) into built structures. Existing approaches to predict the risk of VI intrusion into buildings assume homogeneous or discrete layers in the vadose zone through which TCE migrates from an underlying source zone. In reality, the subsurface of the majority of contaminated sites will be subject to significant variations in moisture and temperature. Detailed site-specific data were measured contemporaneously to evaluate the impact of spatial and temporal variability of subsurface soil properties on VI exposure assessment. The results revealed that indoor air vapour concentrations would be affected by spatial and temporal variability of subsurface soil moisture and temperature. The monthly monitoring of soil-gas concentrations over a period of one year at a depth of 3 m across the study site demonstrated significant variation in TCE vapour concentrations, which ranged from 480 to 629,308 μg/m3. Soil-gas wells at 1 m depth exhibited high seasonal variability in TCE vapour concentrations with a coefficient of variation 1.02 in comparison with values of 0.88 and 0.74 in 2 m and 3 m wells, respectively. Contour plots of the soil-gas TCE plume during wet and dry seasons showed that the plume moved across the site, hence locations of soil-gas monitoring wells for human risk assessment is a site specific decision. Subsurface soil-gas vapour plume characterisation at the study site demonstrates that assessment for VI is greatly influenced by subsurface soil properties such as temperature and moisture that fluctuate with the seasons of the year.

  5. Estimating spatially distributed monthly evapotranspiration rates by linear transformations of MODIS daytime land surface temperature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szilagyi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Under simplifying conditions catchment-scale vapor pressure at the drying land surface can be calculated as a function of its watershed-representative temperature (<Ts> by the wet-surface equation (WSE, similar to the wet-bulb equation in meteorology for calculating the dry-bulb thermometer vapor pressure of the Complementary Relationship of evaporation. The corresponding watershed ET rate, , is obtained from the Bowen ratio with the help of air temperature, humidity and percent possible sunshine data. The resulting (<Ts>, pair together with the wet-environment surface temperature (<Tws> and ET rate (ETw, obtained by the Priestley-Taylor equation, define a linear transformation on a monthly basis by which spatially distributed ET rates can be estimated as a sole function of MODIS daytime land surface temperature, Ts, values within the watershed. The linear transformation preserves the mean which is highly desirable. <Tws>, in the lack of significant open water surfaces within the study watershed (Elkhorn, Nebraska, was obtained as the mean of the smallest MODIS Ts values each month. The resulting period-averaged (2000–2007 catchment-scale ET rate of 624 mm/yr is very close to the water-balance derived ET rate of about 617 mm/yr. The latter is a somewhat uncertain value due to the effects of (a observed groundwater depletion of about 1m over the study period caused by extensive irrigation, and; (b the uncertain rate of net regional groundwater supply toward the watershed. The spatially distributed ET rates correspond well with soil/aquifer properties and the resulting land use type (i.e. rangeland versus center-pivot irrigated crops.

  6. Spatial pattern of impervious surfaces and their impacts on land surface temperature in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Rong-bo; OUYANG Zhi-yun; ZHENG Hua; LI Wei-feng; SCHIENKE Erich W; WANG Xiao-ke

    2007-01-01

    Land surface temperature (LST), which is heavily influenced by urban surface structures, is a significant parameter in urban environmental analysis. This study examined the effect impervious surfaces (IS) spatial patterns have on LST in Beijing, China. A classification and regression tree model (CART) was adopted to estimate IS as a continuous variable using Landsat images from two seasons combined with QuickBird. LST was retrieved from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) image to examine the relationships between IS and LST. The results revealed that CART was capable of consistently predicting LST with acceptable accuracy (correlation coefficient of 0.94 and the average error of 8.59%). Spatial patterns of IS exhibited changing gradients across the various urban-rural transects, with LST values showing a concentric shape that increased as you moved from the outskirts towards the downtown areas.Transect analysis also indicated that the changes in both IS and LST patterns were similar at various resolution levels, which suggests a distinct linear relationship between them. Results of correlation analysis further showed that IS tended to be positively correlated with LST, and that the correlation coefficients increased from 0.807 to 0.925 with increases in IS pixel size. The findings identified in this study provide a theoretical basis for improving urban planning efforts to lessen urban temperatures and thus dampen urban heat island effects.

  7. Geospatial Modeling for Investigating Spatial Pattern and Change Trend of Temperature and Rainfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abu Syed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh has been experiencing increased temperature and change in precipitation regime, which might adversely affect the important ecosystems in the country differentially. The river flows and groundwater recharge over space and time are determined by changes in temperature, evaporation and crucially precipitation. These again have a spatio-temporal dimension. This geospatial modeling research aimed at investigating spatial patterns and changing trends of temperature and rainfall within the geographical boundary of Bangladesh. This would facilitate better understanding the change pattern and their probable impacts on the ecosystem. The southeastern region, which is one of the most important forest ecosystem zones in the country, is experiencing early onset and withdrawal of rain but increasing trends in total rainfall except in the Monsoon season. This means that the region is experiencing a lower number of rainy days. However, total rainfall has not changed significantly. The differential between maximum and minimum showed an increasing trend. This changing pattern in average max and min temperature along with precipitation might cause a situation in which the species that are growing now may shift to suitable habitats elsewhere in the future. Consequently, the biodiversity, watersheds and fisheries, productivity of land, agriculture and food security in the region will be affected by these observed changes in climate.

  8. Spatially-discretized high-temperature approximations and theirO(N) implementation on a grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predescu, Cristian

    2006-10-01

    We consider the problem of performing imaginary-time propagation of wavefunctions on a grid. We demonstrate that spatially-continuous high-temperature approximations can be discretized in such a way that their convergence order is preserved. Requirements of minimal computational work and reutilization of data then uniquely determine the optimal grid, quadrature technique, and propagation method. It is shown that the optimal propagation technique is O(N) with respect to the grid size. The grid technique is utilized to compare the Monte Carlo efficiency of the Trotter-Suzuki approximation against a recently introduced fourth-order high-temperature approximation, while circumventing the issue of statistical noise, which usually prevents such comparisons from being carried out. We document the appearance of a systematic bias in the Monte Carlo estimators that involve temperature differentiation of the density matrix, bias that is due to the dependence of the eigenvalues on the inverse temperature. This bias is negotiated more successfully by the short-time approximations having higher convergence order, leading to non-trivial computational savings.

  9. Spatial temperature distribution in human hairy and glabrous skin after infrared CO2 laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arendt-Nielsen Lars

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CO2 lasers have been used for several decades as an experimental non-touching pain stimulator. The laser energy is absorbed by the water content in the most superficial layers of the skin. The deeper located nociceptors are activated by passive conduction of heat from superficial to deeper skin layers. Methods In the current study, a 2D axial finite element model was developed and validated to describe the spatial temperature distribution in the skin after infrared CO2 laser stimulation. The geometry of the model was based on high resolution ultrasound scans. The simulations were compared to the subjective pain intensity ratings from 16 subjects and to the surface skin temperature distributions measured by an infrared camera. Results The stimulations were sensed significantly slower and less intense in glabrous skin than they were in hairy skin (MANOVA, p 0.90, p 2 (5 W, 0.12 s, d1/e2 = 11.4 mm only two reported pain to glabrous skin stimulation using the same stimulus intensity. The temperature at the epidermal-dermal junction (depth 50 μm in hairy and depth 133 μm in glabrous skin was estimated to 46°C for hairy skin stimulation and 39°C for glabrous skin stimulation. Conclusions As compared to previous one dimensional heat distribution models, the current two dimensional model provides new possibilities for detailed studies regarding CO2 laser stimulation intensity, temperature levels and nociceptor activation.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Spatial Interpolation Methods in the Mediterranean Area: Application to Temperature in Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Di Piazza

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An exhaustive comparison among different spatial interpolation algorithms was carried out in order to derive annual and monthly air temperature maps for Sicily (Italy. Deterministic, data-driven and geostatistics algorithms were used, in some cases adding the elevation information and other physiographic variables to improve the performance of interpolation techniques and the reconstruction of the air temperature field. The dataset is given by air temperature data coming from 84 stations spread around the island of Sicily. The interpolation algorithms were optimized by using a subset of the available dataset, while the remaining subset was used to validate the results in terms of the accuracy and bias of the estimates. Validation results indicate that univariate methods, which neglect the information from physiographic variables, significantly entail the largest errors, while performances improve when such parameters are taken into account. The best results at the annual scale have been obtained using the the ordinary kriging of residuals from linear regression and from the artificial neural network algorithm, while, at the monthly scale, a Fourier-series algorithm has been used to downscale mean annual temperature to reproduce monthly values in the annual cycle.

  11. Spatial Downscaling Research of Satellite Land Surface Temperature Based on Spectral Normalization Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Xiaojun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problem that the spatial and temporal resolution of land surface temperature (LST have the contradiction with each other, a new downscaling model was put forward, based on the TsHARP(an algorithm for sharpening thermal imagery downscaling method, this research makes improvements by selecting the better correlation of spectral index(normalized difference vegetation index, NDVI; normalized difference build-up index, NDBI; modified normalized difference water index, MNDWI; enhanced bare soil index, EBSI with LST, i.e., replaces the original NDVI with new spectral index according to the different surface land-cover types, to assess the accuracy of each downscaling method based on qualitative and quantitative analysis with synchronous Landsat 8 TIRS LST data. The results show that both models could effectively enhance the spatial resolution while simultaneously preserving the characteristics and spatial distribution of the original 1 km MODIS LST image, and also eliminate the “mosaic” effect in the original 1 km image, both models were proved to be effective and applicable in our study area; global scale analysis shows that the new model (RMSE:1.635℃ is better than the TsHARP method (RMSE:2.736℃ in terms of the spatial variability and accuracy of the results; the different land-cover types of downscaling statistical analysis shows that the TsHARP method has poor downscaling results in the low vegetation coverage area, especially for the bare land and building-up area(|MBE|>3℃, the new model has obvious advantages in the description of the low vegetation coverage area. Seasonal analysis shows that the downscaling results of two models in summer and autumn are superior to those in spring and winter, the new model downscaling results are better than the TsHARP method in the four seasons, in which the spring and winter downscaling improvement is better than summer and autumn.

  12. Investigation of temperature effect on cell mechanics by optofluidic microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tie; Nava, Giovanni; Minzioni, Paolo; Veglione, Manuela; Bragheri, Francesca; Lelii, Francesca Demetra; Vazquez, Rebeca Martinez; Osellame, Roberto; Cristiani, Ilaria

    2015-08-01

    Here we present the results of a study concerning the effect of temperature on cell mechanical properties. Two different optofluidic microchips with external temperature control are used to investigate the temperature-induced changes of highly metastatic human melanoma cells (A375MC2) in the range of ~0 - 35 °C. By means of an integrated optical stretcher, we observe that cells' optical deformability is strongly enhanced by increasing cell and buffer-fluid temperature. This finding is supported by the results obtained from a second device, which probes the cells' ability to be squeezed through a constriction. Measured data demonstrate a marked dependence of cell mechanical properties on temperature, thus highlighting the importance of including a proper temperature-control system in the experimental apparatus.

  13. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  14. High temperature lithium cells with solid polymer electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jin; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Singh, Mohit

    2017-03-07

    Electrochemical cells that use electrolytes made from new polymer compositions based on poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) and other high-softening-temperature polymers are disclosed. These materials have a microphase domain structure that has an ionically-conductive phase and a phase with good mechanical strength and a high softening temperature. In one arrangement, the structural block has a softening temperature of about 210.degree. C. These materials can be made with either homopolymers or with block copolymers. Such electrochemical cells can operate safely at higher temperatures than have been possible before, especially in lithium cells. The ionic conductivity of the electrolytes increases with increasing temperature.

  15. Low temperature safety of lithium-thionyl chloride cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Shen, D. H.; Dawson, S.; Halpert, G.

    The use of lithium thionyl chloride cells for low-temperature applications is presently restricted because of their unsafe behavior. An attempt is made in the present investigation to identify the safe/unsafe low temperature operating conditions and to understand the low temperature cell chemistry responsible for the unsafe behavior. Cells subjected to extended reversal at low rate and -40 C were found to explode upon warm-up. Lithium was found to deposit on the carbon cathodes during reversal. Warming up to room temperature may be accelerating the lithium corrosion in the electrolyte. This may be one of the reasons for the cell thermal runaway.

  16. Spatial Modeling of Urban Vegetation and Land Surface Temperature: A Case Study of Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chudong Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The coupling relationship between urban vegetation and land surface temperature (LST has been heatedly debated in a variety of environmental studies. This paper studies the urban vegetation information and LST by utilizing a series of remote sensing imagery covering the period from 1990 to 2007. Their coupling relationship is analyzed, in order to provide the basis for ecological planning and environment protection. The results show that the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, urban vegetation abundance (UVA and urban forest abundance (UFA are negatively correlated with LST, which means that both urban vegetation and urban forest are capable in decreasing LST. The apparent influence of urban vegetation and urban forest on LST varies with the spatial resolution of the imagery, and peaks at the resolutions ranging from 90 m to 120 m.

  17. Spatial regression test for ensuring temperature data quality in southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, J.; Gavilán, P.; García-Marín, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    Quality assurance of meteorological data is crucial for ensuring the reliability of applications and models that use such data as input variables, especially in the field of environmental sciences. Spatial validation of meteorological data is based on the application of quality control procedures using data from neighbouring stations to assess the validity of data from a candidate station (the station of interest). These kinds of tests, which are referred to in the literature as spatial consistency tests, take data from neighbouring stations in order to estimate the corresponding measurement at the candidate station. These estimations can be made by weighting values according to the distance between the stations or to the coefficient of correlation, among other methods. The test applied in this study relies on statistical decision-making and uses a weighting based on the standard error of the estimate. This paper summarizes the results of the application of this test to maximum, minimum and mean temperature data from the Agroclimatic Information Network of Andalusia (southern Spain). This quality control procedure includes a decision based on a factor f, the fraction of potential outliers for each station across the region. Using GIS techniques, the geographic distribution of the errors detected has been also analysed. Finally, the performance of the test was assessed by evaluating its effectiveness in detecting known errors.

  18. Electrolytes for Wide Operating Temperature Lithium-Ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Provided herein are electrolytes for lithium-ion electrochemical cells, electrochemical cells employing the electrolytes, methods of making the electrochemical cells and methods of using the electrochemical cells over a wide temperature range. Included are electrolyte compositions comprising a lithium salt, a cyclic carbonate, a non-cyclic carbonate, and a linear ester and optionally comprising one or more additives.

  19. Spatial coordination between stem cell activity and cell differentiation in the root meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubayidin, Laila; Di Mambro, Riccardo; Sozzani, Rosangela; Pacifici, Elena; Salvi, Elena; Terpstra, Inez; Bao, Dongping; van Dijken, Anja; Dello Ioio, Raffaele; Perilli, Serena; Ljung, Karin; Benfey, Philip N; Heidstra, Renze; Costantino, Paolo; Sabatini, Sabrina

    2013-08-26

    A critical issue in development is the coordination of the activity of stem cell niches with differentiation of their progeny to ensure coherent organ growth. In the plant root, these processes take place at opposite ends of the meristem and must be coordinated with each other at a distance. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, the gene SCR presides over this spatial coordination. In the organizing center of the root stem cell niche, SCR directly represses the expression of the cytokinin-response transcription factor ARR1, which promotes cell differentiation, controlling auxin production via the ASB1 gene and sustaining stem cell activity. This allows SCR to regulate, via auxin, the level of ARR1 expression in the transition zone where the stem cell progeny leaves the meristem, thus controlling the rate of differentiation. In this way, SCR simultaneously controls stem cell division and differentiation, ensuring coherent root growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Climatology Applied To Architecture: An Experimental Investigation about Internal Temperatures Distribution at Two Test Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Tibério Cardoso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Data were analyzed en relative spatial distribution of the internal surface temperature (IST and internal air temperature or dry bulb (TBS, in two different test cells, for a typical experimental day under the influence of tropical mass. The main goal of this research is to provide guidelines to collect temperature data experimentally since there is not an appropriate standard to guide this methodological procedure in buildings. The data series of dry bulb temperature and internal surface temperatures were measured in a test cell with a green roof and the other with conventional ceramic roof by thermocouples installed at predetermined locations. The data of solar radiation and the main climatic variables were recorded by the automatic weather station at the Center of Science Engineering Applied to the Environment (CCEAMA, School of Engineering of São Carlos (EESC-USP. The results led to the conclusion that the distribution of the internal surface temperature is almost uniform in the two test cells, but in relation to the dry bulb temperature there is a small vertical temperature gradient in the conventional cell. This work will contribute significantly to future studies in the area of human comfort and environmental suitability of buildings

  1. Model-assisted analysis of spatial and temporal variations in fruit temperature and transpiration highlighting the role of fruit development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Nordey

    Full Text Available Fruit physiology is strongly affected by both fruit temperature and water losses through transpiration. Fruit temperature and its transpiration vary with environmental factors and fruit characteristics. In line with previous studies, measurements of physical and thermal fruit properties were found to significantly vary between fruit tissues and maturity stages. To study the impact of these variations on fruit temperature and transpiration, a modelling approach was used. A physical model was developed to predict the spatial and temporal variations of fruit temperature and transpiration according to the spatial and temporal variations of environmental factors and thermal and physical fruit properties. Model predictions compared well to temperature measurements on mango fruits, making it possible to accurately simulate the daily temperature variations of the sunny and shaded sides of fruits. Model simulations indicated that fruit development induced an increase in both the temperature gradient within the fruit and fruit water losses, mainly due to fruit expansion. However, the evolution of fruit characteristics has only a very slight impact on the average temperature and the transpiration per surface unit. The importance of temperature and transpiration gradients highlighted in this study made it necessary to take spatial and temporal variations of environmental factors and fruit characteristics into account to model fruit physiology.

  2. Control Device for Temperature Characteristics of a Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Slipchenko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The device for measuring of the temperature coefficients of the photovoltaic characteristics of a solar cell is developed. This device provides a real-time monitoring and study of the energy and photovoltaic parameters of a solar cells and its temperature dependence.

  3. Control Device for Temperature Characteristics of a Solar Cell

    OpenAIRE

    N.I. Slipchenko; V.A. Pismenetskiy; N.V. Gerasimenko; A.D. Sheremet`ev

    2013-01-01

    The device for measuring of the temperature coefficients of the photovoltaic characteristics of a solar cell is developed. This device provides a real-time monitoring and study of the energy and photovoltaic parameters of a solar cells and its temperature dependence.

  4. The Variation of Electrochemical Cell Potentials with Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Gavin D.; McNaught, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical cell potentials have no simple relationship with temperature but depend on the interplay between the sign and magnitude of the isothermal temperature coefficient, dE[degrees]/dT, and on the magnitude of the reaction quotient, Q. The variations in possible responses of standard and non-standard cell potentials to changes in the…

  5. Spatial variability of air temperature in a free-stall in the Northeastern semi-arid region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira C. M. Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The knowledge on the spatial variability of climatic attributes and the building of Kriging maps can assist in the design and management of confined animal facilities, by allowing a spatial visualization that is helpful for the planning and control of information from the production environment. The study aimed to characterize the spatial variability of air temperature in a free-stall barn used for dairy cattle confinement located in Petrolina-PE, Brazil, in different seasons and at different times. The variable air temperature was recorded at 136 points distributed in the areas under the shed and the shade cloth for the study of spatial variability and the construction of maps by Kriging. Air temperature data was collected in the winter and in the summer, in the months of July and August (2013 and January and February (2014, at different times (9 and 15 h. According to the results, the use of geostatistics enabled to define areas with different spatial variabilities in air temperature and specific areas in the free-stall with values higher than the recommended levels for thermal comfort. In addition, the central part of the facility is the region with the lowest values of air temperatures, due to the presence of a ridge vent.

  6. Transparent polymeric cell culture chip with integrated temperature control and uniform media perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petronis, Sarunas; Stangegaard, Michael; Christensen, C.

    2006-01-01

    Modern microfabrication and microfluidic technologies offer new opportunities in the design and fabrication of miniaturized cell culture systems for online monitoring of living cells. We used laser micromachining and thermal bonding to fabricate an optically transparent, low-cost polymeric chip...... for long-term online cell culture observation under controlled conditions. The chip incorporated a microfluidic flow equalization system, assuring uniform perfusion of the cell culture media throughout the cell culture chamber. The integrated indium-tin-oxide heater and miniature temperature probe linked...... to an electronic feedback system created steady and spatially uniform thermal conditions with minimal interference to the optical transparency of the chip. The fluidic and thermal performance of the chip was verified by finite element modeling and by operation tests under fluctuating ambient temperature conditions...

  7. Assimilation of temperature and hydraulic gradients for quantifying the spatial variability of streambed hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang; Andrews, Charles B.; Liu, Jie; Yao, Yingying; Liu, Chuankun; Tyler, Scott W.; Selker, John S.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the spatial and temporal characteristics of water flux into or out of shallow aquifers is imperative for water resources management and eco-environmental conservation. In this study, the spatial variability in the vertical specific fluxes and hydraulic conductivities in a streambed were evaluated by integrating distributed temperature sensing (DTS) data and vertical hydraulic gradients into an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and smoother (EnKS) and an empirical thermal-mixing model. The formulation of the EnKF/EnKS assimilation scheme is based on a discretized 1D advection-conduction equation of heat transfer in the streambed. We first systematically tested a synthetic case and performed quantitative and statistical analyses to evaluate the performance of the assimilation schemes. Then a real-world case was evaluated to calculate assimilated specific flux. An initial estimate of the spatial distributions of the vertical hydraulic gradients was obtained from an empirical thermal-mixing model under steady-state conditions using a constant vertical hydraulic conductivity. Then, this initial estimate was updated by repeatedly dividing the assimilated specific flux by estimates of the vertical hydraulic gradients to obtain a refined spatial distribution of vertical hydraulic gradients and vertical hydraulic conductivities. Our results indicate that optimal parameters can be derived with fewer iterations but greater simulation effort using the EnKS compared with the EnKF. For the field application in a stream segment of the Heihe River Basin in northwest China, the average vertical hydraulic conductivities in the streambed varied over three orders of magnitude (5 × 10-1 to 5 × 102 m/d). The specific fluxes ranged from near zero (qz < ±0.05 m/d) to ±1.0 m/d, while the vertical hydraulic gradients were within the range of -0.2 to 0.15 m/m. The highest and most variable fluxes occurred adjacent to a debris-dam and bridge pier. This phenomenon is very likely

  8. Li-Ion Cell Development for Low Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.-K.; Sakamoto, J. S.; Surampudi, S.; Wolfenstine, J.

    2000-01-01

    JPL is involved in the development of rechargeable Li-ion cells for future Mars Exploration Missions. The specific objectives are to improve the Li-ion cell cycle life performance and rate capability at low temperature (Li-ion rate capability at low temperature has been attributed to: (1) the electrolytes becoming viscous or freezing and/or (2) reduced electrode capacity that results from decreased Li diffusivity. Our efforts focus on increasing the rate capability at low temperature for Li-ion cells. In order to improve the rate capability we evaluated the following: (1) cathode performance at low temperatures, (2) electrode active material particle size on low temperature performance and (3) Li diffusivity at room temperature and low temperatures. In this paper, we will discuss the results of our study.

  9. Application Of New Spatial Statistical Stream Models For Precise Downscaling Of Climate Change Effects On Temperatures In River Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, D.; Luce, C.; Peterson, E.

    2009-12-01

    A warming climate will bring unprecedented changes to stream and river ecosystems, with temperature considerations being of utmost importance, given that most aquatic organisms are ectothermic. Previous broad-scale assessments of climate impacts to streams have been limited by inadequate availability of stream temperature data and often relied on surrogate relationships between air temperature and elevation that are often imprecise. Mechanistic models have sometimes been used to model stream thermal responses directly, but intensive parameterization limits the spatial scope of these applications. Modeling approaches are needed that address stream temperatures directly at the larger spatial scales commensurate with most conservation and restoration planning efforts. We applied new spatial statistical models that account for network topology (i.e., flow direction and volume) to an extensive, but non-random stream temperature database (n = 780) compiled across a 13 year period (1993-2006) for a large (2,500 km) mountain river network in central Idaho. Four predictors—radiation, elevation, air temperature, and stream flow—were used in the spatial model to represent important geomorphic and climatic effects on mean summer stream temperatures. The spatial models accounted for autocorrelation among sample sites to provide improved parameter estimates and predictive accuracy (R2 = 0.93; RMSPE = 0.74○C) relative to traditional, non-spatial models (R2 = 0.68; RMSPE = 1.53○C). A small bias between observed stream temperatures and those predicted by the spatial models amounted to 0.5○C at the extremes of the observed temperature range (5○C - 20○C) and caused over- (under-) predictions for the coldest (warmest) streams. This bias could have arisen from elevational gradients associated with influxes of cold, snowmelt groundwater or alterations in valley form due to past glacial activity. Better understanding regarding the importance of these and other factors that

  10. SHTV, as a technique for core calculation using spatial homogenization and temperature variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghaddam, Nader Maleki, E-mail: nader.moghaddam@gmail.co [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amir Kabir University of Technology (Tehran polytechnique), Hafez Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahedinejad, Ehsan, E-mail: ehsanzahedinejad@gmail.co [Department of Energy Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kashi, Samira, E-mail: smr.kashi@gmail.co [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Davilu, Hadi, E-mail: Davilu@aut.ac.i [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amir Kabir University of Technology (Tehran polytechnique), Hafez Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The accuracy of static neutronic parameters in the nuclear reactors depends upon the determination of group constants of the diffusion equation in the desired geometry. Although several methods have been proposed for calculating these parameters, there is still the need for more reliable methods. In this paper a powerful and innovative method based on Spatial Homogenization and Temperature Variation (SHTV) of physical properties of a WWER-1000 nuclear reactor core for calculating the relative power distribution of Fuel Assemblies (FA) and the hot fuel rod, is presented. The method is based on replacing the heterogeneous lattices of materials with different properties by an equivalent homogeneous mixture of these material for determining the few group constants, while the effect of temperature variation in the fuel and coolant density along the axial core direction is considered. All calculations are performed using WIMS and CITATION codes. The obtained results are compared with the results of Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) prepared by the designer, and good agreement between the two results is shown.

  11. Spatial variation of temperature and indicative of the urban heat island in Chennai Metropolitan Area, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeganathan, Anushiya; Andimuthu, Ramachandran; Prasannavenkatesh, Ramachandran; Kumar, Divya Subash

    2016-01-01

    Heat island is the main product of urban climate, and one of the important problems of twenty-first century. Cities in tropical countries suffer extensively due to the urban heat island effect, and urban climate studies are necessary to improve the comfort level and city planning. Chennai is the tropical city; it is the fourth largest metropolis in India and one of the fastest growing economic and industrial growth centers in South Asia. The spatial distribution of heat intensity in Chennai Metropolitan Area was studied, and the influence of land use and green cover were analyzed in the present work. Mobile measurements were carried out throughout the study area using a grid network to represent various land use patterns of the city. The study revealed some heat and cool pockets within the city limit; the maximum intensities of temperature were noticed in the central core city and north Chennai, which are distinguished for their commercial centers and densely populated residential areas. In morning time, temperature differences between fringes and central parts of heat packets were in the range of 3-4.5 °C. Land use and green cover play a critical role in microclimate and influences it. Green cover has a significant negative correlation with observed microclimate variations. Thus, the study urges city administration, policy makers, and architects to take up effective mitigation and adaptation strategies in the city to make people more comfortable.

  12. Bistable cell fate specification as a result of stochastic fluctuations and collective spatial cell behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Stockholm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In culture, isogenic mammalian cells typically display enduring phenotypic heterogeneity that arises from fluctuations of gene expression and other intracellular processes. This diversity is not just simple noise but has biological relevance by generating plasticity. Noise driven plasticity was suggested to be a stem cell-specific feature. RESULTS: Here we show that the phenotypes of proliferating tissue progenitor cells such as primary mononuclear muscle cells can also spontaneously fluctuate between different states characterized by the either high or low expression of the muscle-specific cell surface molecule CD56 and by the corresponding high or low capacity to form myotubes. Although this capacity is a cell-intrinsic property, the cells switch their phenotype under the constraints imposed by the highly heterogeneous microenvironment created by their own collective movement. The resulting heterogeneous cell population is characterized by a dynamic equilibrium between "high CD56" and "low CD56" phenotype cells with distinct spatial distribution. Computer simulations reveal that this complex dynamic is consistent with a context-dependent noise driven bistable model where local microenvironment acts on the cellular state by encouraging the cell to fluctuate between the phenotypes until the low noise state is found. CONCLUSIONS: These observations suggest that phenotypic fluctuations may be a general feature of any non-terminally differentiated cell. The cellular microenvironment created by the cells themselves contributes actively and continuously to the generation of fluctuations depending on their phenotype. As a result, the cell phenotype is determined by the joint action of the cell-intrinsic fluctuations and by collective cell-to-cell interactions.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Surface Temperature Over Greenland As Observed In AIRS, MODIS and In-Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. N.; Susskind, J.; Wu, D. L.; Nowicki, S.; Hall, D. K.; Iredell, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper compares the temporal and spatial characteristics of the AIRS and MODIS surface temperatures over Greenland. To estimate uncertainties in space-based temperature measurements, we reprojected the MODIS Ice Surface Temperature (IST) into 0.5 by 0.5 degree spatial resolution. We also re-gridded AIRS Skin Temperature (Ts) with same spatial resolution but classified with different cloud conditions and surface types. These co-located data sets make intercomparison between the two instruments relatively straightforward. By this approach, the spatial comparison between AIRS Ts and MODIS IST monthly mean is in good agreement with RMS less than 2K during May 2012. This approach also allows the detection of any long-term calibration drift and the careful examination of calibration consistency in MODIS and AIRS temperature data record. The temporal correlations between temperature data are also compared with those from in-situ measurements from GC-Net and NOAA stations. The most significant diurnal difference is found during spring season (April and May) in high altitude regions, when interannual variability is relatively smaller than summer and winter.

  14. 3D printing of hydrogels in a temperature controlled environment with high spatial resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is great hope in 3D printing techniques to create patient specific scaffolds for therapeutic applications. The majority of these approaches rely on materials that both give support to cells and effectively mimic a tissue specific microenvironment. Hydrogels provide an exceptional support for cells but their physicochemical properties are not suited for conventional additive layer manufacturing. Their low viscosity and resulting fluidic nature inhibit voluminous 3D deposition and lead to crude printing accuracy. To enhance mechanical features, hydrogels are often chemically modified and/or mixed with additives; however it is not clear whether these changes induce effects on cellular behavior or if in vivo applications are at risk. Certainly it increases the complexity of scaffold systems. To circumvent these obstacles, we aimed for a 3D printing technique which is capable of creating scaffolds out of unmodified, pure hydrogels. Here we present a new method to produce alginate scaffolds in a viscosity- independent manner with high spatial resolution. This is achieved by printing in a sub-zero environment which leads to fast freezing of the hydrogels, thus preserving the printed shape and circumventing any viscosity dependent flows. This enables the user to create scaffolds which are able to reflect soft or stiff cell niches.

  15. The Role of Auxiliary Variables in Deterministic and Deterministic-Stochastic Spatial Models of Air Temperature in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanowski, Mariusz; Kryza, Maciej

    2017-02-01

    Our study examines the role of auxiliary variables in the process of spatial modelling and mapping of climatological elements, with air temperature in Poland used as an example. The multivariable algorithms are the most frequently applied for spatialization of air temperature, and their results in many studies are proved to be better in comparison to those obtained by various one-dimensional techniques. In most of the previous studies, two main strategies were used to perform multidimensional spatial interpolation of air temperature. First, it was accepted that all variables significantly correlated with air temperature should be incorporated into the model. Second, it was assumed that the more spatial variation of air temperature was deterministically explained, the better was the quality of spatial interpolation. The main goal of the paper was to examine both above-mentioned assumptions. The analysis was performed using data from 250 meteorological stations and for 69 air temperature cases aggregated on different levels: from daily means to 10-year annual mean. Two cases were considered for detailed analysis. The set of potential auxiliary variables covered 11 environmental predictors of air temperature. Another purpose of the study was to compare the results of interpolation given by various multivariable methods using the same set of explanatory variables. Two regression models: multiple linear (MLR) and geographically weighted (GWR) method, as well as their extensions to the regression-kriging form, MLRK and GWRK, respectively, were examined. Stepwise regression was used to select variables for the individual models and the cross-validation method was used to validate the results with a special attention paid to statistically significant improvement of the model using the mean absolute error (MAE) criterion. The main results of this study led to rejection of both assumptions considered. Usually, including more than two or three of the most significantly

  16. A kinetic standard for precise calibration of spectrophotometer cell temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P A; Berman, M C

    1981-05-01

    We describe a simple, highly reproducible kinetic technique for precisely measuring temperature in spectrophotometric systems having reaction cells that are inaccessible to conventional temperature probes. The method is based on the temperature dependence of pseudo-first-order rate constants for the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of N-o-tolyl-D-glucosylamine. Temperatures of reaction cuvette contents are measured with a precision of +/- 0.05 degrees C (1 SD).

  17. Patterns of species richness in relation to temperature, taxonomy and spatial scale in eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Ji, Mingfei; Fan, Zhexuan; Deng, Jianming

    2011-07-01

    The species richness increases with area is well known in ecology. However, the Metabolic Theory of Biodiversity (MTB) is used to predict diversity patterns without taking account of the area covered by the community addressed. In this study, we developed a new model to integrate the temperature and community area based on the MTB. We collected plant species distribution information from 270 natural reserves and 11 floristic regions in eastern China, including that of three main plant divisions: pteridophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms, and five broadly distributed angiosperm families, to explore the patterns of species richness in relation to temperature and community area size at two spatial scales (floristic region and nature reserve). Our results show that at the floristic region scale, the species richness is independent of the area size of the community and the regression slopes of the natural logarithm of richness vs. the inverse transformed temperature are close to the theoretical value of -0.65 for the three main plant divisions as well as the five angiosperm families. However, at the nature reserve scale, the number of species depends significantly upon the area size of nature reserves, and the regression slopes deviate strongly from the expected slope for all the taxonomic groups, except the pteridophyte division. Therefore, the MTB would be fairly robust only under a presumption that the area size of the community addressed has no significant effect on species richness (e.g. at the floristic region scale). Otherwise, the predictions of diversity patterns by MTB tend to be inaccurate (e.g. at the nature reserve scale).

  18. Electrical coupling in ensembles of nonexcitable cells: modeling the spatial map of single cell potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Javier; Manzanares, Jose Antonio; Mafe, Salvador

    2015-02-19

    We analyze the coupling of model nonexcitable (non-neural) cells assuming that the cell membrane potential is the basic individual property. We obtain this potential on the basis of the inward and outward rectifying voltage-gated channels characteristic of cell membranes. We concentrate on the electrical coupling of a cell ensemble rather than on the biochemical and mechanical characteristics of the individual cells, obtain the map of single cell potentials using simple assumptions, and suggest procedures to collectively modify this spatial map. The response of the cell ensemble to an external perturbation and the consequences of cell isolation, heterogeneity, and ensemble size are also analyzed. The results suggest that simple coupling mechanisms can be significant for the biophysical chemistry of model biomolecular ensembles. In particular, the spatiotemporal map of single cell potentials should be relevant for the uptake and distribution of charged nanoparticles over model cell ensembles and the collective properties of droplet networks incorporating protein ion channels inserted in lipid bilayers.

  19. Neighborhood Landscape Spatial Patterns and Land Surface Temperature: An Empirical Study on Single-Family Residential Areas in Austin, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Hyun; Gu, Donghwan; Sohn, Wonmin; Kil, Sung-Ho; Kim, Hwanyong; Lee, Dong-Kun

    2016-09-02

    Rapid urbanization has accelerated land use and land cover changes, and generated the urban heat island effect (UHI). Previous studies have reported positive effects of neighborhood landscapes on mitigating urban surface temperatures. However, the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on enhancing cooling effects has not yet been fully investigated. The main objective of this study was to assess the relationships between neighborhood landscape spatial patterns and land surface temperatures (LST) by using multi-regression models considering spatial autocorrelation issues. To measure the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on LST, this study analyzed neighborhood environments of 15,862 single-family houses in Austin, Texas, USA. Using aerial photos, geographic information systems (GIS), and remote sensing, FRAGSTATS was employed to calculate values of several landscape indices used to measure neighborhood landscape spatial patterns. After controlling for the spatial autocorrelation effect, results showed that larger and better-connected landscape spatial patterns were positively correlated with lower LST values in neighborhoods, while more fragmented and isolated neighborhood landscape patterns were negatively related to the reduction of LST.

  20. Neighborhood Landscape Spatial Patterns and Land Surface Temperature: An Empirical Study on Single-Family Residential Areas in Austin, Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Hyun Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid urbanization has accelerated land use and land cover changes, and generated the urban heat island effect (UHI. Previous studies have reported positive effects of neighborhood landscapes on mitigating urban surface temperatures. However, the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on enhancing cooling effects has not yet been fully investigated. The main objective of this study was to assess the relationships between neighborhood landscape spatial patterns and land surface temperatures (LST by using multi-regression models considering spatial autocorrelation issues. To measure the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on LST, this study analyzed neighborhood environments of 15,862 single-family houses in Austin, Texas, USA. Using aerial photos, geographic information systems (GIS, and remote sensing, FRAGSTATS was employed to calculate values of several landscape indices used to measure neighborhood landscape spatial patterns. After controlling for the spatial autocorrelation effect, results showed that larger and better-connected landscape spatial patterns were positively correlated with lower LST values in neighborhoods, while more fragmented and isolated neighborhood landscape patterns were negatively related to the reduction of LST.

  1. Innovative High Temperature Fuel Cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Au, Siu Fai

    2003-01-01

    The world's energy consumption is growing extremely rapidly. Fuel cell systems are of interest by researchers and industry as the more efficient alternative to conventional thermal systems for power generation. The principle of fuel cell conversion does not involve thermal combustion and hence in th

  2. Innovative High Temperature Fuel Cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Au, Siu Fai

    2003-01-01

    The world's energy consumption is growing extremely rapidly. Fuel cell systems are of interest by researchers and industry as the more efficient alternative to conventional thermal systems for power generation. The principle of fuel cell conversion does not involve thermal combustion and hence in th

  3. The temporal and spatial characteristics of the surface air temperature variations over the Antarctic and its surrounding area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆龙骅; 卞林根; 贾朋群

    1997-01-01

    The characteristics of the spatial distribution, temporal variations trend and oscillation for the surface air temperature variations during 1957-1993 in the Antarctic and its surrounding area were analyzed. The results show that the short-time climate change in the Antarctic is complex both temporally and spatially. The Antarctic is by no means the strongest responding region to the global greenhouse effect. There is a distinguished difference in the trends of the temperature changes for the Antarctic and global mean, which could not be explained simply by the global greenhouse effect.

  4. Quantification of in situ temperature measurements on a PBI-based high temperature PEMFC unit cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebæk, Jesper; Ali, Syed Talat; Møller, Per

    2010-01-01

    The temperature is a very important operating parameter for all types of fuel cells. In the present work distributed in situ temperature measurements are presented on a polybenzimidazole based high temperature PEM fuel cell (HT-PEM). A total of 16 T-type thermocouples were embedded on both...... sensors showed minimal influence on cell performance, this difference seen in performance is believed to be caused by different bipolar plate materials. The measurement method is suitable for obtaining detailed data for validation of computational models, moreover the results indicate that the method can...

  5. Multicellular automaticity of cardiac cell monolayers: effects of density and spatial distribution of pacemaker cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elber Duverger, James; Boudreau-Béland, Jonathan; Le, Minh Duc; Comtois, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Self-organization of pacemaker (PM) activity of interconnected elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for applications such as PM activity in cardiac tissue to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) are often used as experimental models in studies on cardiac electrophysiology. These monolayers exhibit automaticity (spontaneous activation) of their electrical activity. At low plated density, cells usually show a heterogeneous population consisting of PM and quiescent excitable cells (QECs). It is therefore highly probable that monolayers of NRVMs consist of a heterogeneous network of the two cell types. However, the effects of density and spatial distribution of the PM cells on spontaneous activity of monolayers remain unknown. Thus, a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm was implemented to distribute PM and QECs in a binary-like 2D network. A FitzHugh-Nagumo excitable medium was used to simulate electrical spontaneous and propagating activity. Simulations showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of PM cells. In most simulations, the first initiation sites were found to be located near the substrate boundaries. Comparison with experimental data obtained from cardiomyocyte monolayers shows important similarities in the position of initiation site activity. However, limitations in the model that do not reflect the complex beat-to-beat variation found in experiments indicate the need for a more realistic cardiomyocyte representation.

  6. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part II. State estimation via impedance-based temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Impedance-based temperature detection (ITD) is a promising approach for rapid estimation of internal cell temperature based on the correlation between temperature and electrochemical impedance. Previously, ITD was used as part of an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) state-estimator in conjunction with a thermal model to enable estimation of the 1-D temperature distribution of a cylindrical lithium-ion battery. Here, we extend this method to enable estimation of the 2-D temperature field of a battery with temperature gradients in both the radial and axial directions. An EKF using a parameterised 2-D spectral-Galerkin model with ITD measurement input (the imaginary part of the impedance at 215 Hz) is shown to accurately predict the core temperature and multiple surface temperatures of a 32,113 LiFePO4 cell, using current excitation profiles based on an Artemis HEV drive cycle. The method is validated experimentally on a cell fitted with a heat sink and asymmetrically cooled via forced air convection. A novel approach to impedance-temperature calibration is also presented, which uses data from a single drive cycle, rather than measurements at multiple uniform cell temperatures as in previous studies. This greatly reduces the time required for calibration, since it overcomes the need for repeated cell thermal equalization.

  7. A Student-Constructed Galvanic Cell for the Measurement of Cell Potentials at Different Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A student-made galvanic cell is proposed for temperature measurements of cell potential. This cell can be easily constructed by students, the materials needed are readily available and nontoxic, and the solution applied is in an attractive color. For this cell, the potential values are excellently reproducible at each temperature, and the…

  8. A Student-Constructed Galvanic Cell for the Measurement of Cell Potentials at Different Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A student-made galvanic cell is proposed for temperature measurements of cell potential. This cell can be easily constructed by students, the materials needed are readily available and nontoxic, and the solution applied is in an attractive color. For this cell, the potential values are excellently reproducible at each temperature, and the…

  9. The impact of temperature on the evolution and self-deflection of spatial optical solitons in photovoltaic photorefractive media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG GuangYong; LIU JinSong

    2009-01-01

    The temperature effects on the evolution and self-deflection of bright spatial optical solitons in pho-tovoltaic photorefractive media were investigated by taking into account diffusion effects. The numer-ical results show that the evolution of the bright solitary beam depends strongly on the crystal tem-perature. It is also found that the bending distance of the bright solitary beam centre increases and reaches its maximum value at a characteristic temperature, and then decreases as temperature rises and approaches zero at low and high temperatures. Both the maximum value and characteristic tem-perature increase with the input power density. The self-deflection of bright solitary beam is further studied by a perturbation technique, and the results are found to be in good agreement with that ob-tained by the numerical method. The diffusion process and the dark irradiance dominate the tempera-ture dependence of bending distance in most values of temperature besides at the characteristic tem-perature and in the higher temperature regime. The diffusion process will mainly dominate the tem-perature dependence at the characteristic temperature and the dark irradiance will dominate in the higher temperature range.

  10. Growth pattern of single fission yeast cells is bilinear and depends on temperature and DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgärtner, Stephan; Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva M

    2009-05-20

    Cell growth and division have to be tightly coordinated to keep the cell size constant over generations. Changes in cell size can be easily studied in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe because these cells have a cylindrical shape and grow only at the cell ends. However, the growth pattern of single cells is currently unclear. Linear, exponential, and bilinear growth models have been proposed. Here we measured the length of single fission yeast cells with high spatial precision and temporal resolution over the whole cell cycle by using time-lapse confocal microscopy of cells with green fluorescent protein-labeled plasma membrane. We show that the growth profile between cell separation and the subsequent mitosis is bilinear, consisting of two linear segments separated by a rate-change point (RCP). The change in growth rate occurred at the same relative time during the cell cycle and at the same relative extension for different temperatures. The growth rate before the RCP was independent of temperature, whereas the growth rate after the RCP increased with an increase in temperature, leading to clear bilinear growth profiles at higher temperatures. The RCP was not directly related to the initiation of growth at the new end (new end take-off). When DNA synthesis was inhibited by hydroxyurea, the RCP was not detected. This result suggests that completion of DNA synthesis is required for the increase in growth rate. We conclude that the growth of fission yeast cells is not a simple exponential growth, but a complex process with precise rates regulated by the events during the cell cycle.

  11. Review of solar cell temperature coefficients for space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Energy conversion efficiency is an important parameter for solar cells, and well reported in the literature. However, solar cells heat up in sunlight, and the efficiency decreases. The temperature coefficient of the conversion efficiency is thus also extremely important, especially in mission modeling, but is much less well reported. It is of value to have a table which compiles into a single document values of temperature coefficients reported in the literature. In addition to modeling performance of solar cells in Earth orbit, where operating temperatures may range from about 20 C to as high as 85 C, it is of interest to model solar cells for several other recently proposed missions. These include use for the surface of Mars, for solar electric propulsion missions that may range from Venus to the Asteroid belt, and for laser-photovoltaic power that may involve laser intensities equivalent several suns. For all of these applications, variations in operating temperature away from the nominal test conditions result in significant changes in operating performance. In general the efficiency change with temperature is non-linear, however, in the range from negative 100 C through room temperature to a few hundred degrees C, efficiency is usually quite well modeled as a linear function of temperature (except for a few unusual cell types, such as amorphous silicon, and for extremely low bandgap cells, such as InGaAs).

  12. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part I. Low-order thermal modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating the temperature distribution within Li-ion batteries during operation is critical for safety and control purposes. Although existing control-oriented thermal models - such as thermal equivalent circuits (TEC) - are computationally efficient, they only predict average temperatures, and are unable to predict the spatially resolved temperature distribution throughout the cell. We present a low-order 2D thermal model of a cylindrical battery based on a Chebyshev spectral-Galerkin (SG) method, capable of predicting the full temperature distribution with a similar efficiency to a TEC. The model accounts for transient heat generation, anisotropic heat conduction, and non-homogeneous convection boundary conditions. The accuracy of the model is validated through comparison with finite element simulations, which show that the 2-D temperature field (r, z) of a large format (64 mm diameter) cell can be accurately modelled with as few as 4 states. Furthermore, the performance of the model for a range of Biot numbers is investigated via frequency analysis. For larger cells or highly transient thermal dynamics, the model order can be increased for improved accuracy. The incorporation of this model in a state estimation scheme with experimental validation against thermocouple measurements is presented in the companion contribution (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378775316308163).

  13. Low temperature temporal and spatial atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaee, Morteza, E-mail: m.aghaee@tue.nl; Maydannik, Philipp S. [ASTRaL Group, Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Johansson, Petri; Kuusipalo, Jurkka [Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Creatore, Mariadriana [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Homola, Tomáš; Cameron, David C. [R& D Center for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    Titanium dioxide films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using titanium tetraisopropoxide as a titanium precursor and water, ozone, or oxygen plasma as coreactants. Low temperatures (80–120 °C) were used to grow moisture barrier TiO{sub 2} films on polyethylene naphthalate. The maximum growth per cycle for water, ozone, and oxygen plasma processes were 0.33, 0.12, and 0.56 Å/cycle, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry was used to evaluate the chemical composition of the layers and the origin of the carbon contamination was studied by deconvoluting carbon C1s peaks. In plasma-assisted ALD, the film properties were dependent on the energy dose supplied by the plasma. TiO{sub 2} films were also successfully deposited by using a spatial ALD (SALD) system based on the results from the temporal ALD. Similar properties were measured compared to the temporal ALD deposited TiO{sub 2}, but the deposition time could be reduced using SALD. The TiO{sub 2} films deposited by plasma-assisted ALD showed better moisture barrier properties than the layers deposited by thermal processes. Water vapor transmission rate values lower than 5 × 10{sup −4} g day{sup −1} m{sup −2} (38 °C and 90% RH) was measured for 20 nm of TiO{sub 2} film deposited by plasma-assisted ALD.

  14. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells and Organic Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton

    such an opportunity. Some knowledge about the electrooxidation of DME is available, together with its limited use in low temperature PEM fuel cells, where the low temperature poses an obstacle in the form of phase separation in the fuel supply, making the cells less effective and reducing the amount of power...... harvested from the cells. This is completely avoided at the elevated temperatures with the additional benefit of increased kinetics. In the presented work an experimental setup for testing direct dimethyl ether high temperature fuel cells is described, proposing a novel design of an evaporator for a burst...... evaporated liquid stream supply to either of the electrodes. A large number of MEAs with different component compositions have been prepared and tested in different conditions using the constructed setups to obtain a basic understanding of the nature of direct DME HT-PEM FC, to map the processes occurring...

  15. InGaN High Temperature Photovoltaic Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this Phase II project are to develop InGaN photovoltaic cells for high temperature and/or high radiation environments to TRL 4 and to define the...

  16. InGaN High Temperature Photovoltaic Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I project is to demonstrate InGaN materials are appropriate for high operating temperature single junction solar cells. Single junction...

  17. Novel High Temperature Membrane for PEM Fuel Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed in this STTR program is a high temperature membrane to increase the efficiency and power density of PEM fuel cells. The NASA application is...

  18. Design of high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells. (Spent fuel inspection cells) in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ino, Hiroichi; Ueta, Shouhei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sawa, Kazuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tobita, Tsutomu [Nuclear Engineering Company, Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes design requirements and design results for shields, ventilation system and fuel handling devices for the high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells (spent fuel inspection cells). These cells are small cells to carry out few post-irradiation examinations of spent fuels, specimen, etc., which are irradiated in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, since the cells should be built in limited space in the HTTR reactor building, the cells are designed considering relationship between the cells and the reactor building to utilize the limited space effectively. The cells consist of three partitioned hot cells with wall for neutron and gamma-ray shields, ventilation system including filtering units and fuel handling devices. The post-irradiation examinations of the fuels and materials are planed by using the cells and the Hot Laboratory of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor to establish the technology basis on high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). In future, irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations will be carried out with the cells to upgrade present HTGR technologies and to make the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  19. Development of Spatial Distribution Patterns by Biofilm Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Bak Christensen, Bjarke;

    2015-01-01

    in the context of species distribution patterns observed in macroecology, and we summarize observations about the processes involved in co-adaptation between P. putida and Acinetobacter sp. C6. Our results contribute to an understanding of spatial species distribution patterns as they are observed in nature......Confined spatial patterns of microbial distribution are prevalent in nature, such as in microbial mats, soil communities, and water stream biofilms. The symbiotic two-species consortium of Pseudomonas putida and Acinetobacter sp. C6, originally isolated from a creosote-polluted aquifer, has evolved...... a distinct spatial organization in the laboratory that is characterized by an increased fitness and productivity. In this consortium, P. putida is reliant on microcolonies formed by Acinetobacter sp. C6 — to which it attaches. Here we describe the processes that lead to the microcolony...

  20. Electrolytes for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkel, F.P.F. van; Christie, G.M.; Heuveln, F.H. van; Huijsmans, J.P.P. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Self-supported electrolytes and electrode supported electrolytes of zirconia and ceria have been developed by means of tape casting. The conductivity data of these compounds have been obtained. Cell tests with these materials were conducted in the temperature range of 600 to 800 C. Operation of SOFC within this temperature range has been shown to be feasible.

  1. Solar cell junction temperature measurement of PV module

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, B.J.

    2011-02-01

    The present study develops a simple non-destructive method to measure the solar cell junction temperature of PV module. The PV module was put in the environmental chamber with precise temperature control to keep the solar PV module as well as the cell junction in thermal equilibrium with the chamber. The open-circuit voltage of PV module Voc is then measured using a short pulse of solar irradiation provided by a solar simulator. Repeating the measurements at different environment temperature (40-80°C) and solar irradiation S (200-1000W/m2), the correlation between the open-circuit voltage Voc, the junction temperature Tj, and solar irradiation S is derived.The fundamental correlation of the PV module is utilized for on-site monitoring of solar cell junction temperature using the measured Voc and S at a short time instant with open circuit. The junction temperature Tj is then determined using the measured S and Voc through the fundamental correlation. The outdoor test results show that the junction temperature measured using the present method, Tjo, is more accurate. The maximum error using the average surface temperature Tave as the junction temperature is 4.8 °C underestimation; while the maximum error using the present method is 1.3 °C underestimation. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Improving Estimations of Spatial Distribution of Soil Respiration Using the Bayesian Maximum Entropy Algorithm and Soil Temperature as Auxiliary Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junguo; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Guomo; Luo, Yiqi; Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Pingheng; Liang, Junyi

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration inherently shows strong spatial variability. It is difficult to obtain an accurate characterization of soil respiration with an insufficient number of monitoring points. However, it is expensive and cumbersome to deploy many sensors. To solve this problem, we proposed employing the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) algorithm, using soil temperature as auxiliary information, to study the spatial distribution of soil respiration. The BME algorithm used the soft data (auxiliary information) effectively to improve the estimation accuracy of the spatiotemporal distribution of soil respiration. Based on the functional relationship between soil temperature and soil respiration, the BME algorithm satisfactorily integrated soil temperature data into said spatial distribution. As a means of comparison, we also applied the Ordinary Kriging (OK) and Co-Kriging (Co-OK) methods. The results indicated that the root mean squared errors (RMSEs) and absolute values of bias for both Day 1 and Day 2 were the lowest for the BME method, thus demonstrating its higher estimation accuracy. Further, we compared the performance of the BME algorithm coupled with auxiliary information, namely soil temperature data, and the OK method without auxiliary information in the same study area for 9, 21, and 37 sampled points. The results showed that the RMSEs for the BME algorithm (0.972 and 1.193) were less than those for the OK method (1.146 and 1.539) when the number of sampled points was 9 and 37, respectively. This indicates that the former method using auxiliary information could reduce the required number of sampling points for studying spatial distribution of soil respiration. Thus, the BME algorithm, coupled with soil temperature data, can not only improve the accuracy of soil respiration spatial interpolation but can also reduce the number of sampling points.

  3. Spatial Modulation Microscopy for Real-Time Imaging of Plasmonic Nanoparticles and Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fairbairn, N; Carter, R; Fernandes, R; Kanaras, A G; Elliott, T J; Somekh, M G; Pitter, M C; Muskens, O L

    2012-01-01

    Spatial modulation microscopy is a technique originally developed for quantitative spectroscopy of individual nano-objects. Here, a parallel implementation of the spatial modulation microscopy technique is demonstrated based on a line detector capable of demodulation at kHz frequencies. The capabilities of the imaging system are shown using an array of plasmonic nanoantennas and dendritic cells incubated with gold nanoparticles.

  4. Electrode Kinetics in High Temperature Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse

    1998-01-01

    The O_2 reduction on Pt electrode with an yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte is examined with potential step, voltammetry and impedance measurements. Inductive hysteresis are observed in all cases, indicating an activation-deactivation process for the electrode reaction. The same is found...... when the electrolyte is Gd doped ceria. The activation is generated by current passage. The time constant for the hysteresis is large considering the high operating temperatures, 800- 1000^oC. For the activation process potential steps give two time constants 10^2s and 10^3s for an anodic current, 10...... treated by modelling. The phenomenological model proposed can explain the principal behaviour of the inductive hysteresis. The activation process has first order dependence of the current density and the deactivation first order with respect to the activation.AFM pictures of the electrode...

  5. Spatial atmospheric ALD of functional layers for CIGS Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Frijters, C.; Balder, J.E.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Roozeboom, F.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial Atmosperic Atomic Layer Depositon combines the advantages of temporal ALD, i.e. excellent control of film composition and uniformity over large area substrates, with high growth rages (up tot nm/s). In this paper we present a short overview of our research acctivity carried out on S-ALD of f

  6. Comparison of spatial interpolation methods for gridded bias removal in surface temperature forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Seyedeh Atefeh; Azadi, Majid; Rahmani, Morteza

    2017-08-01

    All numerical weather prediction (NWP) models inherently have substantial biases, especially in the forecast of near-surface weather variables. Statistical methods can be used to remove the systematic error based on historical bias data at observation stations. However, many end users of weather forecasts need bias corrected forecasts at locations that scarcely have any historical bias data. To circumvent this limitation, the bias of surface temperature forecasts on a regular grid covering Iran is removed, by using the information available at observation stations in the vicinity of any given grid point. To this end, the running mean error method is first used to correct the forecasts at observation stations, then four interpolation methods including inverse distance squared weighting with constant lapse rate (IDSW-CLR), Kriging with constant lapse rate (Kriging-CLR), gradient inverse distance squared with linear lapse rate (GIDS-LR), and gradient inverse distance squared with lapse rate determined by classification and regression tree (GIDS-CART), are employed to interpolate the bias corrected forecasts at neighboring observation stations to any given location. The results show that all four interpolation methods used do reduce the model error significantly, but Kriging-CLR has better performance than the other methods. For Kriging-CLR, root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) were decreased by 26% and 29%, respectively, as compared to the raw forecasts. It is found also, that after applying any of the proposed methods, unlike the raw forecasts, the bias corrected forecasts do not show spatial or temporal dependency.

  7. Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

  8. Spatial and temporal variations in mango colour, acidity, and sweetness in relation to temperature and ethylene gradients within the fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordey, Thibault; Léchaudel, Mathieu; Génard, Michel; Joas, Jacques

    2014-11-01

    Managing fruit quality is complex because many different attributes have to be taken into account, which are themselves subjected to spatial and temporal variations. Heterogeneous fruit quality has been assumed to be partly related to temperature and maturity gradients within the fruit. To test this assumption, we measured the spatial variability of certain mango fruit quality traits: colour of the peel and of the flesh, and sourness and sweetness, at different stages of fruit maturity using destructive methods as well as vis-NIR reflectance. The spatial variability of mango quality traits was compared to internal variations in thermal time, simulated by a physical model, and to internal variations in maturity, using ethylene content as an indicator. All the fruit quality indicators analysed showed significant spatial and temporal variations, regardless of the measurement method used. The heterogeneity of internal fruit quality traits was not correlated with the marked internal temperature gradient we modelled. However, variations in ethylene content revealed a strong internal maturity gradient which was correlated with the spatial variations in measured mango quality traits. Nonetheless, alone, the internal maturity gradient did not explain the variability of fruit quality traits, suggesting that other factors, such as gas, abscisic acid and water gradients, are also involved.

  9. Spatial organisation of cell expansion by the cytoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.

    2002-01-01

    The shape of plants is determined by the sum of cell division and cell growth. The cytoskeleton plays an important role in both processes. This thesis presents research that pinpoints how the cytoskeleton controls plant cell growth. Root hairs of the model plant Arabidopsis have been used as a model

  10. Spatial phase sensitivity of complex cells in primary visual cortex depends on stimulus contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meffin, H; Hietanen, M A; Cloherty, S L; Ibbotson, M R

    2015-12-01

    Neurons in primary visual cortex are classified as simple, which are phase sensitive, or complex, which are significantly less phase sensitive. Previously, we have used drifting gratings to show that the phase sensitivity of complex cells increases at low contrast and after contrast adaptation while that of simple cells remains the same at all contrasts (Cloherty SL, Ibbotson MR. J Neurophysiol 113: 434-444, 2015; Crowder NA, van Kleef J, Dreher B, Ibbotson MR. J Neurophysiol 98: 1155-1166, 2007; van Kleef JP, Cloherty SL, Ibbotson MR. J Physiol 588: 3457-3470, 2010). However, drifting gratings confound the influence of spatial and temporal summation, so here we have stimulated complex cells with gratings that are spatially stationary but continuously reverse the polarity of the contrast over time (contrast-reversing gratings). By varying the spatial phase and contrast of the gratings we aimed to establish whether the contrast-dependent phase sensitivity of complex cells results from changes in spatial or temporal processing or both. We found that most of the increase in phase sensitivity at low contrasts could be attributed to changes in the spatial phase sensitivities of complex cells. However, at low contrasts the complex cells did not develop the spatiotemporal response characteristics of simple cells, in which paired response peaks occur 180° out of phase in time and space. Complex cells that increased their spatial phase sensitivity at low contrasts were significantly overrepresented in the supragranular layers of cortex. We conclude that complex cells in supragranular layers of cat cortex have dynamic spatial summation properties and that the mechanisms underlying complex cell receptive fields differ between cortical layers.

  11. Electrolytes for Li-Ion Cells in Low Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Surampudi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Prototype AA-size lithium-ion cells have been demonstrated to operate effectively at temperatures as low as -30 to -40 C. These improvements in low temperature cell performance have been realized by the incorporation of ethylene carbonate-based electrolytes which possess low melting, low viscosity cosolvents, such as methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, gamma-butyrolactone, and ethyl methyl carbonate. The cells containing a 0.75M LiPF6 EC+DEC+DMC+EMC (1:1:1:1) electrolyte displayed the best performance at -30 C (> 90% of the room temperature capacity at approximately C/15 rate), whereas, at -40 C the cells with the 0.75M LiPF6 EC+DEC+DMC+MA (1:1:1:1) and 0.75M LiPF6 EC+DEC+DMC+EA (1:1:1:1) electrolytes showed superior performance.

  12. The contribution of Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) in streams to assess spatial runoff processes in a moraine dominated agricultural catchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boegh, Eva; Blemmer, Morten; Holmes, Esbern

    using a high spatial resolution (10-30 m) land use map which includes agricultural crops, forest, wetlands and inhabited areas, and spatial variations in soil types, geology and tile drainage were represented. The DTS system measured diurnal variations in water temperature each meter along a stream...... accumulation of water from individual grids within the catchment to the stream was calculated using a Lidar based (1.6 m resolution) digital elevation model. Many locations with observed (DTS-based) discrete lateral inflows were in good agreement with stream locations receiving extra large inflows from...

  13. Cell invasion in the spheroid sprouting assay: a spatial organisation analysis adaptable to cell behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blacher

    Full Text Available The endothelial cell spheroid assay provides a suitable in vitro model to study (lymph angiogenesis and test pro- and anti-(lymph angiogenic factors or drugs. Usually, the extent of cell invasion, observed through optical microscopy, is measured. The present study proposes the spatial distribution of migrated cells as a new descriptor of the (lymph angiogenic response. The utility of this novel method rests with its capacity to locally characterise spheroid structure, allowing not only the investigation of single and collective cell invasion but also the evolution of the spheroid core itself. Moreover, the proposed method can be applied to 2D-projected spheroid images obtained by optical microscopy, as well as to 3D images acquired by confocal microscopy. To validate the proposed methodology, endothelial cell invasion was evaluated under different experimental conditions. The results were compared with widely used global parameters. The comparison shows that our method prevents local spheroid modifications from being overlooked and leading to the possible misinterpretation of results.

  14. Stream Temperature Spatial and Temporal Response to Large Dam Removal and Groundwater Pumping under Varying Climate Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risley, J. C.; Constantz, J. E.; Essaid, H.; Rounds, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    We simulated the effects of large upstream dam removal and in-reach groundwater pumping on stream temperature spatial and temporal patterns in a hypothetical river basin under varying climate conditions. A MODFLOW-2000 model, with options for stream-aquifer interaction and grid-block rewetting, was constructed to simulate monthly streamflows for 12 watershed scenarios described below. For each scenario, streamflow output became input into a stream temperature simulation model. Stream temperatures were simulated using the CE-QUAL-W2 water quality model over a 110 km model grid, with the presence and removal of a dam at the top of the reach and pumping in the lower 60 km of the reach. Measured meteorological data from three locations in Oregon and California representing the three meteorological conditions were used as model input to simulate the impact of varying climate conditions on streamflows and stream temperature. For each climate condition, four hypothetical watershed scenarios were modeled: (1) natural (no dam or pumping), (2) large upstream dam present, (3) dam with in-reach pumping, and (4) no dam with pumping continued, resulting in 12 cases. If a transition from a humid to more arid environment occurs under future climate change, the simulations showed that decreased streamflow, increased solar radiation, and increased air temperatures would result in overall increased stream temperatures as expected. From March to August, the presence of a dam caused monthly mean stream temperatures to decrease on average by approximately 3.0°C, 2.5°C, and 2.0°C for the humid, semiarid, and arid conditions, respectively; however, stream temperatures generally increased from September to February. Pumping caused stream temperatures to warm in summer and cool in winter by generally less than 0.5°C. Though dam removal led to greater changes in stream temperature than pumping, ephemeral conditions were increased both temporally and spatially by pumping.

  15. Extraction of the spatial distribution of electron temperature and density in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion implosion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kyle; Mancini, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    We are testing polychromatic tomography to extract the spatial distribution of electron temperatures and densities in the cylindrical implosion plasmas created during MagLIF. Motivation for this technique stems from its successful application to spherical implosion core plasmas on Omega through the analysis of spatially resolved spectra (SRS) collected via pinhole imaging. In MagLIF, collections of SRS can be extracted from the images created by the slit imaging CRITR spectrometers. These spectra can be complemented with pinhole monochromatic images and spectra recorded with a spherical crystal spectrometer. One axially resolved and one radially resolved CRITR are field during MagLIF and information extracted from one of these SRS would be spatially integrated over a plane of finite thickness given by the spatial resolution of the instrument. In our method, we couple a model that creates synthetic sets of spectra, like those obtained from an experiment, with a Pareto genetic algorithm which searches in parameter space for the spatial distribution which best simultaneously and self-consistently fits the set of SRS/ Solutions obtained are used as the initial solution for a Levenberg-Marquadt minimization algorithm to provide a final ``fine-tuned'' solution. We are testing this method by creating synthetic ``experimental'' data and using the technique to search for the spatial distribution. The results of these feasibility studies will be discussed. The work is supported by a contract from Sandia National Laboratories.

  16. Spatial moment dynamics for collective cell movement incorporating a neighbour-dependent directional bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binny, Rachelle N; Plank, Michael J; James, Alex

    2015-05-06

    The ability of cells to undergo collective movement plays a fundamental role in tissue repair, development and cancer. Interactions occurring at the level of individual cells may lead to the development of spatial structure which will affect the dynamics of migrating cells at a population level. Models that try to predict population-level behaviour often take a mean-field approach, which assumes that individuals interact with one another in proportion to their average density and ignores the presence of any small-scale spatial structure. In this work, we develop a lattice-free individual-based model (IBM) that uses random walk theory to model the stochastic interactions occurring at the scale of individual migrating cells. We incorporate a mechanism for local directional bias such that an individual's direction of movement is dependent on the degree of cell crowding in its neighbourhood. As an alternative to the mean-field approach, we also employ spatial moment theory to develop a population-level model which accounts for spatial structure and predicts how these individual-level interactions propagate to the scale of the whole population. The IBM is used to derive an equation for dynamics of the second spatial moment (the average density of pairs of cells) which incorporates the neighbour-dependent directional bias, and we solve this numerically for a spatially homogeneous case.

  17. Li/CFx Cells Optimized for Low-Temperature Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Bhalla, Pooja; Smith, Kiah

    2009-01-01

    Some developments reported in prior NASA Tech Briefs articles on primary electrochemical power cells containing lithium anodes and fluorinated carbonaceous (CFx) cathodes have been combined to yield a product line of cells optimized for relatively-high-current operation at low temperatures at which commercial lithium-based cells become useless. These developments have involved modifications of the chemistry of commercial Li/CFx cells and batteries, which are not suitable for high-current and low-temperature applications because they are current-limited and their maximum discharge rates decrease with decreasing temperature. One of two developments that constitute the present combination is, itself, a combination of developments: (1) the use of sub-fluorinated carbonaceous (CFx wherein xLiBF4 dissolved at a concentration of 0.5 M in a mixture of four volume parts of 1,2 dimethoxyethane with one volume part of propylene carbonate. The proportion, x, of fluorine in the cathode in such a cell lies between 0.5 and 0.9. The best of such cells fabricated to date have exhibited discharge capacities as large as 0.6 A h per gram at a temperature of 50 C when discharged at a rate of C/5 (where C is the magnitude of the current, integrated for one hour, that would amount to the nominal charge capacity of a cell).

  18. The integration of signalling and the spatial organization of the T cell synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremie eRossy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Engagement of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR triggers signalling pathways that lead to T cell selection, differentiation and clonal expansion. Superimposed onto the biochemical network is a spatial organization that describes individual receptor molecules, dimers, oligomers and higher order structures. Here we review recent finding about TCR organization in naïve and memory T cells. A key question that has emerged is how antigen-TCR interactions encode spatial information to direct T cell activation and differentiation. Single molecule super-resolution microscopy may become an important tool in decoding receptor organization at the molecular level.

  19. Spatial variability of the Black Sea surface temperature from high resolution modeling and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizyuk, Artem; Senderov, Maxim; Korotaev, Gennady

    2016-04-01

    Large number of numerical ocean models were implemented for the Black Sea basin during last two decades. They reproduce rather similar structure of synoptical variability of the circulation. Since 00-s numerical studies of the mesoscale structure are carried out using high performance computing (HPC). With the growing capacity of computing resources it is now possible to reconstruct the Black Sea currents with spatial resolution of several hundreds meters. However, how realistic these results can be? In the proposed study an attempt is made to understand which spatial scales are reproduced by ocean model in the Black Sea. Simulations are made using parallel version of NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean). A two regional configurations with spatial resolutions 5 km and 2.5 km are described. Comparison of the SST from simulations with two spatial resolutions shows rather qualitative difference of the spatial structures. Results of high resolution simulation are compared also with satellite observations and observation-based products from Copernicus using spatial correlation and spectral analysis. Spatial scales of correlations functions for simulated and observed SST are rather close and differs much from satellite SST reanalysis. Evolution of spectral density for modelled SST and reanalysis showed agreed time periods of small scales intensification. Using of the spectral analysis for satellite measurements is complicated due to gaps. The research leading to this results has received funding from Russian Science Foundation (project № 15-17-20020)

  20. The non-Gaussianity and spatial asymmetry of temperature extremes relative to the jet: the role of horizontal advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnik, Nili; Garfinkel, Chaim

    2016-04-01

    Global warming is expected raise the number of warm spells and lower the number of cold spells, by simply shifting of the near-surface temperature probability distribution to warmer temperatures. However, changes in the shape of distribution strongly affect how the occurrence of temperature extremes will change. Hence, understanding the processes shaping the spatial and statistical distribution of temperature variations and extremes in the present climate is central to understanding how temperature extremes might vary in the future. Using meteorological reanalyses data we show that the distribution of near-surface temperature variability is non-Gaussian, and consistent with this, extreme warm anomalies occur preferentially poleward of the location of extreme cold anomalies. The non-Guassianity evident in reanalysis data is also found in a set of dry General Circulation Model runs in which the jet is forced at different latitudes, and the location of extremes is influenced by the location of the jet stream. Using a simple model of Lagrangian temperature advection, we investigate the role of synoptic dynamics in causing this non Gaussianity. The meridional shifting between cold and warm extremes, and the related non-Gaussianity are traced back to the synoptic evolution leading up to cold and warm extreme events. We find that the meridional movement of synotpic systems, as well as nonlinear temperature advection are both of crucial importance for the warm/cold asymmetry in the latitudinal distribution of the temperature extremes. The possible implications for future changes in extremes will be briefly discussed.

  1. Climate change and stream temperature projections in the Columbia River Basin: biological implications of spatial variation in hydrologic drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Ficklin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Water temperature is a primary physical factor regulating the persistence and distribution of aquatic taxa. Considering projected increases in temperature and changes in precipitation in the coming century, accurate assessment of suitable thermal habitat in freshwater systems is critical for predicting aquatic species responses to changes in climate and for guiding adaptation strategies. We use a hydrologic model coupled with a stream temperature model and downscaled General Circulation Model outputs to explore the spatially and temporally varying changes in stream temperature at the subbasin and ecological province scale for the Columbia River Basin. On average, stream temperatures are projected to increase 3.5 °C for the spring, 5.2 °C for the summer, 2.7 °C for the fall, and 1.6 °C for the winter. While results indicate changes in stream temperature are correlated with changes in air temperature, our results also capture the important, and often ignored, influence of hydrological processes on changes in stream temperature. Decreases in future snowcover will result in increased thermal sensitivity within regions that were previously buffered by the cooling effect of flow originating as snowmelt. Other hydrological components, such as precipitation, surface runoff, lateral soil flow, and groundwater, are negatively correlated to increases in stream temperature depending on the season and ecological province. At the ecological province scale, the largest increase in annual stream temperature was within the Mountain Snake ecological province, which is characterized by non-migratory coldwater fish species. Stream temperature changes varied seasonally with the largest projected stream temperature increases occurring during the spring and summer for all ecological provinces. Our results indicate that stream temperatures are driven by local processes and ultimately require a physically-explicit modeling approach to accurately characterize the

  2. Spatial heterogeneity of temperature across alpine boulder fields in New South Wales, Australia: multilevel modelling of drivers of microhabitat climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haijing; Paull, David; Rayburg, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the spatial heterogeneity of temperatures across a region is significant for identification and protection of potential microhabitats for species conservation. However, this task is proving difficult because multiple factors drive the temperatures of microhabitats and their effect differs at different scales. In the Australian alpine region, boulder field habitats have been identified as important refugia for a range of small mammals. Vegetation cover and elevation have been found to drive thermal buffering at the level of single sampling sites within boulder fields, whereas the aspect and inclination of slopes have been found to affect thermal buffering at the level of clusters of boulder fields. But how the rock structure (number of rock layers, rock size and cavity of boulders) influences microclimate of boulder fields remains an open question. We used a multilevel modelling approach to detect the factors driving microhabitat temperatures in different seasons at different spatial scales in an Australian alpine region. We found that significant temperature differences existed within and between clusters of boulder fields in different seasons. Besides elevation and vegetation cover, the number of rock layers and rock cavity size also exerts important influences on extreme temperatures at the site (i.e. single boulder field) scale. Topographical variables such as slope gradient and elevation influenced minimum temperatures at the boulder field cluster scale. Variations in boulder field temperatures were significant at fine scales, with variations in minimum temperatures exceeding those of maximum temperatures. We suggest that variations in slope gradient and elevation, interacting with vegetation cover, the number of rock layers and rock cavity size can lead to fine-grained thermal variability, which potentially provides refugia for species at microsites, even when regional climatic conditions become less suitable for their survival.

  3. Fluoroester Co-Solvents for Low-Temperature Li+ Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall; Bugga, Ratnakumar; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Smith, Kiah; Bhalla, Pooja

    2009-01-01

    Electrolytes comprising LiPF6 dissolved in alkyl carbonate/fluoroester mixtures have been found to afford improved low-temperature performance and greater high-temperature resilience in rechargeable lithium-ion electrochemical cells. These and other electrolytes comprising lithium salts dissolved mixtures of esters have been studied in continuing research directed toward extending the lower limit of operating temperatures of such cells. This research at earlier stages, and the underlying physical and chemical principles, were reported in numerous previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The purpose of the present focus on high-temperature resilience in addition to low-temperature performance is to address issues posed by the flammability of the esters and, at temperatures near the upper end (about 55 C) of their intended operating temperature range, by their high chemical reactivity. As used here, high-temperature resilience signifies, loosely, a desired combination of low flammability of an electrolyte mixture and the ability of a cell that contains the mixture to sustain a relatively small loss of reversible charge/discharge capacity during storage in the fully charged condition at high temperature. The selection of fluoroesters for study as candidate electrolyte solvent components to increase high-temperature resilience was prompted in part by the observation that like other halogenated compounds, fluoroesters have low flammability. The fluoroesters investigated in this study include trifluoroethyl butyrate (TFEB), ethyl trifluoroacetate (ETFA), trifluoroethyl acetate (TFEA), and methyl pentafluoropropionate (MPFP). Solvent mixtures were prepared by mixing these fluoroesters with two other esters: ethylene carbonate (EC) and ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC).

  4. Data set: 31 years of spatially distributed air temperature, humidity, precipitation amount and precipitation phase from a mountain catchment in the rain-snow transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty one years of spatially distributed air temperature, relative humidity, dew point temperature, precipitation amount, and precipitation phase data are presented for the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed. The data are spatially distributed over a 10m Lidar-derived digital elevation model at ...

  5. Spatially controlled cell adhesion on three-dimensional substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, Christine; Reinhardt, Martina; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Leisen, Daniel; Trouillet, Vanessa; Truckenmüller, Roman; Blau, Axel; Ziegler, Christiane; Welle, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The microenvironment of cells in vivo is defined by spatiotemporal patterns of chemical and biophysical cues. Therefore, one important goal of tissue engineering is the generation of scaffolds with defined biofunctionalization in order to control processes like cell adhesion and differentiation. Mim

  6. Temperature dependent electroreflectance study of CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raadik, T., E-mail: taavi.raadik@ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Krustok, J.; Josepson, R.; Hiie, J. [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Potlog, T.; Spalatu, N. [Moldova State University, A. Mateevici str. 60, MD-2009 Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium telluride is a promising material for large scale photovoltaic applications. In this paper we study CdS/CdTe heterojunction solar cells with electroreflectance spectroscopy. Both CdS and CdTe layers in solar cells were grown sequentially without intermediate processing by the close-space sublimation method. Electroreflectance measurements were performed in the temperature range of T = 100–300 K. Two solar cells were investigated with conversion efficiencies of 4.1% and 9.6%. The main focus in this work was to study the temperature dependent behavior of the broadening parameter and the bandgap energy of CdTe thin film in solar cells. Room temperature bandgap values of CdTe were E{sub g} = 1.499 eV and E{sub g} = 1.481 eV for higher and lower efficiency solar cells, respectively. Measured bandgap energies are lower than for single crystal CdTe. The formation of CdTe{sub 1−x}S{sub x} solid solution layer on the surface of CdTe is proposed as a possible cause of lower bandgap energies. - Highlights: ► Temperature dependent electroreflectance measurements of CdS/CdTe solar cells ► Investigation of junction properties between CdS and CdTe ► Formation of CdTe{sub 1−} {sub x}S{sub x} solid solution layer in the junction area.

  7. A cell-permeable fluorescent polymeric thermometer for intracellular temperature mapping in mammalian cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruyuki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Changes in intracellular temperatures reflect the activity of the cell. Thus, the tool to measure intracellular temperatures could provide valuable information about cellular status. We previously reported a method to analyze the intracellular temperature distribution using a fluorescent polymeric thermometer (FPT in combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM. Intracellular delivery of the FPT used in the previous study required microinjection. We now report a novel FPT that is cell permeable and highly photostable, and we describe the application of this FPT to the imaging of intracellular temperature distributions in various types of mammalian cell lines. This cell-permeable FPT displayed a temperature resolution of 0.05°C to 0.54°C within the range from 28°C to 38°C in HeLa cell extracts. Using our optimized protocol, this cell-permeable FPT spontaneously diffused into HeLa cells within 10 min of incubation and exhibited minimal toxicity over several hours of observation. FLIM analysis confirmed a temperature difference between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and heat production near the mitochondria, which were also detected previously using the microinjected FPT. We also showed that this cell-permeable FPT protocol can be applied to other mammalian cell lines, COS7 and NIH/3T3 cells. Thus, this cell-permeable FPT represents a promising tool to study cellular states and functions with respect to temperature.

  8. A cell-permeable fluorescent polymeric thermometer for intracellular temperature mapping in mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Teruyuki; Fukuda, Nanaho; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Inada, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    Changes in intracellular temperatures reflect the activity of the cell. Thus, the tool to measure intracellular temperatures could provide valuable information about cellular status. We previously reported a method to analyze the intracellular temperature distribution using a fluorescent polymeric thermometer (FPT) in combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Intracellular delivery of the FPT used in the previous study required microinjection. We now report a novel FPT that is cell permeable and highly photostable, and we describe the application of this FPT to the imaging of intracellular temperature distributions in various types of mammalian cell lines. This cell-permeable FPT displayed a temperature resolution of 0.05°C to 0.54°C within the range from 28°C to 38°C in HeLa cell extracts. Using our optimized protocol, this cell-permeable FPT spontaneously diffused into HeLa cells within 10 min of incubation and exhibited minimal toxicity over several hours of observation. FLIM analysis confirmed a temperature difference between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and heat production near the mitochondria, which were also detected previously using the microinjected FPT. We also showed that this cell-permeable FPT protocol can be applied to other mammalian cell lines, COS7 and NIH/3T3 cells. Thus, this cell-permeable FPT represents a promising tool to study cellular states and functions with respect to temperature.

  9. Spatial-temporal variation of near-surface temperature lapse rates over the Tianshan Mountains, central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan-Jun; Shen, Yanjun; Goetz, Jason; Brenning, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Adequate estimates of near-surface temperature lapse rate (γlocal) are needed to represent air temperature in remote mountain regions with sparse instrumental records such as the mountains of central Asia. To identify the spatial and temporal variations of γlocal in the Tianshan Mountains, long-term (1961-2011) daily maximum, mean, and minimum temperature (Tmax, Tmean, and Tmin) data from 17 weather stations and 1 year of temperature logger data were analyzed considering three subregions: northern slopes, Kaidu Basin, and southern slopes. Simple linear regression was performed to identify relationships between elevation and temperature, revealing spatial and seasonal variations in γlocal. The γlocal are higher on the southern slopes than the northern slopes due to topography and regional climate conditions. Seasonally, γlocal are more pronounced higher in the summer than in the winter months. The γlocal are generally higher for Tmax than Tmean and Tmin. The Kaidu Basin shows similar seasonal variability but with the highest γlocal for Tmean and Tmin occurring in the spring. Formation of γlocal patterns is associated with the interactions of climate factors in different subregions. Overall, annual mean γlocal for Tmax, Tmean, and Tmin in the study's subregions are lower than the standard atmospheric lapse rate (6.5°C km-1), which would therefore be an inadequate choice for representing the near-surface temperature conditions in this area. Our findings highlight the importance of spatial and temporal variations of γlocal in hydrometeorological research in the data-sparse Tianshan Mountains.

  10. Efficient energy transfer in light-harvesting systems, I: optimal temperature, reorganization energy, and spatial-temporal correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jianlan; Shen, Young; Cao, Jianshu; Silbey, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of efficient and robust energy transfer in light-harvesting systems provides new insights for the optimal design of artificial systems. In this paper, we use the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex and phycocyanin 645 (PC 645) to explore the general dependence on physical parameters that help maximize the efficiency and maintain its stability. With the Haken-Strobl model, the maximal energy transfer efficiency (ETE) is achieved under an intermediate optimal value of dephasing rate. Guided by the insight, we use the generalized Bloch-Redfield (GBR) equation approach to correctly describe dissipative exciton dynamics and find that maximal ETE can be achieved under various physical conditions, including temperature, reorganization energy, and spatial-temporal correlations in noise. We also identify regimes of reorganization energy where the ETE changes monotonically with temperature or spatial correlation and therefore cannot be optimized with respect to these two variables.

  11. Urban Surface Temperature Time Series Estimation at the Local Scale by Spatial-Spectral Unmixing of Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zina Mitraka

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of urban climate requires frequent and accurate monitoring of land surface temperature (LST, at the local scale. Since currently, no space-borne sensor provides frequent thermal infrared imagery at high spatial resolution, the scientific community has focused on synergistic methods for retrieving LST that can be suitable for urban studies. Synergistic methods that combine the spatial structure of visible and near-infrared observations with the more frequent, but low-resolution surface temperature patterns derived by thermal infrared imagery provide excellent means for obtaining frequent LST estimates at the local scale in cities. In this study, a new approach based on spatial-spectral unmixing techniques was developed for improving the spatial resolution of thermal infrared observations and the subsequent LST estimation. The method was applied to an urban area in Crete, Greece, for the time period of one year. The results were evaluated against independent high-resolution LST datasets and found to be very promising, with RMSE less than 2 K in all cases. The developed approach has therefore a high potential to be operationally used in the near future, exploiting the Copernicus Sentinel (2 and 3 observations, to provide high spatio-temporal resolution LST estimates in cities.

  12. 400 W High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2006-01-01

    This work demonstrates the operation of a 30 cell high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. This prototype stack has been developed at the Institute of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, as a proof-of-concept for a low pressure cathode air cooled HTPEM stack. The membranes used are Celtec P...... of the species as in a LTPEM fuel cell system. The use of the HTPEM fuel cell makes it possible to use reformed gas at high CO concentrations, still with a stable efficient performance....

  13. Direct asymmetry measurement of temperature and density spatial distributions in inertial confinement fusion plasmas from pinhole space-resolved spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Nagayama, T; Florido, R; Mayes, D; Tommasini, R; Koch, J A; Delettrez, J A; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional space-resolved temperature and density images of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion core have been diagnosed for the first time. Argon-doped, direct-drive ICF experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility and a collection of two-dimensional space-resolved spectra were obtained from an array of gated, spectrally resolved pinhole images recorded by a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager. Detailed spectral analysis revealed asymmetries of the core not just in shape and size but in the temperature and density spatial distributions, thus characterizing the core with an unprecedented level of detail.

  14. Emergence of spatial structure in cell groups and the evolution of cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey D Nadell

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available On its own, a single cell cannot exert more than a microscopic influence on its immediate surroundings. However, via strength in numbers and the expression of cooperative phenotypes, such cells can enormously impact their environments. Simple cooperative phenotypes appear to abound in the microbial world, but explaining their evolution is challenging because they are often subject to exploitation by rapidly growing, non-cooperative cell lines. Population spatial structure may be critical for this problem because it influences the extent of interaction between cooperative and non-cooperative individuals. It is difficult for cooperative cells to succeed in competition if they become mixed with non-cooperative cells, which can exploit the public good without themselves paying a cost. However, if cooperative cells are segregated in space and preferentially interact with each other, they may prevail. Here we use a multi-agent computational model to study the origin of spatial structure within growing cell groups. Our simulations reveal that the spatial distribution of genetic lineages within these groups is linked to a small number of physical and biological parameters, including cell growth rate, nutrient availability, and nutrient diffusivity. Realistic changes in these parameters qualitatively alter the emergent structure of cell groups, and thereby determine whether cells with cooperative phenotypes can locally and globally outcompete exploitative cells. We argue that cooperative and exploitative cell lineages will spontaneously segregate in space under a wide range of conditions and, therefore, that cellular cooperation may evolve more readily than naively expected.

  15. Recent Research toward Understanding Spatial, Temporal, and Climatic Variation in Stream Temperatures across the Northwest U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, D.; Roper, B.; Luce, C.; Holden, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Global air temperature increases raise concerns about effects on thermal regimes of the Earth's rivers and streams. These concerns are acute in the Northwest U.S. due to legislatively mandated water quality standards and the importance of recreational and commercial fisheries for cold-water species such as salmon and trout. Efforts to study climate effects on stream thermal regimes are limited by sparse long-term monitoring records, resulting in a lack of information on historical spatial and temporal variation from which to measure departure. We present research from the last five years that begins to address these shortcomings, including: 1) estimation of stream warming rates in recent decades associated with long-term climate change (+0.11 °C/decade for mean annual temperatures; +0.22 °C/decade for summer temperatures), 2) development of an inexpensive protocol for monitoring full-year temperatures in dynamic mountain streams, 3) rapid expansion of an informal regional monitoring network from 3,000 sites in the last three years, 4) development and use of high-resolution (i.e., 100's of meters) air temperature microclimate models to understand variation in stream temperatures, 5) development of NorWeST, a comprehensive stream temperature database consisting of > 45,000 summers of temperature measurement at > 15,000 unique stream sites, and 6) use of new spatial statistical stream network models with NorWeST to krige predictions at unsampled locations and develop thermal information for most of the region's 350,000 stream kilometers. There is much yet to be learned regarding thermal regimes in rivers and streams but the accelerating pace of knowledge discovery driven by inexpensive sensors, computational improvements, geospatial technologies, and new analyses suggests that many important remaining unknowns will be resolved in the next five years.

  16. Strategies for Lowering Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tarancón

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Lowering the operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs to the intermediate range (500–700 ºC has become one of the main SOFC research goals. High operating temperatures put numerous requirements on materials selection and on secondary units, limiting the commercial development of SOFCs. The present review first focuses on the main effects of reducing the operating temperature in terms of materials stability, thermo-mechanical mismatch, thermal management and efficiency. After a brief survey of the state-of-the-art materials for SOFCs, attention is focused on emerging oxide-ionic conductors with high conductivity in the intermediate range of temperatures with an introductory section on materials technology for reducing the electrolyte thickness. Finally, recent advances in cathode materials based on layered mixed ionic-electronic conductors are highlighted because the decreasing temperature converts the cathode into the major source of electrical losses for the whole SOFC system. It is concluded that the introduction of alternative materials that would enable solid oxide fuel cells to operate in the intermediate range of temperatures would have a major impact on the commercialization of fuel cell technology.

  17. InGaN High-Temperature Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikov, David

    2015-01-01

    This Phase II project developed Indium-Gallium-Nitride (InGaN) photovoltaic cells for high-temperature and high-radiation environments. The project included theoretical and experimental refinement of device structures produced in Phase I as well as modeling and optimization of solar cell device processing. The devices have been tested under concentrated air mass zero (AM0) sunlight, at temperatures from 100 degC to 250 degC, and after exposure to ionizing radiation. The results are expected to further verify that InGaN can be used for high-temperature and high-radiation solar cells. The large commercial solar cell market could benefit from the hybridization of InGaN materials to existing solar cell technology, which would significantly increase cell efficiency without relying on highly toxic compounds. In addition, further development of this technology to even lower bandgap materials for space applications would extend lifetimes of satellite solar cell arrays due to increased radiation hardness. This could be of importance to the Departmentof Defense (DoD) and commercial satellite manufacturers.

  18. Spatial concentration distribution analysis of cells in electrode-multilayered microchannel by dielectric property measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiafeng; Kodera, Tatsuya; Obara, Hiromichi; Sugawara, Michiko; Takei, Masahiro

    2015-07-01

    The spatial concentration distribution of cells in a microchannel is measured by combining the dielectric properties of cells with the specific structure of the electrode-multilayered microchannel. The dielectric properties of cells obtained with the impedance spectroscopy method includes the cell permittivity and dielectric relaxation, which corresponds to the cell concentration and structure. The electrode-multilayered microchannel is constructed by 5 cross-sections, and each cross-section contains 5 electrode-layers embedded with 16 micro electrodes. In the experiment, the dielectric properties of cell suspensions with different volume concentrations are measured with different electrode-combinations corresponding to different electric field distributions. The dielectric relaxations of different cell concentrations are compared and discussed with the Maxwell-Wagner dispersion theory, and the relaxation frequencies are analysed by a cell polarization model established based on the Hanai cell model. Moreover, a significant linear relationship with AC frequency dependency between relative permittivity and cell concentration was found, which provides a promising way to on-line estimate cell concentration in microchannel. Finally, cell distribution in 1 cross-section of the microchannel (X and Y directions) was measured with different electrode-combinations using the dielectric properties of cell suspensions, and cell concentration distribution along the microchannel (Z direction) was visualized at flowing state. The present cell spatial sensing study provides a new approach for 3 dimensional non-invasive online cell sensing for biological industry.

  19. Costs and benefits of thermoregulation revisited: both the heterogeneity and spatial structure of temperature drive energetic costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Michael W; Angilletta, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, ecologists have stepped up to address the challenges imposed by rapidly changing climates. Some researchers have developed niche-based methods to predict how species will shift their ranges. Such methods have evolved rapidly, resulting in models that incorporate physiological and behavioral mechanisms. Despite their sophistication, these models fail to account for environmental heterogeneity at the scale of an organism. We used an individual-based model to quantify the effects of operative environmental temperatures, as well as their heterogeneity and spatial structure, on the thermoregulation, movement, and energetics of ectotherms. Our simulations showed that the heterogeneity and spatial structure of a thermal landscape are as important as its mean temperature. In fact, temperature and heterogeneity interact to determine organismal performance. Consequently, the popular index of environmental quality (d(e)), which ignores variance and spatial structure, is inherently flawed as a descriptor of the thermal quality of an environment. Future efforts to model species' distributions should link thermoregulation and activity to environmental heterogeneity at fine scales.

  20. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Systems, Control and Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Justesen, Kristian Kjær

    2015-01-01

    Various system topologies are available when it comes to designing high temperature PEM fuel cell systems. Very simple system designs are possible using pure hydrogen, and more complex system designs present themselves when alternative fuels are desired, using reformer systems. The use of reformed...... fuels utilizes one of the main advantages of the high temperature PEM fuel cell: robustness to fuel quality and impurities. In order for such systems to provide efficient, robust, and reliable energy, proper control strategies are needed. The complexity and nonlinearity of many of the components...

  1. Status and prospects of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bangwu Liu; Yue Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Compared with conventional electric power generation systems, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has many advantages because of its unique features. High temperature SOFC has been successfully developed to its commercial applications, but it still faces many problems which hamper large-scale commercial applications of SOFC. To reduce the cost of SOFC, intermediate tem-perature solid oxide fuel cell (IT-SOFC) is presently under rapid development. The status of IT-SOFC was reviewed with emphasis on discussion of their component materials.

  2. Direct dimethyl ether high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng

    and suffers from low DME solubility in water. When the DME - water mixture is fed as vapour miscibility is no longer a problem. The increased temperature is more beneficial for the kinetics of the direct oxidation of DME than of methanol. The Open Circuit Voltage (OCV) with DME operation was 50 to 100 m......A high temperature polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer fuel cell was fed with dimethyl ether (DME) and water vapour mixture on the anode at ambient pressure with air as oxidant. A peak power density of 79 mW/cm2 was achieved at 200°C. A conventional polymer based direct DME fuel cell is liquid fed...

  3. Tetrazole substituted polymers for high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkensmeier, Dirk; My Hanh Duong, Ngoc; Brela, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    While tetrazole (TZ) has much lower basicity than imidazole and may not be fully protonated in the presence of phosphoric acid (PA), DFT calculations suggest that the basicity of TZ groups can be increased by the introduction of a 2,6-dioxy-phenyl-group in position 5 of TZ. This structure allows...... interesting for use in a high temperature fuel cell (HT PEMFC). Based on these findings, two polymers incorporating the proposed TZ groups were synthesised, formed into membranes, doped with PA and tested for fuel cell relevant properties. At room temperature, TZ-PEEN and commercial meta-PBI showed...

  4. High temperature polymer fuel cells. Heat utilization and co tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jens, Oluf Jensen; Qingfeng, Li; Ronghuan, He; Gang, Xiao; Ji-An, Gao; Bjerrum, N.J. [Denmark Technical Univ., Department of Chemistry, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-09-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer poly-benzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200 C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working temperature allows for utilization of the excess heat for fuel processing. Moreover, it provides an excellent CO tolerance of several percent, and the system needs no purification of hydrogen from a reformer. Continuous service for over 6 months at 150 C has been demonstrated. (authors)

  5. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  6. Spatial and dynamic organization of molecular structures in the cell nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Anne-Kee

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we attempt to provide a better understanding of the principles that underlie the spatial dynamic organization of the cell nucleus. Chapter 1 reviews the current status of knowledge about the structural and functional organization of the cell nucleus. In chapter 2, the development of a

  7. Photosensitized production of singlet oxygen: spatially-resolved optical studies in single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbach, Thomas; Kuimova, Marina; Gbur, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    be monitored using viability assays. Time- and spatially-resolved optical measurements of both singlet oxygen and its precursor, the excited state sensitizer, reflect the complex and dynamic morphology of the cell. These experiments help elucidate photoinduced, oxygen-dependent events that compromise cell...

  8. Spatial and dynamic organization of molecular structures in the cell nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Anne-Kee

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we attempt to provide a better understanding of the principles that underlie the spatial dynamic organization of the cell nucleus. Chapter 1 reviews the current status of knowledge about the structural and functional organization of the cell nucleus. In chapter 2, the development of a

  9. Spatiotemporal Pattern Formation in BioFluids I: Cell Shape Perturbants As Evidence of Spatially-Organised Membrane Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Lofthouse, J T

    2003-01-01

    I show the assumed Bilayer structure of cell membranes is Topologically falsified by known aminophospholipid dynamics in metabolically-active, Far from Equilibrium cells. The sensitivity of lipid and cytoplasmic flows to temperature, surfactants, viscosity and the gravity vector are used to suggest that rather than being random viscous fluids as currently assumed, both are actually spatially-organised by convective and shear driven mechanisms in vivo. I show how protein-lipid feedback provokes a Gestalt Shift in Cell Mechanics by demonstrating that the primary forces involved in shape changes are generated by bifurcations in fluid flow Topology, which induce affine deformations of the cytoskeletal lattice. The feedback model allows the transduction of Gravitational information into biological form, is universally applicable, and provides a rationale for Homeoviscous Adaptation, and the extensive lipid polymorphism observed in Nature.

  10. Non-invasive chemically specific measurement of subsurface temperature in biological tissues using surface-enhanced spatially offset Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nicholas; Matousek, Pavel

    2016-06-23

    Here we demonstrate for the first time the viability of characterising non-invasively the subsurface temperature of SERS nanoparticles embedded within biological tissues using spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS). The proposed analytical method (T-SESORS) is applicable in general to diffusely scattering (turbid) media and features high sensitivity and high chemical selectivity. The method relies on monitoring the Stokes and anti-Stokes bands of SERS nanoparticles in depth using SORS. The approach has been conceptually demonstrated using a SORS variant, transmission Raman spectroscopy (TRS), by measuring subsurface temperatures within a slab of porcine tissue (5 mm thick). Root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) of 0.20 °C were achieved when measuring temperatures over ranges between 25 and 44 °C. This unique capability complements the array of existing, predominantly surface-based, temperature monitoring techniques. It expands on a previously demonstrated SORS temperature monitoring capability by adding extra sensitivity stemming from SERS to low concentration analytes. The technique paves the way for a wide range of applications including subsurface, chemical-specific, non-invasive temperature analysis within turbid translucent media including: the human body, subsurface monitoring of chemical (e.g. catalytic) processes in manufacture quality and process control and research. Additionally, the method opens prospects for control of thermal treatment of cancer in vivo with direct non-invasive feedback on the temperature of mediating plasmonic nanoparticles.

  11. Dynamic Model of the High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    consists of a prototype cathode air cooled 30 cell HTPEM fuel cell stack developed at the Institute of Energy Technology at Aalborg University. This fuel cell stack uses PEMEAS Celtec P-1000 membranes and runs on pure hydrogen in a dead-end anode configuration with a purge valve. The cooling of the stack...... elements for start-up, heat conduction through stack insulation, cathode air convection, and heating of the inlet gases in the manifold. Various measurements are presented to validate the model predictions of the stack temperatures....

  12. Spatial distribution of excitatory synapses on the dendrites of ganglion cells in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-Peng; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory glutamatergic inputs from bipolar cells affect the physiological properties of ganglion cells in the mammalian retina. The spatial distribution of these excitatory synapses on the dendrites of retinal ganglion cells thus may shape their distinct functions. To visualize the spatial pattern of excitatory glutamatergic input into the ganglion cells in the mouse retina, particle-mediated gene transfer of plasmids expressing postsynaptic density 95-green fluorescent fusion protein (PSD95-GFP) was used to label the excitatory synapses. Despite wide variation in the size and morphology of the retinal ganglion cells, the expression of PSD95 puncta was found to follow two general rules. Firstly, the PSD95 puncta are regularly spaced, at 1-2 µm intervals, along the dendrites, whereby the presence of an excitatory synapse creates an exclusion zone that rules out the presence of other glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Secondly, the spatial distribution of PSD95 puncta on the dendrites of diverse retinal ganglion cells are similar in that the number of excitatory synapses appears to be less on primary dendrites and to increase to a plateau on higher branch order dendrites. These observations suggest that synaptogenesis is spatially regulated along the dendritic segments and that the number of synaptic contacts is relatively constant beyond the primary dendrites. Interestingly, we also found that the linear puncta density is slightly higher in large cells than in small cells. This may suggest that retinal ganglion cells with a large dendritic field tend to show an increased connectivity of excitatory synapses that makes up for their reduced dendrite density. Mapping the spatial distribution pattern of the excitatory synapses on retinal ganglion cells thus provides explicit structural information that is essential for our understanding of how excitatory glutamatergic inputs shape neuronal responses.

  13. Spatial distributions of red blood cells significantly alter local haemodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Sherwood

    Full Text Available Although bulk changes in red blood cell concentration between vessels have been well characterised, local distributions are generally overlooked. Red blood cells aggregate, deform and migrate within vessels, forming heterogeneous distributions which have considerable effect on local haemodynamics. The present study reports data on the local distribution of human red blood cells in a sequentially bifurcating microchannel, representing the branching geometry of the microvasculature. Imaging methodologies with simple extrapolations are used to infer three dimensional, time-averaged velocity and haematocrit distributions under a range of flow conditions. Strong correlation between the bluntness of the velocity and haematocrit profiles in the parent branch of the geometry is observed and red blood cell aggregation has a notable effect on the observed trends. The two branches of the first bifurcation show similar characteristics in terms of the shapes of the profiles and the extent of plasma skimming, despite the difference in geometric configuration. In the second bifurcation, considerable asymmetry between the branches in the plasma skimming relationship is observed, and elucidated by considering individual haematocrit profiles. The results of the study highlight the importance of considering local haematocrit distributions in the analysis of blood flow and could lead to more accurate computational models of blood flow in microvascular networks. The experimental approaches developed in this work provide a foundation for further examining the characteristics of microhaemodynamics.

  14. Investigating spatial self-shielding and temperature effects for homogeneous and double heterogeneous pebble models with MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.; Nuenighoff; Pohl, C.; Allelein, H.J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energieforschung, Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik (IEF-6)

    2010-05-15

    The gas-cooled, high temperature reactor (HTR) represents a valuable option for the future development of nuclear technology, because of its excellent safety features. One main safety feature is the negative temperature coefficient which is due to the Doppler broadening of the (n,y) resonance absorption cross section. A second important effect is the spatial self-shielding due to the double heterogeneous geometry of a pebble bed reactor. At FZ-Juelich two reactor analysis codes have been developed: VSOP for core design and MGT for transient analysis. Currently an update of the nuclear cross section libraries to ENDF/B-VII.0 of both codes takes place. In order to take the temperature dependency as well as the spatial self-shielding into account the absorption cross sections {sigma}{sub (n,y)} for the resonance absorbers like {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U have to be provided as function of incident neutron energy, temperature and nuclide concentration. There are two reasons for choosing the Monte-Carlo approach to calculate group wise cross sections. First, the former applied ZUT-DGL code to generate the resonance cross section tables for MGT is so far not able to handle the new resonance description based on Reich-Moore instead of Single-level Breit-Wigner. Second, the rising interest in PuO{sub 2} fuel motivated an investigation on the generation of group wise cross sections describing thermal resonances of {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu. (orig.)

  15. Advancing the retrievals of surface emissivity by modelling the spatial distribution of temperature in the thermal hyperspectral scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoni, M.; Haelterman, R.; Lodewyckx, P.

    2016-05-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Land Surface Emissivity (LSE) are commonly retrieved from thermal hyperspectral imaging. However, their retrieval is not a straightforward procedure because the mathematical problem is ill-posed. This procedure becomes more challenging in an urban area where the spatial distribution of temperature varies substantially in space and time. For assessing the influence of several spatial variances on the deviation of the temperature in the scene, a statistical model is created. The model was tested using several images from various times in the day and was validated using in-situ measurements. The results highlight the importance of the geometry of the scene and its setting relative to the position of the sun during day time. It also shows that when the position of the sun is in zenith, the main contribution to the thermal distribution in the scene is the thermal capacity of the landcover materials. In this paper we propose a new Temperature and Emissivity Separation (TES) method which integrates 3D surface and landcover information from LIDAR and VNIR hyperspectral imaging data in an attempt to improve the TES procedure for a thermal hyperspectral scene. The experimental results prove the high accuracy of the proposed method in comparison to another conventional TES model.

  16. New polymer electrolytes for low temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundholm, F.; Elomaa, M.; Ennari, J.; Hietala, S.; Paronen, M. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland). Lab. of Polymer Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    Proton conducting polymer membranes for demanding applications, such as low temperature fuel cells, have been synthesised and characterised. Pre-irradiation methods are used to introduce sulfonic acid groups, directly or using polystyrene grafting, in stable, preformed polymer films. The membranes produced in this work show promise for the development of cost-effective, highly conducting membranes. (orig.)

  17. Silicon solar cell monitors high temperature furnace operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, G. J.

    1968-01-01

    Silicon solar cell, attached to each viewpoint, monitors that incandescent emission from the hot interior of a furnace without interfering with the test assembly or optical pyrometry during the test. This technique can provide continuous indication of hot spots or provide warning of excessive temperatures in cooler regions.

  18. Advanced energy analysis of high temperature fuel cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the performance of high temperature fuel cell systems is studied using a new method of exergy analysis. The thesis consists of three parts: ⢠In the first part a new analysis method is developed, which not only considers the total exergy losses in a unit operation, but which distingu

  19. Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Alfred Junio

    This dissertation focuses on the development of nanostructured cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and their performance at low operating temperatures. Cathodes were mainly fabricated by the infiltration method, whereby electrocatalysts are introduced onto porous, ionic conducting backbones......degreeC. The most promising cathode was integrated onto an anode supported cell and it was found that the cell exhibits electrochemical stability with no measureable degradation during 1500 h operation at 700degreeC. LaCoO3 and Co3O4 infiltrated - CGO cathodes were also investigated and revealed...

  20. Lowering the temperature of solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsman, Eric D; Lee, Kang Taek

    2011-11-18

    Fuel cells are uniquely capable of overcoming combustion efficiency limitations (e.g., the Carnot cycle). However, the linking of fuel cells (an energy conversion device) and hydrogen (an energy carrier) has emphasized investment in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells as part of a larger hydrogen economy and thus relegated fuel cells to a future technology. In contrast, solid oxide fuel cells are capable of operating on conventional fuels (as well as hydrogen) today. The main issue for solid oxide fuel cells is high operating temperature (about 800°C) and the resulting materials and cost limitations and operating complexities (e.g., thermal cycling). Recent solid oxide fuel cells results have demonstrated extremely high power densities of about 2 watts per square centimeter at 650°C along with flexible fueling, thus enabling higher efficiency within the current fuel infrastructure. Newly developed, high-conductivity electrolytes and nanostructured electrode designs provide a path for further performance improvement at much lower temperatures, down to ~350°C, thus providing opportunity to transform the way we convert and store energy.

  1. On the importance of modelling the internal spatial dynamics of biological cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyid, Faiz; Kalvala, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Spatial effects such as cell shape have very often been considered negligible in models of cellular pathways, and many existing simulation infrastructures do not take such effects into consideration. Recent experimental results are reversing this judgement by showing that very small spatial variations can make a big difference in the fate of a cell. This is particularly the case when considering eukaryotic cells, which have a complex physical structure and many subtle control mechanisms, but bacteria are also interesting for the huge variation in shape both between species and in different phases of their lifecycle. In this work we perform simulations that measure the effect of three common bacterial shapes on the behaviour of model cellular pathways. To perform these experiments we develop ReDi-Cell, a highly scalable GPGPU cell simulation infrastructure for the modelling of cellular pathways in spatially detailed environments. ReDi-Cell is validated against known-good simulations, prior to its use in new work. We then use ReDi-Cell to conduct novel experiments that demonstrate the effect that three common bacterial shapes (Cocci, Bacilli and Spirilli) have on the behaviour of model cellular pathways. Pathway wavefront shape, pathway concentration gradients, and chemical species distribution are measured in the three different shapes. We also quantify the impact of internal cellular clutter on the same pathways. Through this work we show that variations in the shape or configuration of these common cell shapes alter model cell behaviour.

  2. Durable Catalysts for High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durability of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is recognized as one of the most important issues to be addressed before the commercialization. The failure mechanisms are not well understood, however, degradation of carbon supported noble metal catalysts is identified as a major failure...... corrosion, in turn, triggers the agglomeration of platinum particles resulting in reduction of the active surface area and catalytic activity. This is a major mechanism of the catalyst degradation and a key challenge to the PEMFC long-term durability. High temperature PEMFC, on the other hand, has attached...... the selectivity for platinum loading. Fuel cell durability tests in term of performance degradation were performed with acid doped polybenzimidazole membrane fuel cells at temperatures of up to 160°C. The tests were focused on catalyst degradation by means of a potential cycling protocol. The electrochemical...

  3. Advanced anodes for high-temperature fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, A.; Barnett, S.; Gorte, R.J.;

    2004-01-01

    Fuel cells will undoubtedly find widespread use in this new millennium in the conversion of chemical to electrical energy, as they offer very high efficiencies and have unique scalability in electricity-generation applications. The solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is one of the most exciting...... of these energy technologies; it is an all-ceramic device that operates at temperatures in the range 500-1,000degreesC. The SOFC offers certain advantages over lower temperature fuel cells, notably its ability to use carbon monoxide as a fuel rather than being poisoned by it, and the availability of high......-grade exhaust heat for combined heat and power, or combined cycle gas-turbine applications. Although cost is clearly the most important barrier to widespread SOFC implementation, perhaps the most important technical barriers currently being addressed relate to the electrodes, particularly the fuel electrode...

  4. Improved Wide Operating Temperature Range of Li-Ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2013-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate over a wide temperature range (-60 to +60 C) to satisfy the requirements of various applications including landers, rovers, penetrators, CEV, CLV, etc. This work addresses the need for robust rechargeable batteries that can operate well over a wide temperature range. The Department of Energy (DoE) has identified a number of technical barriers associated with the development of Liion rechargeable batteries for PHEVs. For this reason, DoE has interest in the development of advanced electrolytes that will improve performance over a wide range of temperatures, and lead to long life characteristics (5,000 cycles over a 10-year life span). There is also interest in improving the high-voltage stability of these candidate electrolyte systems to enable the operation of up to 5 V with high specific energy cathode materials. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-40 to +40 C); however, the rate capability at the lower temperatures is very poor. In addition, the low-temperature performance typically deteriorates rapidly upon being exposed to high temperatures. A number of electrolyte formulations were developed that incorporate the use of electrolyte additives to improve the high-temperature resilience, low-temperature power capability, and life characteristics of methyl propionate (MP)-based electrolyte solutions. These electrolyte additives include mono-fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), lithium oxalate, vinylene carbonate (VC), and lithium bis(oxalate borate) (LiBOB), which have previously been shown to result in improved high-temperature resilience of all carbonate-based electrolytes. These MP-based electrolytes with additives have been shown to have improved performance in experiments with MCMB-LiNiCoAlO2 cells.

  5. Spatial and temporal patterns of land surface fluxes from remotely sensed surface temperatures within an uncertainty modelling framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. McCabe

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterising the development of evapotranspiration through time is a difficult task, particularly when utilising remote sensing data, because retrieved information is often spatially dense, but temporally sparse. Techniques to expand these essentially instantaneous measures are not only limited, they are restricted by the general paucity of information describing the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of evaporative patterns. In a novel approach, temporal changes in land surface temperatures, derived from NOAA-AVHRR imagery and a generalised split-window algorithm, are used as a calibration variable in a simple land surface scheme (TOPUP and combined within the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE methodology to provide estimates of areal evapotranspiration at the pixel scale. Such an approach offers an innovative means of transcending the patch or landscape scale of SVAT type models, to spatially distributed estimates of model output. The resulting spatial and temporal patterns of land surface fluxes and surface resistance are used to more fully understand the hydro-ecological trends observed across a study catchment in eastern Australia. The modelling approach is assessed by comparing predicted cumulative evapotranspiration values with surface fluxes determined from Bowen ratio systems and using auxiliary information such as in-situ soil moisture measurements and depth to groundwater to corroborate observed responses.

  6. File list: His.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Histone Adult Temperature sensitiv...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Histone Adult Temperature sensitiv...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Histone Adult Temperature sensitiv...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Histone Adult Temperature sensitiv...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  10. Spatial analysis of temperature (BHT/DST) data and consequences for heat-flow determination in sedimentary basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, A.; Merriam, D.F.; Davis, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Large numbers of bottom-hole temperatures (BHTs) and temperatures measured during drill-stem tests (DSTs) are available in areas explored for hydrocarbons, but their usefulness for estimating geothermal gradients and heat-flow density is limited. We investigated a large data set of BHT and DST measurements taken in boreholes in the American Midcontinent, a geologically uniform stable cratonic area, and propose an empirical correction for BHTs based on relationships between BHTs, DSTs, and thermal logs. This empirical correction is compared with similar approaches determined for other areas. The data were analyzed by multivariate statistics prior to the BHT correction to identify anomalous measurements and quantify external influences. Spatial patterns in temperature measurements for major stratigraphic units outline relations to regional structure. Comparision of temperature and structure trend-surface residuals reveals a relationship between temperature highs and local structure highs. The anticlines, developed by continuous but intermittent movement of basement fault blocks in the Late Paleozoic, are subtle features having closures of 10-30 m and contain relatively small hydrocarbon reservoirs. The temperature anomalies of the order of 5-7 ??C may reflect fluids moving upward along fractures and faults, rather than changes in thermal conductivity resulting from different pore fluids. ?? Springer-Verlag 1997.

  11. Optimization of Storage Temperature for Cultured ARPE-19 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Pasovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The establishment of future retinal pigment epithelium (RPE replacement therapy is partly dependent on the availability of tissue-engineered RPE cells, which may be enhanced by the development of suitable storage methods for RPE. This study investigates the effect of different storage temperatures on the viability, morphology, and phenotype of cultured RPE. Methods. ARPE-19 cells were cultured under standard conditions and stored in HEPES-buffered MEM at nine temperatures (4°C, 8°C, 12°C, 16°C, 20°C, 24°C, 28°C, 32°C, and 37°C for seven days. Viability and phenotype were assessed by a microplate fluorometer and epifluorescence microscopy, while morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Results. The percentage of viable cells preserved after storage was highest in the 16°C group (48.7%±9.8%; P<0.01 compared to 4°C, 8°C, and 24°C–37°C; P<0.05 compared to 12°C. Ultrastructure was best preserved at 12°C, 16°C, and 20°C. Expression of actin, ZO-1, PCNA, caspase-3, and RPE65 was maintained after storage at 16°C compared to control cells that were not stored. Conclusion. Out of nine temperatures tested between 4°C and 37°C, storage at 12°C, 16°C, and 20°C was optimal for maintenance of RPE cell viability, morphology, and phenotype. The preservation of RPE cells is critically dependent on storage temperature.

  12. Spatially resolved shear distribution in microfluidic chip for studying force transduction mechanisms in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbin; Heo, Jinseok; Hua, Susan Z

    2010-01-21

    Fluid shear stress has profound effects on cell physiology. Here we present a versatile microfluidic method capable of generating variable magnitudes, gradients, and different modes of shear flow, to study sensory and force transduction mechanisms in cells. The chip allows cell culture under spatially resolved shear flow conditions as well as study of cell response to shear flow in real-time. Using this chip, we studied the effects of chronic shear stress on cellular functions of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK), renal epithelial cells. We show that shear stress causes reorganization of actin cytoskeleton, which suppresses flow-induced Ca(2+) response.

  13. An integrated microfluidic chip enabling control and spatially resolved monitoring of temperature in micro flow reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoera, Christian; Ohla, Stefan; Shu, Zhe; Beckert, Erik; Nagl, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2015-01-01

    A strength of microfluidic chip laboratories is the rapid heat transfer that, in principle, enables a very homogeneous temperature distribution in chemical processes. In order to exploit this potential, we present an integrated chip system where the temperature is precisely controlled and monitored at the microfluidic channel level. This is realized by integration of a luminescent temperature sensor layer into the fluidic structure together with inkjet-printed micro heating elements. This allows steering of the temperature at the microchannel level and monitoring of the reaction progress simultaneously. A fabrication procedure is presented that allows for straightforward integration of thin polymer layers with optical sensing functionality in microchannels of glass-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chips of only 150 μm width and 29 μm height. Sensor layers consisting of polyacrylonitrile and a temperature-sensitive ruthenium tris-phenanthroline probe with film thicknesses of about 0.5 to 6 μm were generated by combining blade coating and abrasion techniques. Optimal coating procedures were developed and evaluated. The chip-integrated sensor layers were calibrated and investigated with respect to stability, reproducibility, and response times. These microchips allowed observation of temperature in a wide range with a signal change of around 1.6 % per K and a maximum resolution of around 0.07 K. The device is employed to study temperature-controlled continuous micro flow reactions. This is demonstrated exemplarily for the tryptic cleavage of coumarin-modified peptides via fluorescence detection.

  14. Spatial organization of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro--results from a new individual cell-based model with podia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC requires their extensive in vitro expansion. MSC in culture typically grow to confluence within a few weeks. They show spindle-shaped fibroblastoid morphology and align to each other in characteristic spatial patterns at high cell density. We present an individual cell-based model (IBM that is able to quantitatively describe the spatio-temporal organization of MSC in culture. Our model substantially improves on previous models by explicitly representing cell podia and their dynamics. It employs podia-generated forces for cell movement and adjusts cell behavior in response to cell density. At the same time, it is simple enough to simulate thousands of cells with reasonable computational effort. Experimental sheep MSC cultures were monitored under standard conditions. Automated image analysis was used to determine the location and orientation of individual cells. Our simulations quantitatively reproduced the observed growth dynamics and cell-cell alignment assuming cell density-dependent proliferation, migration, and morphology. In addition to cell growth on plain substrates our model captured cell alignment on micro-structured surfaces. We propose a specific surface micro-structure that according to our simulations can substantially enlarge cell culture harvest. The 'tool box' of cell migratory behavior newly introduced in this study significantly enhances the bandwidth of IBM. Our approach is capable of accommodating individual cell behavior and collective cell dynamics of a variety of cell types and tissues in computational systems biology.

  15. Streams in the urban heat island: spatial and temporal variability in temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Kayleigh A.; Bernhardt, Emily S.; Grace, James B.; Hassett, Brooke A.; Sudduth, Elizabeth B.; Wang, Siyi; Urban, Dean L.

    2013-01-01

    Streams draining urban heat islands tend to be hotter than rural and forested streams at baseflow because of warmer urban air and ground temperatures, paved surfaces, and decreased riparian canopy. Urban infrastructure efficiently routes runoff over hot impervious surfaces and through storm drains directly into streams and can lead to rapid, dramatic increases in temperature. Thermal regimes affect habitat quality and biogeochemical processes, and changes can be lethal if temperatures exceed upper tolerance limits of aquatic fauna. In summer 2009, we collected continuous (10-min interval) temperature data in 60 streams spanning a range of development intensity in the Piedmont of North Carolina, USA. The 5 most urbanized streams averaged 21.1°C at baseflow, compared to 19.5°C in the 5 most forested streams. Temperatures in urban streams rose as much as 4°C during a small regional storm, whereas the same storm led to extremely small to no changes in temperature in forested streams. Over a kilometer of stream length, baseflow temperature varied by as much as 10°C in an urban stream and as little as 2°C in a forested stream. We used structural equation modeling to explore how reach- and catchment-scale attributes interact to explain maximum temperatures and magnitudes of storm-flow temperature surges. The best predictive model of baseflow temperatures (R2  =  0.461) included moderately strong pathways directly (extent of development and road density) and indirectly, as mediated by reach-scale factors (canopy closure and stream width), from catchment-scale factors. The strongest influence on storm-flow temperature surges appeared to be % development in the catchment. Reach-scale factors, such as the extent of riparian forest and stream width, had little mitigating influence (R2  =  0.448). Stream temperature is an essential, but overlooked, aspect of the urban stream syndrome and is affected by reach-scale habitat variables, catchment-scale urbanization

  16. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Jose

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae] is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replication and assembly remain poorly understood in mosquito cells. Here we used high-resolution live-cell imaging coupled with single-particle tracking and electron microscopy analyses to delineate steps in the alphavirus life cycle in both the mammalian host cell and insect vector cells. Use of dually labeled SINV in conjunction with cellular stains enabled us to simultaneously determine the spatial and temporal differences of alphavirus replication complexes (RCs in mammalian and insect cells. We found that the nonstructural viral proteins and viral RNA in RCs exhibit distinct spatial organization in mosquito cytopathic vacuoles compared to replication organelles from mammalian cells. We show that SINV exploits filopodial extensions for virus dissemination in both cell types. Additionally, we propose a novel mechanism for replication complex formation around glycoprotein-containing vesicles in mosquito cells that produced internally released particles that were seen budding from the vesicles by live imaging. Finally, by characterizing mosquito cell lines that were persistently infected with fluorescent virus, we show that the replication and assembly machinery are highly modified, and this allows continuous production of alphaviruses at reduced levels.

  17. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Joyce; Taylor, Aaron B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae]) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replication and assembly remain poorly understood in mosquito cells. Here we used high-resolution live-cell imaging coupled with single-particle tracking and electron microscopy analyses to delineate steps in the alphavirus life cycle in both the mammalian host cell and insect vector cells. Use of dually labeled SINV in conjunction with cellular stains enabled us to simultaneously determine the spatial and temporal differences of alphavirus replication complexes (RCs) in mammalian and insect cells. We found that the nonstructural viral proteins and viral RNA in RCs exhibit distinct spatial organization in mosquito cytopathic vacuoles compared to replication organelles from mammalian cells. We show that SINV exploits filopodial extensions for virus dissemination in both cell types. Additionally, we propose a novel mechanism for replication complex formation around glycoprotein-containing vesicles in mosquito cells that produced internally released particles that were seen budding from the vesicles by live imaging. Finally, by characterizing mosquito cell lines that were persistently infected with fluorescent virus, we show that the replication and assembly machinery are highly modified, and this allows continuous production of alphaviruses at reduced levels. PMID:28196962

  18. Spatial uniformity inspection apparatus for solar cells using a projection display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae-Keun; Kim, Seung Kwan; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Park, Seung-Nam

    2012-07-10

    We demonstrate a measurement apparatus to inspect spatial uniformity of quantum efficiency of solar cells using a beam projector. Deviation of irradiance from the used beam projector over the area of 1.5×0.8 m on the cell plane was flattened within ±2.6% through gray scale adjustment, which was originally about 200%. Scanning a small square image with an area of 3×3 mm over a square-shaped photovoltaic cell with an area of 15.6×15.6 cm, we could identify the locations according to efficiency level and showed that the cell had quantum efficiency deviation of more than 10%. Utilizing the advantageous feature of a projection display, we also demonstrated that this apparatus can inspect the spatial uniformity of solar modules and panels consisting of multiple solar cells.

  19. Cell separator operation within temperature ranges to minimize effects on Chinese hamster ovary cell perfusion culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Hans; Ritter, Joachim B; Gorenflo, Volker M; Bowen, Bruce D; Piret, James M

    2007-01-01

    A cell retention device that provides reliable high-separation efficiency with minimal negative effects on the cell culture is essential for robust perfusion culture processes. External separation devices generally expose cells to periodic variations in temperature, most commonly temperatures below 37 degrees C, while the cells are outside the bioreactor. To examine this phenomenon, aliquots of approximately 5% of a CHO cell culture were exposed to 60 s cyclic variations of temperature simulating an acoustic separator environment. It was found that, for average exposure temperatures between 31.5 and 38.5 degrees C, there were no significant impacts on the rates of growth, glucose consumption, or t-PA production, defining an acceptable range of operating temperatures. These results were subsequently confirmed in perfusion culture experiments for average exposure temperatures between 31.6 and 38.1 degrees C. A 2(5-1) central composite factorial design experiment was then performed to systematically evaluate the effects of different operating variables on the inlet and outlet temperatures of a 10L acoustic separator. The power input, ambient temperature, as well as the perfusion and recycle flow rates significantly influenced the temperature, while the cell concentration did not. An empirical model was developed that predicted the temperature changes between the inlet and the outlet of the acoustic separator within +/-0.5 degrees C. A series of perfusion experiments determined the ranges of the significant operational settings that maintained the acoustic separator inlet and outlet temperatures within the acceptable range. For example, these objectives were always met by using the manufacturer-recommended operational settings as long as the recirculation flow rate was maintained above 15 L day(-1) and the ambient temperature was near 22 degrees C.

  20. Methods, compositions and kits for imaging cells and tissues using nanoparticles and spatial frequency heterodyne imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Wands, Jack R.; Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Ortiz, Vivian

    2016-04-19

    Methods, compositions, systems, devices and kits are provided herein for preparing and using a nanoparticle composition and spatial frequency heterodyne imaging for visualizing cells or tissues. In various embodiments, the nanoparticle composition includes at least one of: a nanoparticle, a polymer layer, and a binding agent, such that the polymer layer coats the nanoparticle and is for example a polyethylene glycol, a polyelectrolyte, an anionic polymer, or a cationic polymer, and such that the binding agent that specifically binds the cells or the tissue. Methods, compositions, systems, devices and kits are provided for identifying potential therapeutic agents in a model using the nanoparticle composition and spatial frequency heterodyne imaging.

  1. Temporally increasing spatial synchrony of North American temperature and bird populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter D. Koenig; Andrew M. Liebhold

    2016-01-01

    The ecological impacts of modern global climate change are detectable in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from shifts in species ranges to changes in community composition and human disease dynamics. So far, however, little attention has been given to temporal changes in spatial synchrony—the coincident change in abundance or value across the landscape—despite the...

  2. JT-60U Thomson scattering system with multiple ruby laser and high spatial resolution for high electron temperature plasma measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Hidetoshi; Naito, Osamu; Yamashita, Osamu; Kitamura, Shigeru; Hatae, Takaki; Nagashima, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-11-01

    This article describes the design and operation of a 60 spatial channel Thomson scattering system as of 1996 with multiple ruby lasers to measure the electron temperature T{sub e} and density n{sub e} profiles of the JT-60U plasmas. The wide spectral range (403-683 nm) of the spectrometer and newly developed two-dimensional detector (high repetition photodiode array) has enabled this system to measure the high electron temperature plasma (5 keV or more) formed at the plasma core during negative magnetic shear discharge with high precision and reliability. The high spatial resolution (8 mm) have provided the precise measurement of steep electron temperature and density gradients formed at the plasma edge and in the scrape-off layer during H-mode discharge. The multilaser operation with the minimum time interval of 2 ms has provided an essential tool for the transient phenomenon measurement like the formation process of edge transport barrier during L- to H-mode transition and internal transport barrier during discharge with negative magnetic shear, the relaxation process of pellet injected plasma and so on. Measurement examples of recent JT-60U T{sub e} and n{sub e} profiles are also presented. (author)

  3. Spatial distribution of air temperature in Toruń (Central Poland) and its causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylak, Rajmund; Uscka-Kowalkowska, Joanna; Araźny, Andrzej; Kejna, Marek; Kunz, Mieczysław; Maszewski, Rafał

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the results of an investigation into the air temperature pattern and development (including the urban heat island (UHI)) in Toruń (central Poland) are presented. For the analysis, daily mean temperature (Ti) as well as daily maximum (Tmax) and minimum (Tmin) temperatures for 2012 gathered for 20 sites, evenly distributed in the area of city, have been taken as source data. Additionally, in order to provide more extensive characteristics of the diversity of the air temperature in the study area, the diurnal temperature range (DTR) and the number of the so-called characteristic days were calculated as well. The impact of weather conditions (cloudiness and wind speed), atmospheric circulation, urban morphological parameters and land cover on the UHI in the study area was investigated. In Toruń, according to the present study, the average UHI intensity in 2012 was equal to 1.0 °C. The rise of cloudiness and wind speed led to a decrease of the magnitude of the UHI. Generally, in most cases, anticyclonic situations favour increased thermal contrast between rural and city areas, particularly in summer. Warm western circulation types significantly reduced temperature differences in the western side of the city and enlarged them in the eastern side of the city. Eastern cold types also have a similar influence on air temperature differences. Positive and statistically significant correlations have been found between the percentage of built-up areas (sealing factor) and air temperature. Conversely, sky view factor (SVF) reveals negative correlations which are statistically significant only for Tmin.

  4. Recent climate change in Japan – spatial and temporal characteristics of trends of temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Domroes

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper temperature series of Japan were statistically analysed in order to answer the question whether recent climate change can be proved for Japan; the results were compared and discussed with the global trends. The observations in Japan started for some stations in the 1870s, 59 stations are available since 1901, 136 stations since 1959. Modern statistical methods were applied, such as: Gaussian binominal low-pass filter (30 yr, trend analysis (linear regression model including the trend-to-noise-ratio as measure of significance and the non-parametric, non-linear trend test according to MANN (MANN's Q. According to the results of the analyses, climate change in Japan is clearly shown for temperature over the 100 yr (1901–2000: Annual mean temperatures increased at all stations from 0.35 (Hakodate to 2.95°C (Tokyo. The magnitude of climate change is illustrated to increase over the recent period 1976–2000. Seasonally, the strongest warming trends were observed for winter temperatures and also increasing temperature trends prevailed in summer, with the exception of slightly decreasing trends at only four stations. As far as temperatures are concerned, a distinct increase could be shown over the period 1901–2000 with a strong trend of warming over the more recent period 1976–2000.

  5. Temperature Distribution in Solar Cells Calculated in Three Dimensional Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy K. Elminir

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Field-testing is costly, time consuming and depends heavily on prevailing weather conditions. Adequate security and weather protection must also provide at the test site. Delays can also be caused due to bad weather and system failures. To overcome these problems, a Photovoltaic (PV array simulation may be used. For system design purpose, the model must reflect the details of the physical process occurring in the cell, to get a closer insight into device operation as well as optimization of particular device parameters. PV cell temperature ratings have a great effect on the main cell performance. Hence, the need for an exact technique to calculate accurately and efficiently the temperature distribution of a PV cell arises, from which we can adjust safe and proper operation at maximum ratings. The Scope of this work is to describe the development of 3D-thermal models, which are used to update the operation temperature, to get a closer insight into the response behavior and to estimate the overall performance.

  6. Spatial Variability of L-Band Brightness Temperature during Freeze/Thaw Events over a Prairie Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Roy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Passive microwave measurements from space are known to be sensitive to the freeze/thaw (F/T state of the land surface. These measurements are at a coarse spatial resolution (~15–50 km and the spatial variability of the microwave emissions within a pixel can have important effects on the interpretation of the signal. An L-band ground-based microwave radiometer campaign was conducted in the Canadian Prairies during winter 2014–2015 to examine the spatial variability of surface emissions during frozen and thawed periods. Seven different sites within the Kenaston soil monitoring network were sampled five times between October 2014 and April 2015 with a mobile ground-based L-band radiometer system at approximately monthly intervals. The radiometer measurements showed that in a seemingly homogenous prairie landscape, the spatial variability of brightness temperature (TB is non-negligible during both frozen and unfrozen soil conditions. Under frozen soil conditions, TB was negatively correlated with soil permittivity (εG. This correlation was related to soil moisture conditions before the main freezing event, showing that the soil ice volumetric content at least partly affects TB. However, because of the effect of snow on L-Band emission, the correlation between TB and εG decreased with snow accumulation. When compared to satellite measurements, the average TB of the seven plots were well correlated with the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS TB with a root mean square difference of 8.1 K and consistent representation of the strong F/T signal (i.e., TB increases and decreases when soil freezing and thawing, respectively. This study allows better quantitative understanding of the spatial variability in L-Band emissions related to landscape F/T, and will help the calibration and validation of satellite-based F/T retrieval algorithms.

  7. Quantifying spatial and temporal discharge dynamics of an event in a first order stream, using Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Westhoff

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding spatial distribution of discharge can be important for water quality and quantity modeling. Non-steady flood waves can influence small headwater streams significantly, particularly as a result of short high intensity summer rainstorms. The aim of this paper is to quantify the spatial and temporal dynamics of stream flow in a headwater catchment during a summer rainstorm. These dynamics include gains and losses of stream water, the effect of bypasses that become active and hyporheic exchange fluxes that may vary over time as a function of discharge. We use an advection-dispersion model coupled with an energy balance model to simulate in-stream water temperature, which we confront with high resolution temperature observations obtained with Distributed Temperature Sensing. This model was used as a learning tool to stepwise unravel the complex puzzle of in-stream processes subject to varying discharge. Hypotheses were tested and rejected, which led to more insight in spatial and temporal dynamics in discharge and hyporheic exchange processes. We showed that infiltration losses increase during a rain event, while gains of water remained constant over time. We conclude that, eventually, part of the stream water bypassed the main channel during peak discharge. It also seems that hyporheic exchange varies with varying discharge in the first 250 of the stream; while further downstream it remains constant. Because we relied on solar radiation as the main energy input, we were only able to apply this method during a small event and low flow. However, when additional (artificial energy is available, the presented method is also applicable in larger streams, or during higher flow conditions.

  8. Using high-resolution fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing to measure spatially resolved speed and temperature of airflows in a shallow gully

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Sayde, Chadi; Selker, John

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel observational technique that was applied to study transient shallow cold-air drainages and pools in undulating terrain in weak-wind conditions. Wind speed and air temperature at thousands of closely co-located locations were measured simultaneously at high spatial (0.25m) and temporal (5s) resolution using paired passive and actively heated optical fibers with a distributed temperature sensing system (DTS). The fibers were deployed in a transect across a shallow gully with a total length of 230 m at three levels (0.5, 1, and 2m above ground level) during the Shallow Cold Pool (SCP) Experiment in Northern Colorado, USA in October and November 2012. While we previously demonstrated that air temperature and the thermal structure of the near-surface turbulence can be observed with the DTS technique (Thomas et al., 2012, Zeeman et al., 2014), the novelty here consists of additionally measuring wind speed on horizontal scales of several hundreds of meters with fine resolution. Analogous to a hot-wire anemometer, the approach is based on the principal of velocity-dependent heat transfer from a heated surface. We present the theoretical basis for the DTS wind and temperature measurements and validate it against point observations from sonic anemometers and thermo-hygrometers. A space-time analysis of the near-surface gully flow and temperature field is presented based upon the observations subject to an orthogonal multi-resolution decomposition for selected cases. The temporal variability of near-surface air temperature was largest half-way up the slope caused be shifts of the very sharp thermal boundary between the density driven cold-air drainage flow in the gully bottom and the lower density air on the slopes, which was significantly warmed by enhanced downward mixing of sensible heat in the lee of the gully shoulder. Stationary horizontal temperature gradients at this thermal boundary amounted to 6 to 8 K m-1 and persisted for several hours unless

  9. Spatial Soil Temperature and Moisture Monitoring Across the Transylvanian Plain, in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Weindorf, David; Haggard, Beatrix; Moraru, Paula Ioana; Sopterean, Mara Lucia

    2011-01-01

    The Transylvanian Plain, Romania is an important region for agronomic productivity. However, limited soils data and adoption of best management practices hinder land productivity. Soil temperatures of the Transylvanian Plain were evaluated using a set of twenty datalogging stations positioned throughout the plain. Soil temperatures were monitored at the surface and at 10, 30, and 50 cm depths, and soil moisture was monitored at 10 cm. Preliminary results indicate that most soils of the Transylvanian Plain will have a mesic temperature regime. However, differences in seasonal warming and cooling trends across the plain were noted. These have important implications for planting recommendations. Growing degree days (GDDs) are preferred over maturity ratings, because they can account for temperature anomalies. The crop being considered for this study was corn. The base temperature (BT) was set at 10oC, and the upper threshold was 30oC. Two methods were used to calculate GDDs; 1) minimum and maximum daily temperatures, and 2) 24 h of averaged temperature data. Growing degree days were run from 110-199 day of year (DOY) to represent approximate planting date to tasseling. The DOY that 694 accumulated growing degree days (AGDDs) was reached at each site was then analyzed to identify differences across the TP. Three sites failed to reach 694 AGDDs by DOY 199, and were excluded from comparisons to other results. Averaged values were used to create spline interpolation maps with ArcMap 9.2 (ESRI, Redlands, CA, USA). The southeastern portion of the TP was found to tassel a month earlier assuming a planting date of 109 DOY. Four DeKalb® corn hybrids were then selected based on GDDs to tasseling, drydown, drought tolerance, and insect resistance. With a better understanding of the GDD trends across the TP, more effective planting and harvesting could be accomplished by Romanian farmers to maximize agronomic production.

  10. Temporal and spatial temperature distribution in the glabrous skin of rats induced by short-pulse CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Pen-Li; Hsu, Shu-Shen; Tsai, Meng-Li; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Wang, An-Bang; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2012-11-01

    Pain is a natural alarm that aids the body in avoiding potential danger and can also present as an important indicator in clinics. Infrared laser-evoked potentials can be used as an objective index to evaluate nociception. In animal studies, a short-pulse laser is crucial because it completes the stimulation before escape behavior. The objective of the present study was to obtain the temporal and spatial temperature distributions in the skin caused by the irradiation of a short-pulse laser. A fast speed infrared camera was used to measure the surface temperature caused by a CO2 laser of different durations (25 and 35 ms) and power. The measured results were subsequently implemented with a three-layer finite element model to predict the subsurface temperature. We found that stratum corneum was crucial in the modeling of fast temperature response, and escape behaviors correlated with predictions of temperature at subsurface. Results indicated that the onset latency and duration of activated nociceptors must be carefully considered when interpreting physiological responses evoked by infrared irradiation.

  11. The influence of riparian woodland on the spatial and temporal variability of stream water temperatures in an upland salmon stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatio-temporal variability of stream water temperatures was investigated at six locations on the Girnock Burn (30km2 catchment, Cairngorms, Scotland over three hydrological years between 1998 and 2002. The key site-specific factors affecting the hydrology and climatology of the sampling points were investigated as a basis for physical process inference. Particular emphasis was placed on assessing the effects of riparian forest in the lower catchment versus the heather moorland riparian zones that are spatially dominant in the upper catchment. The findings were related to river heat budget studies that provided process detail. Gross changes in stream temperature were affected by the annual cycle of incoming solar radiation and seasonal changes in hydrological and climatological conditions. Inter-annual variation in these controlling variables resulted in inter-annual variability in thermal regime. However, more subtle inter-site differences reflected the impact of site-specific characteristics on various components of the river energy budget. Inter-site variability was most apparent at shorter time scales, during the summer months and for higher stream temperatures. Riparian woodland in the lower catchment had a substantial impact on thermal regime, reducing diel variability (over a period of 24 hours and temperature extremes. Observed inter-site differences are likely to have a substantial effect on freshwater ecology in general and salmonid fish in particular. Keywords: temperature, thermal regime, forest, salmon, hydrology, Girnock Burn, Cairngorm

  12. Analytical approximations for spatial stochastic gene expression in single cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    Gene expression occurs in an environment in which both stochastic and diffusive effects are significant. Spatial stochastic simulations are computationally expensive compared with their deterministic counterparts, and hence little is currently known of the significance of intrinsic noise in a spatial setting. Starting from the reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) describing stochastic reaction-diffusion processes, we here derive expressions for the approximate steady-state mean concentrations which are explicit functions of the dimensionality of space, rate constants and diffusion coefficients. The expressions have a simple closed form when the system consists of one effective species. These formulae show that, even for spatially homogeneous systems, mean concentrations can depend on diffusion coefficients: this contradicts the predictions of deterministic reaction-diffusion processes, thus highlighting the importance of intrinsic noise. We confirm our theory by comparison with stochastic simulations, using the RDME and Brownian dynamics, of two models of stochastic and spatial gene expression in single cells and tissues.

  13. Spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture-temperature coupling in current and future climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingshackl, Clemens; Hirschi, Martin; Seneviratne, Sonia Isabelle

    2017-04-01

    While climate models generally agree on a future global mean temperature increase, the exact rate of change is still uncertain. The uncertainty is even higher for regional temperature trends that can deviate substantially from the projected global temperature increase. Several studies tried to constrain these regional temperature projections. They found that over land areas soil moisture is an important factor that influences the regional response. Due to the limited knowledge of the influence of soil moisture on atmospheric conditions on global scale the constraint remains still weak, though. Here, we use a framework that is based on the dependence of evaporative fraction (i.e. the fraction of net radiation that goes into latent heat flux) on soil moisture to distinguish between different soil moisture regimes (Seneviratne et al., 2010). It allows to estimate the influence of soil moisture on near-surface air temperature in the current climate and in future projections. While in the wet soil moisture regime, atmospheric conditions and related land surface fluxes can be considered as mostly driven by available energy, in the transitional regime - where evaporative fraction and soil moisture are essentially linearly coupled - soil moisture has an impact on turbulent heat fluxes, air humidity and temperature: Decreasing soil moisture and concomitant decreasing evaporative fraction cause increasing sensible heat flux, which might further lead to higher surface air temperatures. We investigate the strength of the single couplings (soil moisture → latent heat flux → sensible heat flux → air temperature) in order to quantify the influence of soil moisture on surface air temperature in the transitional regime. Moreover, we take into account that the coupling strength can change in the course of the year due to seasonal climate variations. The relations between soil moisture, evaporative fraction and near-surface air temperature in re-analysis and observation

  14. Recent climate change in Japan – spatial and temporal characteristics of trends of temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schaefer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper temperature series of Japan were statistically analysed in order to answer the question whether recent climate change can be proved for Japan; the results were compared and discussed with the global trends. The observations in Japan started for some stations in the 1870s, 59 stations are available since 1901, 136 stations since 1959. Modern statistical methods were applied, such as: Gaussian binominal low-pass filter (30 yr, trend analysis (linear regression model including the trend-to-noise-ratio as measure of significance and the non-parametric, non-linear trend test according to MANN (MANN's Q. According to the results of the analyses, climate change in Japan is clearly shown for temperature over the 100 yr (1901–2000: Annual mean temperatures increased at all stations from 0.35 (Hakodate to 2.95°C (Tokyo. The magnitude of climate change is illustrated to increase over the recent period 1976–2000. Seasonally, the strongest warming trends were observed for winter temperatures and also increasing temperature trends prevailed in summer, with the exception of slightly decreasing trends at only four stations.

  15. Spatially and temporally resolved measurements of the temperature inside droplets impinging on a hot solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaze, William; Caballina, Ophélie; Castanet, Guillaume; Lemoine, Fabrice

    2017-08-01

    Heat transfers at the impact of a droplet on a hot solid surface are investigated experimentally. Millimeter-sized water droplets impinge a flat sapphire window heated at 600 °C. The time evolution of the droplet temperature is characterized using the two-color laser-induced fluorescence technique. For that, a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is used for the excitation of the fluorescence to obtain instantaneous images of the droplet temperature. Water is seeded with two fluorescent dyes, one sensitive to temperature (fluorescein disodium) and the other not (sulforhodamine 640). Owing to a wavelength shift between the dyes' emissions, the fluorescence signal of the dyes can be detected separately by two cameras. The liquid temperature is determined with a good accuracy by doing the ratio of the images of the dyes' fluorescence. A critical feature of the method is that the image ratio is not disturbed by the deformation of the impacting droplet, which affects the signals of the dyes almost identically. Experiments are performed in the conditions of film boiling. A thin vapor film at the interface between the droplet and the solid surface prevents the deposition of liquid on the hot solid surface. Measurements highlight some differences in the rate of heat transfers and in the temperature distribution within the droplet between the bouncing and splashing regimes of impact.

  16. Polybenzimidazoles based on high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares Leon, Jose Joaquin; Camargo, Ana Paula M.; Ashino, Natalia M.; Morgado, Daniella L.; Frollini, Elisabeth; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Gonzalez, Ernesto Rafael [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Bajo, Justo Lobato [University of Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This work presents an interesting approach in order to enhance the performance of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) by means of an increase in the operational temperature. For this, two polymeric materials, Poly(2,5-bibenzimidazole) (ABPBI) and Poly[2,2'-(m-phenyl en)-5,5' bib enzimidazol] (PBI), impregnated with phosphoric acid have been utilized. These have shown excellent properties, such as thermal stability above 500 deg C, reasonably high conductivity when impregnated with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and a low permeability to alcohols compared to Nafion. Preliminary fuel cells measurements on hydrogen based Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) displayed an interestingly reasonable good fuel cell performance, a quite reduced loss when the hydrogen stream was polluted with carbon monoxide, and finally, when the system was tested with an ethanol/water (E/W) fuel, it displayed quite promising results that allows placing this system as an attractive option in order to increase the cell performance and deal with the typical limitations of low temperature Nafion-based PEMFC. (author)

  17. Engineered Nanostructured MEA Technology for Low Temperature Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yimin

    2009-07-16

    The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalyst support technology based on unique engineered nanostructures for low temperature fuel cells which: (1) Achieves high catalyst activity and performance; (2) Improves catalyst durability over current technologies; and (3) Reduces catalyst cost. This project is directed at the development of durable catalysts supported by novel support that improves the catalyst utilization and hence reduce the catalyst loading. This project will develop a solid fundamental knowledge base necessary for the synthetic effort while at the same time demonstrating the catalyst advantages in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs).

  18. High Temperature Polymers for use in Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, Katherine M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is currently working on polymers for fuel cell and lithium battery applications. The desire for more efficient, higher power density, and a lower environmental impact power sources has led to interest in proton exchanges membrane fuels cells (PEMFC) and lithium batteries. A PEMFC has many advantages as a power source. The fuel cell uses oxygen and hydrogen as reactants. The resulting products are electricity, heat, and water. The PEMFC consists of electrodes with a catalyst, and an electrolyte. The electrolyte is an ion-conducting polymer that transports protons from the anode to the cathode. Typically, a PEMFC is operated at a temperature of about 80 C. There is intense interest in developing a fuel cell membrane that can operate at higher temperatures in the range of 80 C- 120 C. Operating the he1 cell at higher temperatures increases the kinetics of the fuel cell reaction as well as decreasing the susceptibility of the catalyst to be poisoned by impurities. Currently, Nafion made by Dupont is the most widely used polymer membrane in PEMFC. Nafion does not function well above 80 C due to a significant decrease in the conductivity of the membrane from a loss of hydration. In addition to the loss of conductivity at high temperatures, the long term stability and relatively high cost of Nafion have stimulated many researches to find a substitute for Nafion. Lithium ion batteries are popular for use in portable electronic devices, such as laptop computers and mobile phones. The high power density of lithium batteries makes them ideal for the high power demand of today s advanced electronics. NASA is developing a solid polymer electrolyte that can be used for lithium batteries. Solid polymer electrolytes have many advantages over the current gel or liquid based systems that are used currently. Among these advantages are the potential for increased power density and design flexibility. Automobiles, computers, and cell phones require

  19. Two-Dimensional Spatial Imaging of Charge Transport in Germanium Crystals at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffatt, Robert [Stanford U.

    2016-01-01

    In this dissertation, I describe a novel apparatus for studying the transport of charge in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures. The motivation to conduct this experiment originated from an asymmetry observed between the behavior of electrons and holes in the germanium detector crystals used by the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS). This asymmetry is a consequence of the anisotropic propagation of electrons in germanium at cryogenic temperatures. To better model our detectors, we incorporated this effect into our Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport. The purpose of the experiment described in this dissertation is to test those models in detail. Our measurements have allowed us to discover a shortcoming in our most recent Monte Carlo simulations of electrons in germanium. This discovery would not have been possible without the measurement of the full, two-dimensional charge distribution, which our experimental apparatus has allowed for the first time at cryogenic temperatures.

  20. Spatial-temporal variation of the land surface temperature field and present-day tectonic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ma

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to acquire information on tectonic activity in western China from land surface temperature (LST field data. On the basis of the established relationship between heat and strain, we analyzed the LST distribution in western China using the satellite data product MODIS/Terra. Our results show that: 1. There are departures from annual changes of LST in some areas, and that these changes are associated with the activity of some active tectonic zones. 2. When annual-change background values caused by climate factors are removed, the long-period component (LSTLOW of temperature residual (ΔT of the LST is able to serve as an indicator for tectonic activity. We have found that a major earthquake can produce different effects on the LST fields of surrounding areas. These effects are characterized by both rises and drops in temperature. For example, there was a noteworthy temperature decline associated with the Sumatran M9 earthquake of 2004 in the Bayan Har-Songpan block of central Tibetan Plateau. 3. On the other hand, the LST field of a single area may respond differently to major shocks occurring in different areas in the regions surrounding China. For instance, the Kunlun M 8.1 event made the LST on the Longmen Mountains fault zone increase, whereas the Zaisan Lake M 7.9 quake of 2003, and the Sumatran M 9 event of 2004, caused decreases in the same area’s LST. 4. The variations of land surface temperature (LST over time are different in different tectonic areas. These phenomena may provide clues for the study of tectonic deformation processes. On the basis of these phenomena, we use a combination of temperature data obtained at varied depths, regional seismicity and strain results obtained with GPS measurements, to test the information related to tectonic activity derived from variations of the LST field, and discuss its implications to the creation of models of regional tectonic deformation.

  1. Photo-Activated Low Temperature, Micro Fuel Cell Power Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry L. Tuller

    2007-03-30

    A Key objective of this program is to identify electrodes that will make it possible to significantly reduce the operating temperature of micro-SOFC and thin film-based SOFCs. Towards this end, efforts are directed towards: (a) identifying the key rate limiting steps which limit presently utilized electrodes from performing at reduced temperatures, as well as, (b) investigating the use of optical, as opposed to thermal energy, as a means for photocatalyzing electrode reactions and enabling reduced operating temperatures. During Phase I, the following objectives were achieved: (a) assembly and testing of our unique Microprobe Thin Film Characterization System; (b) fabrication of the model cathode materials system in thin film form by both PLD and ink jet printing; and (c) the successful configuration and testing of the model materials as cathodes in electrochemical cells. A further key objective (d) to test the potential of illumination in enhancing electrode performance was also achieved.

  2. Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Jabbar, Mohammed Hussain

    An important issue that has limited the potential of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) for portable applications is its high operating temperatures (800-1000 ºC). Lowering the operating temperature of SOFCs to 400-600 ºC enable a wider material selection, reduced degradation and increased lifetime....... On the other hand, low-temperature operation poses serious challenges to the electrode performance. Effective catalysts, redox stable electrodes with improved microstructures are the prime requisite for the development of efficient SOFC anodes. The performance of Nb-doped SrT iO3 (STN) ceramic anodes...... at 400ºC. The potential of using WO3 ceramic as an alternative anode materials has been explored. The relatively high electrode polarization resistance obtained, 11 Ohm cm2 at 600 ºC, proved the inadequate catalytic activity of this system for hydrogen oxidation. At the end of this thesis...

  3. Numerical Approach to Spatial Deterministic-Stochastic Models Arising in Cell Biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Schaff

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid deterministic-stochastic methods provide an efficient alternative to a fully stochastic treatment of models which include components with disparate levels of stochasticity. However, general-purpose hybrid solvers for spatially resolved simulations of reaction-diffusion systems are not widely available. Here we describe fundamentals of a general-purpose spatial hybrid method. The method generates realizations of a spatially inhomogeneous hybrid system by appropriately integrating capabilities of a deterministic partial differential equation solver with a popular particle-based stochastic simulator, Smoldyn. Rigorous validation of the algorithm is detailed, using a simple model of calcium 'sparks' as a testbed. The solver is then applied to a deterministic-stochastic model of spontaneous emergence of cell polarity. The approach is general enough to be implemented within biologist-friendly software frameworks such as Virtual Cell.

  4. Spatially resolved quantitative mapping of thermomechanical properties and phase transition temperatures using scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Nikiforov, Maxim P

    2013-07-09

    An approach for the thermomechanical characterization of phase transitions in polymeric materials (polyethyleneterephthalate) by band excitation acoustic force microscopy is developed. This methodology allows the independent measurement of resonance frequency, Q factor, and oscillation amplitude of a tip-surface contact area as a function of tip temperature, from which the thermal evolution of tip-surface spring constant and mechanical dissipation can be extracted. A heating protocol maintained a constant tip-surface contact area and constant contact force, thereby allowing for reproducible measurements and quantitative extraction of material properties including temperature dependence of indentation-based elastic and loss moduli.

  5. A statistical study into the spatial distribution and dawn‐dusk asymmetry of dayside magnetosheath ion temperatures as a function of upstream solar wind conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dimmock, A. P; Nykyri, K; Karimabadi, H; Osmane, A; Pulkkinen, T. I

    2015-01-01

    ... and nonisotropic and differs between the dawn and dusk flanks. The present study attempts to study the spatial distribution of magnetosheath ion temperature as a function of upstream solar wind conditions...

  6. Novel cathodes for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M.; Xia, C. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Center for Innovative Fuel Cell and Battery Technologies

    2002-04-04

    A solid-oxide fuel cell that operates at 500 C (instead of 600 C and higher), with lower material cost and better long-term stability, is presented. Its key piece is a cathode made of a silver/copper-doped bismuth vanadate (Ag-BI-CUVOX) composite, which reduces oxygen at lower temperatures and diminishes the resistance between the cathode and the electrolyte. (orig.)

  7. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stacks with Advent TPS Meas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neophytides Stylianos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High power/high energy applications are expected to greatly benefit from high temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs. In this work, a combinatorial approach is presented, in which separately developed and evaluated MEAs, design and engineering are employed to result in reliable and effective stacks operating above 180°C and having the characteristics well matched to applications including auxiliary power, micro combined heat and power, and telecommunication satellites.

  8. Distributed fiber Brillouin strain and temperature sensor with centimeter spatial resolution by coherent probe-pump technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lufan; Bao, Xiaoyi; Wan, Yidun; Ravet, Fabien; Chen, Liang

    2005-05-01

    We present a sensing principle of the distributed fiber Brillouin strain and temperature sensor by coherent probe-pump technique that offers a new method to achieve centimeter spatial resolution with high frequency resolution. A combination of continuous wave (cw) and pulse source as the probe (Stokes) beam and cw laser as the pump beam have resulted in stronger Brillouin interaction of Stokes and pump inside the pulse-length in the form of cw-pump and pulse-pump interactions. We find that the coherent portion inside the pulse-length of these two interactions due to the same phase has a very high Brillouin amplification. The Brillouin profile originating from the coherent interaction of pulse-pump with cw-pump results in high temperature and strain accuracy with centimeter resolution, which has been verified by successfully detecting 1.5 cm out-layer crack on an optical ground wire (OPGW) cable.

  9. Solid-State High-Temperature Power Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Jay; West, William

    2008-01-01

    All-solid-state electrochemical power cells have been fabricated and tested in a continuing effort to develop batteries for instruments for use in environments as hot as 500 C. Batteries of this type are needed for exploration of Venus, and could be used on Earth for such applications as measuring physical and chemical conditions in geothermal and oil wells, processing furnaces, and combustion engines. In the state-of-the-art predecessors of the present solid-state power cells, fully packaged molten eutectic salts are used as electrolytes. The molten-salt-based cells can be susceptible to significant amounts of self-discharge and corrosion when used for extended times at elevated temperatures. In contrast, all-solid-state cells such as the present ones are expected to be capable of operating for many days at temperatures up to 500 C, without significant self-discharge. The solid-state cell described here includes a cathode made of FeS2, an electrolyte consisting of a crystalline solid solution of equimolar amounts of Li3PO4 and Li4SiO4, and an anode made of an alloy of Li and Si (see figure). The starting material for making the solid electrolyte is a stoichiometric mixture of Li3PO4, SiO2, and Li3CO2. This mixture is ball-milled, then calcined for two hours at a temperature of 1,100 C, then placed in a die atop the cathode material. Next, the layers in the die are squeezed together at a pressure between 60 and 120 MPa for one hour at a temperature of 600 C to form a unitary structure comprising the solid electrolyte and cathode bonded together. Finally, the lithium-alloy anode is pressure-bonded to the solid electrolyte layer, using an intermediate layer of pure lithium. In one test of a cell of this type, a discharge rate of about 1 mA per gram of cathode material was sustained for 72 hours at a temperature of about 460 C. This is about three times the discharge rate required to support some of the longer duration Venus-exploration mission scenarios.

  10. Comparative Study of Surface Temperature Behavior of Commercial Li-Ion Pouch Cells of Different Chemistries and Capacities by Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shovon Goutam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The non-uniform surface temperature distribution of a battery cell results from complex reactions inside the cell and makes efficient thermal management a challenging task. This experimental work attempts to determine the evolution of surface temperature distribution of three pouch type commercial cells: Nickel Manganese Cobalt oxide (NMC-based 20 Ah cell, Lithium Iron Phosphate (LFP 14 Ah, and Lithium Titanate Oxide (LTO 5 Ah battery cell by using contact thermistor and infrared (IR thermography. High current (up to 100 A continuous charge/discharge and high current (80 A micro pulse cycling profile were applied on the cells. It was found that thermistor based temperature profile varied cell to cell, especially the LTO cell. Among the investigated cells, the NMC cell shows highest temperature rise and the LTO cell the lowest rise. IR (Infrared images revealed the spatial distribution of surface temperature, in particular the location of the hottest region varies depending not only on the geometrical and material properties of the cell, but also the type of loads applied on the cells. Finally, a modeling perspective of the cell temperature non-uniformity is also discussed.

  11. Low cost, high temperature membranes for PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-08-15

    This report details the results of a project to develop novel, low-cost high temperature membranes specifically for automotive fuel cell use. The specific aim of the project was to determine whether a polyaromatic hydrocarbon membrane could be developed that would give a performance (0.68V at 500 mAcm{sub -2}) competitive with an established perfluoronated sulfonic acid (PSA) membrane in a fuel cell at 120{sup o}C and relative humidity of less than 50%. The novel approach used in this project was to increase the concentration of sulphonic groups to a useful level without dissolution by controlling the molecular structure of the membrane through the design of the monomer repeat unit. The physicochemical properties of 70 polymers synthesised in order to determine the effects of controlled sequence distribution were identified using an array of analytical techniques. Appropriate membranes were selected for fuel cell testing and fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies. Most of the homopolymers tested were able to withstand low humidity environments without immediate catastrophic failure and some showed promise from accelerated durability results. The properties of a simple starting polymer structure were found to be enhanced by doping with sulphonated copper phthalocyanine, resulting in high temperature capacity from a potential cheap, simple and scaleable process. The accelerated and long-term durability of such a doped polymer membrane showed that polyaromatics could easily outperform fluoropolymers under high temperature (120{sup o}C) operating conditions.

  12. Spatial modeling of permafrost distribution using rock glacier inventories, topographic attributes and temperature data in the semiarid Andes, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azocar Sandoval, G.; Brenning, A.; Bodin, X.

    2012-12-01

    Statistical-empirical models have been widely used to estimate the spatial distribution of permafrost in the European Alps and North America using topographic, climatic data and geomorphic indicators of permafrost (i.e. rock glaciers). At present, little knowledge about mountain permafrost distribution is available for the Andes. As a first approximation of permafrost distribution, a logistic regression model was fitted to predict rock glacier activity status. The model is based on explanatory variables elevation and potential incoming solar radiation (PISR) derived from an ASTER G-DEM v. 2 digital elevations model and air temperature data in the Chilean Andes between 29 and 34°S. Rock glacier activity status (intact versus fossil) was obtained from several recent rock glacier inventories and is based on the interpretation of aerial photographs or satellite imagery with a resolution higher than 5 m. Constant lapse rates of temperature are obtained for several weather stations in the study region. These are used to estimate the change in temperature with elevation based on the digital elevation model. The model's predictive performance was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve. As a preliminary result using a probability threshold of 0.5, mountain permafrost may be present in up to 21% (1510 km2) of the Huasco watershed (29°S) located in the northern part of the study area. Considering a threshold > 0.75, about 12% (709 km2) of this watershed may be underlain by mountain permafrost. As next steps toward a permafrost distribution model, sources of bias related to the thermal offset and displacement of rock glaciers will be eliminated, and downscaling as well as spatial interpolation approaches will be evaluated in order to replace elevation as a proxy variable with estimates of mean annual air temperature.

  13. Pseudo-proxy tests of the analogue method to reconstruct spatially resolved global temperature during the Common Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Gómez-Navarro, Juan; Zorita, Eduardo; Raible, Christoph C.; Neukom, Raphael

    2017-06-01

    This study addresses the possibility of carrying out spatially resolved global reconstructions of annual mean temperature using a worldwide network of proxy records and a method based on the search of analogues. Several variants of the method are evaluated, and their performance is analysed. As a test bed for the reconstruction, the PAGES 2k proxy database (version 1.9.0) is employed as a predictor, the HadCRUT4 dataset is the set of observations used as the predictand and target, and a set of simulations from the PMIP3 simulations are used as a pool to draw analogues and carry out pseudo-proxy experiments (PPEs). The performance of the variants of the analogue method (AM) is evaluated through a series of PPEs in growing complexity, from a perfect-proxy scenario to a realistic one where the pseudo-proxy records are contaminated with noise (white and red) and missing values, mimicking the limitations of actual proxies. Additionally, the method is tested by reconstructing the real observed HadCRUT4 temperature based on the calibration of real proxies. The reconstructed fields reproduce the observed decadal temperature variability. From all the tests, we can conclude that the analogue pool provided by the PMIP3 ensemble is large enough to reconstruct global annual temperatures during the Common Era. Furthermore, the search of analogues based on a metric that minimises the RMSE in real space outperforms other evaluated metrics, including the search of analogues in the range-reduced space expanded by the leading empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). These results show how the AM is able to spatially extrapolate the information of a network of local proxy records to produce a homogeneous gap-free climate field reconstruction with valuable information in areas barely covered by proxies and make the AM a suitable tool to produce valuable climate field reconstructions for the Common Era.

  14. Climate change impacts on projections of excess mortality at 2030 using spatially varying ozone-temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    We project the change in ozone-related mortality burden attributable to changes in climate between a historical (1995-2005) and near-future (2025-2035) time period while incorporating a non-linear and synergistic effect of ozone and temperature on mortality. We simulate air quali...

  15. Climate change impacts on projections of excess mortality at 2030 using spatially varying ozone-temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    We project the change in ozone-related mortality burden attributable to changes in climate between a historical (1995-2005) and near-future (2025-2035) time period while incorporating a non-linear and synergistic effect of ozone and temperature on mortality. We simulate air quali...

  16. Spatial assessment of land surface temperature and land use/land cover in Langkawi Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Suzana Binti; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Salihu Lay, Usman; Abdullahi, Saleh

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the relationship between Land Surface Temperature and Land Use/Land Cover in Langkawi Island by using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Build-Up Index (NDBI) and Modified Normalized Difference Water Index (MNDWI) qualitatively by using Landsat 7 ETM+ and Landsat 8 (OLI/TIRS) over the period 2002 and 2015. Pixel-based classifiers Maximum Likelihood (MLC) and Support Vector Machine (SVM), has been performed to prepare the Land Use/ Land Cover map (LU/LC) and the result shows that Support Vector Machine (SVM) achieved maximum accuracy with 90% and 90.46% compared to Maximum Likelihood (MLC) classifier with 86.62% and 86.98% respectively. The result revealed that as the impervious surface (built-up /roads) increases, the surface temperature of the area increased. However, land surface temperature decreased in the vegetated areas. Based from the linear regression between LST and NDVI, NDBI and MNDWI, these indices can be used as an indicator to monitor the impact of Land Use/Land Cover on Land Surface Temperature.

  17. Spatial statistical network models for stream and river temperature in New England, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watershed managers are challenged by the need for predictive temperature models with sufficient accuracy and geographic breadth for practical use. We described thermal regimes of New England rivers and streams based on a reduced set of metrics for the May–September growing ...

  18. Spatial Statistical Network Models for Stream and River Temperatures in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous metrics have been proposed to describe stream/river thermal regimes, and researchers are still struggling with the need to describe thermal regimes in a parsimonious fashion. Regional temperature models are needed for characterizing and mapping current stream thermal re...

  19. High temperature PEM fuel cell. Final report. Public part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf (DTU (DK)); Yde Andersen, S.; Rycke, T. de (IRD Fuel Cells A/S (DK)); Nilsson, M. (Danish Power Systems ApS (DK)); Christensen, Torkild, (DONG Energy (DK))

    2006-07-01

    The main outcome of the project is the development of stacking technology for high temperature PEMFC stacks based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes (PBI-membranes) and a study of the potential of a possible accommodation of HT-PEMFC in the national energy system. Stacks of different lengths (up to 40 cells) have been built using two different approaches in terms of plate materials and sealing. The stacks still need maturing and further testing to prove satisfactory reliability, and a steady reduction of production cost is also desired (as in general for fuel cells). However, during the project the process has come a long way. The survey of HT-PEM fuel cells and their regulatory power in the utility system concludes that fuel cells will most likely not be the dominating technique for regulation, but as no other technique has that potential alone, fuel cells are well suited to play a role in the system provided that the establishment of a communication system is not too complicated. In order to maintain an efficient power system with high reliability in a distributed generation scenario, it is important that communication between TSO (Transmission System Operator) and fuel cells is included in the fuel cell system design at an early stage. (au)

  20. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Joyce; Taylor, Aaron B; Kuhn, Richard J

    2017-02-14

    Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae]) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replication and assembly remain poorly understood in mosquito cells. Here we used high-resolution live-cell imaging coupled with single-particle tracking and electron microscopy analyses to delineate steps in the alphavirus life cycle in both the mammalian host cell and insect vector cells. Use of dually labeled SINV in conjunction with cellular stains enabled us to simultaneously determine the spatial and temporal differences of alphavirus replication complexes (RCs) in mammalian and insect cells. We found that the nonstructural viral proteins and viral RNA in RCs exhibit distinct spatial organization in mosquito cytopathic vacuoles compared to replication organelles from mammalian cells. We show that SINV exploits filopodial extensions for virus dissemination in both cell types. Additionally, we propose a novel mechanism for replication complex formation around glycoprotein-containing vesicles in mosquito cells that produced internally released particles that were seen budding from the vesicles by live imaging. Finally, by characterizing mosquito cell lines that were persistently infected with fluorescent virus, we show that the replication and assembly machinery are highly modified, and this allows continuous production of alphaviruses at reduced levels.IMPORTANCE Reemerging mosquito-borne alphaviruses cause serious human epidemics worldwide. Several structural and imaging studies have helped to define the life cycle of alphaviruses in mammalian cells, but the mode of virus replication and

  1. Spatial and temporal aspects of Wnt signaling and planar cell polarity during vertebrate embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Sergei Y

    2015-06-01

    Wnt signaling pathways act at multiple locations and developmental stages to specify cell fate and polarity in vertebrate embryos. A long-standing question is how the same molecular machinery can be reused to produce different outcomes. The canonical Wnt/β-catenin branch modulates target gene transcription to specify cell fates along the dorsoventral and anteroposterior embryonic axes. By contrast, the Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) branch is responsible for cell polarization along main body axes, which coordinates morphogenetic cell behaviors during gastrulation and neurulation. Whereas both cell fate and cell polarity are modulated by spatially- and temporally-restricted Wnt activity, the downstream signaling mechanisms are very diverse. This review highlights recent progress in the understanding of Wnt-dependent molecular events leading to the establishment of PCP and linking it to early morphogenetic processes.

  2. Effects of spatial pattern of green space on land surface temperature: implications for sustainable urban planning and climate change adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaitiyiming, M.; Ghulam, A.

    2013-12-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) refers to the phenomenon of higher atmospheric and surface temperatures occurring in urban areas than in the surrounding rural areas. Numerous studies have shown that increased percent cover of green space (PLAND) can significantly decrease land surface temperatures (LST). Fewer studies, however, have investigated the effects of configuration of green space on LST. This paper aims at to fill this gap using oasis city Aksu in northwestern China as a case study. PLAND along with two configuration metrics are used to measure the composition and configuration of green space. The metrics are calculated by moving window method based on a green space map derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery, and LST data are retrieved from Landsat TM thermal band. Normalized mutual information measure is employed to investigate the relationship between LST and the spatial pattern of green space. The results show that while the PLAND is the most important variable that elicits LST dynamics, spatial configuration of green space also has significant effect on LST. In addition, the variance of LST is largely explained by both composition and configuration of green space. Results from this study can expand our understanding of the relationship between LST and vegetation, and provide insights for sustainable urban planning and management under changing climate.

  3. Spatial and temporal variability of the sea surface temperature in the Ballenas-Salsipuedes Channel (central Gulf of California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MartíNez-DíAz-De-León, A.; Pacheco-RuíZ, I.; Delgadillo-Hinojosa, F.; Zertuche-GonzáLez, J. A.; Chee-BarragáN, A.; Blanco-Betancourt, R.; GuzmáN-Calderón, J. M.; GáLvez-Telles, A.

    2006-02-01

    The Ballenas-Salsipuedes Channel (BSC) is considered an oceanographic province on its own within the Gulf of California. In this region, tidal mixing is modulated by quarterdiurnal, semidiurnal, diurnal, and fortnightly frequencies, producing a strong outcropping of cold and nutrient-rich waters. In this work we analyze the temporal and spatial variability of sea surface temperature (SST) data recorded simultaneously over a period of 1 year in six bays along the BSC. Minimum mean SST differences ( 2.5°C) were recorded in June. The monthly SST anomaly showed that from late October to late January, the channel behaved as a very well mixed region. In contrast, SST anomalies of up to 2.2°C among bays were observed from May to September, indicating intense heat gain in summer and highlighting spatial heterogeneity in the intensity of vertical mixing. Besides the seasonal temperature cycle, influenced by solar irradiation, four main periods (0.25, 0.5, 1, and 15 days) were identified, corresponding to the main timescales of variability induced by the tides. This work demonstrates that the main source of temporal SST variability in BSC is the tide-induced fortnightly modulation, suggesting the possibility of a pulsation mechanism in the outcropping of nutrient-rich waters reaching the surface layer throughout the channel; this could play a crucial role in explaining the exceptionally high biological production of this region.

  4. Effect of Chlorophyll-a Spatial Distribution on Upper Ocean Temperature in the Central and Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Pengfei; LIU Hailong; ZHANG Xuehong

    2008-01-01

    Effect of the spatial distributions of chlorophyll-a concentration on upper ocean temperature and currents in the equatorial Pacific is investigated through a set of numerical experiments by using an ocean general circulation model. This study indicates that enhanced meridional gradient of chlorophylloa between the equator and off-equatorial regions can strengthen zonal circulation and lead to a decrease in equatorial sea surface temperature (SST). However, the circulation changes by themselves are not effective enough to affect SST in the equatorial cold tongue (CT) region. The comparison between the experiments indicates that the CT SST are more sensitive to chlorophyll-a distribution away from the equator. The off-equatorial chlorophyll-a traps more solar radiation in the mixed layer, therefore, the temperature in the thermocline decreases. The cold water can then be transported to the equator by the meridional circulation within the mixed layer. Furthermore, the relation among CT SST, the surface heat flux, and the equatorial upwelling are discussed. The study implies the simulation biases of temperature on the equator are not only related to the local ocean dynamics but also related to some deficiency in simulating off-equatorial processes.

  5. Spatial Correlations of Anomaly Time Series of AIRS Version-6 Land Surface Skin Temperatures with the Nino-4 Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susskind, Joel; Lee, Jae N.; Iredell, Lena

    2013-01-01

    The AIRS Science Team Version-6 data set is a valuable resource for meteorological studies. Quality Controlled earth's surface skin temperatures are produced on a 45 km x 45 km spatial scale under most cloud cover conditions. The same retrieval algorithm is used for all surface types under all conditions. This study used eleven years of AIRS monthly mean surface skin temperature and cloud cover products to show that land surface skin temperatures have decreased significantly in some areas and increased significantly in other areas over the period September 2002 through August 2013. These changes occurred primarily at 1:30 PM but not at 1:30 AM. Cooling land areas contained corresponding increases in cloud cover over this time period, with the reverse being true for warming land areas. The cloud cover anomaly patterns for a given month are affected significantly by El Nino/La Nina activity, and anomalies in cloud cover are a driving force behind anomalies in land surface skin temperature.

  6. Convective heat transfer by oscillating flow in an enclosure with non-uniform spatial bottom wall temperature profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raheimpour Angeneh, Saeid; Aktas, Murat Kadri

    2016-11-01

    Effects of the acoustic streaming motion on convective heat transfer in a rectangular shallow enclosure with sinusoidal spatial bottom wall temperature distribution are investigated numerically. Acoustic excitation is generated by the periodic vibration of left wall. The top wall of the enclosure is isothermal while the side walls are adiabatic. A FORTRAN code is developed to predict the oscillatory and mean flow fields by considering the compressible form of the Navier -Stokes equation and solved by flux-corrected transport algorithm. In order to validate the results of the simulations, a case with an unheated bottom wall is considered and compared with the existing literature. Applying the sinusoidal temperature profile to the bottom wall provides axial and transverse temperature gradients. In return these gradients strongly affect the flow pattern in the enclosure. Heat transfer depends on the flow structure considerably. This is the first time that the effect of nonzero mean vibrational flow on thermal convection from a surface with sinusoidal temperature profile investigated. Results of this study may lead up to design of new heat removal applications.

  7. The creation of future daily gridded datasets of precipitation and temperature with a spatial weather generator, Cyprus 2020-2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Corrado; Bruggeman, Adriana; Hadjinicolaou, Panos; Pashiardis, Stelios; Lange, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution gridded daily datasets are essential for natural resource management and the analysis of climate changes and their effects. This study aimed to create gridded datasets of daily precipitation and daily minimum and maximum temperature, for the future (2020-2050). The horizontal resolution of the developed datasets is 1 x 1 km2, covering the area under control of the Republic of Cyprus (5.760 km2). The study is divided into two parts. The first consists of the evaluation of the performance of different interpolation techniques for daily rainfall and temperature data (1980-2010) for the creation of the gridded datasets. Rainfall data recorded at 145 stations and temperature data from 34 stations were used. For precipitation, inverse distance weighting (IDW) performs best for local events, while a combination of step-wise geographically weighted regression and IDW proves to be the best method for large scale events. For minimum and maximum temperature, a combination of step-wise linear multiple regression and thin plate splines is recognized as the best method. Six Regional Climate Models (RCMs) for the A1B SRES emission scenario from the EU ENSEMBLE project database were selected as sources for future climate projections. The RCMs were evaluated for their capacity to simulate Cyprus climatology for the period 1980-2010. Data for the period 2020-2050 from the three best performing RCMs were downscaled, using the change factors approach, at the location of observational stations. Daily time series were created with a stochastic rainfall and temperature generator. The RainSim V3 software (Burton et al., 2008) was used to generate spatial-temporal coherent rainfall fields. The temperature generator was developed in R and modeled temperature as a weakly stationary process with the daily mean and standard deviation conditioned on the wet and dry state of the day (Richardson, 1981). Finally gridded datasets depicting projected future climate conditions were

  8. Spatial representations of place cells in darkness are supported by path integration and border information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sijie; Schönfeld, Fabian; Wiskott, Laurenz; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Effective spatial navigation is enabled by reliable reference cues that derive from sensory information from the external environment, as well as from internal sources such as the vestibular system. The integration of information from these sources enables dead reckoning in the form of path integration. Navigation in the dark is associated with the accumulation of errors in terms of perception of allocentric position and this may relate to error accumulation in path integration. We assessed this by recording from place cells in the dark under circumstances where spatial sensory cues were suppressed. Spatial information content, spatial coherence, place field size, and peak and infield firing rates decreased whereas sparsity increased following exploration in the dark compared to the light. Nonetheless it was observed that place field stability in darkness was sustained by border information in a subset of place cells. To examine the impact of encountering the environment’s border on navigation, we analyzed the trajectory and spiking data gathered during navigation in the dark. Our data suggest that although error accumulation in path integration drives place field drift in darkness, under circumstances where border contact is possible, this information is integrated to enable retention of spatial representations. PMID:25009477

  9. Relation between clinical mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood and their spatial label free scattering patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Zhenxi; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Li

    2016-07-01

    A single living cell's light scattering pattern (LSP) in the horizontal plane, which has been denoted as the cell's "2D fingerprint," may provide a powerful label-free detection tool in clinical applications. We have recently studied the LSP in spatial scattering planes, denoted as the cell's "3D fingerprint," for mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood. The effects of membrane size, morphology, and the existence of the nucleus on the spatial LSP are discussed. In order to distinguish clinical label-free mature and immature lymphocytes, the special features of the spatial LSP are studied by statistical method in both the spatial and frequency domains. Spatial LSP provides rich information on the cell's morphology and contents, which can distinguish mature from immature lymphocyte cells and hence ultimately it may be a useful label-free technique for clinical leukemia diagnosis.

  10. Spatial variability of surface temperature as related to cropping practice with implications for irrigation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, J. L.; Millard, J. P.; Reginato, R. J.; Jackson, R. D.; Idso, S. B.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Goettelman, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Crop stress measured using thermal infrared emission is evaluated with the stress-degree-day (SDD) concept. Throughout the season, the accumulation of SDD during the reproductive stage of growth is inversely related to yield. This relationship is shown for durum wheat, hard red winter wheat, barley, grain sorghum and soybeans. It is noted that SDD can be used to schedule irrigations for maximizing yields and for applying remotely sensed data to management of water resources. An airborne flight with a thermal-IR scanner was used to examine the variability in temperature that may exist from one field to another and to determine realistic within-field temperature variations. It was found that the airborne and the ground-based data agreed very well and that there was less variability in the fields that were completely covered with crops than those of bare soil.

  11. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Titan's Surface Temperatures from Cassini CIRS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; deKok, R.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    We report a wide-ranging study of Titan's surface temperatures by analysis of the Moon's outgoing radiance through a spectral window in the thermal infrared at 19 mm (530/cm) characterized by lower atmospheric opacity. We begin by modeling Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) far infrared spectra collected in the period 2004-2010, using a radiative transfer forward model combined with a non-linear optimal estimation inversion method. At low-latitudes, we agree with the HASI near-surface temperature of about 94 K at 101S (Fulchignoni et al., 2005). We find a systematic decrease from the equator toward the poles, hemispherically asymmetric, of approx. 1 K at 60 deg. south and approx. 3 K at 60 deg. north, in general agreement with a previous analysis of CIRS data and with Voyager results from the previous northern winter. Subdividing the available database, corresponding to about one Titan season, into 3 consecutive periods, small seasonal changes of up to 2 K at 60 deg N became noticeable in the results. In addition, clear evidence of diurnal variations of the surface temperatures near the equator are observed for the first time: we find a trend of slowly increasing temperature from the morning to the early afternoon and a faster decrease during the night. The diurnal change is approx. 1.5 K, in agreement with model predictions for a surface with a thermal inertia between 300 and 600 J/ sq. m s (exp -1/2) / K. These results provide important constraints on coupled surface-atmosphere models of Titan's meteorology and atmospheric dynamic.

  12. Interaction of Low Temperature Plasmas with Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, Mounir

    2008-10-01

    Due to promising possibilities for their use in medical applications such as wound healing, surface modification of biocompatible materials, and the sterilization of reusable heat-sensitive medical instruments, low temperature plasmas and plasma jets are making big strides as a technology that can potentially be used in medicine^1-2. At this stage of research, fundamental questions about the effects of plasma on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are still not completely answered. An in-depth understanding of the pathway whereby cold plasma interact with biological cells is necessary before real applications can emerge. In this paper, first an overview of non-equilibrium plasma sources (both low and high pressures) will be presented. Secondly, the effects of plasma on bacterial cells will be discussed. Here, the roles of the various plasma agents in the inactivation process will be outlined. In particular, the effects of UV and that of various reactive species (O3, O, OH) are highlighted. Thirdly, preliminary findings on the effects of plasma on few types of eukaryotic cells will be presented. How plasma affects eukaryotic cells, such as mammalian cells, is very important in applications where the viability/preservation of the cells could be an issue (such as in wound treatment). Another interesting aspect is the triggering of apoptosis (programmed cell death). Some investigators have claimed that plasma is able to induce apoptosis in some types of cancer cells. If successfully replicated, this can open up a novel method of cancer treatment. In this talk however, I will briefly focus more on the wound healing potential of cold plasmas. ^1E. A. Blakely, K. A. Bjornstad, J. E. Galvin, O. R. Monteiro, and I. G. Brown, ``Selective Neuron Growth on Ion Implanted and Plasma Deposited Surfaces'', In Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Plasma Sci., (2002), p. 253. ^2M. Laroussi, ``Non-thermal Decontamination of Biological Media by Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas: Review, Analysis, and

  13. Cell-friendly inverse opal-like hydrogels for a spatially separated co-culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaeyun; Bencherif, Sidi A; Li, Weiwei Aileen; Mooney, David J

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional macroporous scaffolds have extensively been studied for cell-based tissue engineering but their use is mostly limited to mechanical support for cell adhesion and growth on the surface of macropores. Here, a templated fabrication method is described to prepare cell-friendly inverse opal-like hydrogels (IOHs) allowing both cell encapsulation within the hydrogel matrix and cell seeding on the surface of macropores. Ionically crosslinked alginate microbeads and photocrosslinkable biocompatible polymers are used as a sacrificial template and as a matrix, respectively. The alginate microbeads are easily removed by a chelating agent, with minimal toxicity for the encapsulated cells during template removal. The outer surface of macropores in IOHs can also provide a space for cell adherence. The cells encapsulated or attached in IOHs are able to remain viable and to proliferate over time. The elastic modulus and cell-adhesion properties of IOHs can be easily controlled and tuned. Finally, it is demonstrated that IOH can be used to co-culture two distinct cell populations in different spatial positions. This cell-friendly IOH system provides a 3D scaffold for organizing different cell types in a controllable microenvironment to investigate biological processes such as stem cell niches or tumor microenvironments.

  14. Retinal ganglion cell distribution and spatial resolving power in deep-sea lanternfishes (Myctophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Busserolles, Fanny; Marshall, N Justin; Collin, Shaun P

    2014-01-01

    Topographic analyses of retinal ganglion cell density are very useful in providing information about the visual ecology of a species by identifying areas of acute vision within the visual field (i.e. areas of high cell density). In this study, we investigated the neural cell distribution in the ganglion cell layer of a range of lanternfish species belonging to 10 genera. Analyses were performed on wholemounted retinas using stereology. Topographic maps were constructed of the distribution of all neurons and both ganglion and amacrine cell populations in 5 different species from Nissl-stained retinas using cytological criteria. Amacrine cell distribution was also examined immunohistochemically in 2 of the 5 species using anti-parvalbumin antibody. The distributions of both the total neuron and the amacrine cell populations were aligned in all of the species examined, showing a general increase in cell density toward the retinal periphery. However, when the ganglion cell population was topographically isolated from the amacrine cell population, which comprised up to 80% of the total neurons within the ganglion cell layer, a different distribution was revealed. Topographic maps of the true ganglion cell distribution in 18 species of lanternfishes revealed well-defined specializations in different regions of the retina. Different species possessed distinct areas of high ganglion cell density with respect to both peak density and the location and/or shape of the specialized acute zone (i.e. elongated areae ventro-temporales, areae temporales and large areae centrales). The spatial resolving power was calculated to be relatively low (varying from 1.6 to 4.4 cycles per degree), indicating that myctophids may constitute one of the less visually acute groups of deep-sea teleosts. The diversity in retinal specializations and spatial resolving power within the family is assessed in terms of possible ecological functions and evolutionary history. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Retinal Ganglion Cell Distribution and Spatial Resolving Power in Deep-Sea Lanternfishes (Myctophidae)

    KAUST Repository

    De Busserolles, Fanny

    2014-01-01

    Topographic analyses of retinal ganglion cell density are very useful in providing information about the visual ecology of a species by identifying areas of acute vision within the visual field (i.e. areas of high cell density). In this study, we investigated the neural cell distribution in the ganglion cell layer of a range of lanternfish species belonging to 10 genera. Analyses were performed on wholemounted retinas using stereology. Topographic maps were constructed of the distribution of all neurons and both ganglion and amacrine cell populations in 5 different species from Nissl-stained retinas using cytological criteria. Amacrine cell distribution was also examined immunohistochemically in 2 of the 5 species using anti-parvalbumin antibody. The distributions of both the total neuron and the amacrine cell populations were aligned in all of the species examined, showing a general increase in cell density toward the retinal periphery. However, when the ganglion cell population was topographically isolated from the amacrine cell population, which comprised up to 80% of the total neurons within the ganglion cell layer, a different distribution was revealed. Topographic maps of the true ganglion cell distribution in 18 species of lanternfishes revealed well-defined specializations in different regions of the retina. Different species possessed distinct areas of high ganglion cell density with respect to both peak density and the location and/or shape of the specialized acute zone (i.e. elongated areae ventro-temporales, areae temporales and large areae centrales). The spatial resolving power was calculated to be relatively low (varying from 1.6 to 4.4 cycles per degree), indicating that myctophids may constitute one of the less visually acute groups of deep-sea teleosts. The diversity in retinal specializations and spatial resolving power within the family is assessed in terms of possible ecological functions and evolutionary history.

  16. Modelling the spatial organization of cell proliferation in the developing central nervous system

    CERN Document Server

    Clairambault, Jean; Perthame, Benoit; Rapacioli, Melina; Rofman, Edmundo; Verdes, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    How far is neuroepithelial cell proliferation in the developing central nervous system a deterministic process? Or, to put it in a more precise way, how accurately can it be described by a deterministic mathematical model? To provide tracks to answer this question, a deterministic system of transport and diffusion partial differential equations, both physiologically and spatially structured, is introduced as a model to describe the spatially organized process of cell proliferation during the development of the central nervous system. As an initial step towards dealing with the three-dimensional case, a unidimensional version of the model is presented. Numerical analysis and numerical tests are performed. In this work we also achieve a first experimental validation of the proposed model, by using cell proliferation data recorded from histological sections obtained during the development of the optic tectum in the chick embryo.

  17. Optimal Cell Towers Distribution by using Spatial Mining and Geographic Information System

    CERN Document Server

    AL-Hamami, Alaa H

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of wireless communication is dramatically changing our life. Mobile telecommunications emerged as a technological marvel allowing for access to personal and other services, devices, computation and communication, in any place and at any time through effortless plug and play. Setting up wireless mobile networks often requires: Frequency Assignment, Communication Protocol selection, Routing schemes selection, and cells towers distributions. This research aims to optimize the cells towers distribution by using spatial mining with Geographic Information System (GIS) as a tool. The distribution optimization could be done by applying the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) on the image of the area which must be covered with two levels of hierarchy. The research will apply the spatial association rules technique on the second level to select the best square in the cell for placing the antenna. From that the proposal will try to minimize the number of installed towers, makes tower's location feasible, and pr...

  18. High temperature PEM fuel cells - Degradation and durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, S.S.

    2012-12-15

    This work analyses the degradation issues of a High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (HT-PEMFC). It is based on the assumption that given the current challenges for storage and distribution of hydrogen, it is more practical to use liquid alcohols as energy carriers for fuel cells. Among these, methanol is very attractive, as it can be obtained from a variety of renewable sources and has a relatively low reforming temperature for the production of hydrogen rich gaseous mixture. The effects on HT-PEMFC of the different constituents of this gaseous mixture, known as a reformate gas, are investigated in the current work. For this, an experimental set up, in which all these constituents can be fed to the anode side of a fuel cell for testing, is put in place. It includes mass flow controllers for the gaseous species, and a vapor delivery system for the vapor mixture of the unconverted reforming reactants. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is used to characterize the effects of these impurities. The effects of CO were tested up to 2% by volume along with other impurities. All the reformate impurities, including ethanol-water vapor mixture, cause loss in the performance of the fuel cell. In general, CO{sub 2} dilutes the reactants, if tested alone at high operating temperatures (180 C), but tends to exacerbate the effects of CO if they are tested together. On the other hand, CO and methanol-water vapor mixture degrade the fuel cell proportionally to the amounts in which they are tested. In this dissertation some of the mechanisms with which the impurities affect the fuel cell are discussed and interdependence among the effects is also studied. This showed that the combined effect of reformate impurities is more than the arithmetic sum of the individual effects of reformate constituents. The results of the thesis help to understand better the issues of degradation and durability in fuel cells, which can help to make them more durable and

  19. Long-term patterns of air temperatures, daily temperature range, precipitation, grass-reference evapotranspiration and aridity index in the USA Great Plains: Part I. Spatial trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukal, M.; Irmak, S.

    2016-11-01

    Due to their substantial spatio-temporal behavior, long-term quantification and analyses of important hydrological variables are essential for practical applications in water resources planning, evaluating the water use of agricultural crop production and quantifying crop evapotranspiration patterns and irrigation management vs. hydrologic balance relationships. Observed data at over 800 sites across the Great Plains of USA, comprising of 9 states and 2,307,410 km2 of surface area, which is about 30% of the terrestrial area of the USA, were used to quantify and map large-scale and long-term (1968-2013) spatial trends of air temperatures, daily temperature range (DTR), precipitation, grass-reference evapotranspiration (ETo) and aridity index (AI) at monthly, growing season and annual time steps. Air temperatures had a strong north to south increasing trend, with annual average varying from -1 to 24 °C, and growing season average temperature varying from 8 to 30 °C. DTR gradually decreased from western to eastern parts of the region, with a regional annual and growing season averages of 14.25 °C and 14.79 °C, respectively. Precipitation had a gradual shift towards higher magnitudes from west to east, with the average annual and growing season (May-September) precipitation ranging from 163 to 1486 mm and from 98 to 746 mm, respectively. ETo had a southwest-northeast decreasing trend, with regional annual and growing season averages of 1297 mm and 823 mm, respectively. AI increased from west to east, indicating higher humidity (less arid) towards the east, with regional annual and growing season averages of 0.49 and 0.44, respectively. The spatial datasets and maps for these important climate variables can serve as valuable background for climate change and hydrologic studies in the Great Plains region. Through identification of priority areas from the developed maps, efforts of the concerned personnel and agencies and resources can be diverted towards development

  20. Modeling robustness tradeoffs in yeast cell polarization induced by spatial gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Shan Chou

    Full Text Available Cells localize (polarize internal components to specific locations in response to external signals such as spatial gradients. For example, yeast cells form a mating projection toward the source of mating pheromone. There are specific challenges associated with cell polarization including amplification of shallow external gradients of ligand to produce steep internal gradients of protein components (e.g. localized distribution, response over a broad range of ligand concentrations, and tracking of moving signal sources. In this work, we investigated the tradeoffs among these performance objectives using a generic model that captures the basic spatial dynamics of polarization in yeast cells, which are small. We varied the positive feedback, cooperativity, and diffusion coefficients in the model to explore the nature of this tradeoff. Increasing the positive feedback gain resulted in better amplification, but also produced multiple steady-states and hysteresis that prevented the tracking of directional changes of the gradient. Feedforward/feedback coincidence detection in the positive feedback loop and multi-stage amplification both improved tracking with only a modest loss of amplification. Surprisingly, we found that introducing lateral surface diffusion increased the robustness of polarization and collapsed the multiple steady-states to a single steady-state at the cost of a reduction in polarization. Finally, in a more mechanistic model of yeast cell polarization, a surface diffusion coefficient between 0.01 and 0.001 µm(2/s produced the best polarization performance, and this range is close to the measured value. The model also showed good gradient-sensitivity and dynamic range. This research is significant because it provides an in-depth analysis of the performance tradeoffs that confront biological systems that sense and respond to chemical spatial gradients, proposes strategies for balancing this tradeoff, highlights the critical role of

  1. PBI-based polymer electrolyte membranes fuel cells. Temperature effects on cell performance and catalyst stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, Justo; Canizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Linares, Jose J. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, 13004 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2007-03-10

    In this work, it has been shown that the temperature (ranging from 100 to 175 C) greatly influences the performance of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-doped polybenzimidazole-based high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells by several and complex processes. The temperature, by itself, increases H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-doped PBI conductivity and enhances the electrodic reactions as it rises. Nevertheless, high temperatures reduce the level of hydration of the membrane, above 130-140 C accelerate the self-dehydration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, and they may boost the process of catalyst particle agglomeration that takes place in strongly acidic H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} medium (as checked by multi-cycling sweep voltammetry), reducing the overall electrochemical active surface. The first process seems to have a rapid response to changes in the temperature and controls the cell performance immediately after them. The second process seems to develop slower, and influences the cell performance in the 'long-term'. The predominant processes, at each moment and temperature, determine the effect of the temperature on the cell performance, as potentiostatic curves display. 'Long-term' polarization curves grow up to 150 C and decrease at 175 C. 'Short-term' ones continuously increase as the temperature does after 'conditioning' the cell at 125 C. On the contrary, when compared the polarization curves at 175 C a continuous decrease is observed with the 'conditioning' temperature. A discussion of the observed trends is proposed in this work. (author)

  2. Anchor cell signaling and vulval precursor cell positioning establish a reproducible spatial context during C. elegans vulval induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimbert, Stéphanie; Tietze, Kyria; Barkoulas, Michalis; Sternberg, Paul W; Félix, Marie-Anne; Braendle, Christian

    2016-08-01

    How cells coordinate their spatial positioning through intercellular signaling events is poorly understood. Here we address this topic using Caenorhabditis elegans vulval patterning during which hypodermal vulval precursor cells (VPCs) adopt distinct cell fates determined by their relative positions to the gonadal anchor cell (AC). LIN-3/EGF signaling by the AC induces the central VPC, P6.p, to adopt a 1° vulval fate. Exact alignment of AC and VPCs is thus critical for correct fate patterning, yet, as we show here, the initial AC-VPC positioning is both highly variable and asymmetric among individuals, with AC and P6.p only becoming aligned at the early L3 stage. Cell ablations and mutant analysis indicate that VPCs, most prominently 1° cells, move towards the AC. We identify AC-released LIN-3/EGF as a major attractive signal, which therefore plays a dual role in vulval patterning (cell alignment and fate induction). Additionally, compromising Wnt pathway components also induces AC-VPC alignment errors, with loss of posterior Wnt signaling increasing stochastic vulval centering on P5.p. Our results illustrate how intercellular signaling reduces initial spatial variability in cell positioning to generate reproducible interactions across tissues.

  3. Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells: Temperature Impact on Passivation and Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seif, J.; Krishnamani, G.; Demaurex, B.; Martin de Nicholas, S.; Holm, N.; Ballif, C.; De Wolf, S.

    2015-03-23

    Photovoltaic devices deployed in the field can reach operation temperatures (T) as high as 90 °C [1]. Hence, their temperature coefficients (TC1) are of great practical importance as they determine their energy yield. In this study we concentrate on T-related lifetime variations of amorphous/crystalline interfaces and study their influence on the TCs of the individual solar cell parameters. We find that both the open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are influenced by these lifetime variations. However, this is only a minor effect compared to the dominant increase of the intrinsic carrier density and the related increase in dark saturation current density. Additionally, in this paper we will show that the TCVoc does not depend solely on the initial value of the Voc [2, 3], but that the structure of the device has to be considered as well.

  4. Electrolytes For Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rękas M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid electrolytes for construction of the intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells, IT-SOFC, have been reviewed. Yttrium stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals, YTZP, as a potential electrolyte of IT-SOFC have been highlighted. The experimental results involving structural, microstructural, electrical properties based on our own studies were presented. In order to study aluminum diffusion in YTZP, aluminum oxide was deposited on the surface of 3 mol.% yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP. The samples were annealed at temperatures from 1523 to 1773 K. Diffusion profiles of Al in the form of mean concentration vs. depth in B-type kinetic region were investigated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS. Both the lattice (DB and grain boundary (DGB diffusion were determined.

  5. Spatial Distribution of Stem Cell-Like Keratinocytes in Dissected Compound Hair Follicles of the Dog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique J Wiener

    Full Text Available Hair cycle disturbances are common in dogs and comparable to some alopecic disorders in humans. A normal hair cycle is maintained by follicular stem cells which are predominately found in an area known as the bulge. Due to similar morphological characteristics of the bulge area in humans and dogs, the shared particularity of compound hair follicles as well as similarities in follicular biomarker expression, the dog is a promising model to study human hair cycle and stem cell disorders. To gain insight into the spatial distribution of follicular keratinocytes with stem cell potential in canine compound follicles, we microdissected hair follicles in anagen and telogen from skin samples of freshly euthanized dogs. The keratinocytes isolated from different locations were investigated for their colony forming efficiency, growth and differentiation potential as well as clonal growth. Our results indicate that i compound and single hair follicles exhibit a comparable spatial distribution pattern with respect to cells with high growth potential and stem cell-like characteristics, ii the lower isthmus (comprising the bulge harbors most cells with high growth potential in both, the anagen and the telogen hair cycle stage, iii unlike in other species, colonies with highest growth potential are rather small with an irregular perimeter and iv the keratinocytes derived from the bulbar region exhibit characteristics of actively dividing transit amplifying cells. Our results now provide the basis to conduct comparative studies of normal dogs and those with hair cycle disorders with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients.

  6. Interstitial cells of Cajal, macrophages and mast cells in the gut musculature: morphology, distribution, spatial and possible functional interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are recognized as pacemaker cells for gastrointestinal movement and are suggested to be mediators of neuromuscular transmission. Intestinal motility disturbances are often associated with a reduced number of ICC and/or ultrastructural damage, sometimes associated...... with immune cells. Macrophages and mast cells in the intestinal muscularis externa of rodents can be found in close spatial contact with ICC. Macrophages are a constant and regularly distributed cell population in the serosa and at the level of Auerbach's plexus (AP). In human colon, ICC are in close contact...... with macrophages at the level of AP, suggesting functional interaction. It has therefore been proposed that ICC and macrophages interact. Macrophages and mast cells are considered to play important roles in the innate immune defence by producing pro-inflammatory mediators during classical activation, which may...

  7. On the theory of ps and sub-ps laser pulse interaction with metals. II. Spatial temperature distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüttner, Bernd; Rohr, Gernot C.

    1998-04-01

    The interaction of short laser pulses with metals is described in terms of a new model involving a generalised nonlocal heat flow in time. The resulting system of coupled differential equations contains additional terms that originate in the thermal inertia of the electron subsystem. They are connected to the time derivative of both the laser intensity and the coupling of the electrons to the phonons. After briefly discussing the importance of the coefficient of heat exchange and of the different contributions to its main parts, the electron-phonon coupling and the average of the squared phonon frequencies, we present snap-shot-like calculations of the spatial temperature distribution along the z-axis for Al, Au, Pb and Nb for different intensities but fixed pulse duration τL=250 fs. In addition, the electron and phonon temperatures inside a thin Au film are studied in detail. Our results are compared to those arising from a standard two temperature model (TTM) and those of the conventional theory. While the traditional theory becomes invalid in most cases at least in the ps-range the differences between our approach and the TTM become the more pronounced the smaller the coefficient of heat exchange.

  8. Identification of a novel temperature sensitive promoter in cho cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesse Friedemann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO expression system is the leading production platform for manufacturing biopharmaceuticals for the treatment of numerous human diseases. Efforts to optimize the production process also include the genetic construct encoding the therapeutic gene. Here we report about the successful identification of an endogenous highly active gene promoter obtained from CHO cells which shows conditionally inducible gene expression at reduced temperature. Results Based on CHO microarray expression data abundantly transcribed genes were selected as potential promoter candidates. The S100a6 (calcyclin and its flanking regions were identified from a genomic CHO-K1 lambda-phage library. Computational analyses showed a predicted TSS, a TATA-box and several TFBSs within the 1.5 kb region upstream the ATG start signal. Various constructs were investigated for promoter activity at 37°C and 33°C in transient luciferase reporter gene assays. Most constructs showed expression levels even higher than the SV40 control and on average a more than two-fold increase at lower temperature. We identified the core promoter sequence (222 bp comprising two SP1 sites and could show a further increase in activity by duplication of this minimal sequence. Conclusions This novel CHO promoter permits conditionally high-level gene expression. Upon a shift to 33°C, a two to three-fold increase of basal productivity (already higher than SV40 promoter is achieved. This property is of particular advantage for a process with reduced expression during initial cell growth followed by the production phase at low temperature with a boost in expression. Additionally, production of toxic proteins becomes feasible, since cell metabolism and gene expression do not directly interfere. The CHO S100a6 promoter can be characterized as cold-shock responsive with the potential for improving process performance of mammalian expression systems.

  9. Spatial estimation of mean temperature and precipitation in areas of scarce meteorological information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, J.D. [Universidad Autonoma Chapingo, Chapingo (Mexico)]. E-mail: dgomez@correo.chapingo.mx; Etchevers, J.D. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales, Colegio de Postgraduados, Montecillo, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Monterroso, A.I. [departamento de Suelos, Universidad Autonoma Chapingo, Chapingo (Mexico); Gay, G. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Campo, J. [Instituto de Ecologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Martinez, M. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales, Montecillo, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-01-15

    In regions of complex relief and scarce meteorological information it becomes difficult to implement techniques and models of numerical interpolation to elaborate reliable maps of climatic variables essential for the study of natural resources using the new tools of the geographic information systems. This paper presents a method for estimating annual and monthly mean values of temperature and precipitation, taking elements from simple interpolation methods and complementing them with some characteristics of more sophisticated methods. To determine temperature, simple linear regression equations were generated associating temperature with altitude of weather stations in the study region, which had been previously subdivided in accordance with humidity conditions and then applying such equations to the area's digital elevation model to obtain temperatures. The estimation of precipitation was based on the graphic method through the analysis of the meteorological systems that affect the regions of the study area throughout the year and considering the influence of mountain ridges on the movement of prevailing winds. Weather stations with data in nearby regions were analyzed according to their position in the landscape, exposure to humid winds, and false color associated with vegetation types. Weather station sites were used to reference the amount of rainfall; interpolation was attained using analogies with satellite images of false color to which a model of digital elevation was incorporated to find similar conditions within the study area. [Spanish] En las regiones de relieve complejo y con escasa informacion meteorologica se dificulta la aplicacion de las diferentes tecnicas y modelos de interpolacion numericos para elaborar mapas de variables climaticas confiables, indispensables para realizar estudios de los recursos naturales, con la utilizacion de las nuevas herramientas de los sistemas de informacion geografica. En este trabajo se presenta un metodo para

  10. Spatial gravity wave characteristics obtained from multiple OH(3-1) airglow temperature time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Paul; Schmidt, Carsten; Wüst, Sabine; Bittner, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach for the detection of gravity waves in OH-airglow observations at the measurement site Oberpfaffenhofen (11.27°E, 48.08°N), Germany. The measurements were performed at the German Remote Sensing Data Center (DFD) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) during the period from February 4th, 2011 to July 6th, 2011. In this case study the observations were carried out by three identical Ground-based Infrared P-branch Spectrometers (GRIPS). These instruments provide OH(3-1) rotational temperature time series, which enable spatio-temporal investigations of gravity wave characteristics in the mesopause region. The instruments were aligned in such a way that their fields of view (FOV) formed an equilateral triangle in the OH-emission layer at a height of 87 km. The Harmonic Analysis is applied in order to identify joint temperature oscillations in the three individual datasets. Dependent on the specific gravity wave activity in a single night, it is possible to detect up to four different wave patterns with this method. The values obtained for the waves' periods and phases are then used to derive further parameters, such as horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and the direction of propagation. We identify systematic relationships between periods and amplitudes as well as between periods and horizontal wavelengths. A predominant propagation direction towards the East and North-North-East characterizes the waves during the observation period. There are also indications of seasonal effects in the temporal development of the horizontal wavelength and the phase velocity. During late winter and early spring the derived horizontal wavelengths and the phase velocities are smaller than in the subsequent period from early April to July 2011.

  11. Station for spatially distributed measurements of soil moisture and ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovec, Jakub; Šanda, Martin; Haase, Tomáš; Sněhota, Michal; Wild, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Third generation of combined thermal and soil moisture standalone field station coded TMS3 with wireless communication is presented. The device combines three thermometers (MAXIM/DALLAS Semiconductor DS7505U with -55 to +125°C range and 0.0625°C resolution, 0.5°C precision in 0 to +70°C range and 2°C precision out of this range). Soil moisture measurement is performed based on time domain transmission (TDT) principle for the full range of soil moisture with 0.025% resolution within the full possible soil moisture span for the most typical conditions of dry to saturated soils with safe margins to enable measurements in freezing, hot or saline soils. Principal compact version is designed for temperature measurements approximately at heights -10, 0 and +15 cm relative to soil surface when installed vertically and soil moisture measurements between 0 and 12 cm below surface. Set of buriable/subsurface stations each with 2.2 meter extension cord with soil and surface temperature measurement provides possibility to scan vertical soil profile for soil moisture and temperature at desired depths. USB equipped station is designed for streamed direct data acquisition in laboratory use in 1s interval. Station is also equipped with the shock sensor indicating the manipulation. Presented version incorporates life time permanent data storage (0.5 million logs). Current sensor design aims towards improved durability in harsh outdoor environment with reliable functioning in wet conditions withstanding mechanical or electric shock destruction. Insertion into the soil is possible by pressing with the use of a simple plastic cover. Data are retrieved by contact portable pocket collector (second generation) or by RFID wireless communication for hundreds meter distance (third generation) in either star pattern of GSM hub to stations or lined up GSM to station to another station both in comprised data packets. This option will allow online data harvesting and real time process

  12. Nanoscale Spatial Organization of Prokaryotic Cells Studied by Super-Resolution Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Andrea Lynn

    All cells spatially organize their interiors, and this arrangement is necessary for cell viability. Until recently, it was believed that only eukaryotic cells spatially segregate their components. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that bacteria also assemble their proteins into complex patterns. In eukaryotic cells, spatial organization arises from membrane bound organelles as well as motor transport proteins which can move cargos within the cell. To date, there are no known motor transport proteins in bacteria and most microbes lack membrane bound organelles, so it remains a mystery how bacterial spatial organization emerges. In hind-sight it is not surprising that bacteria also exhibit complex spatial organization considering much of what we have learned about the basic processes that take place in all cells, such as transcription and translation was first discovered in prokaryotic cells. Perhaps the fundamental principles that govern spatial organization in prokaryotic cells may be applicable in eukaryotic cells as well. In addition, bacteria are attractive model organism for spatial organization studies because they are genetically tractable, grow quickly and much biochemical and structural data is known about them. A powerful tool for observing spatial organization in cells is the fluorescence microscope. By specifically tagging a protein of interest with a fluorescent probe, it is possible to examine how proteins organize and dynamically assemble inside cells. A significant disadvantage of this technology is its spatial resolution (approximately 250 nm laterally and 500 nm axially). This limitation on resolution causes closely spaced proteins to look blurred making it difficult to observe the fine structure within the complexes. This resolution limit is especially problematic within small cells such as bacteria. With the recent invention of new optical microscopies, we now can surpass the existing limits of fluorescence imaging. In some cases, we can

  13. GaAs/Ge solar cell AC parameters at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R. Anil; Suresh, M.S. [ISRO Satellite centre, ISRO, Bangalore 560 017 (India); Nagaraju, J. [Department of Instrumentation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2003-05-15

    The AC parameters of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs/Ge) solar cell were measured at different cell temperatures (198-348K) by varying the cell bias voltage (forward and reverse) under dark condition using impedance spectroscopy technique. It was found that the cell capacitance increases with the cell temperature where as the cell resistance decreases, at any bias voltage. The measured cell parameters were used to calculate the intrinsic concentration of electron-hole pair, cell material relative permittivity and its band gap energy. The diode factor and the cell dynamic resistance at the corresponding maximum power point decrease with the cell temperature.

  14. Interstitial cells of Cajal, macrophages and mast cells in the gut musculature: morphology, distribution, spatial and possible functional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-04-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are recognized as pacemaker cells for gastrointestinal movement and are suggested to be mediators of neuromuscular transmission. Intestinal motility disturbances are often associated with a reduced number of ICC and/or ultrastructural damage, sometimes associated with immune cells. Macrophages and mast cells in the intestinal muscularis externa of rodents can be found in close spatial contact with ICC. Macrophages are a constant and regularly distributed cell population in the serosa and at the level of Auerbach's plexus (AP). In human colon, ICC are in close contact with macrophages at the level of AP, suggesting functional interaction. It has therefore been proposed that ICC and macrophages interact. Macrophages and mast cells are considered to play important roles in the innate immune defence by producing pro-inflammatory mediators during classical activation, which may in itself result in damage to the tissue. They also take part in alternative activation which is associated with anti-inflammatory mediators, tissue remodelling and homeostasis, cancer, helminth infections and immunophenotype switch. ICC become damaged under various circumstances - surgical resection, possibly post-operative ileus in rodents - where innate activation takes place, and in helminth infections - where alternative activation takes place. During alternative activation the muscularis macrophage can switch phenotype resulting in up-regulation of F4/80 and the mannose receptor. In more chronic conditions such as Crohn's disease and achalasia, ICC and mast cells develop close spatial contacts and piecemeal degranulation is possibly triggered.

  15. High performance internal reforming unit for high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiwen; Venkataraman, Ramakrishnan; Novacco, Lawrence J.

    2008-10-07

    A fuel reformer having an enclosure with first and second opposing surfaces, a sidewall connecting the first and second opposing surfaces and an inlet port and an outlet port in the sidewall. A plate assembly supporting a catalyst and baffles are also disposed in the enclosure. A main baffle extends into the enclosure from a point of the sidewall between the inlet and outlet ports. The main baffle cooperates with the enclosure and the plate assembly to establish a path for the flow of fuel gas through the reformer from the inlet port to the outlet port. At least a first directing baffle extends in the enclosure from one of the sidewall and the main baffle and cooperates with the plate assembly and the enclosure to alter the gas flow path. Desired graded catalyst loading pattern has been defined for optimized thermal management for the internal reforming high temperature fuel cells so as to achieve high cell performance.

  16. Changes in CdS/CdTe Solar Cells Subjected to Elevated Temperature, Voltage and Illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demtsu, Samuel; Nagle, Tim

    2003-10-01

    CdTe/CdS solar cells have been known to exhibit degradation in performance after being subjected to elevated temperature, voltage and illumination. These conditions are collectively referred to as "stress". We have studied and presented CdTe/CdS cell degradation under different stress conditions of devices from First Solar Inc., the University of South Florida and the University of Toledo. All cells were stressed in the light (close to 100 mW/cm2) for 56 days at elevated temperature of 900C at two different biases, short circuit (SC) and open circuit (OC). The stress condition surpasses the operation conditions expected in the field. To characterize the cells, we have measured current density as function of the applied voltage (JV), capacitance vs bias voltage (CV) and quantum efficiency (QE) measurements before and after exposure to stress. To investigate the spatial non-uniformity of photocurrent collection induced by stress we have done Light Beam-Induced Current (LBIC) measurement. The effect of the stress on the photovoltaic parameters short-circuit current (Jsc), open-circuit voltage (Voc), Fill-Factor (FF), and efficiency is presented and discussed. Carrier density as a function of the distance from the semiconductor junction is extracted from the C-V measurements. We have seen some variations between cells and degradation was not monotonic with stress time. The highly probable explanation for the degradation of the cells after the stress is that mobile copper ions diffuse out of the back contact towards the primary junction leaving a depletion of Cu in the back contact, which increases the contact barrier.

  17. Polycomb repressive complex PRC1 spatially constrains the mouse embryonic stem cell genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Sugar, Robert; Dimond, Andrew; Javierre, Biola-Maria; Armstrong, Harry; Mifsud, Borbala; Dimitrova, Emilia; Matheson, Louise; Tavares-Cadete, Filipe; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Jurkowski, Wiktor; Wingett, Steven W; Tabbada, Kristina; Andrews, Simon; Herman, Bram; LeProust, Emily; Osborne, Cameron S; Koseki, Haruhiko; Fraser, Peter; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Elderkin, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    The Polycomb repressive complexes PRC1 and PRC2 maintain embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency by silencing lineage-specifying developmental regulator genes. Emerging evidence suggests that Polycomb complexes act through controlling spatial genome organization. We show that PRC1 functions as a master regulator of mouse ESC genome architecture by organizing genes in three-dimensional interaction networks. The strongest spatial network is composed of the four Hox gene clusters and early developmental transcription factor genes, the majority of which contact poised enhancers. Removal of Polycomb repression leads to disruption of promoter-promoter contacts in the Hox gene network. In contrast, promoter-enhancer contacts are maintained in the absence of Polycomb repression, with accompanying widespread acquisition of active chromatin signatures at network enhancers and pronounced transcriptional upregulation of network genes. Thus, PRC1 physically constrains developmental transcription factor genes and their enhancers in a silenced but poised spatial network. We propose that the selective release of genes from this spatial network underlies cell fate specification during early embryonic development.

  18. Spatial distribution of niche and stem cells in ex vivo human limbal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, Indumathi; Kacham, Santhosh; Purushotham, Jyothi; Maddileti, Savitri; Siamwala, Jamila; Sangwan, Virender Singh

    2014-11-01

    Stem cells at the limbus mediate corneal epithelial regeneration and regulate normal tissue homeostasis. Ex vivo cultured limbal epithelial transplantations are being widely practiced in the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency. In this report, we examined whether the limbal niche cells that nurture and regulate epithelial stem cells coexist in ex vivo limbal cultures. We also compared the inherent differences between explant and suspension culture systems in terms of spatial distribution of niche cells and their effect on epithelial stem cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in vitro. We report that the stem cell content of both culture systems was similar, explaining the comparable clinical outcomes reported using these two methods. We also showed that the niche cells get expanded in culture and the nestin-positive cells migrate at the leading edges to direct epithelial cell migration in suspension cultures, whereas they are limited to the intact niche in explant cultures. We provide evidence that C/EBPδ-positive, p15-positive, and quiescent, label-retaining, early activated stem cells migrate at the leading edges to regulate epithelial cell proliferation in explant cultures, and this position effect is lost in early suspension cultures. However, in confluent suspension cultures, the stem cells and niche cells interact with each another, migrate in spiraling patterns, and self-organize to form three-dimensional niche-like compartments resembling the limbal crypts and thereby reestablish the position effect. These 3D-sphere clusters are enriched with nestin-, vimentin-, S100-, and p27-positive niche cells and p15-, p21-, p63α-, C/EBPδ-, ABCG2-, and Pax6-positive quiescent epithelial stem cells.

  19. Effects of urban impervious surfaces on land surface temperatures: Spatial scale dependence, temporal variations, and bioclimatic modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qun; Wu, Jianguo; He, Chunyang

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying the relationship between urban impervious surfaces (UIS) and land surface temperatures (LST) is important for understanding and mitigating the environmental impacts of urban heat islands in human-dominated landscapes. The main goal of this study was to examine how the UIS-LST relationship changes with spatial scales, seasonal and diurnal variations, and bioclimatic context in mainland China. We took a hierarchical approach that explicitly considered three spatial scales: the ecoregion, urban cluster, and urban core. Remote sensing data and regression methods were used. Our results showed that, in general, UIS and LST were positively correlated in summer and winter nighttime, but negatively in winter daytime. The strength of correlation increased from broad to fine scales. For example, the mean R2 for winter nights was 3 times higher at the urban core scale than at the ecoregion scale. The relationship showed large seasonal and diurnal variations: generally stronger in summer than in winter and stronger in nighttime than in daytime. At the urban core scale, for instance, the mean R2 was 2.2 times higher in summer daytime than in winter daytime, and 3.1 times higher in winter nighttime than in winter daytime. Vegetation and climate modified the relationship during summer daytime on the ecoregion scale. In conclusion, UIS has substantial influences on LST, and these effects vary greatly with spatial scales, diurnal/seasonal cycles, and bioclimatic context. Our study reveals several trends on the scale multiplicity, temporal variations, and context dependence of the UIS-LST relationship, which deserve further examination. Importantly, high mean R2 values with large variations on the local urban scale suggest that a great potential exists for mitigating urban heat island effects via urban landscape planning.

  20. Analyzing Ca(2+) dynamics in intact epithelial cells using spatially limited flash photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almassy, Janos; Yule, David I

    2013-01-01

    The production of saliva by parotid acinar cells is stimulated by Ca(2+) activation of Cl(-) and K(+) channels located in the apical plasma membrane of these polarized cells. Here we describe a paradigm for the focal photorelease of either Ca(2+) or an inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (InsP(3)) analog. The protocol is designed to be useful for investigating subcellular Ca(2+) dynamics in polarized cells with minimal experimental intervention. Parotid acinar cells are loaded with cell-permeable versions of the caged precursors (NP-EGTA-AM or Ci-InsP(3)/PM). Photolysis is accomplished using a spatially limited, focused diode laser, but the experiment can be readily modified to whole-field photolysis using a xenon flash lamp.

  1. Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Temperature Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celik, Ismail B. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This EPSCoR project had two primary goals: (i) to build infrastructure and work force at WVU to support long-term research in the area of fuel cells and related sciences; (ii) study effects of various impurities found in coal-syngas on performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). As detailed in this report the WVU research team has made significant accomplishments in both of these areas. What follows is a brief summary of these accomplishments: State-of-the-art test facilities and diagnostic tools have been built and put into use. These include cell manufacturing, half-cell and full-cell test benches, XPS, XRD, TEM, Raman, EDAX, SEM, EIS, and ESEM equipment, unique in-situ measurement techniques and test benches (Environmental EM, Transient Mass-Spectrometer-MS, and IR Optical Temperature measurements). In addition, computational capabilities have been developed culminating in a multi-scale multi-physics fuel cell simulation code, DREAM-SOFC, as well as a Beowulf cluster with 64 CPU units. We have trained 16 graduate students, 10 postdoctoral fellows, and recruited 4 new young faculty members who have actively participated in the EPSCoR project. All four of these faculty members have already been promoted to the tenured associate professor level. With the help of these faculty and students, we were able to secure 14 research awards/contracts amounting to a total of circa $5.0 Million external funding in closely related areas of research. Using the facilities mentioned above, the effects of PH3, HCl, Cl2, and H2S on cell performance have been studied in detail, mechanisms have been identified, and also remedies have been proposed and demonstrated in the laboratory. For example, it has been determined that PH3 reacts rapidly with Ni to from secondary compounds which may become softer or even melt at high temperature and then induce Ni migration to the surface of the cell changing the material and micro-structural properties of the cell drastically. It is found that

  2. Cell segmentation in histopathological images with deep learning algorithms by utilizing spatial relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Nuh; Bilgin, Gokhan

    2017-02-28

    In many computerized methods for cell detection, segmentation, and classification in digital histopathology that have recently emerged, the task of cell segmentation remains a chief problem for image processing in designing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. In research and diagnostic studies on cancer, pathologists can use CAD systems as second readers to analyze high-resolution histopathological images. Since cell detection and segmentation are critical for cancer grade assessments, cellular and extracellular structures should primarily be extracted from histopathological images. In response, we sought to identify a useful cell segmentation approach with histopathological images that uses not only prominent deep learning algorithms (i.e., convolutional neural networks, stacked autoencoders, and deep belief networks), but also spatial relationships, information of which is critical for achieving better cell segmentation results. To that end, we collected cellular and extracellular samples from histopathological images by windowing in small patches with various sizes. In experiments, the segmentation accuracies of the methods used improved as the window sizes increased due to the addition of local spatial and contextual information. Once we compared the effects of training sample size and influence of window size, results revealed that the deep learning algorithms, especially convolutional neural networks and partly stacked autoencoders, performed better than conventional methods in cell segmentation.

  3. Thermodynamic characteristics of a Brownian heat pump in a spatially periodic temperature field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper has studied the thermodynamic performance of a thermal Brownian heat pump,which consists of Brownian particles moving at a periodic sawtooth potential with external forces and contacting with the alternating hot and cold reservoirs along the space coordinate.The heat flows driven by both potential and kinetic energies are taken into account.The analytical expressions for the heating load,coefficient of performance(COP) and power input of the Brownian heat pump are derived and the performance characteristics are obtained by numerical calculations.It is shown that due to the heat flow via the change of kinetic energy of the particles,the Brownian heat pump is always irreversible and the COP can never attain the Carnot COP.The study has also investigated the influences of the operating parameters,i.e.the external force,barrier height of the potential,asymmetry of the sawtooth potential and temperature ratio of the heat reservoirs,on the performance of the Brownian heat pump.The effective regions of external force and barrier height of the potential in which the Brownian motor can operates as a heat pump are determined.The results show that the performance of the Brownian heat pump greatly depends on the parameters;if the parameters are properly chosen,the Brownian heat pump may be controlled to operate in the optimal regimes.

  4. Increasing parameter certainty and data utility through multi-objective calibration of a spatially distributed temperature and solute model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bandaragoda

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available To support the goal of distributed hydrologic and instream model predictions based on physical processes, we explore multi-dimensional parameterization determined by a broad set of observations. We present a systematic approach to using various data types at spatially distributed locations to decrease parameter bounds sampled within calibration algorithms that ultimately provide information regarding the extent of individual processes represented within the model structure. Through the use of a simulation matrix, parameter sets are first locally optimized by fitting the respective data at one or two locations and then the best results are selected to resolve which parameter sets perform best at all locations, or globally. This approach is illustrated using the Two-Zone Temperature and Solute (TZTS model for a case study in the Virgin River, Utah, USA, where temperature and solute tracer data were collected at multiple locations and zones within the river that represent the fate and transport of both heat and solute through the study reach. The result was a narrowed parameter space and increased parameter certainty which, based on our results, would not have been as successful if only single objective algorithms were used. We also found that the global optimum is best defined by multiple spatially distributed local optima, which supports the hypothesis that there is a discrete and narrowly bounded parameter range that represents the processes controlling the dominant hydrologic responses. Further, we illustrate that the optimization process itself can be used to determine which observed responses and locations are most useful for estimating the parameters that result in a global fit to guide future data collection efforts.

  5. 水温—冰盖模式对大湖水面温度的模拟%SPATIALLY DISTRIBUTED WATER SURFACE TEMPERATURE MODELING FOR THE GREAT LAKES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a water temperature model for the Great Lakes.This model is keyed to simulate horizontally and temporally varying surface temperature.An ice cover model is coupled with the water temper ature model,forming a spatially distributed thermodynamic model for the Great La kes.This model can be used to give long-term or short-term simulations of wate r surface temperature and ice cover for the Great Lakes.

  6. Probability-based classifications for spatially characterizing the water temperatures and discharge rates of hot springs in the Tatun Volcanic Region, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Cheng-Shin

    2015-05-01

    Accurately classifying the spatial features of the water temperatures and discharge rates of hot springs is crucial for environmental resources use and management. This study spatially characterized classifications of the water temperatures and discharge rates of hot springs in the Tatun Volcanic Region of Northern Taiwan by using indicator kriging (IK). The water temperatures and discharge rates of the springs were first assigned to high, moderate, and low categories according to the two thresholds of the proposed spring classification criteria. IK was then used to model the occurrence probabilities of the water temperatures and discharge rates of the springs and probabilistically determine their categories. Finally, nine combinations were acquired from the probability-based classifications for the spatial features of the water temperatures and discharge rates of the springs. Moreover, various combinations of spring water features were examined according to seven subzones of spring use in the study region. The research results reveal that probability-based classifications using IK provide practicable insights related to propagating the uncertainty of classifications according to the spatial features of the water temperatures and discharge rates of the springs. The springs in the Beitou (BT), Xingyi Road (XYR), Zhongshanlou (ZSL), and Lengshuikeng (LSK) subzones are suitable for supplying tourism hotels with a sufficient quantity of spring water because they have high or moderate discharge rates. Furthermore, natural hot springs in riverbeds and valleys should be developed in the Dingbeitou (DBT), ZSL, Xiayoukeng (XYK), and Macao (MC) subzones because of low discharge rates and low or moderate water temperatures.

  7. Spatial Representations of Granule Cells and Mossy Cells of the Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GoodSmith, Douglas; Chen, Xiaojing; Wang, Cheng; Kim, Sang Hoon; Song, Hongjun; Burgalossi, Andrea; Christian, Kimberly M; Knierim, James J

    2017-02-08

    Granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are thought to be essential to memory function by decorrelating overlapping input patterns (pattern separation). A second excitatory cell type in the dentate gyrus, the mossy cell, forms an intricate circuit with granule cells, CA3c pyramidal cells, and local interneurons, but the influence of mossy cells on dentate function is often overlooked. Multiple tetrode recordings, supported by juxtacellular recording techniques, showed that granule cells fired very sparsely, whereas mossy cells in the hilus fired promiscuously in multiple locations and in multiple environments. The activity patterns of these cell types thus represent different environments through distinct computational mechanisms: sparse coding in granule cells and changes in firing field locations in mossy cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. High-precision structural analysis of subnuclear complexes in fixed and live cells via spatially modulated illumination (SMI) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymann, Jürgen; Baddeley, David; Gunkel, Manuel; Lemmer, Paul; Stadter, Werner; Jegou, Thibaud; Rippe, Karsten; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2008-01-01

    Spatially modulated illumination (SMI) microscopy is a method of wide field fluorescence microscopy featuring interferometric illumination, which delivers structural information about nanoscale architecture in fluorescently labelled cells. The first prototype of the SMI microscope proved its applicability to a wide range of biological questions. For the SMI live cell imaging this system was enhanced in terms of the development of a completely new upright configuration. This so called Vertico-SMI transfers the advantages of SMI nanoscaling to vital biological systems, and is shown to work consistently at different temperatures using both oil- and water-immersion objective lenses. Furthermore, we increased the speed of data acquisition to minimize errors in the detection signal resulting from cellular or object movement. By performing accurate characterization, the present Vertico-SMI now offers a fully-fledged microscope enabling a complete three-dimensional (3D) SMI data stack to be acquired in less than 2 seconds. We have performed live cell measurements of a tet-operator repeat insert in U2OS cells, which provided the first in vivo signatures of subnuclear complexes. Furthermore, we have successfully implemented an optional optical configuration allowing the generation of high-resolution localization microscopy images of a nuclear pore complex distribution.

  9. File list: Unc.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Unc.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2005-01-24

    AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed strontium-and-magnesium-doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte, La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSGM). The objective of the study was to identify the materials system for fabrication and evaluation of intermediate temperature (600-800 C) solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The slurry-coated electrode materials had fine porosity to enhance catalytic activity. Cathode materials investigated include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM-doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF-LSGM. The anode materials were Ni-Ce{sub 0.85}Gd{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} (Ni-GDC) and Ni-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 2} (Ni-LDC) composites. Experiments conducted with the anode materials investigated the effect of having a barrier layer of GDC or LDC in between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-composite anode to prevent adverse reaction of the Ni with lanthanum in LSGM. For proper interpretation of the beneficial effects of the barrier layer, similar measurements were performed without the barrier layer. The ohmic and the polarization resistances of the system were obtained over time as a function of temperature (600-800 C), firing temperature, thickness, and the composition of the electrodes. The study revealed important details pertaining to the ohmic and the polarization resistances of the electrode as they relate to stability and the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrode structures.

  5. Spatially defined modulation of skin temperature and hand ownership of both hands in patients with unilateral complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, G Lorimer; Gallace, Alberto; Iannetti, Gian Domenico

    2012-12-01

    Numerous clinical conditions, including complex regional pain syndrome, are characterized by autonomic dysfunctions (e.g. altered thermoregulation, sometimes confined to a single limb), and disrupted cortical representation of the body and the surrounding space. The presence, in patients with complex regional pain syndrome, of a disruption in spatial perception, bodily ownership and thermoregulation led us to hypothesize that impaired spatial perception might result in a spatial-dependent modulation of thermoregulation and bodily ownership over the affected limb. In five experiments involving a total of 23 patients with complex regional pain syndrome of one arm and 10 healthy control subjects, we measured skin temperature of the hand with infrared thermal imaging, before and after experimental periods of either 9 or 10 min each, during which the hand was held on one or the other side of the body midline. Tactile processing was assessed by temporal order judgements of pairs of vibrotactile stimuli, delivered one to each hand. Pain and sense of ownership over the hand were assessed by self-report scales. Across experiments, when kept on its usual side of the body midline, the affected hand was 0.5 ± 0.3°C cooler than the healthy hand (P hand were prioritized over those delivered to the affected hand. Simply crossing both hands over the midline resulted in (i) warming of the affected hand (the affected hand became 0.4 ± 0.3°C warmer than when it was in the uncrossed position; P = 0.01); (ii) cooling of the healthy hand (by 0.3 ± 0.3°C; P = 0.02); and (iii) reversal of the prioritization of tactile processing. When only the affected hand was crossed over the midline, it became warmer (by 0.5 ± 0.3°C; P = 0.01). When only the healthy hand was crossed over the midline, it became cooler (by 0.3 ± 0.3°C; P = 0.01). The temperature change of either hand was positively related to its distance from the body midline (pooled data: r = 0.76, P hand over the body

  6. Spatially segregated transcription and translation in cells of the endomembrane-containing bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottshall, Ekaterina Y; Seebart, Corrine; Gatlin, Jesse C; Ward, Naomi L

    2014-07-29

    The dogma of coupled transcription and translation in bacteria has been challenged by recent reports of spatial segregation of these processes within the relatively simple cellular organization of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The bacterial species Gemmata obscuriglobus possesses an extensive endomembrane system. The membranes generate a very convoluted intracellular architecture in which some of the cell's ribosomes appear to have less direct access to the cell's nucleoid(s) than others. This observation prompted us to test the hypothesis that a substantial proportion of G. obscuriglobus translation may be spatially segregated from transcription. Using immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy, we showed that translating ribosomes are localized throughout the cell, with a quantitatively greater proportion found in regions distal to nucleoid(s). Our results extend information about the phylogenetic and morphological diversity of bacteria in which the spatial organization of transcription and translation has been studied. These findings also suggest that endomembranes may provide an obstacle to colocated transcription and translation, a role for endomembranes that has not been reported previously for a prokaryotic organism. Our studies of G. obscuriglobus may provide a useful background for consideration of the evolutionary development of eukaryotic cellular complexity and how it led to decoupled processes of gene expression in eukaryotes.

  7. Effect of Contrast on Visual Spatial Summation in Different Cell Categories in Cat Primary Visual Cortex.

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    Ke Chen

    Full Text Available Multiple cell classes have been found in the primary visual cortex, but the relationship between cell types and spatial summation has seldom been studied. Parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons can be distinguished from pyramidal neurons based on their briefer action potential durations. In this study, we classified V1 cells into fast-spiking units (FSUs and regular-spiking units (RSUs and then examined spatial summation at high and low contrast. Our results revealed that the excitatory classical receptive field and the suppressive non-classical receptive field expanded at low contrast for both FSUs and RSUs, but the expansion was more marked for the RSUs than for the FSUs. For most V1 neurons, surround suppression varied as the contrast changed from high to low. However, FSUs exhibited no significant difference in the strength of suppression between high and low contrast, although the overall suppression decreased significantly at low contrast for the RSUs. Our results suggest that the modulation of spatial summation by stimulus contrast differs across populations of neurons in the cat primary visual cortex.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall and Temperature: An Analysis Based on RegCM3 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, S. K.; Mamgain, Ashu; Pattnayak, K. C.; Giorgi, F.

    2013-04-01

    Regional climate models are important tools to examine the spatial and temporal characteristics of rainfall and temperature at high resolutions. Such information has potential applications in sectors like agriculture and health. In this study, the Regional Climate Model Version 3 (RegCM3) has been integrated in the ensemble mode at 55 km resolution over India for the summer monsoon season during the years 1982-2009. Emphasis has been given on the validation of the model simulation at the regional level. In Central India, both rainfall and temperature show the best correlations with respective observed values. The model gives rise to large wet biases over Northwest and Peninsular India. RegCM3 slightly underestimates the summer monsoon precipitation over the Central and Northeast India. Nevertheless, over these regions, RegCM3 simulated rainfall is closer to the observations when compared to the other regions where rainfall is overestimated. The position of the monsoon trough simulated by the model lies to the north of its original observed position. This is similar to the usual monsoon break conditions leading to less rainfall over Central India. RegCM3 simulated surface maximum temperature shows a large negative bias over the country while the surface minimum temperature is close to the observation. Nevertheless, there is a strong correlation between the all India weighted average surface temperature simulated by RegCM3 and IMD observed values. While examining the extreme weather conditions in Central India, it is found that RegCM3 simulated frequencies of occurrence of very wet days, extremely wet days, warm days and warm nights more often as compared to those in IMD observed values. However, these are systematic biases. The model biases in the frequencies of distribution of rainfall extremes explain the wet and dry biases in different regions in the country. Overall, the inter-annual characteristics of both the rainfall and temperature extremes simulated by Reg

  9. Spatial and Temporal Stream Temperature Response to Contemporary Forest Harvesting in the Oregon Coast Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladon, K. D.; Cook, N. A.; Light, J. T.; Segura, C.; Teply, M.

    2015-12-01

    Historical research at the Alsea Watershed Study (1958-1973), in the Oregon Coast Range, demonstrated that clear-cut harvesting, with complete removal of riparian vegetation, can result in large and dramatic changes in mean daily, maximum daily, diurnal variation, and annual patterns in stream temperature (Ts). This previous research was instrumental in the addition of regulations in the Oregon Forest Practices Act of 1971, necessitating retention of streamside vegetation (riparian management zones) in harvest units to maintain water quality and aquatic habitat. Due to the ecological importance of Ts, preventing or mitigating changes in the thermal regime following land use activities, such as forest harvesting, is a primary focus of contemporary forest watershed management. The Alsea Watershed Study Revisited (2006-Present) has provided a unique opportunity to investigate the Ts responses to contemporary forest harvesting practices and compare these with the impacts from the 1960's harvest. In general, Ts increases from late spring through about mid-July, with peak Ts occuring between about mid-July and mid-August, after which Ts decreases into the fall. During the pre-harvest period (2006-2008; n=244) the June to September mean daily maximum Ts was 13.0°C in Flynn Creek (control) and 12.0°C in Needle Branch (harvested). In the post-harvest period (2010-2012; n=240) the June to September mean daily maximum Ts was 12.4°C in Flynn Creek (control) and 12.0°C in Needle Branch (harvested). Similarly, the difference (Flynn Ck - Needle Branch) in 7 day moving mean of daily maximum Ts decreased from the pre-harvest (1.0°C) to the post-harvest (0.3°C) period, which was principally driven by a decrease in Ts in the control catchment. Longitudinal sampling of Ts within Needle Branch indicated a cooling trend such that the slight increases in post-harvest Ts weren't detectable in downstream, unharvested stream reaches.

  10. Modeling spatial distribution of oxygen in 3d culture of islet beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McReynolds, John; Wen, Yu; Li, Xiaofei; Guan, Jianjun; Jin, Sha

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) scaffold culture of pancreatic β-cell has been proven to be able to better mimic physiological conditions in the body. However, one critical issue with culturing pancreatic β-cells is that β-cells consume large amounts of oxygen, and hence insufficient oxygen supply in the culture leads to loss of β-cell mass and functions. This becomes more significant when cells are cultured in a 3D scaffold. In this study, in order to understand the effect of oxygen tension inside a cell-laden collagen culture on β-cell proliferation, a culture model with encapsulation of an oxygen-generator was established. The oxygen-generator was made by embedding hydrogen peroxide into nontoxic polydimethylsiloxane to avoid the toxicity of a chemical reaction in the β-cell culture. To examine the effectiveness of the oxygenation enabled 3D culture, the spatial-temporal distribution of oxygen tension inside a scaffold was evaluated by a mathematical modeling approach. Our simulation results indicated that an oxygenation-aided 3D culture would augment the oxygen supply required for the β-cells. Furthermore, we identified that cell seeding density and the capacity of the oxygenator are two critical parameters in the optimization of the culture. Notably, cell-laden scaffold cultures with an in situ oxygen supply significantly improved the β-cells' biological function. These β-cells possess high insulin secretion capacity. The results obtained in this work would provide valuable information for optimizing and encouraging functional β-cell cultures. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:221-228, 2017.

  11. A fractal analysis of the spatial distribution of tumoral mast cells in lymph nodes and bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidolin, Diego; Marinaccio, Christian; Tortorella, Cinzia; Ruggieri, Simona; Rizzi, Anna; Maiorano, Eugenio; Specchia, Giorgina; Ribatti, Domenico

    2015-11-15

    The spatial distribution of mast cells inside the tumor stroma has been little investigated. In this study, we have evaluated tumor mast cells distribution through the analysis of the morphological features of the spatial patterns generated by these cells, including size, shape, and architecture of the cell pattern. We have compared diffuse large B cells lymphoma (DLBCL) and systemic mastocytosis in two different anatomical localizations (lymph nodes for DLBCL and, respectively, bone marrow for mastocytosis). Results have indicated that, despite the high difference in size exhibited by the mast cells patterns in the two conditions, the spatial relationship between the mast cells forming the aggregates resulted similar, characterized by a significant tendency of the mast cells to self-organize in clusters.

  12. Possible role of acetylcholine in regulating spatial novelty effects on theta rhythm and grid cells

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    Caswell eBarry

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological and lesion data indicate that acetylcholine plays an important role in memory formation. Increased levels of acetylcholine in the hippocampal formation are associated with successful encoding while disruption of the cholinergic system leads to impairments on a range of mnemonic tasks. Cholinergic signalling from the medial septum also plays a central role in generating and pacing theta-band oscillations throughout the hippocampal formation. New results suggest a potential link between these distinct phenomena. Environmental novelty, a condition associated with strong cholinergic drive, has been shown to induce an expansion in the firing pattern of entorhinal grid cells and a reduction in the frequency of theta measured from the LFP. Computational modelling suggests the spatial activity of grid cells is produced by interference between neuronal oscillators; scale being determined by theta-band oscillations in entorhinal stellate cells, the frequency of which are modulated by acetylcholine. We propose a causal link: increased cholinergic signalling in response to environmental novelty triggers grid expansion. Cholinergic induced grid expansion may enhance, or even induce, encoding by producing a mismatch between spatial inputs to the hippocampus, such as barrier cells and grids cell with different scales.

  13. Design and implementation of a CMOS light pulse receiver cell array for spatial optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Md Shakowat Zaman; Itoh, Shinya; Hamai, Moeta; Takai, Isamu; Andoh, Michinori; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    A CMOS light pulse receiver (LPR) cell for spatial optical communications is designed and evaluated by device simulations and a prototype chip implementation. The LPR cell consists of a pinned photodiode and four transistors. It works under sub-threshold region of a MOS transistor and the source terminal voltage which responds to the logarithm of the photo current are read out with a source follower circuit. For finding the position of the light spot on the focal plane, an image pixel array is embedded on the same plane of the LPR cell array. A prototype chip with 640 × 240 image pixels and 640 × 240 LPR cells is implemented with 0.18 μm CMOS technology. A proposed model of the transient response of the LPR cell agrees with the result of the device simulations and measurements. Both imaging at 60 fps and optical communication at the carrier frequency of 1 MHz are successfully performed. The measured signal amplitude and the calculation results of photocurrents show that the spatial optical communication up to 100 m is feasible using a 10 × 10 LED array.

  14. Design and Implementation of A CMOS Light Pulse Receiver Cell Array for Spatial Optical Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Kawahito

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A CMOS light pulse receiver (LPR cell for spatial optical communications is designed and evaluated by device simulations and a prototype chip implementation. The LPR cell consists of a pinned photodiode and four transistors. It works under sub-threshold region of a MOS transistor and the source terminal voltage which responds to the logarithm of the photo current are read out with a source follower circuit. For finding the position of the light spot on the focal plane, an image pixel array is embedded on the same plane of the LPR cell array. A prototype chip with 640 × 240 image pixels and 640 × 240 LPR cells is implemented with 0.18 μm CMOS technology. A proposed model of the transient response of the LPR cell agrees with the result of the device simulations and measurements. Both imaging at 60 fps and optical communication at the carrier frequency of 1 MHz are successfully performed. The measured signal amplitude and the calculation results of photocurrents show that the spatial optical communication up to 100 m is feasible using a 10 × 10 LED array.

  15. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2006-01-12

    The objective of this work was to obtain a stable materials system for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density greater than 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}. The solid electrolyte chosen for this system was La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, (LSGM). To select the right electrode materials from a group of possible candidate materials, AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed the LSGM electrolyte. Based on the results of the investigation, LSGM electrolyte supported SOFCs were fabricated with La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSCF-LSGM) composite cathode and Nickel-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (Ni-LDC) composite anode having a barrier layer of Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LDC) between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-LDC anode. Electrical performance and stability of these cells were determined and the electrode polarization behavior as a function of cell current was modeled between 600-800 C. The electrical performance of the anode-supported SOFC was simulated assuming an electrode polarization behavior identical to the LSGM-electrolyte-supported SOFC. The simulated electrical performance indicated that the selected material system would provide a stable cell capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density between 0.2 to 1 W/cm{sup 2}.

  16. Gelatin-based laser direct-write technique for the precise spatial patterning of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Nathan R; Chrisey, Douglas B; Corr, David T

    2011-03-01

    Laser direct-writing provides a method to pattern living cells in vitro, to study various cell-cell interactions, and to build cellular constructs. However, the materials typically used may limit its long-term application. By utilizing gelatin coatings on the print ribbon and growth surface, we developed a new approach for laser cell printing that overcomes the limitations of Matrigel™. Gelatin is free of growth factors and extraneous matrix components that may interfere with cellular processes under investigation. Gelatin-based laser direct-write was able to successfully pattern human dermal fibroblasts with high post-transfer viability (91% ± 3%) and no observed double-strand DNA damage. As seen with atomic force microscopy, gelatin offers a unique benefit in that it is present temporarily to allow cell transfer, but melts and is removed with incubation to reveal the desired application-specific growth surface. This provides unobstructed cellular growth after printing. Monitoring cell location after transfer, we show that melting and removal of gelatin does not affect cellular placement; cells maintained registry within 5.6 ± 2.5 μm to the initial pattern. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of gelatin in laser direct-writing to create spatially precise cell patterns with the potential for applications in tissue engineering, stem cell, and cancer research.

  17. Spatially Resolved Spectra from a new X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurements of Ion and Electron Temperature Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, M; Stratton, B; Roquemore, A; Mastrovito, D; Lee, S; Bak, J; Moon, M; Nam, U; Smith, G; Rice, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Fraenkel, B

    2004-08-10

    A new type of high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is being developed to measure ion and electron temperature profiles in tokamak plasmas. The instrument is particularly valuable for diagnosing plasmas with purely Ohmic heating and rf heating, since it does not require the injection of a neutral beam - although it can also be used for the diagnosis of neutral-beam heated plasmas. The spectrometer consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal and a two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. It records spectra of helium-like argon (or krypton) from multiple sightlines through the plasma and projects a de-magnified image of a large plasma cross-section onto the detector. The spatial resolution in the plasma is solely determined by the height of the crystal, its radius of curvature, and the Bragg angle. This new X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer may also be of interest for the diagnosis of ion temperature profiles in future large tokamaks, such as KSTAR and ITER, where the application of the presently used charge-exchange spectroscopy will be difficult, if the neutral beams do not penetrate to the plasma center. The paper presents the results from proof-of-principle experiments performed with a prototype instrument at Alcator C-Mod.

  18. The TOR Signaling Pathway in Spatial and Temporal Control of Cell Size and Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suam Gonzalez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell size is amenable by genetic and environmental factors. The highly conserved nutrient-responsive Target of Rapamycin (TOR signaling pathway regulates cellular metabolic status and growth in response to numerous inputs. Timing and duration of TOR pathway activity is pivotal for both cell mass built up as well as cell cycle progression and is controlled and fine-tuned by the abundance and quality of nutrients, hormonal signals, growth factors, stress, and oxygen. TOR kinases function within two functionally and structurally discrete multiprotein complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, that are implicated in temporal and spatial control of cell size and growth respectively; however, recent data indicate that such functional distinctions are much more complex. Here, we briefly review roles of the two complexes in cellular growth and cytoarchitecture in various experimental model systems.

  19. Some tests of flat plate photovoltaic module cell temperatures in simulated field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J. S.; Rathod, M. S.; Paslaski, J.

    1981-01-01

    The nominal operating cell temperature (NOCT) of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules is an important characteristic. Typically, the power output of a PV module decreases 0.5% per deg C rise in cell temperature. Several tests were run with artificial sun and wind to study the parametric dependencies of cell temperature on wind speed and direction and ambient temperature. It was found that the cell temperature is extremely sensitive to wind speed, moderately so to wind direction and rather insensitive to ambient temperature. Several suggestions are made to obtain data more typical of field conditions.

  20. Galvanic vestibular stimulation impairs cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the rat hippocampus but not spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiwen; Geddes, Lisa; Sato, Go; Stiles, Lucy; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2014-05-01

    Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a method of activating the peripheral vestibular system using direct current that is widely employed in clinical neurological testing. Since movement is recognized to stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis and movement is impossible without activation of the vestibular system, we speculated that activating the vestibular system in rats while minimizing movement, by delivering GVS under anesthesia, would affect hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis, and spatial memory. Compared with the sham control group, the number of cells incorporating the DNA replication marker, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), was significantly reduced in the bilateral hippocampi in both the cathode left-anode right and cathode right-anode left stimulation groups (P ≤ 0.0001). The majority of the BrdU(+ve) cells co-expressed Ki-67, a marker for the S phase of the cell cycle, suggesting that these BrdU(+ve) cells were still in the cell cycle; however, there was no significant difference in the degree of co-labeling between the two stimulation groups. Single labeling for doublecortin (DCX), a marker of immature neurons, showed that while there was no significant difference between the different groups in the number of DCX(+ve) cells in the right dentate gryus, in the left dentate gyrus there was a significant decrease in the cathode left-anode right group compared with the sham controls (P ≤ 0.03). Nonetheless, when animals were tested in place recognition, object exploration and Morris water maze tasks, there were no significant differences between the GVS groups and the sham controls. These results suggest that GVS can have striking effects on cell proliferation and possibly neurogenesis in the hippocampus, without affecting spatial memory.

  1. Spatial characteristics of groundwater temperature in the Ishikari Lowland, Hokkaido, northern Japan: analytical and numerical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dim, J. R.; Sakura, Y.; Fukami, H.; Miyakoshi, A.

    2002-03-01

    In porous sediments of the Ishikari Lowland, there is a gradual increase in the background geothermal gradient from the Ishikari River (3-4 °C 100 m-1) to the southwest highland area (10 °C 100 m-1). However, the geothermal gradient at shallow depths differs in detail from the background distribution. In spite of convective heat-flow loss generally associated with groundwater flow, heat flow remains high (100 mW m-2) in the recharge area in the southwestern part of the Ishikari basin, which is part of an active geothermal field. In the northeastern part of the lowland, heat flow locally reaches 140 mW m-2, probably due to upward water flow from the deep geothermal field. Between the two areas the heat flow is much lower. To examine the role of hydraulic flow in the distortion of the isotherms in this area, thermal gradient vs. temperature analyses were made, and they helped to define the major components of the groundwater-flow system of the region. Two-dimensional simulation modeling aided in understanding not only the cause of horizontal heat-flow variations in this field but also the contrast between thermal properties of shallow and deep groundwater reservoirs. Résumé. Dans les sédiments poreux des basses terres d'Ishikari, on observe une augmentation graduelle du gradient géothermal général depuis la rivière Ishikari (3-4 °C 100 m-1) vers la zone élevée située au sud-ouest (10 °C 100 m-1). Toutefois, le gradient géothermal aux faibles profondeurs diffère dans le détail de la distribution générale. Malgré la perte de flux de chaleur par convection, généralement associée aux écoulements souterrains, le flux de chaleur reste élevé (100 mW m-2) dans la zone de recharge de la partie sud-ouest du bassin de l'Ishikari, qui appartient à un champ géothermal actif. Dans la partie nord-est des basses terres, le flux de chaleur atteint localement 140 mW m-2, probablement à cause d'un écoulement souterrain ascendant depuis le champ g

  2. Comparison of photovoltaic cell temperatures in modules operating with exposed and enclosed back surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, D.; Simon, F. F.

    1981-01-01

    Four different photovoltaic module designs were tested to determine the cell temperature of each design. The cell temperatures were compared to those obtained on identical design, using the same nominal operating cell temperature (NOCT) concept. The results showed that the NOCT procedure does not apply to the enclosed configurations due to continuous transient conditions. The enclosed modules had higher cell temperatures than the open modules, and insulated modules higher than the uninsulated. The severest performance loss - when translated from cell temperatures - 17.5 % for one enclosed, insulated module as a compared to that module mounted openly.

  3. Determination of the temperature-dependent cell membrane permeabilities using microfluidics with integrated flow and temperature control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cifeng; Ji, Fujun; Shu, Zhiquan; Gao, Dayong

    2017-02-28

    We developed an integrated microfluidic platform for instantaneous flow and localized temperature control. The platform consisted of a flow-focusing region for sample delivery and a cross-junction region embedded with a microheater for cell trapping and localized temperature control by using an active feedback control system. We further used it to measure the membrane transport properties of Jurkat cells, including the osmotically inactive cell volume (Vb) and cell membrane permeabilities to water (Lp) and to cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions (dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in this study) (PS) at various temperatures (room temperature, 30 °C, and 37 °C). Such characteristics of cells are of great importance in many applications, especially in optimal cryopreservation. With the results, the corresponding activation energy for water and CPA transport was calculated. The comparison of the results from the current study with reference data indicates that the developed platform is a reliable tool for temperature-dependent cell behavior study, which provides valuable tools for general cell manipulation applications with precise temperature control.

  4. Single-cell spatial reconstruction reveals global division of labour in the mammalian liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar Halpern, Keren; Shenhav, Rom; Matcovitch-Natan, Orit; Tóth, Beáta; Lemze, Doron; Golan, Matan; Massasa, Efi E; Baydatch, Shaked; Landen, Shanie; Moor, Andreas E; Brandis, Alexander; Giladi, Amir; Stokar-Avihail, Avigail; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2017-02-16

    The mammalian liver consists of hexagon-shaped lobules that are radially polarized by blood flow and morphogens. Key liver genes have been shown to be differentially expressed along the lobule axis, a phenomenon termed zonation, but a detailed genome-wide reconstruction of this spatial division of labour has not been achieved. Here we measure the entire transcriptome of thousands of mouse liver cells and infer their lobule coordinates on the basis of a panel of zonated landmark genes, characterized with single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization. Using this approach, we obtain the zonation profiles of all liver genes with high spatial resolution. We find that around 50% of liver genes are significantly zonated and uncover abundant non-monotonic profiles that peak at the mid-lobule layers. These include a spatial order of bile acid biosynthesis enzymes that matches their position in the enzymatic cascade. Our approach can facilitate the reconstruction of similar spatial genomic blueprints for other mammalian organs.

  5. Influence of the Ambient Temperature, to the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPOVICI Ovidiu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The reversible fuel cell can be used to produce hydrogen. The hydrogen is further the chemical energy source to produce electrical energy using the fuel cell. The ambient temperature will influence theparameters of the hydrogen fuel cell.

  6. Analysis of spatial relationships in three dimensions: tools for the study of nerve cell patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raven Mary A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple technologies have been brought to bear on understanding the three-dimensional morphology of individual neurons and glia within the brain, but little progress has been made on understanding the rules controlling cellular patterning. We describe new matlab-based software tools, now available to the scientific community, permitting the calculation of spatial statistics associated with 3D point patterns. The analyses are largely derived from the Delaunay tessellation of the field, including the nearest neighbor and Voronoi domain analyses, and from the spatial autocorrelogram. Results Our tools enable the analysis of the spatial relationship between neurons within the central nervous system in 3D, and permit the modeling of these fields based on lattice-like simulations, and on simulations of minimal-distance spacing rules. Here we demonstrate the utility of our analysis methods to discriminate between two different simulated neuronal populations. Conclusion Together, these tools can be used to reveal the presence of nerve cell patterning and to model its foundation, in turn informing on the potential developmental mechanisms that govern its establishment. Furthermore, in conjunction with analyses of dendritic morphology, they can be used to determine the degree of dendritic coverage within a volume of tissue exhibited by mature nerve cells.

  7. MATERIALS SYSTEM FOR INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2004-02-15

    AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted on symmetrical cells of the type [gas, electrode/LSGM electrolyte/electrode, gas]. The electrode materials were slurry-coated on both sides of the LSGM electrolyte support. The electrodes selected for this investigation are candidate materials for SOFC electrodes. Cathode materials include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM + doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF + LSGM. Pt metal electrodes were also used for the purpose of comparison. Anode material investigated was the Ni + GDC composite. The study revealed important details pertaining to the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrodes. The information obtained can be used to design electrodes for intermediate temperature SOFCs based on LSGM electrolyte.

  8. Bioimpedance monitoring of 3D cell culturing--complementary electrode configurations for enhanced spatial sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canali, Chiara; Heiskanen, Arto; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Høyum, Per; Pettersen, Fred-Johan; Hemmingsen, Mette; Wolff, Anders; Dufva, Martin; Martinsen, Ørjan Grøttem; Emnéus, Jenny

    2015-01-15

    A bioimpedance platform is presented as a promising tool for non-invasive real-time monitoring of the entire process of three-dimensional (3D) cell culturing in a hydrogel scaffold. In this study, the dynamics involved in the whole process of 3D cell culturing, starting from polymerisation of a bare 3D gelatin scaffold, to human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) encapsulation and proliferation, was monitored over time. The platform consists of a large rectangular culture chamber with four embedded vertical gold plate electrodes that were exploited in two- and three terminal (2T and 3T) measurement configurations. By switching between the different combinations of electrode couples, it was possible to generate a multiplexing-like approach, which allowed for collecting spatially distributed information within the 3D space. Computational finite element (FE) analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) characterisation were used to determine the configurations' sensitivity field localisation. The 2T setup gives insight into the interfacial phenomena at both electrode surfaces and covers the central part of the 3D cell culture volume, while the four 3T modes provide focus on the dynamics at the corners of the 3D culture chamber. By combining a number of electrode configurations, complementary spatially distributed information on a large 3D cell culture can be obtained with maximised sensitivity in the entire 3D space. The experimental results show that cell proliferation can be monitored within the tested biomimetic environment, paving the way to further developments in bioimpedance tracking of 3D cell cultures and tissue engineering.

  9. Spatial distribution of unspecified chronic kidney disease in El Salvador by crop area cultivated and ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDervort, Darcy R; López, Dina L; Orantes, Carlos M; Rodríguez, David S

    2014-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology is occurring in various geographic areas worldwide. Cases lack typical risk factors associated with chronic kidney disease, such as diabetes and hypertension. It is epidemic in El Salvador, Central America, where it is diagnosed with increasing frequency in young, otherwise-healthy male farmworkers. Suspected causes include agrochemical use (especially in sugarcane fields), physical heat stress, and heavy metal exposure. To evaluate the geographic relationship between unspecified chronic kidney disease (unCKD) and nondiabetic chronic renal failure (ndESRD) hospital admissions in El Salvador with the proximity to cultivated crops and ambient temperatures. Data on unCKD and ndESRD were compared with environmental variables, crop area cultivated (indicator of agrochemical use) and high ambient temperatures. Using geographically weighted regression analysis, two model sets were created using reported municipal hospital admission rates are per thousand population for unCKD 2006-2010 and rates of ndESRD 2005-2010 [corrected]. These were assessed against local percent of land cultivated by crop (sugarcane, coffee, corn, cotton, sorghum, and beans) and mean maximum ambient temperature, with Moran's indices determining data clustering. Two-dimensional geographic models illustrated parameter spatial distribution. Bivariate geographically weighted regressions showed statistically significant correlations between percent area of sugarcane, corn, cotton, coffee, and bean cultivation, as well as mean maximum ambient temperature with both unCKD and ndESRD hospital admission rates. Percent area of sugarcane cultivation had greatest statistical weight (p ≤ 0.001; Rp2 = 0.77 for unCKD). The most statistically significant multivariate geographically weighted regression model for unCKD included percent area of sugarcane, cotton and corn cultivation (p ≤ 0.001; Rp2 = 0.80), while, for ndESRD, it included the percent area of sugarcane, corn

  10. Spatial modelling of brief and long interactions between T cells and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2007-06-01

    In the early phases of an immune response, T cells of appropriate antigen specificity become activated by antigen-presenting cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Two-photon microscopy imaging experiments have shown that this stimulation occurs in distinct stages during which T cells exhibit different motilities and interactions with dendritic cells (DCs). In this paper, we utilize the Cellular Potts Model, a model formalism that takes cell shapes and cellular interactions explicitly into account, to simulate the dynamics of, and interactions between, T cells and DCs in the lymph node paracortex. Our three-dimensional simulations suggest that the initial decrease in T-cell motility after antigen appearance is due to "stop signals" transmitted by activated DCs to T cells. The long-lived interactions that occur at a later stage can only be explained by the presence of both stop signals and a high adhesion between specific T cells and antigen-bearing DCs. Furthermore, our results indicate that long-lasting contacts with T cells are promoted when DCs retract dendrites that detect a specific contact at lower velocities than other dendrites. Finally, by performing long simulations (after prior fitting to short time scale data) we are able to provide an estimate of the average contact duration between T cells and DCs.

  11. Electrical breakdown in helium cells at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethumadhavan, Bhaskar

    2007-05-01

    We have encountered a new phenomenon in the development of a prototype detector of solar neutrinos using liquid helium in which recoil electrons from neutrino scattering are to be detected by extracting them from the liquid and accelerating them in the vacuum by an electric field. In order to understand the possible constraints on such a particle detector using superfluid helium, we have studied the currents produced by a radioactive source in a helium cell having a liquid/vacuum interface at 100 mK. A number of phenomena have been observed that have not been described in the literature. These include the following. (1) The current at very low voltages, V ˜ 0, in a cell having a free surface can be up to 100 times greater than in a filled cell. (2) There is a large amplification of current in modest electric fields with a free surface present in the cell. (3) The amplification becomes sufficiently large such that a breakdown occurs at potential differences across the vacuum on the order of 1000 V. The results for a partially filled cell can be understood in terms of Penning ionization of excimers on the surface of the helium and the subsequent acceleration of electrons across the vacuum. Triplet excimers are created in the liquid by the radioactive source. These excimers propagate with a mean free path that is determined by scattering from 3He atoms and quasiparticles in the superfluid He. If an excimer reaches the surface, it is bound there but is free to move in the plane of the surface. Once bound to the surface these mobile excimers become distributed uniformly over all surfaces (bulk liquid and the film). They move about and annihilate in pairs through the Penning ionization process to create electrons and positive helium ions in the vacuum. An electron in the vacuum in the presence of an electric field is always destined to hit liquid helium, either the bulk liquid or the film on the top surface of the cell. If the energy of the electron is sufficient to

  12. The Replisomes Remain Spatially Proximal throughout the Cell Cycle in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiameli, Sarah M; Veit, Brian T; Merrikh, Houra; Wiggins, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    The positioning of the DNA replication machinery (replisome) has been the subject of several studies. Two conflicting models for replisome localization have been proposed: In the Factory Model, sister replisomes remain spatially co-localized as the replicating DNA is translocated through a stationary replication factory. In the Track Model, sister replisomes translocate independently along a stationary DNA track and the replisomes are spatially separated for the majority of the cell cycle. Here, we used time-lapse imaging to observe and quantify the position of fluorescently labeled processivity-clamp (DnaN) complexes throughout the cell cycle in two highly-divergent bacterial model organisms: Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. Because DnaN is a core component of the replication machinery, its localization patterns should be an appropriate proxy for replisome positioning in general. We present automated statistical analysis of DnaN positioning in large populations, which is essential due to the high degree of cell-to-cell variation. We find that both bacteria show remarkably similar DnaN positioning, where any potential separation of the two replication forks remains below the diffraction limit throughout the majority of the replication cycle. Additionally, the localization pattern of several other core replisome components is consistent with that of DnaN. These data altogether indicate that the two replication forks remain spatially co-localized and mostly function in close proximity throughout the replication cycle. The conservation of the observed localization patterns in these highly divergent species suggests that the subcellular positioning of the replisome is a functionally critical feature of DNA replication.

  13. Engineering high performance intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin Soo

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are an efficient, fuel flexible energy conversion device, capable of operating on fuels ranging from natural gas to gasoline, diesel, and biofuels, as well as hydrogen. However, to this point the marketability of SOFCs has been limited by their high operating temperatures. Achieving high power at intermediate temperatures (IT, 500 -- 700 °C) would be a significant breakthrough, as low temperature operation would result in better stability and allow for a broader range of material options for the SOFC components as well as the balance of plant, such as stainless steel interconnects (which are only viable at open circuit potential (OCP) by more than 0.1 V resulting in a 140 % increase in power. Further investigations into this molecular AFL showed that a multilayered AFL can further reduce the ASR and increase the maximum power density. Secondly, the potential use of Sm0.075Nd0.075Ce0.85O 2-delta as an electrolyte has been investigated. The current-voltage (I-V) performance of the cell exhibits a maximum power density reaching 1.38 W/cm2 with an area specific resistance (ASR) of 0.087 Ocm 2 at 650 °C with 90 sccm of air and wet hydrogen. Also, the high OCP achieved at 500 °C (0.96 V) as well as the high performance confirmed the viability of Sm0.075Nd0.075Ce0.85 O2-delta as an alternative electrolyte material. The cathode used for this study was La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe 0.8O3 (LSCF) -- Gd0.1Ce0.9O 2 (GDC) composite. Finally, Er0.8Bi1.2O3 (ESB)/GDC bilayered electrolyte combined with recently developed ESB/Bi2Ru2O7 (BRO) composite cathodes was tested. In this work a maximum power density of 2 W/cm2 was achieved at 650 °C with the help of the novel AFL and tapecast anode supports. This is the highest power yet achieved in the IT range and I believe redefines the expectation level for maximum power under IT-SOFC operating conditions.

  14. Bioimpedance monitoring of 3D cell culturing-Complementary electrode configurations for enhanced spatial sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canali, Chiara; Heiskanen, Arto; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir

    2015-01-01

    configurations. By switching between the different combinations of electrode couples, it was possible to generate a multiplexing-like approach, which allowed for collecting spatially distributed information within the 3D space. Computational finite element (FE) analysis and electrochemical impedance......A bioimpedance platform is presented as a promising tool for non-invasive real-time monitoring of the entire process of three-dimensional (3D) cell culturing in a hydrogel scaffold. In this study, the dynamics involved in the whole process of 3D cell culturing, starting from polymerisation...... of a bare 3D gelatin scaffold, to human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) encapsulation and proliferation, was monitored over time. The platform consists of a large rectangular culture chamber with four embedded vertical gold plate electrodes that were exploited in two- and three terminal (2T and 3T) measurement...

  15. Effect of spatial coherence of light on the photoregulation processes in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budagovsky, A. V.; Solovykh, N. V.; Yankovskaya, M. B.; Maslova, M. V.; Budagovskaya, O. N.; Budagovsky, I. A.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the statistical properties of light on the value of the photoinduced reaction of the biological objects, which differ in the morphological and physiological characteristics, the optical properties, and the size of cells, was studied. The fruit of apple trees, the pollen of cherries, the microcuttings of blackberries in vitro, and the spores and the mycelium of fungi were irradiated by quasimonochromatic light fluxes with identical energy parameters but different values of coherence length and radius of correlation. In all cases, the greatest stimulation effect occurred when the cells completely fit in the volume of the coherence of the field, while both temporal and spatial coherence have a significant and mathematically certain impact on the physiological activity of cells. It was concluded that not only the spectral, but also the statistical (coherent) properties of the acting light play an important role in the photoregulation process.

  16. Interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenhua

    Presently, one of the principal goals of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) research is to reduce the stack operating temperature to between 600 and 800°C. However, one of the principal technological barriers is the non-availability of a suitable material satisfying all of the stability requirements for the interconnect. In this work two approaches for intermediate temperature SOFC interconnects have been explored. The first approach comprises an interconnect consisting of a bi-layer structure, a p-type oxide (La0.96Sr0.08MnO 2.001/LSM) layer exposed to a cathodic environment, and an n-type oxide (Y0.08Sr0.88Ti0.95Al0.05O 3-delta/YSTA) layer exposed to anodic conditions. Theoretical analysis based on the bi-layer structure has established design criteria to implement this approach. The analysis shows that the interfacial oxygen partial pressure, which determines the interconnect stability, is independent of the electronic conductivities of both layers but dependent on the oxygen ion layer interconnects, the oxygen ion conductivities of LSM and YSTA were measured as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Based on the measured data, it has been determined that if the thickness of YSTA layer is around 0.1cm, the thickness of LSM layer should be around 0.6 mum in order to maintain the stability of LSM. In a second approach, a less expensive stainless steel interconnect has been studied. However, one of the major concerns associated with the use of metallic interconnects is the development of a semi-conducting or insulating oxide scale and chromium volatility during extended exposure to the SOFC operating environment. Dense and well adhered Mn-Cu spinet oxide coatings were successfully deposited on stainless steel by an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. It was found that the Mn-Cu-O coating significantly reduced the oxidation rate of the stainless steel and the volatility of chromium. The area specific resistance (ASR) of coated Crofer 22 APU is

  17. New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan J. Jacobson

    2006-09-30

    Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode-electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. The initial choices for study were perovskite oxides based on substituted LaFeO{sub 3} (P1 compositions), where significant data in single cell tests exist at PNNL for example, for La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3} cathodes on both YSZ and CSO/YSZ. The materials selection was then extended to La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4} compositions (K1 compositions), and then in a longer range task we evaluated the possibility of completely unexplored group of materials that are also perovskite related, the ABM{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}}. A key component of the research strategy was to evaluate for each cathode material composition, the key performance parameters, including ionic and electronic conductivity, surface exchange rates, stability with respect to the specific electrolyte choice, and thermal expansion coefficients. In the initial phase, we did this in parallel with

  18. Simple, Fast and Effective Correction for Irradiance Spatial Nonuniformity in Measurement of IVs of Large Area Cells at NREL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, Tom

    2016-11-21

    The NREL cell measurement lab measures the IV parameters of cells of multiple sizes and configurations. A large contributing factor to errors and uncertainty in Jsc, Imax, Pmax and efficiency can be the irradiance spatial nonuniformity. Correcting for this nonuniformity through its precise and frequent measurement can be very time consuming. This paper explains a simple, fast and effective method based on bicubic interpolation for determining and correcting for spatial nonuniformity and verification of the method's efficacy.

  19. File list: ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...811238 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...699108 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...699108 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...811237 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  3. Noise Removal with Maintained Spatial Resolution in Raman Images of Cells Exposed to Submicron Polystyrene Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Ahlinder

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The biodistribution of 300 nm polystyrene particles in A549 lung epithelial cells has been studied with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This is a label-free method in which particles and cells can be imaged without using dyes or fluorescent labels. The main drawback with Raman imaging is the comparatively low spatial resolution, which is aggravated in heterogeneous systems such as biological samples, which in addition often require long measurement times because of their weak Raman signal. Long measurement times may however induce laser-induced damage. In this study we use a super-resolution algorithm with Tikhonov regularization, intended to improve the image quality without demanding an increased number of collected pixels. Images of cells exposed to polystyrene particles have been acquired with two different step lengths, i.e., the distance between pixels, and compared to each other and to corresponding images treated with the super-resolution algorithm. It is shown that the resolution after application of super-resolution algorithms is not significantly improved compared to the theoretical limit for optical microscopy. However, to reduce noise and artefacts in the hyperspectral Raman images while maintaining the spatial resolution, we show that it is advantageous to use short mapping step lengths and super-resolution algorithms with appropriate regularization. The proposed methodology should be generally applicable for Raman imaging of biological samples and other photo-sensitive samples.

  4. Direct measurement of local dissolved oxygen concentration spatial profiles in a cell culture environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Controlling local dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) in media is critical for cell or tissue cultures. Various biomaterials and culture methods have been developed to modulate DO. Direct measurement of local DO in cultures has not been validated as a method to test DO modulation. In the present study we developed a DO measurement system equipped with a Clark-type oxygen microelectrode manipulated with 1 μm precision in three-dimensional space to explore potential applications for tissue engineering. By determining the microelectrode tip position precisely against the bottom plane of culture dishes with rat or human cardiac cells in static monolayer culture, we successfully obtained spatial distributions of DO in the medium. Theoretical quantitative predictions fit the obtained data well. Based on analyses of the variance between samples, we found the data reflected "local" oxygen consumption in the vicinity of the microelectrode and the detection of temporal changes in oxygen consumption rates of cultured cells was limited by the diffusion rate of oxygen in the medium. This oxygen measuring system monitors local oxygen consumption and production with high spatial resolution, and can potentially be used with recently developed oxygen modulating biomaterials to design microenvironments and non-invasively monitor local DO dynamics during culture. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Spatially-sculpted aberrated optical tweezers for delivery of nanoparticles onto cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivalingaiah, Shivaranjani; Chhajed, Suyash; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-03-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) are emerging as photochemical and photothermal agents for delivery of drugs and heat onto the targeted cells. Here, we report spatially-sculpting of transverse potential landscape by introducing aberration in the optical tweezers beam for delivery of therapeutic NP on to the prostate cancer PC3 cells. A tunable Ti-Sapphire laser beam was focused to a diffraction limited spot by use of a high numerical aperture microscope objective for optical trapping. A cylindrical lens was used to create the beam profile astigmatic, which led to spatially extended potential landscape. In order to facilitate transport of NP, Comatic potential was created by tilting of the astigmatic beam with respect to the optic axis. NPs were attracted towards the potential minima, transported along the major axis of the elliptic spot and ejected out along the direction having lower stiffness. The Carbon NPs as well as Poly Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid NPs were efficiently transported and concentrated near the PC3 cells in-vitro. The direction and the speed of transport of nano-particles could be reversed by change in tilt direction and angle. Further, by utilizing the scattering force with the asymmetric gradient force, three-dimensional transport of nanoparticles was achieved. The effect of laser beam power and size / refractive index of the nano-particles on the speed of transport will be presented.

  6. Analysis of Spatial-Temporal Variation of Land Surface Temperature, Vegetation and Snow Cover in Lar National Park of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arekhi, M.

    2016-10-01

    Changes in land surface reflectance measured by remote sensing data can be useful in climate change studies. This study attempts to analyze the spatial-temporal extent change of vegetation greenness, Land Surface Temperature (LST), and Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI) in late spring at the Lar National Park of Iran using Landsat data. Vegetation indices (VIs), LST, and NDSI maps were calculated for each date (1985, 1994, 2010, and 2015). All VIs have shown an increasing trend from 1985 to 2015 which depicted increase of vegetation. Spectral reflectance of all bands is declining from 1985 to 2015 except in near-infrared (NIR) bands. High reflectance in NIR bands is due to increased vegetation greenness. The reduction was seen in the visible bands that show increased vegetation photosynthetic activity. In the short-wave infrared bands (SWIR) were observed reduced trend from 1985 to 2015 which is indicate increased vegetation. Also, in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) bands were observed a declining trend which is the result of decreasing soil fraction from 1985 to 2015. LST has increased from 23.27 °C in 1985 to 27.45 °C in 2015. Snow patches were decreased over the study period. In conclusion, VIs and surface reflectance bands are considered the main tool to display vegetation change. Also, high VIs values showed healthy and dense vegetation. The results of our study will provide valuable information in preliminary climate change studies.

  7. Spatially uniform microflows induced by thermoviscous expansion along a traveling temperature wave: Analogies with electro-osmotic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Debashis; Chakraborty, Suman

    2012-07-01

    We discover that thermoviscous expansion along a traveling wave in a microfluidic channel may be capable of generating a spatially uniform flow profile in a time-averaged sense. We further delineate that the resultant complex flow characteristics, realized by virtue of an intricate interplay between thermal compression-expansion waves and temperature-dependent viscosity variations and controlled by an external heating, may be remarkably characterized by a unique thermal penetration depth scale (analogous to Debye length in electro-osmosis) and a velocity scale (analogous to the Helmholtz Smulochowski velocity in electro-osmosis) that in turn depends on the considerations of “thin” and “thick” microchannel limits, as dictated by the thermal penetration depth as compared to the lateral extent of the microfluidic channel. We show that, when the thermal penetration depth is small as compared to the channel height, a uniform velocity profile is generated in the channel in a time-averaged sense. The velocity scale characterizing this uniform flow may be represented by a function of the thermal diffusivity, volumetric expansion coefficient and thermal viscosity coefficient of the fluid, characteristic amplitude and speed of the thermal wave, as well as the channel height. Results from the present study are expected to provide valuable insights towards arresting hydrodynamic dispersion in microchannels by nonelectrochemical means, following a pH-independent route.

  8. ANALYSIS OF SPATIAL-TEMPORAL VARIATION OF LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE, VEGETATION AND SNOW COVER IN LAR NATIONAL PARK OF IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arekhi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes in land surface reflectance measured by remote sensing data can be useful in climate change studies. This study attempts to analyze the spatial-temporal extent change of vegetation greenness, Land Surface Temperature (LST, and Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI in late spring at the Lar National Park of Iran using Landsat data. Vegetation indices (VIs, LST, and NDSI maps were calculated for each date (1985, 1994, 2010, and 2015. All VIs have shown an increasing trend from 1985 to 2015 which depicted increase of vegetation. Spectral reflectance of all bands is declining from 1985 to 2015 except in near-infrared (NIR bands. High reflectance in NIR bands is due to increased vegetation greenness. The reduction was seen in the visible bands that show increased vegetation photosynthetic activity. In the short-wave infrared bands (SWIR were observed reduced trend from 1985 to 2015 which is indicate increased vegetation. Also, in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR bands were observed a declining trend which is the result of decreasing soil fraction from 1985 to 2015. LST has increased from 23.27 °C in 1985 to 27.45 °C in 2015. Snow patches were decreased over the study period. In conclusion, VIs and surface reflectance bands are considered the main tool to display vegetation change. Also, high VIs values showed healthy and dense vegetation. The results of our study will provide valuable information in preliminary climate change studies.

  9. Spatial Patterns and Temperature Predictions of Tuna Fatty Acids: Tracing Essential Nutrients and Changes in Primary Producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethybridge, Heidi R; Parrish, Christopher C; Morrongiello, John; Young, Jock W; Farley, Jessica H; Gunasekera, Rasanthi M; Nichols, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are among the least understood nutrients in marine environments, despite their profile as key energy components of food webs and that they are essential to all life forms. Presented here is a novel approach to predict the spatial-temporal distributions of fatty acids in marine resources using generalized additive mixed models. Fatty acid tracers (FAT) of key primary producers, nutritional condition indices and concentrations of two essential long-chain (≥C20) omega-3 fatty acids (EFA) measured in muscle of albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, sampled in the south-west Pacific Ocean were response variables. Predictive variables were: location, time, sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll-a (Chla), and phytoplankton biomass at time of catch and curved fork length. The best model fit for all fatty acid parameters included fish length and SST. The first oceanographic contour maps of EFA and FAT (FATscapes) were produced and demonstrated clear geographical gradients in the study region. Predicted changes in all fatty acid parameters reflected shifts in the size-structure of dominant primary producers. Model projections show that the supply and availability of EFA are likely to be negatively affected by increases in SST especially in temperate waters where a 12% reduction in both total fatty acid content and EFA proportions are predicted. Such changes will have large implications for the availability of energy and associated health benefits to high-order consumers. Results convey new concerns on impacts of projected climate change on fish-derived EFA in marine systems.

  10. Active intracellular transport in metastatic cells studied by spatial light interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Silvia; Kandel, Mikhail; Sridharan, Shamira; Majeed, Hassaan; Monroy, Freddy; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal patterns of intracellular transport are very difficult to quantify and, consequently, continue to be insufficiently understood. While it is well documented that mass trafficking inside living cells consists of both random and deterministic motions, quantitative data over broad spatiotemporal scales are lacking. We studied the intracellular transport in live cells using spatial light interference microscopy, a high spatiotemporal resolution quantitative phase imaging tool. The results indicate that in the cytoplasm, the intracellular transport is mainly active (directed, deterministic), while inside the nucleus it is both active and passive (diffusive, random). Furthermore, we studied the behavior of the two-dimensional mass density over 30 h in HeLa cells and focused on the active component. We determined the standard deviation of the velocity distribution at the point of cell division for each cell and compared the standard deviation velocity inside the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found that the velocity distribution in the cytoplasm is consistently broader than in the nucleus, suggesting mechanisms for faster transport in the cytosol versus the nucleus. Future studies will focus on improving phase measurements by applying a fluorescent tag to understand how particular proteins are transported inside the cell.

  11. Aleurone Cell Walls of Wheat Grain: High Spatial Resolution Investigation Using Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamme, F.; Robert, R; Bouchet, B; Saulnier, L; Dumas, P; Guillon, F

    2008-01-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy and immunolabeling techniques were employed in order to obtain deeper insight into the biochemical nature of aleurone cell walls of wheat grain. The use of a synchrotron source, thanks to its intrinsic brightness, has provided unprecedented information at the level of a few micrometers and has allowed the discrimination of various polysaccharides in cell walls. The high spectral quality obtained in the small analyzed domain has been beneficial in estimating the relative proportions of {Beta}-glucan and arabinoxylan, through the use of principal component analysis (PCA). The highest amount of {Beta}-glucan is found in periclinal cell walls close to the starchy endosperm. The junction regions between aleurone cells are enriched in arabinoxylan. At the early stage of wheat grain development (271 degrees D), the chemical composition along the cell walls is more heterogeneous than at the mature stage. Both synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and immunolabeling experiments made it possible to reveal the spatial heterogeneity of the various chemical compositions of aleurone cell walls.

  12. Spatial distribution and temporal evolution of DRONPA-fused SNAP25 clusters in adrenal chromaffin cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoku, Yasuko; Dedecker, Peter; da Silva Pinheiro, Paulo César;

    2015-01-01

    Sub-diffraction imaging of plasma membrane localized proteins, such as the SNARE (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein Receptor) proteins involved in exocytosis, in fixed cells have resulted in images with high spatial resolution, at the expense of dynamical information. Here, we have imaged localized......, making possible the simultaneous identification of cluster size, location and temporal evolution. The results indicate that the DRONPA-fused SNAP-25 clusters display rich dynamics, going from staying constant to disappearing and reappearing in specific cluster domains within minutes....

  13. Spatial distribution and temporal evolution of DRONPA-fused SNAP25 clusters in adrenal chromaffin cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoku, Yasuko; Dedecker, Peter; da Silva Pinheiro, Paulo César

    2015-01-01

    Sub-diffraction imaging of plasma membrane localized proteins, such as the SNARE (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein Receptor) proteins involved in exocytosis, in fixed cells have resulted in images with high spatial resolution, at the expense of dynamical information. Here, we have imaged localized ......, making possible the simultaneous identification of cluster size, location and temporal evolution. The results indicate that the DRONPA-fused SNAP-25 clusters display rich dynamics, going from staying constant to disappearing and reappearing in specific cluster domains within minutes....

  14. On the impact of spatial heterogeneous permeability distributions on the development of free convection cells in the Perth Basin, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederau, Jan; Ebigbo, Anozie; Freitag, Sebastian; Marquart, Gabriele; Clauser, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Recent increase in exploration of the geothermal energy potential of the Perth Metropolitan Area (PMA) results in the need for reliable and robust reservoir models in order to explore rock properties and temperature distributions in the subsurface, where free convection in the main reservoir (Yarragadee Aquifer) is likely to occur [1]. While the structure of the Perth Basin has been refined recently, the heterogeneity and spatial complexity of permeability was up till now mainly neglected. An integrated, three dimensional tectonostratigraphic model of the PMA is constructed, using the modeling software '3D GeoModeller' and data of numerous artesian and petroleum wells. Comprising the region around the city of Perth, the model covers an area of about 5000 km2 up to a depth of 4.5 km, with focus on adequate representation of the main reservoir. We further construct a numerical model for fluid flow and heat transport in the Yarragadee Aquifer. Porosity distributions are deduced from well logs and linked to permeability by a calibrated correlation, based on a fractal approach. Three different cases are simulated using the FD code SHEMAT-Suite, in order to assess the influence of spatial heterogeneity of porosity and permeability on the development of free convection cells. constant porosity and permeability for the entire aquifer porosity and permeability decreasing with depth, thus reflecting compaction a conditional random permeability field within prescribed limits and for given correlation length In order to improve understanding of model correctness, as well as identification and comparison of convection cells in different simulations, we are developing a specialized visualization tool tailored to this purpose. The three different scenarios show distinctions in the distribution of convection cells. Where the Yarragadee Aquifer is in contact with overlying aquifers, regions of downflow develop. These in turn have a strong impact on the regional flow field and

  15. Abnormal spatial diffusion of Ca2+ in F508del-CFTR airway epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becq Frédéric

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In airway epithelial cells, calcium mobilization can be elicited by selective autocrine and/or paracrine activation of apical or basolateral membrane heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors linked to phospholipase C (PLC stimulation, which generates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 and 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG and induces Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER stores. Methods In the present study, we monitored the cytosolic Ca2+ transients using the UV light photolysis technique to uncage caged Ca2+ or caged IP3 into the cytosol of loaded airway epithelial cells of cystic fibrosis (CF and non-CF origin. We compared in these cells the types of Ca2+ receptors present in the ER, and measured their Ca2+ dependent activity before and after correction of F508del-CFTR abnormal trafficking either by low temperature or by the pharmacological corrector miglustat (N-butyldeoxynojirimycin. Results We showed reduction of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R dependent-Ca2+ response following both correcting treatments compared to uncorrected cells in such a way that Ca2+ responses (CF+treatment vs wild-type cells were normalized. This normalization of the Ca2+ rate does not affect the activity of Ca2+-dependent chloride channel in miglustat-treated CF cells. Using two inhibitors of IP3R1, we observed a decrease of the implication of IP3R1 in the Ca2+ response in CF corrected cells. We observed a similar Ca2+ mobilization between CF-KM4 cells and CFTR-cDNA transfected CF cells (CF-KM4-reverted. When we restored the F508del-CFTR trafficking in CFTR-reverted cells, the specific IP3R activity was also reduced to a similar level as in non CF cells. At the structural level, the ER morphology of CF cells was highly condensed around the nucleus while in non CF cells or corrected CF cells the ER was extended at the totality of cell. Conclusion These results suggest reversal of the IP3R dysfunction in F508del-CFTR epithelial

  16. The spatial distribution of LGR5+ cells correlates with gastric cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Simon

    Full Text Available In this study we tested the prevalence, histoanatomical distribution and tumour biological significance of the Wnt target protein and cancer stem cell marker LGR5 in tumours of the human gastrointestinal tract. Differential expression of LGR5 was studied on transcriptional (real-time polymerase chain reaction and translational level (immunohistochemistry in malignant and corresponding non-malignant tissues of 127 patients comprising six different primary tumour sites, i.e. oesophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, colon and rectum. The clinico-pathological significance of LGR5 expression was studied in 100 patients with gastric carcinoma (GC. Non-neoplastic tissue usually harboured only very few scattered LGR5(+ cells. The corresponding carcinomas of the oesophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, colon and rectum showed significantly more LGR5(+ cells as well as significantly higher levels of LGR5-mRNA compared with the corresponding non-neoplastic tissue. Double staining experiments revealed a coexpression of LGR5 with the putative stem cell markers CD44, Musashi-1 and ADAM17. Next we tested the hypothesis that the sequential changes of gastric carcinogenesis, i.e. chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and invasive carcinoma, are associated with a reallocation of the LGR5(+ cells. Interestingly, the spatial distribution of LGR5 changed: in non-neoplastic stomach mucosa, LGR5(+ cells were found predominantly in the mucous neck region; in intestinal metaplasia LGR5(+ cells were localized at the crypt base, and in GC LGR5(+ cells were present at the luminal surface, the tumour centre and the invasion front. The expression of LGR5 in the tumour centre and invasion front of GC correlated significantly with the local tumour growth (T-category and the nodal spread (N-category. Furthermore, patients with LGR5(+ GCs had a shorter median survival (28.0±8.6 months than patients with LGR5(- GCs (54.5±6.3 months. Our results show that LGR5 is

  17. Spiking neurons in a hierarchical self-organizing map model can learn to develop spatial and temporal properties of entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen K Pilly

    Full Text Available Medial entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells provide neural correlates of spatial representation in the brain. A place cell typically fires whenever an animal is present in one or more spatial regions, or places, of an environment. A grid cell typically fires in multiple spatial regions that form a regular hexagonal grid structure extending throughout the environment. Different grid and place cells prefer spatially offset regions, with their firing fields increasing in size along the dorsoventral axes of the medial entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. The spacing between neighboring fields for a grid cell also increases along the dorsoventral axis. This article presents a neural model whose spiking neurons operate in a hierarchy of self-organizing maps, each obeying the same laws. This spiking GridPlaceMap model simulates how grid cells and place cells may develop. It responds to realistic rat navigational trajectories by learning grid cells with hexagonal grid firing fields of multiple spatial scales and place cells with one or more firing fields that match neurophysiological data about these cells and their development in juvenile rats. The place cells represent much larger spaces than the grid cells, which enable them to support navigational behaviors. Both self-organizing maps amplify and learn to categorize the most frequent and energetic co-occurrences of their inputs. The current results build upon a previous rate-based model of grid and place cell learning, and thus illustrate a general method for converting rate-based adaptive neural models, without the loss of any of their analog properties, into models whose cells obey spiking dynamics. New properties of the spiking GridPlaceMap model include the appearance of theta band modulation. The spiking model also opens a path for implementation in brain-emulating nanochips comprised of networks of noisy spiking neurons with multiple-level adaptive weights for controlling autonomous

  18. Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the development of an equivalent circuit model of a 65 cell high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The HTPEM fuel cell membranes used are PBI-based and uses phosphoric acid as proton conductor. The operating temperature...

  19. Spatial distribution of prominin-1 (CD133-positive cells within germinative zones of the vertebrate brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Jászai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In mammals, embryonic neural progenitors as well as adult neural stem cells can be prospectively isolated based on the cell surface expression of prominin-1 (CD133, a plasma membrane glycoprotein. In contrast, characterization of neural progenitors in non-mammalian vertebrates endowed with significant constitutive neurogenesis and inherent self-repair ability is hampered by the lack of suitable cell surface markers. Here, we have investigated whether prominin-1-orthologues of the major non-mammalian vertebrate model organisms show any degree of conservation as for their association with neurogenic geminative zones within the central nervous system (CNS as they do in mammals or associated with activated neural progenitors during provoked neurogenesis in the regenerating CNS. METHODS: We have recently identified prominin-1 orthologues from zebrafish, axolotl and chicken. The spatial distribution of prominin-1-positive cells--in comparison to those of mice--was mapped in the intact brain in these organisms by non-radioactive in situ hybridization combined with detection of proliferating neural progenitors, marked either by proliferating cell nuclear antigen or 5-bromo-deoxyuridine. Furthermore, distribution of prominin-1 transcripts was investigated in the regenerating spinal cord of injured axolotl. RESULTS: Remarkably, a conserved association of prominin-1 with germinative zones of the CNS was uncovered as manifested in a significant co-localization with cell proliferation markers during normal constitutive neurogenesis in all species investigated. Moreover, an enhanced expression of prominin-1 became evident associated with provoked, compensatory neurogenesis during the epimorphic regeneration of the axolotl spinal cord. Interestingly, significant prominin-1-expressing cell populations were also detected at distinct extraventricular (parenchymal locations in the CNS of all vertebrate species being suggestive of further, non

  20. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Alan K; Baldor, Linda C; Hogan, Brian P

    2005-10-04

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement.

  1. An approach to estimate spatial distribution of analyte within cells using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Irfanullah, Mir; Basu, Santanu Kumar; Madhu, Sheri; De, Suman; Jadhav, Sameer; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli; Chowdhury, Arindam

    2017-03-01

    While fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool amongst chemists and biologists for the detection of various analyte within cellular environments, non-uniform spatial distribution of sensors within cells often restricts extraction of reliable information on relative abundance of analytes in different subcellular regions. As an alternative to existing sensing methodologies such as ratiometric or FRET imaging, where relative proportion of analyte with respect to the sensor can be obtained within cells, we propose a methodology using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy, via which both the relative abundance of sensor as well as their relative proportion with respect to the analyte can be simultaneously extracted for local subcellular regions. This method is exemplified using a BODIPY sensor, capable of detecting mercury ions within cellular environments, characterized by spectral blue-shift and concurrent enhancement of emission intensity. Spectral emission envelopes collected from sub-microscopic regions allowed us to compare the shift in transition energies as well as integrated emission intensities within various intracellular regions. Construction of a 2D scatter plot using spectral shifts and emission intensities, which depend on the relative amount of analyte with respect to sensor and the approximate local amounts of the probe, respectively, enabled qualitative extraction of relative abundance of analyte in various local regions within a single cell as well as amongst different cells. Although the comparisons remain semi-quantitative, this approach involving analysis of multiple spectral parameters opens up an alternative way to extract spatial distribution of analyte in heterogeneous systems. The proposed method would be especially relevant for fluorescent probes that undergo relatively nominal shift in transition energies compared to their emission bandwidths, which often restricts their usage for quantitative ratiometric imaging in

  2. Temperature reduction of solar cells in a concentrator photovoltaic system using a long wavelength cut filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nawwar; Ota, Yasuyuki; Nishioka, Kensuke

    2017-03-01

    We propose a Fresnel lens optical concentration system that can reduce the solar cell temperature. For the reduction of the solar cell temperature, we added a long-wavelength cut filter in order to utilize the part of the solar spectrum that is beneficial to a solar cell while reflecting the rest of the long-wavelength spectrum. A thermal simulation was conducted to estimate the actual cell temperature for optical systems with and without the long-wavelength cut filter, and the results showed a decrease of approximately 25.3 °C in the solar cell temperature using the filter. The lifetime of a solar cell can be extended by reducing its temperature, and the results showed an increase of 1.9 × 105 h in the lifetime of the solar cell.

  3. Evaluation of thin-film solar cell temperature coefficients for space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Simon H.; Simburger, Edward J.; Matsumoto, James; Garcia, Alexander; Ross, Jasen; Nocerino, John [Aerospace Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    At present, commercially available thin-film photovoltaic cells are evaluated for terrestrial applications. To apply thin-film photovoltaic cells for space applications, the assessment of the solar cell performance must be conducted in simulated space conditions. We investigated the temperature coefficients of the I-V characteristics of thin-film amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cells manufactured by Uni-Solar and Iowa Thin Film Technologies, and CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells manufactured by MicroSat Systems with simulated space solar radiation. The temperature coefficient of the thin-film solar cells between temperatures of 15 and 100 deg C was measured with a temperature-controlled vacuum plate. The vacuum plate ensures maximum thermal contact between the plate and the solar cell as well as reducing the thermal gradient in the solar cell. The vacuum plate also serves as a thermal reservoir that provides temperature stability during the performance evaluation when the solar cell is exposed to simulated sunlight radiation. An X-25 sunlight simulator calibrated for AMO conditions provides the necessary radiation in performance characterization of the thin-film solar cell. The I-V characteristics of the solar cell were obtained at various temperatures to gain a thorough knowledge of the cell's performance at different temperatures. (Author)

  4. Spatial distribution of synapses on tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing juxtaglomerular cells in the mouse olfactory glomerulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokage, Emi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Toida, Kazunori

    2017-04-01

    Olfactory sensory axons converge in specific glomeruli where they form excitatory synapses onto dendrites of mitral/tufted (M/T) and juxtaglomerular (JG) cells, including periglomerular (PG), external tufted (ET), and superficial-short axon cells. JG cells consist of heterogeneous subpopulations with different neurochemical, physiological, and morphological properties. Among JG cells, previous electron microscopic (EM) studies have shown that the majority of synaptic inputs to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive neurons were asymmetrical synapses from olfactory nerve (ON) terminals. However, recent physiological results revealed that 70% of dopaminergic/γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons received polysynaptic inputs via ET cells, whereas the remaining 30% received monosynaptic ON inputs. To understand the discrepancies between EM and physiological data, we used serial EM analysis combined with confocal laser scanning microscope images to examine the spatial distribution of synapses on dendrites using mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of the TH promoter. The majority of synaptic inputs to TH-expressing JG cells were from ON terminals, and they preferentially targeted distal dendrites from the soma. On the other hand, the numbers of non-ON inputs were fewer and targeted proximal dendrites. Furthermore, individual TH-expressing JG cells formed serial synapses, such as M/T→TH→another presumed M/T or ON→TH→presumed M/T, but not reciprocal synapses. Serotonergic fibers also associated with somatic regions of TH neurons, displaying non-ON profiles. Thus, fewer proximal non-ON synapses provide more effective inputs than large numbers of distal ON synapses and may occur on the physiologically characterized population of dopaminergic-GABAergic neurons (70%) that receive their most effective inputs indirectly via an ON→ET→TH circuit. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1059-1074, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley

  5. Spatial Patterns and Temperature Predictions of Tuna Fatty Acids: Tracing Essential Nutrients and Changes in Primary Producers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi R Pethybridge

    Full Text Available Fatty acids are among the least understood nutrients in marine environments, despite their profile as key energy components of food webs and that they are essential to all life forms. Presented here is a novel approach to predict the spatial-temporal distributions of fatty acids in marine resources using generalized additive mixed models. Fatty acid tracers (FAT of key primary producers, nutritional condition indices and concentrations of two essential long-chain (≥C20 omega-3 fatty acids (EFA measured in muscle of albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, sampled in the south-west Pacific Ocean were response variables. Predictive variables were: location, time, sea surface temperature (SST and chlorophyll-a (Chla, and phytoplankton biomass at time of catch and curved fork length. The best model fit for all fatty acid parameters included fish length and SST. The first oceanographic contour maps of EFA and FAT (FATscapes were produced and demonstrated clear geographical gradients in the study region. Predicted changes in all fatty acid parameters reflected shifts in the size-structure of dominant primary producers. Model projections show that the supply and availability of EFA are likely to be negatively affected by increases in SST especially in temperate waters where a 12% reduction in both total fatty acid content and EFA proportions are predicted. Such changes will have large implications for the availability of energy and associated health benefits to high-order consumers. Results convey new concerns on impacts of projected climate change on fish-derived EFA in marine systems.

  6. Geo-spatial analysis of temporal trends of temperature and its extremes over India using daily gridded (1°×1°) temperature data of 1969-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Seshasai, M. V. R.; Rao, S. V. C. Kameswara; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2016-07-01

    Daily gridded (1°×1°) temperature data (1969-2005) were used to detect spatial patterns of temporal trends of maximum and minimum temperature (monthly and seasonal), growing degree days (GDDs) over the crop-growing season (kharif, rabi, and zaid) and annual frequencies of temperature extremes over India. The direction and magnitude of trends, at each grid level, were estimated using the Mann-Kendall statistics (α = 0.05) and further assessed at the homogeneous temperature regions using a field significance test (α=0.05). General warming trends were observed over India with considerable variations in direction and magnitude over space and time. The spatial extent and the magnitude of the increasing trends of minimum temperature (0.02-0.04 °C year-1) were found to be higher than that of maximum temperature (0.01-0.02 °C year-1) during winter and pre-monsoon seasons. Significant negative trends of minimum temperature were found over eastern India during the monsoon months. Such trends were also observed for the maximum temperature over northern and eastern parts, particularly in the winter month of January. The general warming patterns also changed the thermal environment of the crop-growing season causing significant increase in GDDs during kharif and rabi seasons across India. The warming climate has also caused significant increase in occurrences of hot extremes such as hot days and hot nights, and significant decrease in cold extremes such as cold days and cold nights.

  7. Spatially Coordinated Changes in Intracellular Rheology and Extracellular Force Exertion during Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Quach, Nhat D.; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties within the cell are regulated by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, which is linked to the extracellular environment through focal adhesion proteins that transmit force. Chemical and mechanical stimuli alter the organization of cytoskeletal actin, which results in changes in cell shape, adhesion, and differentiation. By combining particle-tracking microrheology and traction force cytometry, we can monitor the mechanical properties of the actin meshwork and determine how changes in the intracellular network contribute to force generation. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemical (differentiation factors) and mechanical (substrate rigidity) stimuli important in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation on the intracellular mechanics and traction stress generation. We found the presence of adipogenic factors resulted in stiffening of the actin meshwork regardless of substrate rigidity. In contrast, these factors increased traction stresses on hard substrates, which was associated with increased expression of contractility genes. Furthermore, MSCs cultured on hard substrates expressed both adipogenic and osteogenic markers indicative of mixed differentiation. On hard substrates, heterogeneity in the local elastic modulus-traction stress correlation was also increased in response to adipogenic factors, indicating that these mechanical properties may be reflective of differences in level of MSC differentiation. These results suggest intracellular rheology and traction stress generation are spatially regulated and contribute insight into how single cell mechanical forces contribute to MSC differentiation. PMID:25156989

  8. Spatial Engineering of Osteochondral Tissue Constructs Through Microfluidically Directed Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Stephen M; Barabino, Gilda A

    2016-01-01

    The development of tissue engineered osteochondral units has been slowed by a number of technical hurdles associated with recapitulating their heterogeneous nature ex vivo. Subsequently, numerous approaches with respect to cell sourcing, scaffolding composition, and culture media formulation have been pursued, which have led to high variability in outcomes and ultimately the lack of a consensus bioprocessing strategy. As such, the objective of this study was to standardize the design process by focusing on differentially supporting formation of cartilaginous and bony matrix by a single cell source in a spatially controlled manner within a single material system. A cell-polymer solution of bovine mesenchymal stem cells and agarose was cast against micromolds of a serpentine network and stacked to produce tissue constructs containing two independent microfluidic networks. Constructs were fluidically connected to two controlled flow loops and supplied with independently tuned differentiation parameters for chondrogenic and osteogenic induction, respectively. Constructs receiving inductive media showed differential gene expression of both chondrogenic and osteogenic markers in opposite directions along the thickness of the construct that was recapitulated at the protein level with respect to collagens I, II, and X. A control group receiving noninductive media showed homogeneous expression of these biomarkers measured in lower concentrations at both the mRNA and protein level. This work represents an important step in the rational design of engineered osteochondral units through establishment of an enabling technology for further optimization of scaffolding formulations and bioprocessing conditions toward the production of commercially viable osteochondral tissue products.

  9. Spatially coordinated changes in intracellular rheology and extracellular force exertion during mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Quach, Nhat D.; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical properties within the cell are regulated by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, which is linked to the extracellular environment through focal adhesion proteins that transmit force. Chemical and mechanical stimuli alter the organization of cytoskeletal actin, which results in changes in cell shape, adhesion, and differentiation. By combining particle-tracking microrheology and traction force cytometry, we can monitor the mechanical properties of the actin meshwork and determine how changes in the intracellular network contribute to force generation. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemical (differentiation factors) and mechanical (substrate rigidity) stimuli important in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation on the intracellular mechanics and traction stress generation. We found the presence of adipogenic factors resulted in stiffening of the actin meshwork regardless of substrate rigidity. In contrast, these factors increased traction stresses on hard substrates, which was associated with increased expression of contractility genes. Furthermore, MSCs cultured on hard substrates expressed both adipogenic and osteogenic markers indicative of mixed differentiation. On hard substrates, heterogeneity in the local elastic modulus-traction stress correlation was also increased in response to adipogenic factors, indicating that these mechanical properties may be reflective of differences in the level of MSC differentiation. These results suggest intracellular rheology and traction stress generation are spatially regulated and contribute insight into how single cell mechanical forces contribute to MSC differentiation.

  10. Cell integrated multi-junction thermocouple array for solid oxide fuel cell temperature sensing: N+1 architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaweera, Manoj; Kim, Jung-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the cell temperature distribution of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks during normal operation has multifaceted advantages in performance and degradation studies. Present efforts on measuring temperature from operating SOFCs measure only the gas channel temperature and do not reveal the cell level temperature distribution, which is more important for understanding a cell's performance and its temperature-related degradation. The authors propose a cell-integrated, multi-junction thermocouple array for in-situ cell surface temperature monitoring of an operational SOFC. The proposed thermocouple array requires far fewer numbers of thermoelements than that required by sets of thermocouples for the same number of temperature sensing points. Hence, the proposed array causes lower disturbance to cell performance than thermocouples. The thermoelement array was sputter deposited on the cathode of a commercial SOFC using alumel (Ni:Al:Mn:Si - 95:2:2:1 by wt.) and chromel (Ni:Cr - 90:10 by wt.). The thermocouple array was tested in a furnace over the entire operating temperature range of a typical SOFC. The individual sensing points of the array were shown to measure temperature independently from each other with equivalent accuracy to a thermocouple. Thus, the concept of multi-junction thermocouples is experimentally validated and its stability on a porous SOFC cathode is confirmed.

  11. A novel dichromic self-referencing optical probe SrO:Bi(3+),Eu(3+) for temperature spatially and temporally imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jipeng; Pang, Ran; Jiang, Lihong; Jia, Yonglei; Sun, Wenzhi; Zhang, Su; Li, Chengyu

    2016-09-14

    A novel dichromic luminescence probe SrO:Eu(3+),Bi(3+) for temperature sensing is achieved. The detailed luminescence properties, e.g., the excitation emission spectra, energy transfer efficiency, luminescence decay lifetimes and temperature dependent luminescence are comprehensively studied. The two dominant emissions (5)D0→(7)F2 transition of Eu(3+) and the (3)P1→(1)S0 transition of Bi(3+) display adjustable spectrum area. The interaction effect between Eu(3+) and Bi(3+) are proposed. The dichromic emissions are specifically responding to temperature with high sensitivity at ultra-wide range from 30 to 400 °C. Spatial and temporal temperature images on an aircraft surface have been successfully realized under excitation of commercial 365 nm light emitting diode (LED) by painting the SrO:Bi(3+),Eu(3+) phosphor on a plane model. Finally, the thermal quenching mechanism revealed by Arrhenius theory is employed to interpret the temperature sensitive luminescence behaviour.

  12. Fabrication and temperature dependence of a GaInP/GaAs/Ge tandem solar cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔敏; 陈诺夫; 杨晓丽; 张汉

    2012-01-01

    GaInP/GaAs/Ge tandem solar cells were fabricated by a MOCVD technique.The photoelectric properties of the solar cells were characterized by a current-voltage test method.The dependence of the solar cell's characteristics on temperature were investigated from 30 to 170 ℃ at intervals of 20 ℃.Test results indicated that with increasing temperature,Jsc of the cell increased slightly with a temperature coefficient of 9.8 (μA/cm2)/℃.Voc reduced sharply with a coefficient of-5.6 mV/℃.FF was reduced with a temperature coefficient of-0.00063/℃.Furthermore,the conversion efficiency decreased linearly with increasing temperature which decreased from 28% at 30 ℃ to 22.1% at 130 ℃.Also,detailed theoretical analyses for temperature characteristics of the solar cell were given.

  13. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Spatially Controls Activation and Misregulation of Host Cell Rac1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pseudotuberculosis binds host cells and modulates the mammalian Rac1 guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase at two levels. Activation of Rac1 results from integrin receptor engagement, while misregulation is promoted by translocation of YopE and YopT proteins into target cells. Little is known regarding how these various factors interplay to control Rac1 dynamics. To investigate these competing processes, the localization of Rac1 activation was imaged microscopically using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. In the absence of translocated effectors, bacteria induced activation of the GTPase at the site of bacterial binding. In contrast, the entire cellular pool of Rac1 was inactivated shortly after translocation of YopE RhoGAP. Inactivation required membrane localization of Rac1. The translocated protease YopT had very different effects on Rac1. This protein, which removes the membrane localization site of Rac1, did not inactivate Rac1, but promoted entry of cleaved activated Rac1 molecules into the host cell nucleus, allowing Rac1 to localize with nuclear guanosine nucleotide exchange factors. As was true for YopE, membrane-associated Rac1 was the target for YopT, indicating that the two translocated effectors may compete for the same pool of target protein. Consistent with the observation that YopE inactivation requires membrane localization of Rac1, the presence of YopT in the cell interfered with the action of the YopE RhoGAP. As a result, interaction of target cells with a strain that produces both YopT and YopE resulted in two spatially distinct pools of Rac1: an inactive cytoplasmic pool and an activated nuclear pool. These studies demonstrate that competition between bacterial virulence factors for access to host substrates is controlled by the spatial arrangement of a target protein. In turn, the combined effects of translocated bacterial proteins are to generate pools of a single signaling molecule with distinct localization and

  14. Cross-spectral study of the spatial relationships in the North Pacific sea-surface temperature anomaly field. Report No. 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, J.W.

    1980-03-01

    Cross-spectral analysis is used to examine the dependence of the temporal covariation of sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies at pairs of spatially separated points in the North Pacific on (1) the time scale of the variations, (2) the relative displacement of the points and (3) their location within the North Pacific basin. Spatial scales considered here range from 1000 kilometers up to the width of the basin. The study focuses on cross-spectral estimates for the interannual frequency band, 0.125-0.75 yr/sup -1/ although estimates for three other bands spanning higher frequencies are also examined.

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF TIME ON THE DEATH OF HELA CELLS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The time required to kill HeLa cells in suspension was determined for the range of temperatures from 48 to 65 C. The cells were placed between 6...elevated temperature episode and distinguished live from dead cells. The time (t) to cause death of the HeLa cells was found to range from 1 second at 65 C to 1900 seconds at 48 C. (Author)

  16. Patterned porous silicon photonic crystals with modular surface chemistry for spatial control of neural stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tiffany H.; Pei, Yi; Zhang, Douglas; Li, Yanfen; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a strategy to spatially define regions of gold and nanostructured silicon photonics, each with materials-specific surface chemistry, for azide-alkyne cycloaddition of different bioactive peptides. Neural stem cells are spatially directed to undergo neurogenesis and astrogenesis as a function of both surface properties and peptide identity.We present a strategy to spatially define regions of gold and nanostructured silicon photonics, each with materials-specific surface chemistry, for azide-alkyne cycloaddition of different bioactive peptides. Neural stem cells are spatially directed to undergo neurogenesis and astrogenesis as a function of both surface properties and peptide identity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08327c

  17. The efficacy of Kriging spatial interpolation for filling temporal gaps in daily air temperature data:A case study in northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YanLin Zhang; XiaoLi Chang; Ji Liang; DongLiang Luo; RuiXia He

    2016-01-01

    Quality-controlled and serially complete daily air temperature data are essential to evaluating and modelling the influences of climate change on the permafrost in cold regions. Due to malfunctions and location changes of observing stations, temporal gaps (i.e., missing data) are common in collected datasets. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of Kriging spatial interpolation for estimating missing data to fill the temporal gaps in daily air temperature data in northeast China. A cross-validation experiment was conducted. Daily air temperature series from 1960 to 2012 at each station were estimated by using the universal Kriging (UK) and Kriging with an external drift (KED), as appropriate, as if all the ob-servations at a given station were completely missing. The temporal and spatial variation patterns of estimation uncer-tainties were also checked. Results showed that Kriging spatial interpolation was generally desirable for estimating missing data in daily air temperature, and in this study KED performed slightly better than UK. At most stations the cor-relation coefficients (R2) between the observed and estimated daily series were >0.98, and root mean square errors (RMSEs) of the estimated daily mean (Tmean), maximum (Tmax), and minimum (Tmin) of air temperature were <3 °C. However, the estimation quality was strongly affected by seasonality and had spatial variation. In general, estimation uncertainties were small in summer and large in winter. On average, the RMSE in winter was approximately 1 °C higher than that in summer. In addition, estimation uncertainties in mountainous areas with complex terrain were significantly larger than those in plain areas.

  18. Spatial regulation of cell cohesion by Wnt5a during second heart field progenitor deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ding; Sinha, Tanvi; Ajima, Rieko; Seo, Hwa-Seon; Yamaguchi, Terry P; Wang, Jianbo

    2016-04-01

    Wnt5a, a non-canonical Wnt ligand critical for outflow tract (OFT) morphogenesis, is expressed specifically in second heart field (SHF) progenitors in the caudal splanchnic mesoderm (SpM) near the inflow tract (IFT). Using a conditional Wnt5a gain of function (GOF) allele and Islet1-Cre, we broadly over-expressed Wnt5a throughout the SHF lineage, including the entire SpM between the IFT and OFT. Wnt5a over-expression in Wnt5a null mutants can rescue the cell polarity and actin polymerization defects as well as severe SpM shortening, but fails to rescue OFT shortening. Moreover, Wnt5a over-expression in wild-type background is able to cause OFT shortening. We find that Wnt5a over-expression does not perturb SHF cell proliferation, apoptosis or differentiation, but affects the deployment of SHF cells by causing them to accumulate into a large bulge at the rostral SpM and fail to enter the OFT. Our immunostaining analyses suggest an inverse correlation between cell cohesion and Wnt5a level in the wild-type SpM. Ectopic Wnt5a expression in the rostral SpM of Wn5a-GOF mutants diminishes the upregulation of adherens junction; whereas loss of Wnt5a in Wnt5a null mutants causes premature increase in adherens junction level in the caudal SpM. Over-expression of mouse Wnt5a in Xenopus animal cap cells also reduces C-cadherin distribution on the plasma membrane without affecting its overall protein level, suggesting that Wnt5a may play an evolutionarily conserved role in controlling the cell surface level of cadherin to modulate cell cohesion during tissue morphogenesis. Collectively, our data indicate that restricted expression of Wnt5a in the caudal SpM is essential for normal OFT morphogenesis, and uncover a novel function of spatially regulated cell cohesion by Wnt5a in driving the deployment of SHF cells from the SpM into the OFT.

  19. Weibull strength variations between room temperature and high temperature Ni-3YSZ half-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curran, Declan; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2013-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell stacks are vulnerable to mechanical failures. One of the most relevant failure mechanisms is brittle fracture of the individual ceramic cells, which are an integral part of the stack structure. Even the mechanical failure of one cell can lead to temporary interruption, reduc...

  20. Dynamic Model of the High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    consists of a prototype cathode air cooled 30 cell HTPEM fuel cell stack developed at the Institute of Energy Technology at Aalborg University. This fuel cell stack uses PEMEAS Celtec P-1000 membranes and runs on pure hydrogen in a dead-end anode configuration with a purge valve. The cooling of the stack...

  1. Temporal and spatial changes in Ca2+ distribution during the programmed cell death of tracheary elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The changes in Ca2+ distribution in the tracheary elements (TEs) of the pepper leaves were studied using the cytochemical method of potassium antimonate. At the early stage of TEs formation, the vacuole and the nucleus held large volume, and antimonate Ca2+ deposits were observed mainly in the intercellular space and the cell wall. As the thickening of secondary wall occurred, the vacuole, nucleus and other organelles began to rupture, concomitant with the increase of calcium deposits in the cytosol, showing the influx of Ca2+ into the cell. With the further rupture of cytoplasm and other organelles, the number of calcium deposits at the non-thickening cell wall increased, but declined at the thickening bands of the secondary wall. When the cytoplasmic contents disappeared completely, the level of Ca2+ decreased at the non-thickening wall, but by contrast,increased at the thickening bands of the secondary wall.These observations indicated that the dynamic changes in Ca2+ distribution spatially and temporarily might have a close correlation with its distinct roles played during the formation of the secondary walls.

  2. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Engineering Model Powerplant. Test Report: Benchmark Tests in Three Spatial Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyselle, Patricia; Prokopius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology is the leading candidate to replace the aging alkaline fuel cell technology, currently used on the Shuttle, for future space missions. This test effort marks the final phase of a 5-yr development program that began under the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program, transitioned into the Next Generation Launch Technologies (NGLT) Program, and continued under Constellation Systems in the Exploration Technology Development Program. Initially, the engineering model (EM) powerplant was evaluated with respect to its performance as compared to acceptance tests carried out at the manufacturer. This was to determine the sensitivity of the powerplant performance to changes in test environment. In addition, a series of tests were performed with the powerplant in the original standard orientation. This report details the continuing EM benchmark test results in three spatial orientations as well as extended duration testing in the mission profile test. The results from these tests verify the applicability of PEM fuel cells for future NASA missions. The specifics of these different tests are described in the following sections.

  3. Ultrafast laser-assisted spatially targeted optoporation into cortical axons and retinal cells in the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2017-06-01

    Visualization and assessment of the cellular structure and function require localized delivery of the molecules into specific cells in restricted spatial regions of the tissue and may necessitate subcellular delivery and localization. Earlier, we have shown ultrafast near-infrared laser beam-assisted optoporation of actin-staining molecules into cortical neurons with single-cell resolution and high efficiency. However, diffusion of optoporated molecules in soma degrades toward the growth cone, leading to difficulties in visualization of the actin network in the growth cone in cases of long axons. Here, we demonstrate optoporation of impermeable molecules to functional cortical neurons by precise laser subaxotomy near the growth cone, leading to visualization of the actin network in the growth cone. Further, we demonstrate patterned delivery of impermeable molecules into targeted retinal cells in the rat eye. The development of optoporation as a minimally invasive approach to reliably deliver exogenous molecules into targeted axons and soma of retinal neurons in vivo will enable enhanced visualization of the structure and function of the retina.

  4. Equilibrium configurations of director in a planar nematic cell with one spatially modulated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Ledney

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We study two-dimensional equilibrium configurations of nematic liquid crystal (NLC director in a cell confined between two parallel surfaces: a planar surface and a spatially modulated one. The relief of the modulated surface is described by a smooth periodic sine-like function. The director easy axis orientation is homeotropic at one of the bounding surfaces and is planar at the other one. Strong NLC anchoring with both surfaces is assumed. We consider the case where disclination lines occur in the bulk of NLC strictly above local extrema of the modulated surface. These disclination lines run along the crests and troughs of the relief waves. In the approximation of planar director deformations we obtain analytical expressions describing a director distribution in the bulk of the cell. Equilibrium distances from disclination lines to the modulated surface are calculated and their dependences on the cell thickness and the period and depth of the surface relief are studied. It is shown that the distances from disclination lines to the modulated surface decrease as the depth of the relief increases.

  5. High-Spatial-Resolution Monitoring of Strong Magnetic Field using Rb vapor Nanometric-Thin Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Hakhumyan, G; Pashayan-Leroy, Y; Sarkisyan, D; Auzinsh, M

    2011-01-01

    We have implemented the so-called $\\lambda$-Zeeman technique (LZT) to investigate individual hyperfine transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the Rb atoms in a strong external magnetic field $B$ in the range of $2500 - 5000$ G (recently it was established that LZT is very convenient for the range of $10 - 2500$ G). Atoms are confined in a nanometric thin cell (NTC) with the thickness $L = \\lambda$, where $\\lambda$ is the resonant wavelength 794 nm for Rb $D_1$ line. Narrow velocity selective optical pumping (VSOP) resonances in the transmission spectrum of the NTC are split into several components in a magnetic field with the frequency positions and transition probabilities depending on the $B$-field. Possible applications are described, such as magnetometers with nanometric local spatial resolution and tunable atomic frequency references.

  6. High-spatial-resolution monitoring of strong magnetic field using Rb vapor nanometric-thin cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakhumyan, G.; Leroy, C.; Pashayan-Leroy, Y.; Sarkisyan, D.; Auzinsh, M.

    2011-08-01

    We have implemented the so-called λ-Zeeman technique (LZT) to investigate individual hyperfine transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the Rb atoms in a strong external magnetic field B in the range of 2500 - 5000 G (recently it was established that LZT is very convenient for the range of 10 - 2500 G). Atoms are confined in a nanometric thin cell (NTC) with the thickness L = λ, where λ is the resonant wavelength 794 nm for Rb D 1 line. Narrow velocity selective optical pumping (VSOP) resonances in the transmission spectrum of the NTC are split into several components in a magnetic field with the frequency positions and transition probabilities depending on the B-field. Possible applications are described, such as magnetometers with nanometric local spatial resolution and tunable atomic frequency references.

  7. High temperature and high pressure gas cell for quantitative spectroscopic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Fateev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A high temperature and high pressure gas cell (HTPGC) has been manufactured for quantitative spectroscopic measurements in the pressure range 1-200 bar and temperature range 300-1300 K. In the present work the cell was employed at up to 100 bar and 1000 K, and measured absorption coefficients...

  8. Electrocatalysis and electrocatalysts for low temperature fuel cells: fundamentals, state of the art, research and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendt Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with electrocatalysis and electrocatalysts for low temperature fuel cells and also with established means and methods in electrocatalyst research, development and characterization. The intention is to inform about the fundamentals, state of the art, research and development of noble metal electrocatalysts for fuel cells operating at low temperatures.

  9. Spatially-resolved current and impedance analysis of a stirred tank reactor and serpentine fuel cell flow-field at low relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Warren H. J.; Steiner, Johannes; Benziger, Jay B.; Hakenjos, Alex

    A 20 cm 2 segmented anode fuel cell is used to investigate the performance of a hydrogen-air fuel cell at 1 atm. with two different flow-fields using spatially-resolved current and impedance measurements. A self-draining stirred tank reactor (STR) fuel cell and a single-channel serpentine fuel cell are compared with humidified and dry feed conditions. The current density distribution, impedance distribution, heat distribution and water evolution are compared for the two different flow-fields. With inlet feed dew points of 30 °C, the STR fuel cell and serpentine system performed comparably with moderate current gradients. With drier feeds, however, the STR fuel cell exhibited superior overall performance in terms of a higher total current and lower current, impedance and temperature distribution gradients. The STR fuel cell design is superior to a single-channel serpentine design under dry conditions because its open channel design allows the feed gases to mix with the product water and auto-humidify the cell.

  10. Influence of high-pressure-low-temperature treatment on the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Shen; G. Urrutia Benet; S. Brul; D. Knorr

    2005-01-01

    High pressure inactivation processes, especially at subzero temperatures, were performed on Bacillus subtilis vegetative cells at various pressure, temperature and time combinations. Whilst atmospheric pressure, lowering the temperature for various periods to as low as 45 -C was found to have minor

  11. Photorespiration and temperature dependence of oxygen evolution in tomato plants monitored by open photoacoustic cell technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Luna, M.; Madueño, L.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Sosa, M.; González-Solís, J. L.; Sánchez-Rocha, S.; Olalde-Portugal, V.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Campos, P.

    2003-01-01

    The open photoacoustic cell was used to monitor the evolution rate of oxygen from tomato leaves. Estimates of the relative amount of released oxygen in vivo and in situ conditions as influenced by ambient temperature are being presented. Photorespiration phenomenon is shown to dominate above a critical temperature. The evolution of this critical point is analyzed as a function of the environmental temperature.

  12. 利用时空Kriging进行气温插值研究%Interpolation of Temperature Based on Spatial-temporal Kriging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莎; 舒红; 徐正全

    2012-01-01

    A kind of integrated covariance(variogram) model is introduced for spatial-temporal Kriging interpolation of monthly average temperature of 37 years in Heilongjiang province.As monthly average temperature display obvious seasonal change,seasonal part is removed before interpolation.Spatial-temporal variogram is built based on the ones of pure space and pure time.Extending ordinary Kriging into space-time and considering variable's correlation both in space and time,the monthly average temperatures of all stations in 2007 are estimated,and the effect is compared with spatial Kriging's.The result shows that spatial-temporal interpolation is practical,and its accuracy is better than that of spatial Kriging.%以黑龙江省近37a的月均气温数据为研究对象,介绍了一类积分式时空协方差(变异)函数模型进行时空Kriging插值。针对月均气温呈现出的明显季节变化,对各站点的气温进行去季节项处理,并在此基础上建立时空变异函数。将空间维的普通Kriging插值扩展至时空维,同时考虑空间和时间相关性对研究变量进行时空估计,并将估计结果与空间Kriging插值效果进行了比较。结果表明,时空插值效果理想,插值精度较空间Kriging更高。

  13. Comparison of temperature distributions inside a PEM fuel cell with parallel and interdigitated gas distributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J. J.; Liu, S. J.

    A comparison of the temperature distributions in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell between the parallel-flow gas distributors and the interdigitated gas distributor has been discussed in detail. An electrochemical-thermal coupled numerical model in a five-layer membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) is developed. The temperatures for the reactant fuels as well as the carbon fibers in the porous electrode are predicted by using a CFD technique. The overpotential across the MEA is varied to examine its effect on the temperature distributions of the PEM fuel cell. It is found that both the fuel temperature and the carbon fiber temperature are increased with increasing the total overpotential. In addition, the fuel and carbon-fiber temperature distributions are significantly affected by the flow pattern that cast on the gas distributor. Replacing the parallel-flow gas distributor by the interdigitated gas distributor will increase the local maximum temperature inside the PEM fuel cell.

  14. Spatial distribution of human neocortical neurons and glial cells according to sex and age measured by the saucer method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Anette Kirstine; Petersen, A O; Gardi, Jonathan Eyal

    2007-01-01

    a proportion of a suitable size to have a reasonable relationship between workload and the information obtained. In this paper the method is used on vertical sections to investigate the spatial distribution of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglial cells, endothelial cells and secondary neurons around...... primary neurons in the human neocortex (divided into frontal-, temporal-, parietal- and occipital cortex) of young and old subjects free of neurological or psychological disease to test if age and gender has any influence on the cell distribution in human neocortex. Plots of the spatial distribution......A new stereological probe, the saucer, was used for estimating three-dimensional (3D) spatial distributions of particles around particles. The advantages of the saucer include that the measurements and the results are in 3D and the size and design of the probe enables the investigator to sample...

  15. Determining intracellular temperature at single-cell levelby a novel thermocouple method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changling Wang; Ruizhi Xu; Wenj uan Tian; Xiaoli Jiang; Zhengyu Cui; Meng Wang; Huaming Sun; Kun Fang; Ning Gu

    2011-01-01

    Dear Editor,Living cells can change their intramembranous temperature during cell activities such as division,gene expression,enzyme reaction,and metabolism [1,2].Moreover,under external stimuli,such as drugs or other signals,cells may quickly change their metabolic activities,leading to acute variation of intracellular temperatures from the normal state [3,4].However,such temperature change inside cells is usually at a small scale and is of transient nature due to the thermo-influence by the extracellular environment,rendering it rather difficult to measure using the conventional temperature detection methods.Thus,a more precise and faster-response thermometer is needed to measure single-cell temperature changes in real time,which may constitute a new layer of cellular information for studies of cellular signaling,and even clinical diagnosis and therapy.

  16. MOnthly TEmperature DAtabase of Spain 1951-2010: MOTEDAS (2): The Correlation Decay Distance (CDD) and the spatial variability of maximum and minimum monthly temperature in Spain during (1981-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Nicola; Peña-Angulo, Dhais; Simolo, Claudia; Stepanek, Peter; Brunetti, Michele; Gonzalez-Hidalgo, José Carlos

    2014-05-01

    One of the key point in the develop of the MOTEDAS dataset (see Poster 1 MOTEDAS) in the framework of the HIDROCAES Project (Impactos Hidrológicos del Calentamiento Global en España, Spanish Ministery of Research CGL2011-27574-C02-01) is the reference series for which no generalized metadata exist. In this poster we present an analysis of spatial variability of monthly minimum and maximum temperatures in the conterminous land of Spain (Iberian Peninsula, IP), by using the Correlation Decay Distance function (CDD), with the aim of evaluating, at sub-regional level, the optimal threshold distance between neighbouring stations for producing the set of reference series used in the quality control (see MOTEDAS Poster 1) and the reconstruction (see MOREDAS Poster 3). The CDD analysis for Tmax and Tmin was performed calculating a correlation matrix at monthly scale between 1981-2010 among monthly mean values of maximum (Tmax) and minimum (Tmin) temperature series (with at least 90% of data), free of anomalous data and homogenized (see MOTEDAS Poster 1), obtained from AEMEt archives (National Spanish Meteorological Agency). Monthly anomalies (difference between data and mean 1981-2010) were used to prevent the dominant effect of annual cycle in the CDD annual estimation. For each station, and time scale, the common variance r2 (using the square of Pearson's correlation coefficient) was calculated between all neighbouring temperature series and the relation between r2 and distance was modelled according to the following equation (1): Log (r2ij) = b*°dij (1) being Log(rij2) the common variance between target (i) and neighbouring series (j), dij the distance between them and b the slope of the ordinary least-squares linear regression model applied taking into account only the surrounding stations within a starting radius of 50 km and with a minimum of 5 stations required. Finally, monthly, seasonal and annual CDD values were interpolated using the Ordinary Kriging with a

  17. Moissanite-anvil cells for the electrical transport measurements at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomo, Shusuke; Tozer, Stanley W.

    2010-03-01

    We have successfully measured the Hall effect of a single crystal of a high temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 in moissanite-anvil high pressure cells. A pressure cell with new Zylon-gasket and wiring arrangement survived under pressure up to at least 5 GPa. Pressure which was clamped at room temperature increased with lowering the temperature down to below 60 K by a factor of 1.3-1.4.

  18. Moissanite-anvil cells for the electrical transport measurements at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yomo, Shusuke [School of Biological Science and Engineering, Tokai University, Minami-ku, Sapporo 005-8601 (Japan); Tozer, Stanley W, E-mail: yomo@tokai-u.j [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL 32310-3706 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    We have successfully measured the Hall effect of a single crystal of a high temperature superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} in moissanite-anvil high pressure cells. A pressure cell with new Zylon-gasket and wiring arrangement survived under pressure up to at least 5 GPa. Pressure which was clamped at room temperature increased with lowering the temperature down to below 60 K by a factor of 1.3-1.4.

  19. Thermal Stability of GaAs Solar Cells for High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yukun; Faucher, Joseph; Jung, Daehwan; Vaisman, Michelle; McPheeters, Clay; Sharps, Paul; Perl, Emmett; Simon, John; Steiner, Myles; Friedman, Daniel; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2016-11-21

    The characteristics of GaAs solar cells after 200 hours of annealing at 400-450 degrees C are reported. The room-temperature reflectivity and external quantum efficiency (EQE) are unchanged after such heat treatments, and peak EQE values of 90% are observed both before and after. At an operating temperature of 400 degrees C, the performance of annealed cells was only slightly worse than cells that had not undergone any annealing; Voc = 0.55 V and FF = 66% were demonstrated for annealed cells tested at 400 degrees C under strong optical injection. These results constitute a promising first step towards photovoltaic applications that demand stable operation at elevated temperatures.

  20. Modelling and Evaluation of Heating Strategies for High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on two different cathode air cooled high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stacks; a 30 cell 400W prototype stack using two bipolar plates per cell, and a 65 cell 1 kW commercial stack using one bipolar plate per cell. The work seeks to examine the use of different...... heating strategies and find a strategy suited for fast startup of the HTPEM fuel cell stacks. Fast start-up of these high temperature systems enables use in a wide range of applications, such as automotive and auxiliary power units, where immediate system response is needed. The development of a dynamic...... model to simulate the temperature development of a fuel cell stack during heating can be used for assistance in system and control design. The heating strategies analyzed and tested reduced the startup time of one of the fuel cell stacks from 1 h to about 6 min....

  1. Spatial Organization of the Cytoskeleton enhances Cargo Delivery to Specific Target Areas on the Plasma Membrane of Spherical Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Hafner, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular transport is vital for the proper functioning and survival of a cell. Cargo (proteins, vesicles, organelles, etc.) is transferred from its place of creation to its target locations via molecular motor assisted transport along cytoskeletal filaments. The transport efficiency is strongly affected by the spatial organization of the cytoskeleton, which constitutes an inhomogeneous, complex network. In cells with a centrosome microtubules grow radially from the central microtubule organizing center towards the cell periphery whereas actin filaments form a dense meshwork, the actin cortex, underneath the cell membrane with a broad range of orientations. The emerging ballistic motion along filaments is frequently interrupted due to constricting intersection nodes or cycles of detachment and reattachment processes in the crowded cytoplasm. In order to investigate the efficiency of search strategies established by the cell's specific spatial organization of the cytoskeleton we formulate a random velocity...

  2. Impact of temperature on performance of series and parallel connected mono-crystalline silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Chander

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on impact of temperature on the performance of series and parallel connected mono-crystalline silicon (mono-Si solar cell employing solar simulator. The experiment was carried out at constant light intensity 550 W/m2with cell temperature in the range 25–60 oC for single, series and parallel connected mono-Si solar cells. The performance parameters like open circuit voltage, maximum power, fill factor and efficiency are found to decrease with cell temperature while the short circuit current is observed to increase. The experimental results reveal that silicon solar cells connected in series and parallel combinations follow the Kirchhoff’s laws and the temperature has a significant effect on the performance parameters of solar cell.

  3. Scale Effect of Errors on Spatialization of Annual Mean Air Temperature Data%多年平均气温数据空间化误差的尺度效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖顺宝; 张赛

    2014-01-01

    Spatialization of attribute data is a way to output grid data products from vector data. It is beneficial to integrated analysis of geosciences data from various sources and in different formats. However, it is also a pro-cess companied with errors, and the errors are closely related to density of data sources, spatializing models and resolution of grid cells. In this paper, 7 levels of density of meteorological stations, 5 spatializing models and 19 levels of resolutions of grid cells were used to analyze the relationships between the errors of annual mean air temperature data spatialization and these affecting factors. The following conclusions were drawn:(a) Reduction of density of meteorological stations led to increasing of the spatialization errors. (b) Of the five models, Adjust-ed IDW, Regression and Anusplin had higher accuracy than IDW and Kriging. The reason is that both IDW and Kriging are spatial autocorrelation based interpolation methods. They neglect influence of underlying surface on air temperature. But, elevation factor is taken into account for Adjusted IDW, Regression and Anusplin. There-fore higher accuracy can be gained with the three interpolation methods. (c) The accuracy generally decreased with increasing of size of grid cells. The trend was significant especially for Adjusted IDW, Regression and Anusplin. (d) Of the three kinds of factors affecting accuracy of spatialization, the models had the greatest im-pact on the accuracy, the resolution of grid cells second and the density of meteorological stations the lowest. (e) For spatialization products of annual mean air temperature data at national scale, some spatial hetero-correlation interpolation methods, such as Adjusted IDW, Regress and Anusplin should be applied, and the size of grid cells should be smaller than ten kilometers by ten kilometers. In such a case, the mean absolute error for spatialization can be less than one degree centigrade. At last, a quantitative multiple

  4. Optimized LTE Cell Planning with Varying Spatial and Temporal User Densities

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-03-09

    Base station deployment in cellular networks is one of the fundamental problems in network design. This paper proposes a novel method for the cell planning problem for the fourth generation (4G) cellular networks using meta-heuristic algorithms. In this approach, we aim to satisfy both cell coverage and capacity constraints simultaneously by formulating an optimization problem that captures practical planning aspects. The starting point of the planning process is defined through a dimensioning exercise that captures both coverage and capacity constraints. Afterwards, we implement a meta-heuristic algorithm based on swarm intelligence (e.g., particle swarm optimization or the recently-proposed grey wolf optimizer) to find suboptimal base station locations that satisfy both problem constraints in the area of interest which can be divided into several subareas with different spatial user densities. Subsequently, an iterative approach is executed to eliminate eventual redundant base stations. We also perform Monte Carlo simulations to study the performance of the proposed scheme and compute the average number of users in outage. Next, the problems of green planning with regards to temporal traffic variation and planning with location constraints due to tight limits on electromagnetic radiations are addressed, using the proposed method. Finally, in our simulation results, we apply our proposed approach for different scenarios with different subareas and user distributions and show that the desired network quality of service targets are always reached even for large-scale problems.

  5. An improved procedure for subcellular spatial alignment during live-cell CLEM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin S Padman

    Full Text Available Live-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM offers unique insights into the ultrastructure of dynamic cellular processes. A critical and technically challenging part of CLEM is the 3-dimensional relocation of the intracellular region of interest during sample processing. We have developed a simple CLEM procedure that uses toner particles from a laser printer as orientation marks. This facilitates easy tracking of a region of interest even by eye throughout the whole procedure. Combined with subcellular fluorescence markers for the plasma membrane and nucleus, the toner particles allow for precise subcellular spatial alignment of the optical and electron microscopy data sets. The toner-based reference grid is printed and transferred onto a polymer film using a standard office printer and laminator. We have also designed a polymer film holder that is compatible with most inverted microscopes, and have validated our strategy by following the ultrastructure of mitochondria that were selectively photo-irradiated during live-cell microscopy. In summary, our inexpensive and robust CLEM procedure simplifies optical imaging, without limiting the choice of optical microscope.

  6. Spatially Resolved Cathodoluminescence of CdTe Thin Films and Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, M. J.; Metzger, W.; Gessert, T. A.; Albin, D. S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2003-05-01

    We have investigated the spatial distribution of different transitions identified in the emission spectra of CdTe thin films and solar cells by cathodoluminescence spectroscopic imaging (CLSI). Prior to back-contact deposition, the spectra are dominated by excitons (X) and donor-to-acceptor (DAP) transitions. After contacting, Cu acceptor states are found in addition to the X and DAP recombination processes. A very systematic behavior found in CdTe is that DAP transitions occur preferentially at grain boundaries (GBs). The distribution of these states responsible for the passivation of GBs is not affected by further processing, although additional levels participate in the recombination process. We believe that this stability is one of the reasons for the success of thin-film CdTe solar cells. Estimates of the densities of different donors and acceptors participating in the recombination process are possible from the analysis of the evolution of the emission spectra with the excitation level. It is found that the back contact suppresses some intrinsic acceptors (associated with the A center) near the back-contact interface and, therefore, Cu acceptor states should be responsible for the p-typeness of the back surface more than a reduction of compensation. CLSI measurements are shown to be helpful in understanding the physics of back-contact formation.

  7. Low Temperature Affects Stem Cell Maintenance in Brassica oleracea Seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, de Jennifer; Kodde, Jan; Severing, Edouard I.; Bonnema, Guusje; Angenent, Gerco C.; Immink, Richard G.H.; Groot, Steven P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the above ground tissues in higher plants originate from stem cells located in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several plant species can suffer from spontaneous stem cell arrest resulting in lack of further shoot development. In Brassica oleracea this SAM arrest is known as blindness and oc

  8. [Effect of temperature on the duration of mitosis in mammalian cells cultivated outside the body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushkov, F V; Smirnova, T M; Savik, Z F

    1978-02-01

    Nine cell strains of different origin were cultivated at 28--36 degrees with the interval of 2 degrees. During the phase of logarithmic culture growth, the duration of mitosis (Tm) was determined by means of colchicine method. A strict temperatural dependence Tm, obeyed to Arrenius' law was revealed. Temperature range within which Arreinius' law is valid in different cell strains is not alike. Cultivation of L cells and connective tissue cells from Chinese hamster to 39, 41and 42 degrees demonstrated their upper critical point Tm to be for L cells 39 degrees, for connective tissue cells from the Chinese hamster--41 degrees. Electron microscopic investigations demonstrated that cell cultivation within physiological (mitosis destroying) range of temperatures does not notably effect their ultrastructural organization.

  9. Real Time Monitoring of Temperature of a Micro Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Chuang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon micro-hole arrays (Si-MHA were fabricated as a gas diffusion layer (GDL in a micro fuel cell using the micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS fabrication technique. The resistance temperature detector (RTD sensor was integrated with the GDL on a bipolar plate to measure the temperature inside the fuel cell. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature was generally linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity were within 0.5 °C and 1.68×10-3/°C, respectively. The best experimental performance was 9.37 mW/cm2 at an H2/O2 dry gas flow rate of 30/30 SCCM. Fuel cell temperature during operation was 27 °C, as measured using thermocouples in contact with the backside of the electrode. Fuel cell operating temperature measured in situ was 30.5 °C.

  10. Temperature propagation in prismatic lithium-ion-cells after short term thermal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Pamina; Liebig, Gerd; Komsiyska, Lidiya; Wittstock, Gunther

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a 3D model based on the thermal material characteristics of an automotive prismatic Li-NiMnCoO2 (NMC) cell was created in COMSOL Multiphysics® in order to simulate the temperature propagation in the cell during short term thermal stress. The thermal characteristics of the battery components were experimentally determined via laser flash analysis (LFA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and used as an input parameter for the models. In order to validate the modelling approach, an experimental setup was built to measure the temperature propagation during thermal stresses within a dummy cell, equipped with temperature sensors. After validating, the model is used to describe the temperature propagation after a short-term temperature stress on automotive prismatic lithium-ion cells, simulating welding of the contact leads.

  11. On the potential of solar cells to efficiently operate at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitouny, Joya; Lalau, Noémie; Katz, Eugene A.; Dollet, Alain; Vossier, Alexis

    2017-09-01

    The development of high temperature CPV/thermal (CSP) hybrid systems appears to be a promising route to improve the overall solar to electricity conversion efficiency. Moreover, such systems would not only use the residual heat stemming from the unconverted fraction of the incident solar radiation in PV cells, but they would also provide the advantage of storing energy as heat. However, the performances of such hybrid systems depend strongly on the temperature of the thermal receivers which are only effective at high temperatures (typically above 250°C) while solar cells typically operate at temperatures close to ambient. An appropriate strategy is to make PV cells efficiently operate at temperature levels significantly exceeding the normal range of temperatures for which they are commonly designed. The degradation of electrical performance associated with high working temperature is less pronounced when the cell is submitted to high sunlight concentrations. An efficient photovoltaic conversion at temperature levels exceeding the ambient may however require significant modifications in the architecture of the cells. In this work, we assessed the feasibility of this strategy by studying the electrical properties as well as the overall efficiency of the PV/CSP system at different temperatures and sunlight illuminations.

  12. Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Sohal

    2009-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on “Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation,” held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: • Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) • Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

  13. A Simple Method for Determining the Temperature Coefficient of Voltaic Cell Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saieed, Alfred E.; Davies, Keith M.

    1996-10-01

    Although use of the Nernst equation to illustrate the dependence of cell potential on half-cell concentrations is routinely covered in first-year college chemistry and high school AP chemistry classes, the temperature dependence of cell voltages is rarely encountered outside of the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory. Even there, its coverage is somewhat limited because of the cost and sophistication of the instrumentation required. This article describes a relatively simple method for preparing voltaic cells, and through their temperature coefficient, _Eo/_T, it explores relationships between DeltaGo, DeltaHo and DeltaSo for the cell reactions involved.

  14. Ultrasound Technologies for the Spatial Patterning of Cells and Extracellular Matrix Proteins and the Vascularization of Engineered Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Kelley A.

    Technological advancements in the field of tissue engineering could save the lives of thousands of organ transplant patients who die each year while waiting for donor organs. Currently, two of the primary challenges preventing tissue engineers from developing functional replacement tissues and organs are the need to recreate complex cell and extracellular microenvironments and to vascularize the tissue to maintain cell viability and function. Ultrasound is a form of mechanical energy that can noninvasively and nondestructively interact with tissues at the cell and protein level. In this thesis, novel ultrasound-based technologies were developed for the spatial patterning of cells and extracellular matrix proteins and the vascularization of three-dimensional engineered tissue constructs. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields were utilized to noninvasively control the spatial organization of cells and cell-bound extracellular matrix proteins within collagen-based engineered tissue. Additionally, ultrasound induced thermal mechanisms were exploited to site-specifically pattern various extracellular matrix collagen microstructures within a single engineered tissue construct. Finally, ultrasound standing wave field technology was used to promote the rapid and extensive vascularization of three-dimensional tissue constructs. As such, the ultrasound technologies developed in these studies have the potential to provide the field of tissue engineering with novel strategies to spatially pattern cells and extracellular matrix components and to vascularize engineered tissue, and thus, could advance the fabrication of functional replacement tissues and organs in the field of tissue engineering.

  15. Solar Cell Temperature Dependent Efficiency and Very High Temperature Efficiency Limits

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Clean renewable solar energy is and will continue to be a critically important source of electrical energy. Solar energy has the potential of meeting all of the world's energy needs, and has seen substantial growth in recent years. Solar cells can convert sun light directly into electrical energy, and much progress has been made in making them less expensive and more efficient. Solar cells are often characterized and modeled at 25 °C, which is significantly lower than their peak operating tem...

  16. Temperature effect on proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells from turkeys with different growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D L; Coy, C S; Strasburg, G M; Reed, K M; Velleman, S G

    2016-04-01

    Poultry selected for growth have an inefficient thermoregulatory system and are more sensitive to temperature extremes. Satellite cells are precursors to skeletal muscle and mediate all posthatch muscle growth. Their physiological functions are affected by temperature. The objective of the current study was to determine how temperature affects satellite cells isolated from the pectoralis major (p. major) muscle (breast muscle) of turkeys selected for increased 16 wk body weight (F line) in comparison to a randombred control line (RBC2) from which the F line originated. Pectoralis major muscle satellite cells were thermally challenged by culturing between 33°C and 43°C to analyze the effects of cold and heat on proliferation and differentiation as compared to control temperature of 38°C. Expression levels of myogenic regulatory factors: myogenic differentiation factor 1 (MYOD1) and myogenin (MYOG) were quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). At all sampling times, proliferation increased at a linear rate across temperature in both the RBC2 and F lines. Differentiation also increased at a linear rate across temperature from 33 to 41°C at all sampling times in both the F and RBC2 lines. Satellite cells isolated from F line turkeys were more sensitive to both hot and cold temperatures as proliferation and differentiation increased to a greater extent across temperature (33 to 43°C) when compared with the RBC2 line. Expression of MYOD1 and MYOG increased as temperatures increased from 33 to 41°C at all sampling times in both the F and RBC2 lines. These results demonstrate that satellite cell function is sensitive to both cold and hot temperatures and p. major muscle satellite cells from F line turkeys are more sensitive to temperature extremes than RBC2 satellite cells.

  17. Bone marrow dosimetry via microCT imaging and stem cell spatial mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielar, Kayla N.

    In order to make predictions of radiation dose in patients undergoing targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer, an accurate model of skeletal tissues is necessary. Concerning these tissues, the dose-limiting factor in these therapies is the toxicity of the hematopoietically active bone marrow. In addition to acute effects, one must be concerned as well with long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced leukemia. Particular cells of interest for both toxicity and cancer risk are the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), found within the active marrow regions of the skeleton. At present, cellular-level dosimetry models are complex, and thus we cannot model individual stem cells in an anatomic model of the patient. As a result, one reverts to looking at larger tissue regions where these cell populations may reside. To provide a more accurate marrow dose assessment, the skeletal dosimetry model must also be patient-specific. That is, it should be designed to match as closely as possible to the patient undergoing treatment. Absorbed dose estimates then can be tailored based on the skeletal size and trabecular microstructure of an individual for an accurate prediction of marrow toxicity. Thus, not only is it important to accurately model the target tissues of interest in a normal patient, it is important to do so for differing levels of marrow health. A skeletal dosimetry model for the adult female was provided for better predictions of marrow toxicity in patients undergoing radionuclide therapy. This work is the first fully established gender specific model for these applications, and supersedes previous models in scalability of the skeleton and radiation transport methods. Furthermore, the applicability of using bone marrow biopsies was deemed sufficient in prediction of bone marrow health, specifically for the hematopoietic stem cell population. The location and concentration of the HSC in bone marrow was found to follow a spatial gradient from the bone trabeculae

  18. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    in detail; however, due to different operating conditions it is not straightforward to link the chemical and the electrochemical environment. The largest differences reflect in (1) the oxidation state of the surface (the oxygen species coverage), (2) temperature and (3) the possibility of platinum...

  19. Optimization of solar cells for air mass zero operation and a study of solar cells at high temperatures, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovel, H.; Woodall, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Crystal growth procedures, fabrication techniques, and theoretical analysis were developed in order to make GaAlAs-GaAs solar cell structures which exhibit high performance at air mass 0 illumination and high temperature conditions.

  20. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells - Degradation and Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon

    A harmonious mix of renewable and alternative energy sources, including fuel cells is necessary to mitigate problems associated with the current fossil fuel based energy system, like air pollution, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, and economic dependence on oil, and therefore on unstable areas...... of the globe. Fuel cells can harness the excess energy from other renewable sources, such as the big players in the renewable energy market, Photovoltaic (PV) panels and wind turbines, which inherently suffer from intermittency problems. The excess energy can be used to produce hydrogen from water or can...... be stored in liquid alcohols such as methanol, which can be sources of hydrogen for fuel cell applications. In addition, fuel cells unlike other technologies can use a variety of other fuels that can provide a source of hydrogen, such as biogas, methane, butane, etc. More fuel flexibility combined...

  1. Investigation of Temperature and Aging Effects in Nanostructured Dye Solar Cells Studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Toivola

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of aging and cyclically varying temperature on the electrical parameters of dye solar cells were analyzed with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Photoelectrode total resistance increased as a function of time due to increasing electron transport resistance in the TiO2 film. On the other hand, photoelectrode recombination resistance was generally larger, electron lifetimes in the TiO2 were film longer, and charge transfer resistance on the counter electrode was smaller after the temperature treatments than before them. These effects correlated with the slower deterioration rate of the temperature-treated cells, in comparison to the reference cells.

  2. A scientific theory of Ars Memoriae: Spatial view cells in a continuous attractor network with linked items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Edmund T

    2017-05-01

    The art of memory (ars memoriae) used since classical times includes using a well-known scene to associate each view or part of the scene with a different item in a speech. This memory technique is also known as the "method of loci." The new theory is proposed that this type of memory is implemented in the CA3 region of the hippocampus where there are spatial view cells in primates that allow a particular view to be associated with a particular object in an event or episodic memory. Given that the CA3 cells with their extensive recurrent collateral system connecting different CA3 cells, and associative synaptic modifiability, form an autoassociation or attractor network, the spatial view cells with their approximately Gaussian view fields become linked in a continuous attractor network. As the view space is traversed continuously (e.g., by self-motion or imagined self-motion across the scene), the views are therefore successively recalled in the correct order, with no view missing, and with low interference between the items to be recalled. Given that each spatial view has been associated with a different discrete item, the items are recalled in the correct order, with none missing. This is the first neuroscience theory of ars memoriae. The theory provides a foundation for understanding how a key feature of ars memoriae, the ability to use a spatial scene to encode a sequence of items to be remembered, is implemented. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generator Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Pierre

    2007-09-30

    This report describes the results of the tubular SOFC development program from August 22, 1997 to September 30, 2007 under the Siemens/U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement. The technical areas discussed include cell manufacturing development, cell power enhancement, SOFC module and system cost reduction and technology advancement, and our field unit test program. Whereas significant progress has been made toward commercialization, significant effort remains to achieve our cost, performance and reliability targets for successful commercialization.

  4. Temperature control of growth and productivity in mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells synthesizing a recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, N; Hovey, A

    1993-11-05

    The use of a temperature switch to control the growth and productivity of temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants was investigated to extend the productive life span of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in batch culture. Bromodeoxyuridine was used at 39 degrees C to select mutagenized CHO-K1 cells, which resulted in the isolation of 31 temperature-sensitive mutants that were growth inhibited at 39 degrees C. Two of these mutants were successfully transfected with the gene for tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) using glutamine synthetase amplification, and a permanent recombinant cell line established (5G1-B1) that maintains the ts phenotype.Continuous exposure to the nonpermissive temperature (npt) of 39 degrees C led to a rapid decline in cell viability. However, a temperature regime using alternating incubations at 34 degrees C and 39 degrees C arrested the 5G1-B1 cells while retaining a high cell viability for up to 170 h in culture. The specific production rate of the growth-arrested cells was 3-4 times that of control cultures maintained at a constant 34 degrees C over the crucial 72-130-h period of culture, which resulted in a 35% increase in the maximum product yield. Glucose uptake and lactate production both decreased in arrested cells. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that 5G1-B1 cells arrested in the G(1) or G(0) phase of the cell cycle, and no major structural damage was caused to these cells by the alternating temperature regime.These results demonstrate that growth-arrested ts CHO cells have increased productivity compared to growing cultures and maintain viability for longer periods. The system offers the prospect of enhancing the productivity of recombinant mammalian cells grown in simple batch fermentors.

  5. Evaluating links between forest harvest and stream temperature threshold exceedances: the value of spatial and temporal data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremiah D. Groom; Sherri L. Johnson; Joshua D. Seeds; George G. Ice

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a replicated before-after-control-impact study on 33 streams to test the effectiveness of riparian rules for private and State forests at meeting temperature