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Sample records for cell size control

  1. Control of transcription by cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yung Wu

    Full Text Available Cell size increases significantly with increasing ploidy. Differences in cell size and ploidy are associated with alterations in gene expression, although no direct connection has been made between cell size and transcription. Here we show that ploidy-associated changes in gene expression reflect transcriptional adjustment to a larger cell size, implicating cellular geometry as a key parameter in gene regulation. Using RNA-seq, we identified genes whose expression was altered in a tetraploid as compared with the isogenic haploid. A significant fraction of these genes encode cell surface proteins, suggesting an effect of the enlarged cell size on the differential regulation of these genes. To test this hypothesis, we examined expression of these genes in haploid mutants that also produce enlarged size. Surprisingly, many genes differentially regulated in the tetraploid are identically regulated in the enlarged haploids, and the magnitude of change in gene expression correlates with the degree of size enlargement. These results indicate a causal relationship between cell size and transcription, with a size-sensing mechanism that alters transcription in response to size. The genes responding to cell size are enriched for those regulated by two mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and components in those pathways were found to mediate size-dependent gene regulation. Transcriptional adjustment to enlarged cell size could underlie other cellular changes associated with polyploidy. The causal relationship between cell size and transcription suggests that cell size homeostasis serves a regulatory role in transcriptome maintenance.

  2. MyosinV controls PTEN function and neuronal cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Michiel T; Parsons, Maddy; Downes, C Peter; Leslie, Nicholas R; Hindges, Robert; Eickholt, Britta J

    2009-10-01

    The tumour suppressor PTEN can inhibit cell proliferation and migration as well as control cell growth, in different cell types. PTEN functions predominately as a lipid phosphatase, converting PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) to PtdIns(4,5)P(2), thereby antagonizing PI(3)K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) and its established downstream effector pathways. However, much is unclear concerning the mechanisms that regulate PTEN movement to the cell membrane, which is necessary for its activity towards PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) (Refs 3, 4, 5). Here we show a requirement for functional motor proteins in the control of PI3K signalling, involving a previously unknown association between PTEN and myosinV. FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) measurements revealed that PTEN interacts directly with myosinV, which is dependent on PTEN phosphorylation mediated by CK2 and/or GSK3. Inactivation of myosinV-transport function in neurons increased cell size, which, in line with known attributes of PTEN-loss, required PI(3)K and mTor. Our data demonstrate a myosin-based transport mechanism that regulates PTEN function, providing new insights into the signalling networks regulating cell growth.

  3. Computational analysis of mammalian cell division gated by a circadian clock: quantized cell cycles and cell size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámborszky, Judit; Hong, Christian I; Csikász Nagy, Attila

    2007-12-01

    Cell cycle and circadian rhythms are conserved from cyanobacteria to humans with robust cyclic features. Recently, molecular links between these two cyclic processes have been discovered. Core clock transcription factors, Bmal1 and Clock (Clk), directly regulate Wee1 kinase, which inhibits entry into the mitosis. We investigate the effect of this connection on the timing of mammalian cell cycle processes with computational modeling tools. We connect a minimal model of circadian rhythms, which consists of transcription-translation feedback loops, with a modified mammalian cell cycle model from Novak and Tyson (2004). As we vary the mass doubling time (MDT) of the cell cycle, stochastic simulations reveal quantized cell cycles when the activity of Wee1 is influenced by clock components. The quantized cell cycles disappear in the absence of coupling or when the strength of this link is reduced. More intriguingly, our simulations indicate that the circadian clock triggers critical size control in the mammalian cell cycle. A periodic brake on the cell cycle progress via Wee1 enforces size control when the MDT is quite different from the circadian period. No size control is observed in the absence of coupling. The issue of size control in the mammalian system is debatable, whereas it is well established in yeast. It is possible that the size control is more readily observed in cell lines that contain circadian rhythms, since not all cell types have a circadian clock. This would be analogous to an ultradian clock intertwined with quantized cell cycles (and possibly cell size control) in yeast. We present the first coupled model between the mammalian cell cycle and circadian rhythms that reveals quantized cell cycles and cell size control influenced by the clock.

  4. Epidermal Patterning Genes Impose Non-cell Autonomous Cell Size Determination and have Additional Roles in Root Meristem Size Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian L?fke; Kai Dünser; Jürgen Kleine-Vehn

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of cellular growth is of vital importance for embryonic and postembryonic patterning. Growth regulation in the epidermis has importance for organ growth rates in roots and shoots, proposing epidermal cells as an interesting model for cellular growth regulation. Here we assessed whether the root epidermis is a suitable model system to address cell size determination. In Arabidopsis thaliana L., root epidermal cells are regularly spaced in neighbouring tricho-(root hair) and atrichoblast (non-hair) cells, showing already distinct cell size regulation in the root meristem. We determined cell sizes in the root meristem and at the onset of cellular elongation, revealing that not only division rates but also cellular shape is distinct in tricho-and atrichoblasts. Intriguingly, epidermal-patterning mutants, failing to define differential vacuolization in neighbouring epidermal cell files, also display non-differential growth. Using these epidermal-patterning mutants, we show that polarized growth behaviour of epidermal tricho-and atrichoblast is interdependent, suggesting non-cell autonomous signals to integrate tissue expansion. Besides the interweaved cell-type-dependent growth mechanism, we reveal an additional role for epidermal patterning genes in root meristem size and organ growth regulation. We conclude that epidermal cells represent a suitable model system to study cell size determination and interdependent tissue growth.

  5. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into pancreatic endoderm in patterned size-controlled clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Dennis; Mendelsohn, Adam D; Seerke, Rina; Desai, Tejal A; German, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Pancreatic β-cells function optimally when clustered in islet-like structures. However, nutrient and oxygen deprivation limits the viability of cells at the core of excessively large clusters. Hence, production of functional β-cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for patients with diabetes would benefit from the growth and differentiation of these cells in size-controlled aggregates. In this study, we controlled cluster size by seeding hESCs onto glass cover slips patterned by the covalent microcontact-printing of laminin in circular patches of 120 μm in diameter. These were used as substrates to grow and differentiate hESCs first into SOX17-positive/SOX7-negative definitive endoderm, after which many clusters released and formed uniformly sized three-dimensional clusters. Both released clusters and those that remained attached differentiated into HNF1β-positive primitive gut tube-like cells with high efficiency. Further differentiation yielded pancreatic endoderm-like cells that co-expressed PDX1 and NKX6.1. Controlling aggregate size allows efficient production of uniformly-clustered pancreatic endocrine precursors for in vivo engraftment or further in vitro maturation.

  6. Comparative analysis of cells and proteins of pumpkin plants for the control of fruit size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yumiko; Taniguchi, Go; Takazaki, Shinya; Oda-Ueda, Naoko; Miyahara, Kohji; Ohshima, Yasumi

    2012-09-01

    Common pumpkin plants (Cucurbita maxima) produce fruits of 1-2 kg size on the average, while special varieties of the same species called Atlantic Giant are known to produce a huge fruit up to several hundred kilograms. As an approach to determine the factors controlling the fruit size in C. maxima, we cultivated both AG and control common plants, and found that both the cell number and cell sizes were increased in a large fruit while DNA content of the cell did not change significantly. We also compared protein patterns in the leaves, stems, ripe and young fruits by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis, and identified those differentially expressed between them with mass spectroscopy. Based on these results, we suggest that factors in photosynthesis such as ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase, glycolysis pathway enzymes, heat-shock proteins and ATP synthase play positive or negative roles in the growth of a pumpkin fruit. These results provide a step toward the development of plant biotechnology to control fruit size in the future.

  7. A novel Drosophila Girdin-like protein is involved in Akt pathway control of cell size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puseenam, Aekkachai [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuhide [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Venture Laboratory, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Nagai, Rika [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Hashimoto, Reina [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Venture Laboratory, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Suyari, Osamu [Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Itoh, Masanobu [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Enomoto, Atsushi [Department of Pathology, Center for Neurological Disease and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Takahashi, Masahide [Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Department of Pathology, Center for Neurological Disease and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    The Akt signaling pathway is well known to regulate cell proliferation and growth. Girdin, a novel substrate of Akt, plays a crucial role in organization of the actin cytoskeleton and cell motility under the control of Akt. We here identified a novel Girdin-like protein in Drosophila (dGirdin), which has two isoforms, dGirdin PA and dGirdin PB. dGirdin shows high homology with human Girdin in the N-terminal and coiled-coil domains, while diverging at the C-terminal domain. On establishment of transgenic fly lines, featuring knockdown or overexpression of dGirdin in vivo, overexpression in the wing disc cells induced ectopic apoptosis, implying a role in directing apoptosis. Knockdown of dGirdin in the Drosophila wing imaginal disc cells resulted in reduction of cell size. Furthermore, this was enhanced by half reduction of the Akt gene dose, suggesting that Akt positively regulates dGirdin. In the wing disc, cells in which dGirdin was knocked down exhibited disruption of actin filaments. From these in vivo analyses, we conclude that dGirdin is required for actin organization and regulation of appropriate cell size under control of the Akt signaling pathway.

  8. Tuning the Properties of Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells by Adjusting Fullerene Size to Control Intercalation

    KAUST Repository

    Cates, Nichole C.

    2009-12-09

    We demonstrate that intercalation of fullerene derivatives between the side chains of conjugated polymers can be controlled by adjusting the fullerene size and compare the properties of intercalated and nonintercalated poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (pBTTT):fullerene blends. The intercalated blends, which exhibit optimal solar-cell performance at 1:4 polymer:fullerene by weight, have better photoluminescence quenching and lower absorption than the nonintercalated blends, which optimize at 1:1. Understanding how intercalation affects performance will enable more effective design of polymer:fullerene solar cells. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  9. Control of cell proliferation, endoreduplication, cell size, and cell death by the retinoblastoma-related pathway in maize endosperm

    KAUST Repository

    Sabelli, Paolo A.

    2013-04-22

    The endospermof cereal grains is one of the most valuable products of modern agriculture. Cereal endosperm development comprises different phases characterized by mitotic cell proliferation, endoreduplication, the accumulation of storage compounds, and programmed cell death. Although manipulation of these processes could maximize grain yield, how they are regulated and integrated is poorly understood. We show that the Retinoblastoma-related (RBR) pathway controls key aspects of endosperm development in maize. Down-regulation of RBR1 by RNAi resulted in up-regulation of RBR3-type genes, as well as the MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE 2-7 gene family and PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN, which encode essential DNA replication factors. Both the mitotic and endoreduplication cell cycles were stimulated. Developing transgenic endosperm contained 42-58% more cells and ~70% more DNA than wild type, whereas there was a reduction in cell and nuclear sizes. In addition, cell death was enhanced. The DNA content of mature endosperm increased 43% upon RBR1 downregulation, whereas storage protein content and kernel weight were essentially not affected. Down-regulation of both RBR1 and CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE A (CDKA);1 indicated that CDKA;1 is epistatic to RBR1 and controls endoreduplication through an RBR1- dependent pathway. However, the repressive activity of RBR1 on downstream targets was independent from CDKA;1, suggesting diversification of RBR1 activities. Furthermore, RBR1 negatively regulated CDK activity, suggesting the presence of a feedback loop. These results indicate that the RBR1 pathway plays a major role in regulation of different processes during maize endosperm development and suggest the presence of tissue/organlevel regulation of endosperm/seed homeostasis.

  10. The REVEILLE clock genes inhibit growth of juvenile and adult plants by control of cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jennifer A; Shalit-Kaneh, Akiva; Chu, Dalena Nhu; Hsu, Polly Yingshan; Harmer, Stacey

    2017-03-02

    The circadian clock is a complex regulatory network that enhances plant growth and fitness in a constantly changing environment. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the clock is comprised of numerous regulatory feedback loops in which REVEILLE8 (RVE8) and its homologs RVE4 and RVE6 act in a partially redundant manner to promote clock pace. Here, we report that the remaining members of the RVE8 clade, RVE3 and RVE5, play only minor roles in regulation of clock function. However, we find that RVE8 clade proteins have unexpected functions in modulation of light input to the clock and control of plant growth at multiple stages of development. In seedlings, these proteins repress hypocotyl elongation in a day-length and sucrose dependent manner. Strikingly, adult rve4 6 8 and rve3 4 5 6 8 mutants are much larger than wild type, with both increased leaf area and biomass. This size phenotype is associated with a faster growth rate and larger cell size and is not simply due to a delay in the transition to flowering. Gene expression and epistasis analysis reveal that the growth phenotypes of rve mutants are due to misregulation of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) and PIF5 expression. Our results shows that even small changes in PIF gene expression caused by perturbation of clock gene function can have large effects on the growth of adult plants.

  11. Environmental control of the Pom1-dependent cell-size regulation pathway in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Kelkar, M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells couple their growth and division rate in response to nutrient availability to maintain a constant size. This co-ordination happens either at the G1-S or the G2-M transition of the cell cycle. In the rod-shaped fission yeast, size regulation happens at the G2-M transition prior to mitotic commitment. Recent studies have focused on the role of the DYRK-family protein kinase Pom1, which forms gradients emanating from cell poles and inhibits the mitotic activator kinase Cdr2, present at the...

  12. Lateral inhibition-induced pattern formation controlled by the size and geometry of the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-09-01

    Pattern formation in development biology is one of the fundamental processes by which cells change their functions. It is based on the communication of cells via intra- and intercellular dynamics of biochemicals. Thus, the cell is directly involved in biochemical interactions. However, many theoretical approaches describing biochemical pattern formation have usually neglected the cell's role or have simplified the subcellular process without considering cellular aspects despite the cell being the environment where biochemicals interact. On the other hand, recent experimental observations suggest that a change in the physical conditions of cell-to-cell contact can result in a change in cell fate and tissue patterning in a lateral inhibition system. Here we develop a mathematical model by which biochemical dynamics can be directly observed with explicitly expressed cell structure and geometry in higher dimensions, and reconsider pattern formation by lateral inhibition of the Notch-Delta signaling pathway. We explore how the physical characteristic of cell, such as cell geometry or size, influences the biochemical pattern formation in a multi-cellular system. Our results suggest that a property based on cell geometry can be a novel mechanism for symmetry breaking inducing cell asymmetry. We show that cell volume can critically influence cell fate determination and pattern formation at the tissue level, and the surface area of the cell-to-cell contact can directly affect the spatial range of patterning.

  13. Copper nitride nanocubes: size-controlled synthesis and application as cathode catalyst in alkaline fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haibin; Chen, Wei

    2011-10-05

    Copper nitride nanocubes are synthesized in a facile one-phase process. The crystal size could be tuned easily by using different primary amines as capping agents. Such Pt-free nanocrystals exhibit electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction and appear to be promising cathodic electrocatalysts in alkaline fuel cells.

  14. The BAR Domain Protein PICK1 Controls Vesicle Number and Size in Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Pinheiro, Paulo César; Jansen, Anna M; de Wit, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Protein Interacting with C Kinase 1 (PICK1) is a Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain protein involved in AMPA receptor trafficking. Here, we identify a selective role for PICK1 in the biogenesis of large, dense core vesicles (LDCVs) in mouse chromaffin cells. PICK1 colocalized with syntaxin-6......, a marker for immature granules. In chromaffin cells isolated from a PICK1 knockout (KO) mouse the amount of exocytosis was reduced, while release kinetics and Ca(2+) sensitivity were unaffected. Vesicle-fusion events had a reduced frequency and released lower amounts of transmitter per vesicle (i.......e., reduced quantal size). This was paralleled by a reduction in the mean single-vesicle capacitance, estimated by averaging time-locked capacitance traces. EM confirmed that LDCVs were fewer and of markedly reduced size in the PICK1 KO, demonstrating that all phenotypes can be explained by reductions...

  15. Physalis floridana Cell Number Regulator1 encodes a cell membrane-anchored modulator of cell cycle and negatively controls fruit size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhichao; He, Chaoying

    2015-01-01

    Physalis species show a significant variation in berry size; however, the underlying molecular basis is unknown. In this work, we showed that cell division difference in the ovaries might contribute to the ultimate berry size variation within Physalis species, and that mRNA abundance of Physalis floridana Cell Number Regulator1 (PfCNR1), the putative orthologue of the tomato fruit weight 2.2 (FW2.2), was negatively correlated with cell division in the ovaries. Moreover, heterochronic expression variation of the PfCNR1 genes in the ovaries concomitantly correlated with berry weight variation within Physalis species. In transgenic Physalis, multiple organ sizes could be negatively controlled by altering PfCNR1 levels, and cell division instead of cell expansion was primarily affected. PfCNR1 was shown to be anchored in the plasma membrane and to interact with PfAG2 (an AGAMOUS-like protein determining ovary identity). The expression of PfCYCD2;1, a putative orthologue of the mitosis-specific gene CyclinD2;1 in the cell cycle was negatively correlated with the PfCNR1 mRNA levels. PfAG2 was found to selectively bind to the CArG-box in the PfCYCD2;1 promoter and to repress PfCYCD2;1 expression, thus suggesting a PfAG2-mediated pathway for PfCNR1 to regulate cell division. The interaction of PfCNR1 with PfAG2 enhanced the repression of PfCYCD2;1 expression. The nuclear import of PfAG2 was essential in the proposed pathway. Our data provide new insights into the developmental pathways of a cell membrane-anchored protein that modulates cell division and governs organ size determination. This study also sheds light on the link between organ identity and organ growth in plants.

  16. XIAO is involved in the control of organ size by contributing to the regulation of signaling and homeostasis of brassinosteroids and cell cycling in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunhe; Bao, Liang; Jeong, So-Yoon; Kim, Seong-Ki; Xu, Caiguo; Li, Xianghua; Zhang, Qifa

    2012-05-01

    Organ size is determined by cell number and size, and involves two fundamental processes: cell proliferation and cell expansion. Although several plant hormones are known to play critical roles in shaping organ size by regulating the cell cycle, it is not known whether brassinosteroids (BRs) are also involved in regulating cell division. Here we identified a rice T-DNA insertion mutant for organ size, referred to as xiao, that displays dwarfism and erect leaves, typical BR-related phenotypes, together with reduced seed setting. XIAO is predicted to encode an LRR kinase. The small stature of the xiao mutant resulted from reduced organ sizes due to decreased cell numbers resulting from reduced cell division rate, as supported by the observed co-expression of XIAO with a number of genes involved in cell cycling. The xiao mutant displayed a tissue-specific enhanced BR response and greatly reduced BR contents at the whole-plant level. These results indicated that XIAO is a regulator of BR signaling and cell division. Thus, XIAO may provide a possible connection between BRs and cell-cycle regulation in controlling organ growth.

  17. Cell number regulator genes in Prunus provide candidate genes for the control of fruit size in sweet and sour cherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franceschi, P; Stegmeir, T; Cabrera, A; van der Knaap, E; Rosyara, U R; Sebolt, A M; Dondini, L; Dirlewanger, E; Quero-Garcia, J; Campoy, J A; Iezzoni, A F

    2013-01-01

    Striking increases in fruit size distinguish cultivated descendants from small-fruited wild progenitors for fleshy fruited species such as Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Prunus spp. (peach, cherry, plum, and apricot). The first fruit weight gene identified as a result of domestication and selection was the tomato FW2.2 gene. Members of the FW2.2 gene family in corn (Zea mays) have been named CNR (Cell Number Regulator) and two of them exert their effect on organ size by modulating cell number. Due to the critical roles of FW2.2/CNR genes in regulating cell number and organ size, this family provides an excellent source of candidates for fruit size genes in other domesticated species, such as those found in the Prunus genus. A total of 23 FW2.2/CNR family members were identified in the peach genome, spanning the eight Prunus chromosomes. Two of these CNRs were located within confidence intervals of major quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously discovered on linkage groups 2 and 6 in sweet cherry (Prunus avium), named PavCNR12 and PavCNR20, respectively. An analysis of haplotype, sequence, segregation and association with fruit size strongly supports a role of PavCNR12 in the sweet cherry linkage group 2 fruit size QTL, and this QTL is also likely present in sour cherry (P. cerasus). The finding that the increase in fleshy fruit size in both tomato and cherry associated with domestication may be due to changes in members of a common ancestral gene family supports the notion that similar phenotypic changes exhibited by independently domesticated taxa may have a common genetic basis.

  18. Ste12/Fab1 phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate 5-kinase is required for nitrogen-regulated mitotic commitment and cell size control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauries, Marie; Kaczmarek, Adrian; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Du, Wei; Krug, Karsten; Maček, Boris; Petersen, Janni

    2017-01-01

    Tight coupling of cell growth and cell cycle progression enable cells to adjust their rate of division, and therefore size, to the demands of proliferation in varying nutritional environments. Nutrient stress promotes inhibition of Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 (TORC1) activity. In fission yeast, reduced TORC1 activity advances mitotic onset and switches growth to a sustained proliferation at reduced cell size. A screen for mutants, that failed to advance mitosis upon nitrogen stress, identified a mutant in the PIKFYVE 1-phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate 5-kinase fission yeast homolog Ste12. Ste12PIKFYVE deficient mutants were unable to advance the cell cycle to reduce cell size after a nitrogen downshift to poor nitrogen (proline) growth conditions. While it is well established that PI(3,5)P2 signalling is required for autophagy and that Ste12PIKFYVE mutants have enlarged vacuoles (yeast lysosomes), neither a block to autophagy or mutants that independently have enlarged vacuoles had any impact upon nitrogen control of mitotic commitment. The addition of rapamycin to Ste12PIKFYVE deficient mutants reduced cell size at division to suggest that Ste12PIKFYVE possibly functions upstream of TORC1. ste12 mutants display increased Torin1 (TOR inhibitor) sensitivity. However, no major impact on TORC1 or TORC2 activity was observed in the ste12 deficient mutants. In summary, Ste12PIKFYVE is required for nitrogen-stress mediated advancement of mitosis to reduce cell size at division. PMID:28273166

  19. Towards standardisation of cell-free DNA measurement in plasma: controls for extraction efficiency, fragment size bias and quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devonshire, Alison S; Whale, Alexandra S; Gutteridge, Alice; Jones, Gerwyn; Cowen, Simon; Foy, Carole A; Huggett, Jim F

    2014-10-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is becoming an important clinical analyte for prenatal testing, cancer diagnosis and cancer monitoring. The extraction stage is critical in ensuring clinical sensitivity of analytical methods measuring minority nucleic acid fractions, such as foetal-derived sequences in predominantly maternal cfDNA. Consequently, quality controls are required for measurement of extraction efficiency, fragment size bias and yield for validation of cfDNA methods. We evaluated the utility of an external DNA spike for monitoring these parameters in a study comparing three specific cfDNA extraction methods [QIAamp circulating nucleic acid (CNA) kit, NucleoSpin Plasma XS (NS) kit and FitAmp plasma/serum DNA isolation (FA) kit] with the commonly used QIAamp DNA blood mini (DBM) kit. We found that the extraction efficiencies of the kits ranked in the order CNA kit > DBM kit > NS kit > FA kit, and the CNA and NS kits gave a better representation of smaller DNA fragments in the extract than the DBM kit. We investigated means of improved reporting of cfDNA yield by comparing quantitative PCR measurements of seven different reference gene assays in plasma samples and validating these with digital PCR. We noted that the cfDNA quantities based on measurement of some target genes (e.g. TERT) were, on average, more than twofold higher than those of other assays (e.g. ERV3). We conclude that analysis and averaging of multiple reference genes using a GeNorm approach gives a more reliable estimate of total cfDNA quantity.

  20. Random walks and cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Wheatley, D N

    2000-11-01

    For many years, it has been believed that diffusion is the principle motive force for distributing molecules within the cell. Yet, our current information about the cell makes this improbable. Furthermore, the argument that limitations responsible for the relative constancy of cell size--which seldom varies by more than a factor of 2, whereas organisms can vary in mass by up to 10(24)--are based on the limits of diffusion is questionable. This essay seeks to develop an alternative explanation based on transport of molecules along structural elements in the cytoplasm and nucleus. This mechanism can better account for cell size constancy, in light of modern biological knowledge of the complex microstructure of the cell, than simple diffusion.

  1. Molecular mechanism of size control in development and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolong Yang; Tian Xu

    2011-01-01

    How multicellular organisms control their size is a fundamental question that fascinated generations of biologists.In the past 10 years, tremendous progress has been made toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying size control. Original studies from Drosophila showed that in addition to extrinsic nutritional and hormonal cues, intrinsic mechanisms also play important roles in the control of organ size during development. Several novel signaling pathways such as insulin and Hippo-LATS signaling pathways have been identified that control organ size by regulating cell size and/or cell number through modulation of cell growth, cell division, and cell death. Later studies using mammalian cell and mouse models also demonstrated that the signaling pathways identified in flies are also conserved in mammals. Significantly, recent studies showed that dysregulation of size control plays important roles in the development of many human diseases sucha as cancer,diabetes,and hypertrophy.

  2. Micro-environmental mechanical stress controls tumor spheroid size and morphology by suppressing proliferation and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Cheng

    Full Text Available Compressive mechanical stress produced during growth in a confining matrix limits the size of tumor spheroids, but little is known about the dynamics of stress accumulation, how the stress affects cancer cell phenotype, or the molecular pathways involved.We co-embedded single cancer cells with fluorescent micro-beads in agarose gels and, using confocal microscopy, recorded the 3D distribution of micro-beads surrounding growing spheroids. The change in micro-bead density was then converted to strain in the gel, from which we estimated the spatial distribution of compressive stress around the spheroids. We found a strong correlation between the peri-spheroid solid stress distribution and spheroid shape, a result of the suppression of cell proliferation and induction of apoptotic cell death in regions of high mechanical stress. By compressing spheroids consisting of cancer cells overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes, we demonstrate that mechanical stress-induced apoptosis occurs via the mitochondrial pathway.Our results provide detailed, quantitative insight into the role of micro-environmental mechanical stress in tumor spheroid growth dynamics, and suggest how tumors grow in confined locations where the level of solid stress becomes high. An important implication is that apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, induced by compressive stress, may be involved in tumor dormancy, in which tumor growth is held in check by a balance of apoptosis and proliferation.

  3. Auxin and ethylene interactions control mitotic activity of the quiescent centre, root cap size, and pattern of cap cell differentiation in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Georgina; Barlow, Peter W; Feldman, Lewis J; Cassab, Gladys I

    2005-06-01

    Root caps (RCs) are the terminal tissues of higher plant roots. In the present study the factors controlling RC size, shape and structure were examined. It was found that this control involves interactions between the RC and an adjacent population of slowly dividing cells, the quiescent centre, QC. Using the polar auxin transport inhibitor 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), the effects of QC activation on RC gene expression and border cell release was characterized. Ethylene was found to regulate RC size and cell differentiation, since its addition, or the inhibition of its synthesis, affected RC development. The stimulation of cell division in the QC following NPA treatment was reversed by ethylene, and quiescence was re-established. Moreover, inhibition of both ethylene synthesis and auxin polar transport triggered a new pattern of cell division in the root epidermis and led to the appearance of supernumerary epidermal cell files with cap-like characteristics. The data suggest that the QC ensures an ordered internal distribution of auxin, and thereby regulates not only the planes of growth and division in both the root apex proper and the RC meristem, but also regulates cell fate in the RC. Ethylene appears to regulate the auxin redistribution system that resides in the RC. Experiments with Arabidopsis roots also reveal that ethylene plays an important role in regulating the auxin sink, and consequently cell fate in the RC.

  4. Porosity and cell size control in alumina foam preparation by thermo-foaming of powder dispersions in molten sucrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujith Vijayan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The foaming characteristics of alumina powder dispersions in molten sucrose have been studied as a function of alumina powder to sucrose weight ratio (WA/S and foaming temperature. The increase in foaming temperature significantly decreases the foaming and foam setting time and increases the foam volume due to an increase in the rate of OH condensation as well as a decrease in the viscosity of the dispersion. Nevertheless, the foam collapses beyond a critical foaming temperature, which depends on the WA/S. The sintering shrinkage depends mainly on the WA/S and marginally on the foaming temperature. The porosity (83.4–94.6 vol.% and cell size (0.55–1.6 mm increase with an increase in foaming temperature (120–170 °C and a decrease in WA/S (0.8–1.6. The drastic decrease in compressive strength and modulus beyond a WA/S of 1.2 is due to the pores generated on the cell walls and struts as a result of particle agglomeration. Gibson and Ashby plots show large deviation with respect to the model constants ‘C’ and ‘n’, especially at higher alumina powder to sucrose weight ratios.

  5. Effects of size-controlled TiO2 nanopowders synthesized by chemical vapor condensation process on conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo-Byoung; Lee, Jai-Sung

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the microstructural effects of the synthesized TiO2 nanopowders such as particle size, specific surface area, pore size and pore distributions for the application of an anode material of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC), size-controlled and well-dispersed TiO2 nanopowders were synthesized by chemical vapor condensation (CVC) process in the range of 800-1000 degreesC under a pressure of 50 mbar. The average particle size of synthesized TiO2 nanopowders was increased with increasing temperature from 13 nm for 800 degreesC, 15 nm for 900 degreesC and 26 nm. The specific surface area of synthesized nanoparticles were measured as 119.1 m2/g for 800 degreesC, 104.7 m2/g for 900 degreesC and 59.5 m2/g for 1000 degreesC, respectively. The conversion efficiency values (eta%) of DSSC with the synthesized TiO2 nanopowders at 800 degreesC, 900 degreesC, and 1000 degreesC were 2.59%, 5.96% and 3.66%, respectively. The highest conversion efficiency obtained in the 900 degreesC (5.96%) sample is thought to be attributable to homogeneous particle size and pore distributions, large specific surface area, and high transmittance in regions of dye absorption wavelength.

  6. The bacterial alarmone (p)ppGpp is required for virulence and controls cell size and survival of Pseudomonas syringae on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatnaparat, Tiyakhon; Li, Zhong; Korban, Schuyler S; Zhao, Youfu

    2015-11-01

    The stringent response, mediated by second messenger (p)ppGpp, results in swift and massive transcriptional reprogramming under nutrient limited conditions. In this study, the role of (p)ppGpp on virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a (PssB728a) was investigated. The virulence of the relA/spoT (ppGpp(0) ) double mutant was completely impaired on bean, and bacterial growth was significantly reduced, suggesting that (p)ppGpp is required for full virulence of P. syringae. Expression of T3SS and other virulence genes was reduced in ppGpp(0) mutants. In addition, ppGpp deficiency resulted in loss of swarming motility, reduction of pyoverdine production, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and antibiotic tolerance, as well as reduced ability to utilize γ-amino butyric acid. Increased levels of ppGpp resulted in reduced cell size of PssB728a when grown in a minimal medium and on plant surfaces, while most ppGpp(0) mutant cells were not viable on plant surfaces 24 h after spray inoculation, suggesting that ppGpp-mediated stringent response temporarily limits cell growth, and might control cell survival on plants by limiting their growth. These results demonstrated that ppGpp-mediated stringent response plays a central role in P. syringae virulence and survival and indicated that ppGpp serves as a global signal for regulating various virulence traits in PssB728a.

  7. Fuzzy Mathematics for Raw Silk Size Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zheng-yu; YU Hai-feng; GU Ping

    2008-01-01

    With photographing and experiments,this paper divides the cocoon layers into three categories according to their colors,establishes three-color membership function based on fuzzy mathemtics,constructs fuzzy sets which satisfy the range of size contrd by using the ordinary set and attached fiequency of three color cocoons combination,then achieves the ordinary sets of range of size control by choosing λ-cut.Under these ordinary sets,each end does duality relative level,then sets up relative matrix and overall sequence and finds the membership function to iudge whether the size cmtrol is normal.

  8. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Lee, Elizabeth (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Kallam, Alekhya (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Majumdar, Partha (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J. (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  9. Advanced Attitude Control af Pico Sized Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper A.; Amini, Rouzbeh; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2005-01-01

    accuracy of better than 5 degrees. Cost, size, weight and power requirements, on the other hand, impose selecting relative simple sensors and actuators which leads to an attitude control requirement of less than 1 degree. This precision is obtained by a combination of magnetorquers and momentum wheels...

  10. On size and growth of cells

    CERN Document Server

    Boudaoud, A

    2002-01-01

    Understanding how growth induces form is a longstanding biological question. Many studies concentrated on the shapes of plant cells, fungi or bacteria. Some others have shown the importance of the mechanical properties of bacterial walls and plant tissues in pattern formation. Here I sketch a simple physical picture of cell growth. The study is focussed on isolated cells that have walls. They are modeled as thin elastic shells containing a liquid, which pressure drives the growth as generally admitted for bacteria or plant cells. Requiring mechanical equilibrium leads to estimations of typical cell sizes, in quantitative agreement with compiled data including bacteria, cochlear outer hair, fungi, yeast, root hair and giant alga cells.

  11. Heat engines and heat pumps in a hydrostatic atmosphere: How surface pressure and temperature control wind power output and circulation cell size

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, A M; Nefiodov, A V; Sheil, D; Nobre, A D; Shearman, P L; Li, B -L

    2015-01-01

    The gross spatial features of the atmospheric kinetic energy budget are analytically investigated. Kinetic energy generation is evaluated in a hydrostatic atmosphere where the axisymmetric circulation cells are represented by Carnot cycles. The condition that kinetic energy generation is positive in the lower atmosphere is shown to limit the poleward cell extension via a relationship between the meridional differences in surface pressure and temperature $\\Delta p_s$ and $\\Delta T_s$: an upper limit to cell size exists when $\\Delta p_s$ increases sublinearly with $\\Delta T_s$. This is the case for the Hadley cells as demonstrated here using data from MERRA re-analysis. The limited cell size necessitates the appearance of heat pumps -- circulation cells with negative work output where the low-level air moves towards colder areas. These cells consume the positive work output of heat engines -- cells where the low-level air moves towards the warmer areas -- and can in principle drive the global efficiency of atmo...

  12. Nucleolar function and size in cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Derenzini, M; Trerè, D; Pession, A; Montanaro, L; Sirri, V.; Ochs, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have have studied the relationship between nucleolar function and size and cell doubling time in cancer cells. Seven human cancer cell lines characterized by different proliferation rates were used. Nucleolar functional activity was evaluated by measuring RNA polymerase I activity and expression of RNA polymerase I upstream binding factor (UBF), DNA topoisomerase I, and fibrillarin, three proteins involved in synthesis and processing of rRNA. Transcriptional activity of RNA polymerase I wa...

  13. Bilayer thickness mismatch controls domain size in biomimetic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Petruzielo, Robin S.; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kučerka, Norbert; Standaert, Robert F.; Feigenson, Gerald W.; Katsara, John

    2013-03-01

    In order to promote functionality, cells may alter the spatial organization of membrane lipids and proteins, including separation of liquid phases into distinct domains. In model membranes, domain size and morphology depend strongly on composition and temperature, but the physicochemical mechanisms controlling them are poorly understood. Theoretical work suggests a role for interfacial energy at domain boundaries, which may be driven in part by thickness mismatch between a domain and its surrounding bilayer. However, no direct evidence linking thickness mismatch to domain size in free-standing bilayers has been reported. We describe the use of Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) to detect domains in simplified lipid-only models that mimic the composition of plasma membrane. We find that domain size is controlled by the degree of acyl chain unsaturation of low-melting temperature lipids, and that this size transition is correlated to changes in the thickness mismatch between coexisting liquid phases.

  14. Global Climatic Controls On Leaf Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I. J.; Prentice, I. C.; Dong, N.; Maire, V.

    2015-12-01

    Since the 1890s it's been known that the wet tropics harbour plants with exceptionally large leaves. Yet the observed latitudinal gradient of leaf size has never been fully explained: it is still unclear which aspects of climate are most important for understanding geographic trends in leaf size, a trait that varies many thousand-fold among species. The key is the leaf-to-air temperature difference, which depends on the balance of energy inputs (irradiance) and outputs (transpirational cooling, losses to the night sky). Smaller leaves track air temperatures more closely than larger leaves. Widely cited optimality-based theories predict an advantage for smaller leaves in dry environments, where transpiration is restricted, but are silent on the latitudinal gradient. We aimed to characterize and explain the worldwide pattern of leaf size. Across 7900 species from 651 sites, here we show that: large-leaved species predominate in wet, hot, sunny environments; smaller-leaved species typify hot, sunny environments only when arid; small leaves are required to avoid freezing in high latitudes and at high elevation, and to avoid overheating in dry environments. This simple pattern was unclear in earlier, more limited analyses. We present a simple but robust, fresh approach to energy-balance modelling for both day-time and night-time leaf-to-air temperature differences, and thus risk of overheating and of frost damage. Our analysis shows night-chilling is important as well as day-heating, and simplifies leaf temperature modelling. It provides both a framework for modelling leaf size constraints, and a solution to one of the oldest conundrums in ecology. Although the path forward is not yet fully clear, because of its role in controlling leaf temperatures we suggest that climate-related leaf size constraints could usefully feature in the next generation of land ecosystem models.

  15. Controls of eolian dune size and spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, N.

    1988-11-01

    Data for the Namib and Gran Desierto sand seas suggest that the controls of dune size and spacing are complex. The relation between dune height and spacing varies with dune type and location and reflects both dune dynamics (vertical accretion vs. migration or extension) and availability of sand. There is no general relation between dune spacing and grain size. In the Namib sand sea the height of compound and complex dunes (draas) is inversely proportional to potential sand-transport rates, whereas the height of dunes superimposed on their flanks varies directly with potential sand-transport rates. These observations can be combined with data on dune spacing to demonstrate the existence of a hierarchy of eolian dunes, each element of which responds to variations in sand-transport rates at different temporal and spatial scales. Whereas the morphology of individual simple dunes and superimposed dunes on draas is related to contemporary rates and directions of sand transport, the morphology and development of draas reflects long-term and regional patterns of sand transport and deposition.

  16. Cell size and growth regulation in the Arabidopsis thaliana apical stem cell niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lisa; Refahi, Yassin; Wightman, Raymond; Landrein, Benoit; Teles, José; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell size and growth kinetics are fundamental cellular properties with important physiological implications. Classical studies on yeast, and recently on bacteria, have identified rules for cell size regulation in single cells, but in the more complex environment of multicellular tissues, data have been lacking. In this study, to characterize cell size and growth regulation in a multicellular context, we developed a 4D imaging pipeline and applied it to track and quantify epidermal cells over 3–4 d in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot apical meristems. We found that a cell size checkpoint is not the trigger for G2/M or cytokinesis, refuting the unexamined assumption that meristematic cells trigger cell cycle phases upon reaching a critical size. Our data also rule out models in which cells undergo G2/M at a fixed time after birth, or by adding a critical size increment between G2/M transitions. Rather, cell size regulation was intermediate between the critical size and critical increment paradigms, meaning that cell size fluctuations decay by ∼75% in one generation compared with 100% (critical size) and 50% (critical increment). Notably, this behavior was independent of local cell–cell contact topologies and of position within the tissue. Cells grew exponentially throughout the first >80% of the cell cycle, but following an asymmetrical division, the small daughter grew at a faster exponential rate than the large daughter, an observation that potentially challenges present models of growth regulation. These growth and division behaviors place strong constraints on quantitative mechanistic descriptions of the cell cycle and growth control. PMID:27930326

  17. Cell control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This extensive report provides an essential overview of cells and their use as factory automation building blocks. The following issues are discussed in depth: Cell integration Cell software and standards Future technologies applied to cells Plus Cell control applications including: - rotary parts manufacturing - diesel engine component development - general cell control development at the General Electric Corporation - a vendor list.

  18. Sample size considerations for historical control studies with survival outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Song; Ahn, Chul

    2015-01-01

    Historical control trials (HCTs) are frequently conducted to compare an experimental treatment with a control treatment from a previous study, when they are applicable and favored over a randomized clinical trial (RCT) due to feasibility, ethics and cost concerns. Makuch and Simon developed a sample size formula for historical control (HC) studies with binary outcomes, assuming that the observed response rate in the HC group is the true response rate. This method was extended by Dixon and Simon to specify sample size for HC studies comparing survival outcomes. For HC studies with binary and continuous outcomes, many researchers have shown that the popular Makuch and Simon method does not preserve the nominal power and type I error, and suggested alternative approaches. For HC studies with survival outcomes, we reveal through simulation that the conditional power and type I error over all the random realizations of the HC data have highly skewed distributions. Therefore, the sampling variability of the HC data needs to be appropriately accounted for in determining sample size. A flexible sample size formula that controls arbitrary percentiles, instead of means, of the conditional power and type I error, is derived. Although an explicit sample size formula with survival outcomes is not available, the computation is straightforward. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed method preserves the operational characteristics in a more realistic scenario where the true hazard rate of the HC group is unknown. A real data application of an advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinical trial is presented to illustrate sample size considerations for HC studies in comparison of survival outcomes. PMID:26098200

  19. Environmental controls on alpine cirque size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Magali; Gunnell, Yanni; Calvet, Marc

    2014-02-01

    Pleistocene alpine cirques are emblematic landforms of mountain scenery, yet their deceptively simple template conceals complex controlling variables. This comparative study presents a new database of 1071 cirques, the largest of its kind, located in the French eastern Pyrenees. It is embedded in a review of previous work on cirque morphometry and thus provides a perspective on a global scale. First-order cirque attributes of length, width, and amplitude were measured; and their power as predictors of climatic and lithological variables and as proxies for the duration of glacier activity was tested using ANOVA, simple and multiple linear regression, and their various post-hoc tests. Conventional variables such as cirque aspect, floor elevation, and exposure with respect to regional precipitation-bearing weather systems are shown to present some consistency in spatial patterns determined by solar radiation, the morning-afternoon effect, and wind-blown snow accumulation in the lee of ridgetops. This confirms in greater detail the previously encountered links between landforms and climate. A special focus on the influence of bedrock lithology, a previously neglected nonclimatic variable, highlights the potential for spurious relations in the use of cirque size as a proxy of past environmental conditions. Cirques are showcased as complex landforms resulting from the combination of many climatic and nonclimatic variables that remain difficult to rank by order of importance. Apart from a few statistically weak trends, several combinations of different factors in different proportions are shown to produce similar morphometric outcomes, suggesting a case of equifinality in landform development.

  20. Polycystin-1 Regulates Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase-Dependent Phosphorylation of Tuberin To Control Cell Size through mTOR and Its Downstream Effectors S6K and 4EBP1 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, Gianfranco; Boca, Manila; Rowe, Isaline; Wodarczyk, Claas; Ma, Li; Piontek, Klaus B.; Germino, Gregory G.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Boletta, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disease characterized by bilateral renal cyst formation. Both hyperproliferation and hypertrophy have been previously observed in ADPKD kidneys. Polycystin-1 (PC-1), a large orphan receptor encoded by the PKD1 gene and mutated in 85% of all cases, is able to inhibit proliferation and apoptosis. Here we show that overexpression of PC-1 in renal epithelial cells inhibits cell growth (size) in a cell cycle-independent manner due to the downregulation of mTOR, S6K1, and 4EBP1. Upregulation of the same pathway leads to increased cell size, as found in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Pkd1−/− mice. We show that PC-1 controls the mTOR pathway in a Tsc2-dependent manner, by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated phosphorylation of tuberin in Ser664. We provide a detailed molecular mechanism by which PC-1 can inhibit the mTOR pathway and regulate cell size. PMID:19255143

  1. Measuring bacterial cells size with AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiro, Denise; Filho, Rubens Bernardes; Assis, Odilio Benedito Garrido; Jorge, Lúcio André de Castro; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) can be used to obtain high-resolution topographical images of bacteria revealing surface details and cell integrity. During scanning however, the interactions between the AFM probe and the membrane results in distortion of the images. Such distortions or artifacts are the result of geometrical effects related to bacterial cell height, specimen curvature and the AFM probe geometry. The most common artifact in imaging is surface broadening, what can lead to errors in bacterial sizing. Several methods of correction have been proposed to compensate for these artifacts and in this study we describe a simple geometric model for the interaction between the tip (a pyramidal shaped AFM probe) and the bacterium (Escherichia coli JM-109 strain) to minimize the enlarging effect. Approaches to bacteria immobilization and examples of AFM images analysis are also described.

  2. Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Petruzielo, Robin S [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Drazba, Paul [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Feigenson, Gerald [Cornell University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  3. Auxin regulates SNARE-dependent vacuolar morphology restricting cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfke, Christian; Dünser, Kai; Scheuring, David; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2015-03-05

    The control of cellular growth is central to multicellular patterning. In plants, the encapsulating cell wall literally binds neighbouring cells to each other and limits cellular sliding/migration. In contrast to its developmental importance, growth regulation is poorly understood in plants. Here, we reveal that the phytohormone auxin impacts on the shape of the biggest plant organelle, the vacuole. TIR1/AFBs-dependent auxin signalling posttranslationally controls the protein abundance of vacuolar SNARE components. Genetic and pharmacological interference with the auxin effect on vacuolar SNAREs interrelates with auxin-resistant vacuolar morphogenesis and cell size regulation. Vacuolar SNARE VTI11 is strictly required for auxin-reliant vacuolar morphogenesis and loss of function renders cells largely insensitive to auxin-dependent growth inhibition. Our data suggests that the adaptation of SNARE-dependent vacuolar morphogenesis allows auxin to limit cellular expansion, contributing to root organ growth rates.

  4. Cell Size Breathing and Possibilities to Introduce Cell Sleep Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micallef, Gilbert; Mogensen, Preben; Scheck, Hans-Otto

    2010-01-01

    regular upgrades in the infrastructure. While network equipment is in itself becoming more efficient, these upgrades still increase the overall energy consumption of the networks. This paper investigates the energy saving potential of exploiting cell size breathing by putting low loaded cells into sleep...... mode. The energy consumption and network performance of the resulting network are used to quantify the potential of this feature. The investigation is carried out on a tilt optimized network. Since putting cells into sleep mode results in a non-optimum antenna tilt configuration, this paper also...

  5. Green synthesis of size controllable gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Kumar, Kesarla; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Kiran Kumar, Hoskote A.; Maddinedi, Sireesh Babu

    2013-12-01

    A facile rapid green eco-friendly method to synthesize gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) of tunable size using aqueous Terminalia arjuna fruit extracts has been demonstrated herein. Formation of Au NPs was confirmed by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) study at 528 nm using UV-visible spectrophotometer. The time of reduction, size and morphological variations of Au NPs were studied with varying quantities of T. arjuna fruit aqueous extracts. Synthesized Au NPs were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). Polyphenols responsible for reduction of Au3+ to Au0 were identified using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) as ascorbic acid, gallic acid and pyrogallol. The oxidized forms of polyphenols formed coordination with surface of Au NPs which protected their further growth and aggregation. We also propose a plausible mechanism how to tune size and shape of Au NPs by varying the quantity of extracts. Thus obtained Au NPs were stable for more than four months.

  6. Green synthesis of size controllable gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Kumar, Kesarla; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Kiran Kumar, Hoskote A; Maddinedi, Sireesh Babu

    2013-12-01

    A facile rapid green eco-friendly method to synthesize gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) of tunable size using aqueous Terminalia arjuna fruit extracts has been demonstrated herein. Formation of Au NPs was confirmed by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) study at 528 nm using UV-visible spectrophotometer. The time of reduction, size and morphological variations of Au NPs were studied with varying quantities of T. arjuna fruit aqueous extracts. Synthesized Au NPs were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). Polyphenols responsible for reduction of Au(3+) to Au(0) were identified using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) as ascorbic acid, gallic acid and pyrogallol. The oxidized forms of polyphenols formed coordination with surface of Au NPs which protected their further growth and aggregation. We also propose a plausible mechanism how to tune size and shape of Au NPs by varying the quantity of extracts. Thus obtained Au NPs were stable for more than four months.

  7. Cell Control Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1996-01-01

    The engineering process of creating cell control systems is described, and a Cell Control Engineering (CCE) concept is defined. The purpose is to assist people, representing different disciplines in the organisation, to implement cell controllers by addressing the complexity of having many systems...... in physically and logically different and changing manufacturing environments. The defined CCE concept combines state-of-the-art of commercially available enabling technologies for automation system software development, generic cell control models and guidelines for the complete engineering process....... It facilitates the understanding of the task and structure of cell controllers and uses this knowledge directly in the implementation of the system. By applying generic models CCE facilitates reuse of software components and maintenance of applications. In many enterprises, software makes up an increasing part...

  8. Aggregate Size Optimization in Microwells for Suspension-based Cardiac Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bauwens, Celine L.; Toms, Derek; Ungrin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac differentiation of human pluripotent stems cells (hPSCs) is typically carried out in suspension cell aggregates. Conventional aggregate formation of hPSCs involves dissociating cell colonies into smaller clumps, with size control of the clumps crudely controlled by pipetting the cell suspension until the desired clump size is achieved. One of the main challenges of conventional aggregate-based cardiac differentiation of hPSCs is that culture heterogeneity and spatial disorganization l...

  9. Controllable microgels from multifunctional molecules: structure control and size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhenyu; Patterson, Gary; Cao, Rong; Armitage, Bruce

    2004-03-01

    Supramolecular microgels with fractal structures were produced by engineered multifunctional molecules. The combination of static and dynamic light scattering was utilized to characterize the fractal dimension (Df) of the microgels and analyze the aggregation process of the microgels. The microgels are assembled from (1) a tetrafunctional protein (avidin), (2) a trifunctional DNA construct known as a three-way junction, and (3) a biotinylated peptide nucleic acid (PNA) that acts as a crosslinker by binding irreversibly to four equivalent binding sites on the protein and thermoreversibly to three identical binding sites on the DNA. The structure of microgels can be controlled through different aggregation mechanisms. The initial microgels formed by titration have a compact structure with Df ˜2.6; while the reversible microgels formed from melted aggregates have an open structure with Df ˜1.8. The values are consistent with the point-cluster and the cluster-cluster aggregation mechanisms, respectively. A narrow size distribution of microgels was observed and explained in terms of the Flory theory of reversible self-assembly.

  10. Signalling and the control of skeletal muscle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, Anthony [School of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Building, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, Berkshire, RG6 6UB (United Kingdom); Patel, Ketan, E-mail: ketan.patel@reading.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Building, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, Berkshire, RG6 6UB (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal muscle is highly adaptive to environmental stimuli and can alter its mass accordingly. This tissue is almost unique in that it can increase its size through two distinct mechanisms. It can grow through a cellular process mediated by cell fusion, or it can increase its size simply by increasing its protein content. Understanding how these processes are regulated is crucial for the development of potential therapies against debilitating skeletal muscle wasting diseases. Two key signalling molecules, Insulin like Growth Factor (IGF) and GDF-8/myostatin, have emerged in recent years to be potent regulators of skeletal muscle size. In this review we bring together recent data highlighting the important and novel aspects of both molecules and their signalling pathways, culminating in a discussion of the cellular and tissue phenotypic outcomes of their stimulation or antagonism. We emphasise the complex regulatory mechanisms and discuss the temporal and spatial differences that control their action, understanding of which is crucial to further their use as potential therapeutic targets.

  11. Principles of Bacterial Cell-Size Determination Revealed by Cell-Wall Synthesis Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Tropini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although bacterial cell morphology is tightly controlled, the principles of size regulation remain elusive. In Escherichia coli, perturbation of cell-wall synthesis often results in similar morphologies, making it difficult to deconvolve the complex genotype-phenotype relationships underlying morphogenesis. Here we modulated cell width through heterologous expression of sequences encoding the essential enzyme PBP2 and through sublethal treatments with drugs that inhibit PBP2 and the MreB cytoskeleton. We quantified the biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell wall across a wide range of cell sizes. We find that, although cell-wall chemical composition is unaltered, MreB dynamics, cell twisting, and cellular mechanics exhibit systematic large-scale changes consistent with altered chirality and a more isotropic cell wall. This multiscale analysis enabled identification of distinct roles for MreB and PBP2, despite having similar morphological effects when depleted. Altogether, our results highlight the robustness of cell-wall synthesis and physical principles dictating cell-size control.

  12. Control of root meristem size by DA1-RELATED PROTEIN2 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuancheng; Ma, Wenying; Chen, Liangliang; Yang, Lei; Li, Shengjun; Zhao, Hongtao; Zhao, Yankun; Jin, Weihuan; Li, Na; Bevan, Michael W; Li, Xia; Tong, Yiping; Li, Yunhai

    2013-03-01

    The control of organ growth by coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation is a fundamental developmental process. In plants, postembryonic root growth is sustained by the root meristem. For maintenance of root meristem size, the rate of cell differentiation must equal the rate of cell division. Cytokinin and auxin interact to affect the cell proliferation and differentiation balance and thus control root meristem size. However, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that determine root meristem size still remain largely unknown. Here, we report that da1-related protein2 (dar2) mutants produce small root meristems due to decreased cell division and early cell differentiation in the root meristem of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). dar2 mutants also exhibit reduced stem cell niche activity in the root meristem. DAR2 encodes a Lin-11, Isl-1, and Mec-3 domain-containing protein and shows an expression peak in the border between the transition zone and the elongation zone. Genetic analyses show that DAR2 functions downstream of cytokinin and SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 to maintain normal auxin distribution by influencing auxin transport. Further results indicate that DAR2 acts through the PLETHORA pathway to influence root stem cell niche activity and therefore control root meristem size. Collectively, our findings identify the role of DAR2 in root meristem size control and provide a novel link between several key regulators influencing root meristem size.

  13. Cell-size distribution in epithelial tissue formation and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puliafito, Alberto; Primo, Luca; Celani, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    How cell growth and proliferation are orchestrated in living tissues to achieve a given biological function is a central problem in biology. During development, tissue regeneration and homeostasis, cell proliferation must be coordinated by spatial cues in order for cells to attain the correct size and shape. Biological tissues also feature a notable homogeneity of cell size, which, in specific cases, represents a physiological need. Here, we study the temporal evolution of the cell-size distribution by applying the theory of kinetic fragmentation to tissue development and homeostasis. Our theory predicts self-similar probability density function (PDF) of cell size and explains how division times and redistribution ensure cell size homogeneity across the tissue. Theoretical predictions and numerical simulations of confluent non-homeostatic tissue cultures show that cell size distribution is self-similar. Our experimental data confirm predictions and reveal that, as assumed in the theory, cell division times scale like a power-law of the cell size. We find that in homeostatic conditions there is a stationary distribution with lognormal tails, consistently with our experimental data. Our theoretical predictions and numerical simulations show that the shape of the PDF depends on how the space inherited by apoptotic cells is redistributed and that apoptotic cell rates might also depend on size.

  14. Physics of sinking and selection of plankton cell size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciascia, R., E-mail: r.sciascia@isac.cnr.it [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy); Doctorate Program in Fluid Dynamics, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); De Monte, S. [CNRS, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Institut de Biologie de l' Ecole Normale Supérieure, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Provenzale, A. [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy)

    2013-02-04

    Gravitational sinking in the water column is known to affect size composition of planktonic communities. One important driver toward the reduction of plankton size is the fact that larger cells tend to sink faster below the euphotic layer. In this work, we discuss the role of gravitational sinking in driving cell size selection, showing that the outcome of phytoplankton competition is determined by the dependence of sinking velocity on cell size, shape, and on the temporal variability associated with turbulence. This opens a question on whether regional modulations of the turbulence intensity could affect size distribution of planktonic communities.

  15. Revisionist integral deferred correction with adaptive step-size control

    KAUST Repository

    Christlieb, Andrew

    2015-03-27

    © 2015 Mathematical Sciences Publishers. Adaptive step-size control is a critical feature for the robust and efficient numerical solution of initial-value problems in ordinary differential equations. In this paper, we show that adaptive step-size control can be incorporated within a family of parallel time integrators known as revisionist integral deferred correction (RIDC) methods. The RIDC framework allows for various strategies to implement stepsize control, and we report results from exploring a few of them.

  16. Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Wang, George T.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical (QSC-PEC) etching provides a new route to the precision fabrication of epitaxial semiconductor nanostructures in the sub-10-nm size regime. For example, quantum dots (QDs) can be QSC-PEC-etched from epitaxial InGaN thin films using narrowband laser photoexcitation, and the QD sizes (and hence bandgaps and photoluminescence wavelengths) are determined by the photoexcitation wavelength.

  17. Atmospheric oxygen concentration controls the size history of foraminifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J.; Jost, A. B.; Ouyang, X.; Skotheim, J. M.; Wang, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    Body size correlates with numerous physiological traits and thus influences organism fitness. However, long-term controls on size evolution remain poorly understood because few datasets spans sufficiently long intervals. One proposed controlling factor is variation in atmospheric oxygen, which is widely argued to have influenced size evolution in numerous taxa, notably gigantism in arthropods during the late Paleozoic. In this study, we compiled a comprehensive genus- and species-level size database of foraminifers (marine protists) to enable an extensive analysis of factors influencing size evolution. Foraminifers are an ideal study group because they are present in all Phanerozoic periods and have been diverse and abundant in shallow-marine habitats since Devonian time. We observe significant correlation between foraminiferan size and atmospheric oxygen concentration in foraminifers as a whole and in half of the major subclades. Larger size is associated with higher oxygen concentrations, as predicted by simple physiological models based on changes in the ratio of surface area to volume. Because the oxygen content ocean waters is controlled in part by atmospheric pO2, we interpret the association between foraminiferan size and pO2 to result from a direct physiological effect of oxygen availability. Atmospheric oxygen concentration predicts foraminiferan size better than six other Phanerozoic time series (pCO2, sea level, number of named geological formations, δ18O, δ13C, 87Sr/86Sr), further suggesting the correlation between oxygen and size does not occur simply through some common geological cause that influences many aspects of Earth system history. These findings support the hypothesis that widespread Permo-Carboniferous gigantism was enabled by high pO2 and suggest that oxygen availability has been among the most important influences on size evolution through Phanerozoic time.

  18. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  19. Effects of cell size on compressive properties of aluminum foam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Xiao-qing; WANG Zhi-hua; MA Hong-wei; ZHAO Long-mao; YANG Gui-tong

    2006-01-01

    The effects of cell size on the quasi-static and dynamic compressive properties of open cell aluminum foams produced by infiltrating process were studied experimentally. The quasi-static and dynamic compressive tests were carried out on MTS 810 system and SHPB(split Hopkinson pressure bar) respectively. It is found that the elastic moduli and compressive strengths of the studied aluminum foam are not only dependent on the relative density but also dependent on the cell size of the foam under both quasi-static loading and dynamic loading. The foams studied show a significant strain rate sensitivity, the flow strength can be improved as much as 112%, and the cell size also has a sound influence on the strain rate sensitivity of the foams. The foams of middle cell size exhibit the highest elastic modulus, the highest flow strength and the most significant strain rate sensitivity.

  20. Controlling Silver Nanoparticle Size and Morphology with Photostimulated Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, A K; Langlois, R; Loth, M; Schmitz, R; Taft, G; Tanke, R S; Wruck, A

    2005-01-01

    Photo-induced synthesis and control over the size and shape of colloidal silver nanoparticles is investigated in contrast to photo-stimulated aggregation of small nanoparticles into large fractal-type structures. The feasibility of light-driven nanoengineering which enables manipulation of the sizes and shapes of the isolated nanoparticles is studied by varying the amount and type of the stabilizing agent and the type of optical irradiation.

  1. Isotropic 2D quadrangle meshing with size and orientation control

    KAUST Repository

    Pellenard, Bertrand

    2011-12-01

    We propose an approach for automatically generating isotropic 2D quadrangle meshes from arbitrary domains with a fine control over sizing and orientation of the elements. At the heart of our algorithm is an optimization procedure that, from a coarse initial tiling of the 2D domain, enforces each of the desirable mesh quality criteria (size, shape, orientation, degree, regularity) one at a time, in an order designed not to undo previous enhancements. Our experiments demonstrate how well our resulting quadrangle meshes conform to a wide range of input sizing and orientation fields.

  2. CONTROL OF POLYMER PARTICLE SIZE USING POROUS GLASS MEMBRANE EMULSIFICATION A REVIEW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui Ma

    2003-01-01

    Much attention has in recent years been paid to fine applications of polymer particles, e.g., carrier for enzyme, separation media for protein, DNA and cell, and carrier for drug in Drug Delivery System (DDS). Control of polymer particle size is especially important in such fine applications. For instance, when the particles are used as a carrier of anti-cancer agents, the locations of particles containing anti-cancer agents also depend on the size of the particles. In this paper, various techniques of controlling polymer particle size are described, with emphasis on Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG) membrane emulsification, as carried out in our research group.

  3. Nanomaterial cytotoxicity is composition, size, and cell type dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaebuddin Syed K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive research efforts, reports of cellular responses to nanomaterials are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, relationships between the responding cell type and nanomaterial properties are not well understood. Using three model cell lines representing different physiological compartments and nanomaterials of different compositions and sizes, we have systematically investigated the influence of nanomaterial properties on the degrees and pathways of cytotoxicity. In this study, we selected nanomaterials of different compositions (TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs] with differing size (MWCNTs of different diameters 50 nm; but same length 0.5-2 μm to analyze the effects of composition and size on toxicity to 3T3 fibroblasts, RAW 264.7 macrophages, and telomerase-immortalized (hT bronchiolar epithelial cells. Results Following characterization of nanomaterial properties in PBS and serum containing solutions, cells were exposed to nanomaterials of differing compositions and sizes, with cytotoxicity monitored through reduction in mitochondrial activity. In addition to cytotoxicity, the cellular response to nanomaterials was characterized by quantifying generation of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane destabilization and mitochondrial permeability. The effect of these responses on cellular fate - apoptosis or necrosis - was then analyzed. Nanomaterial toxicity was variable based on exposed cell type and dependent on nanomaterial composition and size. In addition, nanomaterial exposure led to cell type dependent intracellular responses resulting in unique breakdown of cellular functions for each nanomaterial: cell combination. Conclusions Nanomaterials induce cell specific responses resulting in variable toxicity and subsequent cell fate based on the type of exposed cell. Our results indicate that the composition and size of nanomaterials as well as the

  4. Sonochemical synthesis of silica particles and their size control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwa-Min [Advanced Materials and Chemical Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk 38430 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hyun [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk 38430 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bonghwan, E-mail: bhkim@cu.ac.kr [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk 38430 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Silica particles were easily prepared by an ultrasound-assisted sol–gel method. • The particle size was controlled by the ammonium hydroxide/water molar ratio. • The size-controlled diameter of silica particles ranged from 40 to 400 nm. • The particles were formed in a relatively short reaction time. - Abstract: Using an ultrasound-assisted sol–gel method, we successfully synthesized very uniformly shaped, monodisperse, and size-controlled spherical silica particles from a mixture of ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of ammonia as catalyst, at room temperature. The diameters of the silica particles were distributed in the range from 40 to 400 nm; their morphology was well characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The silica particle size could be adjusted by choosing suitable concentrations of ammonium hydroxide and water, which in turn determined the nucleation and growth rates of the particles during the reaction. This sonochemical-based silica synthesis offers an alternative way to produce spherical silica particles in a relatively short reaction time. Thus, we suggest that this simple, low-cost, and efficient method of preparing uniform silica particles of various sizes will have practical and wide-ranging industrial applicability.

  5. Combined Optimal Sizing and Control for a Hybrid Tracked Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei Peng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The optimal sizing and control of a hybrid tracked vehicle is presented and solved in this paper. A driving schedule obtained from field tests is used to represent typical tracked vehicle operations. Dynamics of the diesel engine-permanent magnetic AC synchronous generator set, the lithium-ion battery pack, and the power split between them are modeled and validated through experiments. Two coupled optimizations, one for the plant parameters, forming the outer optimization loop and one for the control strategy, forming the inner optimization loop, are used to achieve minimum fuel consumption under the selected driving schedule. The dynamic programming technique is applied to find the optimal controller in the inner loop while the component parameters are optimized iteratively in the outer loop. The results are analyzed, and the relationship between the key parameters is observed to keep the optimal sizing and control simultaneously.

  6. SCF(SAP) controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-04-06

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size.

  7. Automated Control Surface Design and Sizing for the Prandtl Plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ginneken, D.A.J.; Voskuijl, M.; Van Tooren, M.J.L.; Frediani, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the design of the primary flight control surfaces, in terms of size, number and location, for fixed wing aircraft (conventional or unconventional). As test case, the methodology is applied to a 300 passenger variant of the Prandtl Plane. This box wing aircraft i

  8. Koehler-illumination-based method to improve beam size controllability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Kiyoshi; Sunaoshi, Hitoshi; Ando, Atsushi

    1998-06-01

    We have developed a new EB calibration method for adjusting both Koehler illumination condition and beam current density precisely in the EB direct writing system EX-8D. Koehler illumination condition is adjusted by controlling the condenser lens so that the beam size change on the target vs. focus change of the objective is minimized. Beam current density is adjusted to the desired value by controlling the two condenser lenses which acts as a zoom lens function and maintaining above Koehler illumination condition. Using this method, beam size deviation was improved to less than 2 nm for a focus change of 10 micrometers , and beam current density was controlled to less than 0.5 percent error from the desired value. This beam calibration was executed in less than 10 minutes. We have also evaluated the pattern roughness and the pattern size deviation depending on the focus change by delineating a 0.125 micrometers line and space pattern. The pattern roughness was controlled to less than 2 nm and the pattern size deviation was less than 2 nm for a focus change of +/- micrometers .

  9. Optimizing human embryonic stem cells differentiation efficiency by screening size-tunable homogenous embryoid bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung-Hwan; Ju, Jongil; Park, Soon-Jung; Bae, Daekyeong; Chung, Hyung-Min; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-07-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are generally induced to differentiate by forming spherical structures termed embryoid bodies (EBs) in the presence of soluble growth factors. hEBs are generated by suspending small clumps of hESC colonies; however, the resulting hEBs are heterogeneous because this method lacks the ability to control the number of cells in individual EBs. This heterogeneity affects factors that influence differentiation such as cell-cell contact and the diffusion of soluble factors, and consequently, the differentiation capacity of each EB varies. Here, we fabricated size-tunable concave microwells to control the physical environment, thereby regulating the size of EBs formed from single hESCs. Defined numbers of single hESCs were forced to aggregate and generate uniformly sized EBs with high fidelity, and the size of the EBs was controlled using concave microwells of different diameters. Differentiation patterns in H9- and CHA15-hESCs were affected by EB size in both the absence and presence of growth factors. By screening EB size in the presence of various BMP4 concentrations, a two-fold increase in endothelial cell differentiation was achieved. Because each hESC line has unique characteristics, the findings of this study demonstrate that concave microwells could be used to screen different EB sizes and growth factor concentrations to optimize differentiation for each hESC line.

  10. Size Controlled Synthesis of Transition Metal Nanoparticles for Catalytic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Esparza, Angel

    2011-07-07

    Catalysis offers cleaner and more efficient chemical reactions for environmental scientists. More than 90% of industrial processes are performed with a catalyst involved, however research it is still required to improve the catalyst materials. The purpose of this work is to contribute with the development of catalysts synthesis with two different approaches. First, the precise size control of non-noble metals nanoparticles. Second, a new one-pot synthesis method based on a microemulsion system was developed to synthesize size-controlled metal nanoparticles in oxide supports. The one-pot method represents a simple approach to synthesize both support and immobilized nanometer-sized non-noble metal nanoparticles in the same reaction system. Narrow size distribution nickel, cobalt, iron and cobalt-nickel nanoparticles were obtained. High metal dispersions are attainable regardless the metal or support used in the synthesis. Thus, the methodology is adaptable and robust. The sizecontrolled supported metal nanoparticles offer the opportunity to study size effects and metal-support interactions on different catalytic reactions with different sets of metals and supports.

  11. How does cell size regulation affect population growth?

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of a growing microbial colony is well characterized by the population growth rate. However, at the single-cell level, isogenic cells often exhibit different cell-cycle durations. For evolutionary dynamics, it is thus important to establish the connection between the population growth rate and the heterogeneous single-cell generation time. Existing theories often make the assumption that the generation times of mother and daughter cells are independent. However, it has been shown that to maintain a bounded cell size distribution, cells that grow exponentially at the single-cell level need to adopt cell size regulation, leading to a negative correlation of mother-daughter generation time. In this work, we construct a general framework to describe the population growth in the presence of size regulation. We derive a formula for the population growth rate, which only depends on the variability of single-cell growth rate, independent of other sources of noises. Our work shows that a population ca...

  12. Environmental control of natural gap size distribution in tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulamoussène, Youven; Bedeau, Caroline; Descroix, Laurent; Linguet, Laurent; Hérault, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Natural disturbances are the dominant form of forest regeneration and dynamics in unmanaged tropical forests. Monitoring the size distribution of treefall gaps is important to better understand and predict the carbon budget in response to land use and other global changes. In this study, we model the size frequency distribution of natural canopy gaps with a discrete power law distribution. We use a Bayesian framework to introduce and test, using Monte Carlo Markov chain and Kuo-Mallick algorithms, the effect of local physical environment on gap size distribution. We apply our methodological framework to an original light detecting and ranging dataset in which natural forest gaps were delineated over 30 000 ha of unmanaged forest. We highlight strong links between gap size distribution and environment, primarily hydrological conditions and topography, with large gaps being more frequent on floodplains and in wind-exposed areas. In the future, we plan to apply our methodological framework on a larger scale using satellite data. Additionally, although gap size distribution variation is clearly under environmental control, variation in gap size distribution in time should be tested against climate variability.

  13. Magnetic agglomeration method for size control in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Dale L.

    2011-07-05

    A method for controlling the size of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles that employs magnetic interaction between particles to control particle size and does not rely on conventional kinetic control of the reaction to control particle size. The particles are caused to reversibly agglomerate and precipitate from solution; the size at which this occurs can be well controlled to provide a very narrow particle size distribution. The size of particles is controllable by the size of the surfactant employed in the process; controlling the size of the surfactant allows magnetic control of the agglomeration and precipitation processes. Agglomeration is used to effectively stop particle growth to provide a very narrow range of particle sizes.

  14. Efficiency optimized control of medium-size induction motor drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, F.; Blaabjerg, Frede; Pedersen, John Kim;

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of a variable speed induction motor drive can be optimized by adaption of the motor flux level to the load torque. In small drives (... not be disregarded without further analysis. The importance of the converter losses on efficiency optimization in medium-size drives is analyzed in this paper. Based on the experiments with a 90 kW drive it is found that it is not critical if the converter losses are neglected in the control, except...... that the robustness towards load disturbances may unnecessarily be reduced. Both displacement power factor and model-based efficiency optimizing control methods perform well in medium-size drives. The last strategy is also tested on a 22 kW drive with good results....

  15. Body size perception and weight control in youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quick, V; Nansel, T R; Liu, D

    2014-01-01

    -overweight boys were 10% more likely to diet at Time 3, whereas overweight and non-overweight girls were 19% and 16%, respectively, less likely to diet at Time 3. Controlling for country-level overweight prevalence did not impact trends in dieting for weight loss. Additionally, the association of self-perceived...... for weight loss were assessed in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey conducted in 24 countries cross-sectionally at three time points (2001/2002, 2005/2006 and 2009/2010). Logistic regression models examined change over time in overestimation of body size in non-overweight adolescents......)=1.68 for girls; OR=1.10 for boys), whereas non-overweight adolescents had lower odds of body size overestimation at Time 3 (OR=0.87 for girls; OR=0.89 for boys). Controlling for country-level overweight prevalence attenuated these relationships. Compared with Time 1, overweight and non...

  16. Capabilities and Limitations of Tissue Size Control through Passive Mechanical Forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Kursawe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryogenesis is an extraordinarily robust process, exhibiting the ability to control tissue size and repair patterning defects in the face of environmental and genetic perturbations. The size and shape of a developing tissue is a function of the number and size of its constituent cells as well as their geometric packing. How these cellular properties are coordinated at the tissue level to ensure developmental robustness remains a mystery; understanding this process requires studying multiple concurrent processes that make up morphogenesis, including the spatial patterning of cell fates and apoptosis, as well as cell intercalations. In this work, we develop a computational model that aims to understand aspects of the robust pattern repair mechanisms of the Drosophila embryonic epidermal tissues. Size control in this system has previously been shown to rely on the regulation of apoptosis rather than proliferation; however, to date little work has been done to understand the role of cellular mechanics in this process. We employ a vertex model of an embryonic segment to test hypotheses about the emergence of this size control. Comparing the model to previously published data across wild type and genetic perturbations, we show that passive mechanical forces suffice to explain the observed size control in the posterior (P compartment of a segment. However, observed asymmetries in cell death frequencies across the segment are demonstrated to require patterning of cellular properties in the model. Finally, we show that distinct forms of mechanical regulation in the model may be distinguished by differences in cell shapes in the P compartment, as quantified through experimentally accessible summary statistics, as well as by the tissue recoil after laser ablation experiments.

  17. Influence of geography and climate on patterns of cell size and body size in the lizard Anolis carolinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Rachel M; Echternacht, Arthur C; Hall, Jim C; Deng, Lihan D; Welch, Jessica N

    2013-06-01

    Geographic patterns in body size are often associated with latitude, elevation, or environmental and climatic variables. This study investigated patterns of body size and cell size of the green anole lizard, Anolis carolinensis, and potential associations with geography or climatic variables. Lizards were sampled from 19 populations across the native range, and body size, red blood cell size and size and number of muscle cells were measured. Climatic data from local weather stations and latitude and longitude were entered into model selection with Akaike's information criterion to explain patterns in cell and body sizes. Climatic variables did not drive any major patterns in cell size or body size; rather, latitude and longitude were the best predictors of cell and body size. In general, smaller body and cell sizes in Florida anoles drove geographic patterns in A. carolinensis. Small size in Florida may be attributable to the geological history of the peninsular state or the unique ecological factors in this area, including a recently introduced congener. In contrast to previous studies, we found that A. carolinensis does not follow Bergmann's rule when the influence of Florida is excluded. Rather, the opposite pattern of larger lizards in southern populations is evident in the absence of Florida populations, and mirrors the general pattern in squamates. Muscle cell size was negatively related to latitude and red blood cell size showed no latitudinal trend outside of Florida. Different patterns in the sizes of the 2 cell types confirm the importance of examining multiple cell types when studying geographic variation in cell size.

  18. Control of body size in C. elegans dependent on food and insulin/IGF-1 signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Shuhei; Miyahara, Kohji; Ohshima, Yasumi

    2011-06-01

    The body size of an organism is governed by genetic and environmental factors. As an environmental factor, food appears to be the most important for body size control in animals. C. elegans worms are usually grown on an E. coli strain OP50. We show that the wild-type worms fed on another E. coli strain HB101 grow 1.6 times as large as those fed on OP50. The regression line representing the relationship between the sizes of worms grown on each food for over 30 mutants was drawn, indicating that small mutants tend to be more affected by the change in food. Mutants for the DAF-2 insulin/IGF-1 receptor and downstream SGK-1, a homolog of the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase, grow less or little larger on HB101, indicating control of body size by these factors. Results on the suppression of mutations in these factors by a mutation in the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor indicate both DAF-16-dependent and DAF-16-independent control. Furthermore, we show that the food-dependent body size change is because of a change in cell size that is closely related to the protein content per cell.

  19. Sample size in orthodontic randomized controlled trials: are numbers justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletsi, Despina; Pandis, Nikolaos; Fleming, Padhraig S

    2014-02-01

    Sample size calculations are advocated by the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) group to justify sample sizes in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This study aimed to analyse the reporting of sample size calculations in trials published as RCTs in orthodontic speciality journals. The performance of sample size calculations was assessed and calculations verified where possible. Related aspects, including number of authors; parallel, split-mouth, or other design; single- or multi-centre study; region of publication; type of data analysis (intention-to-treat or per-protocol basis); and number of participants recruited and lost to follow-up, were considered. Of 139 RCTs identified, complete sample size calculations were reported in 41 studies (29.5 per cent). Parallel designs were typically adopted (n = 113; 81 per cent), with 80 per cent (n = 111) involving two arms and 16 per cent having three arms. Data analysis was conducted on an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis in a small minority of studies (n = 18; 13 per cent). According to the calculations presented, overall, a median of 46 participants were required to demonstrate sufficient power to highlight meaningful differences (typically at a power of 80 per cent). The median number of participants recruited was 60, with a median of 4 participants being lost to follow-up. Our finding indicates good agreement between projected numbers required and those verified (median discrepancy: 5.3 per cent), although only a minority of trials (29.5 per cent) could be examined. Although sample size calculations are often reported in trials published as RCTs in orthodontic speciality journals, presentation is suboptimal and in need of significant improvement.

  20. Effect of cell-size on the energy absorption features of closed-cell aluminium foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammi, S. K.; Edwards, G.; Shirvani, H.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of cell-size on the compressive response and energy absorption features of closed-cell aluminium (Al) foam were investigated by finite element method. Micromechanical models were constructed with a repeating unit-cell (RUC) which was sectioned from tetrakaidecahedra structure. Using this RUC, three Al foam models with different cell-sizes (large, medium and small) and all of same density, were built. These three different cell-size pieces of foam occupy the same volume and their domains contained 8, 27 and 64 RUCs respectively. However, the smaller cell-size foam has larger surface area to volume ratio compared to other two. Mechanical behaviour was modelled under uniaxial loading. All three aggregates (3D arrays of RUCs) of different cell-sizes showed an elastic region at the initial stage, then followed by a plateau, and finally, a densification region. The smaller cell size foam exhibited a higher peak-stress and a greater densification strain comparing other two cell-sizes investigated. It was demonstrated that energy absorption capabilities of smaller cell-size foams was higher compared to the larger cell-sizes examined.

  1. A Coarse Estimation of Cell Size Region from a Mesoscopic Stochastic Cell Cycle Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Ming; JIA Ya; LIU Quan; ZHU Chun-Lian; YANG Li-Jian

    2007-01-01

    Based on a deterministic cell cycle model of fission yeast, the effects of the finite cell size on the cell cycle regulation in wee1- cdc25△ double mutant type are numerically studied by using of the chemical Langevin equations. It is found that at a certain region of cell size, our numerical results from the chemical Langevin equations are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The two resettings to the G2 phase from early stages of mitosis can be induced under the moderate cell size. The quantized cycle times can be observed during such a cell size region. Therefore, a coarse estimation of cell size is obtained from the mesoscopic stochastic cell cycle model.

  2. A Coarse Estimation of Cell Size Region from a Mesoscopic Stochastic Cell Cycle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ming; Jia, Ya; Liu, Quan; Zhu, Chun-Lian; Yang, Li-Jian

    2007-07-01

    Based on a deterministic cell cycle model of fission yeast, the effects of the finite cell size on the cell cycle regulation in wee1- cdc25Δ double mutant type are numerically studied by using of the chemical Langevin equations. It is found that at a certain region of cell size, our numerical results from the chemical Langevin equations are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The two resettings to the G2 phase from early stages of mitosis can be induced under the moderate cell size. The quantized cycle times can be observed during such a cell size region. Therefore, a coarse estimation of cell size is obtained from the mesoscopic stochastic cell cycle model.

  3. The critical size is set at a single-cell level by growth rate to attain homeostasis and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Colomina, Neus; Palmisano, Alida; Garí, Eloi; Gallego, Carme; Csikász-Nagy, Attila; Aldea, Martí

    2012-01-01

    Budding yeast cells are assumed to trigger Start and enter the cell cycle only after they attain a critical size set by external conditions. However, arguing against deterministic models of cell size control, cell volume at Start displays great individual variability even under constant conditions. Here we show that cell size at Start is robustly set at a single-cell level by the volume growth rate in G1, which explains the observed variability. We find that this growth-rate-dependent sizer is intimately hardwired into the Start network and the Ydj1 chaperone is key for setting cell size as a function of the individual growth rate. Mathematical modelling and experimental data indicate that a growth-rate-dependent sizer is sufficient to ensure size homeostasis and, as a remarkable advantage over a rigid sizer mechanism, it reduces noise in G1 length and provides an immediate solution for size adaptation to external conditions at a population level.

  4. Size control by rate control in colloidal PbSe quantum dot synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čapek, Richard Karel; Yanover, Dianna; Lifshitz, Efrat

    2015-03-01

    A recently demonstrated approach to control the size of colloidal nanoparticles, ``size control by rate control'', which was validated on the examples of colloidal CdSe- and CdS-quantum dot (CQD) synthesis, appears to be a general strategy for designing technically applicable CQD-syntheses. The ``size control by rate control'' concept allows full-yield syntheses of ensembles of CQDs with different sizes by tuning the solute formation rate. In this work, we extended this strategy to dialkylphosphine enhanced hot-injection synthesis of PbSe-CQDs. Furthermore, we provide new insight into the reaction mechanism of dialkylphosphine enhancement in TOPSe based CQD-syntheses.A recently demonstrated approach to control the size of colloidal nanoparticles, ``size control by rate control'', which was validated on the examples of colloidal CdSe- and CdS-quantum dot (CQD) synthesis, appears to be a general strategy for designing technically applicable CQD-syntheses. The ``size control by rate control'' concept allows full-yield syntheses of ensembles of CQDs with different sizes by tuning the solute formation rate. In this work, we extended this strategy to dialkylphosphine enhanced hot-injection synthesis of PbSe-CQDs. Furthermore, we provide new insight into the reaction mechanism of dialkylphosphine enhancement in TOPSe based CQD-syntheses. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional data about the reaction and growth kinetics, NMR-data and exemplary TEM images of PbSe-CQDs prepared by the procedure described in this publication. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00028a

  5. Walking control of small size humanoid robot: HAJIME ROBOT 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hajime; Nakatsu, Ryohei

    2007-12-01

    HAJIME ROBOT 18 is a fully autonomous biped robot. It has been developed for RoboCup which is a worldwide soccer competition of robots. It is necessary for a robot to have high mobility to play soccer. High speed walking and all directional walking are important to approach and to locate in front of a ball. HAJIME ROBOT achieved these walking. This paper describes walking control of a small size humanoid robot 'HAJIME ROBOT 18' and shows the measurement result of ZMP (Zero Moment Point). HAJIME ROBOT won the Robotics Society of Japan Award in RoboCup 2005 and in RoboCup 2006 Japan Open.

  6. A LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium controls mitotic spindle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaoyu; Gholkar, Ankur; Senese, Silvia; Torres, Jorge Z

    2015-01-01

    Leucine carboxyl methyltransferase-1 (LCMT1) and protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) are essential enzymes that regulate the methylation of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2AC). LCMT1 and PME-1 have been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. We show here an important role for an LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium in controlling mitotic spindle size. Depletion of LCMT1 or overexpression of PME-1 led to long spindles. In contrast, depletion of PME-1, pharmacological inhibition of PME-1 or overexpression of LCMT1 led to short spindles. Furthermore, perturbation of the LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium led to mitotic arrest, spindle assembly checkpoint activation, defective cell divisions, induction of apoptosis and reduced cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium is critical for regulating mitotic spindle size and thereby proper cell division.

  7. Influence of texture feature size on spherical silicon solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAYASHI Shota; MINEMOTO Takashi; TAKAKURA Hideyuki; HAMAKAWA Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    The effects of surface texturing on spherical silicon solar cells were investigated. Surface texturing for spherical Si solar cells was prepared by immersing p-type spherical Si crystals in KOH solution with stirring. Two kinds of texture feature sizes (1 and 5μm pyramids) were prepared by changing stirring speed. After fabrication through our baseline processes, these cells were evaluated by solar cell performance and external quantum efficiency. The cell with 1 and 5μm pyramids shows the short circuit current density ( Jsc ) value of 31.9 and 33.2 mA·cm-2 , which is 9% and 13% relative increase compared to the cell without texturing. Furthermore, the cell with 5 μm pyramids has a higher open-circuit voltage (0.589 V) than the cell with 1 μm pyramids (0.577 V). As a result, the conversion efficiency was improved from 11.4% for the cell without texturing to 12.1% for the cell with 5 μm pyramids.

  8. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qian Peter; Du, Wanqing; Ji, Qinghua; Xue, Boxin; Jiang, Dong; Zhu, Yueyao; Lou, Jizhong; Yu, Li; Sun, Yujie

    2016-04-07

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro studies also lack physiological relevance. Here, we use lysosomes and autolysosomes, whose sizes range between 100 nm and 1 μm, as model systems to study the size effects on nanotube formation both in vivo and in vitro. Single molecule observations indicate that driven by kinesin motors, small vesicles (100-200 nm) are mainly transported along the tracks while a remarkable portion of large vesicles (500-1000 nm) form nanotubes. This size effect is further confirmed by in vitro reconstitution assays on liposomes and purified lysosomes and autolysosomes. We also apply Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to measure the initiation force for nanotube formation. These results suggest that the size-dependence may be one of the mechanisms for cells to regulate cellular processes involving membrane-deformation, such as the timing of tubulation-mediated vesicle recycling.

  9. Photocatalytic Properties of Size-Controlled Titania Nanotube Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Hashishin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The titania nanotube arrays (TNAs with smooth surface was synthesized by anodization of titanium foil with 3 cm2 in square area using the electrolyte composed of 0.2 wt% NH4F and 0.5 vol% H2SO4 in ethylene glycol in order to evaluate the methylene blue photodegradation under ultra-violet irradiation. The tube length and inner diameter as a size parameter were controlled by the anodization time from 5 to 10 h and applied voltage from 10 to 50 V. The titania nanotube arrays (TNAs annealed at 300 to 500°C were assigned to anatase phase, and TNAs at 600°C had both phase of anatase and rutile. The crystallite size and the apparent rate constant were increased with the increase in the annealing temperature of TNAs from 300 to 500°C. The bigger crystallite size of TNAs is suggested to be related to the increase in the amount of hole at the valence band, leading to the decrease in the apparent rate constant of MB degradation. Interestingly, the four kinds of linear relationship with the apparent rate constant were seen in both the inner diameter of TNAs and the length. Consequently, the apparent rate constant strongly depended on inner diameter of TNAs.

  10. Hydrophilic and size-controlled graphene nanopores for protein detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Gaurav; Bok Lee, Yong; Darvish, Armin; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes a general approach for transferring clean single-layer graphene onto silicon nitride nanopore devices and the use of the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to drill size-controlled nanopores in freely suspended graphene. Besides nanopore drilling, we also used the TEM to heal and completely close the unwanted secondary holes formed by electron beam damage during the drilling process. We demonstrate electron beam assisted shrinking of irregularly shaped 40-60 nm pores down to 2 nm, exhibiting an exquisite control of graphene nanopore diameter. Our fabrication workflow also rendered graphene nanopores hydrophilic, allowing easy wetting and use of the pores for studying protein translocation and protein-protein interaction with a high signal to noise ratio.

  11. Particle size tailoring of ursolic acid nanosuspensions for improved anticancer activity by controlled antisolvent precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yancai; Song, Ju; Chow, Shing Fung; Chow, Albert H L; Zheng, Ying

    2015-10-15

    The present study was aimed at tailoring the particle size of ursolic acid (UA) nanosuspension for improved anticancer activity. UA nanosuspensions were prepared by antisolvent precipitation using a four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM) under defined conditions of varying solvent composition, drug feeding concentration or stream flow rate. The resulting products were characterized for particle size and polydispersity. Two of the UA nanosuspensions with mean particle sizes of 100 and 300 nm were further assessed for their in-vitro activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells using fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, as well as flow cytometry with propidium (PI) staining and with double staining by fluorescein isothiocyanate. It was revealed that the solvent composition, drug feeding concentration and stream flow rate were critical parameters for particle size control of the UA nanosuspensions generated with the MIVM. Specifically, decreasing the UA feeding concentration or increasing the stream flow rate or ethanol content resulted in a reduction of particle size. Excellent reproducibility for nanosuspension production was demonstrated for the 100 and 300 nm UA preparations with a deviation of not more than 5% in particle size from the mean value of three independent batches. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that these two different sized UA nanosuspensions, particularly the 300 nm sample, exhibited a higher anti-proliferation activity against the MCF-7 cells and afforded a larger population of these cells in both early and late apoptotic phases. In conclusion, MIVM is a robust and pragmatic tool for tailoring the particle size of the UA nanosuspension. Particle size appears to be a critical determinant of the anticancer activity of the UA nanoparticles.

  12. Cyclin D3 coordinates the cell cycle during differentiation to regulate erythrocyte size and number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vijay G; Ludwig, Leif S; Sicinska, Ewa; Xu, Jian; Bauer, Daniel E; Eng, Jennifer C; Patterson, Heide Christine; Metcalf, Ryan A; Natkunam, Yasodha; Orkin, Stuart H; Sicinski, Piotr; Lander, Eric S; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-09-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified a genetic variant of moderate effect size at 6p21.1 associated with erythrocyte traits in humans. We show that this variant affects an erythroid-specific enhancer of CCND3. A Ccnd3 knockout mouse phenocopies these erythroid phenotypes, with a dramatic increase in erythrocyte size and a concomitant decrease in erythrocyte number. By examining human and mouse primary erythroid cells, we demonstrate that the CCND3 gene product cyclin D3 regulates the number of cell divisions that erythroid precursors undergo during terminal differentiation, thereby controlling erythrocyte size and number. We illustrate how cell type-specific specialization can occur for general cell cycle components-a finding resulting from the biological follow-up of unbiased human genetic studies.

  13. Heterotrophic free-living and particle-bound bacterial cell size in the river Cauvery and its downstream tributaries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T S Harsha; Sadanand M Yamakanamardi; M Mahadevaswamy

    2007-03-01

    This is the first comprehensive study on planktonic heterotrophic bacterial cell size in the river Cauvery and its important tributaries in Karnataka State, India. The initial hypothesis that the mean cell size of planktonic heterotrophic bacteria in the four tributaries are markedly different from each other and also from that in the main river Cauvery was rejected, because all five watercourses showed similar planktonic heterotrophic bacterial cell size. Examination of the correlation between mean heterotrophic bacterial cell size and environmental variables showed four correlations in the river Arkavathy and two in the river Shimsha. Regression analysis revealed that 18% of the variation in mean heterotrophic free-living bacterial cell size was due to biological oxygen demand (BOD) in the river Arkavathy, 11% due to surface water velocity (SWV) in the river Cauvery and 11% due to temperature in the river Kapila. Heterotrophic particle-bound bacterial cell size variation was 28% due to chloride and BOD in the river Arkavathy, 11% due to conductivity in the river Kapila and 8% due to calcium in the river Cauvery. This type of relationship between heterotrophic bacterial cell size and environmental variables suggests that, though the mean heterotrophic bacterial cell size was similar in all the five water courses, different sets of environmental variables apparently control the heterotrophic bacterial cell size in the various water bodies studied in this investigation. The possible cause for this environmental (bottom–up) control is discussed.

  14. Controlling Cell Function with Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrksich, Milan

    2012-02-01

    This presentation will describe the use of patterned substrates to control cell shape with examples that illustrate the ways in which cell shape can regulate cell function. Most cells are adherent and must attach to and spread on a surface in order to survive, proliferate and function. In tissue, this surface is the extracellular matrix (ECM), an insoluble scaffold formed by the assembly of several large proteins---including fibronectin, the laminins and collagens and others---but in the laboratory, the surface is prepared by adsorbing protein to glass slides. To pattern cells, gold-coated slides are patterned with microcontact printing to create geometric features that promote cell attachment and that are surrounded by inert regions. Cells attach to these substrates and spread to adopt the shape defined by the underlying pattern and remain stable in culture for several days. Examples will be described that used a series of shapes to reveal the relationship between the shape of the cell and the structure of its cytoskeleton. These geometric cues were used to control cell polarity and the tension, or contractility, present in the cytoskeleton. These rules were further used to control the shapes of mesenchymal stem cells and in turn to control the differentiation of these cells into specialized cell types. For example, stem cells that were patterned into a ``star'' shape preferentially differentiated into bone cells whereas those that were patterned into a ``flower'' shape preferred a fat cell fate. These influences of shape on differentiation depend on the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton. These examples, and others, reveal that shape is an important cue that informs cell function and that can be combined with the more common soluble cues to direct and study cell function.

  15. Environment friendly approach for size controllable synthesis of biocompatible Silver nanoparticles using diastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddinedi, Sireesh Babu; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Anna, Kiran Kumar

    2017-01-01

    A green, facile method for the size selective synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using diastase as green reducing and stabilizing agent is reported. The thiol groups present in the diastase are mainly responsible for the rapid reaction rate of silver nanoparticles synthesis. The variation in the size and morphology of AgNPs were studied by changing the pH of diastase. The prepared silver nanoparticles were characterized by using UV-vis, XRD, FTIR, TEM and SAED. The FTIR analysis revealed the stabilization of diastase molecules on the surface of AgNPs. Additionally, in-vitro cytotoxicity experiments concluded that the cytotoxicity of the as-synthesized AgNPs towards mouse fibroblast (3T3) cell lines is dose and size dependent. Furthermore, the present method is an alternative to the traditional chemical methods of size controlled AgNPs synthesis.

  16. Cell size and cancer: a new solution to Peto's paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciak, Sebastian; Michalak, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Cancer, one of the leading health concerns for humans, is by no means a human-unique malady. Accumulating evidence shows that cancer kills domestic and wild animals at a similar rate to humans and can even pose a conservation threat to certain species. Assuming that each physiologically active and proliferating cell is at risk of malignant transformation, any evolutionary increase in the number of cells (and thus body mass) will lead to a higher cancer frequency, all else being equal. However, available data fail to support the prediction that bigger animals are affected by cancer more than smaller ones. The unexpected lack of correlation between body size (and life span) and cancer risk across taxa was dubbed Peto's paradox. In this perspective, several plausible explanations of Peto's paradox are presented, with the emphasis on a largely underappreciated relation of cell size to both metabolism and cell division rates across species, which we believe are key factors underlying the paradox. We conclude that larger organisms have bigger and slowly dividing cells with lower energy turnover, all significantly reducing the risk of cancer initiation. Solving Peto's paradox will enhance our understanding the evolution of cancer and may provide new implications for cancer prevention and treatment.

  17. Photovoltaic Performance of Perovskite Solar Cells with Different Grain Sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Do; Ohkita, Hideo; Benten, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinzaburo

    2016-02-01

    Perovskite solar cells exhibit improved photovoltaic parameters with increasing perovskite grain size. The larger photocurrent is due to the enhanced absorption efficiency for thicker perovskite layers. The larger open-circuit voltage (VOC ) is ascribed to the reduced trap-assisted recombination for the larger grains. As a result, the power conversion efficiency exceeds 19% at best. Further improvement in VOC would be possible if the trap density were reduced.

  18. Surfactant effects in magnetite nanoparticles of controlled size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardia, P. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (IN2UB) , Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028- Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Batlle-Brugal, B. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (IN2UB) , Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028- Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Roca, A.G. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Iglesias, O. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (IN2UB) , Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028- Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Morales, M.P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Serna, C.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Labarta, A. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (IN2UB) , Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028- Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Batlle, X. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (IN2UB) , Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028- Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)]. E-mail: xavier@ffn.ub.es

    2007-09-15

    Magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles of controlled size within 6 and 20 nm in diameter were synthesised by thermal decomposition of an iron organic precursor in an organic medium. Particles were coated with oleic acid. For all samples studied, saturation magnetisation M{sub s} is size-independent, and reaches a value close to that expected for bulk magnetite, in contrast to results in small particle systems for which M{sub s} is usually much smaller due to surface spin disorder. The coercive field for the 6 nm particles is in agreement with coherent rotation, taking the bulk magnetocrystalline anisotropy into account. Both results suggest that the oleic acid molecules covalently bonded to the nanoparticle surface yield a strong reduction in the surface spin disorder. However, although the saturated state may be similar, the approach to saturation is different and, in particular, the high-field differential susceptibility is one order of magnitude larger than in bulk materials. The relevance of these results in biomedical applications is discussed.

  19. Stationary Size Distributions of Growing Cells with Binary and Multiple Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rading, M. M.; Engel, T. A.; Lipowsky, R.; Valleriani, A.

    2011-10-01

    Populations of unicellular organisms that grow under constant environmental conditions are considered theoretically. The size distribution of these cells is calculated analytically, both for the usual process of binary division, in which one mother cell produces always two daughter cells, and for the more complex process of multiple division, in which one mother cell can produce 2 n daughter cells with n=1,2,3,… . The latter mode of division is inspired by the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The uniform response of the whole population to different environmental conditions is encoded in the individual rates of growth and division of the cells. The analytical treatment of the problem is based on size-dependent rules for cell growth and stochastic transition processes for cell division. The comparison between binary and multiple division shows that these different division processes lead to qualitatively different results for the size distribution and the population growth rates.

  20. Pro-apoptotic protein Noxa regulates memory T cell population size and protects against lethal immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensveen, Felix M; Klarenbeek, Paul L; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Pascutti, Maria F; Derks, Ingrid A M; van Schaik, Barbera D C; Ten Brinke, Anja; de Vries, Niek; Cekinovic, Durdica; Jonjic, Stipan; van Lier, René A W; Eldering, Eric

    2013-02-01

    Memory T cells form a highly specific defense layer against reinfection with previously encountered pathogens. In addition, memory T cells provide protection against pathogens that are similar, but not identical to the original infectious agent. This is because each T cell response harbors multiple clones with slightly different affinities, thereby creating T cell memory with a certain degree of diversity. Currently, the mechanisms that control size, diversity, and cross-reactivity of the memory T cell pool are incompletely defined. Previously, we established a role for apoptosis, mediated by the BH3-only protein Noxa, in controlling diversity of the effector T cell population. This function might positively or negatively impact T cell memory in terms of function, pool size, and cross-reactivity during recall responses. Therefore, we investigated the role of Noxa in T cell memory during acute and chronic infections. Upon influenza infection, Noxa(-/-) mice generate a memory compartment of increased size and clonal diversity. Reinfection resulted in an increased recall response, whereas cross-reactive responses were impaired. Chronic infection of Noxa(-/-) mice with mouse CMV resulted in enhanced memory cell inflation, but no obvious pathology. In contrast, in a model of continuous, high-level T cell activation, reduced apoptosis of activated T cells rapidly led to severe organ pathology and premature death in Noxa-deficient mice. These results establish Noxa as an important regulator of the number of memory cells formed during infection. Chronic immune activation in the absence of Noxa leads to excessive accumulation of primed cells, which may result in severe pathology.

  1. Scaffolds and cells for tissue regeneration: different scaffold pore sizes-different cell effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Bironaitė, Daiva; Bagdonas, Edvardas; Bernotienė, Eiva

    2016-05-01

    During the last decade biomaterial sciences and tissue engineering have become new scientific fields supplying rising demand of regenerative therapy. Tissue engineering requires consolidation of a broad knowledge of cell biology and modern biotechnology investigating biocompatibility of materials and their application for the reconstruction of damaged organs and tissues. Stem cell-based tissue regeneration started from the direct cell transplantation into damaged tissues or blood vessels. However, it is difficult to track transplanted cells and keep them in one particular place of diseased organ. Recently, new technologies such as cultivation of stem cell on the scaffolds and subsequently their implantation into injured tissue have been extensively developed. Successful tissue regeneration requires scaffolds with particular mechanical stability or biodegradability, appropriate size, surface roughness and porosity to provide a suitable microenvironment for the sufficient cell-cell interaction, cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. Further functioning of implanted cells highly depends on the scaffold pore sizes that play an essential role in nutrient and oxygen diffusion and waste removal. In addition, pore sizes strongly influence cell adhesion, cell-cell interaction and cell transmigration across the membrane depending on the various purposes of tissue regeneration. Therefore, this review will highlight contemporary tendencies in application of non-degradable scaffolds and stem cells in regenerative medicine with a particular focus on the pore sizes significantly affecting final recover of diseased organs.

  2. Size-Controlled Synthesis of Sub-10 nm PtNi3 Alloy Nanoparticles and their Unusual Volcano-Shaped Size Effect on ORR Electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lin; Rudi, Stefan; Cui, Chunhua; Heggen, Marc; Strasser, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Dealloyed Pt bimetallic core-shell catalysts derived from low-Pt bimetallic alloy nanoparticles (e.g, PtNi3 ) have recently shown unprecedented activity and stability on the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) under realistic fuel cell conditions and become today's catalyst of choice for commercialization of automobile fuel cells. A critical step toward this breakthrough is to control their particle size below a critical value (≈10 nm) to suppress nanoporosity formation and hence reduce significant base metal (e.g., Ni) leaching under the corrosive ORR condition. Fine size control of the sub-10 nm PtNi3 nanoparticles and understanding their size dependent ORR electrocatalysis are crucial to further improve their ORR activity and stability yet still remain unexplored. A robust synthetic approach is presented here for size-controlled PtNi3 nanoparticles between 3 and 10 nm while keeping a constant particle composition and their size-selected growth mechanism is studied comprehensively. This enables us to address their size-dependent ORR activities and stabilities for the first time. Contrary to the previously established monotonic increase of ORR specific activity and stability with increasing particle size on Pt and Pt-rich bimetallic nanoparticles, the Pt-poor PtNi3 nanoparticles exhibit an unusual "volcano-shaped" size dependence, showing the highest ORR activity and stability at the particle sizes between 6 and 8 nm due to their highest Ni retention during long-term catalyst aging. The results of this study provide important practical guidelines for the size selection of the low Pt bimetallic ORR electrocatalysts with further improved durably high activity.

  3. A moonlighting enzyme links Escherichia coli cell size with central metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert S Hill

    Full Text Available Growth rate and nutrient availability are the primary determinants of size in single-celled organisms: rapidly growing Escherichia coli cells are more than twice as large as their slow growing counterparts. Here we report the identification of the glucosyltransferase OpgH as a nutrient-dependent regulator of E. coli cell size. During growth under nutrient-rich conditions, OpgH localizes to the nascent septal site, where it antagonizes assembly of the tubulin-like cell division protein FtsZ, delaying division and increasing cell size. Biochemical analysis is consistent with OpgH sequestering FtsZ from growing polymers. OpgH is functionally analogous to UgtP, a Bacillus subtilis glucosyltransferase that inhibits cell division in a growth rate-dependent fashion. In a striking example of convergent evolution, OpgH and UgtP share no homology, have distinct enzymatic activities, and appear to inhibit FtsZ assembly through different mechanisms. Comparative analysis of E. coli and B. subtilis reveals conserved aspects of growth rate regulation and cell size control that are likely to be broadly applicable. These include the conservation of uridine diphosphate glucose as a proxy for nutrient status and the use of moonlighting enzymes to couple growth rate-dependent phenomena to central metabolism.

  4. A chemical screen probing the relationship between mitochondrial content and cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshimori Kitami

    Full Text Available The cellular content of mitochondria changes dynamically during development and in response to external stimuli, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. To systematically identify molecular probes and pathways that control mitochondrial abundance, we developed a high-throughput imaging assay that tracks both the per cell mitochondrial content and the cell size in confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We screened 28,786 small molecules and observed that hundreds of small molecules are capable of increasing or decreasing the cellular content of mitochondria in a manner proportionate to cell size, revealing stereotyped control of these parameters. However, only a handful of compounds dissociate this relationship. We focus on one such compound, BRD6897, and demonstrate through secondary assays that it increases the cellular content of mitochondria as evidenced by fluorescence microscopy, mitochondrial protein content, and respiration, even after rigorous correction for cell size, cell volume, or total protein content. BRD6897 increases uncoupled respiration 1.6-fold in two different, non-dividing cell types. Based on electron microscopy, BRD6897 does not alter the percent of cytoplasmic area occupied by mitochondria, but instead, induces a striking increase in the electron density of existing mitochondria. The mechanism is independent of known transcriptional programs and is likely to be related to a blockade in the turnover of mitochondrial proteins. At present the molecular target of BRD6897 remains to be elucidated, but if identified, could reveal an important additional mechanism that governs mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover.

  5. Graphene-Based Flexible Micrometer-Sized Microbial Fuel Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2013-10-23

    Microbial fuel cells harvest electrical energy produced by bacteria during the natural decomposition of organic matter. We report a micrometer-sized microbial fuel cell that is able to generate nanowatt-scale power from microliters of liquids. The sustainable design is comprised of a graphene anode, an air cathode, and a polymer-based substrate platform for flexibility. The graphene layer was grown on a nickel thin film by using chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure. Our demonstration provides a low-cost option to generate useful power for lab-on-chip applications and could be promising to rapidly screen and scale up microbial fuel cells for water purification without consuming excessive power (unlike other water treatment technologies).

  6. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S.; Morono, Y.; Littmann, S.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Lomstein, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Into the seafloor, a radical decline in nutrient and energy availability poses strong metabolic demands to any residing life. However, a sedimentary microbial ecosystem seems to maintain itself close to what we understand to be the energetic limit of life. Since a complex sediment matrix is interfering with the analysis of whole cells and sub-cellular compounds such as cell wall and membrane molecules, little is known about the physiological properties of cells in the deep biosphere. Here we focus on the size and carbon content of cells from a 90-m sediment drill core retrieved in October 2013 at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea, in 437 meters water depth. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density centrifugation and visualized via fluorescence microscopy (FM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography after cells had additionally been purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Cell-carbon turnover times were estimated using an amino acid racemization model that is based on the built-in molecular clock of aspartic acid, which due to racemization alternates between the D- and L-isomeric configurations over timescales of thousands of years at low in-situ temperatures (≈4˚C). We find that the majority of microbial cells in the sediment have coccoid or rod-shaped morphology, and that absolute values for cell volume are strongly dependent on the method used, spanning three orders of magnitude from approximately 0.001 to 1 µm3 for both coccoid and rod-shaped cells. From the surface to the deepest sample measured (≈60 mbsf), cell volume decreases by an order of magnitude, and carbon content is in the lower range (factors. Cell-carbon is turned over approximately every 50-600 years, and total carbon oxidation rates decrease from ≈3400

  7. Size-controlled and redox-responsive supramolecular nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Mejia-Ariza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Control over the assembly and disassembly of nanoparticles is pivotal for their use as drug delivery vehicles. Here, we aim to form supramolecular nanoparticles (SNPs by combining advantages of the reversible assembly properties of SNPs using host–guest interactions and of a stimulus-responsive moiety. The SNPs are composed of a core of positively charged poly(ethylene imine grafted with β-cyclodextrin (CD and a positively charged ferrocene (Fc-terminated poly(amidoamine dendrimer, with a monovalent stabilizer at the surface. Fc was chosen for its loss of CD-binding properties when oxidizing it to the ferrocenium cation. The ionic strength was shown to play an important role in controlling the aggregate growth. The attractive supramolecular and repulsive electrostatic interactions constitute a balance of forces in this system at low ionic strengths. At higher ionic strengths, the increased charge screening led to a loss of electrostatic repulsion and therefore to faster aggregate growth. A Job plot showed that a 1:1 stoichiometry of host and guest moieties gave the most efficient aggregate growth. Different stabilizers were used to find the optimal stopper to limit the growth. A weaker guest moiety was shown to be less efficient in stabilizing the SNPs. Also steric repulsion is important for achieving SNP stability. SNPs of controlled particle size and good stability (up to seven days were prepared by fine-tuning the ratio of multivalent and monovalent interactions. Finally, reversibility of the SNPs was confirmed by oxidizing the Fc guest moieties in the core of the SNPs.

  8. Size-controlled and redox-responsive supramolecular nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Ariza, Raquel; Kronig, Gavin A; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2015-01-01

    Control over the assembly and disassembly of nanoparticles is pivotal for their use as drug delivery vehicles. Here, we aim to form supramolecular nanoparticles (SNPs) by combining advantages of the reversible assembly properties of SNPs using host-guest interactions and of a stimulus-responsive moiety. The SNPs are composed of a core of positively charged poly(ethylene imine) grafted with β-cyclodextrin (CD) and a positively charged ferrocene (Fc)-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimer, with a monovalent stabilizer at the surface. Fc was chosen for its loss of CD-binding properties when oxidizing it to the ferrocenium cation. The ionic strength was shown to play an important role in controlling the aggregate growth. The attractive supramolecular and repulsive electrostatic interactions constitute a balance of forces in this system at low ionic strengths. At higher ionic strengths, the increased charge screening led to a loss of electrostatic repulsion and therefore to faster aggregate growth. A Job plot showed that a 1:1 stoichiometry of host and guest moieties gave the most efficient aggregate growth. Different stabilizers were used to find the optimal stopper to limit the growth. A weaker guest moiety was shown to be less efficient in stabilizing the SNPs. Also steric repulsion is important for achieving SNP stability. SNPs of controlled particle size and good stability (up to seven days) were prepared by fine-tuning the ratio of multivalent and monovalent interactions. Finally, reversibility of the SNPs was confirmed by oxidizing the Fc guest moieties in the core of the SNPs.

  9. The coordination of ploidy and cell size differs between cell layers in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Yohei; Hasegawa, Junko; Fujikura, Ushio; Hoshino, Rina; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2016-04-01

    Growth and developmental processes are occasionally accompanied by multiple rounds of DNA replication, known as endoreduplication. Coordination between endoreduplication and cell size regulation often plays a crucial role in proper organogenesis and cell differentiation. Here, we report that the level of correlation between ploidy and cell volume is different in the outer and inner cell layers of leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana using a novel imaging technique. Although there is a well-known, strong correlation between ploidy and cell volume in pavement cells of the epidermis, this correlation was extremely weak in palisade mesophyll cells. Induction of epidermis cell identity based on the expression of the homeobox gene ATML1 in mesophyll cells enhanced the level of correlation between ploidy and cell volume to near that of wild-type epidermal cells. We therefore propose that the correlation between ploidy and cell volume is regulated by cell identity.

  10. Film Grain-Size Related Long-Term Stability of Inverted Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chien-Hung; Wu, Chun-Guey

    2016-09-22

    The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the perovskite solar cell is high enough to be commercially viable. The next important issue is the stability of the device. This article discusses the effect of the perovskite grain-size on the long-term stability of inverted perovskite solar cells. Perovskite films composed of various sizes of grains were prepared by controlling the solvent annealing time. The grain-size related stability of the inverted cells was investigated both in ambient atmosphere at relative humidity of approximately 30-40 % and in a nitrogen filled glove box (H2 Osolar cell based on a perovskite film having the grain size larger than 1 μm (D-10) decreases less than 10 % with storage in a glove box and less than 15 % when it was stored under an ambient atmosphere for 30 days. However, the cell using the perovskite film composed of small (∼100 nm) perovskite grains (D-0) exhibits complete loss of PCE after storage under the ambient atmosphere for only 15 days and a PCE loss of up to 70 % with storage in the glove box for 30 days. These results suggest that, even under H2 O-free conditions, the chemical- and thermal-induced production of pin holes at the grain boundaries of the perovskite film could be the reason for long-term instability of inverted perovskite solar cells.

  11. Microcephaly disease gene Wdr62 regulates mitotic progression of embryonic neural stem cells and brain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Fu; Zhang, Ying; Wilde, Jonathan; Hansen, Kirk C; Lai, Fan; Niswander, Lee

    2014-05-30

    Human genetic studies have established a link between a class of centrosome proteins and microcephaly. Current studies of microcephaly focus on defective centrosome/spindle orientation. Mutations in WDR62 are associated with microcephaly and other cortical abnormalities in humans. Here we create a mouse model of Wdr62 deficiency and find that the mice exhibit reduced brain size due to decreased neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Wdr62 depleted cells show spindle instability, spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation, mitotic arrest and cell death. Mechanistically, Wdr62 associates and genetically interacts with Aurora A to regulate spindle formation, mitotic progression and brain size. Our results suggest that Wdr62 interacts with Aurora A to control mitotic progression, and loss of these interactions leads to mitotic delay and cell death of NPCs, which could be a potential cause of human microcephaly.

  12. Ragweed subpollen particles of respirable size activate human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitti Pazmandi

    Full Text Available Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(PH oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs. We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3(+ pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(PH oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs in the airways and SPPs' NAD(PH oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins.

  13. Size-controlled synthesis of biodegradable nanocarriers for targeted and controlled cancer drug delivery using salting out cation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madasamy Hari Balakrishanan; Mariappan Rajan

    2016-02-01

    Research for synthesis of size-controlled carriers is currently challenging one. In this research paper, a method for size-controlled synthesis of biodegradable nanocarriers is proposed and described. Salting out method is suitable for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for the encapsulation on carriers. This synthetic method is based on polylactic acid (PLA) and non-ionic carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) composed by CaCl2 as salting out agent. This method permits size-controlled synthesis of particles between 50 and 400 nm simply by varying the concentration of salting out agents. We have prepared cisplatin (CDDP)-loaded PLA-CMC nanocarriers by salting out method, with varying salting out agent (CaCl2) concentrations as 0.05, 0.2, 0.35 and 0.5 M. The nanocarriers were characterized for their size, surface charge and morphology by atomic force microscope, zeta potential analyser and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency and in-vitro drug-releasing behaviour of the nanocarriers were investigated. The cytotoxicity effect of nanocarriers and drug-loaded nanocarriers was tested against MCF-7 breast cancer cell line.

  14. Quantifying size-dependent interactions between fluorescently labeled polystyrene nanoparticles and mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varela Juan A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanoparticles (NPs are currently used in a wide variety of fields such as technology, medicine and industry. Due to the novelty of these applications and to ensure their success, a precise characterization of the interactions between NPs and cells is essential. Findings The current study explores the uptake of polystyrene NPs by 1321N1 human astrocytoma and A549 human lung carcinoma cell lines. In this work we show for the first time a comparison of the uptake rates of fluorescently labeled carboxylated polystyrene (PS NPs of different sizes (20, 40 and 100 nm in two different cell types, keeping the number of NPs per unit volume constant for all sizes. We propose a reliable methodology to control the dose of fluorescently labeled NPs, by counting individual NPs using automated particle detection from 3D confocal microscopy images. The possibility of detecting individual NPs also allowed us to calculate the size of each nanoparticle and compare the fluorescence of single NPs across different sizes, thereby providing a robust platform for normalization of NP internalization experiments as measured by flow cytometry. Conclusions Our findings show that 40 nm NPs are internalized faster than 20 nm or 100 nm particles in both cell lines studied, suggesting that there is a privileged size gap in which the internalization of NPs is higher.

  15. Quantifying size-dependent interactions between fluorescently labeled polystyrene nanoparticles and mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles (NPs) are currently used in a wide variety of fields such as technology, medicine and industry. Due to the novelty of these applications and to ensure their success, a precise characterization of the interactions between NPs and cells is essential. Findings The current study explores the uptake of polystyrene NPs by 1321N1 human astrocytoma and A549 human lung carcinoma cell lines. In this work we show for the first time a comparison of the uptake rates of fluorescently labeled carboxylated polystyrene (PS) NPs of different sizes (20, 40 and 100 nm) in two different cell types, keeping the number of NPs per unit volume constant for all sizes. We propose a reliable methodology to control the dose of fluorescently labeled NPs, by counting individual NPs using automated particle detection from 3D confocal microscopy images. The possibility of detecting individual NPs also allowed us to calculate the size of each nanoparticle and compare the fluorescence of single NPs across different sizes, thereby providing a robust platform for normalization of NP internalization experiments as measured by flow cytometry. Conclusions Our findings show that 40 nm NPs are internalized faster than 20 nm or 100 nm particles in both cell lines studied, suggesting that there is a privileged size gap in which the internalization of NPs is higher. PMID:23006133

  16. Size-Dependent Photodynamic Anticancer Activity of Biocompatible Multifunctional Magnetic Submicron Particles in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyong-Hoon; Nam, Ki Chang; Malkinski, Leszek; Choi, Eun Ha; Jung, Jin-Seung; Park, Bong Joo

    2016-09-06

    In this study, newly designed biocompatible multifunctional magnetic submicron particles (CoFe₂O₄-HPs-FAs) of well-defined sizes (60, 133, 245, and 335 nm) were fabricated for application as a photosensitizer delivery agent for photodynamic therapy in cancer cells. To provide selective targeting of cancer cells and destruction of cancer cell functionality, basic cobalt ferrite (CoFe₂O₄) particles were covalently bonded with a photosensitizer (PS), which comprises hematoporphyrin (HP), and folic acid (FA) molecules. The magnetic properties of the CoFe₂O₄ particles were finely adjusted by controlling the size of the primary CoFe₂O₄ nanograins, and secondary superstructured composite particles were formed by aggregation of the nanograins. The prepared CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited high water solubility, good MR-imaging capacity, and biocompatibility without any in vitro cytotoxicity. In particular, our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited remarkable photodynamic anticancer efficiency via induction of apoptotic death in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a particle size- and concentration-dependent manner. This size-dependent effect was determined by the specific surface area of the particles because the number of HP molecules increased with decreasing size and increasing surface area. These results indicate that our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA may be applicable for photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a PS delivery material and a therapeutic agent for MR-imaging based PDT owing to their high saturation value for magnetization and superparamagnetism.

  17. A Total Quality-Control Plan with Right-Sized Statistical Quality-Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgard, James O

    2017-03-01

    A new Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments option for risk-based quality-control (QC) plans became effective in January, 2016. Called an Individualized QC Plan, this option requires the laboratory to perform a risk assessment, develop a QC plan, and implement a QC program to monitor ongoing performance of the QC plan. Difficulties in performing a risk assessment may limit validity of an Individualized QC Plan. A better alternative is to develop a Total QC Plan including a right-sized statistical QC procedure to detect medically important errors. Westgard Sigma Rules provides a simple way to select the right control rules and the right number of control measurements.

  18. Morphology, dendritic field size, somal size, density, and coverage of M and P retinal ganglion cells of dichromatic Cebus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, E S; Silveira, L C; Perry, V H

    1996-01-01

    Male Cebus monkeys are all dichromats, but about two thirds of the females are trichromats. M and P retinal ganglion cells were studied in the male Cebus monkey to investigate the relationship of their morphology to retinal eccentricity. Retinal ganglion cells were retrogradely labeled after optic nerve deposits of biocytin to reveal their entire dendritic tree. Cebus M and P ganglion cell morphology revealed by biocytin retrograde filling is similar to that described for macaque and human M and P ganglion cells obtained by in vitro intracellular injection of HRP and neurobiotin. We measured 264 and 441 M and P ganglion cells, respectively. M ganglion cells have larger dendritic field and cell body size than P ganglion cells at any comparable temporal or nasal eccentricity. Dendritic trees of both M and P ganglion cells are smaller in the nasal than in the temporal region at eccentricities greater than 5 mm and 2 mm for M and P ganglion cells, respectively. The depth of terminal dendrites allows identification of both inner and outer subclasses of M and P ganglion cells. The difference in dendritic tree size between inner and outer cells is small or absent. Comparison between Cebus and Macaca shows that M and P ganglion cells have similar sizes in the central retinal region. The results support the view that M and P pathways are similarly organized in diurnal dichromat and trichromat primates.

  19. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  20. Arabidopsis haiku mutants reveal new controls of seed size by endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Damien; Saingery, Virginie; Chambrier, Pierre; Mayer, Ulrike; Jürgens, Gerd; Berger, Frédéric

    2003-04-01

    In flowering plants, maternal seed integument encloses the embryo and the endosperm, which are both derived from double fertilization. Although the development of these three components must be coordinated, we have limited knowledge of mechanisms involved in such coordination. The endosperm may play a central role in these mechanisms as epigenetic modifications of endosperm development, via imbalance of dosage between maternal and paternal genomes, affecting both the embryo and the integument. To identify targets of such epigenetic controls, we designed a genetic screen in Arabidopsis for mutants that phenocopy the effects of dosage imbalance in the endosperm. The two mutants haiku 1 and haiku 2 produce seed of reduced size that resemble seed with maternal excess in the maternal/paternal dosage. Homozygous haiku seed develop into plants indistinguishable from wild type. Each mutation is sporophytic recessive, and double-mutant analysis suggests that both mutations affect the same genetic pathway. The endosperm of haiku mutants shows a premature arrest of increase in size that causes precocious cellularization of the syncytial endosperm. Reduction of seed size in haiku results from coordinated reduction of endosperm size, embryo proliferation, and cell elongation of the maternally derived integument. We present further evidence for a control of integument development mediated by endosperm-derived signals.

  1. Control of grain size in sublimation-grown CdTe, and the improvement in performance of devices with systematically increased grain size

    OpenAIRE

    Major, Jonathan; Proskuryakov, Yuri; Durose, Ken; Zoppi, Guillaume; Forbes, Ian

    2010-01-01

    A method to control the grain size of CdTe thin films deposited by close space sublimation using chamber pressure is demonstrated. Grain diameter is shown to increase in the pressure range 2–200 Torr, following the linear relationship D (?m)=0.027×P (Torr)+0.90. A mechanism is proposed to explain the dominance of the 111 preferred orientation in the small-grained, but not the large-grained films. For a series of CdTe/CdS solar cells in which the only variable was grain size, the performance p...

  2. RNA Control of HIV-1 Particle Size Polydispersity

    CERN Document Server

    Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Thomas, Audrey; Tartour, Kevin; Beck, Yvonne; Iazykov, Maksym; Danial, John; Lourdin, Morgane; Muriaux, Delphine; Castelnovo, Martin

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1, an enveloped RNA virus, produces viral particles that are known to be much more heterogeneous in size than is typical of non-enveloped viruses. We present here a novel strategy to study HIV-1 Viral Like Particles (VLP) assembly by measuring the size distribution of these purified VLPs and subsequent viral cores thanks to Atomic Force Microscopy imaging and statistical analysis. This strategy allowed us to identify whether the presence of viral RNA acts as a modulator for VLPs and cores size heterogeneity in a large population of particles. These results are analyzed in the light of a recently proposed statistical physics model for the self-assembly process. In particular, our results reveal that the modulation of size distribution by the presence of viral RNA is qualitatively reproduced, suggesting therefore an entropic origin for the modulation of RNA uptake by the nascent VLP.

  3. Studies on the particle size control of gelatin microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixue SUN; Jingjing SHI; Yanchuan GUO; Lijuan CHEN

    2009-01-01

    A series of gelatin microspheres (GMs) were prepared through emulsification-coacervation method in water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions. The influence of preparation parameters on particle size, surface morphology, and dispersion of GMs was examined. The studied preparation parameters include concentration of gelatin solutions, concentration of the emulsifier, w/o ratio, emulsifying time, stirring speed, and so on. The surface morphology, dispersion, and particle sizes of GMs were determined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SemAfore 4 Demo software, and particle size distribution graphic charts. The experimental results indicated that increasing the concentration of gelatin solution would increase the particle size of GMs. When the solution concentration increased from 0.050 to 0.200 g/mL gradually, the particle size increased correspondingly. The relationship between the two quantities was linear. On the contrary, increasing the concentration of the emulsifier would decrease the particle size of GMs. Furthermore, the particle size reduced quickly at initial time and slowed down latterly. With the increase of emulsifier concentration from 0 to 0.020 g/mL, the mean diameters of GMs decreased from 17.32 to 5.38 urn. However, the particle size dwindled slowly when emulsifier concentration was higher than 0.020 g/mL. The excellent result was obtained with the condition of 0.050 g/mL of emulsifier concentration, 0.100 g/mL of gelatin solution concentration, 1/5 of w/o ratio, 10 min of emulsifying time, and 900 r/min of the stirring speed. The GMs prepared at this condition had the smallest sizes, the narrowest size distribution, the best spherical shape, and fluidity. The w/o ratio has the same influence on particle size of GMs as that of gelatin solution concentration. With the increase of w/o ratio, the average particle sizes increased linearly, and the surface of microspheres become smoother as well. It is supposed that w/o ratio can be used to change the diameters

  4. Novel approach to fabricate keratin sponge scaffolds with controlled pore size and porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Kazunori; Tanabe, Toshizumi; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2004-08-01

    A compression-molding/particulate-leaching (CM/PL) method was developed to fabricate S-sulfo keratin sponges with the controlled pore size and porosity. The S-sulfo keratin was extracted from wool and was then spray-dried to give S-sulfo keratin powder. The S-sulfo keratin powder mixed with urea in advance was compression-molded together with the sieved NaCl particulates above the melting temperature of urea. The following removal of the salts and urea in water created the sponges composed of interconnected pores and the continuous S-sulfo keratin matrix. The S-sulfo keratin sponges were strong enough to handle and water-insoluble. By contrast, the sponges prepared without urea were very fragile and readily collapsed, because most of S-sulfo keratin matrix remained powdery. The pore size was in good accordance with the size of the salts, indicating that the pores were formed by leaching-out the salts. The S-sulfo keratin sponges with the regulated sizes of pores (<100, 100-300 and 300-500 microm) were fabricated, all of which had more than 90% of the porosity. Thus, CM/PL method is able to give the S-sulfo keratin sponge with the desired pore size and porosity, which might be a good scaffold for the cells in tissue engineering.

  5. Size-Controlled Dissolution of Organic-Coated Silver Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Rui; Levard, Clément; Marinakos, Stella M.; Cheng, Yingwen; Liu, Jie; Michel, F. Marc; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.; Lowry, Gregory V. (Duke)

    2012-04-02

    The solubility of Ag NPs can affect their toxicity and persistence in the environment. We measured the solubility of organic-coated silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) having particle diameters ranging from 5 to 80 nm that were synthesized using various methods, and with different organic polymer coatings including poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and gum arabic. The size and morphology of Ag NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and synchrotron-based total X-ray scattering and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis were used to determine the local structure around Ag and evaluate changes in crystal lattice parameters and structure as a function of NP size. Ag NP solubility dispersed in 1 mM NaHCO{sub 3} at pH 8 was found to be well correlated with particle size based on the distribution of measured TEM sizes as predicted by the modified Kelvin equation. Solubility of Ag NPs was not affected by the synthesis method and coating as much as by their size. Based on the modified Kelvin equation, the surface tension of Ag NPs was found to be {approx}1 J/m{sup 2}, which is expected for bulk fcc (face centered cubic) silver. Analysis of XAFS, X-ray scattering, and PDFs confirm that the lattice parameter, {alpha}, of the fcc crystal structure of Ag NPs did not change with particle size for Ag NPs as small as 6 nm, indicating the absence of lattice strain. These results are consistent with the finding that Ag NP solubility can be estimated based on TEM-derived particle size using the modified Kelvin equation for particles in the size range of 5-40 nm in diameter.

  6. Size-controlled dissolution of organic-coated silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Levard, Clément; Marinakos, Stella M; Cheng, Yingwen; Liu, Jie; Michel, F Marc; Brown, Gordon E; Lowry, Gregory V

    2012-01-17

    The solubility of Ag NPs can affect their toxicity and persistence in the environment. We measured the solubility of organic-coated silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) having particle diameters ranging from 5 to 80 nm that were synthesized using various methods, and with different organic polymer coatings including poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and gum arabic. The size and morphology of Ag NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and synchrotron-based total X-ray scattering and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis were used to determine the local structure around Ag and evaluate changes in crystal lattice parameters and structure as a function of NP size. Ag NP solubility dispersed in 1 mM NaHCO(3) at pH 8 was found to be well correlated with particle size based on the distribution of measured TEM sizes as predicted by the modified Kelvin equation. Solubility of Ag NPs was not affected by the synthesis method and coating as much as by their size. Based on the modified Kelvin equation, the surface tension of Ag NPs was found to be ∼1 J/m(2), which is expected for bulk fcc (face centered cubic) silver. Analysis of XAFS, X-ray scattering, and PDFs confirm that the lattice parameter, a, of the fcc crystal structure of Ag NPs did not change with particle size for Ag NPs as small as 6 nm, indicating the absence of lattice strain. These results are consistent with the finding that Ag NP solubility can be estimated based on TEM-derived particle size using the modified Kelvin equation for particles in the size range of 5-40 nm in diameter.

  7. Differentiation of mouse iPS cells is dependent on embryoid body size in microwell chip culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Daisuke; Nakazawa, Kohji

    2016-10-01

    A microwell chip possessing microwells of several hundred micrometers is a promising platform for generating embryoid bodies (EBs) of stem cells. Here, we investigated the effects of initial EB size on the growth and differentiation of mouse iPS cells in microwell chip culture. We fabricated a chip that contained 195 microwells in a triangular arrangement at a diameter of 600 μm. To evaluate the effect of EB size, four similar conditions were designed with different seeding cell densities of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 cells/EB. The cells in each microwell gradually aggregated and then spontaneously formed a single EB within 1 d of culture, and EB size increased with further cell proliferation. EB growth was regulated by the initial EB size, and the growth ability of smaller EBs was higher than that of larger EBs. Furthermore, stem cell differentiation also depended on the initial EB size, and the EBs at more than 500 cells/EB promoted hepatic and cardiac differentiations, but the EBs at 100 cells/EB preferred vascular differentiation. These results indicated that the initial EB size was one of the important factors controlling the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells in the microwell chip culture.

  8. Image Analysis of Pellet Size for a Control System in Industrial Feed Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2011-01-01

    When producing aquaculture fish feed pellets, the size of the output product is of immense importance. As the production method cannot produce pellets of constant and uniform size using constant machine settings, there is a demand for size control. Fish fed with feed pellets of improper size...

  9. What Controls the Size of the Antarctic Ozone Hole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor); Newman, Paul A.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Nash, Eric R.

    2002-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole is a region of extremely large ozone depletion that is roughly centered over the South Pole. Since 1979, the area coverage of the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million square kilometers. In the 8-year period from 1981 to 1989, the area expanded by 18 Million square kilometers. During the last 5 years, the hole has been observed to exceed 25 Million square kilometers over brief periods. We will review these size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. The area is derived from the area enclosed by the 220 DU total ozone contour. We will discuss the rationale for the choice of 220 DU: 1) it is located near the steep gradient between southern mid-latitudes and the polar region, and 2) 220 DU is a value that is lower than the pre- 1979 ozone observations over Antarctica during the spring period. The phenomenal growth of the ozone hole was directly caused by the increases of chlorine and bromine compounds in the stratosphere. In this talk, we will show the relationship of the ozone hole's size to the interannual variability of Antarctic spring temperatures. In addition, we will show the relationship of these same temperatures to planetary-scale wave forcings.

  10. Nanoparticle interactions with live cells: Quantitative fluorescence microscopy of nanoparticle size effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nanomaterials are known to enter human cells, often via active endocytosis. Mechanistic details of the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs with cells are still not well enough understood. NP size is a key parameter that controls the endocytic mechanism and affects the cellular uptake yield. Therefore, we have systematically analyzed the cellular uptake of fluorescent NPs in the size range of 3.3–100 nm (diameter by live cells. By using spinning disk confocal microscopy in combination with quantitative image analysis, we studied the time courses of NP association with the cell membrane and subsequent internalization. NPs with diameters of less than 10 nm were observed to accumulate at the plasma membrane before being internalized by the cells. In contrast, larger NPs (100 nm were directly internalized without prior accumulation at the plasma membrane, regardless of their surface charges. We attribute this distinct size dependence to the requirement of a sufficiently strong local interaction of the NPs with the endocytic machinery in order to trigger the subsequent internalization.

  11. Perfluorocarbon particle size influences magnetic resonance signal and immunological properties of dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmar Waiczies

    Full Text Available The development of cellular tracking by fluorine ((19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has introduced a number of advantages for following immune cell therapies in vivo. These include improved signal selectivity and a possibility to correlate cells labeled with fluorine-rich particles with conventional anatomic proton ((1H imaging. While the optimization of the cellular labeling method is clearly important, the impact of labeling on cellular dynamics should be kept in mind. We show by (19F MR spectroscopy (MRS that the efficiency in labeling cells of the murine immune system (dendritic cells by perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether (PFCE particles increases with increasing particle size (560>365>245>130 nm. Dendritic cells (DC are professional antigen presenting cells and with respect to impact of PFCE particles on DC function, we observed that markers of maturation for these cells (CD80, CD86 were also significantly elevated following labeling with larger PFCE particles (560 nm. When labeled with these larger particles that also gave an optimal signal in MRS, DC presented whole antigen more robustly to CD8+ T cells than control cells. Our data suggest that increasing particle size is one important feature for optimizing cell labeling by PFCE particles, but may also present possible pitfalls such as alteration of the immunological status of these cells. Therefore depending on the clinical scenario in which the (19F-labeled cellular vaccines will be applied (cancer, autoimmune disease, transplantation, it will be interesting to monitor the fate of these cells in vivo in the relevant preclinical mouse models.

  12. Synthesis of size-controlled Bi particles by electrochemical deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C N Tharamani; H C Thejaswini; S Sampath

    2008-06-01

    Small sized bismuth particles are prepared by an electrochemical method using a triple voltage pulse technique. The bath composition and electrochemical parameters are optimized to yield monodisperse particles. The particles have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. The particles, as deposited, are highly crystalline in nature and the particle size and shape get tuned depending on the conditions of deposition.

  13. Recovery of Aging-Related Size Increase of Skin Epithelial Cells: In vivo Mouse and In vitro Human Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Igor; Guz, Natali V.; Iyer, Swaminathan; Hewitt, Amy; Sokolov, Nina A.; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Woodworth, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The size increase of skin epithelial cells during aging is well-known. Here we demonstrate that treatment of aging cells with cytochalasin B substantially decreases cell size. This decrease was demonstrated on a mouse model and on human skin cells in vitro. Six nude mice were treated by topical application of cytochalasin B on skin of the dorsal left midsection for 140 days (the right side served as control for placebo treatment). An average decrease in cell size of 56±16% resulted. A reduction of cell size was also observed on primary human skin epithelial cells of different in vitro age (passages from 1 to 8). A cell strain obtained from a pool of 6 human subjects was treated with cytochalasin B in vitro for 12 hours. We observed a decrease in cell size that became statistically significant and reached 20–40% for cells of older passage (6–8 passages) whereas no substantial change was observed for younger cells. These results may be important for understanding the aging processes, and for cosmetic treatment of aging skin. PMID:25807526

  14. Biotemplated fabrication of size controlled palladium nanoparticle chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Xingfei; Zheng, Lifei; Li, Rong; Li, Bin; Pillai, Saju; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles exhibit unique size- and spatial organization-dependent physical and chemical properties, and have a wide range of applications in various areas including single electron devices, chemical catalysts and biomedicines. In this paper, chains of palladium nanoparticles were obtained

  15. Reversible Size Control of Silver Nanoclusters via Ligand-exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2015-05-21

    The properties of atomically monodisperse noble metal nanoclusters (NCs) are intricately intertwined with their precise molecular formula. The vast majority of size-specific NC syntheses start from the reduction of the metal salt and thiol ligand mixture. Only in gold was it recently shown that ligand-exchange could induce the growth of NCs from one atomically precise species to another; a process of yet unknown reversibility. Here, we present a process for the ligand-exchange-induced growth of atomically precise silver NCs, in a biphasic liquid-liquid system, which is particularly of interest because of its complete reversibility and ability to occur at room temperature. We explore this phenomenon in-depth using Ag35(SG)18 [SG= glutathionate] and Ag44(4-FTP)30 [4-FTP= 4-fluorothiophenol] as model systems. We show that the ligand-exchange conversion of Ag35(SG)18 into Ag44(4-FTP)30 is rapid (< 5 min) and direct, while the reverse process proceeds slowly through intermediate cluster sizes. We adapt a recently developed theory of reverse Ostwald ripening to model the NCs’ interconvertibility. The model’s predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations, and they highlight the importance of small changes in the ligand-metal binding energy in determining the final equilibrium NC size. Based on the insight provided by this model, we demonstrated experimentally that by varying the choice of ligands, ligand-exchange can be used to obtain different sized NCs. The findings in this work establish ligand-exchange as a versatile tool for tuning cluster sizes.

  16. The Influences of Cell Type and ZnO Nanoparticle Size on Immune Cell Cytotoxicity and Cytokine Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Cory; Thurber, Aaron; Hanna, Charles; Punnoose, Alex; Zhang, Jianhui; Wingett, Denise G.

    2009-12-01

    Nanotechnology represents a new and enabling platform that promises to provide a range of innovative technologies for biological applications. ZnO nanoparticles of controlled size were synthesized, and their cytotoxicity toward different human immune cells evaluated. A differential cytotoxic response between human immune cell subsets was observed, with lymphocytes being the most resistant and monocytes being the most susceptible to ZnO nanoparticle-induced toxicity. Significant differences were also observed between previously activated memory lymphocytes and naive lymphocytes, indicating a relationship between cell-cycle potential and nanoparticle susceptibility. Mechanisms of toxicity involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with monocytes displaying the highest levels, and the degree of cytotoxicity dependent on the extent of nanoparticle interactions with cellular membranes. An inverse relationship between nanoparticle size and cytotoxicity, as well as nanoparticle size and reactive oxygen species production was observed. In addition, ZnO nanoparticles induce the production of the proinflammatory cytokines, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-12, at concentrations below those causing appreciable cell death. Collectively, these results underscore the need for careful evaluation of ZnO nanoparticle effects across a spectrum of relevant cell types when considering their use for potential new nanotechnology-based biological applications.

  17. The Influences of Cell Type and ZnO Nanoparticle Size on Immune Cell Cytotoxicity and Cytokine Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurber Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanotechnology represents a new and enabling platform that promises to provide a range of innovative technologies for biological applications. ZnO nanoparticles of controlled size were synthesized, and their cytotoxicity toward different human immune cells evaluated. A differential cytotoxic response between human immune cell subsets was observed, with lymphocytes being the most resistant and monocytes being the most susceptible to ZnO nanoparticle-induced toxicity. Significant differences were also observed between previously activated memory lymphocytes and naive lymphocytes, indicating a relationship between cell-cycle potential and nanoparticle susceptibility. Mechanisms of toxicity involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with monocytes displaying the highest levels, and the degree of cytotoxicity dependent on the extent of nanoparticle interactions with cellular membranes. An inverse relationship between nanoparticle size and cytotoxicity, as well as nanoparticle size and reactive oxygen species production was observed. In addition, ZnO nanoparticles induce the production of the proinflammatory cytokines, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-12, at concentrations below those causing appreciable cell death. Collectively, these results underscore the need for careful evaluation of ZnO nanoparticle effects across a spectrum of relevant cell types when considering their use for potential new nanotechnology-based biological applications.

  18. Effects of microbubble size on ultrasound-mediated gene transfection in auditory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Hsieh, Yi-Lei; Ho, Hsin-Chiao; Chen, Hang-Kang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Shih, Cheng-Ping; Chen, Hsin-Chien; Kuo, Chao-Yin; Lu, Ying-Jui; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy for sensorineural hearing loss has recently been used to insert genes encoding functional proteins to preserve, protect, or even regenerate hair cells in the inner ear. Our previous study demonstrated a microbubble- (MB-)facilitated ultrasound (US) technique for delivering therapeutic medication to the inner ear. The present study investigated whether MB-US techniques help to enhance the efficiency of gene transfection by means of cationic liposomes on HEI-OC1 auditory cells and whether MBs of different sizes affect such efficiency. Our results demonstrated that the size of MBs was proportional to the concentration of albumin or dextrose. At a constant US power density, using 0.66, 1.32, and 2.83 μm albumin-shelled MBs increased the transfection rate as compared to the control by 30.6%, 54.1%, and 84.7%, respectively; likewise, using 1.39, 2.12, and 3.47 μm albumin-dextrose-shelled MBs increased the transfection rates by 15.9%, 34.3%, and 82.7%, respectively. The results indicate that MB-US is an effective technique to facilitate gene transfer on auditory cells in vitro. Such size-dependent MB oscillation behavior in the presence of US plays a role in enhancing gene transfer, and by manipulating the concentration of albumin or dextrose, MBs of different sizes can be produced.

  19. Effects of Microbubble Size on Ultrasound-Mediated Gene Transfection in Auditory Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Ho Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy for sensorineural hearing loss has recently been used to insert genes encoding functional proteins to preserve, protect, or even regenerate hair cells in the inner ear. Our previous study demonstrated a microbubble- (MB-facilitated ultrasound (US technique for delivering therapeutic medication to the inner ear. The present study investigated whether MB-US techniques help to enhance the efficiency of gene transfection by means of cationic liposomes on HEI-OC1 auditory cells and whether MBs of different sizes affect such efficiency. Our results demonstrated that the size of MBs was proportional to the concentration of albumin or dextrose. At a constant US power density, using 0.66, 1.32, and 2.83 μm albumin-shelled MBs increased the transfection rate as compared to the control by 30.6%, 54.1%, and 84.7%, respectively; likewise, using 1.39, 2.12, and 3.47 μm albumin-dextrose-shelled MBs increased the transfection rates by 15.9%, 34.3%, and 82.7%, respectively. The results indicate that MB-US is an effective technique to facilitate gene transfer on auditory cells in vitro. Such size-dependent MB oscillation behavior in the presence of US plays a role in enhancing gene transfer, and by manipulating the concentration of albumin or dextrose, MBs of different sizes can be produced.

  20. A genomics approach to understanding the role of auxin in apple (Malus x domestica fruit size control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devoghalaere Fanny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Auxin is an important phytohormone for fleshy fruit development, having been shown to be involved in the initial signal for fertilisation, fruit size through the control of cell division and cell expansion, and ripening related events. There is considerable knowledge of auxin-related genes, mostly from work in model species. With the apple genome now available, it is possible to carry out genomics studies on auxin-related genes to identify genes that may play roles in specific stages of apple fruit development. Results High amounts of auxin in the seed compared with the fruit cortex were observed in 'Royal Gala' apples, with amounts increasing through fruit development. Injection of exogenous auxin into developing apples at the start of cell expansion caused an increase in cell size. An expression analysis screen of auxin-related genes involved in auxin reception, homeostasis, and transcriptional regulation showed complex patterns of expression in each class of gene. Two mapping populations were phenotyped for fruit size over multiple seasons, and multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs were observed. One QTL mapped to a region containing an Auxin Response Factor (ARF106. This gene is expressed during cell division and cell expansion stages, consistent with a potential role in the control of fruit size. Conclusions The application of exogenous auxin to apples increased cell expansion, suggesting that endogenous auxin concentrations are at least one of the limiting factors controlling fruit size. The expression analysis of ARF106 linked to a strong QTL for fruit weight suggests that the auxin signal regulating fruit size could partially be modulated through the function of this gene. One class of gene (GH3 removes free auxin by conjugation to amino acids. The lower expression of these GH3 genes during rapid fruit expansion is consistent with the apple maximising auxin concentrations at this point.

  1. Size-controllable polypyrrole nanospheres synthesized in the presence of phosphorylated chitosan and their size effect in different applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Cao, Yi; Lu, Yun, E-mail: yunlu@nju.edu.cn [Nanjing University, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Key Laboratory of High Performance Polymer Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2015-05-15

    The size-controllable polypyrrole (PPy) nanospheres are successfully synthesized by oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using N-methylene phosphonic chitosan (NMPC) as a structure-directing agent. By simply changing the amount of NMPC, the size of the PPy nanospheres can be adjusted from 190 to 50 nm in diameter. The spectrometric results suggest that the electrostatic interactions of phosphate groups in NMPC molecule with pyrrole ring might be a driving force for formation of the uniform and size-controllable PPy nanospheres. The PPy nanospheres with the diameter of 100 nm exhibit the largest capacity and a good cycling stability as electrode materials of supercapacitors. The as-prepared PPy nanospheres also can be combined with carbon dots to form composite nanospheres presenting enhanced fluorescence intensity, which show potential application in fluorescence detection.

  2. Cell size at S phase initiation: an emergent property of the G1/S network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Barberis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic cell cycle is the repeated sequence of events that enable the division of a cell into two daughter cells. It is divided into four phases: G1, S, G2, and M. Passage through the cell cycle is strictly regulated by a molecular interaction network, which involves the periodic synthesis and destruction of cyclins that bind and activate cyclin-dependent kinases that are present in nonlimiting amounts. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors contribute to cell cycle control. Budding yeast is an established model organism for cell cycle studies, and several mathematical models have been proposed for its cell cycle. An area of major relevance in cell cycle control is the G1 to S transition. In any given growth condition, it is characterized by the requirement of a specific, critical cell size, PS, to enter S phase. The molecular basis of this control is still under discussion. The authors report a mathematical model of the G1 to S network that newly takes into account nucleo/cytoplasmic localization, the role of the cyclin-dependent kinase Sic1 in facilitating nuclear import of its cognate Cdk1-Clb5, Whi5 control, and carbon source regulation of Sic1 and Sic1-containing complexes. The model was implemented by a set of ordinary differential equations that describe the temporal change of the concentration of the involved proteins and protein complexes. The model was tested by simulation in several genetic and nutritional setups and was found to be neatly consistent with experimental data. To estimate PS, the authors developed a hybrid model including a probabilistic component for firing of DNA replication origins. Sensitivity analysis of PS provides a novel relevant conclusion: PS is an emergent property of the G1 to S network that strongly depends on growth rate.

  3. Size controlled near-infrared high-quality PbSe quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalasad, M. N.; Rabinal, M. K.; Mulimani, B. G.; Greenham, N. C.

    2015-06-01

    Herein, we report the size controlled preparation of PbSe quantum dots (QDs) by non coordinating solvent route using oleic acid as surfactant molecules. The particles size is controlled by varying temperature and time of reaction. The present method of synthesis gives highly stable colloids, spherical in shape, better size tunability, narrow size distribution, extremely small size, monodisperse and exhibit strong near-infrared emission. The estimated particles sizes are in the range of 2 to 8 nm. These PbSe quantum dots are used for applications in optoelectronics and biological imaging.

  4. Size control synthesis of starch capped-gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajammul Hussain, S., E-mail: dr_tajammul@yahoo.c [Quaid-i-Azam University, Centre for Nano Science and Catalysis, National Centre for Physics (Pakistan); Iqbal, M.; Mazhar, M. [Quaid-i-Azam University, Department of Chemistry (Pakistan)

    2009-08-15

    Metallic gold nanoparticles have been synthesized by the reduction of chloroaurate anions [AuCl{sub 4}]{sup -} solution with hydrazine in the aqueous starch and ethylene glycol solution at room temperature and at atmospheric pressure. The characterization of synthesized gold nanoparticles by UV-vis spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that average size of pure gold nanoparticles is 3.5 nm, they are spherical in shape and are pure metallic gold. The concentration effects of [AuCl{sub 4}]{sup -} anions, starch, ethylene glycol, and hydrazine, on particle size, were investigated, and the stabilization mechanism of Au nanoparticles by starch polymer molecules was also studied by FT-IR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA analysis shows that hydroxyl groups of starch are responsible of capping and stabilizing gold nanoparticles. The UV-vis spectrum of these samples shows that there is blue shift in surface plasmon resonance peak with decrease in particle size due to the quantum confinement effect, a supporting evidence of formation of gold nanoparticles and this shift remains stable even after 3 months.

  5. A micro-sized bio-solar cell for self-sustaining power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hankeun; Choi, Seokheun

    2015-01-21

    Self-sustainable energy sources are essential for a wide array of wireless applications deployed in remote field locations. Due to their self-assembling and self-repairing properties, "biological solar (bio-solar) cells" are recently gaining attention for those applications. The bio-solar cell can continuously generate electricity from microbial photosynthetic and respiratory activities under day-night cycles. Despite the vast potential and promise of bio-solar cells, they, however, have not yet successfully been translated into commercial applications, as they possess persistent performance limitations and scale-up bottlenecks. Here, we report an entirely self-sustainable and scalable microliter-sized bio-solar cell with significant power enhancement by maximizing solar energy capture, bacterial attachment, and air bubble volume in well-controlled microchambers. The bio-solar cell has a ~300 μL single chamber defined by laser-machined poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates and it uses an air cathode to allow freely available oxygen to act as an electron acceptor. We generated a maximum power density of 0.9 mW m(-2) through photosynthetic reactions of cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is the highest power density among all micro-sized bio-solar cells.

  6. Genome size evolution in Ontario ferns (Polypodiidae): evolutionary correlations with cell size, spore size, and habitat type and an absence of genome downsizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Thomas A; Bainard, Jillian D; Newmaster, Steven G

    2014-10-01

    Genome size is known to correlate with a number of traits in angiosperms, but less is known about the phenotypic correlates of genome size in ferns. We explored genome size variation in relation to a suite of morphological and ecological traits in ferns. Thirty-six fern taxa were collected from wild populations in Ontario, Canada. 2C DNA content was measured using flow cytometry. We tested for genome downsizing following polyploidy using a phylogenetic comparative analysis to explore the correlation between 1Cx DNA content and ploidy. There was no compelling evidence for the occurrence of widespread genome downsizing during the evolution of Ontario ferns. The relationship between genome size and 11 morphological and ecological traits was explored using a phylogenetic principal component regression analysis. Genome size was found to be significantly associated with cell size, spore size, spore type, and habitat type. These results are timely as past and recent studies have found conflicting support for the association between ploidy/genome size and spore size in fern polyploid complexes; this study represents the first comparative analysis of the trend across a broad taxonomic group of ferns.

  7. Size-Dependent Photodynamic Anticancer Activity of Biocompatible Multifunctional Magnetic Submicron Particles in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyong-Hoon Choi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, newly designed biocompatible multifunctional magnetic submicron particles (CoFe2O4-HPs-FAs of well-defined sizes (60, 133, 245, and 335 nm were fabricated for application as a photosensitizer delivery agent for photodynamic therapy in cancer cells. To provide selective targeting of cancer cells and destruction of cancer cell functionality, basic cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 particles were covalently bonded with a photosensitizer (PS, which comprises hematoporphyrin (HP, and folic acid (FA molecules. The magnetic properties of the CoFe2O4 particles were finely adjusted by controlling the size of the primary CoFe2O4 nanograins, and secondary superstructured composite particles were formed by aggregation of the nanograins. The prepared CoFe2O4-HP-FA exhibited high water solubility, good MR-imaging capacity, and biocompatibility without any in vitro cytotoxicity. In particular, our CoFe2O4-HP-FA exhibited remarkable photodynamic anticancer efficiency via induction of apoptotic death in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a particle size- and concentration-dependent manner. This size-dependent effect was determined by the specific surface area of the particles because the number of HP molecules increased with decreasing size and increasing surface area. These results indicate that our CoFe2O4-HP-FA may be applicable for photodynamic therapy (PDT as a PS delivery material and a therapeutic agent for MR-imaging based PDT owing to their high saturation value for magnetization and superparamagnetism.

  8. Control of crystallite size in diamond film chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Mark B.; Johnson, Linda F.; Klemm, Karl A.

    1992-12-01

    In depositing an adhering, continuous, polycrystalline diamond film of optical or semiconductor quality on a substrate, as by forming on the substrate a layer of a refractory nitride interlayer and depositing diamond on the interlayer without mechanical treatment or seeding of the substrate or the interlayer, the substrate is heated in a vacuum chamber containing a microwave activated mixture of hydrogen and a gas including carbon, and the size of deposited diamond crystallites and their rate of deposition selectively varied by a bias voltage applied to the substrate.

  9. Organic Based Solar Cells with Morphology Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Rieks

    The field of organic solar cells has in the last years gone through an impressive development with efficiencies reported up to 12 %. For organic solar cells to take the leap from primarily being a laboratory scale technology to being utilized as renewable energy source, several issues need...... of the nanoparticles was investigated both internally and externally, both were attempted to be controlled by variation in preparation solvent and particle sizes. The inks were slot-die coated on both the R2R coater and mini roll coater but only after a number of inks modifications and adjustments of the coating...... deposition techniques which have been downscaled from the R2R coater i.e. slot-die coating and flexographic printing. Thereby allowing the device optimizations to be transferred almost directly from small to large scale. This is in contrast to devices prepared by spincoating. Another advantage...

  10. Effects of meal size and composition on incretin, alpha-cell, and beta-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M; McQuarrie, Kelly; Girman, Cynthia J; Stein, Peter P; Mari, Andrea; Holst, Jens J; Nijpels, Giel; Dekker, Jacqueline M

    2010-04-01

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate postprandial insulin release from the beta-cells. We investigated the effects of 3 standardized meals with different caloric and nutritional content in terms of postprandial glucose, insulin, glucagon, and incretin responses. In a randomized crossover study, 18 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 6 healthy volunteers underwent three 4-hour meal tolerance tests (small carbohydrate [CH]-rich meal, large CH-rich meal, and fat-rich meal). Non-model-based and model-based estimates of beta-cell function and incremental areas under the curve of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP were calculated. Mixed models and Friedman tests were used to test for differences in meal responses. The large CH-rich meal and fat-rich meal resulted in a slightly larger insulin response as compared with the small CH-rich meal and led to a slightly shorter period of hyperglycemia, but only in healthy subjects. Model-based insulin secretion estimates did not show pronounced differences between meals. Both in healthy individuals and in those with diabetes, more CH resulted in higher GLP-1 release. In contrast with the other meals, GIP release was still rising 2 hours after the fat-rich meal. The initial glucagon response was stimulated by the large CH-rich meal, whereas the fat-rich meal induced a late glucagon response. Fat preferentially stimulates GIP secretion, whereas CH stimulates GLP-1 secretion. Differences in meal size and composition led to differences in insulin and incretin responses but not to differences in postprandial glucose levels of the well-controlled patients with diabetes.

  11. Size-controlled nanoassemblies based on cyclodextrin-modified dextrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintgens, Véronique; Nielsen, Thorbjørn Terndrup; Larsen, Kim Lambertsen; Amiel, Catherine

    2011-09-09

    Nanoassemblies formed by host/guest interactions between two polymers in aqueous media are studied. Two types of polymers with the same dextran backbone are modified with adamantyl or βCD groups. The sizes of the spontaneously formed nanoassemblies depend on the βCD:Ada ratio and on the total concentration and composition of the mixtures. The results can be rationalized by assuming a core/shell structure of the nanoassemblies, the core resulting from associative phase separation of the two polymers and being stabilized by an external shell made of Ada-grafted dextran and containing ions adsorbed from the solution. Hydrophobic compounds such as benzophenone can be incorporated efficiently without inducing changes in properties of the nanoassemblies.

  12. Electronic structure and size of TiO sub 2 nanoparticles of controlled size prepared by aerosol methods

    CERN Document Server

    Soriano, L; Sanchez-Agudo, M; Sanz, J M; Ahonen, P P; Kauppinen, E I; Palomares, F J; Bressler, P R

    2002-01-01

    A complete characterization of nanostructures has to deal both with electronic structure and dimensions. Here we present the characterization of TiO sub 2 nanoparticles of controlled size prepared by aerosol methods. The electronic structure of these nanoparticles was probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), the particle size by atomic force microscopy (AFM). XAS spectra show that the particles crystallize in the anatase phase upon heating at 500 sup o C, whereas further annealing at 700 sup o C give crystallites of 70 % anatase and 30 % rutile phases. Raising the temperature to 900 sup o C results in a complete transformation of the particles to rutile. AFM images reveal that the mean size of the anatase particles formed upon heating at 500 sup o C is 30 nm, whereas for the rutile particles formed upon annealing at 900 sup o C 90 nm were found. The results obtained by these techniques agree with XRD data. (author)

  13. Relationship between Microcellular Foaming Injection Molding Process Parameters and Cell Size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Guang-hong; JIANG Chao-dong; CUI Zhen-shan

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the relationship between the main process parameters and the cell size, the mathematical model of cell growth of microcellular foaming injection process is built. Then numeric simulation is employed as experimental method, and the Taguchi method is used to analyze significance of effect of process parameters on the cell size. At last the process parameters are focused on melt temperature, injection time, mold temperature and pre- filled volume. The significance order from big to small of the effect of each process parameters on cell size is melt temperature, pre-filled volume, injection time, and mold temperature. On the basis of above research, the effect of each process parameter on cell size is further researched.Appropriate reduction of the melt temperature and increase of the we-filled volume can optimize the cell size effectively, while the effects of injection time and mold temperature on cell size are less significant.

  14. Enrichment of putative human epidermal stem cells based on cell size and collagen type IV adhesiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juxue Li; Enkui Duan; Chenglin Miao; Weixiang Guo; Liwei Jia; Jiaxi Zhou; Baohua Ma; Sha Peng; Shuang Liu; Yujing Cao

    2008-01-01

    The enrichment and identification of human epidermal stem cells (EpSCs) are of paramount importance for both basic research and clinical application. Although several approaches for the enrichment of EpSCs have been established, enriching a pure population of viable EpSCs is still a challenging task. An improved approach is worth developing to enhance the purity and viability of EpSCs. Here we report that cell size combined with collagen type IV adhesiveness can be used in an improved approach to enrich pure and viable human EpSCs. We separated the rapidly adherent keratinocytes into three populations that range in size from 5-7 μm (population A), to 7-9 μm (population B), to >9 μm (population C) in diameter, and found that human putative EpSCs could be further enriched in population A with the smallest size. Among the three populations, population A displayed the highest density of βl-integrin receptor, contained the highest percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase, showed the highest nucleus to cytoplasm ratio, and possessed the highest colony formation efficiency (CFE). When injected into murine blastocysts, these cells participated in multi-tissue formation. More significantly, compared with a previous approach that sorted putative EpSCs according to pl-integrin antibody staining, the viability of the EpSCs enriched by the improved approach was significantly enhanced. Our results provide a putative strategy for the enrichment of human EpSCs, and encourage further study into the role of cell size in stem cell biology.

  15. Particle Size Control for PIV Seeding Using Dry Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    unsuccessful in forming discrete particles from either location and instead, gaseous CO2 clouds were present in the test section. Using the simple shroud...which was then kept pressurized by a pneumatic butterfly valve. The butterfly valve was operated and electronically controlled by a Fisher R© system. The...distribution was nonuniform , so even though a single number is presented to describe the particles at each test condition, the actual particles varied

  16. Interspecies avian brain chimeras reveal that large brain size differences are influenced by cell-interdependent processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chun; Balaban, Evan; Jarvis, Erich D

    2012-01-01

    Like humans, birds that exhibit vocal learning have relatively delayed telencephalon maturation, resulting in a disproportionately smaller brain prenatally but enlarged telencephalon in adulthood relative to vocal non-learning birds. To determine if this size difference results from evolutionary changes in cell-autonomous or cell-interdependent developmental processes, we transplanted telencephala from zebra finch donors (a vocal-learning species) into Japanese quail hosts (a vocal non-learning species) during the early neural tube stage (day 2 of incubation), and harvested the chimeras at later embryonic stages (between 9-12 days of incubation). The donor and host tissues fused well with each other, with known major fiber pathways connecting the zebra finch and quail parts of the brain. However, the overall sizes of chimeric finch telencephala were larger than non-transplanted finch telencephala at the same developmental stages, even though the proportional sizes of telencephalic subregions and fiber tracts were similar to normal finches. There were no significant changes in the size of chimeric quail host midbrains, even though they were innervated by the physically smaller zebra finch brain, including the smaller retinae of the finch eyes. Chimeric zebra finch telencephala had a decreased cell density relative to normal finches. However, cell nucleus size differences between each species were maintained as in normal birds. These results suggest that telencephalic size development is partially cell-interdependent, and that the mechanisms controlling the size of different brain regions may be functionally independent.

  17. Interspecies avian brain chimeras reveal that large brain size differences are influenced by cell-interdependent processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Like humans, birds that exhibit vocal learning have relatively delayed telencephalon maturation, resulting in a disproportionately smaller brain prenatally but enlarged telencephalon in adulthood relative to vocal non-learning birds. To determine if this size difference results from evolutionary changes in cell-autonomous or cell-interdependent developmental processes, we transplanted telencephala from zebra finch donors (a vocal-learning species into Japanese quail hosts (a vocal non-learning species during the early neural tube stage (day 2 of incubation, and harvested the chimeras at later embryonic stages (between 9-12 days of incubation. The donor and host tissues fused well with each other, with known major fiber pathways connecting the zebra finch and quail parts of the brain. However, the overall sizes of chimeric finch telencephala were larger than non-transplanted finch telencephala at the same developmental stages, even though the proportional sizes of telencephalic subregions and fiber tracts were similar to normal finches. There were no significant changes in the size of chimeric quail host midbrains, even though they were innervated by the physically smaller zebra finch brain, including the smaller retinae of the finch eyes. Chimeric zebra finch telencephala had a decreased cell density relative to normal finches. However, cell nucleus size differences between each species were maintained as in normal birds. These results suggest that telencephalic size development is partially cell-interdependent, and that the mechanisms controlling the size of different brain regions may be functionally independent.

  18. Optimization and Evaluation of a Novel Size Based Circulating Tumor Cell Isolation System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    Full Text Available Isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs from peripheral blood has the potential to provide a far easier "liquid biopsy" than tumor tissue biopsies, to monitor tumor cell populations during disease progression and in response to therapies. Many CTC isolation technologies have been developed. We optimized the Parsortix system, an epitope independent, size and compressibility-based platform for CTCs isolation, making it possible to harvest CTCs at the speed and sample volume comparable to standard CellSearch system. We captured more than half of cancer cells from different cancer cell lines spiked in blood samples from healthy donors using this system. Cell loss during immunostaining of cells transferred and fixed on the slides is a major problem for analyzing rare cell samples. We developed a novel cell transfer and fixation method to retain >90% of cells on the slide after the immunofluorescence process without affecting signal strength and specificity. Using this optimized method, we evaluated the Parsortix system for CTC harvest in prostate cancer patients in comparison to immunobead based CTC isolation systems IsoFlux and CellSearch. We harvested a similar number (p = 0.33 of cytokeratin (CK positive CTCs using Parsortix and IsoFlux from 7.5 mL blood samples of 10 prostate cancer patients (an average of 33.8 and 37.6 respectively. The purity of the CTCs harvested by Parsortix at 3.1% was significantly higher than IsoFlux at 1.0% (p = 0.02. Parsortix harvested significantly more CK positive CTCs than CellSearch (p = 0.04 in seven prostate cancer patient samples, where both systems were utilized (an average of 32.1 and 10.1 respectively. We also captured CTC clusters using Parsortix. Using four-color immunofluorescence we found that 85.8% of PC3 cells expressed EpCAM, 91.7% expressed CK and 2.5% cells lacked both epithelial markers. Interestingly, 95.6% of PC3 cells expressed Vimentin, including those cells that lacked both epithelial marker

  19. Immunosuppressive Activity of Size-Controlled PEG-PLGA Nanoparticles Containing Encapsulated Cyclosporine A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We encapsulated cyclosporine A (CsA in poly(ethylene glycol-b-poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide (PEG-PLGA nanoparticles (NPs by nanoprecipitation of CsA and PEG-PLGA. The resulting CsA/PEG-PLGA-NPs were <100 nm in diameter with a narrow particle size distribution. The NP size could be controlled by tuning the polymer concentration, solvent, or water/solvent ratio during formulation. The PEGylated NPs maintained non-aggregated in salt solution. Solid NPs lyoprotected with bovine serum albumin were prepared for the convenience of storage and transportation. The release kinetics of CsA (55.6% released on Day 1 showed potential for maintaining therapeutic CsA concentrations in vivo. In T-cell assays, both free CsA and CsA/PEG-PLGA-NPs suppressed T-cell proliferation and production of inflammatory cytokines dose dependently. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction assay, the IC50 values for free CsA and CsA/PEG-PLGA-NPs were found to be 30 and 35 ng/mL, respectively. This nanoparticulate CsA delivery technology constitutes a strong basis for future targeted delivery of immunosuppressive drugs with improved efficiency and potentially reduced toxicity.

  20. Effect of Mixture Pressure and Equivalence Ratio on Detonation Cell Size for Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    EFFECT OF MIXTURE PRESSURE AND EQUIVALENCE RATIO ON DETONATION CELL SIZE FOR HYDROGEN -AIR MIXTURES...protection in the United States. AFIT-ENY-MS-15-J-045 EFFECT OF MIXTURE PRESSURE AND EQUIVALENCE RATIO ON DETONATION CELL SIZE FOR HYDROGEN -AIR...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENY-MS-15-J-045 EFFECT OF MIXTURE PRESSURE AND EQUIVALENCE RATIO ON DETONATION CELL SIZE FOR HYDROGEN -AIR MIXTURES

  1. The color and size of chili peppers (Capsicum annuum) influence Hep-G2 cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovich, David G; Sia, Sharon Y; Zhang, Wei; Lim, Mon L

    2014-11-01

    Four types of chili (Capsicum annuum) extracts, categorized according to color; green and red, and size; small and large were studied in Hep-G2 cells. Red small (RS) chili had an LC50 value of 0.378 ± 0.029 compared to green big (GB) 1.034 ± 0.061 and green small (GS) 1.070 ± 0.21 mg/mL. Red big (RB) was not cytotoxic. Capsaicin content was highest in RS and produced a greater percentage sub-G1 cells (6.47 ± 1.8%) after 24 h compared to GS (2.96 ± 1.3%) and control (1.29 ± 0.8%) cells. G2/M phase was reduced by GS compared to RS and control cells. RS at the LC50 concentration contained 1.6 times the amount of pure capsaicin LC50 to achieve the same effect of capsaicin alone. GS and GB capsaicin content at the LC50 value was lower (0.2 and 0.66, respectively) compared to the amount of capsaicin to achieve a similar reduction in cell growth.

  2. Genome-Wide Screen for Haploinsufficient Cell Size Genes in the Opportunistic Yeast Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Chaillot

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most critical but still poorly understood aspects of eukaryotic cell proliferation is the basis for commitment to cell division in late G1 phase, called Start in yeast and the Restriction Point in metazoans. In all species, a critical cell size threshold coordinates cell growth with cell division and thereby establishes a homeostatic cell size. While a comprehensive survey of cell size genetic determinism has been performed in the saprophytic yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, very little is known in pathogenic fungi. As a number of critical Start regulators are haploinsufficient for cell size, we applied a quantitative analysis of the size phenome, using elutriation-barcode sequencing methodology, to 5639 barcoded heterozygous deletion strains of the opportunistic yeast Candida albicans. Our screen identified conserved known regulators and biological processes required to maintain size homeostasis in the opportunistic yeast C. albicans. We also identified novel C. albicans-specific size genes and provided a conceptual framework for future mechanistic studies. Interestingly, some of the size genes identified were required for fungal pathogenicity suggesting that cell size homeostasis may be elemental to C. albicans fitness or virulence inside the host.

  3. Genome-Wide Screen for Haploinsufficient Cell Size Genes in the Opportunistic Yeast Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillot, Julien; Cook, Michael A.; Corbeil, Jacques; Sellam, Adnane

    2016-01-01

    One of the most critical but still poorly understood aspects of eukaryotic cell proliferation is the basis for commitment to cell division in late G1 phase, called Start in yeast and the Restriction Point in metazoans. In all species, a critical cell size threshold coordinates cell growth with cell division and thereby establishes a homeostatic cell size. While a comprehensive survey of cell size genetic determinism has been performed in the saprophytic yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, very little is known in pathogenic fungi. As a number of critical Start regulators are haploinsufficient for cell size, we applied a quantitative analysis of the size phenome, using elutriation-barcode sequencing methodology, to 5639 barcoded heterozygous deletion strains of the opportunistic yeast Candida albicans. Our screen identified conserved known regulators and biological processes required to maintain size homeostasis in the opportunistic yeast C. albicans. We also identified novel C. albicans-specific size genes and provided a conceptual framework for future mechanistic studies. Interestingly, some of the size genes identified were required for fungal pathogenicity suggesting that cell size homeostasis may be elemental to C. albicans fitness or virulence inside the host. PMID:28040776

  4. New algorithm and system for measuring size distribution of blood cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuiping Yao(姚翠萍); Zheng Li(李政); Zhenxi Zhang(张镇西)

    2004-01-01

    In optical scattering particle sizing, a numerical transform is sought so that a particle size distribution can be determined from angular measurements of near forward scattering, which has been adopted in the measurement of blood cells. In this paper a new method of counting and classification of blood cell, laser light scattering method from stationary suspensions, is presented. The genetic algorithm combined with nonnegative least squared algorithm is employed to inverse the size distribution of blood cells. Numerical tests show that these techniques can be successfully applied to measuring size distribution of blood cell with high stability.

  5. The Drosophila Cadherin Fat regulates tissue size and planar cell polarity through different domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Zhao

    Full Text Available The Drosophila Cadherin Fat (Ft has been identified as a crucial regulator of tissue size and Planar Cell Polarity (PCP. However, the precise mechanism by which Ft regulates these processes remains unclear. In order to advance our understanding of the action of Ft, we have sought to identify the crucial Ft effector domains. Here we report that a small region of the Ft cytoplasmic domain (H2 region is both necessary and sufficient, when membrane localized, to support viability and prevent tissue overgrowth. Interestingly, the H2 region is dispensable for regulating PCP signaling, whereas the mutant Ft lacking the H2 region is fully capable of directing PCP. This result suggests that Ft's roles in PCP signaling and tissue size control are separable, and each can be carried out independently. Surprisingly, the crucial regions of Ft identified in our structure-function study do not overlap with the previously reported interaction regions with Atrophin, Dco, or Lowfat.

  6. Size control of laser-fabricated surfactant-free gold nanoparticles with highly diluted electrolytes and their subsequent bioconjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehbock, Christoph; Merk, Vivian; Gamrad, Lisa; Streubel, René; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2013-03-07

    Size control of laser-fabricated surfactant-free gold nanoparticles is a challenging endeavor. In this work, we show that size control can be achieved by adding ions with low salinity during synthesis. In addition, this approach offers the opportunity to fundamentally study ion interactions with bare nanoparticle surfaces and can help to elucidate the nanoparticle formation mechanism. The studies were carried out in a flow-through reactor and in the presence of NaCl, NaBr and sodium phosphate buffer at minimal ionic strengths. A significant size quenching effect at ionic strengths from 1-50 μM was found, which allowed surfactant-free nanoparticle size control with average diameters of 6-30 nm. This effect went along with low polydispersity and minimal aggregation tendencies and was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, TEM, SEM and analytical disk centrifugation. Our findings indicate that size quenching originates from an anionic electrostatic stabilization depending on the nanoparticle surface area, which may be caused by specific ion adsorption. By subsequent delayed bioconjugation in liquid-flow using bovine serum albumin as a stabilizing agent, nano-bioconjugates with good stability in cell culture media were obtained, which are applicable in toxicology and cell biology.

  7. crm-1 facilitates BMP signaling to control body size in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Wong Yan; Fat, Ko Frankie Chi; Eng, Cheah Kathryn Song; Lau, Chow King

    2007-11-01

    We have identified in Caenorhabditis elegans a homologue of the vertebrate Crim1, crm-1, which encodes a putative transmembrane protein with multiple cysteine-rich (CR) domains known to have bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) binding activity. Using the body morphology of C. elegans as an indicator, we showed that attenuation of crm-1 activity leads to a small body phenotype reminiscent of that of BMP pathway mutants. We showed that the crm-1 loss-of-function phenotype can be rescued by constitutive supply of sma-4 activity. crm-1 can enhance BMP signaling and this activity is dependent on the presence of the DBL-1 ligand and its receptors. crm-1 is expressed in neurons at the ventral nerve cord, where the DBL-1 ligand is produced. However, ectopic expression experiments reveal that crm-1 gene products act outside the DBL-1 producing cells and function non-autonomously to facilitate dbl/sma pathway signaling to control body size.

  8. NiPt hollow nanocatalyst:Green synthesis, size control and electrocatalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aixian Shan; Ming Cheng; Hongsheng Fan; Zhichao Chen; Rongming Wang; Chinping Chen

    2014-01-01

    Nearly monodispersed hollow nanospheres of bimetallic NiPt have been synthesized by a one-pot wet chemical method at room temperature with a precursor Ni nanocompound as a sacrificial template. The size control is carried out via the sacrificial template, from about 35 nm to nearly 100 nm in diameter. The shell thickness of the NiPt hollow sphere reaches down to as thin as 2-3 nm slightly larger than a single layer of alloyed NiPt nanocrystallites. The product with the citric acid as surfactant exhibits enhanced oxygen reduction activities compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst and the hollow nanospheres coated with PVP. It has potential applications in fuel cells, biotechnology and environmental chemistry with the facile synthesis, low cost and excellent electrocatalytic activity.

  9. Development of an Autonomous Flight Control System for Small Size Unmanned Helicopter Based on Dynamical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It is devoted to the development of an autonomous flight control system for small size unmanned helicopter based on dynamical model. At first, the mathematical model of a small size helicopter is described. After that simple but effective MTCV control algorithm was proposed. The whole flight control algorithm is composed of two parts:orientation controller based on the model for rotation dynamics and a robust position controller for a double integrator. The MTCV block is also used to achieve translation velocity control. To demonstrate the performance of the presented algorithm, simulation results and results achieved in real flight experiments were presented.

  10. Control of grain size in sublimation-grown CdTe, and the improvement in performance of devices with systematically increased grain size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, J.D.; Proskuryakov, Y.Y.; Durose, K. [Department of Physics, Science Laboratories, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Zoppi, G.; Forbes, I. [Northumbria University, Northumbria Photovoltaics Applications Centre, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    A method to control the grain size of CdTe thin films deposited by close space sublimation using chamber pressure is demonstrated. Grain diameter is shown to increase in the pressure range 2-200 Torr, following the linear relationship D ({mu}m)=0.027 x P (Torr)+0.90. A mechanism is proposed to explain the dominance of the 111 preferred orientation in the small-grained, but not the large-grained films. For a series of CdTe/CdS solar cells in which the only variable was grain size, the performance parameters were seen to increase from 0.54% (0.94 {mu}m grains) up to a plateau of 11.3% ({>=}3.6 {mu}m grains). This corresponds to the point at which the series resistance is no longer dominated by grain boundaries, but by the contacts. (author)

  11. Droplet size influences division of mammalian cell factories in droplet microfluidic cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periyannan Rajeswari, Prem Kumar; Joensson, Haakan N.; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2017-01-01

    The potential of using droplet microfluidics for screening mammalian cell factories has been limited by the difficulty in achieving continuous cell division during cultivation in droplets. Here, we report the influence of droplet size on mammalian cell division and viability during cultivation......, making them a more suitable droplet size for 72-h cultivation. This study shows a direct correlation of microfluidic droplet size to the division and viability of mammalian cells. This highlights the importance of selecting suitable droplet size for mammalian cell factory screening assays....... in droplets. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, the most widely used mammalian host cells for biopharmaceuticals production were encapsulated and cultivated in 33, 180 and 320 pL droplets for 3 days. Periodic monitoring of the droplets during incubation showed that the cell divisions in 33 pL droplets stopped...

  12. Recrystallization Behavior Design for Controlling Grain Size in Strip Rolling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Guo-hui; S V Subramanian

    2008-01-01

    To promote effectively dynamic recrystallization and obtain a homogeneous distribution of ultrafine grain size in strip finish rolling process, the behavior of static and dynamic recrystallization must be appropriately designed to provide an ultrafine austenite microstructure without mixed grain size. The design of rolling schedule was analyzed based on the control of the recrystallization behavior to achieve ultrafine grain size in the strip rolling process of niobium microalloyed steel. The experimental simulations were presented to validate the twice dynamic recrystallization design to achieve ultrafine grain size control.

  13. Sorting of cells of the same size, shape, and cell cycle stage for a single cell level assay without staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomo Tetsuya

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell level studies are being used increasingly to measure cell properties not directly observable in a cell population. High-performance data acquisition systems for such studies have, by necessity, developed in synchrony. However, improvements in sample purification techniques are also required to reveal new phenomena. Here we assessed a cell sorter as a sample-pretreatment tool for a single-cell level assay. A cell sorter is routinely used for selecting one type of cells from a heterogeneous mixture of cells using specific fluorescence labels. In this case, we wanted to select cells of exactly the same size, shape, and cell-cycle stage from a population, without using a specific fluorescence label. Results We used four light scatter parameters: the peak height and area of the forward scatter (FSheight and FSarea and side scatter (SSheight and SSarea. The rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, a neuronal cell line, was used for all experiments. The living cells concentrated in the high FSarea and middle SSheight/SSarea fractions. Single cells without cell clumps were concentrated in the low SS and middle FS fractions, and in the higher FSheight/FSarea and SSheight/SSarea fractions. The cell populations from these viable, single-cell-rich fractions were divided into twelve subfractions based on their FSarea-SSarea profiles, for more detailed analysis. We found that SSarea was proportional to the cell volume and the FSarea correlated with cell roundness and elongation, as well as with the level of DNA in the cell. To test the method and to characterize the basic properties of the isolated single cells, sorted cells were cultured in separate wells. The cells in all subfractions survived, proliferated and differentiated normally, suggesting that there was no serious damage. The smallest, roundest, and smoothest cells had the highest viability. There was no correlation between proliferation and differentiation. NGF increases

  14. Cytocompatibility of HeLa Cells to Nano-Sized Ceramics Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitoku, Eri; Abe, Shigeaki; Kusaka, Teruo; Nakamura, Mariko; Inoue, Satoshi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Sano, Hidehiko

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the behaviors and cytocompatibility response of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells expose to nano-sized particles. Cultivated cells exposed to titanium oxide and indium oxide nanoparticles remained highly viable. In the presence of copper oxide (CuO); however, the cells became seriously inflamed. To understand the mechanism by which CuO causes cell death, we evaluated cell death and apoptosis cytometry. CuO induced cells apoptosis more strongly than exposure to titania nanoparticles. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the nano-sized particles penetrate the cells.

  15. Selective Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Deprivation Affects Cell Size and Number in Kitten Locus Coeruleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Shaffery

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cells in the locus coeruleus (LC constitute the sole source of norepinephrine (NE in the brain, and change their discharge rates according to vigilance state. In addition to its well established role in vigilance, NE affects synaptic plasticity in the postnatal critical period (CP of development. One form of CP synaptic plasticity affected by NE results from monocular occlusion, which leads to physiological and cytoarchitectural alterations in central visual areas. Selective suppression of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS in the CP kitten enhances the central effects of monocular occlusion. The mechanisms responsible for heightened cortical plasticity following REMS deprivation (REMSD remain undetermined. One possible mediator of an increase in plasticity is continuous NE outflow, which presumably persists during extended periods of REMSD. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of NE and serves as a marker for NE-producing cells. We selectively suppressed REMS in kittens for one week during the CP. The number and size of LC cells expressing immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-ir was assessed in age-matched REMS-deprived (RD-, treatment-control (TXC-, and home cage-reared (HCC animals. Sleep amounts and slow wave activity (SWA were also examined relative to baseline. Time spent in REMS during the study was lower in RD compared to TXC animals, and RD kittens increased SWA delta power in the latter half of the REMSD period. The estimated total number of TH-ir cells in LC was significantly lower in the RD- than in the TXC kittens and numerically lower than in HCC animals. The size of LC cells expressing TH-ir was greatest in the HCC group. They were significantly larger than the cells in the RD kittens. These data are consistent with a possible reduction in NE in forebrain areas, including visual cortex, caused by one week of REMSD.

  16. Human cord blood cells and myocardial infarction: effect of dose and route of administration on infarct size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Robert J; Burgos, Jose D; Vasko, Mark; Alvarado, Felipe; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Sanberg, Paul R; Morgan, Michael B

    2007-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding the optimal dose of stem cells or the optimal route of administration for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Bone marrow cells, containing hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, in doses of 0.5 x 10(6) to >30 x 10(6) have been directly injected into the myocardium or into coronary arteries or infused intravenously in subjects with myocardial infarctions to reduce infarct size and improve heart function. Therefore, we determined the specific effects of different doses of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HUCBC), which contain hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, on infarct size. In order to determine the optimal technique for stem cell administration, HUCBC were injected directly into the myocardium (IM), or into the LV cavity with the ascending aorta transiently clamped to facilitate coronary artery perfusion (IA), or injected intravenously (IV) in rats 1-2 h after the left anterior coronary artery was permanently ligated. Immune suppressive therapy was not given to any rat. One month later, the infarct size in control rat hearts treated with only Isolyte averaged 23.7 +/- 1.7% of the LV muscle area. Intramyocardial injection of HUCBC reduced the infarct size by 71% with 0.5 x 10(6) HUCBC and by 93% with 4 x 10(6) HUCBC in comparison with the controls (p p p p < 0.05). Nevertheless, IM, IA, and IV HUCBC all produced significant reductions in infarct size in comparison with Isolyte-treated infarcted hearts without requirements for host immune suppression. The present experiments demonstrate that the optimal dose of HUCBC for reduction of infarct size in the rat is 4 x 10(6) IM, 4 x 10(6) IA, and 16 x 10(6) IV, and that the IM injection of HUCBC is the most effective technique for reduction in infarct size.

  17. Phanerozoic size history of the foraminifera: Implications for environmental and biological controls on macroevolutionary trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J.; Jost, A. B.; Cummins, R.; Tachiki, N.; Ingram, K.

    2009-12-01

    Size is among the most important ecological characteristics of any organism, correlating with a wide variety of traits from metabolic rate to generation time. Although there have been numerous studies of body size evolution in the fossil record, few have spanned multiple geological eras. Thus, the effect of environmental changes occurring on Wilson-cycle timescales (hundreds of millions of years) on the evolution of size remains poorly understood. We compiled a comprehensive genus-level size database for benthic foraminifers through Phanerozoic time. We find that the average size of calcareous benthic foraminifers increased gradually through the Late Paleozoic, reaching local maxima in mean and maximum size during the Early Permian. Sizes decreased to a relative minimum during the Early Triassic before increasing gradually to a second local maximum in the Late Cretaceous (for maximum size) and early Paleogene (for mean size). Close resemblance of trends in mean size to trends in atmospheric oxygen concentrations suggest either oxygen has been an important driver of size evolution or the two variables share a common control. Superimposed on these long-term trends are signatures of the major extinction events. Four of the five largest drops in mean size occur in association with the Middle Permian (Guadalupian), end-Permian, end-Triassic, and end-Cretaceous mass extinctions. Thus, the Phanerozoic size history of benthic foraminifera appears to have been driven primarily by long-term and short-term environmental change.

  18. Control of cell cycle and cell growth by molecular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Martí; Garí, Eloi; Colomina, Neus

    2007-11-01

    Cells adapt their size to both intrinsic and extrinsic demands and, among them, those that stem from growth and proliferation rates are crucial for cell size homeostasis. Here we revisit mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell growth in budding yeast. Cyclin Cln3, the most upstream activator of Start, is retained at the endoplasmic reticulum in early G(1) and released by specific chaperones in late G(1) to initiate the cell cycle. On one hand, these chaperones are rate-limiting for release of Cln3 and cell cycle entry and, on the other hand, they are required for key biosynthetic processes. We propose a model whereby the competition for specialized chaperones between growth and cycle machineries could gauge biosynthetic rates and set a critical size threshold at Start.

  19. Effect of Different Support Morphologies and Pt Particle Sizes in Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sevjidsuren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a low temperature fuel cell is strongly correlated with parameters like the platinum particle size, platinum dispersion on the carbon support, and electronic and protonic conductivity in the catalyst layer as well as its porosity. These parameters can be controlled by a rational choice of the appropriate catalyst synthesis and carbon support. Only recently, particular attention has been given to the support morphology, as it plays an important role for the formation of the electrode structure. Due to their significantly different structure, mesoporous carbon microbeads (MCMBs and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were used as supports and compared. Pt nanoparticles were decorated on these supports using the polyol method. Their size was varied by different heating times during the synthesis, and XRD, TEM, SEM, CV, and single cell tests used in their detailed characterization. A membrane-electrode assembly prepared with the MCMB did not show any activity in the fuel cell test, although the catalyst's electrochemical activity was almost similar to the MWCNT. This is assumed to be due to the very dense electrode structure formed by this support material, which does not allow for sufficient mass transport.

  20. Cell Size Discrimination Based on the Measurement of the Equilibrium Velocity in Rectangular Microchannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Schott

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry is a well-established diagnostic tool for cell counting and characterization. It utilizes fluorescence and scattered excitation light simultaneously emitted from cells passing an excitation laser focus to discriminate various cell types and estimate cell size. Here, we apply the principle of spatially modulated emission (SME to fluorescently stained SUP-B15 cells as a model system for cancer cells and Marinococcus luteus as model for bacteria. We demonstrate that the experimental apparatus is able to detect these model cells and that the results are comparable to those obtained by a commercially available CASY® TT Counter. Furthermore, by examining the velocity distribution of the cells, we observe clear relationships between cell condition/size and cell velocity. Thus, the cell velocity provides information comparable to the scatter signal in conventional flow cytometry. These results indicate that the SME technique is a promising method for simultaneous cell counting and viability characterization.

  1. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  2. Particle Size Controls on Water Adsorption and Condensation Regimes at Mineral Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Merve Yeşilbaş; Jean-François Boily

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric water vapour interacting with hydrophilic mineral surfaces can produce water films of various thicknesses and structures. In this work we show that mineral particle size controls water loadings achieved by water vapour deposition on 21 contrasting mineral samples exposed to atmospheres of up to ~16 Torr water (70% relative humidity at 25 °C). Submicrometer-sized particles hosted up to ~5 monolayers of water, while micrometer-sized particles up to several thousand monolayers. All f...

  3. Larger Daphnia at lower temperature: a role for cell size and genome configuration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Marwa; Wojewodzic, Marcin W; Laane, Carl Morten M; Hessen, Dag O

    2013-09-01

    Experiments with Daphnia magna and Daphnia pulex raised at 10 and 20 °C yielded larger adult size at the lower temperature. This must reflect increased cell size, increased cell numbers, or a combination of both. As it is difficult to achieve good estimates on cell size in crustaceans, we, therefore, measured nucleus and genome size using flow cytometry at 10 and 20 °C. DNA was stained with propidium iodide, ethidium bromide, and DAPI. Both nucleus and genome size estimates were elevated at 10 °C compared with 20 °C, suggesting that larger body size at low temperature could partly be accredited to an enlarged nucleus and thus cell size. Confocal microscopy observations confirmed the staining properties of fluorochromes. As differences in nucleotide numbers in response of growth temperature within a life span is unlikely, these results seem accredited to changed DNA-fluorochrome binding properties, presumably reflecting increased DNA condensation at low temperature. This implies that genome size comparisons may be impacted by ambient temperature in ectotherms. It also suggests that temperature-induced structural changes in the genome could affect cell size and for some species even body size.

  4. UNICS - An Unified Instrument Control System for Small/Medium Sized Astronomical Observatories

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Mudit K; Burse, Mahesh P; Chordia, Pravin A; Chillal, Kalpesh S; Mestry, Vilas B; Das, Hillol K; Kohok, Abhay A

    2009-01-01

    Although the astronomy community is witnessing an era of large telescopes, smaller and medium sized telescopes still maintain their utility being larger in numbers. In order to obtain better scientific outputs it is necessary to incorporate modern and advanced technologies to the back-end instruments and to their interfaces with the telescopes through various control processes. However often tight financial constraints on the smaller and medium size observatories limit the scope and utility of these systems. Most of the time for every new development on the telescope the back-end control systems are required to be built from scratch leading to high costs and efforts. Therefore a simple, low cost control system for small and medium size observatory needs to be developed to minimize the cost and efforts while going for the expansion of the observatory. Here we report on the development of a modern, multipurpose instrument control system UNICS (Unified Instrument Control System) to integrate the controls of vari...

  5. Fuel cell with internal flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Venkiteswaran, Arun [Karnataka, IN

    2012-06-12

    A fuel cell stack is provided with a plurality of fuel cell cassettes where each fuel cell cassette has a fuel cell with an anode and cathode. The fuel cell stack includes an anode supply chimney for supplying fuel to the anode of each fuel cell cassette, an anode return chimney for removing anode exhaust from the anode of each fuel cell cassette, a cathode supply chimney for supplying oxidant to the cathode of each fuel cell cassette, and a cathode return chimney for removing cathode exhaust from the cathode of each fuel cell cassette. A first fuel cell cassette includes a flow control member disposed between the anode supply chimney and the anode return chimney or between the cathode supply chimney and the cathode return chimney such that the flow control member provides a flow restriction different from at least one other fuel cell cassettes.

  6. Analysis of stochastic stem cell models with control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jienian; Sun, Zheng; Komarova, Natalia L

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the dynamics of stem cell lineages is of central importance both for healthy and cancerous tissues. We study stochastic population dynamics of stem cells and differentiated cells, where cell decisions, such as proliferation vs. differentiation decisions, or division and death decisions, are under regulation from surrounding cells. The goal is to understand how different types of control mechanisms affect the means and variances of cell numbers. We use the assumption of weak dependencies of the regulatory functions (the controls) on the cell populations near the equilibrium to formulate moment equations. We then study three different methods of closure, showing that they all lead to the same results for the highest order terms in the expressions for the moments. We derive simple explicit expressions for the means and the variances of stem cell and differentiated cell numbers. It turns out that the variance is expressed as an algebraic function of partial derivatives of the controls with respect to the population sizes at the equilibrium. We demonstrate that these findings are consistent with the results previously obtained in the context of particular systems, and also present two novel examples with negative and positive control of division and differentiation decisions. This methodology is formulated without any specific assumptions on the functional form of the controls, and thus can be used for any biological system.

  7. Size and shape controllable preparation of graphene sponge by freezing, lyophilizing and reducing in container

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO LianQin; YU BaoWei; ZHANG XiaoLiang; WU RuiHan; LIU XiaoYang; LIAO Rong; YANG ShengTao

    2016-01-01

    Graphene sponge (GS) is a porous 3D structure of graphene.Although hydrothermal reduction,chemical vapor deposition,solution reduction and high temperature annealing could be used for the preparation of GS,the size and shape cannot be well controlled.Herein,we reported a facile method to prepare GS under mild condition in a size and shape controllable way.Graphene oxide was lyophilized to form the spongy structure and reduced by steamy hydrazine hydrate to produce GS.The size and shape of GS prepared were nearly identical to that of the container.The reduction degree of GS could be regulated by the reduction temperature and time.

  8. Wireless magnetic sensors applied in the signal control of small and medium-sized cities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Zijun; Zhang Bo; Huang Zhen; Song Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    This topic is mainly about the typical applications of Wireless magnetic sensors in the signal control of smal and medium-sized cities. Based on the traffic characteristics of Fenghua city, through the networked control of Wireless magnetic sensors and signal controler, from "point, line, face" three aspects to optimize the traffic flow of Fenghua. The application results show that Wireless magnetic sensors can effectively improve the efficiency of traffic signal control in Fenghua.

  9. How does a single cell know when the liver has reached its correct size?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Hohmann

    Full Text Available The liver is a multi-functional organ that regulates major physiological processes and that possesses a remarkable regeneration capacity. After loss of functional liver mass the liver grows back to its original, individual size through hepatocyte proliferation and apoptosis. How does a single hepatocyte 'know' when the organ has grown to its final size? This work considers the initial growth phase of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in which the mass is restored. There are strong and valid arguments that the trigger of proliferation after partial hepatectomy is mediated through the portal blood flow. It remains unclear, if either or both the concentration of metabolites in the blood or the shear stress are crucial to hepatocyte proliferation and liver size control. A cell-based mathematical model is developed that helps discriminate the effects of these two potential triggers. Analysis of the mathematical model shows that a metabolic load and a hemodynamical hypothesis imply different feedback mechanisms at the cellular scale. The predictions of the developed mathematical model are compared to experimental data in rats. The assumption that hepatocytes are able to buffer the metabolic load leads to a robustness against short-term fluctuations of the trigger which can not be achieved with a purely hemodynamical trigger.

  10. Size-Controlled Nanomicelles of Poly(lactic acid–Poly(ethylene glycol Copolymers with a Multiblock Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Somekawa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to control the micelle size of poly(lactic acid and poly(ethylene glycol (PLA–PEG block copolymers is important for controlling their circulation in blood cell recognition, drug release and therapeutic effects. We successfully controlled the micelle size by changing the block number of copolymers (multiblock index. PLA–PEG multiblock copolymers with multiblock indexes ranging from 1.35 to 2.78 were synthesized by direct polycondensation with tin chloride/p-toluenesulfonic acid binary catalysts, using PEG with a molecular weight (Mw of 3200 Da. The Mw of PLA–PEG copolymers increased with an increase in the multiblock index, while micelle size, measured by dynamic light scattering, decreased greatly from 349 to 28 nm. In addition, the X-ray diffraction peak of the PLA crystal disappeared when the multiblock index was increased. These results indicate that a multiblock structure is useful for controlling micelle size without changing the PLA/PEG composition or PEG molecular weight, which strongly influences other micelle features.

  11. Toxicity of nano- and micro-sized silver particles in human hepatocyte cell line L02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Pengpeng; Guan Rongfa; Jiang Jiaxin; Liu Mingqi; Huang Guangrong; Chen Xiaoting [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Biometrology and Inspection and Quarantine, College of Life Sciences, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Ye Xingqian, E-mail: rfguan@163.com [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2011-07-06

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) previously classified as antimicrobial agents have been widely used in consumers and industrial products, especially food storage material. Ag NPs used as antimicrobial agents may be found in liver. Thus, examination of the ability of Ag NPs to penetrate the liver is warranted. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal viability assay for using with Ag NPs in order to assess their toxicity to liver cells. For toxicity evaluations, cellular morphology, mitochondrial function (3-(4, 5-dimethylazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, MTT assay), membrane leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH release assay), Oxidative stress markers (malonaldehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)), DNA damage (single cell gel eletrophoresis, SCGE assay), and protein damage were assessed under control and exposed conditions (24 h of exposure). The results showed that mitochondrial function decreased significantly in cells exposed to Ag NPs at 25 {mu}g{center_dot}mL{sup -1}. LDH leakage significantly increased in cells exposed to Ag NPs ({>=} 25 {mu}g mL{sup -1}) while micro-sized silver particles tested displayed LDH leakage only at higher doses (100 {mu}g{center_dot}mL{sup -1}). The microscopic studies demonstrated that nanoparticle-exposed cells at higher doses became abnormal in size, displaying cellular shrinkage, and an acquisition of an irregular shape. Due to toxicity of silver, further study conducted with reference to its oxidative stress. The results exhibited significant depletion of GSH level, increase in SOD levels and lead to lipid peroxidation, which suggested that cytotoxicity of Ag NPs in liver cells might be mediated through oxidative stress. The results demonstrates that Ag NPs lead to cellular morphological modifications, LDH leakage, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cause increased generation of ROS, depletion of GSH, lipid peroxidation, oxidative DNA damage and protein damage

  12. Combinatorial delivery of immunosuppressive factors to dendritic cells using dual-sized microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jamal S; Roche, Chris; Zhang, Ying; Brusko, Todd M; Wasserfall, Clive H; Atkinson, Mark; Clare-Salzler, Michael J; Keselowsky, Benjamin G

    2014-05-07

    Microparticulate systems are beginning to show promise for delivery of modulatory agents for immunotherapeutic applications which modulate dendritic cell (DC) functions. Co-administration of multiple factors is an emerging theme in immune modulation which may prove beneficial in this setting. Herein, we demonstrate that localized, controlled delivery of multiple factors can be accomplished through poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticle systems fabricated in two size classes of phagocytosable and unphagocytosable microparticles (MPs). The immunosuppressive ability of combinatorial multi-factor dual MP systems was evaluated by investigating effects on DC maturation, DC resistance to LPS-mediated maturation and proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. Phagocytosable MPs (~2 μm) were fabricated encapsulating either rapamycin (RAPA) or all-trans retinoic acid (RA), and unphagocytosable MPs (~30 μm) were fabricated encapsulating either transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) or interleukin-10 (IL-10). Combinations of these MP classes reduced expression of stimulatory/costimulatory molecules (MHC-II, CD80 and CD86) in comparison to iDC and soluble controls, but not necessarily to single factor MPs. Dual MP-treated DCs resisted LPS-mediated activation, in a manner driven by the single factor phagocytosable MPs used. Dendritic cells treated with dual MP systems suppressed allogeneic T cell proliferation, generally demonstrating greater suppression by combination MPs than single factor formulations, particularly for the RA/IL-10 MPs. This work demonstrates feasibility of simultaneous targeted delivery of immunomodulatory factors to cell surface receptors and intracellular locations, and indicates that a combinatorial approach can boost immunoregulatory responses for therapeutic application in autoimmunity and transplantation.

  13. A computer module used to calculate the horizontal control surface size of a conceptual aircraft design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Swanson, Stephen Mark

    1990-01-01

    The creation of a computer module used to calculate the size of the horizontal control surfaces of a conceptual aircraft design is discussed. The control surface size is determined by first calculating the size needed to rotate the aircraft during takeoff, and, second, by determining if the calculated size is large enough to maintain stability of the aircraft throughout any specified mission. The tail size needed to rotate during takeoff is calculated from a summation of forces about the main landing gear of the aircraft. The stability of the aircraft is determined from a summation of forces about the center of gravity during different phases of the aircraft's flight. Included in the horizontal control surface analysis are: downwash effects on an aft tail, upwash effects on a forward canard, and effects due to flight in close proximity to the ground. Comparisons of production aircraft with numerical models show good accuracy for control surface sizing. A modified canard design verified the accuracy of the module for canard configurations. Added to this stability and control module is a subroutine that determines one of the three design variables, for a stable vectored thrust aircraft. These include forward thrust nozzle position, aft thrust nozzle angle, and forward thrust split.

  14. Perturbation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport affects size of nucleus and nucleolus in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Abira; Bhattacharjee, Chumki; Bhave, Madhura; Kailaje, Vaishali; Jain, Bhawik K; Sengupta, Isha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu

    2016-03-01

    Size regulation of human cell nucleus and nucleolus are poorly understood subjects. 3D reconstruction of live image shows that the karyoplasmic ratio (KR) increases by 30-80% in transformed cell lines compared to their immortalized counterpart. The attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes the KR value to increase by 30-50% in immortalized cell lines. Nucleolus volumes are significantly increased in transformed cell lines and the attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes a significant increase in the nucleolus volume of immortalized cell lines. A cytosol and nuclear fraction swapping experiment emphasizes the potential role of unknown cytosolic factors in nuclear and nucleolar size regulation.

  15. Critical cell wall hole size for lysis in Gram-positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gabriel; Wiesenfeld, Kurt; Nelson, Daniel; Weitz, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Gram-positive bacteria transport molecules necessary for their survival through holes in their cell wall. The holes in cell walls need to be large enough to let critical nutrients pass through. However, the cell wall must also function to prevent the bacteria's membrane from protruding through a large hole into the environment and lysing the cell. As such, we hypothesize that there exists a range of cell wall hole sizes that allow for molecule transport but prevent membrane protrusion. Here we develop and analyze a biophysical theory of the response of a Gram-positive cell's membrane to the formation of a hole in the cell wall. We predict a critical hole size in the range 15-24nm beyond which lysis occurs. To test our theory, we measured hole sizes in Streptococcus pyogenes cells undergoing enzymatic lysis via transmission electron microscopy. The measured hole sizes are in strong agreement with our theoretical prediction. Together, the theory and experiments provide a means to quantify the mechanisms of death of Gram-positive cells via enzymatically mediated lysis and provides insight into the range of cell wall hole sizes compatible with bacterial homeostasis.

  16. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B.; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. PMID:26370500

  17. Attitude angle anti-windup control of small size unmanned helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Taizhou; Long, Haihui; Zhao, Jiankang; Xia, Xuan; Yang, Guang

    2017-01-01

    This paper researches the small-size unmanned helicopter attitude control problem with actuator saturation limit. Traditional approach for this problem is often based on an accurate dynamic model which is complicated and difficult to achieve in engineering. In this paper, we propose an anti-windup PID approach which does not rely on sophicated helicopter dynamic model. The anti-windup PID controller is established by adding a phase-lead compensator to the conventional PID controller. The performance and merits of this proposed controller are exemplified by the simulations between the conventional PID controller and the anti-windup PID controller.

  18. Co-variation of metabolic rates and cell-size in coccolithophores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Aloisi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Coccolithophores are sensitive recorders of environmental change. The size of their coccosphere varies in the ocean along gradients of environmental conditions and provides a key for understanding the fate of this important phytoplankton group in the future ocean. But interpreting field changes in coccosphere size in terms of laboratory observations is hard, mainly because the marine signal reflects the response of multiple morphotypes to changes in a combination of environmental variables. In this paper I examine the large corpus of published laboratory experiments with coccolithophores looking for relations between environmental conditions, metabolic rates and cell size (a proxy for coccosphere size. I show that growth, photosynthesis, and to a lesser extent calcification, co-vary with cell size when pCO2, irradiance, temperature, nitrate, phosphate and iron conditions change. With the exception of phosphate and temperature, a change from limiting to non-limiting conditions always results in an increase in cell size. An increase in phosphate or temperature produces the opposite effect. The magnitude of the coccosphere size changes observed in the laboratory is comparable to that observed in the ocean. If the biological reasons behind the environment-metabolism-size link are understood, it will be possible to use coccosphere size changes in the modern ocean and in marine sediments to investigate the fate of coccolithophores in the future ocean. This reasoning can be extended to the size of coccoliths if, as recent experiments are starting to show, coccolith size reacts to environmental change proportionally to coccosphere size. I introduce a simple model that simulates the growth rate and the size of cells forced by nitrate and phosphate concentrations. By considering a simple rule that allocates the energy flow from nutrient acquisition to cell structure (biomass and cell maturity (biological complexity, eventually leading to cell division

  19. Plasmon-Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting with Size-Controllable Gold Nanodot Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, HJ; Lee, SH; Upadhye, AA; Ro, I; Tejedor-Tejedor, MI; Anderson, MA; Kim, WB; Huber, GW

    2014-10-01

    Size-controllable Au nanodot arrays (50, 63, and 83 nm dot size) with a narrow size distribution (+/- 5%) were prepared by a direct contact printing method on an indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate. Titania was added to the Au nanodots using TiO2 sols of 2-3 nm in size. This created a precisely controlled Au nanodot with 110 nm of TiO2 overcoats. Using these precisely controlled nanodot arrays, the effects of Au nanodot size and TiO2 overcoats were investigated for photoelectrochemical water splitting using a three-electrode system with a fiber-optic visible light source. From UV-vis measurement, the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak energy (ELSPR) increased and the LSPR line width (G) decreased with decreasing Au nanodot size. The generated plasmonic enhancement for the photoelectrochemical water splitting reaction increased with decreasing Au particle size. The measured plasmonic enhancement for light on/off experiments was 25 times for the 50 nm Au size and 10 times for the 83 nm Au nanodot size. The activity of each catalyst increased by a factor of 6 when TiO2 was added to the Au nanodots for all the samples. The activity of the catalyst was proportional to the quality factor (defined as Q = E-LSPR/Gamma) of the plasmonic metal nanostructure. The enhanced water splitting performance with the decreased Au nanodot size is probably due to more generated charge carriers (electron/hole pair) by local field enhancement as the quality factor increases.

  20. The cell size distribution of tomato fruit can be changed by overexpression of CDKA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerednik, Anna; Busscher, Marco; Angenent, Gerco C; de Maagd, Ruud A

    2015-02-01

    Tomato is one of the most cultivated vegetables in the world and an important ingredient of the human diet. Tomato breeders and growers face a continuous challenge of combining high quantity (production volume) with high quality (appearance, taste and perception for the consumers, processing quality for the processing industry). To improve the quality of tomato, it is important to understand the regulation of fruit development and of fruit cellular structure, which is in part determined by the sizes and numbers of cells within a tissue. The role of the cell cycle therein is poorly understood. Plant cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are homologues of yeast cdc2, an important cell cycle regulator conserved throughout all eukaryotes. CDKA1 is constitutively expressed during the cell cycle and has dual functions in S- and M-phase progression. We have produced transgenic tomato plants with increased expression of CDKA1 under the control of the fruit-specific TPRP promoter, which despite a reduced number of seeds and diminished amount of jelly, developed fruits with weight and shape comparable to that of wild-type fruits. However, the phenotypic changes with regard to the pericarp thickness and placenta area were remarkable. Fruits of tomato plants with the highest expression of CDKA1 had larger septa and columella (placenta), compared with wild-type fruits. Our data demonstrate the possibility of manipulating the ratio between cell division and expansion by changing the expression of a key cell cycle regulator and probably its activity with substantial effects on structural traits of the harvested fruit.

  1. Cell responses to two kinds of nanohydroxyapatite with different sizes and crystallinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei SC

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaochen Liu1, Minzhi Zhao1, Jingxiong Lu2, Jian Ma4, Jie Wei2, Shicheng Wei1,31Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing, 2Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, 3Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing, 4Hospital of Stomatology, Tongji University, Shanghai, ChinaIntroduction:Hydroxyapatite (HA is the principal inorganic constituent of human bone. Due to its good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, all kinds of HA particles were prepared by different methods. Numerous reports demonstrated that the properties of HA affected its biological effects.Methods: Two kinds of nanohydroxyapatite with different sizes and crystallinities were obtained via a hydrothermal treatment method under different temperatures. It was found that at a temperature of 140°C, a rod-like crystal (n-HA1 with a diameter of 23 ± 5 nm, a length of 47 ± 14 nm, and crystallinity of 85% ± 5% was produced, while at a temperature of 80°C, a rod-like crystal (n-HA2 with a diameter of 16 ± 3 nm, a length of 40 ± 10 nm, and crystallinity of 65% ± 3% was produced. The influence of nanohydroxyapatite size and crystallinity on osteoblast viability was studied by MTT, scanning electron microscopy, and flow cytometry.Results: n-HA1 gave a better biological response than n-HA2 in promoting cell growth and inhibiting cell apoptosis, and also exhibited much more active cell morphology. Alkaline phosphatase activity for both n-HA2 and n-HA1 was obviously higher than for the control, and no significant difference was found between n-HA1 and n-HA2. The same trend was observed on Western blotting for expression of type I collagen and osteopontin. In addition, it was found by transmission electron microscopy that large quantities of n-HA2 entered into the cell

  2. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  3. Finite-size corrections to scaling behavior in sorted cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopper, A V; Krens, G; Grill, S W; Heisenberg, C-P

    2010-10-01

    Cell sorting is a widespread phenomenon pivotal to the early development of multicellular organisms. In vitro cell sorting studies have been instrumental in revealing the cellular properties driving this process. However, these studies have as yet been limited to two-dimensional analysis of three-dimensional cell sorting events. Here we describe a method to record the sorting of primary zebrafish ectoderm and mesoderm germ layer progenitor cells in three dimensions over time, and quantitatively analyze their sorting behavior using an order parameter related to heterotypic interface length. We investigate the cell population size dependence of sorted aggregates and find that the germ layer progenitor cells engulfed in the final configuration display a relationship between total interfacial length and system size according to a simple geometrical argument, subject to a finite-size effect.

  4. SHOEBOX Modulates Root Meristem Size in Rice through Dose-Dependent Effects of Gibberellins on Cell Elongation and Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jintao; Zhao, Yu; Chu, Huangwei; Wang, Likai; Fu, Yanru; Liu, Ping; Upadhyaya, Narayana; Chen, Chunli; Mou, Tongmin; Feng, Yuqi; Kumar, Prakash; Xu, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about how the size of meristem cells is regulated and whether it participates in the control of meristem size in plants. Here, we report our findings on shoebox (shb), a mild gibberellin (GA) deficient rice mutant that has a short root meristem size. Quantitative analysis of cortical cell length and number indicates that shb has shorter, rather than fewer, cells in the root meristem until around the fifth day after sowing, from which the number of cortical cells is also reduced. These defects can be either corrected by exogenous application of bioactive GA or induced in wild-type roots by a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of paclobutrazol on GA biosynthesis, suggesting that GA deficiency is the primary cause of shb mutant phenotypes. SHB encodes an AP2/ERF transcription factor that directly activates transcription of the GA biosynthesis gene KS1. Thus, root meristem size in rice is modulated by SHB-mediated GA biosynthesis that regulates the elongation and proliferation of meristem cells in a developmental stage-specific manner.

  5. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and later...... for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the Supplemental Data...

  6. Cell size effects for vibration analysis and design of sandwich beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaoming Dai; Weihong Zhang

    2009-01-01

    In this work, sandwich beams are studied to reveal the underlying size effects of the periodic core cells for the first time within the framework of free vibration analysis of such an advanced lightweight structure. The energy equiv-alence method is formulated as a theoretical approach that takes into account the cell size effect. It is compared with the asymptotic homogenization method and direct finite element method systematically to show their consistence and appli-cability. The accuracy of free vibration responses predicted by the detailed finite element model is used as the standard of comparison. It is shown that the cell size is an important parameter characterizing the cellular core rigidities that influ-ence vibration responses. The homogenization model agrees exactly with the asymptotic solution of the analytical expres-sion of the beam model only whenever the cell size tends to be infinitely small.

  7. Scattering pulse of label free fine structure cells to determine the size scale of scattering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Kaixing; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Scattering pulse is sensitive to the morphology and components of each single label-free cell. The most direct detection result, label free cell's scattering pulse is studied in this paper as a novel trait to recognize large malignant cells from small normal cells. A set of intrinsic scattering pulse calculation method is figured out, which combines both hydraulic focusing theory and small particle's scattering principle. Based on the scattering detection angle ranges of widely used flow cytometry, the scattering pulses formed by cell scattering energy in forward scattering angle 2°-5° and side scattering angle 80°-110° are discussed. Combining the analysis of cell's illuminating light energy, the peak, area, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of label free cells' scattering pulses for fine structure cells with diameter 1-20 μm are studied to extract the interrelations of scattering pulse's features and cell's morphology. The theoretical and experimental results show that cell's diameter and FWHM of its scattering pulse agree with approximate linear distribution; the peak and area of scattering pulse do not always increase with cell's diameter becoming larger, but when cell's diameter is less than about 16 μm the monotone increasing relation of scattering pulse peak or area with cell's diameter can be obtained. This relationship between the features of scattering pulse and cell's size is potentially a useful but very simple criterion to distinguishing malignant and normal cells by their sizes and morphologies in label free cells clinical examinations.

  8. A flexible microprocessor system for the measurement of cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, J M; Jones, D A; Edwards, R H

    1982-06-01

    A flexible system for the measurement of length and area is described. The system consists of the Reichert Jung MOP-1 area measuring device interfaced with a Commodore PET computer. Its use is illustrated by the planimetric measurement of cross sectional areas in histochemical preparations of normal and diseased muscle. While measurements are being made data can be displayed on the computer screen either in numerical form or as a frequency histogram together with simple statistical analyses. Hard copy can be obtained from an attached printer. Mean values for fibre area in normal human skeletal muscle are reported. An alternative, widely used method of calculating fibre area from the lesser diameter was found to give a consistent underestimate of approximately 30% when compared with our planimetric method. In diseased muscle with abnormally shaped fibres the discrepancy is even larger; such fibres can be identified using a "form factor" which relates the area of a cell to its perimeter. This rapid, accurate and flexible system is also suitable for the measurement of many different types of graphical record.

  9. The Influence of Genome and Cell Size on Brain Morphology in Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Gerhard; Walkowiak, Wolfgang

    2015-08-10

    In amphibians, nerve cell size is highly correlated with genome size, and increases in genome and cell size cause a retardation of the rate of development of nervous (as well as nonnervous) tissue leading to secondary simplification. This yields an inverse relationship between genome and cell size on the one hand and morphological complexity of the tectum mesencephali as the main visual center, the size of the torus semicircularis as the main auditory center, the size of the amphibian papilla as an important peripheral auditory structure, and the size of the cerebellum as a major sensorimotor center. Nervous structures developing later (e.g., torus and cerebellum) are more affected by secondary simplification than those that develop earlier (e.g., the tectum). This effect is more prominent in salamanders and caecilians than in frogs owing to larger genome and cells sizes in the former two taxa. We hypothesize that because of intragenomic evolutionary processes, important differences in brain morphology can arise independently of specific environmental selection.

  10. Size-controlled synthesis of Cu2O nanoparticles via reaction-diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Layla; Epstein, Irving R.

    2017-02-01

    Copper (I) oxide nanoparticles are synthesized by a simple reaction-diffusion process involving Cu+ ions and sodium hydroxide in gelatin. The mean diameter and the size dispersion of the nanoparticles can be controlled by two experimental parameters, the percent of gelatin in the medium and the hydroxide ion concentration. UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are used to analyze the size, morphology, and chemical composition of the nanoparticles generated.

  11. Relevant parameters in models of cell division control

    CERN Document Server

    Grilli, Jacopo; Kennard, Andrew S; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2016-01-01

    A recent burst of dynamic single-cell growth-division data makes it possible to characterize the stochastic dynamics of cell division control in bacteria. Different modeling frameworks were used to infer specific mechanisms from such data, but the links between frameworks are poorly explored, with relevant consequences for how well any particular mechanism can be supported by the data. Here, we describe a simple and generic framework in which two common formalisms can be used interchangeably: (i) a continuous-time division process described by a hazard function and (ii) a discrete-time equation describing cell size across generations (where the unit of time is a cell cycle). In our framework, this second process is a discrete-time Langevin equation with a simple physical analogue. By perturbative expansion around the mean initial size (or inter-division time), we show explicitly how this framework describes a wide range of division control mechanisms, including combinations of time and size control, as well a...

  12. Microfabrication of chip-sized scaffolds for three-dimensional cell cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giselbrecht, Stefan; Gottwald, Eric; Truckenmueller, Roman; Trautmann, Christina; Welle, Alexander; Guber, Andreas; Saile, Volker; Gietzelt, Thomas; Weibezahn, Karl-Friedrich

    2008-05-12

    Using microfabrication technologies is a prerequisite to create scaffolds of reproducible geometry and constant quality for three-dimensional cell cultivation. These technologies offer a wide spectrum of advantages not only for manufacturing but also for different applications. The size and shape of formed cell clusters can be influenced by the exact and reproducible architecture of the microfabricated scaffold and, therefore, the diffusion path length of nutrients and gases can be controlled.1 This is unquestionably a useful tool to prevent apoptosis and necrosis of cells due to an insufficient nutrient and gas supply or removal of cellular metabolites. Our polymer chip, called CellChip, has the outer dimensions of 2 x 2 cm with a central microstructured area. This area is subdivided into an array of up to 1156 microcontainers with a typical dimension of 300 m edge length for the cubic design (cp- or cf-chip) or of 300 m diameter and depth for the round design (r-chip).2 So far, hot embossing or micro injection moulding (in combination with subsequent laborious machining of the parts) was used for the fabrication of the microstructured chips. Basically, micro injection moulding is one of the only polymer based replication techniques that, up to now, is capable for mass production of polymer microstructures.3 However, both techniques have certain unwanted limitations due to the processing of a viscous polymer melt with the generation of very thin walls or integrated through holes. In case of the CellChip, thin bottom layers are necessary to perforate the polymer and provide small pores of defined size to supply cells with culture medium e.g. by microfluidic perfusion of the containers. In order to overcome these limitations and to reduce the manufacturing costs we have developed a new microtechnical approach on the basis of a down-scaled thermoforming process. For the manufacturing of highly porous and thin walled polymer chips, we use a combination of heavy ion

  13. Simultaneous Size Control of Microcapsule and Its Nanopores Using Polymer Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemyung Cha,; Eun Ho Jeong,; Arakawa Takahiro,; Kyung Chun Kim,; Shuich Shoji,; Jeung Sang Go,

    2010-03-01

    Polymeric microcapsules with nanopores are produced using the droplet-based self-assembly of a block copolymer in the microfluidic channel. Differently from the conventional wise, the sizes of the microcapsule and its nanopores are controlled by changing the concentration of the block copolymer dissolved in an organic solvent. The increase in the polymer concentration shows the increase in the size of the microcapsule and the decrease of the size and number of the nanopores. Also, to obtain the optimal morphology of the nanopores in the microcapsule, the removal process of a surfactant is newly developed by using a microporous metal mesh.

  14. Construct hepatic analog by cell-matrix controlled assembly technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Haixia; YAN Yongnian; WANG Xiaohong; CHENG Jie; LIN Feng; XIONG Zhuo; Wu Rendong

    2006-01-01

    A mixture of hepatic cells and chitosan/gelatin solution was deposited to construct a hepatic analog by way of layer-by-layer deposition technique using a home-made devise. The size and cell concentration of the analogs can be controlled freely. Approximately 90% of the hepatic cells remained viable under 0.2 Mpa extrusion pressure. Cultured in vitro 8 weeks before animal test, hepatic cells in structure maintained their phenotype and kept proliferating, and albumin and other secretion of the cells increased. Cords and hepaton-like structures were observed after culture for 20 d. These results indicate that hepatic cells could be assembled directly into a 3D viable structure and expanded to form a hepatic organoid. This accomplishment is considered to be an interesting means for the fabrication of liver replacements.

  15. Size-controlled flow synthesis of gold nanoparticles using a segmented flow microfluidic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Victor Sebastian; Kuhn, Simon; Kulkarni, Amol A; Jensen, Klavs F

    2012-05-01

    Segmented flow is often used in the synthesis of nanomaterials to achieve narrow particle size distribution. The narrowness of the distribution is commonly attributed to the reduced dispersion associated with segmented flows. On the basis of the analysis of flow fields and the resulting particle size distribution, we demonstrate that it is the slip velocity between the two fluids and internal mixing in the continuous-phase slugs that govern the nature of the particle size distribution. The reduction in the axial dispersion has less impact on particle growth and hence on the particle size distribution. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles from HAuCl(4) with rapid reduction by NaBH(4) serves as a model system. Rapid reduction yields gold nuclei, which grow by agglomeration, and it is controlled by the interaction of the nuclei with local flow. Thus, the difference in the physical properties of the two phases and the inlet flow rates ultimately control the particle growth. Hence, a careful choice of continuous and dispersed phases is necessary to control the nanoparticle size and size distribution.

  16. Size-controlled fluorescent nanodiamonds: a facile method of fabrication and color-center counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Remi; Floyd, Daniel L; Peng, Wei; Choy, Jennifer T; Loncar, Marko; Bakr, Osman M

    2013-12-07

    We present a facile method for the production of fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (DNCs) of different sizes and efficiently quantify the concentration of emitting defect color centers (DCCs) of each DNC size. We prepared the DNCs by ball-milling commercially available micrometer-sized synthetic (high pressure, high temperature (HPHT)) diamonds and then separated the as-produced DNCs by density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) into size-controlled fractions. A protocol to enhance the uniformity of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in the diamonds was devised by depositing the DNCs as a dense monolayer on amino-silanized silicon substrates and then subjecting the monolayer to He(+) beam irradiation. Using a standard confocal setup, we analyzed the average number of NV centers per crystal, and obtained a quantitative relationship between the DNC particle size and the NV number per crystal. This relationship was in good agreement with results from previous studies that used more elaborate setups. Our findings suggest that nanocrystal size separation by DGU may be used to control the number of defects per nanocrystal. The efficient approaches described herein to control and quantify DCCs are valuable to researchers as they explore applications for color centers and new strategies to create them.

  17. Size-controlled fluorescent nanodiamonds: a facile method of fabrication and color-center counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Remi; Floyd, Daniel L.; Peng, Wei; Choy, Jennifer T.; Loncar, Marko; Bakr, Osman M.

    2013-11-01

    We present a facile method for the production of fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (DNCs) of different sizes and efficiently quantify the concentration of emitting defect color centers (DCCs) of each DNC size. We prepared the DNCs by ball-milling commercially available micrometer-sized synthetic (high pressure, high temperature (HPHT)) diamonds and then separated the as-produced DNCs by density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) into size-controlled fractions. A protocol to enhance the uniformity of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in the diamonds was devised by depositing the DNCs as a dense monolayer on amino-silanized silicon substrates and then subjecting the monolayer to He+ beam irradiation. Using a standard confocal setup, we analyzed the average number of NV centers per crystal, and obtained a quantitative relationship between the DNC particle size and the NV number per crystal. This relationship was in good agreement with results from previous studies that used more elaborate setups. Our findings suggest that nanocrystal size separation by DGU may be used to control the number of defects per nanocrystal. The efficient approaches described herein to control and quantify DCCs are valuable to researchers as they explore applications for color centers and new strategies to create them.

  18. Size-controlled fluorescent nanodiamonds: A facile method of fabrication and color-center counting

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Remi

    2013-01-01

    We present a facile method for the production of fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (DNCs) of different sizes and efficiently quantify the concentration of emitting defect color centers (DCCs) of each DNC size. We prepared the DNCs by ball-milling commercially available micrometer-sized synthetic (high pressure, high temperature (HPHT)) diamonds and then separated the as-produced DNCs by density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) into size-controlled fractions. A protocol to enhance the uniformity of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in the diamonds was devised by depositing the DNCs as a dense monolayer on amino-silanized silicon substrates and then subjecting the monolayer to He+ beam irradiation. Using a standard confocal setup, we analyzed the average number of NV centers per crystal, and obtained a quantitative relationship between the DNC particle size and the NV number per crystal. This relationship was in good agreement with results from previous studies that used more elaborate setups. Our findings suggest that nanocrystal size separation by DGU may be used to control the number of defects per nanocrystal. The efficient approaches described herein to control and quantify DCCs are valuable to researchers as they explore applications for color centers and new strategies to create them. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Tripolyphosphate Cross-Linked Macromolecular Composites for the Growth of Shape- and Size-Controlled Apatites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fwu-Long Mi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive composites that enable the formation of calcium phosphates have received increased attention over the last decade, in the development of osteoconductive biomaterials for orthopaedic applications. In this work, tripolyphosphate (TPP-cross-linked chitosan/gelatin composites (TPP-CG were prepared for the growth of shape- and size-controlled calcium phosphates on/in the composites. The mineralization pattern of the composites, after soaking in the Ca(OH2 aqueous solution, clearly demonstrated oriented, needle-like nanocrystallites of calcium phosphates in the matrix with especially high Ca/P molar ratio (3.98 as detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX analysis. Subsequent to mineralization in a simulated body fluid (SBF, the mineralized composites showed micro-scaled spherical aggregates deposited on the surface and granule-like nanocrystallites grew in the matrix. The Ca/P molar ratio (1.72 and X-ray diffraction pattern of the nanocrystallites grown in the composites were similar to those of hydroxyapatite (HAp. Osteoblastic differentiation of ROS cells cultured on the mineralized composites allowed an enhanced expression of the chosen osteogenic marker (alkaline phosphatase, ALPase. These results indicated that the composites mineralized with micro- and nano-scaled calcium phosphates with various structural features make them attractive for bone tissue engineering applications.

  20. In Vivo Single-Cell Fluorescence and Size Scaling of Phytoplankton Chlorophyll Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Eva; Nogueira, Enrique; López-Urrutia, Ángel

    2017-04-01

    In unicellular phytoplankton, the size scaling exponent of chlorophyll content per cell decreases with increasing light limitation. Empirical studies have explored this allometry by combining data from several species, using average values of pigment content and cell size for each species. The resulting allometry thus includes phylogenetic and size scaling effects. The possibility of measuring single-cell fluorescence with imaging-in-flow cytometry devices allows the study of the size scaling of chlorophyll content at both the inter- and intraspecific levels. In this work, the changing allometry of chlorophyll content was estimated for the first time for single phytoplankton populations by using data from a series of incubations with monocultures exposed to different light levels. Interspecifically, our experiments confirm previous modeling and experimental results of increasing size scaling exponents with increasing irradiance. A similar pattern was observed intraspecifically but with a larger variability in size scaling exponents. Our results show that size-based processes and geometrical approaches explain variations in chlorophyll content. We also show that the single-cell fluorescence measurements provided by imaging-in-flow devices can be applied to field samples to understand the changes in the size dependence of chlorophyll content in response to environmental variables affecting primary production.IMPORTANCE The chlorophyll concentrations in phytoplankton register physiological adjustments in cellular pigmentation arising mainly from changes in light conditions. The extent of these adjustments is constrained by the size of the phytoplankton cells, even within single populations. Hence, variations in community chlorophyll derived from photoacclimation are also dependent on the phytoplankton size distribution.

  1. Cell Size Clues for the Allee Effect in Vegetative Amoeba Suspension Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Carl; Rappazzo, Brendan; Wang, Xiaoning; Segota, Igor

    That cells proliferate at higher rates with increasing density helps us appreciate and understand the development of multicellular behavior through the study of dilute cell systems. However, arduous cell counting with a microscope reveals that in the model eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum this transition is difficult to ascertain and thereby further explore despite our earlier progress (Phys. Rev. E 77, 041905, (2008)). Here we report preliminary evidence that the slow proliferation phase is well characterized by reduced cell size compared to the wide distribution of cell sizes in the familiar exponential proliferation phase of moderate densities. This observation is enabled by a new system for characterizing cells in stirred suspension cultures. Our technique relies on quickly acquiring magnitude distributions of detected flashes of laser light scattered in situ by cell targets.

  2. Size-controlled bismuth nanoparticles physically grown by the support of cobalt atomic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Seok; Noh, Jin-Seo

    2016-04-01

    Bi nanoparticle arrays with the almost monodispersity were synthesized using a magnetically assisted physical method. The average size and the overall morphology of Bi nanoparticles could be controlled by the adjustment of several parameters such as relative powers applied to Bi and Co targets, substrate temperature, and growth time. It was disclosed that Bi nanoparticles grow larger at a higher relative power to Bi, higher substrate temperature, and longer growth time, accompanying the deterioration of well-developed faceted structures. This physical method may provide a facile and fast route to achieving quality Bi nanoparticle arrays with a certain extent of size and morphology controllability.

  3. In vitro culture and oxygen consumption of NSCs in size-controlled neurospheres of Ca-alginate/gelatin microbead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kedong, E-mail: Kedongsong@dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian R and D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yang, Yanfei; Li, Shixiao; Wu, Meiling; Wu, Yixing [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian R and D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Lim, Mayasari [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Liu, Tianqing, E-mail: liutq@dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian R and D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) forming neurospheres in a conventional culture tend to develop necrotic/apoptotic centers due to mass transport limitations. In this study, the internal pore structure of calcium-alginate/gelatin (CAG) microbeads was tuned and controlled to provide a suitable three-dimensional environment supporting NSC proliferation. Direct impact of three-dimensional space availability was quantified by oxygen consumption rates of NSCs and cells were cultured in three different methods: neurospheres, single cell suspension of NSCs, and encapsulated NSCs in microbeads. Our results showed that encapsulated NSCs in CAG microbeads maintained higher cell viability than in conventional culture. In addition, NSCs encapsulated in CAG microbeads preserved their original stemness and continued to express nestin, CNPase, GFAP and β-tubulin-III post-encapsulation. Oxygen consumption rates of encapsulated NSCs in CAG microbeads were the lowest as compared to the other two culture methods. The optimal cell density supporting high cell proliferation in CAG microbeads was found to be 1.5 × 10{sup 5} cells/mL. The glucose consumption curve suggests that encapsulated NSCs in microbeads had a slower growth profile. This study presents an alternative method in hybrid microbead preparation to generate a highly favorable three-dimensional cell carrier for NSCs and was successfully applied for its effective in vitro expansion. - Highlights: • CAG microbeads effectively restricted the size of neurospheres.

  4. Optical separation and controllable delivery of cells from particle and cell mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuchao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell separation and delivery have recently gained significant attention in biological and biochemical studies. In thiswork, an optical method for separation and controllable delivery of cells by using an abruptly tapered fiber probe is reported. By launching a laser beam at the wavelength of 980 nm into the fiber, a mixture of cells with sizes of ~5 and ~3 μm and poly(methyl methacrylate particles with size of 5 μm are separated into three chains along the direction of propagation of light. The cell and particle chains are delivered in three dimensions over 600 μm distance. Experimental results are interpreted by numerical simulations. Optical forces and forward migration velocities of different particles and cells are calculated and discussed.

  5. Controllability analysis of decentralised linear controllers for polymeric fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Maria; Aguado, Joaquin; Ansede, Xavier; Riera, Jordi [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C. Llorens i Artigas 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-10-10

    This work deals with the control of polymeric fuel cells. It includes a linear analysis of the system at different operating points, the comparison and selection of different control structures, and the validation of the controlled system by simulation. The work is based on a complex non linear model which has been linearised at several operating points. The linear analysis tools used are the Morari resiliency index, the condition number, and the relative gain array. These techniques are employed to compare the controllability of the system with different control structures and at different operating conditions. According to the results, the most promising control structures are selected and their performance with PI based diagonal controllers is evaluated through simulations with the complete non linear model. The range of operability of the examined control structures is compared. Conclusions indicate good performance of several diagonal linear controllers. However, very few have a wide operability range. (author)

  6. Small- and Medium-Sized Commercial Building Monitoring and Controls Needs: A Scoping Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Underhill, Ronald M.; Goddard, James K.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Piette, M. A.; Granderson, J.; Brown, Rich E.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; Kuruganti, T.

    2012-10-31

    Buildings consume over 40% of the total energy consumption in the U.S. A significant portion of the energy consumed in buildings is wasted because of the lack of controls or the inability to use existing building automation systems (BASs) properly. Much of the waste occurs because of our inability to manage and controls buildings efficiently. Over 90% of the buildings are either small-size (<5,000 sf) or medium-size (between 5,000 sf and 50,000 sf); these buildings currently do not use BASs to monitor and control their building systems from a central location. According to Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), about 10% of the buildings in the U.S. use BASs or central controls to manage their building system operations. Buildings that use BASs are typically large (>100,000 sf). Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were asked by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP) to identify monitoring and control needs for small- and medium-sized commercial buildings and recommend possible solutions. This study documents the needs and solutions for small- and medium-sized buildings.

  7. Assembly of MOF Microcapsules with Size-Selective Permeability on Cell Walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanbin; Zhang, Yufan; Xu, Zehai; Meng, Qin; Fan, Zheng; Ye, Shuaiju; Zhang, Guoliang

    2016-01-18

    The assembly of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) into microcapsules has attracted great interest because of their unique properties. However, it remains a challenge to obtain MOF microcapsules with size selectivity at the molecular scale. In this report, we used cell walls from natural biomaterials as non-toxic, stable, and inexpensive support materials to assemble MOF/cell wall (CW) microcapsules with size-selective permeability. By making use of the hollow structure, small pores, and high density of heterogeneous nucleation sites of the cell walls, uniform and continuous MOF layers could be easily obtained by inside/outside interfacial crystallization. The prepared MOF/CW microcapsules have excellent stability and enable the steady, slow, and size-selective release of small molecules. Moreover, the size selectivity of the microcapsules can be adjusted by changing the type of deposited MOF.

  8. Heteronanojunctions with atomic size control using a lab-on-chip electrochemical approach with integrated microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunca Popa, P; Dalmas, G; Faramarzi, V; Dayen, J F; Majjad, H; Kemp, N T; Doudin, B

    2011-05-27

    A versatile tool for electrochemical fabrication of heteronanojunctions with nanocontacts made of a few atoms and nanogaps of molecular spacing is presented. By integrating microfluidic circuitry in a lab-on-chip approach, we keep control of the electrochemical environment in the vicinity of the nanojunction and add new versatility for exchanging and controlling the junction's medium. Nanocontacts made of various materials by successive local controlled depositions are demonstrated, with electrical properties revealing sizes reaching a few atoms only. Investigations on benchmark molecular electronics material, trapped between electrodes, reveal the possibility to create nanogaps of size matching those of molecules. We illustrate the interest of a microfluidic approach by showing that exposure of a fabricated molecular junction to controlled high solvent flows can be used as a reliability criterion for the presence of molecular entities in a gap.

  9. Photosensitive chitosan to control cell attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nan; Cao, Xudong

    2011-09-01

    An approach to control cell adhesion using a photocleavable molecule on chitosan has been developed and studied. Photocleavable 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl chloroformate (NVOC) was introduced into chitosan to control the surface properties. The two UV illuminations with a photomask controlled the cleavage of NVOC and the presentation of deprotected amines on one chitosan surface spatially and temporally. The following immobilizations of cell repulsive poly(ethylene glycol) after the first illumination and cell adhesive sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) after the second illumination on the surface helped create surface heterogeneity. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), water contact angle, and UV-visible spectroscopy were used to characterize the surfaces and photoactivation during the process. To study the cell attachment and morphology on our designed surfaces, NIH/3T3 fibroblast cell was used. Cell number and morphology on the surfaces were investigated. The cell study demonstrated the feasibility of the surfaces on the control of cell adhesion and the formation of cell patterns by UV illuminations and the following immobilizations of different biomolecules.

  10. Impact Craters on Asteroids: Does Gravity or Strength Control Their Size?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Michael C.; Asphaug, Erik; Melosh, H. Jay; Greenberg, Richard

    1996-12-01

    The formation of kilometer-size craters on asteroids is qualitatively different from the formation of meter-size (laboratory- and weapons-scale) craters on Earth. A numerical hydrocode model is used to examine the outcomes of various-size cratering impacts into spheres and half-spaces. A shock wave fractures the target in advance of the crater excavation flow; thus, for impactors larger than 100 m, impacting at typical asteroid impact velocities, target tensile strength is irrelevant to the impact outcome. This result holds whether the target is initially intact or a “rubble pile,” even ignoring the effects of gravity. Because of the shock-induced fracture, crater excavation is controlled by gravity at smaller sizes than would otherwise be predicted. Determining the strength-gravity transition by comparing the physical strength of the material to the force of gravity will not work, because strength is eliminated by the shock wave.

  11. Liquid-Metal Microdroplets Formed Dynamically with Electrical Control of Size and Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Joshipura, Ishan D; Lin, Yiliang; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Dickey, Michael D

    2016-01-27

    Liquid metal co-injected with electrolyte through a microfluidic flow-focusing orifice forms droplets with diameters and production frequencies controlled in real time by voltage. Applying voltage to the liquid metal controls the interfacial tension via a combination of electrochemistry and electrocapillarity. This simple and effective method can instantaneously tune the size of the microdroplets, which has applications in composites, catalysts, and microsystems.

  12. Developmental control of lateralized neuron size in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockery Shawn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nervous systems are generally bilaterally symmetric on a gross structural and organizational level but are strongly lateralized (left/right asymmetric on a functional level. It has been previously noted that in vertebrate nervous systems, symmetrically positioned, bilateral groups of neurons in functionally lateralized brain regions differ in the size of their soma. The genetic mechanisms that control these left/right asymmetric soma size differences are unknown. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans offers the opportunity to study this question with single neuron resolution. A pair of chemosensory neurons (ASEL and ASER, which are bilaterally symmetric on several levels (projections, synaptic connectivity, gene expression patterns, are functionally lateralized in that they express distinct chemoreceptors and sense distinct chemosensory cues. Results We describe here that ASEL and ASER also differ substantially in size (soma volume, axonal and dendritic diameter, a feature that is predicted to change the voltage conduction properties of the two sensory neurons. This difference in size is not dependent on sensory input or neuronal activity but developmentally programmed by a pathway of gene regulatory factors that also control left/right asymmetric chemoreceptor expression of the two ASE neurons. This regulatory pathway funnels via the DIE-1 Zn finger transcription factor into the left/right asymmetric distribution of nucleoli that contain the rRNA regulator Fibrillarin/FIB-1, a RNA methyltransferase implicated in the non-hereditary immune disease scleroderma, which we find to be essential to establish the size differences between ASEL and ASER. Conclusions Taken together, our findings reveal a remarkable conservation of the linkage of functional lateralization with size differences across phylogeny and provide the first insights into the developmentally programmed regulatory mechanisms that control neuron size lateralities.

  13. Planning an Authority Control Project at a Medium-Sized University Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sha Li

    2001-01-01

    Authority control is a vital part of providing students and faculty with adequate access to collections in university libraries. Small and medium-sized libraries find it challenging to meet rising user expectations and provide adequate access in an online environment through appropriate authority work. A planning process is offered on an authority…

  14. Nanotopographical Control of Stem Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. McNamara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into various lineages, and the ability to reliably direct stem cell fate determination would have tremendous potential for basic research and clinical therapy. Nanotopography provides a useful tool for guiding differentiation, as the features are more durable than surface chemistry and can be modified in size and shape to suit the desired application. In this paper, nanotopography is examined as a means to guide differentiation, and its application is described in the context of different subsets of stem cells, with a particular focus on skeletal (mesenchymal stem cells. To address the mechanistic basis underlying the topographical effects on stem cells, the likely contributions of indirect (biochemical signal-mediated and direct (force-mediated mechanotransduction are discussed. Data from proteomic research is also outlined in relation to topography-mediated fate determination, as this approach provides insight into the global molecular changes at the level of the functional effectors.

  15. A Nonlinear Size-Dependent Equivalent Circuit Model for Single-Cell Electroporation on Microfluidic Chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagoshtasbi, Hooman; Deng, Peigang; Lee, Yi-Kuen

    2015-08-01

    Electroporation (EP) is a process of applying a pulsed intense electric field on the cell membrane to temporarily induce nanoscale electropores on the plasma membrane of biological cells. A nonlinear size-dependent equivalent circuit model of a single-cell electroporation system is proposed to investigate dynamic electromechanical behavior of cells on microfluidic chips during EP. This model consists of size-dependent electromechanical components of a cell, electrical components of poration media, and a microfluidic chip. A single-cell microfluidic EP chip with 3D microelectrode arrays along a microchannel is designed and fabricated to experimentally analyze the permeabilization of a cell. Predicted electrical current responses of the model are in good agreement (average error of 6%) with that of single-cell EP. The proposed model can successfully predict the time responses of transmembrane voltage, pore diameter, and pore density at four different stages of permeabilization. These stages are categorized based on electromechanical changes of the lipid membrane. The current-voltage characteristic curve of the cell membrane during EP is also investigated at different EP stages in detail. The model can precisely predict the electric breakdown of different cell lines at a specific critical cell membrane voltage of the target cell lines.

  16. Infrared-Controlled Welding of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, R.; Finnell, S. E.; Decker, H. J.; Hodor, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed apparatus for welding large arrays of solar cells to flexible circuit substrates would sense infrared emission from welding spot. Emission would provide feedback for control of welding heat. Welding platform containing optical fibers moves upward through slots in movable holding fixture to contact solar cells. Fibers pick up infrared radiation from weld area.

  17. Controlled surface chemistries and quantitative cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Anne L.

    2002-03-01

    Living cells experience a large number of signaling cues from their extracellular matrix. As a result of these inputs, a variety of intracellular signaling pathways are apparently initiated simultaneously. The vast array of alternative responses that result from the integration of these inputs suggests that it may be reasonable to look for cellular response not as an 'on' or 'off' condition but as a distribution of responses. A difficult challenge is to determine whether variations in responses from individual cells arise from the complexity of intracellular signals or are due to variations in the cell culture environment. By controlling surface chemistry so that every cell 'sees' the same chemical and physical environment, we can begin to assess how the distribution of cell response is affected strictly by changes in the chemistry of the cell culture surface. Using the gene for green fluorescent protein linked to the gene for the promoter of the extracellular matrix protein, tenascin, we can easily probe the end product in a signaling pathway that is purported to be linked to surface protein chemistry and to cell shape. Cell response to well-controlled, well-characterized, and highly reproducible surfaces prepared using soft lithography techniques are compared with more conventional ways of preparing extracellular matrix proteins for cell culture. Using fluorescence microscopy and image analysis of populations of cells on these surfaces, we probe quantitatively the relationship between surface chemistry, cell shape and variations in gene expression endpoint.

  18. Behavior of osteoblast-like cells on calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite ceramics composed of particles with different shapes and sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Uno, Yuika; Ioku, Koji

    2014-01-01

    In designing the biomaterials, it is important to control their surface morphologies, because they affect the interactions between the materials and cells. We previously reported that porous calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics composed of rod-like particles had advantages over sintered porous HA ceramics; however, the effects of the surface morphology of calcium-deficient HA ceramics on cell behavior have remained unclear. Using a hydrothermal process, we successfully prepared porous calcium-deficient HA ceramics with different surface morphologies, composed of plate-like particles of 200-300, 500-800 nm, or 2-3 μm in width and rod-like particles of 1 or 3-5 μm in width, respectively. The effects of these surface morphologies on the behavior of osteoblast-like cells were examined. Although the numbers of cells adhered to the ceramic specimens did not differ significantly among the specimens, the proliferation rates of cells on the ceramics decreased with decreasing particle size. Our results reveal that controlling the surface morphology that is governed by particle shape and size is important for designing porous calcium-deficient HA ceramics.

  19. Controlling the Pore Size of Mesoporous Carbon Thin Films through Thermal and Solvent Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengping; Liu, Guoliang

    2017-02-02

    Herein an approach to controlling the pore size of mesoporous carbon thin films from metal-free polyacrylonitrile-containing block copolymers is described. A high-molecular-weight poly(acrylonitrile-block-methyl methacrylate) (PAN-b-PMMA) is synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The authors systematically investigate the self-assembly behavior of PAN-b-PMMA thin films during thermal and solvent annealing, as well as the pore size of mesoporous carbon thin films after pyrolysis. The as-spin-coated PAN-b-PMMA is microphase-separated into uniformly spaced globular nanostructures, and these globular nanostructures evolve into various morphologies after thermal or solvent annealing. Surprisingly, through thermal annealing and subsequent pyrolysis of PAN-b-PMMA into mesoporous carbon thin films, the pore size and center-to-center spacing increase significantly with thermal annealing temperature, different from most block copolymers. In addition, the choice of solvent in solvent annealing strongly influences the block copolymer nanostructure and the pore size of mesoporous carbon thin films. The discoveries herein provide a simple strategy to control the pore size of mesoporous carbon thin films by tuning thermal or solvent annealing conditions, instead of synthesizing a series of block copolymers of various molecular weights and compositions.

  20. Controlled deposition of NIST-traceable nanoparticles as additional size standards for photomask applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Pui, David Y. H.; Qi, Chaolong; Yook, Se-Jin; Fissan, Heinz; Ultanir, Erdem; Liang, Ted

    2008-03-01

    Particle standard is important and widely used for calibration of inspection tools and process characterization and benchmarking. We have developed a method for generating and classifying monodisperse particles of different materials with a high degree of control. The airborne particles are first generated by an electrospray. Then a tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) system is used to obtain monodisperse particles with NIST-traceable sizes. We have also developed a clean and well-controlled method to deposit airborne particles on mask blanks or wafers. This method utilizes electrostatic approach to deposit particles evenly in a desired spot. Both the number of particles and the spot size are well controlled. We have used our system to deposit PSL, silica and gold particles ranging from 30 nm to 125 nm on 193nm and EUV mask blanks. We report the experimental results of using these particles as calibration standards and discuss the dependency of sensitivity on the types of particles and substrate surfaces.

  1. Diatom feeding across trophic guilds in tidal flat nematodes, and the importance of diatom cell size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Tom; Vafeiadou, Anna-Maria; De Geyter, Ellen; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Sabbe, Koen; De Troch, Marleen

    2014-09-01

    We examine the capacity of nematodes from three feeding types (deposit feeder, epistrate feeder, predator) to utilize microphytobenthos (MPB), and assess whether diatom cell size and consumer body size are important drivers of their feeding. We analyzed natural stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in abundant nematode genera and a variety of carbon sources at an estuarine intertidal flat. All nematodes had δ13C indicating that MPB is their major carbon source. δ15N, however, demonstrated that only one deposit and one epistrate feeder genus obtained most of their carbon from direct grazing on MPB, whereas other deposit feeders and predators obtained at least part of their carbon by predation on MPB grazers. We then performed a microcosm experiment in which equal cell numbers of each of three differently sized strains of the pennate diatom Seminavis were offered as food to four, one and one genera of deposit feeders, epistrate feeders and predators, respectively. Previous studies have shown that all but the epistrate feeder ingest whole diatoms, whereas the epistrate feeder pierces cells and sucks out their contents. Most genera showed markedly higher carbon absorption from medium and large cells than from small ones. When considering the number of cells consumed, however, none of the nematodes which ingest whole cells exhibited a clear preference for any specific diatom size. The epistrate feeder was the smallest nematode taxon considered here, yet it showed a marked preference for large cells. These results highlight that the feeding mechanism is much more important than consumer size as a driver of particle size selection in nematodes grazing MPB.

  2. Elevator Sizing, Placement, and Control-Relevant Tradeoffs for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickeson, Jeffrey J.; Rodriguez, Armando A.; Sridharan, Srikanth; Korad, Akshay

    2010-01-01

    Within this paper, control-relevant vehicle design concepts are examined using a widely used 3 DOF (plus flexibility) nonlinear model for the longitudinal dynamics of a generic carrot-shaped scramjet powered hypersonic vehicle. The impact of elevator size and placement on control-relevant static properties (e.g. level-flight trimmable region, trim controls, Angle of Attack (AOA), thrust margin) and dynamic properties (e.g. instability and right half plane zero associated with flight path angle) are examined. Elevator usage has been examine for a class of typical hypersonic trajectories.

  3. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-08-31

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, peripheral T cells expressing a TCR with low avidity for self-antigens were strongly reduced, whereas an overall impairment of T-cell activation by weak antigenic stimulation was observed. Mechanistically, Nck deletion resulted in a significant decrease in calcium mobilization and ERK phosphorylation upon TCR engagement. Taken together, our findings unveil a crucial role for the Nck adaptors in shaping the T-cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage and optimal T cell excitability.

  4. Understanding of the size control of biocompatible gold nanoparticles in millifluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Han; Fabienne, Testard; Florent, Malloggi; Coulon, Pierre-Eugene; Nicolas, Menguy; Olivier, Spalla

    2012-11-13

    The size control of gold nanoparticles synthesized in surfactant free water with a continuous flow mode was elucidated and used to produce higher concentration (3 mM) of stabilized gold nanoparticles. The originality of the synthesis was to finely modulate the initial pH of the reducing agent instead of the gold precursor to modify the kinetic of the reaction. The acceleration of the kinetic (~1 s) prevents the modification of the gold precursors ensuring the control of the final size (from 3 to 25 nm) of the nanoparticles with a low polydispersity for aqueous surfactant free solution. The accurate measure of the size distribution by small angle X-ray scattering was combined to the use of a model based on the coupling of nucleation and growth equations together with a progressive injection of monomers. The results on the final state show that the size of the nanoparticles is indeed controlled by the kinetic of reduction of gold atoms. A millifluidic setup equipped with a homemade mixer offers a robust way of rapid mixing to obtain a reproducible production of large amounts of nanoparticles.

  5. A Hh-driven gene network controls specification, pattern and size of the Drosophila simple eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Hidalgo, Daniel; Domínguez-Cejudo, María A; Amore, Gabriele; Brockmann, Anette; Lemos, María C; Córdoba, Antonio; Casares, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    During development, extracellular signaling molecules interact with intracellular gene networks to control the specification, pattern and size of organs. One such signaling molecule is Hedgehog (Hh). Hh is known to act as a morphogen, instructing different fates depending on the distance to its source. However, how Hh, when signaling across a cell field, impacts organ-specific transcriptional networks is still poorly understood. Here, we investigate this issue during the development of the Drosophila ocellar complex. The development of this sensory structure, which is composed of three simple eyes (or ocelli) located at the vertices of a triangular patch of cuticle on the dorsal head, depends on Hh signaling and on the definition of three domains: two areas of eya and so expression--the prospective anterior and posterior ocelli--and the intervening interocellar domain. Our results highlight the role of the homeodomain transcription factor engrailed (en) both as a target and as a transcriptional repressor of hh signaling in the prospective interocellar region. Furthermore, we identify a requirement for the Notch pathway in the establishment of en maintenance in a Hh-independent manner. Therefore, hh signals transiently during the specification of the interocellar domain, with en being required here for hh signaling attenuation. Computational analysis further suggests that this network design confers robustness to signaling noise and constrains phenotypic variation. In summary, using genetics and modeling we have expanded the ocellar gene network to explain how the interaction between the Hh gradient and this gene network results in the generation of stable mutually exclusive gene expression domains. In addition, we discuss some general implications our model may have in some Hh-driven gene networks.

  6. Lithium AA-size cells for Navy mine applications. 1. Selection and test plan. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilroy, W.J.; Freeman, W.A.; Banner, J.A.; Hoff, G.F.; Mitchell, K.A.

    1993-11-30

    As part of an effort to reduce Navy battery procurement problems, a program has been developed to standardize battery chemistries and cell sizes. Currently, several mercury-based cells are being used in mine batteries; however, they have limited energy and power densities and present uncertain long-term availability and disposal issues. The lithium/thionyl chloride electrochemical technology is being considered as a long-term solution to these problems. This report describes the surveillance effort that gave rise to selection of AA-size lithium thionyl chloride cells for mine battery development. A test plan to verify this choice and to identify potential cell or battery production and performance problems is also provided. Lithium/thionyl chloride, Lithium, Battery, Mercury-based cells.

  7. Subnanometer Control of Mean Core Size during Mesofluidic Synthesis of Small (D(core) Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Edward W; Haben, Patrick M; Hutchison, James E

    2015-11-03

    A convenient, single-step synthesis is reported that produces ligand-stabilized, water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with subnanometer-level precision of the mean core diameter over a range of 2-9 nm for a series of desired surface chemistries. The synthesis involves the reduction of a Au(III) species with sodium borohydride in the presence of a functionalized alkyl thiosulfate (Bunte salt) to yield thiolate-protected AuNPs. A key advantage of this synthesis is that simply adjusting the pH of the gold salt solution leads to control over the AuNP core size. The speciation of Au(III), and therefore the kinetics for its reduction and the core size produced, depends upon pH. The use of pH as the sole variable to control core size is a more reliable and convenient method than traditional approaches that rely on adjusting the concentrations and ratios of ligand, metal salt, and reducing agent. The average core size increased as the pH was raised for each ligand studied. Because the influence of pH was different for each of the ligands, working curves were plotted for each ligand to identify conditions to synthesize particles with specific, targeted core diameters. Using this approach, reaction conditions can be rapidly optimized using a combination of a mesofluidic reactor and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) size analysis. The use of the mesofluidic reactor was needed to ensure fast mixing given the rapid kinetics for core formation. Using the reactor, it is possible to obtain reproducible sizes across multiple syntheses (size variation) and subnanometer control of the mean core dimensions. The synthetic method demonstrated here provides an attractive alternative to two-step syntheses involving ligand exchange because it is more efficient and eliminates the possibility of nanoparticle core size changes during exchange steps. This approach enables the development of "size ladders" of particles with the same surface chemistry for investigations of structure

  8. Control of sizes and densities of nano catalysts for nanotube synthesis by plasma breaking method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, J.S.; Umeda, K.; Uchino, K.; Nakashima, H.; Muraoka, K

    2004-03-15

    Sizes and densities of nano catalysts for carbon nanotube synthesis, formed by the plasma breaking method of thin Fe films deposited using pulse laser deposition (PLD) were controlled by the changes of operating parameters. At the best optimum condition, nano catalysts with a density of 1.9x10{sup 15} m{sup -2} and a diameter of about 15 nm were obtained. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) synthesized on these catalysts were shown to have almost the same size and density as those of the catalysts.

  9. Stratification of yeast cells during chronological aging by size points to the role of trehalose in cell vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkrtova, Andrea; Belicova, Lenka; Volejnikova, Andrea; Sigler, Karel; Jazwinski, S Michal; Pichova, Alena

    2016-04-01

    Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo a process akin to differentiation during prolonged culture without medium replenishment. Various methods have been used to separate and determine the potential role and fate of the different cell species. We have stratified chronologically-aged yeast cultures into cells of different sizes, using centrifugal elutriation, and characterized these subpopulations physiologically. We distinguish two extreme cell types, very small (XS) and very large (L) cells. L cells display higher viability based on two separate criteria. They respire much more actively, but produce lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). L cells are capable of dividing, albeit slowly, giving rise to XS cells which do not divide. L cells are more resistant to osmotic stress and they have higher trehalose content, a storage carbohydrate often connected to stress resistance. Depletion of trehalose by deletion of TPS2 does not affect the vital characteristics of L cells, but it improves some of these characteristics in XS cells. Therefore, we propose that the response of L and XS cells to the trehalose produced in the former differs in a way that lowers the vitality of the latter. We compare our XS- and L-fraction cell characteristics with those of cells isolated from stationary cultures by others based on density. This comparison suggests that the cells have some similarities but also differences that may prove useful in addressing whether it is the segregation or the response to trehalose that may play the predominant role in cell division from stationary culture.

  10. Factors controlling the size of graphene oxide sheets produced via the graphite oxide route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuyang; Aksay, Ilhan A

    2011-05-24

    We have studied the effect of the oxidation path and the mechanical energy input on the size of graphene oxide sheets derived from graphite oxide. The cross-planar oxidation of graphite from the (0002) plane results in periodic cracking of the uppermost graphene oxide layer, limiting its lateral dimension to less than 30 μm. We use an energy balance between the elastic strain energy associated with the undulation of graphene oxide sheets at the hydroxyl and epoxy sites, the crack formation energy, and the interaction energy between graphene layers to determine the cell size of the cracks. As the effective crack propagation rate in the cross-planar direction is an order of magnitude smaller than the edge-to-center oxidation rate, graphene oxide single sheets larger than those defined by the periodic cracking cell size are produced depending on the aspect ratio of the graphite particles. We also demonstrate that external energy input from hydrodynamic drag created by fluid motion or sonication, further reduces the size of the graphene oxide sheets through tensile stress buildup in the sheets.

  11. Development of gelatin-chitosan-hydroxyapatite based bioactive bone scaffold with controlled pore size and mechanical strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Kanchan; Dasgupta, Sudip; Kundu, Biswanath; Bissoyi, Akalabya

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite-chitosan/gelatin (HA:Chi:Gel) nanocomposite scaffold has potential to serve as a template matrix to regenerate extra cellular matrix of human bone. Scaffolds with varying composition of hydroxyapatite, chitosan, and gelatin were prepared using lyophilization technique where glutaraldehyde (GTA) acted as a cross-linking agent for biopolymers. First, phase pure hydroxyapatite-chitosan nanocrystals were in situ synthesized by coprecipitation method using a solution of 2% acetic acid dissolved chitosan and aqueous solution of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate [Ca(NO3)2,4H2O] and diammonium hydrogen phosphate [(NH4)2H PO4]. Keeping solid loading constant at 30 wt% and changing the composition of the original slurry of gelatin, HA-chitosan allowed control of the pore size, its distribution, and mechanical properties of the scaffolds. Microstructural investigation by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a well interconnected porous scaffold with a pore size in the range of 35-150 μm. The HA granules were uniformly dispersed in the gelatin-chitosan network. An optimal composition in terms of pore size and mechanical properties was obtained from the scaffold with an HA:Chi:Gel ratio of 21:49:30. The composite scaffold having 70% porosity with pore size distribution of 35-150 μm exhibited a compressive strength of 3.3-3.5 MPa, which is within the range of that exhibited by cancellous bone. The bioactivity of the scaffold was evaluated after conducting mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) - materials interaction and MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay using MSCs. The scaffold found to be conducive to MSC's adhesion as evident from lamellipodia, filopodia extensions from cell cytoskeleton, proliferation, and differentiation up to 14 days of cell culture.

  12. Characterization of winemaking yeast by cell number-size distribution analysis through flow field-flow fractionation with multi-wavelength turbidimetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa

    2004-10-29

    Yeasts are widely used in several areas of food industry, e.g. baking, beer brewing, and wine production. Interest in new analytical methods for quality control and characterization of yeast cells is thus increasing. The biophysical properties of yeast cells, among which cell size, are related to yeast cell capabilities to produce primary and secondary metabolites during the fermentation process. Biophysical properties of winemaking yeast strains can be screened by field-flow fractionation (FFF). In this work we present the use of flow FFF (FlFFF) with turbidimetric multi-wavelength detection for the number-size distribution analysis of different commercial winemaking yeast varieties. The use of a diode-array detector allows to apply to dispersed samples like yeast cells the recently developed method for number-size (or mass-size) analysis in flow-assisted separation techniques. Results for six commercial winemaking yeast strains are compared with data obtained by a standard method for cell sizing (Coulter counter). The method here proposed gives, at short analysis time, accurate information on the number of cells of a given size, and information on the total number of cells.

  13. Size distribution of retrovirally marked lineages matches prediction from population measurements of cell cycle behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li; Hayes, Nancy L.; Takahashi, Takao; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Nowakowski, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate neuron production in the developing mouse neocortex were examined by using a retroviral lineage marking method to determine the sizes of the lineages remaining in the proliferating population of the ventricular zone during the period of neuron production. The distribution of clade sizes obtained experimentally in four different injection-survival paradigms (E11-E13, E11-E14, E11-E15, and E12-E15) from a total of over 500 labeled lineages was compared with that obtained from three models in which the average behavior of the proliferating population [i.e., the proportion of cells remaining in the proliferative population (P) vs. that exiting the proliferative population (Q)] was quantitatively related to lineage size distribution. In model 1, different proportions of asymmetric, symmetric terminal, and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions coexisted during the entire developmental period. In model 2, the developmental period was divided into two epochs: During the first, asymmetric and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions occurred, but, during the second, asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions occurred. In model 3, the shifts in P and Q are accounted for by changes in the proportions of the two types of symmetric cell divisions without the inclusion of any asymmetric cell divisions. The results obtained from the retroviral experiments were well accounted for by model 1 but not by model 2 or 3. These findings demonstrate that: 1) asymmetric and both types of symmetric cell divisions coexist during the entire period of neurogenesis in the mouse, 2) neuron production is regulated in the proliferative population by the independent decisions of the two daughter cells to reenter S phase, and 3) neurons are produced by both asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions. In addition, the findings mean that cell death and/or tangential movements of cells in the proliferative population occur at only a low rate and that there are no

  14. Size and quality control of fast grown CdS quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fregnaux, Mathieu [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 1 Boulevard Arago, 57078 Metz (France); Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse et Chimie Laser, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 1 Boulevard Arago, 57078 Metz (France); Dalmasso, Stephane; Laurenti, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 1 Boulevard Arago, 57078 Metz (France); Gaumet, Jean-Jacques [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse et Chimie Laser, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 1 Boulevard Arago, 57078 Metz (France)

    2012-08-15

    The synthesis of high quality II-VI semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is fundamental for developing new devices in several applications such as biomarkers, solar cells or blue-UV lasers. These emerging technologies are funded on the size-dependent optical properties of the QDs. Consequently, it is a crucial aspect to get insight into different ways for syntheses of their nanosized particles. In this work, we use two different QD elaboration methods: (i) a single source precursor thermal growth methodology and (ii) a microwave synthetic route. Using both protocols, high quality small QDs (Oe < 5 nm) are produced. Both growing techniques offer the advantage to be simple and fast: 2 hours (i) and less than 25 minutes (ii) in duration, growth temperatures do not exceed 280 C. For both elaboration procedures, we report a unique physics/chemistry cross-disciplinary study on these small size QDs: mass spectrometry (MS) technique provides background data about composition, size and stability of particles; crystalline structure and size distribution of the QDs are obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM); room temperature (RT) optical spectrometry of nanodispersions - photoluminescence (PL) and absorption - reveals quantum size effects. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. User-centered evaluation of handle shape and size and input controls for a neutron detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Scarlett R; Castillejos, Pamela; Hallbeck, M Susan

    2011-11-01

    Current neutron detectors are big, heavy, difficult to use and are not ergonomically designed. Good handle design and easy to use control mechanisms are imperative for comfort, usability and accuracy for hand-held tools. Two studies were performed to assess these factors; Study I explored handle design (shape and size) preference and Study II evaluated the effects of control mechanisms, device orientations and word orientation on performance time. According to research findings, the recommended handle perimeter is 11 cm with a diameter range of 3.5-4.0 cm. These results demonstrated that as the handle perimeter decreased the handle becomes less preferred by first responders when using layered gloves. For control type, the fastest performance time was found with vertical push buttons and a vertical word orientation. These objective results matched the subjective results, which showed that the most preferred controller was a vertical push button control.

  16. Shape-controlled synthesis of highly monodisperse and small size gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU YunZhi; DU YuKou; YANG Ping; LI JinRu; JIANG Long

    2007-01-01

    We describe here that fine control of nanoparticle shape and size can be achieved by systematic variation of experimental parameters in the seeded growth procedure in aqueous solution. Cubic and spherical gold nanoparticles are obtained respectively. In particularly, the Au cubes are highly monodisperse in 33±2 nm diameter. The experimental methods involve the preparation of Au seed particles and the subsequent addition of an appropriate quantity of Au seed solution to the aqueous growth solutions containing desired quantities of CTAB and ascorbic acid (AA). Here, AA is a weak reducing agent and CTAB is not only a stable agent for nanoparticles but also an inductive agent for leading increase in the face of nanoparticle. Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to characterize the nanoparticles. The results show that the different size gold nanoparticles displayed high size homogenous distribution and formed mono-membrane at the air/solid interface.

  17. Size controlled biogenic silver nanoparticles as antibacterial agent against isolates from HIV infected patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganya, K. S. Uma; Govindaraju, K.; Kumar, V. Ganesh; Dhas, T. Stalin; Karthick, V.; Singaravelu, G.; Elanchezhiyan, M.

    2015-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are synthesized using biological sources due to its high specificity in biomedical applications. Herein, we report the size and shape controlled synthesis of AgNPs using the aqueous extract of blue green alga, Spirulina platensis. Size, shape and elemental composition of AgNPs were characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy, FT-IR (Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy), FT-RS (Fourier Transform-Raman Spectroscopy), SEM-EDAX (Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis) and HR-TEM (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy). AgNPs were stable, well defined and monodispersed (spherical) with an average size of 6 nm. The synthesized AgNPs were tested for its antibacterial potency against isolates obtained from HIV patients.

  18. Enhanced Immunostimulating Activity of Lactobacilli-Mimicking Materials by Controlling Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Koji; Kumano, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Yuichi; Oyama, Naho; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Moriyama, Kaoru; Shida, Kan; Nomoto, Koji; Chiba, Katsuyoshi; Koumoto, Kazuya; Matsui, Jun

    2015-08-19

    The design and synthesis of materials capable of activating the immune system in a safe manner is of great interest in immunology and related fields. Lactobacilli activate the innate immune system of a host when acting as probiotics. Here, we constructed lactobacilli-mimicking materials in which polysaccharide-peptidoglycan complexes (PS-PGs) derived from lactobacilli were covalently conjugated to the surfaces of polymeric microparticles with a wide variety of sizes, ranging from 200 nm to 3 μm. The artificial lactobacilli successfully stimulated macrophages without cytotoxicity. Importantly, we found that the size of artificial lactobacilli strongly influenced their immunostimulating activities, and that artificial lactobacilli of 1 μm exhibited 10-fold higher activity than natural lactobacilli. One major advantage of the artificial lactobacilli is facile control of size, which cannot be changed in natural lactobacilli. These findings provide new insights into the design of materials for immunology as well as the molecular biology of lactobacillus.

  19. Size-controllable synthesis and bandgap modulation of single-layered RF-sputtered bismuth nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin-Kun; Chern, Ming-Yau; Lee, Hsin-Yen

    2014-05-01

    We here report a simple and efficient method to grow single-layer bismuth nanoparticles (BiNPs) with various sizes on glass substrates. Optimal conditions were found to be 200°C and 0.12 W/cm2 at a growth rate of 6 Å/s, with the deposition time around 40 s. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were used to calculate the particle size distribution statistics, and high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were used to examine the chemical interactions between BiNPs and the substrates. By measuring the transmission spectra within the range of 300 to 1,000 nm, we found that the optical bandgap can be modulated from 0.45 to 2.63 eV by controlling the size of these BiNPs. These interesting discoveries offer an insight to explore the dynamic nature of nanoparticles.

  20. Shape and size controlled synthesis of uniform iron oxide nanocrystals through new non-hydrolytic routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlu; Lee, Seung Soo; Wu, Jiewei; Hinton, Carl H.; Fortner, John D.

    2016-08-01

    New, non-hydrolytic routes to synthesize highly crystalline iron oxide nanocrystals (8-40 nm, magnetite) are described in this report whereby particle size and morphology were precisely controlled through reactant (precursor, e.g. (FeO(OH)) ratios, co-surfactant and organic additive, and/or reaction time. Particle size, with high monodispersivity (oxide nanocrystals can be reproducibly synthesized through simple one-pot thermal decomposition methods. High resolution transmission electron microscope, x-ray diffraction, and superconducting quantum interference device were used to characterize the size, structure and magnetic properties of the resulting nanocrystals. For aqueous applications, materials synthesized/purified in organic solvents are broadly water dispersible through a variety of phase (aqueous) transfer method(s).

  1. Controlling DNA Bundle Size and Spatial Arrangement in Self-assembled Arrays on Superhydrophobic Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriele Ciasca; Luca Businaro; Marco De Spirito; Massimiliano Papi; Valentina Palmieri; Michela Chiarpotto; Simone Di Claudio; Adele De Ninno; Ennio Giovine; Gaetano Campi; Annamaria Gerardino

    2015-01-01

    The use of superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) is now emerging as an attractive platform for the realization of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with potential applications in many nanotechnological and biotechnological fields. To this purpose, a strict control of the nanostructures size and their spatial arrangement is highly required. However, these parameters may be strongly dependent on the complex evaporation dynamics of the sessile droplet on the SHS. In this work, we investigated the effect of the evaporation dynamics on the size and the spatial arrangement of self-assembled 1D DNA bundles. Our results reveal that different arrangements and bundle size distributions may occur depending on droplet evaporation stage. These results contribute to elucidate the formation mechanism of 1D nanostructures on SHSs.

  2. Size and morphology controlled NiSe nanoparticles as efficient catalyst for the reduction reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, Udumula; Marakatti, Vijaykumar S.; Amshumali, Mungalimane K.; Loukya, B.; Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Datta, Ranjan; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2016-12-01

    Facile and efficient ball milling and polyol methods were employed for the synthesis of nickel selenide (NiSe) nanoparticle. The particle size of the NiSe nanoparticle has been controlled mechanically by varying the ball size in the milling process. The role of the surfactants in the formation of various morphologies was studied. The compounds were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The efficiency of the NiSe nanoparticle as a catalyst was tested for the reduction of para-nitroaniline (PNA) to para-phenyldiamine (PPD) and para-nitrophenol (PNP) to para-aminophenol (PAP) using NaBH4 as the reducing agent. Particle size, morphology and the presence of surfactant played a crucial role in the reduction process.

  3. Controlling Pore Size and its Distribution of γ-Al2O3 Nanofiltration Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Chun XIONG; Xiao Dong LEI; Gang WEI

    2003-01-01

    The preparation process of γ-Al2O3 nanofiltration membranes were studied by N2absorption and desorption test and retention rate vs thickness gradient curve method. It was foundthat template and thermal treatment were key factors for controlling pore size and its distribution.Under the optimized experimental conditions, the BJH (Barret-Joyner-Halenda) desorption averagepore diameter, BJH desorption cumulative volume of pores and BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller)surface area of obtained membranes were about 3.9 nm, 0.33 cm3/g and 245 m2/g respectively, thepore size distribution was very narrow. Pore size decreased with the increasing of thickness andno evident change after the dense top layer was formed. The optimum thickness can becontrolled by retention rate vs thickness gradient curve method.

  4. Measuring the mass, density, and size of particles and cells using a suspended microchannel resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Michel; Bryan, Andrea K.; Burg, Thomas P.; Babcock, Ken; Manalis, Scott R.

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of mass, density, and size of cells and nanoparticles using suspended microchannel resonators. The masses of individual particles are quantified as transient frequency shifts, while the particles transit a microfluidic channel embedded in the resonating cantilever. Mass histograms resulting from these data reveal the distribution of a population of heterogeneously sized particles. Particle density is inferred from measurements made in different carrier fluids since the frequency shift for a particle is proportional to the mass difference relative to the displaced solution. We have characterized the density of polystyrene particles, Escherichia coli, and human red blood cells with a resolution down to 10-4g/cm3.

  5. Distributed Active Traction Control System Applied to the RoboCup Middle Size League

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Almeida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the problem of traction control in mobile wheeled robots in the particular case of the RoboCup Middle Size League (MSL. The slip control problem is formulated using simple friction models for ISePorto Team Robots with a differential wheel configuration. Traction was also characterized experimentally in the MSL scenario for relevant game events. This work proposes a hierarchical traction control architecture which relies on local slip detection and control at each wheel, with relevant information being relayed to a higher level responsible for global robot motion control. A dedicated one axis control embedded hardware subsystem allowing complex local control, high frequency current sensing and odometric information procession was developed. This local axis control board is integrated in a distributed system using CAN bus communications. The slipping observer was implemented in the axis control hardware nodes integrated in the ISePorto Robots and was used to control and detect loss of traction. An external vision system was used to perform a qualitative analysis of the slip detection and observer performance results are presented.

  6. Cell size is positively correlated between different tissues in passerine birds and amphibians, but not necessarily in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, J; Czarnoleski, M; François-Krassowska, A; Maciak, S; Pis, T

    2010-12-23

    We examined cell size correlations between tissues, and cell size to body mass relationships in passerine birds, amphibians and mammals. The size correlated highly between all cell types in birds and amphibians; mammalian tissues clustered by size correlation in three tissue groups. Erythrocyte size correlated well with the volume of other cell types in birds and amphibians, but poorly in mammals. In birds, body mass correlated positively with the size of all cell types including erythrocytes, and in mammals only with the sizes of some cell types. Size of mammalian erythrocytes correlated with body mass only within the most taxonomically uniform group of species (rodents and lagomorphs). Cell volume increased with body mass of birds and mammals to less than 0.3 power, indicating that body size evolved mostly by changes in cell number. Our evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms determining cell size relationships in tissues are conservative in birds and amphibians, but less stringent in mammals. The patterns of cell size to body mass relationships we obtained challenge some key assumptions of fractal and cellular models used by allometric theory to explain mass-scaling of metabolism. We suggest that the assumptions in both models are not universal, and that such models need reformulation.

  7. Evaluating the control software for CTA in a medium size telescope prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, I.; Behera, B.; Birsin, E.; Koeppel, H.; Melkumyan, D.; Schmidt, T.; Schwanke, U.; Wegner, P.; Wiesand, S.; Winde, M.; Consortium, CTA

    2012-12-01

    CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array) is one of the largest ground-based astronomy projects being pursued and will be the largest facility for ground-based γ-ray observations ever built. CTA will consist of two arrays (one in the Northern hemisphere and one in the Southern hemisphere) composed of telescopes of several sizes. A prototype for the Medium Size Telescope (MST) of a diameter of 12 m will be installed in Berlin by the end of 2012. This MST prototype will be composed of the mechanical structure, drive system and mirror facets mounted with powered actuators to enable active control. Five Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) cameras and a weather station will allow the measurement of the performance of the instrument. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Common Software (ACS) distributed control framework is currently being considered by the CTA consortium to serve as the array control middleware. In order to evaluate the ACS software, it has been decided to implement an ACS-based readout and control system for the MST prototype. The design of the control software is following the concepts and tools under evaluation within the CTA consortium, like the use of a Unified Modeling Language (UML) based code generation framework for ACS component modeling, and the use of OPen Connectivity-Unified Architecture (OPC UA) for hardware access. In this contribution, the progress in the implementation of the control system for this CTA prototype telescope is described.

  8. Small-Size Resonant Photoacoustic Cell of Inclined Geometry for Gas Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelik, A V; Nikonovich, F N; Zakharich, M P; Chebotar, A I; Firago, V A; Stetsik, V M; Kazak, N S; Starovoitov, V S

    2009-01-01

    A photoacoustic cell intended for laser detection of trace gases is represented. The cell is adapted so as to enhance the gas-detection performance and, simultaneously, to reduce the cell size. The cell design provides an efficient cancellation of the window background (a parasite response due to absorption of laser beam in the cell windows) and acoustic isolation from the environment for an acoustic resonance of the cell. The useful photoacoustic response from a detected gas, window background and noise are analyzed in demonstration experiments as functions of the modulation frequency for a prototype cell with the internal volume ~ 0.5 cm^3. The minimal detectable absorption for the prototype is estimated to be ~ 1.2 10^{-8} cm^{-1} W Hz^{-1/2}.

  9. The Langerhans islet cells of female rabbits are differentially affected by hypothyroidism depending on the islet size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castelán, J; Nicolás, L; Morimoto, S; Cuevas, E

    2015-04-01

    Effects of hypothyroidism on the glucose and insulin levels are controversial, and its impact on the Langerhans islet morphology of adult subjects has been poorly addressed. In spite of hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus are more frequent in females than in males, most studies using animal models have been done in males. The effect of hypothyroidism on the immunolabeling of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) and thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) of islet cells is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of hypothyroidism on the glucose and insulin concentrations, morphometry of islets, and immunostaining of TRs α1-2 and β1 and TSHR of islet cells in female rabbits. Control and hypothyroid (0.02% of methimazole for 30 days) animals were used to quantify blood levels of glucose and insulin, density of islets, cross-sectional area (CSA) of islets, number of cells per islet, cell proliferation, and the immunolabeling of TRs α1-2, TRβ1, and TSHR. Student's t or Mann-Whitney-U tests, two-way ANOVAs, and Fischer's tests were applied. Concentrations of glucose and insulin, as well as the insulin resistance were similar between groups. Hypothyroidism did not affect the density or the CSA of islets. The analysis of islets by size showed that hypothyroidism reduced the cell number in large and medium islets, but not in small ones. In small islets, cell proliferation was increased. The immunoreactivity of TRα1-2, TRβ1, and TSHR was increased by hypothyroidism in all islet sizes. Our results show that hypothyroidism affects differentially the islet cells depending on the size of islets.

  10. Dermal papilla cell number specifies hair size, shape and cycling and its reduction causes follicular decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Woo; Wu, Eleanor; Morgan, Bruce A

    2013-04-01

    Although the hair shaft is derived from the progeny of keratinocyte stem cells in the follicular epithelium, the growth and differentiation of follicular keratinocytes is guided by a specialized mesenchymal population, the dermal papilla (DP), that is embedded in the hair bulb. Here we show that the number of DP cells in the follicle correlates with the size and shape of the hair produced in the mouse pelage. The same stem cell pool gives rise to hairs of different sizes or types in successive hair cycles, and this shift is accompanied by a corresponding change in DP cell number. Using a mouse model that allows selective ablation of DP cells in vivo, we show that DP cell number dictates the size and shape of the hair. Furthermore, we confirm the hypothesis that the DP plays a crucial role in activating stem cells to initiate the formation of a new hair shaft. When DP cell number falls below a critical threshold, hair follicles with a normal keratinocyte compartment fail to generate new hairs. However, neighbouring follicles with a few more DP cells can re-enter the growth phase, and those that do exploit an intrinsic mechanism to restore both DP cell number and normal hair growth. These results demonstrate that the mesenchymal niche directs stem and progenitor cell behaviour to initiate regeneration and specify hair morphology. Degeneration of the DP population in mice leads to the types of hair thinning and loss observed during human aging, and the results reported here suggest novel approaches to reversing hair loss.

  11. Modeling, analysis and control of fuel cell hybrid power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Kyung Won

    due to the conflicting objectives. The compromise can be mitigated by augmenting the fuel cell power system with an energy buffer such as a battery. We consider two different and popular ways of connecting the battery and the fuel cell to the load and we refer to them as electric architectures. Various controller gains are used to span the fuel cell operation from load-following to load-leveling, and hence, to determine adequate fuel cell-battery sizing (hybridization level) and the associated trends in the system efficiency.

  12. On the repeated measures designs and sample sizes for randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    For the analysis of longitudinal or repeated measures data, generalized linear mixed-effects models provide a flexible and powerful tool to deal with heterogeneity among subject response profiles. However, the typical statistical design adopted in usual randomized controlled trials is an analysis of covariance type analysis using a pre-defined pair of "pre-post" data, in which pre-(baseline) data are used as a covariate for adjustment together with other covariates. Then, the major design issue is to calculate the sample size or the number of subjects allocated to each treatment group. In this paper, we propose a new repeated measures design and sample size calculations combined with generalized linear mixed-effects models that depend not only on the number of subjects but on the number of repeated measures before and after randomization per subject used for the analysis. The main advantages of the proposed design combined with the generalized linear mixed-effects models are (1) it can easily handle missing data by applying the likelihood-based ignorable analyses under the missing at random assumption and (2) it may lead to a reduction in sample size, compared with the simple pre-post design. The proposed designs and the sample size calculations are illustrated with real data arising from randomized controlled trials.

  13. Facile fabrication of BiVO4 nanofilms with controlled pore size and their photoelectrochemical performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chenchen; Jiao, Zhengbo; Li, Shaopeng; Zhang, Yan; Bi, Yingpu

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate a facile method for the rational fabrication of pore-size controlled nanoporous BiVO4 photoanodes, and confirmed that the optimum pore-size distributions could effectively absorb visible light through light diffraction and confinement functions. Furthermore, in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals more efficient photoexcited electron-hole separation than conventional particle films, induced by light confinement and rapid charge transfer in the inter-crossed worm-like structures.We demonstrate a facile method for the rational fabrication of pore-size controlled nanoporous BiVO4 photoanodes, and confirmed that the optimum pore-size distributions could effectively absorb visible light through light diffraction and confinement functions. Furthermore, in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals more efficient photoexcited electron-hole separation than conventional particle films, induced by light confinement and rapid charge transfer in the inter-crossed worm-like structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06584d

  14. Simultaneous phase and size control of upconversion nanocrystals through lanthanide doping

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Feng

    2010-02-25

    Doping is a widely applied technological process in materials science that involves incorporating atoms or ions of appropriate elements into host lattices to yield hybrid materials with desirable properties and functions. For nanocrystalline materials, doping is of fundamental importance in stabilizing a specific crystallographic phase, modifying electronic properties, modulating magnetism as well as tuning emission properties. Here we describe a material system in which doping influences the growth process to give simultaneous control over the crystallographic phase, size and optical emission properties of the resulting nanocrystals. We show that NaYF 4 nanocrystals can be rationally tuned in size (down to ten nanometres), phase (cubic or hexagonal) and upconversion emission colour (green to blue) through use of trivalent lanthanide dopant ions introduced at precisely defined concentrations. We use first-principles calculations to confirm that the influence of lanthanide doping on crystal phase and size arises from a strong dependence on the size and dipole polarizability of the substitutional dopant ion. Our results suggest that the doping-induced structural and size transition, demonstrated here in NaYF 4 upconversion nanocrystals, could be extended to other lanthanide-doped nanocrystal systems for applications ranging from luminescent biological labels to volumetric three-dimensional displays. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  15. Control of Alginate Core Size in Alginate-Poly (Lactic-Co-Glycolic) Acid Microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Daniel; Yeo, David; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-01-01

    Core-shell alginate-poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microparticles are potential candidates to improve hydrophilic drug loading while facilitating controlled release. This report studies the influence of the alginate core size on the drug release profile of alginate-PLGA microparticles and its size. Microparticles are synthesized through double-emulsion fabrication via a concurrent ionotropic gelation and solvent extraction. The size of alginate core ranges from approximately 10, 50, to 100 μm when the emulsification method at the first step is homogenization, vortexing, or magnetic stirring, respectively. The second step emulsification for all three conditions is performed with magnetic stirring. Interestingly, although the alginate core has different sizes, alginate-PLGA microparticle diameter does not change. However, drug release profiles are dramatically different for microparticles comprising different-sized alginate cores. Specifically, taking calcein as a model drug, microparticles containing the smallest alginate core (10 μm) show the slowest release over a period of 26 days with burst release less than 1 %.

  16. Size controllable synthesis of ultrafine spherical gold particles and their simulation of plasmonic and SERS behaviors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Zao [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China); College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu, Xibin [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China); College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Luo, Jiangshan; Li, Xibo [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yi, Yong [Joint Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology and Research Center of Laser Fusion, Mianyang (China); Jiang, Xiaodong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China); Yi, Yougen, E-mail: yougenyi@mail.csu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Tang, Yongjian [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-04-01

    A simple and reproducible way was explored to synthesize quasi-spherical gold particles with different size distributions in water by rapidly adding a mixture solution of HAuCl{sub 4}, sodium citrate, and a trace amount of silver nitrate. By careful tuning of the reaction parameters, mono-disperse gold particles with the diameter of 5–220 nm can be obtained controllably. The particle size of 130 nm for the particles film showed the highest SERS activity with the 632.8 nm excitation. The theoretical calculations of the UV–vis extinction spectra can be directly compared with experiments by using the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA). Control of nanostructure shape allows optimization of plasmon resonance for molecular detection and spectroscopy.

  17. A Method of MPPT Control Based on Power Variable Step-size in Photovoltaic Converter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Hui-xiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the disadvantage of traditional MPPT algorithms of variable step-size, proposed power tracking based on variable step-size with the advantage method of the constant-voltage and the perturb-observe (P&O[1-3]. The control strategy modify the problem of voltage fluctuation caused by perturb-observe method, at the same time, introducing the advantage of constant-voltage method and simplify the circuit topology. With the theoretical derivation, control the output power of photovoltaic modules to change the duty cycle of main switch. Achieve the maximum power stabilization output, reduce the volatility of energy loss effectively, and improve the inversion efficiency[3,4]. Given the result of experimental test based theoretical derivation and the curve of MPPT when the prototype work.

  18. Introducing micrometer-sized artificial objects into live cells: a method for cell-giant unilamellar vesicle electrofusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira C Saito

    Full Text Available Here, we report a method for introducing large objects of up to a micrometer in diameter into cultured mammalian cells by electrofusion of giant unilamellar vesicles. We prepared GUVs containing various artificial objects using a water-in-oil (w/o emulsion centrifugation method. GUVs and dispersed HeLa cells were exposed to an alternating current (AC field to induce a linear cell-GUV alignment, and then a direct current (DC pulse was applied to facilitate transient electrofusion. With uniformly sized fluorescent beads as size indexes, we successfully and efficiently introduced beads of 1 µm in diameter into living cells along with a plasmid mammalian expression vector. Our electrofusion did not affect cell viability. After the electrofusion, cells proliferated normally until confluence was reached, and the introduced fluorescent beads were inherited during cell division. Analysis by both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry supported these findings. As an alternative approach, we also introduced a designed nanostructure (DNA origami into live cells. The results we report here represent a milestone for designing artificial symbiosis of functionally active objects (such as micro-machines in living cells. Moreover, our technique can be used for drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cell manipulation.

  19. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  20. Size and composition-controlled fabrication of VO2 nanocrystals by terminated cluster growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Slack, Jonathan

    2013-05-14

    A physical vapor deposition-based route for the fabrication of VO2 nanoparticles is demonstrated, consisting of reactive sputtering and vapor condensation at elevated pressures. The oxidation of vanadium atoms is an efficient heterogeneous nucleation method, leading to high nanoparticle throughtput. Fine control of the nanoparticle size and composition is obtained. Post growth annealing leads to crystalline VO2 nanoparticles with optimum thermocromic and plasmonic properties.

  1. Advances in synthesis of calcium phosphate crystals with controlled size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kaili; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2014-10-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) materials have a wide range of applications, including biomaterials, adsorbents, chemical engineering materials, catalysts and catalyst supports and mechanical reinforcements. The size and shape of CaP crystals and aggregates play critical roles in their applications. The main inorganic building blocks of human bones and teeth are nanocrystalline CaPs; recently, much progress has been made in the application of CaP nanocrystals and their composites for clinical repair of damaged bone and tooth. For example, CaPs with special micro- and nanostructures can better imitate the biomimetic features of human bone and tooth, and this offers significantly enhanced biological performances. Therefore, the design of CaP nano-/microcrystals, and the shape and hierarchical structures of CaPs, have great potential to revolutionize the field of hard tissue engineering, starting from bone/tooth repair and augmentation to controlled drug delivery devices. Previously, a number of reviews have reported the synthesis and properties of CaP materials, especially for hydroxyapatite (HAp). However, most of them mainly focused on the characterizations and physicochemical and biological properties of HAp particles. There are few reviews about the control of particle size and size distribution of CaPs, and in particular the control of nano-/microstructures on bulk CaP ceramic surfaces, which is a big challenge technically and may have great potential in tissue engineering applications. This review summarizes the current state of the art for the synthesis of CaP crystals with controlled sizes from the nano- to the macroscale, and the diverse shapes including the zero-dimensional shapes of particles and spheres, the one-dimensional shapes of rods, fibers, wires and whiskers, the two-dimensional shapes of sheets, disks, plates, belts, ribbons and flakes and the three-dimensional (3-D) shapes of porous, hollow, and biomimetic structures similar to biological bone and tooth

  2. Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. M.; Telling, N. D.; Coker, V. S.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; van der Laan, G.; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    The bioproduction of nanoscale magnetite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria offers a potentially tunable, environmentally benign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the size of magnetite nanoparticles produced by Geobacter sulfurreducens by adjusting the total biomass introduced at the start of the process. The particles have a narrow size distribution and can be controlled within the range of 10-50 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that controlled production of a number of different biominerals is possible via this method including goethite, magnetite and siderite, but their formation is strongly dependent upon the rate of Fe(III) reduction and total concentration and rate of Fe(II) produced by the bacteria during the reduction process. Relative cation distributions within the structure of the nanoparticles have been investigated by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and indicate the presence of a highly reduced surface layer which is not observed when magnetite is produced through abiotic methods. The enhanced Fe(II)-rich surface, combined with small particle size, has important environmental applications such as in the reductive bioremediation of organics, radionuclides and metals. In the case of Cr(VI), as a model high-valence toxic metal, optimized biogenic magnetite is able to reduce and sequester the toxic hexavalent chromium very efficiently to the less harmful trivalent form.

  3. Scalable fabrication of size-controlled chitosan nanoparticles for oral delivery of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiyu; Santos, Jose Luis; Tian, Houkuan; Huang, Huahua; Hu, Yizong; Liu, Lixin; Leong, Kam W; Chen, Yongming; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2017-06-01

    Controlled delivery of protein would find diverse therapeutic applications. Formulation of protein nanoparticles by polyelectrolyte complexation between the protein and a natural polymer such as chitosan (CS) is a popular approach. However, the current method of batch-mode mixing faces significant challenges in scaling up while maintaining size control, high uniformity, and high encapsulation efficiency. Here we report a new method, termed flash nanocomplexation (FNC), to fabricate insulin nanoparticles by infusing aqueous solutions of CS, tripolyphosphate (TPP), and insulin under rapid mixing condition (Re > 1600) in a multi-inlet vortex mixer. In comparison with the bulk-mixing method, the optimized FNC process produces CS/TPP/insulin nanoparticles with a smaller size (down to 45 nm) and narrower size distribution, higher encapsulation efficiency (up to 90%), and pH-dependent nanoparticle dissolution and insulin release. The CS/TPP/insulin nanoparticles can be lyophilized and reconstituted without loss of activity, and produced at a throughput of 5.1 g h(-1) when a flow rate of 50 mL min(-1) is used. Evaluated in a Type I diabetes rat model, the smaller nanoparticles (45 nm and 115 nm) control the blood glucose level through oral administration more effectively than the larger particles (240 nm). This efficient, reproducible and continuous FNC technique is amenable to scale-up in order to address the critical barrier of manufacturing for the translation of protein nanoparticles.

  4. Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, J. M.; Telling, N. D.; Coker, V. S.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Laan, G. van der; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2011-08-02

    The bioproduction of nano-scale magnetite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria offers a potentially tunable, environmentally benign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the size of magnetite nanoparticles produced by Geobacter sulfurreducens, by adjusting the total biomass introduced at the start of the process. The particles have a narrow size distribution and can be controlled within the range of 10-50 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that controlled production of a number of different biominerals is possible via this method including goethite, magnetite and siderite, but their formation is strongly dependent upon the rate of Fe(III) reduction and total concentration and rate of Fe(II) produced by the bacteria during the reduction process. Relative cation distributions within the structure of the nanoparticles has been investigated by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and indicates the presence of a highly reduced surface layer which is not observed when magnetite is produced through abiotic methods. The enhanced Fe(II)-rich surface, combined with small particle size, has important environmental applications such as in the reductive bioremediation of organics, radionuclides and metals. In the case of Cr(VI), as a model high-valence toxic metal, optimised biogenic magnetite is able to reduce and sequester the toxic hexavalent chromium very efficiently in the less harmful trivalent form.

  5. Consultation for Small-Sized Penis in the Egyptian Males: A Case Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Nader

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to report penile dimensions in adult Egyptian males consulting for small-sized penis (SSP) and describe their demographics and andrological profile. A case control study was designed through retrospective data analysis of patients (n = 239) seeking advice for SSP and a control group (n = 59). This included sociodemographics, other andrological complaints, and penile dimensions (pendulous length [PL], penopubic or total length [TL], and circumference [CF]) at flaccid and erect states and the size of the prepubic fatty pad. The results reported that most patients were single, students, and smokers and had not completed a university education. Several patients reported falsely premature ejaculation (PE), penile curvature (PC), and small-sized testes. Most penile dimensions of the patients (mean, cm) were significantly lower than those of the controls, whether in flaccid (PL: 7.4 vs. 8.05, p = .008; CF: 8.7 vs. 8.98, p = .026) or erect state (PL: 11.8 vs. 13, p = .000; TL: 14.2 vs. 15, p = .000; CF: 11.3 vs. 11.8, p = .003). However, no patient presented with a pendulous penile length <4 cm in flaccid or <7 cm in erect state. In conclusion, Egyptian men consulting for SSP did not have true small organs, but their penile dimensions were slightly smaller than those of men without such complaint. The proper sexual education program is highly advisable in these situations to avoid the myths and misconceptions about sexuality.

  6. Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J M; Telling, N D; Coker, V S; Pattrick, R A D; van der Laan, G; Arenholz, E; Tuna, F; Lloyd, J R

    2011-11-11

    The bioproduction of nanoscale magnetite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria offers a potentially tunable, environmentally benign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the size of magnetite nanoparticles produced by Geobacter sulfurreducens by adjusting the total biomass introduced at the start of the process. The particles have a narrow size distribution and can be controlled within the range of 10-50 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that controlled production of a number of different biominerals is possible via this method including goethite, magnetite and siderite, but their formation is strongly dependent upon the rate of Fe(III) reduction and total concentration and rate of Fe(II) produced by the bacteria during the reduction process. Relative cation distributions within the structure of the nanoparticles have been investigated by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and indicate the presence of a highly reduced surface layer which is not observed when magnetite is produced through abiotic methods. The enhanced Fe(II)-rich surface, combined with small particle size, has important environmental applications such as in the reductive bioremediation of organics, radionuclides and metals. In the case of Cr(VI), as a model high-valence toxic metal, optimized biogenic magnetite is able to reduce and sequester the toxic hexavalent chromium very efficiently to the less harmful trivalent form.

  7. Effect of hydroxyapatite particle size, morphology and crystallinity on proliferation of colon cancer HCT116 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Sangeeta; Das, Mitun, E-mail: mitun@cgcri.res.in; Balla, Vamsi Krishna

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to chemically and physically characterize the synthesized Hydroxyapatite (HAp) micro and nanoparticles and to explore the inhibitory effect of nano-HAps on the in vitro growth of human colon cancerous cells HCT116. HAp powder was synthesized using three different routes to achieve micro and nanosized powders, with different morphologies and crystallinity. The synthesized powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the average crystallite size of HAp powder varies from 11 nm to 177 nm and respective crystallinity of powder found to be in the range of 0.12 and 0.92. The effect of these physico-chemical properties of HAp powders on human colon cancer HCT116 cells inhibition was determined in vitro. It was found that decreasing the HAp powder crystallite size between 11 nm and 22 nm significantly increases the HCT116 cell inhibition. Our results demonstrate that apart from HAp powder size their crystallinity and morphology also play an important role in cellular inhibition of human colon cancer cells. - Highlights: • Chemically synthesized hydroxyapatite micro and nano-particles with different morphologies and crystallinity. • In vitro cell–material interaction showed that hydroxyapatite nano-particles inhibit colon cancer cells. • Human colon cancer cell inhibition also depends on crystallinity and morphology of HAp powder.

  8. Modelling studies to proper size a hydrogen generator for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggio, G.; Recupero, V.; Di Leonardo, R.; Lagana, M. [Istituto CNR-TAE, Lucia, Messina (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    Based upon an extensive survey of literature a mathematical model has been developed to study the temperature profile along the catalytic bed of a reactor for the methane partial oxidation. The model allowed a preliminary design of a 5 Nm{sup 3} syngas/h prototype to be integrated with second generation fuel cells as hydrogen generator (in the framework of the EC-JOU2 contract). This design was based on some target features, including the choice of a GHSV (gas hour space velocity) equal to 80000 h{sup -1}, a catalyst particle size of 1/8inches, a molar air/methane ratio of 2.7 (i.e. O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}=0.53), a linear velocity in the catalytic bed of about 2 m/sec, and an inert/catalyst ratio 3:1. Starting from this data, the work has been concerned with the identification of the controlling regime (kinetic or diffusional), and then with the estimation of the gas composition and temperature profiles along the reactor. A comparison between experimental and model results has also been accomplished.

  9. TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  10. Organic Based Solar Cells with Morphology Control

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Thomas Rieks; Bundgaard, Eva; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    The field of organic solar cells has in the last years gone through an impressive development with efficiencies reported up to 12 %. For organic solar cells to take the leap from primarily being a laboratory scale technology to being utilized as renewable energy source, several issues need to be addressed. Among these are a more direct transfer of new materials tested on a laboratory scale to large scale production than offered by spincoating, a method offering direct control of the morpholog...

  11. Translational control in germline stem cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaidina, Maija; Lehmann, Ruth

    2014-10-13

    Stem cells give rise to tissues and organs during development and maintain their integrity during adulthood. They have the potential to self-renew or differentiate at each division. To ensure proper organ growth and homeostasis, self-renewal versus differentiation decisions need to be tightly controlled. Systematic genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster are revealing extensive regulatory networks that control the switch between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in the germline. These networks, which are based primarily on mutual translational repression, act via interlocked feedback loops to provide robustness to this important fate decision.

  12. Mechanobiological induction of long-range contractility by diffusing biomolecules and size scaling in cell assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasbiswas, K.; Alster, E.; Safran, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Mechanobiological studies of cell assemblies have generally focused on cells that are, in principle, identical. Here we predict theoretically the effect on cells in culture of locally introduced biochemical signals that diffuse and locally induce cytoskeletal contractility which is initially small. In steady-state, both the concentration profile of the signaling molecule as well as the contractility profile of the cell assembly are inhomogeneous, with a characteristic length that can be of the order of the system size. The long-range nature of this state originates in the elastic interactions of contractile cells (similar to long-range “macroscopic modes” in non-living elastic inclusions) and the non-linear diffusion of the signaling molecules, here termed mechanogens. We suggest model experiments on cell assemblies on substrates that can test the theory as a prelude to its applicability in embryo development where spatial gradients of morphogens initiate cellular development.

  13. Determining the optimum cell size of digital elevation model for hydrologic application

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arabinda Sharma; K N Tiwari; P B S Bhadoria

    2011-08-01

    Scale is one of the most important but unsolved issues in various scientific disciplines that deal with spatial data. The arbitrary choice of grid cell size for contour interpolated digital elevation models (DEM) is one of the major sources of uncertainty in the hydrologic modelling process. In this paper, an attempt was made to identify methods for determining an optimum cell size for a contour interpolated DEM in prior to hydrologic modelling. Twenty-meter interval contour lines were used to generate DEMs of five different resolutions, viz., 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 m using TOPOGRID algorithm. The obtained DEMs were explored for their intrinsic quality using four different methods, i.e., sink analysis, fractal dimension of derived stream network, entropy measurement and semivariogram modelling. These methods were applied to determine the level artifacts (interpolation error) in DEM surface as well as derived stream network, spatial information content and spatial variability respectively. The results indicated that a 90 m cell size is sufficient to capture the terrain variability for subsequent hydrologic modelling in the study area. The significance of this research work is that it provides methods which DEM users can apply to select an appropriate DEM cell size in prior to detailed hydrologic modelling.

  14. Sizing stack and battery of a fuel cell hybrid distribution truck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tazelaar, Edwin; Shen, Y.; Veenhuizen, Bram; Hofman, T.; Bosch, P. van den

    2012-01-01

    An existing fuel cell hybrid distribution truck, built for demonstration purposes, is used as a case study to investigate the effect of stack (kW) and battery (kW, kWh) sizes on the hydrogen consumption of the vehicle. Three driving cycles, the NEDC for Low Power vehicles, CSC and JE05 cycle, define

  15. Size Control and Fractionation of Ionic Liquid Filled Polymersomes with Glassy and Rubbery Bilayer Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Soonyong; Lodge, Timothy P

    2016-05-17

    We demonstrate control over the size of ionic liquid (IL) filled polymeric vesicles (polymersomes) by three distinct methods: mechanical extrusion, cosolvent-based processing in an IL, and fractionation of polymersomes in a biphasic system of IL and water. For the representative ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([EMIM][TFSI])), the size and dispersity of polymersomes formed from 1,2-polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PB-PEO) and polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-PEO) diblock copolymers were shown to be sensitive to assembly conditions. During mechanical extrusion through a polycarbonate membrane, the relatively larger polymersomes were broken up and reorganized into vesicles with mean size comparable to the membrane pore (100 nm radius); the distribution width also decreased significantly after only a few passes. Other routes were studied using the solvent-switch or cosolvent (CS) method, whereby the initial content of the cosolvent and the PEO block length of PS-PEO were systemically changed. The nonvolatility of the ionic liquid directly led to the desired concentration of polymersomes in the ionic liquid using a single step, without the dialysis conventionally used in aqueous systems, and the mean vesicle size depended on the amount of cosolvent employed. Finally, selective phase transfer of PS-PEO polymersomes based on size was used to extract larger polymersomes from the IL to the aqueous phase via interfacial tension controlled phase transfer. The interfacial tension between the PS membrane and the aqueous phase was varied with the concentration of sodium chloride (NaCl) in the aqueous phase; then the larger polymersomes were selectively separated to the aqueous phase due to differences in shielding of the hydrophobic core (PS) coverage by the hydrophilic corona brush (PEO). This novel fractionation is a simple separation process without any special apparatus and can help to prepare monodisperse polymersomes

  16. Sexual Functioning and Behavior of Men with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Concerning Penis Size Compared with Men Anxious about Penis Size and with Controls: A Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Veale, D; Miles, S; Read, J.; Troglia, A.; Wylie, K.R.; Muir, G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about the sexual functioning and behavior of men anxious about the size of their penis and the means that they might use to try to alter the size of their penis. Aim: To compare sexual functioning and behavior in men with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) concerning penis size and in men with small penis anxiety (SPA without BDD) and in a control group of men who do not have any concerns. Methods: An opportunistic sample of 90 men from the community were recru...

  17. Temperature and zooplankton size structure: climate control and basin-scale comparison in the North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Sanae; Batten, Sonia D; Yoshiki, Tomoko; Sasaki, Yuka; Sasaoka, Kosei; Sugisaki, Hiroya; Ichikawa, Tadafumi

    2015-02-01

    The global distribution of zooplankton community structure is known to follow latitudinal temperature gradients: larger species in cooler, higher latitudinal regions. However, interspecific relationships between temperature and size in zooplankton communities have not been fully examined in terms of temporal variation. To re-examine the relationship on a temporal scale and the effects of climate control thereon, we investigated the variation in copepod size structure in the eastern and western subarctic North Pacific in 2000-2011. This report presents the first basin-scale comparison of zooplankton community changes in the North Pacific based on a fully standardized data set obtained from the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey. We found an increase in copepod community size (CCS) after 2006-2007 in the both regions because of the increased dominance of large cold-water species. Sea surface temperature varied in an east-west dipole manner, showing the typical Pacific Decadal Oscillation pattern: cooling in the east and warming in the west after 2006-2007. The observed positive correlation between CCS and sea surface temperature in the western North Pacific was inconsistent with the conventional interspecific temperature-size relationship. We explained this discrepancy by the geographical shift of the upper boundary of the thermal niche, the 9°C isotherm, of large cold-water species. In the eastern North Pacific, the boundary stretched northeast, to cover a large part of the sampling area after 2006-2007. In contrast, in the western North Pacific, the isotherm location hardly changed and the sampling area remained within its thermal niche throughout the study period, despite the warming that occurred. Our study suggests that while a climate-induced basin-scale cool-warm cycle can alter copepod community size and might subsequently impact the functions of the marine ecosystem in the North Pacific, the interspecific temperature-size relationship is not

  18. Preparation of big size open-cell aluminum foam board using infiltration casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lucai; Chen Yuyong; Wang Fang; Wu Jianguo; You Xiaohong

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an infiltration casting technique for manufacturing big size open-cell aluminum foam boards. The principle and key technologies of infiltration casting are also analyzed. Based on the previous practice of the small size aluminum foam production, the die for preparing big size aluminum foam boards is designed and manufactured. The experiments on aluminum boards of 300 mm×300 mm×(20-75) mm, with the pore size ranging from 1.0 to 3.2 mm and average porosity of 60%, have been performed. The experimental results show that a reliable infiltration process depends critically on the pouring temperature of the molten AI-alloy, the preheated temperature of the mould and salt particles and vacuum. Current research explores the possibility of large-scale manufacturing and application of the aluminum foams.

  19. Wnt signaling and stem cell control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roel Nusse

    2008-01-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in the control over various types of stem cells and may act as a niche factor to maintain stem cells in a self-renewing state.As currently understood,Wnt proteins bind to receptors of the Frizzled and LRP families on the cell surface.Through several cytoplasmic relay components,the signal is transduced to B-catenin,which then enters the nucleus and forms a complex with TCF to activate transcription of Wnt target genes.Wnts can also signal through tyrosine kinase receptors,in particular the ROR and RYK receptors,leading to alternative modes of Wnt signaling.During the growth of tissues,these ligands and receptors are dynamically expressed,often transcriptionally controlled by Wnt signals themselves,to ensure the right balance between proliferation and differentiation.Isolated Wnt proteins are active on a variety of stem cells,including neural,mammary and embryonic stem cells.In general,Wnt proteins act to maintain the undifferentiated state of stem cells,while other growth factors instruct the cells to proliferate.These other factors include FGF and EGF,signaling through tyrosine kinase pathways.

  20. Controlling particle size in the Stöber process and incorporation of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greasley, Sarah L; Page, Samuel J; Sirovica, Slobodan; Chen, Shu; Martin, Richard A; Riveiro, Antonio; Hanna, John V; Porter, Alexandra E; Jones, Julian R

    2016-05-01

    The Stӧber process is commonly used for synthesising spherical silica particles. This article reports the first comprehensive study of how the process variables can be used to obtain monodispersed particles of specific size. The modal particle size could be selected within in the range 20-500 nm. There is great therapeutic potential for bioactive glass nanoparticles, as they can be internalised within cells and perform sustained delivery of active ions. Biodegradable bioactive glass nanoparticles are also used in nanocomposites. Modification of the Stӧber process so that the particles can contain cations such as calcium, whilst maintaining monodispersity, is desirable. Here, whilst calcium incorporation is achieved, with a homogenous distribution, careful characterisation shows that much of the calcium is not incorporated. A maximum of 10 mol% CaO can be achieved and previous reports are likely to have overestimated the amount of calcium incorporated.

  1. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R. [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Redondo, Santiago [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Peçanha, Franck [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Martín, Angela [Departamento de Bioquímica, Fisiología y Genética Molecular, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922, Alcorcón (Spain); Fortuño, Ana [Área de Ciencias Cardiovasculares, Centro de Investigación Médica Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31008, Pamplona (Spain); Cachofeiro, Victoria [Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Tejerina, Teresa [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Salaices, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.salaices@uam.es [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  2. Factors controlling the population size of microbes in groundwater from AECL's Underground Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Hamon, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Whiteshell Labs., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada); Mills, K. [University of Saskatoon, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Rana, S.; Vaidyanathan, S. [Deep River Science Academy, Whiteshell Campus Summer 1997, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    2001-01-01

    Microbial populations in groundwaters from AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) range from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} cells/mL. Based on the total dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrate and phosphate content of these waters, populations of about 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7} cells/mL should be possible. Upon storage of groundwater samples, total cell counts generally increase and viable cell counts always increase. A study was undertaken to determine what controls the in situ microbial population size in groundwater and what causes this population to grow upon sampling. Fresh URL groundwater was filter-sterilized, inoculated with small quantities of the unaltered water and incubated in the absence and presence of added nutrients (nitrate, phosphate and glucose). Unfiltered groundwater and R2A growth medium inoculated with unaltered groundwater, were also incubated. Microbial changes over time were followed by total and viable (on R2A medium) cell counts. Results showed that in the absence of any nutrient addition, populations grew to between 5 x 10{sup 5} to 4 x 10{sup 6} cells/mL, regardless of the initial size of the population ({approx}10{sup 1} to 10{sup 4} cells/mL), suggesting that nutrients for growth were available in the unamended groundwater. It was hypothesized that the original groundwater population was in 'equilibrium' with the underground environment, which likely included a large population of sessile cells in biofilms on fracture surfaces. Sampling of the groundwater removed the large demand on nutrient supplies by the sessile population which subsequently allowed the planktonic population to grow to a new 'equilibrium' with the available nutrients in the sample bottles. Addition of single nutrients (C, N or P) did not increase cell numbers, suggesting that more than one nutrient is limiting growth. Glucose was used very efficiently aerobically in the presence of both added N and P, but somewhat less under anaerobic

  3. Mechanical weed control on small-size dry bean and its response to cross-flaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martelloni, L.; Frasconi, C.; Fontanelli, M.; Raffaelli, M.; Peruzzi, A.

    2016-11-01

    Dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) can be a profitable crop for farmers; however controlling weeds effectively without a decrease in yield remains a problem. An example where mechanical weed control is difficult to conduct is dry bean ‘Toscanello’, which is a small sized high-income niche product growing low to the ground. Concerning intra-row weed control, also flame weeding could be an opportunity but the dry bean heat tolerance needs to be studied. The aims of this research were to study the weed control efficacy of a spring-tine harrow and an inter-row cultivator in this bean variety, and to test the tolerance of dry bean cultivated under weed-free conditions to cross-flaming applied with different liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) doses. Flame weeding was applied at BBCH 13 and BBCH 14 bean growth stages by pairs of burners producing direct double flame acting into the intra-row space, with bean plants placed in the middle. The results suggest that the spring-tine harrow used two times at BBCH 13 and 14, respectively, lead to a yield similar to that of the weedy control. The inter-row cultivator could be an opportunity for small-sized dry bean crops producers, enabling them to obtain a similar yield compared to the hand-weeded control. Concerning the bean tolerance to cross-flaming the results showed that bean flamed at BBCH 13 stage had little tolerance to cross-flaming. Bean flamed at BBCH 14 stage was tolerant until an LPG dose of 39 kg/ha, giving yield responses similar to those observed in the non-flamed control. (Author)

  4. Effect of decellularized adipose tissue particle size and cell density on adipose-derived stem cell proliferation and adipogenic differentiation in composite methacrylated chondroitin sulphate hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cody F C; Yan, Jing; Han, Tim Tian Y; Marecak, Dale M; Amsden, Brian G; Flynn, Lauren E

    2015-07-30

    An injectable composite scaffold incorporating decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) as a bioactive matrix within a hydrogel phase capable of in situ polymerization would be advantageous for adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) delivery in the filling of small or irregular soft tissue defects. Building on previous work, the current study investigates DAT milling methods and the effects of DAT particle size and cell seeding density on the response of human ASCs encapsulated in photo-cross-linkable methacrylated chondroitin sulphate (MCS)-DAT composite hydrogels. DAT particles were generated by milling lyophilized DAT and the particle size was controlled through the processing conditions with the goal of developing composite scaffolds with a tissue-specific 3D microenvironment tuned to enhance adipogenesis. ASC proliferation and adipogenic differentiation were assessed in vitro in scaffolds incorporating small (average diameter of 38   ±   6 μm) or large (average diameter of 278   ±   3 μm) DAT particles in comparison to MCS controls over a period of up to 21 d. Adipogenic differentiation was enhanced in the composites incorporating the smaller DAT particles and seeded at the higher density of 5   ×   10(5) ASCs/scaffold, as measured by glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) enzyme activity, semi-quantitative analysis of perilipin expression and oil red O staining of intracellular lipid accumulation. Overall, this study demonstrates that decellularized tissue particle size can impact stem cell differentiation through cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, providing relevant insight towards the rational design of composite biomaterial scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering.

  5. Grain size control and phase transformations in nanocrystalline ZrO(2)-Al(2)O(3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyser, Bridget Maureen

    1998-12-01

    An effort has been made to develop nanocrystalline ZrOsb2-Alsb2Osb3 powders that exhibit grain size and phase stability during one thermal cycle from room temperature to 1100-1200sp°C for potential use as thermal barrier coating materials. For this use, the tetragonal phase of ZrOsb2 must be maintained. Tetragonal ZrOsb2 can be prevented from transforming to the monoclinic form by maintaining the grain size below a critical value. Alsb2Osb3 was intended to provide this grain size control due to its immiscibility with ZrOsb2. Several sol-gel and precipitation methods of producing the powders were compared, along with two different forms of high energy mixing. The powders were subsequently calcined and heat treated in order to assess their ability to maintain the desired phase distribution during thermal cycling. The powders were characterized by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The method producing the greatest fraction of tetragonal ZrOsb2 with the least amount of added Alsb2Osb3 was that in which a commercial colloidal solution of ZrOsb2 was mixed with an aluminum nitrate solution. The critical grain size of ZrOsb2 in this system was 30 nm. The grain size was controlled not by a pinning mechanism as is often seen in conventional, high Alsb2Osb3,\\ Alsb2Osb3-ZrOsb2 ceramics, but instead by mutual constraint of surrounding grains aided by sluggish grain boundary diffusion. The grain growth kinetics in all the phases tended to be slower than in micron sized materials, and a range of grain growth exponents from n = 1 to n = 30 were determined for the various phases. Transformation kinetics in ZrOsb2 followed classic Avrami behavior. Alsb2Osb3 phase transformation kinetics were not specifically determined, however, gamma-Alsb2Osb3 was identified at temperatures well beyond its usual stability, which is possibly a grain size effect.

  6. Mechanical tugging force regulates the size of cell–cell junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijun; Tan, John L.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Yang, Michael T.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Ruiz, Sami Alom; Nelson, Celeste M.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    Actomyosin contractility affects cellular organization within tissues in part through the generation of mechanical forces at sites of cell–matrix and cell–cell contact. While increased mechanical loading at cell–matrix adhesions results in focal adhesion growth, whether forces drive changes in the size of cell–cell adhesions remains an open question. To investigate the responsiveness of adherens junctions (AJ) to force, we adapted a system of microfabricated force sensors to quantitatively report cell–cell tugging force and AJ size. We observed that AJ size was modulated by endothelial cell–cell tugging forces: AJs and tugging force grew or decayed with myosin activation or inhibition, respectively. Myosin-dependent regulation of AJs operated in concert with a Rac1, and this coordinated regulation was illustrated by showing that the effects of vascular permeability agents (S1P, thrombin) on junctional stability were reversed by changing the extent to which these agents coupled to the Rac and myosin-dependent pathways. Furthermore, direct application of mechanical tugging force, rather than myosin activity per se, was sufficient to trigger AJ growth. These findings demonstrate that the dynamic coordination of mechanical forces and cell–cell adhesive interactions likely is critical to the maintenance of multicellular integrity and highlight the need for new approaches to study tugging forces. PMID:20463286

  7. Size-Controlled and Optical Properties of Monodispersed Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized by the Radiolytic Reduction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Naghavi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Size-controlled and monodispersed silver nanoparticles were synthesized from an aqueous solution containing silver nitrate as a metal precursor, polyvinyl alcohol as a capping agent, isopropyl alcohol as hydrogen and hydroxyl radical scavengers, and deionized water as a solvent with a simple radiolytic method. The average particle size decreased with an increase in dose due to the domination of nucleation over ion association in the formation of the nanoparticles by gamma reduction. The silver nanoparticles exhibit a very sharp and strong absorption spectrum with the absorption maximum λmax blue shifting with an increased dose, owing to a decrease in particle size. The absorption spectra of silver nanoparticles of various particle sizes were also calculated using a quantum physics treatment and an agreement was obtained with the experimental absorption data. The results suggest that the absorption spectrum of silver nanoparticles possibly derived from the intra-band excitations of conduction electrons from the lowest energy state (n = 5, l = 0 to higher energy states (n ≥ 6; Δl = 0, ±1; Δs = 0, ±1, allowed by the quantum numbers principle. This demonstrates that the absorption phenomenon of metal nanoparticles based on a quantum physics description could be exploited to be added into the fundamentals of metal nanoparticles and the related fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  8. Gold nanoparticle assemblies of controllable size obtained by hydroxylamine reduction at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tódor, István Sz.; Szabó, László; Marişca, Oana T.; Chiş, Vasile; Leopold, Nicolae, E-mail: nicolae.leopold@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics (Romania)

    2014-12-15

    Colloidal nanoparticle assemblies (NPAs) were obtained in a one-step procedure, by reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, at room temperature, without the use of any additional nucleating agent. By changing the order of the reactants, NPAs with mean size of ∼20 and ∼120 nm were obtained. Because of their size and irregular popcorn like shape, the larger size NPAs show absorption in the NIR spectral region. The building blocks of the resulted nanoassemblies are spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 4–8 and 10–30 nm, respectively. Moreover, by stabilizing the colloid with bovine serum albumin at different time moments after synthesis, NPAs of controlled size between 20 and 120 nm, could be obtained. The NPAs were characterized using UV–Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM electron microscopies. In addition, the possibility of using the here proposed NPAs as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was assessed and found to provide a higher enhancement compared to conventional citrate-reduced nanoparticles.

  9. Gold nanoparticle assemblies of controllable size obtained by hydroxylamine reduction at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tódor, István Sz.; Szabó, László; Marişca, Oana T.; Chiş, Vasile; Leopold, Nicolae

    2014-12-01

    Colloidal nanoparticle assemblies (NPAs) were obtained in a one-step procedure, by reduction of HAuCl4 by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, at room temperature, without the use of any additional nucleating agent. By changing the order of the reactants, NPAs with mean size of 20 and 120 nm were obtained. Because of their size and irregular popcorn like shape, the larger size NPAs show absorption in the NIR spectral region. The building blocks of the resulted nanoassemblies are spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 4-8 and 10-30 nm, respectively. Moreover, by stabilizing the colloid with bovine serum albumin at different time moments after synthesis, NPAs of controlled size between 20 and 120 nm, could be obtained. The NPAs were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM electron microscopies. In addition, the possibility of using the here proposed NPAs as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was assessed and found to provide a higher enhancement compared to conventional citrate-reduced nanoparticles.

  10. Sexual Functioning and Behavior of Men with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Concerning Penis Size Compared with Men Anxious about Penis Size and with Controls: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Veale, MD, FRCPsych

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Men with BDD are more likely to have erectile dysfunction and less satisfaction with intercourse than controls but maintain their libido. Further research is required to develop and evaluate a psychological intervention for such men with adequate outcome measures. Veale D, Miles S, Read J, Troglia A, Wylie K, and Muir G. Sexual functioning and behavior of men with body dysmorphic disorder concerning penis size compared with men anxious about penis size and with controls: A cohort study. Sex Med 2015;3:147–155.

  11. Scaling of traction forces with the size of cohesive cell colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Aaron F; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Che, Yonglu; German, Guy K; Xu, Ye; Hyland, Callen; Marchetti, M Cristina; Horsley, Valerie; Dufresne, Eric R

    2012-05-11

    To understand how the mechanical properties of tissues emerge from interactions of multiple cells, we measure traction stresses of cohesive colonies of 1-27 cells adherent to soft substrates. We find that traction stresses are generally localized at the periphery of the colony and the total traction force scales with the colony radius. For large colony sizes, the scaling appears to approach linear, suggesting the emergence of an apparent surface tension of the order of 10(-3)  N/m. A simple model of the cell colony as a contractile elastic medium coupled to the substrate captures the spatial distribution of traction forces and the scaling of traction forces with the colony size.

  12. Flow perfusion culture of human mesenchymal stem cells on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with various pore sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Lea; Bünger, Cody; Baatrup, Anette;

    2011-01-01

    of this study was to obtain a clinically relevant substitute size using a direct perfusion culture system. Human bone marrowderived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with 200 μm or 500 μm pores, and resulting constructs were cultured in a perfusion bioreactor or in static......Bone grafts are widely used in orthopaedic reconstructive surgery, but harvesting of autologous grafts is limited due to donor site complications. Bone tissue engineering is a possible alternative source for substitutes, and to date, mainly small scaffold sizes have been evaluated. The aim...... culture for up to 21 days and analysed for cell distribution and osteogenic differentiation using histological stainings, alkaline phosphatase activity assay, and real-time RT-PCR on bone markers. We found that the number of cells was higher during static culture at most time points and that the final...

  13. Self-assembly of size-controlled liposomes on DNA nanotemplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Jing; Shigematsu, Hideki; Xu, Weiming; Shih, William M.; Rothman, James E.; Lin, Chenxiang

    2016-05-01

    Artificial lipid-bilayer membranes are valuable tools for the study of membrane structure and dynamics. For applications such as the study of vesicular transport and drug delivery, there is a pressing need for artificial vesicles with controlled size. However, controlling vesicle size and shape with nanometre precision is challenging, and approaches to achieve this can be heavily affected by lipid composition. Here, we present a bio-inspired templating method to generate highly monodispersed sub-100-nm unilamellar vesicles, where liposome self-assembly was nucleated and confined inside rigid DNA nanotemplates. Using this method, we produce homogeneous liposomes with four distinct predefined sizes. We also show that the method can be used with a variety of lipid compositions and probe the mechanism of templated liposome formation by capturing key intermediates during membrane self-assembly. The DNA nanotemplating strategy represents a conceptually novel way to guide lipid bilayer formation and could be generalized to engineer complex membrane/protein structures with nanoscale precision.

  14. Integration of epigenetic and genetic controls of seed size by cytokinin in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Nie, Xin; Tan, Jeanie Li Hui; Berger, Frédéric

    2013-09-17

    The development of seeds in flowering plants is placed under complex interactions between maternal tissues, the embryo, and the endosperm. The endosperm plays a major role in the regulation of seed size. In Arabidopsis thaliana, endosperm size depends on the coordination of the genetic pathway HAIKU (IKU) with epigenetic controls comprising genome dosage, DNA methylation, and trimethylated lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me3) deposition. However, the effectors that integrate these pathways have remained unknown. Here, we identify a target of the IKU pathway, the cytokinin oxidase CKX2, that affects cytokinin signaling. CKX2 expression is activated by the IKU transcription factor WRKY10 directly and promotes endosperm growth. CKX2 expression also depends on H3K27me3 deposition, which fluctuates in response to maternal genome dosage imbalance and DNA demethylation of male gametes. Hence, the control of endosperm growth by CKX2 integrates genetic and epigenetic regulations. In angiosperms, cytokinins are highly active in endosperm, and we propose that IKU effectors coordinate environmental and physiological factors, resulting in modulation of seed size.

  15. Controlling micro-sized droplet generation using electrical pulses for studying liquid-liquid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandino, M.; La Forgia, N.; Vera, A. J.; Bjerknes, J.; Dorao, C. A.

    2014-04-01

    Water droplets removal from oil is a critical process in several industries, in particular in the oil and gas industry. Water/oil separation is commonly done in large gravitational sedimentation tanks, which are over dimensioned due to the lack of accurate models to allow for optimization. This can become challenging for off-shore and subsea processing installations. One of the bottlenecks to study droplet dynamics in the micron range, is the generation of droplets with less than 100μm in diameter. In this regard, one of the most promising techniques for controlling the generated droplet size is based on the use of a high voltage electrical signal or electro-hydrodynamic technique (EHD). Although much work on EHD and droplet generation can been found in the literature, many challenges still remain. One of this is the generation of droplets smaller than 100μm in diameter in a controllable, on-demand manner. In this work, the effect of the meniscus shape and the electric pulse characteristics on the size of the generated droplet is investigated. Both the meniscus height and width help to determine the droplet size, with the latter having a stronger effect. No significant influence of the pulse amplitude and pulse width was observed for the tested conditions.

  16. Optimization of size controlled poly (lactide-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles using quality by design concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmanabha R. V. Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality by design (QbD is a risk management and science-based approach laid down by the ICH as well as other Regulatory agencies to enhance pharmaceutical development throughout a product′s lifecycle. Poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA is the material of choice for development of depot particulate formulations due to its biodegradable nature and is also considered as the ′green′ eco-friendly material due its biocompatibility and non-toxic properties. Further, PLGA based formulations are approved by regulatory agencies and currently in clinical practice. The aim of the current investigation involves formulation, optimization and in vitro characterization of size controlled PLGA based nanoparticles by employing modified nanoprecipitation technique. An initial risk-assessment analysis was conducted with different formulation and process variables along with their impact on critical quality attributes of the formulation which were identified as particle size and percentage process yield. The Ishikawa diagram was employed to determine the potential risk factors and subsequently optimized by statistical experimental design concept. Box-Behnken design was utilized to optimize nanoparticles and further characterizing the optimized nanoparticulate formulation in vitro. From the present study, it can be concluded that PLGA based nanoparticles with controlled particle size and process yield can be obtained by inculcating the concept of QbD in the product development.

  17. Controllable synthesis of gold nanoparticles with ultrasmall size and high monodispersity via continuous supplement of precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Shoujie; Yao, Tao; Sun, Zhihu; Jiang, Zheng; Huang, Yuying; Cheng, Hao; Huang, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Yong; Xie, Zhi; Pan, Guoqiang; Yan, Wensheng; Wei, Shiqiang

    2012-10-14

    Synthesis of monodisperse small Au nanoparticles in a controllable manner is of great importance for fundamental science and technical applications. Here, we report a "precursor continuous-supply" strategy for controllable synthesis of 0.9-3.3 nm Au nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution of 0.1-0.2 nm, using a weak reductant to slow-down the reducing rate of AuClPPh(3) precursor in ethanol. Time-dependent X-ray absorption and UV-Vis absorption measurements revealed that owing to the joint use of AuClPPh(3) and ethanol, the remnant AuClPPh(3) was self-supplied and the precursor concentration was maintained at a level near to its equilibrium solubility (ca. 1.65 mmol L(-1)) in ethanol. Hence the nucleation duration was extended that focused the initial size distribution of the Au clusters. With reaction going on for 58 min, most of AuClPPh(3) with a nominal Au concentration of 17.86 mmol L(-1) was converted to ethanol-soluble Au clusters with a size of about 1.0 nm, resulting in a high-yield synthesis.

  18. The effect of decrease in salinity on the dynamics of abundance and the cell size of Corethron Hystrix (Bacillariophyta) in laboratory culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizdaicher, Nina A.; Markina, Zhanna V.

    2010-03-01

    Effect of salinity on abundance dynamics and cell size of microalga Corethron hystrix Hensen (Bacillariophyta) were studied. C. hystrix can normally grow within a rather narrow salinity range between 32 and 28‰. The viable cells of this microalga change their morphological characters at a salinity of 24‰. This salinity level probably marks the beginning of cell division restriction, because the general number of cells by the end of the experiment was lower than in the control. The decrease of salinity to 16‰ caused pronounced irreversible morphological changes: cell height increased, chloroplasts compressed, protoplasm became granular, cytoplasm retracted, and spines shortened.

  19. Control of pore size and structure of tissue engineering scaffolds produced by supercritical fluid processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Tai

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering scaffolds require a controlled pore size and structure to host tissue formation. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 processing may be used to form foamed scaffolds in which the escape of CO2 from a plasticized polymer melt generates gas bubbles that shape the developing pores. The process of forming these scaffolds involves a simultaneous change in phase in the CO2 and the polymer, resulting in rapid expansion of a surface area and changes in polymer rheological properties. Hence, the process is difficult to control with respect to the desired final pore size and structure. In this paper, we describe a detailed study of the effect of polymer chemical composition, molecular weight and processing parameters on final scaffold characteristics. The study focuses on poly(DL-lactic acid (PDLLA and poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA as polymer classes with potential application as controlled release scaffolds for growth factor delivery. Processing parameters under investigation were temperature (from 5 to 55oC and pressure (from 60 to 230 bar. A series of amorphous PDLLA and PLGA polymers with various molecular weights (from 13 KD to 96 KD and/or chemical compositions (the mole percentage of glycolic acid in the polymers was 0, 15, 25, 35 and 50 respectively were employed. The resulting scaffolds were characterised by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and micro X-ray computed tomography (µCT. This is the first detailed study on using these series polymers for scaffold formation by supercritical technique. This study has demonstrated that the pore size and structure of the supercritical PDLLA and PLGA scaffolds can be tailored by careful control of processing conditions.

  20. Limitations of mRNA amplification from small-size cell samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myklebost Ola

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global mRNA amplification has become a widely used approach to obtain gene expression profiles from limited material. An important concern is the reliable reflection of the starting material in the results obtained. This is especially important with extremely low quantities of input RNA where stochastic effects due to template dilution may be present. This aspect remains under-documented in the literature, as quantitative measures of data reliability are most often lacking. To address this issue, we examined the sensitivity levels of each transcript in 3 different cell sample sizes. ANOVA analysis was used to estimate the overall effects of reduced input RNA in our experimental design. In order to estimate the validity of decreasing sample sizes, we examined the sensitivity levels of each transcript by applying a novel model-based method, TransCount. Results From expression data, TransCount provided estimates of absolute transcript concentrations in each examined sample. The results from TransCount were used to calculate the Pearson correlation coefficient between transcript concentrations for different sample sizes. The correlations were clearly transcript copy number dependent. A critical level was observed where stochastic fluctuations became significant. The analysis allowed us to pinpoint the gene specific number of transcript templates that defined the limit of reliability with respect to number of cells from that particular source. In the sample amplifying from 1000 cells, transcripts expressed with at least 121 transcripts/cell were statistically reliable and for 250 cells, the limit was 1806 transcripts/cell. Above these thresholds, correlation between our data sets was at acceptable values for reliable interpretation. Conclusion These results imply that the reliability of any amplification experiment must be validated empirically to justify that any gene exists in sufficient quantity in the input material. This

  1. Normal human epithelial cells regulate the size and morphology of tissue-engineered capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Marie-Hélène; Fradette, Julie; Fortin, Véronique; Tomasetig, Florence; Roberge, Charles J; Baker, Kathleen; Berthod, François; Auger, François A; Germain, Lucie

    2010-05-01

    The survival of thick tissues/organs produced by tissue engineering requires rapid revascularization after grafting. Although capillary-like structures have been reconstituted in some engineered tissues, little is known about the interaction between normal epithelial cells and endothelial cells involved in the in vitro angiogenic process. In the present study, we used the self-assembly approach of tissue engineering to examine this relationship. An endothelialized tissue-engineered dermal substitute was produced by adding endothelial cells to the tissue-engineered dermal substitute produced by the self-assembly approach. The latter consists in culturing fibroblasts in the medium supplemented with serum and ascorbic acid. A network of tissue-engineered capillaries (TECs) formed within the human extracellular matrix produced by dermal fibroblasts. To determine whether epithelial cells modify TECs, the size and form of TECs were studied in the endothelialized tissue-engineered dermal substitute cultured in the presence or absence of epithelial cells. In the presence of normal keratinocytes from skin, cornea or uterine cervix, endothelial cells formed small TECs (cross-sectional area estimated at less than 50 microm(2)) reminiscent of capillaries found in the skin's microcirculation. In contrast, TECs grown in the absence of epithelial cells presented variable sizes (larger than 50 microm(2)), but the addition of keratinocyte-conditioned media or exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor induced their normalization toward a smaller size. Vascular endothelial growth factor neutralization inhibited the effect of keratinocyte-conditioned media. These results provide new direct evidence that normal human epithelial cells play a role in the regulation of the underlying TEC network, and advance our knowledge in tissue engineering for the production of TEC networks in vitro.

  2. Active impulsive noise control using maximum correntropy with adaptive kernel size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Haiquan

    2017-03-01

    The active noise control (ANC) based on the principle of superposition is an attractive method to attenuate the noise signals. However, the impulsive noise in the ANC systems will degrade the performance of the controller. In this paper, a filtered-x recursive maximum correntropy (FxRMC) algorithm is proposed based on the maximum correntropy criterion (MCC) to reduce the effect of outliers. The proposed FxRMC algorithm does not requires any priori information of the noise characteristics and outperforms the filtered-x least mean square (FxLMS) algorithm for impulsive noise. Meanwhile, in order to adjust the kernel size of FxRMC algorithm online, a recursive approach is proposed through taking into account the past estimates of error signals over a sliding window. Simulation and experimental results in the context of active impulsive noise control demonstrate that the proposed algorithms achieve much better performance than the existing algorithms in various noise environments.

  3. Cell cycle control by a minimal Cdk network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Gérard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In present-day eukaryotes, the cell division cycle is controlled by a complex network of interacting proteins, including members of the cyclin and cyclin-dependent protein kinase (Cdk families, and the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC. Successful progression through the cell cycle depends on precise, temporally ordered regulation of the functions of these proteins. In light of this complexity, it is surprising that in fission yeast, a minimal Cdk network consisting of a single cyclin-Cdk fusion protein can control DNA synthesis and mitosis in a manner that is indistinguishable from wild type. To improve our understanding of the cell cycle regulatory network, we built and analysed a mathematical model of the molecular interactions controlling the G1/S and G2/M transitions in these minimal cells. The model accounts for all observed properties of yeast strains operating with the fusion protein. Importantly, coupling the model's predictions with experimental analysis of alternative minimal cells, we uncover an explanation for the unexpected fact that elimination of inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk is benign in these strains while it strongly affects normal cells. Furthermore, in the strain without inhibitory phosphorylation of the fusion protein, the distribution of cell size at division is unusually broad, an observation that is accounted for by stochastic simulations of the model. Our approach provides novel insights into the organization and quantitative regulation of wild type cell cycle progression. In particular, it leads us to propose a new mechanistic model for the phenomenon of mitotic catastrophe, relying on a combination of unregulated, multi-cyclin-dependent Cdk activities.

  4. Nanoparticle films and photonic crystal multilayers from colloidally stable, size-controllable zinc and iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redel, Engelbert; Mirtchev, Peter; Huai, Chen; Petrov, Srebri; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2011-04-26

    We report a facile sol-gel synthesis of colloidally stable Fe(2)O(3) and ZnO nanoparticles in alcoholic solvents, ROH, where R = methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, isopropyl, and tert-butyl. We show that nanoparticles of ZnO (4-42) nm and Fe(2)O(3) (4-38 nm) monotonically increase in size upon increasing the alkyl chain length and branching of the alcohol solvent. These colloidally stable and size-controllable metal oxide nanoparticles enable the formation of high optical quality films and photonic crystal multilayers whose component layer thickness, refractive index, porosity, and surface area are found to scale with the nature of the alcohol. Utility of these colloidally stable nanoparticles is demonstrated by preparation of one-dimensional porous photonic crystals comprising ncZnO/ncWO(3) and ncFe(2)O(3)/ncWO(3) multilayers whose photonic stop band can be tuned by tailoring nanoparticle size. Myriad applications can be envisaged for these nanoparticle films in, for example, heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, electrocatalysis, chemical sensors, and solar cells.

  5. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hatzold

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well.

  6. Temperature and phytoplankton cell size regulate carbon uptake and carbon overconsumption in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Craig

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton plays a critical role in the uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide by the ocean, and is comprised of a spectrum of cell sizes that are strongly associated with different oceanographic conditions. Studies suggest that the ocean will become increasingly stratified in response to a warming climate, limiting nutrient exchange to the upper sunlit ocean and favouring small cells able to grow in warmer, nutrient poor conditions. Here we show that, in a temperate shelf sea, a summertime population of numerically abundant small cells accounts for approximately 20% of annual carbon uptake. These small cells are not well represented by chlorophyll a – the ubiquitously used proxy of phytoplankton biomass – but rather, are strongly correlated with surface water temperature. Given the persistent near-zero nutrient concentrations during the summer, it appears that small cells drive carbon overconsumption, and suggest that their role in carbon fixation will become increasingly important in a warming ocean.

  7. Particle size- and number-dependent delivery to cells by layered double hydroxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haiyan; Parekh, Harendra S; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that delivery efficiency to cells is highly dependent on particle size and the administered dose. However, there is a marked discrepancy in many reports, mainly due to the inconsistency in assessment of various parameters. In this particular research, we designed experiments using layered double hydroxide nanoparticles (LDH NPs) to specifically elucidate the effect of particle size, dose and dye loading manner on cellular uptake. Using the number of LDH NPs taken up by HCT-116 cells as the indicator of delivery efficiency, we found that (1) the size of sheet-like LDH in the range of 40-100 nm did not significantly affect their cellular uptake; (2) cellular uptake of 40 and 100 nm LDH NPs was increased proportionally to the number concentration below a critical value, but remained relatively constant beyond the critical value; and (3) the effect of the dye loading manner is mainly dependent on the loading capacity or yield. In particular, the loading capacity is determined by the NP specific surface area. This research may be extended to a larger size range to examine the size effect, but suggests that it is necessary to set up a protocol to evaluate the effects of NP's physicochemical properties on the cellular delivery efficiency.

  8. One-pot size and shape controlled synthesis of DMSO capped iron oxide nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debanjan Guin; Sunkara V Manorama; S Radha; A K Nigam

    2006-11-01

    We report here the capping of iron oxide nanoparticles with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to make chloroform soluble iron oxide nanoparticles. Size and shape of the capped iron oxide nanoparticles are well controlled by simply varying the reaction parameters. The synthesized nanocrystallites were characterized by thermal analysis (TG–DTA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for evaluating phase, structure and morphology. 1H NMR spectra of the synthesized samples confirm DMSO, and the capping of DMSO on the ferrite samples. Shift of the S=O stretching frequency in Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectra indicates that the bonding between DMSO and ferrite is through an oxygen moiety. The magnetic measurements of all the synthesized samples were investigated with a SQUID magnetometer which shows that the magnetic properties are strongly dependent on the size as well as shape of the iron oxide.

  9. Strategies to control the particle size distribution of poly-epsilon-caprolactone nanoparticles for pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lince, Federica; Marchisio, Daniele L; Barresi, Antonello A

    2008-06-15

    In this work turbulent precipitation through solvent displacement for the production of poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) nanoparticles is investigated; two different PCL molecular weights have been employed, using acetone and water as solvent and anti-solvent, respectively. The main important thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, such as solubility and interfacial tension of PCL in water-acetone mixtures, are determined and the effect of the process operating conditions on the final particle size distribution is also investigated. Particles produced under different conditions into a Confined Impinging Jets Reactor (CIJR) were characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering, Zeta potential measurements and Scanning Electronic Microscopy. Results clearly show the strong effect of mixing on the particle size distribution and how mixing must be controlled in order to obtain a product with particular characteristics. Eventually the measured thermodynamic and kinetic parameters are used to interpret the obtained experimental data.

  10. Synthesis of supported bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size and composition distributions for active site elucidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim, Sikander H.; Sener, Canan; Alba Rubio, Ana C.; Gostanian, Thomas M.; O' neill, Brandon J; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Dumesic, James A

    2015-08-01

    Elucidation of active sites in supported bimetallic catalysts is complicated by the high level of dispersity in the nanoparticle size and composition that is inherent in conventional methods of catalyst preparation. We present a synthesis strategy that leads to highly dispersed, bimetallic nanoparticles with uniform particle size and composition by means of controlled surface reactions. We demonstrate the synthesis of three systems, RhMo, PtMo, and RhRe, consisting of a highly reducible metal with an oxophilic promoter. These catalysts are characterized by FTIR, CO chemisorption, STEM/EDS, TPR, and XAS analysis. The catalytic properties of these bimetallic nanoparticles were probed for the selective CO hydrogenolysis of (hydroxymethyl)tetrahydropyran to produce 1,6 hexanediol. Based on the characterization results and reactivity trends, the active sites in the hydrogenolysis reaction are identified to be small ensembles of the more noble metal (Rh, Pt) adjacent to highly reduced moieties of the more oxophilic metal (Mo, Re).

  11. The effect of cell size and channel density on neuronal information encoding and energy efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Biswa; Faisal, A Aldo; Laughlin, Simon B; Niven, Jeremy E

    2013-09-01

    Identifying the determinants of neuronal energy consumption and their relationship to information coding is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Three of the main determinants are cell size, ion channel density, and stimulus statistics. Here we investigate their impact on neuronal energy consumption and information coding by comparing single-compartment spiking neuron models of different sizes with different densities of stochastic voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels and different statistics of synaptic inputs. The largest compartments have the highest information rates but the lowest energy efficiency for a given voltage-gated ion channel density, and the highest signaling efficiency (bits spike(-1)) for a given firing rate. For a given cell size, our models revealed that the ion channel density that maximizes energy efficiency is lower than that maximizing information rate. Low rates of small synaptic inputs improve energy efficiency but the highest information rates occur with higher rates and larger inputs. These relationships produce a Law of Diminishing Returns that penalizes costly excess information coding capacity, promoting the reduction of cell size, channel density, and input stimuli to the minimum possible, suggesting that the trade-off between energy and information has influenced all aspects of neuronal anatomy and physiology.

  12. Molecular behavior of DNA in a cell-sized compartment coated by lipids

    CERN Document Server

    Hamada, T; Shimobayashi, S F; Ichikawa, M; Takagi, M

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of long DNA molecules in a cell-sized confined space was investigated. We prepared water-in-oil droplets covered by phospholipids, which mimic the inner space of a cell, following the encapsulation of DNA molecules with unfolded coil and folded globule conformations. Microscopic observation revealed that the adsorption of coiled DNA onto the membrane surface depended on the size of the vesicular space. Globular DNA showed a cell-size-dependent unfolding transition after adsorption on the membrane. Furthermore, when DNA interacted with a two-phase membrane surface, DNA selectively adsorbed on the membrane phase, such as an ordered or disordered phase, depending on its conformation. We discuss the mechanism of these trends by considering the free energy of DNA together with a polyamine in the solution. The free energy of our model was consistent with the present experimental data. The cooperative interaction of DNA and polyamines with a membrane surface leads to the size-dependent behavior of molec...

  13. Enhancement of pig embryonic implants in factor VIII KO mice: a novel role for the coagulation cascade in organ size control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Aronovich

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the mechanisms that contribute to organ size differences between species. In the present study, we used a mouse model of embryonic pig tissue implantation to define the role of host Factor VIII in controlling the final size attained by the implant. We show here that pig embryonic spleen, pancreas, and liver all grow to an increased size in mice that are deficient in the Factor VIII clotting cascade. Similar results were obtained using the transplantation model after treatment with the low molecular weight heparin derivative Clexane which markedly enhanced transplant size. Likewise, enhanced size was found upon treatment with the direct thrombin inhibitor Dabigatran, suggesting that organ size regulation might be mediated by thrombin, downstream of Factor VIII. Considering that thrombin was shown to mediate various functions unrelated to blood clotting, either directly by cleavage of protease-activated receptors (PARs or indirectly by cleaving osteopontin (OPN on stroma cells, the role of PAR1 and PAR4 antagonists as well as treatment with cleaved form of OPN (tcOPN were tested. While the former was not found to have an impact on overgrowth of embryonic pig spleen implants, marked reduction of size was noted upon treatment with the (tcOPN. Collectively, our surprising set of observations suggests that factors of the coagulation cascade have a novel role in organ size control.

  14. Rgs13 constrains early B cell responses and limits germinal center sizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il-Young Hwang

    Full Text Available Germinal centers (GCs are microanatomic structures that develop in secondary lymphoid organs in response to antigenic stimulation. Within GCs B cells clonally expand and their immunoglobulin genes undergo class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation. Transcriptional profiling has identified a number of genes that are prominently expressed in GC B cells. Among them is Rgs13, which encodes an RGS protein with a dual function. Its canonical function is to accelerate the intrinsic GTPase activity of heterotrimeric G-protein α subunits at the plasma membrane, thereby limiting heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. A unique, non-canonical function of RGS13 occurs following translocation to the nucleus, where it represses CREB transcriptional activity. The functional role of RGS13 in GC B cells is unknown. To create a surrogate marker for Rgs13 expression and a loss of function mutation, we inserted a GFP coding region into the Rgs13 genomic locus. Following immunization GFP expression rapidly increased in activated B cells, persisted in GC B cells, but declined in newly generated memory B and plasma cells. Intravital microscopy of the inguinal lymph node (LN of immunized mice revealed the rapid appearance of GFP(+ cells at LN interfollicular regions and along the T/B cell borders, and eventually within GCs. Analysis of WT, knock-in, and mixed chimeric mice indicated that RGS13 constrains extra-follicular plasma cell generation, GC size, and GC B cell numbers. Analysis of select cell cycle and GC specific genes disclosed an aberrant gene expression profile in the Rgs13 deficient GC B cells. These results indicate that RGS13, likely acting at cell membranes and in nuclei, helps coordinate key decision points during the expansion and differentiation of naive B cells.

  15. Follistatin modulates a BMP autoregulatory loop to control the size and patterning of sensory domains in the developing tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beites, Crestina L; Hollenbeck, Piper L W; Kim, Joon; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Lander, Arthur D; Calof, Anne L

    2009-07-01

    The regenerative capacity of many placode-derived epithelial structures makes them of interest for understanding the molecular control of epithelial stem cells and their niches. Here, we investigate the interaction between the developing epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme in one such system, the taste papillae and sensory taste buds of the mouse tongue. We identify follistatin (FST) as a mesenchymal factor that controls size, patterning and gustatory cell differentiation in developing taste papillae. FST limits expansion and differentiation of Sox2-expressing taste progenitor cells and negatively regulates the development of taste papillae in the lingual epithelium: in Fst(-/-) tongue, there is both ectopic development of Sox2-expressing taste progenitors and accelerated differentiation of gustatory cells. Loss of Fst leads to elevated activity and increased expression of epithelial Bmp7; the latter effect is consistent with BMP7 positive autoregulation, a phenomenon we demonstrate directly. We show that FST and BMP7 influence the activity and expression of other signaling systems that play important roles in the development of taste papillae and taste buds. In addition, using computational modeling, we show how aberrations in taste papillae patterning in Fst(-/-) mice could result from disruption of an FST-BMP7 regulatory circuit that normally suppresses noise in a process based on diffusion-driven instability. Because inactivation of Bmp7 rescues many of the defects observed in Fst(-/-) tongue, we conclude that interactions between mesenchyme-derived FST and epithelial BMP7 play a central role in the morphogenesis, innervation and maintenance of taste buds and their stem/progenitor cells.

  16. Plasmonic nanoparticle films for solar cell applications fabricated by size-selective aerosol deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, T.V.; Ortiz Gonzalez, J.; Santbergen, R.; Tan, H.; Schmidt-Ott, A.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    A soft deposition method for incorporating surface plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles within photovoltaic devices was studied. This self-assembly method provides excellent control over both nanoparticle size and surface coverage. Films of spherical Ag nanoparticles with diameter of ∼100 nm were fa

  17. Controlling cell-cell interactions using surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; French, Jarrod B; Mao, Zhangming; Zhao, Hong; Li, Sixing; Nama, Nitesh; Fick, James R; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-06

    The interactions between pairs of cells and within multicellular assemblies are critical to many biological processes such as intercellular communication, tissue and organ formation, immunological reactions, and cancer metastasis. The ability to precisely control the position of cells relative to one another and within larger cellular assemblies will enable the investigation and characterization of phenomena not currently accessible by conventional in vitro methods. We present a versatile surface acoustic wave technique that is capable of controlling the intercellular distance and spatial arrangement of cells with micrometer level resolution. This technique is, to our knowledge, among the first of its kind to marry high precision and high throughput into a single extremely versatile and wholly biocompatible technology. We demonstrated the capabilities of the system to precisely control intercellular distance, assemble cells with defined geometries, maintain cellular assemblies in suspension, and translate these suspended assemblies to adherent states, all in a contactless, biocompatible manner. As an example of the power of this system, this technology was used to quantitatively investigate the gap junctional intercellular communication in several homotypic and heterotypic populations by visualizing the transfer of fluorescent dye between cells.

  18. A microchip to analyze single crystal growth and size-controllability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A microfluidic device to control single crystallization on the micron scale has been developed. The salt solution was stored in the nano-volume gaps between the arrays of protrudent circular plots in the microchip. The mixed organic solvent was injected into the chip as the counter diffusion phase for crystallization forming. This device provides a liquid-liquid interface through which only one phase flows while the other stays at the fixed plot. Therefore, it is possible to control the position of crystallization on the fixed plot. We can control the size and the uniformity of single crystals from 5 to 50 μm in length by adjusting the relative factors, such as interface lifetime, breeds of the mix-organic solvents and injecting velocities. The longer interface lifetime and lower organic solvent injecting velocities can bring up larger and more asymmetric crystals, which nearly shows the same trend compared with the macroscopic crystallization. Finally, the effect of the surfactant on the crystallization in the microdevice was studied. By adding the surfactant into the liquid-liquid interface, smaller sizes of crystals can be obtained without changing the crystal configuration.

  19. Size controlled synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles and their activity in the oxidation of NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parvathy R; Naseer, M; Udupa, N; Sandhyarani, N

    2012-01-13

    Size and shape controlled synthesis remains a major bottleneck in the research on nanoparticles even after the development of different methods for their preparation. By tuning the size and shape of a nanoparticle, the intrinsic properties of the nanoparticle can be controlled leading tremendous potential applications in different fields of science and technology. We describe a facile route for the one pot synthesis of gold nanoparticles in water using monosodium glutamate as the reducing and stabilizing agent in the absence of seed particles. The particle diameter can be easily controlled by varying the pH of the reaction medium. Nanoparticles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and dynamic light scattering. Zeta potential measurements were made to compare the stability of the different nanoparticles. The results suggest that lower pH favours a nucleation rate giving rise to smaller particles and higher pH favours a growth rate leading to the formation of larger particles. The synthesized nanoparticles are found to be stable and biocompatible. The nanoparticles synthesized at high pH exhibited a good electrocatalytic activity towards oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH).

  20. A microchip to analyze single crystal growth and size-controllability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG YuanFeng; LIU JiangJiang; LI HaiFang; LIN JinMing

    2009-01-01

    A microfluidic device to control single crystallization on the micron scale has been developed.The salt solution was stored in the nano-volume gaps between the arrays of protrudent circular plots in the microchip.The mixed organic solvent was injected into the chip as the counter diffusion phase for crystallization forming.This device provides a liquid-liquid interface through which only one phase flows while the other stays at the fixed plot.Therefore,it is possible to control the position of crystallization on the fixed plot.We can control the size and the uniformity of single crystals from 5 to 50 μm in length by adjusting the relative factors,such as interface lifetime,breeds of the mix-organic solvents and inject- ing velocities.The longer interface lifetime and lower organic solvent injecting velocities can bring up larger and more asymmetric crystals,which nearly shows the same trend compared with the macroscopic crystallization.Finally,the effect of the surfactant on the crystallization in the micro-device was studied.By adding the surfactant into the liquid-liquid interface,smaller sizes of crystals can be obtained without changing the crystal configuration.

  1. Simulation step size analysis of a whole-cell computational model of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Raphael; Castro, Maria Clicia S.; Silva, Fabrício Alves B.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how complex phenotypes arise from individual molecules and their interactions is a major challenge in biology and, to meet this challenge, computational approaches are increasingly employed. As an example, a recent paper [1] proposed a whole-cell model Mycoplasma genitalium including all cell components and their interactions. 28 modules representing several cell functions were modeled independently, and then integrated into a single computational model. One assumption considered in the whole-cell model of M.Genitalium is that all 28 modules can be modeled independently given the 1 second step size used in simulations. This is a major assumption, since it simplifies the modeling of several cell functions and makes the modeling of the system as a whole feasible. In this paper we investigate the dependency of experimental results on that assumption. We have simulated the M.Genitalium cell cycle using several simulation time step sizes and compared the results to the ones obtained with the system using 1 second simulation time step.

  2. Particle Size-Dependent Antibacterial Activity and Murine Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Graphene Oxide Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have indicated that graphene and its derivative graphene oxide (GO engage in a wide range of antibacterial activities with limited toxicity to human cells. Here, we systematically evaluate the dependence of GO toxicity on the size of the nanoparticles used in treatments: we compare the cytotoxic effects of graphene quantum dots (GQDs, <15 nm, small GOs (SGOs, 50–200 nm, and large GOs (LGOs, 0.5–3 μm. We synthesize the results of bacterial colony count assays and SEM-based observations of morphological changes to assess the antibacterial properties that these GOs bring into effect against E. coli. We also use Live/Dead assays and morphological analysis to investigate changes to mammalian (Murine macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells induced by the presence of the various GO particle types. Our results demonstrate that LGOs, SGOs, and GQDs possess antibacterial activities and cause mammalian cell cytotoxicity at descending levels of potency. Placing our observations in the context of previous simulation results, we suggest that both the lateral size and surface area of GO particles contribute to cytotoxic effects. We hope that the size dependence elucidated here provides a useful schematic for tuning GO-cell interactions in biomedical applications.

  3. Flow perfusion culture of human mesenchymal stem cells on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with various pore sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerre, Lea; Bünger, Cody; Baatrup, Anette; Kassem, Moustapha; Mygind, Tina

    2011-06-01

    Bone grafts are widely used in orthopaedic reconstructive surgery, but harvesting of autologous grafts is limited due to donor site complications. Bone tissue engineering is a possible alternative source for substitutes, and to date, mainly small scaffold sizes have been evaluated. The aim of this study was to obtain a clinically relevant substitute size using a direct perfusion culture system. Human bone marrowderived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with 200 μm or 500 μm pores, and resulting constructs were cultured in a perfusion bioreactor or in static culture for up to 21 days and analysed for cell distribution and osteogenic differentiation using histological stainings, alkaline phosphatase activity assay, and real-time RT-PCR on bone markers. We found that the number of cells was higher during static culture at most time points and that the final number of cells was higher in 500 μm constructs as compared with 200 μm constructs. Alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity assays and real time RT-PCR on seven osteogenic markers showed that differentiation occurred primarily and earlier in statically cultured constructs with 200 μm pores compared with 500 μm ones. Adhesion and proliferation of the cells was seen on both scaffold sizes, but the vitality and morphology of cells changed unfavorably during perfusion culture. In contrast to previous studies using spinner flask that show increased cellularity and osteogenic properties of cells when cultured dynamically, the perfusion culture in our study did not enhance the osteogenic properties of cell/scaffold constructs. The statically cultured constructs showed increasing cell numbers and abundant osteogenic differentiation probably because of weak initial cell adhesion due to the surface morphology of scaffolds. Our conclusion is that the specific scaffold surface microstructure and culturing system flow dynamics has a great impact on cell distribution and proliferation

  4. Size-dependence of volatile and semi-volatile organic carbon content in phytoplankton cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eRuiz-Halpern

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The content of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOC and SOC, measured as exchangeable dissolved organic carbon (EDOC, was quantified in 9 phytoplanktonic species that spanned 4 orders of magnitude in cell volume, by disrupting the cells and quantifying the gaseous organic carbon released. EDOC content varied 4 orders of magnitude, from 0.0015 to 14.12 pg C cell-1 in the species studied and increased linearly with increasing phytoplankton cell volume following the equation EDOC (pg C cell-1 = -2.35 x cellular volume (CV, µm3 cell-1 0.90 (± 0.3, with a slope (0.90 not different from 1 indicating a constant increase in volatile carbon as the cell size of phytoplankton increased. The percentage of EDOC relative to total cellular carbon was small but varied 20 fold from 0.28 % to 5.17 %, and no obvious taxonomic pattern in the content of EDOC was appreciable for the species tested. The cell release rate of EDOC is small compared to the amount of carbon in the cell and difficult to capture. Nonetheless, the results point to a potential flux of volatile and semivolatile phytoplankton-derived organic carbon to the atmosphere that has been largely underestimated and deserves further attention in the future.

  5. Reciprocal control of cell proliferation and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Donatis Alina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In adult tissue the quiescent state of a single cell is maintained by the steady state conditions of its own microenvironment for what concern both cell-cell as well as cell-ECM interaction and soluble factors concentration. Physiological or pathological conditions can alter this quiescent state through an imbalance of both soluble and insoluble factors that can trigger a cellular phenotypic response. The kind of cellular response depends by many factors but one of the most important is the concentration of soluble cytokines sensed by the target cell. In addition, due to the intrinsic plasticity of many cellular types, every single cell is able, in response to the same stimulus, to rapidly switch phenotype supporting minimal changes of microenviromental cytokines concentration. Wound healing is a typical condition in which epithelial, endothelial as well as mesenchymal cells are firstly subjected to activation of their motility in order to repopulate the damaged region and then they show a strong proliferative response in order to successfully complete the wound repair process. This schema constitute the leitmotif of many other physiological or pathological conditions such as development vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as well as cancer outgrowth and metastasis. Our review focuses on the molecular mechanisms that control the starting and, eventually, the switching of cellular phenotypic outcome in response to changes in the symmetry of the extracellular environment.

  6. Control of size in losartan/copper(II) coordination complex hydrophobic precipitate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Ângelo M L; Da Silva, Jeferson G; Guimarães, Pedro P G; Gomes, Leonardo Bertolini S; Mangrich, Antonio S; de Rezende, Edivaltrys I P; Daniel, Izabela M P; Beraldo, Heloísa; Sinisterra, Rubén D

    2013-10-01

    Reaction of highly soluble orally active, non-peptide antihypertensive drug losartan with copper(II) leads to the spontaneous formation of a very insoluble 2:1 covalent complex, which self assembles in a hydrophobic supramolecular structure of nanometric dimensions. Thermal analysis showed that Los/Cu(II) complex presents intermediate stability in comparison with its precursors KLos and Cu(OAc)2·H2O. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicated complexation to be a stepwise process, driven by enthalpy and entropy. Zeta potential and DLS measurements showed that it is possible to control the size and charge of nanoprecipitates by adjusting the relative concentration of Los(-) and Cu(II).

  7. Evaluation of growth, cell size and biomass of Isochrysis aff. galbana (T-ISO with two LED regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Victor Cordoba-Matson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to crops, there are fewer studies using LED-based light with green microalgae and none cultivating the microalga Isochrysis aff. galbana (T-ISO even though of its importance in marine aquaculture. The objective was to evaluate of white and red LEDs as an alternative source of light to cultivate I. aff. galbana (T-ISO. In order to carry this out white and red LEDs were used with a laboratory built Erlenmeyer-type photobioreactor to determine productivity, cell number and size and biomass composition. Results were compared with standard fluorescent lights of the same light intensity. The culture system consisted of 3 flasks for applying red LEDs and three for white LEDs and 3 control group flasks illuminated with the normal fluorescent lighting at the similar light intensity of ~60 mM m–2 s–1. It was found that the population cell density did not significantly increase with either red LEDs or white LEDs (p > 0.05, if at all. Standard fluorescent lighting (control group showed significant increases in population cell number (p < 0.05. Through microscopic observation cell size was found to be smaller for white LEDS and even smaller for red LEDs compared to fluorescent lighting. Biochemical composition of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids was similar for all light regimes. The authors suggest that the unexpected non-growth I. aff. galbana (T-ISO, a haptophyte microalga, with white and red LEDs is possibly due to fact that to initiate cell growth this microalgae requires other wavelengths (possibly green besides red and blue, to allow other pigments, probably fucoxanthin, to capture light

  8. Cell culture arrays using micron-sized ferromagnetic ring-shaped thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang, E-mail: wei@pme.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China); Lai, Mei-Feng; Ger, Tzong-Rong [Institute of NanoEngineering and MicroSystems, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-07

    Cell patterning has become an important technology for tissue engineering. In this research, domain walls are formed at the two ends of a ferromagnetic ring thin film after applying a strong external magnetic field, which can effectively attract magnetically labeled cells and control the position for biological cell. Magnetophoresis experiment was conducted to quantify the magnetic nanoparticle inside the cells. A ring-shaped magnetic thin films array was fabricated through photolithography. It is observed that magnetically labeled cells can be successfully attracted to the two ends of the ring-shaped magnetic thin film structure and more cells were attracted and further attached to the structures. The cells are co-cultured with the structure and kept proliferating; therefore, such ring thin film can be an important candidate for in-vitro biomedical chips or tissue engineering.

  9. Effects of apatite particle size in two apatite/collagen composites on the osteogenic differentiation profile of osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Wataru; Taira, Masayuki; Chosa, Naoyuki; Kihara, Hidemichi; Ishisaki, Akira; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2013-12-01

    The development of new osteoconductive bone substitute materials is expected in medicine. In this study, we attempted to produce new hydroxylapatite (HAP)/collagen (Col) composites using two HAP particles of different sizes and porcine type I collagen. The two HAP particles were either nano-sized (40 nm in average diameter; n-HAP) or had macro-pore sizes of 0.5‑1.0 mm in length with fully interconnected pores (m-HAP). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of apatite particle size in two HAP/Col composites on the osteogenic differentiation profile in osteoblast-like cells (SaOS-2). We created a collagen control sponge (Col) and two HAP/Col composite sponges (n-HAP/Col and m-HAP/Col) using freeze-drying and dehydrothermal cross-linking techniques, and then punched out samples of 6 mm in diameter and 1 mm in height. The SaOS-2 cells were cultured on three test materials for 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. Total RNA was extracted from the cultured cells and the expression of osteogenic differentiation-related genes was evaluated by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) using primer sets of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), type 1 collagen (COL1), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcin precursor [bone gamma-carboxyglutamate (gla) protein (BGLAP)] genes, as well as the β-actin gene. The cells were also cultured on Col, n-HAP/Col and m-HAP/Col specimens for 1 and 4 weeks, and were then observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The experimental results were as follows: RT-PCR indicated that osteogenic differentiation, particularly the gene expression of BSP, was most accelerated when the cells were cultured on n-HAP/Col specimens, followed by m-HAP/Col, whilst the weakest accelaeration was observed when the cells were cultured on Col specimens. As shown by the SEM images, the SaOS-2 cells were fibroblastic when cultured on Col specimens for up to 4 weeks; they were fibroblastic when cultured on n-HAP/Col specimens for 1 week, but appeared as spheroids

  10. Genetic deletion of Rab27B in pancreatic acinar cells affects granules size and has inhibitory effects on amylase secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Lentz, Stephen I; Williams, John A

    2016-03-18

    Small G protein Rab27B is expressed in various secretory cell types and plays a role in mediating secretion. In pancreatic acinar cells, Rab27B was found to be expressed on the zymogen granule membrane and by overexpression to regulate the secretion of zymogen granules. However, the effect of Rab27B deletion on the physiology of pancreatic acinar cells is unknown. In the current study, we utilized the Rab27B KO mouse model to better understand the role of Rab27B in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Our data show that Rab27B deficiency had no obvious effects on the expression of major digestive enzymes and other closely related proteins, e.g. similar small G proteins, such as Rab3D and Rab27A, and putative downstream effectors. The overall morphology of acinar cells was not changed in the knockout pancreas. However, the size of zymogen granules was decreased in KO acinar cells, suggesting a role of Rab27B in regulating the maturation of secretory granules. The secretion of digestive enzymes was moderately decreased in KO acini, compared with the WT control. These data indicate that Rab27B is involved at a different steps of zymogen granule maturation and secretion, which is distinct from that of Rab3D.

  11. TELICS—A Telescope Instrument Control System for Small/Medium Sized Astronomical Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Mudit K.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Burse, Mahesh P.; Chordia, Pravin A.; Chillal, Kalpesh S.; Mestry, Vilas B.; Das, Hillol K.; Kohok, Abhay A.

    2009-10-01

    For any modern astronomical observatory, it is essential to have an efficient interface between the telescope and its back-end instruments. However, for small and medium-sized observatories, this requirement is often limited by tight financial constraints. Therefore a simple yet versatile and low-cost control system is required for such observatories to minimize cost and effort. Here we report the development of a modern, multipurpose instrument control system TELICS (Telescope Instrument Control System) to integrate the controls of various instruments and devices mounted on the telescope. TELICS consists of an embedded hardware unit known as a common control unit (CCU) in combination with Linux-based data acquisition and user interface. The hardware of the CCU is built around the ATmega 128 microcontroller (Atmel Corp.) and is designed with a backplane, master-slave architecture. A Qt-based graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed and the back-end application software is based on C/C++. TELICS provides feedback mechanisms that give the operator good visibility and a quick-look display of the status and modes of instruments as well as data. TELICS has been used for regular science observations since 2008 March on the 2 m, f/10 IUCAA Telescope located at Girawali in Pune, India.

  12. PEM fuel stack dynamics, constraining supervisory control for propulsion systems in fuel cell busses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tazelaar, Edwin; Veenhuizen, Bram; Middelman, E.; Bosch, P. van den

    2013-01-01

    The last decade several prototypes of fuel cell busses have been presented [1, 2]. A closer observation of these prototypes shows remarkable differences in both sizing and control of the system components. Some busses are essentially electric vehicles with a relative low power fuel cell system used

  13. Nonaqueous magnetic nanoparticle suspensions with controlled particle size and nuclear magnetic resonance properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meledandri, Carla J; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Brougham, Dermot F

    2008-12-16

    We report the preparation of monodisperse maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticle suspensions in heptane, by thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine surfactants. By varying the surfactant/Fe precursor mole ratio during synthesis, control was exerted both over the nanocrystal core size, in the range from 3 to 6 nm, and over the magnetic properties of the resulting nanoparticle dispersions. We report field-cycling 1H NMR relaxation analysis of the superparamagnetic relaxation rate enhancement of nonaqueous suspensions for the first time. This approach permits measurement of the relaxivity and provides information on the saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy energy of the suspended particles. The saturation magnetization was found to be in the expected range for maghemite particles of this size. The anisotropy energy was found to increase significantly with decreasing particle size, which we attribute to increased shape anisotropy. This study can be used as a guide for the synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles with selected magnetic properties for a given application.

  14. Shape-controlled synthesis of highly monodisperse and small size gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We describe here that fine control of nanoparticle shape and size can be achieved by systematic varia-tion of experimental parameters in the seeded growth procedure in aqueous solution. Cubic and spherical gold nanoparticles are obtained respectively. In particularly, the Au cubes are highly mono-disperse in 33±2 nm diameter. The experimental methods involve the preparation of Au seed particles and the subsequent addition of an appropriate quantity of Au seed solution to the aqueous growth solutions containing desired quantities of CTAB and ascorbic acid (AA). Here, AA is a weak reducing agent and CTAB is not only a stable agent for nanoparticles but also an inductive agent for leading increase in the face of nanoparticle. Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to characterize the nanoparticles. The results show that the different size gold nanoparticles displayed high size homogenous distribution and formed mono-membrane at the air/solid interface.

  15. Segmented Polyurethane Nanocomposites: Impact of Controlled Particle Size Nanofillers on the Morphological Response to Uniaxial Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnigan, Bradley; Jack, Kevin; Campbell, Kayleen; Halley, Peter; Truss, Rowan; Casey, Phil; Cookson, David; King, Stephen; Martin, Darren (Rutherford); (ASRP); (Queensland); (CSIRO)

    2008-10-03

    A series of TPU nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating organically modified layered silicates with controlled particle size. To our knowledge, this is the first study into the effects of layered silicate diameter in polymer nanocomposites utilizing the same mineral for each size fraction. The tensile properties of these materials were found to be highly dependent upon the size of the layered silicates. A decrease in disk diameter was associated with a sharp upturn in the stress-strain curve and a pronounced increase in tensile strength. Results from SAXS/SANS experiments showed that the layered silicates did not affect the bulk TPU microphase structure and the morphological response of the host TPU to deformation or promote/hinder strain-induced soft segment crystallization. The improved tensile properties of the nanocomposites containing the smaller nanofillers resulted from the layered silicates aligning in the direction of strain and interacting with the TPU sequences via secondary bonding. This phenomenon contributes predominantly above 400% strain once the microdomain architecture has largely been disassembled. Large tactoids that are unable to align in the strain direction lead to concentrated tensile stresses between the polymer and filler, instead of desirable shear stresses, resulting in void formation and reduced tensile properties. In severe cases, such as that observed for the composite containing the largest silicate, these voids manifest visually as stress whitening.

  16. Particle size control of LiCoO{sub 2} powders by powder engineering methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlyakhtin, O.A. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea). Materials Science and Technology Division; Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Young Soo Yoon; Young Jei Oh [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2003-10-01

    The directed influence on the micromorphology of precursors during preparation of lithium cobaltate powders by chemical synthesis methods allows to control the size of LiCoO{sub 2} crystallites from 4-6 {mu}m to 60-100 nm. Localization of melting during thermolysis by mixing acetate precursors with foaming agents promotes the reduction of grain size from 4-6 down to 1-1.5 {mu}m. More efficient prevention of grain coalescence can be performed by introducing a thermally stable inert encapsulation agent (K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) removed by dissolution after thermal processing. The combination of this method with intense deagglomeration of precursor mixtures by planetary milling results in keeping the grain size at the level of primary LiCoO{sub 2} particles (60-80 nm) even at T=800 {sup o}C. Intense mechanical processing of as-formed LiCoO{sub 2} powders is undesirable due to negative influence on the crystallographic ordering processes. (author)

  17. Size-controllable growth of ZnO nanorods on Si substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhentao; Li, Hui; Qiu, Yining; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Wu; Xu, Ning; Sun, Jian; Wu, Jiada

    2017-01-01

    Here we report a simple two-step chemical-solution-based method to grow highly oriented and size-controllable ZnO nanorods on ZnO-seeded Si substrate. The morphology of the grown ZnO nanorods was examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering spectrum. Photoluminescence spectra were measured at room temperature and low temperatures to evaluate the photoluminescence properties of the ZnO nanorods. The grown ZnO nanorods are structured with hexagonal wurtzite. The diameter and length of ZnO nanorods can be controlled by varying the crystal quality of the underlying ZnO seed layers. The crystal quality of the seed layers gets improved as the deposition time and annealing temperature for ZnO seed layers are increased. The effects of annealing on the ZnO nanorods were also studied.

  18. Optical Flow Cell for Measuring Size, Velocity and Composition of Flowing Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammer-ul Hassan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Here an optical flow cell with two light paths is reported that can accurately quantify the size and velocity of droplets flowing through a microchannel. The flow cell can measure the time taken for droplets to pass between and through two conjoined light paths, and thereby is capable of measuring the velocities (0.2–5.45 mm/s and sizes of droplets (length > 0.8 mm. The composition of the droplet can also be accurately quantified via optical absorption measurements. The device has a small footprint and uses low-powered, low-cost components, which make it ideally suited for use in field-deployable and portable analytical devices.

  19. Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Hase, M; Hamada, T; Yoshikawa, K; Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE into a bilayer. The lipid vesicle can then be transported back into the oil phase. This novel experimental procedure may be a useful tool for creating a model cellular system, which, together with a microreactor, is applicable as a micrometer-scale biochemical reaction field.

  20. Protein Corona Influences Cellular Uptake of Gold Nanoparticles by Phagocytic and Nonphagocytic Cells in a Size-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaju; Tian, Xin; Wu, Anqing; Li, Jianxiang; Tian, Jian; Chong, Yu; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying; Ge, Cuicui

    2015-09-23

    The interaction at nanobio is a critical issue in designing safe nanomaterials for biomedical applications. Recent studies have reported that it is nanoparticle-protein corona rather than bare nanoparticle that determines the nanoparticle-cell interactions, including endocytic pathway and biological responses. Here, we demonstrate the effects of protein corona on cellular uptake of different sized gold nanoparticles in different cell lines. The experimental results show that protein corona significantly decreases the internalization of Au NPs in a particle size- and cell type-dependent manner. Protein corona exhibits much more significant inhibition on the uptake of large-sized Au NPs by phagocytic cell than that of small-sized Au NPs by nonphagocytic cell. The endocytosis experiment indicates that different endocytic pathways might be responsible for the differential roles of protein corona in the interaction of different sized Au NPs with different cell lines. Our findings can provide useful information for rational design of nanomaterials in biomedical application.

  1. JNK1 Controls Dendritic Field Size in L2/3 and L5 of the Motor Cortex, Constrains Soma Size and Influences Fine Motor Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia eKomulainen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic anomalies on the JNK pathway confer susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia and intellectual disability. The mechanism whereby a gain or loss of function in JNK signaling predisposes to these prevalent dendrite disorders, with associated motor dysfunction, remains unclear. Here we find that JNK1 regulates the dendritic field of L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons of the mouse motor cortex (M1, the main excitatory pathway controlling voluntary movement. In Jnk1-/- mice, basal dendrite branching of L5 pyramidal neurons is increased in M1, as is cell soma size, whereas in L2/3, dendritic arborization is decreased. We show that JNK1 phosphorylates rat HMW-MAP2 on T1619, T1622 and T1625 (Uniprot P15146 corresponding to mouse T1617, T1620, T1623, to create a binding motif, that is critical for MAP2 interaction with and stabilization of microtubules, and dendrite growth control. Targeted expression in M1 of GFP-HMW-MAP2 that is pseudo-phosphorylated on T1619, T1622 and T1625 increases dendrite complexity in L2/3 indicating that JNK1 phosphorylation of HMW-MAP2 regulates the dendritic field. Consistent with the morphological changes observed in L2/3 and L5, Jnk1-/- mice exhibit deficits in limb placement and motor coordination, while stride length is reduced in older animals. In summary, JNK1 phosphorylates HMW-MAP2 to increase its stabilization of microtubules while at the same time controlling dendritic fields in the main excitatory pathway of M1. Moreover, JNK1 contributes to normal functioning of fine motor coordination. We report for the first time, a quantitative sholl analysis of dendrite architecture, and of motor behavior in Jnk1-/- mice. Our results illustrate the molecular and behavioral consequences of interrupted JNK1 signaling and provide new ground for mechanistic understanding of those prevalent neuropyschiatric disorders where genetic disruption of the JNK pathway is central.

  2. FACTORS LIMITING BACTERIAL GROWTH : III. CELL SIZE AND "PHYSIOLOGIC YOUTH" IN BACTERIUM COLI CULTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, A D; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1938-07-20

    1. Measurements of the rate of oxygen uptake per cell in transplants of Bacterium coli from cultures of this organism in different phases of growth have given results in essential agreement with the observations of others. 2. Correlations of viable count, centrifugable nitrogen, and turbidity, with oxygen consumption, indicate that the increased metabolism during the early portion of the growth period is quantitatively referable to increased average size of cells. 3. Indirect evidence has suggested that the initial rate of growth of transplants is not related to the phase of growth of the parent culture.

  3. Exact, time-independent estimation of clone size distributions in normal and mutated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, A; Jones, P H; Greenman, C D

    2014-10-06

    Biological tools such as genetic lineage tracing, three-dimensional confocal microscopy and next-generation DNA sequencing are providing new ways to quantify the distribution of clones of normal and mutated cells. Understanding population-wide clone size distributions in vivo is complicated by multiple cell types within observed tissues, and overlapping birth and death processes. This has led to the increased need for mathematically informed models to understand their biological significance. Standard approaches usually require knowledge of clonal age. We show that modelling on clone size independent of time is an alternative method that offers certain analytical advantages; it can help parametrize these models, and obtain distributions for counts of mutated or proliferating cells, for example. When applied to a general birth-death process common in epithelial progenitors, this takes the form of a gambler's ruin problem, the solution of which relates to counting Motzkin lattice paths. Applying this approach to mutational processes, alternative, exact, formulations of classic Luria-Delbrück-type problems emerge. This approach can be extended beyond neutral models of mutant clonal evolution. Applications of these approaches are twofold. First, we resolve the probability of progenitor cells generating proliferating or differentiating progeny in clonal lineage tracing experiments in vivo or cell culture assays where clone age is not known. Second, we model mutation frequency distributions that deep sequencing of subclonal samples produce.

  4. Toxicity of nano- and micro-sized ZnO particles in human lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Weisheng [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry and Environmental Research Center (United States); Xu Yi; Huang Chuanchin [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Biological Sciences and Environmental Research Center (United States); Ma Yinfa [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry and Environmental Research Center (United States); Shannon, Katie B. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Biological Sciences and Environmental Research Center (United States); Chen Daren [Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering (United States); Huang, Yue-Wern, E-mail: huangy@mst.ed [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Biological Sciences and Environmental Research Center (United States)

    2009-01-15

    This is the first comprehensive study to evaluate the cytotoxicity, biochemical mechanisms of toxicity, and oxidative DNA damage caused by exposing human bronchoalveolar carcinoma-derived cells (A549) to 70 and 420 nm ZnO particles. Particles of either size significantly reduced cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner within a rather narrow dosage range. Particle mass-based dosimetry and particle-specific surface area-based dosimetry yielded two distinct patterns of cytotoxicity in both 70 and 420 nm ZnO particles. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulted in intracellular oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, cell membrane leakage, and oxidative DNA damage. The protective effect of N-acetylcysteine on ZnO-induced cytotoxicity further implicated oxidative stress in the cytotoxicity. Free Zn{sup 2+} and metal impurities were not major contributors of ROS induction as indicated by limited free Zn{sup 2+} cytotoxicity, extent of Zn{sup 2+} dissociation in the cell culture medium, and inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry metal analysis. We conclude that (1) exposure to both sizes of ZnO particles leads to dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity reflected in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, cell membrane damage, and oxidative DNA damage, (2) ZnO particles exhibit a much steeper dose-response pattern unseen in other metal oxides, and (3) neither free Zn{sup 2+} nor metal impurity in the ZnO particle samples is the cause of cytotoxicity.

  5. Analysis of a stochastic model for bacterial growth and the lognormality in the cell-size distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell divisions and linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We derive that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values which give good lognormal approximation, so the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  6. Fluidic control over cell proliferation and chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisman, Alex

    2006-03-01

    Microscopic flows are almost always stable and laminar that allows precise control of chemical environment in micro-channels. We describe design and operation of several microfluidic devices, in which various types of environments are created for different experimental assays with live cells. In a microfluidic chemostat, colonies of non-adherent bacterial and yeast cells are trapped in micro-chambers with walls permeable for chemicals. Fast chemical exchange between the chambers and nearby flow-through channels creates essentially chemostatic medium conditions in the chambers and leads to exponential growth of the colonies up to very high cell densities. Another microfluidic device allows creation of linear concentration profiles of a pheromone (α-factor) across channels with non-adherent yeast cells, without exposure of the cells to flow or other mechanical perturbation. The concentration profile remains stable for hours enabling studies of chemotropic response of the cells to the pheromone gradient. A third type of the microfluidic devices is used to study chemotaxis of human neutrophils exposed to gradients of a chemoattractant (fMLP). The devices generate concentration profiles of various shapes, with adjustable steepness and mean concentration. The ``gradient'' of the chemoattractant can be imposed and reversed within less than a second, allowing repeated quantitative experiments.

  7. Anodic aluminum oxide with fine pore size control for selective and effective particulate matter filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su; Wang, Yang; Tan, Yingling; Zhu, Jianfeng; Liu, Kai; Zhu, Jia

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution is widely considered as one of the most pressing environmental health issues. Particularly, atmospheric particulate matters (PM), a complex mixture of solid or liquid matter suspended in the atmosphere, are a harmful form of air pollution due to its ability to penetrate deep into the lungs and blood streams, causing permanent damages such as DNA mutations and premature death. Therefore, porous materials which can effectively filter out particulate matters are highly desirable. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate that anodic aluminum oxide with fine pore size control fabricated through a scalable process can serve as effective and selective filtering materials for different types of particulate matters (such as PM2.5, PM10). Combining selective and dramatic filtering effect, fine pore size control and a scalable process, this type of anodic aluminum oxide templates can potentially serve as a novel selective filter for different kinds of particulate matters, and a promising and complementary solution to tackle this serious environmental issue.

  8. Large 2D-arrays of size-controllable silver nanoparticles prepared by hybrid deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieu Thuy Ung, Thi; Hoa Nguyen, Thi; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2016-09-01

    Two main results are presented in this paper. (i) Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with uniform size-distribution and controllability in the range of 20-50 nm were synthesized by seeding and growing at ambient conditions. The single-crystal Ag nano-seeds were created by reduction of AgNO3 in presence of citrate surfactant at 70 °C. Then, importantly, the fresh AgCl precursor was used in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone to adjust the reaction rate with ascorbic acid to generate Ag for growing on the surface of single-crystal Ag nano-seeds. The AgNPs size could be well-controlled by varying the amount of Ag nano-seeds while keeping the AgCl precursor concentration to be constant. (ii) The large 2D-arrays with homogeneous and dense monolayers of AgNPs were prepared on ITO substrates by hybrid method, in which the key technological point is the surface functionalization of AgNPs using mixed alkanethiols (dodecanethiol:octadecanethiol = 6:1). We have used the fabricated 2D-arrays from the 50 nm AgNPs as a surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate to take the Raman scattering spectra of rhodamine B (RhB), glucose and viral pathogen (H5N1) at very low concentrations of 10-10 M, 10-12 M and 4 ng μl-1, respectively.

  9. Partner Influence in Diet and Exercise Behaviors: Testing Behavior Modeling, Social Control, and Normative Body Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciciurkaite, Gabriele; Brady, Christy Freadreacea; Garcia, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has documented social contagion in obesity and related health behaviors, but less is known about the social processes underlying these patterns. Focusing on married or cohabitating couples, we simultaneously explore three potential social mechanisms influencing obesity: normative body size, social control, and behavior modeling. We analyze the association between partner characteristics and the obesity-related health behaviors of focal respondents, comparing the effects of partners’ body type, partners’ attempts to manage respondents’ eating behaviors, and partners’ own health behaviors on respondents’ health behaviors (physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and fast food consumption). Data on 215 partners are extracted from a larger study of social mechanisms of obesity in family and community contexts conducted in 2011 in the United States. Negative binomial regression models indicate that partner behavior is significantly related to respondent behavior (p obesity-related patterns of consumption and physical activity. In contrast, we find little support for the influence of normative body size or partner social control in this sample, though generalizations about the relevance of these processes may be inappropriate. These results underscore the importance of policies and interventions that target dyads and social groups, suggesting that adoption of exercise or diet modifications in one individual is likely to spread to others, creating a social environment characterized by mutual reinforcement of healthy behavior. PMID:28033428

  10. Tectonic controls on earthquake size distribution and seismicity rate: slab buoyancy and slab bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, T.; Ide, S.

    2014-12-01

    There are clear variations in maximum earthquake magnitude among Earth's subduction zones. These variations have been studied extensively and attributed to differences in tectonic properties in subduction zones, such as relative plate velocity and subducting plate age [Ruff and Kanamori, 1980]. In addition to maximum earthquake magnitude, the seismicity of medium to large earthquakes also differs among subduction zones, such as the b-value (i.e., the slope of the earthquake size distribution) and the frequency of seismic events. However, the casual relationship between the seismicity of medium to large earthquakes and subduction zone tectonics has been unclear. Here we divide Earth's subduction zones into over 100 study regions following Ide [2013] and estimate b-values and the background seismicity rate—the frequency of seismic events excluding aftershocks—for subduction zones worldwide using the maximum likelihood method [Utsu, 1965; Aki, 1965] and the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model [Ogata, 1988]. We demonstrate that the b-value varies as a function of subducting plate age and trench depth, and that the background seismicity rate is related to the degree of slab bending at the trench. Large earthquakes tend to occur relatively frequently (lower b-values) in shallower subduction zones with younger slabs, and more earthquakes occur in subduction zones with deeper trench and steeper dip angle. These results suggest that slab buoyancy, which depends on subducting plate age, controls the earthquake size distribution, and that intra-slab faults due to slab bending, which increase with the steepness of the slab dip angle, have influence on the frequency of seismic events, because they produce heterogeneity in plate coupling and efficiently inject fluid to elevate pore fluid pressure on the plate interface. This study reveals tectonic factors that control earthquake size distribution and seismicity rate, and these relationships between seismicity and

  11. Controlling Functional Group Architecture in Artificial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-02

    further enable enzyme encapsulation to improve the efficiency of light-driven hydrogen fuel production. 5. Changes in key personnel, if applicable : -None ...Controlling Functional Group Architecture in Artificial Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W9132T-14-2-0002 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...cycloadditions to modify reactive groups within the phospholipid membrane structure and how the nature of the reactive elements, the copper catalyst

  12. Relationship between tumor size and disease stage in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Fu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether tumor size and stage distribution are correlated remains controversial. The objective is to assess the relationship between tumor size and disease stage distribution in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 917 cases of NSCLC that were resected in the Cancer Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Sixth Hospital between January 2000 and February 2009. Tumor sizes were grouped into five categories: ≤20 mm, 21 to 30 mm, 31 to 50 mm, 51 to 70 mm and ≥71 mm. Results Age and tumor size affected stage distribution: patients 60 years or older had a higher percentage of N0M0 disease than patients younger than 60 years (61.67% vs. 44.85%, p Conclusions There is a statistically significant relationship between tumor size and distribution of disease stage of primary NSCLC tumors: the smaller the tumor, the more likely the disease is N0M0 status.

  13. Carbon nanotubes for stem cell control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Stout

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, two major advancements have transformed the world of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine—stem cells and carbon nano-dimensional materials. In the past, stem cell therapy seemed like it may present a cure for all medical ailments, but problems arose (i.e., immune system clearance, control of differentiation in the body, etc. that have hindered progress. But, with the synergy of carbon nano-dimensional materials, researchers have been able to overcome these tissue engineering and regenerative medicine obstacles and have begun developing treatments for strokes, bone failure, cardiovascular disease, and many other conditions. Here, we briefly review research involving carbon nanotubes which are relevant to the tissue engineering and regenerative medicine field with a special emphasis on carbon nanotube applications for stem cell delivery, drug delivery applications, and their use as improved medical devices.

  14. On the effect of particle size distribution on the discharge performance of nickel-metal hydride cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikonen, J.M. [Center for Scientific Computing, Espoo (Finland); Nagarajan, G.S.; Zee, J.W. van [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The effect of particle size distribution on the discharge performance of nickel-metal hydride cells with mathematical models is investigated. A model with a continuous size distribution is presented and a simplified discrete version with two particle sizes is numerically analyzed for various parameter values. Simulation results are compared with experiments from another article and the deviations are analyzed. (orig.) 13 refs.

  15. Development of a multi-layer microfluidic array chip to culture and replate uniform-sized embryoid bodies without manual cell retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Edward; Choi, Yoon Young; Jun, Yesl; Chung, Bong Geun; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2010-10-21

    We have developed a multi-layer, microfluidic array platform containing concave microwells and flat cell culture chambers to culture embryonic stem (ES) cells and regulate uniform-sized embryoid body (EB) formation. The main advantage of this platform was that EBs cultured within the concave microwells of a bottom layer were automatically replated into flat cell culture chambers of a top layer, following inversion of the multi-layer microfluidic array platform. This allowed EB formation and EB replating to be controlled simultaneously inside a single microfluidic device without pipette-based manual cell retrieval, a drawback of previous EB culture methods.

  16. Arrays of size and distance controlled platinum nanoparticles fabricated by a colloidal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzke, Achim; Vogel, Nicolas; Weiss, Clemens K.; Ziener, Ulrich; Plettl, Alfred; Landfester, Katharina; Ziemann, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Based on emulsion polymerization in the presence of a Pt complex, polystyrene (PS) particles were prepared exhibiting a well defined average diameter with narrow size-distribution. Furthermore, the colloids contain a controlled concentration of the Pt precursor complex. Optimized coating of Si substrates with such colloids leads to extended areas of hexagonally ordered close-packed PS particles. Subsequent application of plasma etching and annealing steps allows complete removal of the PS carriers and in parallel nucleation and growth of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) which are located at the original center of the PS colloids. In this way, hexagonally arranged spherical Pt NPs are obtained with controlled size and interparticle distances demonstrating variability and precision with so far unknown parameter scalability. This control is demonstrated by the fabrication of Pt NP arrays at a fixed particle distance of 185 nm while systematically varying the diameters between 8 and 15 nm. Further progress could be achieved by seeded emulsion polymerization. Here, Pt loaded PS colloids of 130 nm were used as seeds for a subsequent additional emulsion polymerization, systematically enlarging the diameter of the PS particles. Applying the plasma and annealing steps as above, in this way hexagonally ordered arrays of 9 nm Pt NPs could be obtained at distances up to 260 nm. To demonstrate their stability, such Pt particles were used as etching masks during reactive ion etching thereby transferring their hexagonal pattern into the Si substrate resulting in corresponding arrays of nanopillars.Based on emulsion polymerization in the presence of a Pt complex, polystyrene (PS) particles were prepared exhibiting a well defined average diameter with narrow size-distribution. Furthermore, the colloids contain a controlled concentration of the Pt precursor complex. Optimized coating of Si substrates with such colloids leads to extended areas of hexagonally ordered close-packed PS particles

  17. Characterization of hybridoma cell responses to elevated pCO(2) and osmolality: intracellular pH, cell size, apoptosis, and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deZengotita, Vivian M; Schmelzer, Albert E; Miller, William M

    2002-02-15

    CO(2) partial pressure (pCO(2)) in industrial cell culture reactors may reach 150-200 mm Hg, which can significantly inhibit cell growth and recombinant protein production. The inhibitory effects of elevated pCO(2) at constant pH are due to a combination of the increases in pCO(2) and [HCO(-) (3)], per se, and the associated increase in osmolality. To decouple the effects of pCO(2) and osmolality, low-salt basal media have been used to compensate for this associated increase in osmolality. Under control conditions (40 mm Hg-320 mOsm/kg), hybridoma cell growth and metabolism was similar in DMEM:F12 with 2% fetal bovine serum and serum-free HB GRO. In both media, pCO(2) and osmolality made dose-dependent contributions to the inhibition of hybridoma cell growth and synergized to more extensively inhibit growth when combined. Elevated osmolality was associated with increased apoptosis. In contrast, elevated pCO(2) did not increase apoptotic cell death. Specific antibody production also increased with osmolality although not with pCO(2). In an effort to understand the mechanisms through which elevated pCO(2) and osmolality affect hybridoma cells, glucose metabolism, glutamine metabolism, intracellular pH (pHi), and cell size were monitored in batch cultures. Elevated pCO(2) (with or without osmolality compensation) inhibited glycolysis in a dose-dependent fashion in both media. Osmolality had little effect on glycolysis. On the other hand, elevated pCO(2) alone had no effect on glutamine metabolism, whereas elevated osmolality increased glutamine uptake. Hybridoma mean pHi was approximately 0.2 pH units lower than control at 140 mm Hg pCO(2) (with or without osmolality compensation) but further increases in pCO(2) did not further decrease pHi. Osmolality had little effect on pHi. Cell size was smaller than control at elevated pCO(2) at 320 mOsm/kg, and greater than control in hyperosmotic conditions at 40 mm Hg.

  18. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Small-sized Hepatocellular Carcinoma as Salvage Therapy: Sustained Local Control and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jung Ae; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the rate of tumor response, local control, and treatment-related complications after hypofractionated radiotherapy for recurrent hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) less than 5 cm in size. Among the HCC patients who were treated by radiotherapy (RT) between 2006 and 2007 after the failure of previous treatment, a total of 12 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The criteria for hypofractionated RT was as follows: 1) HCC less than 5 cm, 2) HCC not adjacent to a critical organ, 3) HCC without portal vein tumor thrombosis, and 4) less than 15% of normal liver volume that irradiated 50% of the prescribed dose. Hypofractionated RT was performed with 50 Gy delivered in 10 fractions, at a rate of 5 fractions per week. The evaluation of tumor response was determined by CT scans performed at 3 months after the cessation of RT, followed by the evaluation of toxicity by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. The median follow-up period after radiotherapy was 18 months. A complete response (CR) was achieved in 5 of 12 lesions (41.7%) at CT performed at 3 months after the cessation, whereas the overall complete response was observed in 7 of 12 cases (58.3%). In-field local control rate was sustained in 83.3% of patients. All patients developed intra-hepatic metastases except for 2 patients. The overall survival rate was 90.0% at 1 year and 67.5% at 2 years, respectively. Three patients developed Grade 1 nausea during RT and 1 patient showed a progression of ascites after RT. There was no grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicities. Hypofractionated RT for small-sized HCC as a salvage therapy showed a 58.3% CR rate and 83.3% of local control. Fifty Gy administered in 10 fractions of partial liver irradiation is considered as a tolerable dose that does not cause severe complications.

  19. ALFY-Controlled DVL3 Autophagy Regulates Wnt Signaling, Determining Human Brain Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Rotem; Harel, Tamar; Markus, Barak; Perez, Yonatan; Bakhrat, Anna; Cohen, Idan; Volodarsky, Michael; Feintsein-Linial, Miora; Chervinski, Elana; Zlotogora, Joel; Sivan, Sara; Birnbaum, Ramon Y; Abdu, Uri; Shalev, Stavit; Birk, Ohad S

    2016-03-01

    Primary microcephaly is a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder of reduced head circumference and brain volume, with fewer neurons in the cortex of the developing brain due to premature transition between symmetrical and asymmetrical cellular division of the neuronal stem cell layer during neurogenesis. We now show through linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing, that a dominant mutation in ALFY, encoding an autophagy scaffold protein, causes human primary microcephaly. We demonstrate the dominant effect of the mutation in drosophila: transgenic flies harboring the human mutant allele display small brain volume, recapitulating the disease phenotype. Moreover, eye-specific expression of human mutant ALFY causes rough eye phenotype. In molecular terms, we demonstrate that normally ALFY attenuates the canonical Wnt signaling pathway via autophagy-dependent removal specifically of aggregates of DVL3 and not of Dvl1 or Dvl2. Thus, autophagic attenuation of Wnt signaling through removal of Dvl3 aggregates by ALFY acts in determining human brain size.

  20. ALFY-Controlled DVL3 Autophagy Regulates Wnt Signaling, Determining Human Brain Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotem Kadir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary microcephaly is a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder of reduced head circumference and brain volume, with fewer neurons in the cortex of the developing brain due to premature transition between symmetrical and asymmetrical cellular division of the neuronal stem cell layer during neurogenesis. We now show through linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing, that a dominant mutation in ALFY, encoding an autophagy scaffold protein, causes human primary microcephaly. We demonstrate the dominant effect of the mutation in drosophila: transgenic flies harboring the human mutant allele display small brain volume, recapitulating the disease phenotype. Moreover, eye-specific expression of human mutant ALFY causes rough eye phenotype. In molecular terms, we demonstrate that normally ALFY attenuates the canonical Wnt signaling pathway via autophagy-dependent removal specifically of aggregates of DVL3 and not of Dvl1 or Dvl2. Thus, autophagic attenuation of Wnt signaling through removal of Dvl3 aggregates by ALFY acts in determining human brain size.

  1. Structure Sensitivity Study of Waterborne Contaminant Hydrogenation Using Shape- and Size-Controlled Pd Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2013-03-01

    Catalytic reduction with Pd has emerged as a promising technology to remove a suite of contaminants from drinking water, such as oxyanions, disinfection byproducts, and halogenated pollutants, but low activity is a major challenge for application. To address this challenge, we synthesized a set of shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles and evaluated the activity of three probe contaminants (i.e., nitrite, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and diatrizoate) as a function of facet type (e.g., (100), (110), (111)), ratios of low- to high-coordination sites, and ratios of surface sites to total Pd (i.e., dispersion). Reduction results for an initial contaminant concentration of 100 μM show that initial turnover frequency (TOF0) for nitrite increases 4.7-fold with increasing percent of (100) surface Pd sites (from 0% to 95.3%), whereas the TOF0 for NDMA and for diatrizoate increases 4.5- and 3.6-fold, respectively, with an increasing percent of terrace surface Pd sites (from 79.8% to 95.3%). Results for an initial nitrite concentration of 2 mM show that TOF0 is the same for all shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles. Trends for TOF0 were supported by results showing that all catalysts but one were stable in shape and size up to 12 days; for the exception, iodide liberation in diatrizoate reduction appeared to be responsible for a shape change of 4 nm octahedral Pd nanoparticles. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations for the free energy change of hydrogen (H2), nitrite, and nitric oxide (NO) adsorption and a two-site model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism suggest that competition of adsorbates for different Pd sites can explain the TOF0 results. Our study shows for the first time that catalytic reduction activity for waterborne contaminant removal varies with the Pd shape and size, and it suggests that Pd catalysts can be tailored for optimal performance to treat a variety of contaminants for drinking water. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  2. Adaptive Step Size Control of LMS-based Interference Cancellationfor ICS Repeater in Wibro Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeong-gon KIM; Won-geon BAE; Won-seok CHOI

    2010-01-01

    The use of repeater for the support of high rate data transmission and the extension of cell coverage is imperative for the Wibrc system,which based on the IEEE 8M.16e standardization.Generally,if the separation between transmitting and receiving antennas isnot sufficient,the oscillation of repeater and the interference due to the feedback signals from original transmitted signal may be ocerur.Hence,the Interference Cancellation System(ICS)should be implemented as the important part of the repeater system far the mobile cellular systems in order to eliminate unwanted signals from the corruptW signals in the receiver.In this paper,we propose an adaptive technique for the Least Mean Square(LMS)-based interference cancellation methods by changing the step size according to the variation of channel environment in order to improve the performance degradation which oceuurs by using the fixed step size approach.Simrlatim results show that the proposed sclxme attains a little lower Berafor Rate(BER)performance and much faster convergence speed compared to the conventional LMS-based interference cancellation techniques.The proposed scheme can be applied to other Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple(OFDM)-based cellular systems and also be expected to achieve a similar performance improvement to W17-advanced system,which is called as the next generation mobile communication standards.

  3. Porous Carbon Fibers Containing Pores with Sizes Controlled at the Ångstrom Level by the Cavity Size of Pillar[6]arene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Yoshikoshi, Kumiko; Sueto, Ryuta; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Yamagishi, Tada-Aki

    2015-05-26

    We report a new synthesis method of fibrous carbon material with pores sizes that are precisely controlled at the Ångstrom level, by carbonization of two dimensional (2D) porous sheets of pillar[6]arenes. The 2D porous sheets were prepared by 2D supramolecular polymerization induced by oxidation of hydroquinone units of pillar[6]arenes. Owing to the hexagonal structure of pillar[6]arene, the assembly induced by 2D supramolecular polymerization gave hexagonal 2D porous sheets, and the highly ordered structure of the 2D porous sheets formed regular fibrous structures. Then, carbonization of the 2D porous sheets afforded fibrous carbon materials with micropores. The micropore size of the fibrous porous carbon prepared from pillar[6]arene was the same size as that of the starting material pillar[6]arene assembly.

  4. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkhovskaya, Olesya V; Zorin, Daniil Yu; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity.

  5. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya V Bolkhovskaya

    Full Text Available Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity.

  6. Shape-and size-controlled Ag nanoparticles stabilized by in situ generated secondary amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Meneses, E., E-mail: esther.ramirez@ibero.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongación Paseo de la Reforma 880, Lomas de Santa Fe, Distrito Federal C.P. 01219 (Mexico); Montiel-Palma, V. [Centro de Investigaciones Químicas, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001 Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Morelos C.P. 62209 (Mexico); Domínguez-Crespo, M.A.; Izaguirre-López, M.G. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada-IPN, Unidad Altamira. Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial, 89600 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Palacios-Gonzalez, E. [Laboratorio de Microscopia de Ultra alta Resolución, Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas No. 152, C.P. 07730 México D.F. (Mexico); Dorantes-Rosales, H. [Departamento de Metalurgia, E.S.I.Q.I.E.-I.P.N., Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Zacatenco, Delegación. Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ag nanoparticles were generated from Ag amido complexes AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • Ag nanoparticles were stabilized by in situ generated HN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} or HN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • 1 or 5 equiv. of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent decreases the average size of the particles. • Ethylenediamine favor the formation of spherical particles. - Abstract: Silver amides such as AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2} have been employed successfully as precursors for the yield synthesis of silver nanoparticles under mild conditions of dihydrogen gas reduction (2 atm) in organic media. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of silver nanoparticles with FCC structure, variously sized from 26 to 35 nm for AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and from 14 to 86 nm for AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, the synthesis could take place in absence of added stabilizers due to the in situ formation of secondary amines from the reaction of dihydrogen gas with the amide ligands of the silver precursor. Indeed, the presence of HNR{sub 2} (R = iPr{sub 2}, N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}) on the surface of the nanoparticle was confirmed by spectroscopic means. Finally, the addition of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent allowed not only the control of the structural characteristics of the resulting Ag nanoparticles (well-dispersed with spherical shape), but that regarding the nanoparticle size as it inhibited overgrowth, limiting it to ca. 25 nm.

  7. 氨法制取纳米氧化锌的粒径控制研究%Particle size control of nano - sized zinc oxide by ammonia process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡建国; 蔡睿敏

    2009-01-01

    为有效控制氨法制取纳米氧化锌的粒径,在蒸氨前将浸出原液用一定量的纯净水稀释,可增加初期沉淀生成的晶核数,使沉淀粒径更加均匀和细化,同时发现蒸氨残液不可以作为浸出原液的稀释剂回用.蒸氨的加热方式对纳米氧化锌的粒径也有影响,选择蒸汽直接加热,当溶液含锌质量浓度小于0.3 g/L时,所制取的纳米氧化锌粒径满足GB/T 19589-2004纳米氧化锌的要求 .%In order to effectively control the particle size of nano - sized zinc oxide prepared by ammonia process,leaching stock solution was diluted with a certain amount of purified water before ammonia distillation process,which could increase the quantity of crystal nucleus generated by initial precipitation and make particle size of precipitate more uniform and refined.Meanwhile,it was found that distilled ammonia residual liquid could not be served as diluent of leaching stock solution for recycling.Also,heating method of ammonia distillation will affect the particle size of nano - sized zinc oxide.Particle size of prepared nano - sized zinc oxide can satisfy the requirements of GB/T 19589-2004,when direct steam heating was selected and mass concentration of zinc in the solution was less than 0.3 g/L.

  8. Size-Controlled Synthesis of CoFe2O4 Nanoparticles Potential Contrast Agent for MRI and Investigation on Their Size-Dependent Magnetic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujun Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CoFe2O4 NPs were synthesized by coprecipitation followed by treatments with diluted nitric acid and sodium citrate. Transmission electron microscope (TEM and photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS characterization showed that the size distributions of these nanoparticles were monodisperse and that no aggregation occurred. This colloid showed a long-term stability. Through adjustment of the concentrations of reactants and reaction temperature, the size of the NPs can be tuned from 6 to 80 nm. The size-control mechanism is explained by a nucleation-growth model, where the local concentration of monomers is assumed to decide the size of nuclei, and reaction temperatures influence the growth of nuclei. Magnetization and relaxivity r1,2 measurements showed that the NPs revealed size-dependent magnetization and relaxivity properties, which are explained via a “dead magnetic layer” theory where reductions of saturation magnetization (Ms and r1,2 are assumed to be caused by the demagnetization of surface spins.

  9. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide with a long-range order and tunable cell sizes by phosphoric acid anodization on pre-patterned substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawathanawises, Krissada; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2014-01-20

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) has been explored for various applications due to its regular cell arrangement and relatively easy fabrication processes. However, conventional two-step anodization based on self-organization only allows the fabrication of a few discrete cell sizes and formation of small domains of hexagonally packed pores. Recent efforts to pre-pattern aluminum followed with anodization significantly improve the regularity and available pore geometries in AAO, while systematic study of the anodization condition, especially the impact of acid composition on pore formation guided by nanoindentation is still lacking. In this work, we pre-patterned aluminium thin films using ordered monolayers of silica beads and formed porous AAO in a single-step anodization in phosphoric acid. Controllable cell sizes ranging from 280 nm to 760 nm were obtained, matching the diameters of the silica nanobead molds used. This range of cell size is significantly greater than what has been reported for AAO formed in phosphoric acid in the literature. In addition, the relationships between the acid concentration, cell size, pore size, anodization voltage and film growth rate were studied quantitatively. The results are consistent with the theory of oxide formation through an electrochemical reaction. Not only does this study provide useful operational conditions of nanoindentation induced anodization in phosphoric acid, it also generates significant information for fundamental understanding of AAO formation.

  10. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide with a long-range order and tunable cell sizes by phosphoric acid anodization on pre-patterned substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawathanawises, Krissada; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2014-01-01

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) has been explored for various applications due to its regular cell arrangement and relatively easy fabrication processes. However, conventional two-step anodization based on self-organization only allows the fabrication of a few discrete cell sizes and formation of small domains of hexagonally packed pores. Recent efforts to pre-pattern aluminum followed with anodization significantly improve the regularity and available pore geometries in AAO, while systematic study of the anodization condition, especially the impact of acid composition on pore formation guided by nanoindentation is still lacking. In this work, we pre-patterned aluminium thin films using ordered monolayers of silica beads and formed porous AAO in a single-step anodization in phosphoric acid. Controllable cell sizes ranging from 280 nm to 760 nm were obtained, matching the diameters of the silica nanobead molds used. This range of cell size is significantly greater than what has been reported for AAO formed in phosphoric acid in the literature. In addition, the relationships between the acid concentration, cell size, pore size, anodization voltage and film growth rate were studied quantitatively. The results are consistent with the theory of oxide formation through an electrochemical reaction. Not only does this study provide useful operational conditions of nanoindentation induced anodization in phosphoric acid, it also generates significant information for fundamental understanding of AAO formation. PMID:24535886

  11. Innovative heating of large-size automotive Li-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Teng; Wang, Chao-Yang

    2017-02-01

    Automotive Li-ion cells are becoming much larger and thicker in order to reduce the cell count and increase battery reliability, posing a new challenge to battery heating from the cold ambient due to poor through-plane heat transfer across a cell's multiple layers of electrodes and separators. In this work, widely used heating methods, including internal heating using the cell's resistance and external heating by resistive heaters, are compared with the recently developed self-heating Li-ion battery (SHLB) with special attention to the heating speed and maximum local temperature critical to battery safety. Both conventional methods are found to be slow due to low heating power required to maintain battery safety. The heating power in the external heating method is limited by the risk of local over-heating, in particular for thick cells. As a result, the external heating method is restricted to ∼20 min slow heating for a 30 °C temperature rise. In contrast, the SHLB is demonstrated to reach a heating speed of 1-2 °C/sec, ∼40 times faster for large-size thick cells, with nearly 100% heating efficiency and spatially uniform heating free from safety concerns.

  12. Energy harvesting from organic liquids in micro-sized microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, J.E.

    2014-03-07

    Micro-sized microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are miniature energy harvesters that use bacteria to convert biomass from liquids into usable power. The key challenge is transitioning laboratory test beds into devices capable of producing high power using readily available fuel sources. Here, we present a pragmatic step toward advancing MFC applications through the fabrication of a uniquely mobile and inexpensive micro-sized device that can be fueled with human saliva. The 25-ll MFC was fabricated with graphene, a two-dimensional atomic crystal-structured material, as an anode for efficient current generation and with an air cathode for enabling the use of the oxygen present in air, making its operation completely mobile and free of the need for laboratory chemicals. With saliva as a fuel, the device produced higher current densities (1190 Am-3) than any previous aircathode micro-sized MFCs. The use of the graphene anode generated 40 times more power than that possible using a carbon cloth anode. Additional tests were performed using acetate, a conventional organic material, at high organic loadings that were comparable to those in saliva, and the results demonstrated a linear relationship between the organic loading and current. These findings open the door to saliva-powered applications of this fuel cell technology for Lab-on-a-Chip devices or portable point-of-care diagnostic devices. 2014 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved 1884-4057/14.

  13. Preparation of Size-Controlled Silver Nanoparticles and Chitin-Based Composites and Their Antimicrobial Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinh Quang Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for the preparation of size-controlled spherical silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs was reported for their generation by autoclaving a mixture of silver-containing glass powder and glucose. The particle size is regulated by the glucose concentration, with concentrations of 0.25, 1.0, and 4.0 wt% glucose providing small (3.48±1.83 nm in diameter, medium (6.53±1.78 nm, and large (12.9±2.5 nm particles, respectively. In this study, Ag NP/chitin composites were synthesized by mixing each of these three Ag NP suspensions with a <5% deacetylated (DAc chitin powder (pH 7.0 at room temperature. The Ag NPs were homogenously dispersed and stably adsorbed onto the chitin. The Ag NP/chitin composites were obtained as yellow or brown powders. Approximately 5, 15, and 20 μg of the small, medium, and large Ag NPs, respectively, were estimated to maximally adsorb onto 1 mg of chitin. The bactericidal and antifungal activities of the Ag NP/chitin composites increased as the amount of Ag NPs in the chitin increased. Furthermore, smaller Ag NPs (per weight in the chitin composites provided higher bactericidal and anti-fungal activities.

  14. Biosynthesis of Inorganic Nanoparticles: A Fresh Look at the Control of Shape, Size and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Amar Dahoumane

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Several methodologies have been devised for the design of nanomaterials. The “Holy Grail” for materials scientists is the cost-effective, eco-friendly synthesis of nanomaterials with controlled sizes, shapes and compositions, as these features confer to the as-produced nanocrystals unique properties making them appropriate candidates for valuable bio-applications. The present review summarizes published data regarding the production of nanomaterials with special features via sustainable methodologies based on the utilization of natural bioresources. The richness of the latter, the diversity of the routes adopted and the tuned experimental parameters have led to the fabrication of nanomaterials belonging to different chemical families with appropriate compositions and displaying interesting sizes and shapes. It is expected that these outstanding findings will encourage researchers and attract newcomers to continue and extend the exploration of possibilities offered by nature and the design of innovative and safer methodologies towards the synthesis of unique nanomaterials, possessing desired features and exhibiting valuable properties that can be exploited in a profusion of fields.

  15. Size control in production and freeze-drying of poly-ε-caprolactone nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenková, Tereza; Fissore, Davide; Marchisio, Daniele L; Barresi, Antonello A

    2014-06-01

    This work is focused on the control of poly-ε-caprolactone nanoparticle characteristics, notably size and size distribution, in both the production and preservation (by using freeze-drying) stages. Nanoparticles were obtained by employing the solvent displacement method in a confined impinging jets mixer. The effect of several operating conditions, namely, initial polymer concentration and solvent-to-antisolvent flow rate ratio, and the influence of postprocessing conditions, such as final dilution and solvent evaporation, on nanoparticle characteristics was investigated. Further addition of antisolvent (water) after preparation was demonstrated to be effective in obtaining stable nanoparticles, that is, avoiding aggregation that would result in larger particles. On the contrary, solvent (acetone) evaporation was shown to have a small effect on the final nanoparticle characteristics. Eventually, freeze-drying of the solutions containing nanoparticles, after solvent evaporation, was also investigated. To ensure maximum nanoparticles stability, lyoprotectants (e.g., sucrose and mannitol) and steric stabilizers (e.g., Cremophor EL and Poloxamer 388) had to be added to the suspensions. The efficacy of the selected lyoprotectants, in the presence (or absence) of steric stabilizers, and in various concentrations, to avoid particle aggregation during the freeze-drying process was investigated, thus pointing to the optimal formulation.

  16. Size control of semimetal bismuth nanoparticles and the UV-visible and IR absorption spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y W; Hong, Byung Hee; Kim, Kwang S

    2005-04-21

    We introduced a simple chemical method to synthesize semimetal bismuth nanoparticles in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) by reducing Bi(3+) with sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)) in the presence of poly(vinylpyrroldone) (PVP) at room temperature. The size and dispersibility of Bi nanoparticles can be easily controlled by changing the synthetic conditions such as the molar ratio of PVP to BiCl(3) and the concentration of BiCl(3). The UV-visible absorption spectra of Bi nanoparticles of different diameters are systematically studied. The surface plasmon peaks broaden with the increasing molar ratio of PVP to BiCl(3) as the size of bismuth nanoparticles decreases. Infrared (IR) spectra of the complexes with different molar ratios of PVP/BiCl(3) show a strong interaction between the carboxyl oxygen (C=O) of PVP and Bi(3+) ion and a weak interaction between the carboxyl oxygen (C=O) of PVP and the Bi atom in nanoparticles. This indicates that PVP serves as an effective capping ligand, which prevents the nanoparticles from aggregation.

  17. 高校班级规模的控制%On Control of College Class Size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚利民; 杨静

    2012-01-01

    班级规模是影响高校教学质量的重要因素之一,高校班级规模过大,必须加以控制。从政府看,要树立正确的教育观念,执行教育法规,增加高等教育投入;从高校看,要将学生利益放在首位,将教学质量视为学校生命线。遵循和落实国家教育法规,丰富教学资源,适时调整专业结构,引导学生合理选择专业,提高专任教师的上课率。%Class size is an important factor in effecting the teaching quality. Large class size must be controlled. Governments need taking the following measures: establishing correct views of educa- tion, implementing education laws and regulations and increasing investment in higher education. Colleges need taking the following measures: putting the students' benefits to the initial place, considering the teaching quality as the lifeline of the college, adhering and implementing laws and regulations of national education, enriching the colleges teaching resources and raising the ratio of teachers' teaching.

  18. Regenerated silk fibroin films with controllable nanostructure size and secondary structure for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juan; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Lijun; Zhong, Jian; Zhu, Jun; Yan, Juan; Wang, Ping; Cao, Chuanbao; He, Dannong

    2014-12-24

    The ability of drug release from SF materials was governed largely by their secondary structure. It is known that the breakage degree of the peptide chain during the silk fibroin (SF) dissolution can affect the structure, property, and applications of SF materials. To deeply understand this effect, we designed a reaction system based on CaCl2/H2O/C2H5OH ternary solvent with different ethanol content to obtain the regenerated SF films with different morphologies and secondary structures. The results showed that the globule-like nanostructure was observed in all regenerated SF films, and their size decreased significantly with reducing the ethanol content in the solvent. Correspondingly, the β-sheet structure content of the SF films increased. In addition, the contact angle and the elongation ratio increased, and water absorption decreased significantly with decreasing the ethanol content in the solvent. The accumulated release percents of doxorubicin from these SF films were significantly different with increasing the time. With smaller nanostructure size and more β-sheet content, the SF films had a slower drug release at the beginning. This study indicated the importance of the ethanol content in the solvent in controlling the structure and properties of the regenerated SF films, which would improve the application of SF in drug delivery.

  19. Increased monolayer domain size and patterned growth of tungsten disulfide through controlling surface energy of substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Kyle; Kang, Kyungnam; Fu, Shichen; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2016-08-01

    We report a surface energy-controlled low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of WS2 monolayers on SiO2 using pre-growth oxygen plasma treatment of substrates, facilitating increased monolayer surface coverage and patterned growth without lithography. Oxygen plasma treatment of the substrate caused an increase in the average domain size of WS2 monolayers by 78%  ±  2% while having a slight reduction in nucleation density, which translates to increased monolayer surface coverage. This substrate effect on growth was exploited to grow patterned WS2 monolayers by patterned plasma treatment on patterned substrates and by patterned source material with resolutions less than 10 µm. Contact angle-based surface energy measurements revealed a dramatic increase in polar surface energy. A growth model was proposed with lowered activation energies for growth and increased surface diffusion length consistent with the range of results observed. WS2 samples grown with and without oxygen plasma were similar high quality monolayers verified through transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, Raman, and photoluminescence measurements. This technique enables the production of large-grain size, patterned WS2 without a post-growth lithography process, thereby providing clean surfaces for device applications.

  20. Ion-track membranes of fluoropolymers: Toward controlling the pore size and shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaki, T., E-mail: yamaki.tetsuya@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Nuryanthi, N. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Koshikawa, H.; Asano, M.; Sawada, S.; Hakoda, T.; Maekawa, Y. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Voss, K.-O.; Severin, D.; Seidl, T.; Trautmann, C.; Neumann, R. [Materials Research Department, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of varying the beam parameters and applying the effect of a pre-etching treatment for poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) ion-track membranes was investigated with the goal of achieving enhanced track etching for effective control of the pore size and shape. Commercially available 25 μm-thick PVDF films were irradiated at room temperature with swift heavy ions from the JAEA’s TIARA cyclotron and GSI’s UNILAC linear accelerator. Irradiation with a higher linear energy transfer (LET) beam gave faster track etching and larger pores, suggesting that the LET could be the most crucial factor determining the pore size. In-situ infra-red absorption and residual gas analyses shed light on the detailed chemistry of not only the ion-induced degradation, but also post-irradiation reactions. The pre-etching treatment effect involved oxidation of the unsaturated bonds within the latent track, which accelerated the chemical dissolution for efficient pore evolution. In other words, exposure to a gaseous oxidant, i.e., ozone, shortened the breakthrough time.

  1. Erbium-doped slot waveguides containing size-controlled silicon nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, R.; Beyer, J., E-mail: jan.beyer@physik.tu-freiberg.de; Heitmann, J. [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, D-09596 Freiberg (Germany); Klemm, V.; Rafaja, D. [Institute of Materials Science, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, D-09596 Freiberg (Germany); Johnson, B. C.; McCallum, J. C. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2015-04-28

    Silicon based slot waveguides with a slot containing Si nanocrystals (Si-nc) and Erbium ions (Er{sup 3+}) inside a silica matrix were prepared using sputter deposition and low-energy ion implantation. This sequence enabled independent optimization of nanocrystal formation and Er{sup 3+} incorporation parameters. Using a superlattice approach, the size of the Si-nc inside the slot could be controlled and optimized for maximum Er{sup 3+} luminescence yield at 1.54 μm. Er{sup 3+} is found to be efficiently pumped by Si-nc of sizes around 3 to 4 nm. Increasing Er{sup 3+} photoluminescence at 1.54 μm with increasing post-implantation annealing temperatures up to 1000 °C is attributed to annealing of matrix or Si-nc interface defects mainly. Additionally, a dependence of the Er{sup 3+} luminescence intensity on both the excitation and emission linear polarization orientation is shown, which demonstrates efficient field enhancement in sputtered slot waveguide structures.

  2. A polarised population of dynamic microtubules mediates homeostatic length control in animal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigio Picone

    Full Text Available Because physical form and function are intimately linked, mechanisms that maintain cell shape and size within strict limits are likely to be important for a wide variety of biological processes. However, while intrinsic controls have been found to contribute to the relatively well-defined shape of bacteria and yeast cells, the extent to which individual cells from a multicellular animal control their plastic form remains unclear. Here, using micropatterned lines to limit cell extension to one dimension, we show that cells spread to a characteristic steady-state length that is independent of cell size, pattern width, and cortical actin. Instead, homeostatic length control on lines depends on a population of dynamic microtubules that lead during cell extension, and that are aligned along the long cell axis as the result of interactions of microtubule plus ends with the lateral cell cortex. Similarly, during the development of the zebrafish neural tube, elongated neuroepithelial cells maintain a relatively well-defined length that is independent of cell size but dependent upon oriented microtubules. A simple, quantitative model of cellular extension driven by microtubules recapitulates cell elongation on lines, the steady-state distribution of microtubules, and cell length homeostasis, and predicts the effects of microtubule inhibitors on cell length. Together this experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that microtubule dynamics impose unexpected limits on cell geometry that enable cells to regulate their length. Since cells are the building blocks and architects of tissue morphogenesis, such intrinsically defined limits may be important for development and homeostasis in multicellular organisms.

  3. Rapid Synthesis of Size-controlled Gold Nanoparticles by Complex Intramolecular Photoreduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Shou-an; YANG Sheng-chun; TANG Chun

    2007-01-01

    A rapid synthesis of size-controlled gold nanoparticles was proposed. The method is based on the sensitive intramolecular photoreduction reaction of Fe( Ⅲ )-EDTA complex in chloroacetic acid-sodium acetate buffer solution,where Fe(Ⅱ)-EDTA complex generated by photo-promotion acts as a reductant of AuCl4- ions. Gold nanoparticles formed were stabilized by EDTA ligand or other protective agents added. As a result, well-dispersed gold nanoparticles with an average diameter range of 6.7 to 50. 9 nm were obtained. According to the characterizations by the UV spectrum and TEM, the intramolecular charge transfer of the excited states of complex Fe(Ⅲ) -EDTA and the mechanism of forming gold nanoparticles were discussed in detail.

  4. Size control of L12-FePt3 nanocrystals by spin-coating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamshad, Zahra; Sebt, Seyed Ali; Abolhassani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Annealing is one of the stages of FePt nanoparticles preparation, during which the transition to a compositionally ordered phase occurs. In order to size and shape control of the nanoparticles in the mentioned stage, it is needed that they be distributed on a suitable surface. In the present work, the spin-coating method is suggested for preparing monolayer from L12-FePt3 nanoparticles colloidal solution on SiO2/Si substrates. FePt3 nanoparticles were gradually deposited as droplets on the center of a 500 rpm rotating substrate. This step was performed in hexane vapor atmosphere without any stopping time. The analyses revealed that a uniform surface distribution was formed so that, after annealing at 600 °C for 1 h the 6.1 nm L12-FePt3 nanoparticles were spherical in shape with standard deviation of 1.5 nm.

  5. Munc18-1 expression levels control synapse recovery by regulating readily releasable pool size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Ruud F. G.; Wierda, Keimpe; Sons, Michèle S.; de Wit, Heidi; Cornelisse, L. Niels; Brussaard, Arjen; Plomp, Jaap J.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Prompt recovery after intense activity is an essential feature of most mammalian synapses. Here we show that synapses with reduced expression of the presynaptic gene munc18-1 suffer from increased depression during intense stimulation at glutamatergic, GABAergic, and neuromuscular synapses. Conversely, munc18-1 overexpression makes these synapses recover faster. Concomitant changes in the readily releasable vesicle pool and its refill kinetics were found. The number of vesicles docked at the active zone and the total number of vesicles per terminal correlated with both munc18-1 expression levels and the size of the releasable vesicle pool. These data show that varying expression of a single gene controls synaptic recovery by modulating the number of docked, release-ready vesicles and thereby replenishment of the secretion capacity. PMID:17110441

  6. Size-Controlled Synthesis of Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles in the Layers of Montmorillonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayoon Kalantari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs were synthesized using chemical coprecipitation method. Fe3O4-NPs are located in interlamellar space and external surfaces of montmorillonite (MMT as a solid supported at room temperature. The size of magnetite nanoparticles could be controlled by varying the amount of NaOH as reducing agent in the medium. The interlamellar space changed from 1.24 nm to 2.85 nm and average diameter of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was from 12.88 nm to 8.24 nm. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using some instruments such as transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  7. Strong Attractions with Controllable Size between Hydrophilic Inorganic Macroanions and Reversible Supramolecular Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Melissa; Bhatt, Anish; Liu, Guang; Liu, Tianbo

    2007-03-01

    The polyoxometalate (POM) hydrophilic macroionic solutions, offer a direct connection between traditional fields of simple inorganic ions, colloidal suspensions, polyelectrolytes, particularly proteins and DNAs. Many types of POM macroanions are highly soluble, but undergo reversible self-assembly to form uniform, stable, soft, single-layer vesicle-like ``blackberry'' structures containing >1000 individual POMs in dilute solutions. Blackberry structures represent a new state of soluble inorganic ions. The driving forces of the POM self-assembly are unlike those of surfactant micelles or colloid aggregates. The POM driving forces are most likely counterion-mediated attraction (like-charge attraction). Blackberry size is controlled by the solvent quality, or the charge density of macroions. Blackberry structures may be analogous to virus shell structures formed by capsid proteins. Unexpected phenomena have been observed in the novel POM systems. References: JACS. 2005, 127, 6942; 2003, 125, 312; 2002, 124, 10942. Nature, 2003, 426, 59. J. Clust. Sci, 2006, 17, 427.

  8. Pore chemistry and size control in hybrid porous materials for acetylene capture from ethylene

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, X.

    2016-05-20

    The trade-off between physical adsorption capacity and selectivity of porous materials is a major barrier for efficient gas separation and purification through physisorption. We report control over pore chemistry and size in metal coordination networks with hexafluorosilicate and organic linkers for the purpose of preferential binding and orderly assembly of acetylene molecules through cooperative host-guest and/or guest-guest interactions. The specific binding sites for acetylene are validated by modeling and neutron powder diffraction studies. The energies associated with these binding interactions afford high adsorption capacity (2.1 millimoles per gram at 0.025 bar) and selectivity (39.7 to 44.8) for acetylene at ambient conditions. Their efficiency for the separation of acetylene/ethylene mixtures is demonstrated by experimental breakthrough curves (0.73 millimoles per gram from a 1/99 mixture).

  9. Effects of meal size and composition on incretin, alpha-cell, and beta-cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M; McQuarrie, Kelly; Girman, Cynthia J

    2009-01-01

    of beta-cell function and incremental areas under the curve of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP were calculated. Mixed models and Friedman tests were used to test for differences in meal responses. The large CH-rich meal and fat-rich meal resulted in a slightly larger insulin response......The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate postprandial insulin release from the beta-cells. We investigated the effects of 3 standardized meals with different caloric and nutritional content in terms of postprandial glucose......, insulin, glucagon, and incretin responses. In a randomized crossover study, 18 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 6 healthy volunteers underwent three 4-hour meal tolerance tests (small carbohydrate [CH]-rich meal, large CH-rich meal, and fat-rich meal). Non-model-based and model-based estimates...

  10. Facile fabrication of uniform size-controlled microparticles and potentiality for tandem drug delivery system of micro/nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Saito, Noriaki; Sanae, Hidetoshi; Nakamura, Makoto

    2013-09-01

    This article describes a rapid and facile method for manufacturing various size-controlled gel particles with utilizing inkjet printing technology. Generally, the size of droplets could be controlled by changing nozzle heads of inkjet printer, from which ink solution is ejected. However, this method uses drying process before gelling microparticles, and with that, the size of microparticles was easily controlled by only altering the concentration of ejected solution. When sodium alginate solution with various concentrations was ejected from inkjet printer, we found that the concentration of alginate solution vs. the volume of dried alginate particle showed an almost linear relationship in the concentration range from 0.1 to 3.0%. After dried alginate particles were soaked into calcium chloride solution, the size of microgel beads were obtained almost without increasing their size. The microparticles including various sizes of nanoparticles were easily manufactured by ejecting nanoparticle-dispersed alginate solution. The release of 25-nm sized nanoparticles from alginate microgel beads was finished in a relatively-rapid manner, whereas 100-nm sized nanoparticles were partially released from those ones. Moreover, most of 250-nm sized nanoparticles were not released from alginate microgel beads even after 24-h soaking. This particle fabricating method would enable the tandem drug delivery system with a combination of the release from nano and microparticles, and be expected for the biological and tissue engineering application.

  11. Facile fabrication and adsorption property of a nano/microporous coordination polymer with controllable size and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Jin, Li-Na; Sun, Wei-Yin

    2012-09-11

    A porous coordination polymer [Cu(3)(btc)(2)] with controllable size and morphology from nanocube to microoctahedron was readily synthesized in an ethanol-water mixture at room temperature by adjusting the concentration of the surfactant and the polymer shows size- and morphology-dependent sorption properties.

  12. Changes in the number and size of nucleoli of Chara vulgaris L. antheridial filament cells during the period preceding light-induced re-initiation of cell divisions following a mitodepressive effect of darkness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kwiatkowska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The changes in number and size of nucleoli of Chara vulgaris antheridial filament cells were monitored with the use of Howell and Black's silver staining method. After a 3-day mitodepressive treatment with darkness the cells were exposed to light which reactivated mitotic activity after 18-20 hours. Eight-celled antheridial filaments were observed. In the period preceding light-induced re-initiation of mitoses a gradual reconstruction of the number and size of nucleoli characteristic of control, as well as their total area per nucleus appeared. The obtained results indicate that one of the important conditions for a cell to be able to divide is accumulation of nucleolus components characteristic of a given developmental stage and this controls nucleologenesis of the subsequent cell cycle.

  13. Size-controlled synthesis of SnO{sub 2} quantum dots and their gas-sensing performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jianping, E-mail: dujp518@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, Shanxi (China); Zhao, Ruihua [Shanxi Kunming Tobacco Limited Liability Company, Taiyuan 030012, Shanxi (China); Xie, Yajuan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, Shanxi (China); Li, Jinping, E-mail: jpli211@hotmail.com [Research Institute of Special Chemicals, Taiyuan University of Technology, Shanxi, 030024 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The gas-sensing property of quantum dots is related to their sizes. SnO{sub 2} quantum dots (TQDs) were synthesized and the sizes were controlled by a simple strategy. The results show that controlling QDs size is efficient to detect low-concentration hazardous volatile compounds selectively. - Highlights: • SnO{sub 2} quantum dots with controllable size were synthesized by hydrothermal route. • The sizes of SnO{sub 2} quantum dots (TQDs) were controlled by a simple strategy. • The responses to volatile chemicals strongly depend on the size of quantum dots. • Small-size TQDs exhibit a good selectivity and response to triethylamine. • Controlling size is efficient to detect low-concentration toxic gases selectively. - Abstract: Tin dioxide quantum dots (TQDs) with controllable size were synthesized by changing the amount of alkaline reagent in the hydrothermal process. The gas-sensing properties were investigated by operating chemoresistor type sensor. The morphology and structure were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning/transmission electron microscopy, UV–vis and Raman spectrometry. The as-synthesized SnO{sub 2} shows the characteristics of quantum dots and the narrowest size distribution is about 2–3 nm. The gas-sensing results indicate that the responses are strongly dependent on the size of quantum dots. TQDs with different sizes exhibit different sensitivities and selectivities to volatile toxic chemicals such as aldehyde, acetone, methanol, ethanol and amine. Especially, when the sensors are exposed to 100 ppm triethylamine (TEA), the sensing response value of TQDs with small size is two times higher than that of the large-size TQDs. The maximum response values of TQDs to 1 ppm and 100 ppm TEA are 15 and 153, respectively. The response time is 1 s and the recovery time is 47 s upon exposure to 1 ppm TEA. The results suggest that it is an effective method by regulating the size of SnO{sub 2} quantum dots to detect low

  14. Controlling the rheological behavior of ceramic slurries and consolidated bodies: Interpenetrating networks and ion size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Matthew Lyle

    Colloidal processing has been demonstrated as an effective technique for increasing the reliability of ceramic components by reducing the flaw populations in sintered bodies. The formation of long-range repulsive potentials produces a dispersed slurry which can be filtered to remove heterogeneities and truncate the flaw size distribution. When the pair potentials are changed from repulsive to weakly attractive, a short-range repulsive potential can be developed in the slurry state which prevents mass segregation, allows particles to consolidate to high volume fractions, and produces plastic consolidated bodies. Plastic behavior in saturated ceramic compacts would allow plastic shape forming technologies to be implemented on advanced ceramic powders. Two networks of different interparticle potential have been mixed to control the rheological properties of slurries and develop clay-like plasticity in consolidated bodies. The elastic modulus and yield stress of slurries were found to increase with volume fraction in a power law fashion. Consolidated bodies containing mixtures of alkylated and non-alkylated powder pack to high volume fraction and exhibit similar flow properties to clay. The mixing of aqueous networks of different pair potential can also be effective in tailoring the flow properties. The flow stress of saturated compacts has been adjusted by the addition of a second network of uncoated particles which is stabilized electrostatically. The influence of the addition of silica of various sizes on the viscosity and zeta potentials of alumina suspensions has been investigated. The adsorption of nano-silica to the surface of alumina shifts the iep. The amount of silica at which the maximum shift in zeta potential occurs is consistent with the silica required to produce the minimum viscosity. This level of silica on the surface is consistent with calculations of the amount necessary for dense random parking of silica spheres around alumina. The influence of

  15. Effect of particle size of Martian dust on the degradation of photovoltaic cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.

    1991-01-01

    Glass coverglass and SiO2 covered and uncovered silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells were subjected to conditions simulating a Mars dust storm, using the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel, to assess the effect of particle size on the performance of PV cells in the Martian environment. The dust used was an artificial mineral of the approximate elemental composition of Martian soil, which was sorted into four different size ranges. Samples were tested both initially clean and initially dusted. The samples were exposed to clear and dust laden winds, wind velocities varying from 23 to 116 m/s, and attack angles from 0 to 90 deg. It was found that transmittance through the coverglass approximates the power produced by a dusty PV cell. Occultation by the dust was found to dominate the performance degradation for wind velocities below 50 m/s, whereas abrasion dominates the degradation at wind velocities above 85 m/s. Occultation is most severe at 0 deg (parallel to the wind), is less pronounced from 22.5 to 67.5 deg, and is somewhat larger at 90 deg (perpendicular to the wind). Abrasion is negligible at 0 deg, and increases to a maximum at 90 deg. Occultation is more of a problem with small particles, whereas large particles (unless they are agglomerates) cause more abrasion.

  16. Controlling the Focal Length and the Spot Size in Flying Optics by Dual-deformable-mirror-systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Quanzhong; CHENG Zhaogu; GAO Haijun; CHAI Xiongliang; LUO Hongxin

    2002-01-01

    The models of several dual-deformable-mirror-systems,which can control focal the length and the spot size in flying optics,were introduced and their operating principle and adjusting characteristics were analyzed.The simulation results indicate that dual-deformable-mirror-systems can control the focal length and the spot size.This research is a good guidance to engineering application of dual-deformable-mirror-systems.

  17. Epigenetic control of cell identity and plasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Orlando, Valerio

    2014-04-02

    The DNA centered dogma for genetic information and cell identity is now evolving into a much more complex and flexible dimension provided by the discovery of the Epigenome. This comprises those chromosome structural and topological components that complement DNA information and contribute to genome functional organization. Current concept is that the Epigenome constitutes the dynamic molecular interface allowing the Genome to interact with the Environment. Exploring how the genome interacts with the environment is a key to fully understand cellular and complex organism mechanisms of adaptation and plasticity. Our work focuses on the role of an essential, specialized group or chromatin associated proteins named Polycomb (PcG) that control maintenance of transcription programs during development and in adult life. In particular PcG proteins exert epigenetic “memory” function by modifying chromosome structures at various levels to maintain gene silencing in particular through cell division. While in the past decade substantial progress was made in understanding PcG mechanisms acting in development and partially during cell cycle, very little is known about their role in adult post-mitotic tissues and more in general the role of the epigenome in adaptation. To this, we studied the role of PcG in the context of mammalian skeletal muscle cell differentiation. We previously reported specific dynamics of PRC2 proteins in myoblasts and myotubes, in particular the dynamics of PcG Histone H3 K27 Methyl Transferases (HMT), EZH2 and EZH1, the latter apparently replacing for EZH2 in differentiated myotubes. Ezh1 protein, although almost identical to Ezh2, shows a weak H3K27 HMT activity and its primary function remains elusive. Recent ChIPseq studies performed in differentiating muscle cells revealed that Ezh1 associates with active and not repressed regulatory regions to control RNA pol II elongation. Since H3K27 tri-methylation levels are virtually steady in non

  18. Microneedles with Controlled Bubble Sizes and Drug Distributions for Efficient Transdermal Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi Lei; Zhu, Dan Dan; Liu, Xu Bo; Chen, Bo Zhi; Guo, Xin Dong

    2016-01-01

    Drug loaded dissolving microneedles (DMNs) fabricated with water soluble polymers have received increasing attentions as a safe and efficient transdermal drug delivery system. Usually, to reach a high drug delivery efficiency, an ideal drug distribution is gathering more drugs in the tip or the top part of DMNs. In this work, we introduce an easy and new method to introduce a bubble with controlled size into the body of DMNs. The introduction of bubbles can prevent the drug diffusion into the whole body of the MNs. The heights of the bubbles are well controlled from 75 μm to 400 μm just by changing the mass concentrations of polymer casting solution from 30 wt% to 10 wt%. The drug-loaded bubble MNs show reliable mechanical properties and successful insertion into the skins. For the MNs prepared from 15 wt% PVA solution, bubble MNs achieve over 80% of drug delivery efficiency in 20 seconds, which is only 10% for the traditional solid MNs. Additionally, the bubble microstructures in the MNs are also demonstrated to be consistent and identical regardless the extension of MN arrays. These scalable bubble MNs may be a promising carrier for the transdermal delivery of various pharmaceuticals. PMID:27929104

  19. Controlled emission and coupling of small-size YAG:Ce3+ nanocrystals to gold nanowire

    CERN Document Server

    Birowosuto, M D; Donega, C de Mello; Meijerink, A

    2015-01-01

    We report a controlled emission of Ce3+ ions inside single Yttrium Aluminum Gar- net Y3Al5O12 (YAG:Ce3+) nanocrystals with a diameter of 22 +- 10 nm as a result of a coupling of a surface plasmon mode propagating along single gold nanowire (NW). From the PL images, the intensity for single YAG:Ce3+ nanocrystals in the proximity of the single gold NW increases by a factor of two in comparison with that without the NW. Also, we observe a maximum of 3.8-fold emission rate en- hancements for the single nanocrystal close to the single gold NW. The emission rate enhancements of YAG:Ce3+ nanocrystals are two folds the enhancements of 100-nm fluorescent nanospheres. This value is in agreement with the calculation of a combi- nation from the analytical scattering model and boundary element method (BEM). We also confirm that the small size light sources are more efficient for the emission rate enhancements. Thus, the controlled emission of small YAG:Ce3+ nanocrystals with the perfect photostabilities will pave the way ...

  20. Detection and sizing of defects in control rod drive mechanism penetrations using eddy current and ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, G.M.; Fisher, J.L.; Tennis, R.F.; Stolte, J.S.; Hendrix, G.J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Over the last two years, concern has been generated about the capabilities of performing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of the closure-head penetrations in nuclear-reactor pressure vessels. These penetrations are primarily for instrumentation and control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and are usually thick-walled Inconel tubes, which are shrink-fitted into the steel closure head. The penetrations are then welded between the outside surface of the penetration and the inside surface of the closure head. Stress corrosion cracks initiating at the inner surface of the penetration have been reported at several plants. Through-wall cracks in the CRDM penetration or CRDM weld could lead to loss of coolant in the reactor vessel. The CRDM penetration presents a complex inspection geometry for conventional NDE techniques. A thermal sleeve, through which pass the mechanical linkages for operating the control rods, is inserted into the penetration in such a way that only a small annulus (nominally 3 mm) exists between the thermal sleeve and inside surface of the penetration. Ultrasonic (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) techniques that could be used to provide defect detection and sizing capability were investigated. This paper describes the ET and UT techniques, the probes developed, and the results obtained using these probes and techniques on CRDM penetration mock-ups.

  1. Excellent endurance of MWCNT anode in micro-sized Microbial Fuel Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2012-08-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) are a sustainable technology for energy production using bioelectrochemical reactions from bacteria. Microfabrication of micro-sized MFCs allows rapid and precise production of devices that can be integrated into Lab-on-a-chip or other ultra low power devices. We show a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) integrated anode in a biocompatible and high power and current producing device. Long term testing of the MWCNT anode also reveals a high endurance and durable anode material that can be adapted as a long-lasting power source. © 2012 IEEE.

  2. Hybrid Guidance Control for a Hypervelocity Small Size Asteroid Interceptor Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebenay, Melak M.; Lyzhoft, Joshua R.; Barbee, Brent W.

    2017-01-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) are comets and/or asteroids that have orbits in proximity with Earth's own orbit. NEOs have collided with the Earth in the past, which can be seen at such places as Chicxulub crater, Barringer crater, and Manson crater, and will continue in the future with potentially significant and devastating results. Fortunately such NEO collisions with Earth are infrequent, but can happen at any time. Therefore it is necessary to develop and validate techniques as well as technologies necessary to prevent them. One approach to mitigate future NEO impacts is the concept of high-speed interceptor. This concept is to alter the NEO's trajectory via momentum exchange by using kinetic impactors as well as nuclear penetration devices. The interceptor has to hit a target NEO at relative velocity which imparts a sufficient change in NEO velocity. NASA's Deep Impact mission has demonstrated this scenario by intercepting Comet Temple 1, 5 km in diameter, with an impact relative speed of approximately 10 km/s. This paper focuses on the development of hybrid guidance navigation and control (GNC) algorithms for precision hypervelocity intercept of small sized NEOs. The spacecraft's hypervelocity and the NEO's small size are critical challenges for a successful mission as the NEO will not fill the field of view until a few seconds before intercept. The investigation needs to consider the error sources modeled in the navigation simulation such as spacecraft initial state uncertainties in position and velocity. Furthermore, the paper presents three selected spacecraft guidance algorithms for asteroid intercept and rendezvous missions. The selected algorithms are classical Proportional Navigation (PN) based guidance that use a first order difference to compute the derivatives, Three Plane Proportional Navigation (TPPN), and the Kinematic Impulse (KI). A manipulated Bennu orbit that has been changed to impact Earth will be used as a demonstrative example to compare the

  3. High-speed counting and sizing of cells in an impedance flow microcytometer with compact electronic instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo-Fernandez, Oscar; Rodriguez-Trujíllo, Romén; Gomila, Gabriel;

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a high-throughput impedance flow cytometer on a chip. This device was built using compact and inexpensive electronic instrumentation. The system was used to count and size a mixed cell sample containing red blood cells and white blood cells. It demonstrated a counting capacity of...

  4. Effects of disorder in location and size of fence barriers on molecular motion in cell membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Kalay, Z; Kenkre, V M

    2008-01-01

    The effect of disorder in the energetic heights and in the physical locations of fence barriers encountered by transmembrane molecules such as proteins and lipids in their motion in cell membranes is studied theoretically. The investigation takes as its starting point a recent analysis of a periodic system with constant distances between barriers and constant values of barrier heights, and employs effective medium theory to treat the disorder. The calculations make possible, in principle, the extraction of confinement parameters such as mean compartment sizes and mean intercompartmental transition rates from experimentally reported published observations. The analysis should be helpful both as an unusual application of effective medium theory and as an investigation of observed molecular movements in cell membranes.

  5. Dependence of reproductive rate on cell size and temperature in freshwater ciliated protozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finlay, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    Reproductive rates have been calculated for ten species of ciliated protozoa in defined conditions. Interspecific double log regressions of generation time vs. cell volume have been computed at each of three temperatures (8.5/sup 0/C, 15/sup 0/C, and 20/sup 0/C) indicating a significant dependence of reproductive rate on cell size. Recorded generation times varied from 6.38 h in Vorticella microstoma at 20/sup 0/C to 1004 h in Spirostomum teres at 8.5/sup 0/C. These values correspond to a range in r/sub m/ (day)/sup -1/ of 2.607 to 0.017 and lambda (day)/sup -1/ of 13.554 to 1.017. The relationship between these data and similar published data for marine ciliates is examined and the value of such regressions in ecological studies of the protozoa is discussed.

  6. Culture of Dermal Papilla Cells from Ovine Wool Follicles: An In Vitro Model for Papilla Size Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufaut, Nicholas W; Nixon, Allan J; Sinclair, Rodney D

    2016-01-01

    Common human balding or hair loss is driven by follicle miniaturization. Miniaturization is thought to be caused by a reduction in dermal papilla size. The molecular mechanisms that regulate papilla size are poorly understood, and their elucidation would benefit from a tractable experimental model. We have found that dermal papilla cells from sheep spontaneously aggregate in culture to form papilla-like structures. Here, we describe methods for microdissecting dermal papillae from wool follicles, for initiating and maintaining cultures of ovine papilla cells, and for using these cells in an in vitro assay to measure the effect of bioactive molecules on aggregate size.

  7. Cell-cycle control by protein kinase B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kops, G.J.P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Numerous cells in the body divide, and do so in a well-controlled manner. In some situations where this control is deregulated, cells may divide continuously. Such uncontrolled proliferation of cells is thought to be responsible for the onset of cancer. In order for a cell to divide in a normal set

  8. P27 in cell cycle control and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe

    2000-01-01

    In order to survive, cells need tight control of cell cycle progression. The control mechanisms are often lost in human cancer cells. The cell cycle is driven forward by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The CDK inhibitors (CKIs) are important regulators of the CDKs. As the name implies, CKIs were...

  9. Biodegradable sizing agents from soy protein via controlled hydrolysis and dis-entanglement for remediation of textile effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Maiping; Xu, Helan; Hou, Xiuliang; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Yiqi

    2017-03-01

    Fully biodegradable textile sizes with satisfactory performance properties were developed from soy protein with controlled hydrolysis and dis-entanglement to tackle the intractable environmental issues associated with the non-biodegradable polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in textile effluents. PVA derived from petroleum is the primary sizing agent due to its excellent sizing performance on polyester-containing yarns, especially in increasingly prevailing high-speed weaving. However, due to the poor biodegradability, PVA causes serious environmental pollution, and thus, should be substituted with more environmentally friendly polymers. Soy protein treated with high amount of triethanolamine was found with acceptable sizing properties. However, triethanolamine is also non-biodegradable and originated from petroleum, therefore, is not an ideal additive. In this research, soy sizes were developed from soy protein treated with glycerol, the biodegradable triol that could also be obtained from soy. The soy sizes had good film properties, adhesion to polyester and abrasion resistance close to PVA, rendering them qualified for sizing applications. Regarding desizing, consumption of water and energy for removal of soy size could be remarkably decreased, comparing to removal of PVA. Moreover, with satisfactory degradability, the wastewater containing soy sizes was readily dischargeable after treated in activated sludge for two days. In summary, the fully biodegradable soy sizes had potential to substitute PVA for sustainable textile processing.

  10. cMyc Regulates the Size of the Premigratory Neural Crest Stem Cell Pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerosuo, Laura; Bronner, Marianne E

    2016-12-06

    The neural crest is a transient embryonic population that originates within the central nervous system (CNS) and then migrates into the periphery and differentiates into multiple cell types. The mechanisms that govern neural crest stem-like characteristics and self-renewal ability are poorly understood. Here, we show that the proto-oncogene cMyc is a critical factor in the chick dorsal neural tube, where it regulates the size of the premigratory neural crest stem cell pool. Loss of cMyc dramatically decreases the number of emigrating neural crest cells due to reduced self-renewal capacity, increased cell death, and shorter duration of the emigration process. Interestingly, rather than via E-Box binding, cMyc acts in the dorsal neural tube by interacting with another transcription factor, Miz1, to promote self-renewal. The finding that cMyc operates in a non-canonical manner in the premigratory neural crest highlights the importance of examining its role at specific time points and in an in vivo context.

  11. Structural Transition of Actin Filament in a Cell-Sized Water Droplet with a Phospholipid Membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Hase, M

    2005-01-01

    Actin filament, F-actin, is a semiflexible polymer with a negative charge, and is one of the main constituents on cell membranes. To clarify the effect of cross-talk between a phospholipid membrane and actin filaments in cells, we conducted microscopic observations on the structural changes in actin filaments in a cell-sized (several tens of micrometers in diameter) water droplet coated with a phospholipid membrane such as phosphatidylserine (PS; negatively-charged head group) or phosphatidylethanolamine (PE; neutral head group) as a simple model of a living cell membrane. With PS, actin filaments are distributed uniformly in the water phase without adsorption onto the membrane surface between 2 and 6 mM Mg2+, while between 6 and 12 mM Mg2+, actin filaments are adsorbed onto the inner membrane surface. With PE, actin filaments are uniformly adsorbed onto the inner membrane surface between 2 and 12 mM Mg2+. With both PS and PE membranes, at Mg2+ concentrations higher than 12 mM, thick bundles are formed in the...

  12. Passive permeability and effective pore size of HeLa cell nuclear membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudram, Arunkarthick; Mangalassery, Bijeesh M; Kowshik, Meenal; Patincharath, Nandakumar; Varier, Geetha K

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear pore complexes in the nuclear membrane act as the sole gateway of transport of molecules from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and vice versa. Studies on biomolecular transport through nuclear membranes provide vital data on the nuclear pore complexes. In this work, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran molecules as a model system and study the passive nuclear import of biomolecules through nuclear pore complexes in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells. Experiments are carried out under transient conditions in the time lapse imaging scheme using an in-house constructed confocal laser scanning microscope. Transport rates of dextran molecules having molecular weights of 4-70 kDa corresponding to Stokes radius of 1.4-6 nm are determined. Analyzing the permeability of the nuclear membrane for different sizes the effective pore radius of HeLa cell nuclear membrane is determined to be 5.3 nm, much larger than the value reported earlier using proteins as probe molecules. The range of values reported for the nuclear pore radius suggest that they may not be rigid structures and it is quite probable that the effective pore size of nuclear pore complexes is critically dependent on the probe molecules and on the environmental factors.

  13. 40 CFR 141.81 - Applicability of corrosion control treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems. 141.81 Section 141.81 Protection of... WATER REGULATIONS Control of Lead and Copper § 141.81 Applicability of corrosion control treatment steps... review and approve the addition of a new source or long-term change in water treatment before it...

  14. Improved Light Conversion Efficiency Of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell By Dispersing Submicron-Sized Granules Into The Nano-Sized TiO2 Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song S.A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, TiO2 nanoparticles and submicron-sized granules were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and spray pyrolysis, respectively. Submicron-sized granules were dispersed into the nano-sized TiO2 layer to improve the light conversion efficiency. Granules showed better light scattering, but lower in terms of the dye-loading quantity and recombination resistance compared with nanoparticles. Consequently, the nano-sized TiO2 layer had higher cell efficiency than the granulized TiO2 layer. When dispersed granules into the nanoparticle layer, the light scattering was enhanced without the loss of dye-loading quantities. The dispersion of granulized TiO2 led to increase the cell efficiency up to 6.51%, which was about 5.2 % higher than that of the electrode consisting of only TiO2 nanoparticles. Finally, the optimal hydrothermal temperature and dispersing quantity of granules were found to be 200°C and 20 wt%, respectively.

  15. Comparative effects of macro-sized aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide nanoparticles on erythrocyte hemolysis: influence of cell source, temperature, and size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinardell, M. P., E-mail: mpvinardellmh@ub.edu; Sordé, A. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisiologia, Facultat de Farmàcia (Spain); Díaz, J. [Universitat de Barcelona CCiT, Scientific and Technological Centers (Spain); Baccarin, T.; Mitjans, M. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisiologia, Facultat de Farmàcia (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the most abundantly produced nanomaterial and has been used in diverse fields, including the medical, military, and industrial sectors. As there are concerns about the health effects of nanoparticles, it is important to understand how they interact with cells, and specifically with red blood cells. The hemolysis induced by three commercial nano-sized aluminum oxide particles (nanopowder 13 nm, nanopowder <50 nm, and nanowire 2–6 × 200–400 nm) was compared to aluminum oxide and has been studied on erythrocytes from humans, rats, and rabbits, in order to elucidate the mechanism of action and the influence of size and shape on hemolytic behavior. The concentrations inducing 50 % hemolysis (HC{sub 50}) were calculated for each compound studied. The most hemolytic aluminum oxide particles were of nanopowder 13, followed by nanowire and nanopowder 50. The addition of albumin to PBS induced a protective effect on hemolysis in all the nano-forms of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, but not on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The drop in HC{sub 50} correlated to a decrease in nanomaterial size, which was induced by a reduction of aggregation. Aluminum oxide nanoparticles are less hemolytic than other oxide nanoparticles and behave differently depending on the size and shape of the nanoparticles. The hemolytic behavior of aluminum oxide nanoparticles differs from that of aluminum oxide.

  16. Fast and Near-Optimal Timing-Driven Cell Sizing under Cell Area and Leakage Power Constraints Using a Simplified Discrete Network Flow Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Ren

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a timing-driven discrete cell-sizing algorithm that can address total cell size and/or leakage power constraints. We model cell sizing as a “discretized” mincost network flow problem, wherein available sizes of each cell are modeled as nodes. Flow passing through a node indicates the choice of the corresponding cell size, and the total flow cost reflects the timing objective function value corresponding to these choices. Compared to other discrete optimization methods for cell sizing, our method can obtain near-optimal solutions in a time-efficient manner. We tested our algorithm on ISCAS’85 benchmarks, and compared our results to those produced by an optimal dynamic programming- (DP- based method. The results show that compared to the optimal method, the improvements to an initial sizing solution obtained by our method is only 1% (3% worse when using a 180 nm (90 nm library, while being 40–60 times faster. We also obtained results for ISPD’12 cell-sizing benchmarks, under leakage power constraint, and compared them to those of a state-of-the-art approximate DP method (optimal DP runs out of memory for the smallest of these circuits. Our results show that we are only 0.9% worse than the approximate DP method, while being more than twice as fast.

  17. Myonuclear transcription is responsive to mechanical load and DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Tyler J; Patel, Rooshil M; McClintock, Timothy S; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; Peterson, Charlotte A; McCarthy, John J

    2016-03-01

    Myofibers increase size and DNA content in response to a hypertrophic stimulus, thus providing a physiological model with which to study how these factors affect global transcription. Using 5-ethynyl uridine (EU) to metabolically label nascent RNA, we measured a sevenfold increase in myofiber transcription during early hypertrophy before a change in cell size and DNA content. The typical increase in myofiber DNA content observed at the later stage of hypertrophy was associated with a significant decrease in the percentage of EU-positive myonuclei; however, when DNA content was held constant by preventing myonuclear accretion via satellite cell depletion, both the number of transcriptionally active myonuclei and the amount of RNA generated by each myonucleus increased. During late hypertrophy, transcription did not scale with cell size, as smaller myofibers (hypertrophy and that myofiber transcription is responsive to DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy.

  18. Digital IIR filters design using differential evolution algorithm with a controllable probabilistic population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wu; Fang, Jian-an; Tang, Yang; Zhang, Wenbing; Du, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Design of a digital infinite-impulse-response (IIR) filter is the process of synthesizing and implementing a recursive filter network so that a set of prescribed excitations results a set of desired responses. However, the error surface of IIR filters is usually non-linear and multi-modal. In order to find the global minimum indeed, an improved differential evolution (DE) is proposed for digital IIR filter design in this paper. The suggested algorithm is a kind of DE variants with a controllable probabilistic (CPDE) population size. It considers the convergence speed and the computational cost simultaneously by nonperiodic partial increasing or declining individuals according to fitness diversities. In addition, we discuss as well some important aspects for IIR filter design, such as the cost function value, the influence of (noise) perturbations, the convergence rate and successful percentage, the parameter measurement, etc. As to the simulation result, it shows that the presented algorithm is viable and comparable. Compared with six existing State-of-the-Art algorithms-based digital IIR filter design methods obtained by numerical experiments, CPDE is relatively more promising and competitive.

  19. Exotic optoelectronic properties of organic semiconductors with super-controlled nanoscale sizes and molecular shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Shu; Yamao, Takeshi; Katagiri, Toshifumi

    2014-03-01

    We present several aspects of thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers (TPCOs). TPCOs are regarded as a newly occurring class of organic semiconductors. These materials are synthesized by hybridizing thiophene and phenylene rings at the molecular level with their various mutual arrangements. These materials are characterized by the super-controlled nanoscale sizes and molecular shapes. These produce peculiar crystallographic structures and high-performance optical and electronic properties. The crystals of TPCOs were obtained through both vapor phase and liquid phase. In the TPCO crystals, the molecules take upright configuration. These cause large carrier mobilities of field-effect transistors and laser oscillations under optical excitations. Spectrally-narrowed emissions (SNEs) were also achieved under weak optical excitation using a mercury lamp. The light-emitting field-effect transistors using these crystals for an active layer have shown the current-injected SNEs when the device was combined with an optical cavity and operated by an alternating-current gate-voltage method. Thus the TPCO materials will play an important role in the future in the fields of nanoscale technology and organic semiconductor materials as well as their optoelectronic device applications.

  20. Stochastic Lot-Sizing under Carbon Emission Control for Profit Optimisation in MTO Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggravating global warming has heightened the imminent need by the world to step up forceful efforts on curbing emission of greenhouse gases. Although manufacturing is a major resource of carbon emission, few research works have studied the impacts of carbon constraints on manufacturing, leading to environmentally unsustainable production strategies and operations. This paper incorporates carbon emission management into production planning for make-to-order (MTO manufacturing. This paper proposes a model that solves lot-sizing problems to maximise profits under carbon emission caps. The model adopts stochastic interarrival times for customer orders to enhance the practicality of the results for real-world manufacturing. Numerical experiments show that reducing carbon emission undercuts short-term profits of a company. However, it is conducive to the company’s market image as being socially responsible which would attract more customers who concern about environmental protection. Hence, reducing carbon emission in manufacturing is beneficial to long-term profitability and sustainability. The results provide managerial insights into manufacture operations for balancing profitability and carbon control.

  1. Increased brain size in mammals is associated with size variations in gene families with cell signalling, chemotaxis and immune-related functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Urrutia, Araxi O; Gutiérrez, Humberto

    2014-01-22

    Genomic determinants underlying increased encephalization across mammalian lineages are unknown. Whole genome comparisons have revealed large and frequent changes in the size of gene families, and it has been proposed that these variations could play a major role in shaping morphological and physiological differences among species. Using a genome-wide comparative approach, we examined changes in gene family size (GFS) and degree of encephalization in 39 fully sequenced mammalian species and found a significant over-representation of GFS variations in line with increased encephalization in mammals. We found that this relationship is not accounted for by known correlates of brain size such as maximum lifespan or body size and is not explained by phylogenetic relatedness. Genes involved in chemotaxis, immune regulation and cell signalling-related functions are significantly over-represented among those gene families most highly correlated with encephalization. Genes within these families are prominently expressed in the human brain, particularly the cortex, and organized in co-expression modules that display distinct temporal patterns of expression in the developing cortex. Our results suggest that changes in GFS associated with encephalization represent an evolutionary response to the specific functional requirements underlying increased brain size in mammals.

  2. Organelles and chromatin fragmentation of human umbilical vein endothelial cell influence by the effects of zeta potential and size of silver nanoparticles in different manners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakol, Shima; Hoveizi, Elham; Kharrazi, Sharmin; Tavakol, Behnaz; Karimi, Shabnam; Rezayat Sorkhabadi, Seyed Mahdi

    2017-06-01

    Recently, it has been disclosed that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have the potential to inhibit infection and cancerous cells and eventually penetrate through injected site into the capillary due to their small size. This study focuses on the effect of size and zeta potential of bare and citrate-coated AgNPs on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as main capillary cells. AgNPs with high and low concentrations and no citrate coating were synthesized by using simple wet chemical method and named as AgNP/HC, AgNP/LC, and AgNP, respectively. Citrate coated particles showed larger zeta potential of -22 mV and AgNp/HC showed the smallest size of 13.2 nm. UV-Visible spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were performed to evaluate particle size and hydrodynamic diameter of NPs in water and cell culture media. Results indicated that higher concentrations of citrate decreased hydrodynamic diameter and NP agglomeration. reactive oxygen species (ROS) production of all AgNPs was similar at 28 ppm although it was significantly higher than control group. Their effects on cell membrane and chromosomal structure were studied using LDH measurement and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, as well. Results demonstrated that AgNP/LC was less toxic to cells owing to higher value of IC50, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and less release of LDH. Cancerous (Human Caucasian neuroblastoma) and immortal cells (Mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line) were about twice more sensitive than HUVECs to toxic effects of AgNPs. DAPI staining results showed that AgNP and AgNP/HC induced highest and lowest breaking of chromosome. Overall results suggest that viability of HUVECs will be higher than 90% when viability of cancerous cells is 50% in AgNPs chemotherapy.

  3. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation, and size-distribution analysis of whole yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora

    2004-08-01

    This work continues the project on field-flow fractionation characterisation of whole wine-making yeast cells reported in previous papers. When yeast cells are fractionated by gravitational field-flow fractionation and cell sizing of the collected fractions is achieved by the electrosensing zone technique (Coulter counter), it is shown that yeast cell retention depends on differences between physical indexes of yeast cells other than size. Scanning electron microscopy on collected fractions actually shows co-elution of yeast cells of different size and shape. Otherwise, the observed agreement between the particle size distribution analysis obtained by means of the Coulter counter and by flow field-flow fractionation, which employs a second mobile phase flow as applied field instead of Earth's gravity, indicates that yeast cell density can play a major role in the gravitational field-flow fractionation retention mechanism of yeast cells, in which flow field-flow fractionation retention is independent of particle density. Flow field-flow fractionation is then coupled off-line to gravitational field-flow fractionation for more accurate characterisation of the doubly-fractionated cells. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation eventually furnishes more information on the multipolydispersity indexes of yeast cells, in particular on their shape and density polydispersity.

  4. Control over Particle Size Distribution by Autoclaving Poloxamer-Stabilized Trimyristin Nanodispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göke, Katrin; Roese, Elin; Arnold, Andreas; Kuntsche, Judith; Bunjes, Heike

    2016-09-06

    Lipid nanoparticles are under investigation as delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drugs. The particle size in these dispersions strongly influences important pharmaceutical properties like biodistribution and drug loading capacity; it should be below 500 nm for direct injection into the bloodstream. Consequently, small particles with a narrow particle size distribution are desired. Hitherto, there are, however, only limited possibilities for the preparation of monodisperse, pharmaceutically relevant dispersions. In this work, the effect of autoclaving at 121 °C on the particle size distribution of lipid nanoemulsions and -suspensions consisting of the pharmaceutically relevant components trimyristin and poloxamer 188 was studied. Additionally, the amount of emulsifier needed to stabilize both untreated and autoclaved particles was assessed. In our study, four dispersions of mean particle sizes from 45 to 150 nm were prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization. The particle size distribution before and after autoclaving was characterized using static and dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and transmission electron microscopy. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation was used for particle size distribution analyses and for the determination of free poloxamer 188. Upon autoclaving, the mean particle size increased to up to 200 nm, but not proportionally to the initial size. At the same time, the particle size distribution width decreased remarkably. Heat treatment thus seems to be a promising approach to achieve the desired narrow particle size distribution of such dispersions. Related to the lipid content, suspension particles needed more emulsifier for stabilization than emulsion droplets, and smaller particles more than larger ones.

  5. Rab1b overexpression modifies Golgi size and gene expression in HeLa cells and modulates the thyrotrophin response in thyroid cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Nahuel; Dumur, Catherine I; Martinez, Hernán; García, Iris A; Monetta, Pablo; Slavin, Ileana; Sampieri, Luciana; Koritschoner, Nicolas; Mironov, Alexander A; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Alvarez, Cecilia

    2013-03-01

    Rab1b belongs to the Rab-GTPase family that regulates membrane trafficking and signal transduction systems able to control diverse cellular activities, including gene expression. Rab1b is essential for endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi transport. Although it is ubiquitously expressed, its mRNA levels vary among different tissues. This work aims to characterize the role of the high Rab1b levels detected in some secretory tissues. We report that, in HeLa cells, an increase in Rab1b levels induces changes in Golgi size and gene expression. Significantly, analyses applied to selected genes, KDELR3, GM130 (involved in membrane transport), and the proto-oncogene JUN, indicate that the Rab1b increase acts as a molecular switch to control the expression of these genes at the transcriptional level, resulting in changes at the protein level. These Rab1b-dependent changes require the activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein consensus binding site in those target promoter regions. Moreover, our results reveal that, in a secretory thyroid cell line (FRTL5), Rab1b expression increases in response to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Additionally, changes in Rab1b expression in FRTL5 cells modify the specific TSH response. Our results show, for the first time, that changes in Rab1b levels modulate gene transcription and strongly suggest that a Rab1b increase is required to elicit a secretory response.

  6. Structure and Control Strategies of Fuel Cell Vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋建国; 张承宁; 孙逢春; 钟秋海

    2004-01-01

    The structure and kinds of the fuel cell vehicle (FCV) and the mathematical model of the fuel cell processor are discussed in detail. FCV includes many parts: the fuel cell thermal and water management, fuel supply, air supply and distribution, AC motor drive, main and auxiliary power management, and overall vehicle control system. So it requires different kinds of control strategies, such as the PID method, zero-pole method, optimal control method, fuzzy control and neural network control. Along with the progress of control method, the fuel cell vehicle's stability and reliability is up-and-up. Experiment results show FCV has high energy efficiency.

  7. Sample size requirements for studies of treatment effects on beta-cell function in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Lachin

    Full Text Available Preservation of β-cell function as measured by stimulated C-peptide has recently been accepted as a therapeutic target for subjects with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. In recently completed studies conducted by the Type 1 Diabetes Trial Network (TrialNet, repeated 2-hour Mixed Meal Tolerance Tests (MMTT were obtained for up to 24 months from 156 subjects with up to 3 months duration of type 1 diabetes at the time of study enrollment. These data provide the information needed to more accurately determine the sample size needed for future studies of the effects of new agents on the 2-hour area under the curve (AUC of the C-peptide values. The natural log(x, log(x+1 and square-root (√x transformations of the AUC were assessed. In general, a transformation of the data is needed to better satisfy the normality assumptions for commonly used statistical tests. Statistical analysis of the raw and transformed data are provided to estimate the mean levels over time and the residual variation in untreated subjects that allow sample size calculations for future studies at either 12 or 24 months of follow-up and among children 8-12 years of age, adolescents (13-17 years and adults (18+ years. The sample size needed to detect a given relative (percentage difference with treatment versus control is greater at 24 months than at 12 months of follow-up, and differs among age categories. Owing to greater residual variation among those 13-17 years of age, a larger sample size is required for this age group. Methods are also described for assessment of sample size for mixtures of subjects among the age categories. Statistical expressions are presented for the presentation of analyses of log(x+1 and √x transformed values in terms of the original units of measurement (pmol/ml. Analyses using different transformations are described for the TrialNet study of masked anti-CD20 (rituximab versus masked placebo. These results provide the information needed to

  8. Fabrication of large-sized two-dimensional ordered surface array with well-controlled structure via colloidal particle lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinping; Ye, Lei; Qiu, Dong

    2014-06-17

    Epoxy resin coated glass slides were used for colloidal particle lithography, in order to prepare well-defined 2D surface arrays. Upon the assistance of a large-sized 2D colloidal single crystal as template, centimeter-sized ordered surface arrays of bowl-like units were obtained. Systematic studies revealed that the parameters of obtained surface arrays could be readily controlled by some operational factors, such as temperature, epoxy resin layer thickness, and template particle size. With epoxy resin substituting for normal linear polymer, the height/diameter ratio of bowls in the formed surface arrays can be largely increased. With further reactive plasma etching, the parameters of ordered surface arrays could be finely tuned through controlling etching time. This study provides a facile way to prepare large-sized 2D surface arrays with tunable parameters.

  9. Size, Shape, and Arrangement of Cellulose Microfibril in Higher Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) are imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the sub-nanometer resolution. We found that the size and shape of fundamental cellulose elementary fibril (CEF) is essentially identical in different cell wall types, i.e., primary wall (PW), parenchyma secondary wall (pSW), and sclerenchyma secondary wall (sSW), which is consistent with previously proposed 36-chain model (Ding et al., 2006, J. Agric. Food Chem.). The arrangement of individual CEFs in these wall types exhibits two orientations. In PW, CEFs are horizontally associated through their hydrophilic faces, and the planar faces are exposed, forming ribbon-like macrofibrils. In pSW and sSW, CEFs are vertically oriented, forming layers, in which hemicelluloses are interacted with the hydrophobic faces of the CEF and serve as spacers between CEFs. Lignification occurs between CEF-hemicelluloses layers in secondary walls. Furthermore, we demonstrated quantitative analysis of plant cell wall accessibility to and digestibility by different cellulase systems at real-time using chemical imaging (e.g., stimulated Raman scattering) and fluorescence microscopy of labeled cellulases (Ding et al., 2012, Science, in press).

  10. MODELING, SIMULATON AND SIZING OF PHOTOVOLTAIC/WIND/FUEL CELL HYBRID GENERATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.S.LATHA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The depleting fossil fuel reserves and increasing concern towards global warming have created the need to surge for the alternative power generation options. Renewable energy sources like Wind, Solar-PV, Biomass and fuel cells are gaining prominence nowadays, as they are more energy efficient, reduce pollution and also they serveas a promising solution to the toughest energy crisis faced during the recent years. This paper focuses on the modeling and simulation of solar – photovoltaic, wind and fuel cell hybrid energy systems using MATLAB/Simulink software. The intermittent nature of solar and wind energy sources make them unreliable. Hence Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT is used to extract maximum power from the wind and sunwhen it is available. The standard perturb and observe method of MPPT is used for the PV system and for the wind generation system. The simulation results of the PV/Wind /Fuel cell hybrid system are presented in graph showing the effectiveness of the proposed system model. Also, hardware implementation of microcontroller based MPPT for solar-PV alone and unit sizing of the hybrid system for the PG simulation lab in EEE Dept. of Thiagarajar College of Engineering is depicted in the paper.

  11. Population size drives industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcoholic fermentation and is under genetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertin, Warren; Marullo, Philippe; Aigle, Michel; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Bely, Marina; Sicard, Delphine

    2011-04-01

    Alcoholic fermentation (AF) conducted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been exploited for millennia in three important human food processes: beer and wine production and bread leavening. Most of the efforts to understand and improve AF have been made separately for each process, with strains that are supposedly well adapted. In this work, we propose a first comparison of yeast AFs in three synthetic media mimicking the dough/wort/grape must found in baking, brewing, and wine making. The fermentative behaviors of nine food-processing strains were evaluated in these media, at the cellular, populational, and biotechnological levels. A large variation in the measured traits was observed, with medium effects usually being greater than the strain effects. The results suggest that human selection targeted the ability to complete fermentation for wine strains and trehalose content for beer strains. Apart from these features, the food origin of the strains did not significantly affect AF, suggesting that an improvement program for a specific food processing industry could exploit the variability of strains used in other industries. Glucose utilization was analyzed, revealing plastic but also genetic variation in fermentation products and indicating that artificial selection could be used to modify the production of glycerol, acetate, etc. The major result was that the overall maximum CO(2) production rate (V(max)) was not related to the maximum CO(2) production rate per cell. Instead, a highly significant correlation between V(max) and the maximum population size was observed in all three media, indicating that human selection targeted the efficiency of cellular reproduction rather than metabolic efficiency. This result opens the way to new strategies for yeast improvement.

  12. Fixation patterns, not clinical diagnosis, predict body size over‐estimation in eating disordered women and healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Katri K.; Cornelissen, Piers L.; Hancock, Peter J. B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective A core feature of anorexia nervosa (AN) is an over‐estimation of body size. Women with AN have a different pattern of eye‐movements when judging bodies, but it is unclear whether this is specific to their diagnosis or whether it is found in anyone over‐estimating body size. Method To address this question, we compared the eye movement patterns from three participant groups while they carried out a body size estimation task: (i) 20 women with recovering/recovered anorexia (rAN) who had concerns about body shape and weight and who over‐estimated body size, (ii) 20 healthy controls who had normative levels of concern about body shape and who estimated body size accurately (iii) 20 healthy controls who had normative levels of concern about body shape but who did over‐estimate body size. Results Comparisons between the three groups showed that: (i) accurate body size estimators tended to look more in the waist region, and this was independent of clinical diagnosis; (ii) there is a pattern of looking at images of bodies, particularly viewing the upper parts of the torso and face, which is specific to participants with rAN but which is independent of accuracy in body size estimation. Discussion Since the over‐estimating controls did not share the same body image concerns that women with rAN report, their over‐estimation cannot be explained by attitudinal concerns about body shape and weight. These results suggest that a distributed fixation pattern is associated with over‐estimation of body size and should be addressed in treatment programs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:507–518). PMID:26996142

  13. Genetic control of cowpea seed sizes Controle genético do tamanho das sementes de caupi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Cláudio da Conceição Lopes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.] is one of the most widely adapted grain legumes in hot regions of Africa, Asia and the Americas. In the semiarid Northeast of Brazil, it is the main subsistence crop, an excellent protein source of low cost, for the poor population. The objective of this work was to estimate genetic parameters to understand the inheritance of seed sizes in cowpea. The parents P1 and P2 and the generations, F1, F2, BC1 and BC2 of the cross TVx5058-09C X Manteiguinha formed the genetic material for this study. These six generates (P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1 and BC were evaluated in a completely randomized block-design with six replications, in Teresina - PI, Brazil, in 1998. The genetic parameters estimated were: phenotypic and total genetic variance, additive and dominance genetic components of variance and the variance attributed to the environment, heritability in the broad and narrow senses, average degree of dominance and the number of genes controlling the character. The additive - dominance model fitted the data for 100-seeds weight in as much as the midparental value and the additive effect were the more important genetic parameters for the determination of this character. The number of genes that control its expression is five. The occurrence of high values for narrow sense heritability indicates that the selection for seed size can be made in early generations.Caupi [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.] é uma das leguminosas mais adaptadas às regiões quentes da África, Ásia e das Américas. No semi-árido do nordeste do Brasil é a principal cultura de subsistência, por ser uma excelente fonte de proteína de baixo custo para a população mais carente. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estimar parâmetros genéticos que podem explicar a herança do tamanho das sementes de caupi. Os genótipos parentais P1 e P2 e as gerações F1, F2, RC1 e RC2 do cruzamento TVx5058-09C X Manteiguinha, constituíram o material genético utilizado

  14. Mesoporous Silica Supported Au Nanoparticles with Controlled Size as Efficient Heterogeneous Catalyst for Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of Au catalysts with different sizes were synthesized and employed on amine group functionalized ordered mesoporous silica solid supports as catalyst for the aerobic oxidation of various alcohols. The mesoporous silica of MCM-41 supported Au nanoparticles (Au-1 exhibited the smallest particle size at ~1.8 nm with superior catalytic activities owing to the confinement effect of the mesoporous channels. Au-1 catalyst is also very stable and reusable under aerobic condition. Therefore, this presented work would obviously provide us a platform for synthesizing more size-controlled metal catalysts to improve the catalytic performances.

  15. Sample Size Calculation: Inaccurate A Priori Assumptions for Nuisance Parameters Can Greatly Affect the Power of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Tavernier

    Full Text Available We aimed to examine the extent to which inaccurate assumptions for nuisance parameters used to calculate sample size can affect the power of a randomized controlled trial (RCT. In a simulation study, we separately considered an RCT with continuous, dichotomous or time-to-event outcomes, with associated nuisance parameters of standard deviation, success rate in the control group and survival rate in the control group at some time point, respectively. For each type of outcome, we calculated a required sample size N for a hypothesized treatment effect, an assumed nuisance parameter and a nominal power of 80%. We then assumed a nuisance parameter associated with a relative error at the design stage. For each type of outcome, we randomly drew 10,000 relative errors of the associated nuisance parameter (from empirical distributions derived from a previously published review. Then, retro-fitting the sample size formula, we derived, for the pre-calculated sample size N, the real power of the RCT, taking into account the relative error for the nuisance parameter. In total, 23%, 0% and 18% of RCTs with continuous, binary and time-to-event outcomes, respectively, were underpowered (i.e., the real power was 90%. Even with proper calculation of sample size, a substantial number of trials are underpowered or overpowered because of imprecise knowledge of nuisance parameters. Such findings raise questions about how sample size for RCTs should be determined.

  16. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways.

  17. Nanometer-scale sizing accuracy of particle suspensions on an unmodified cell phone using elastic light scattering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary J Smith

    Full Text Available We report on the construction of a Fourier plane imaging system attached to a cell phone. By illuminating particle suspensions with a collimated beam from an inexpensive diode laser, angularly resolved scattering patterns are imaged by the phone's camera. Analyzing these patterns with Mie theory results in predictions of size distributions of the particles in suspension. Despite using consumer grade electronics, we extracted size distributions of sphere suspensions with better than 20 nm accuracy in determining the mean size. We also show results from milk, yeast, and blood cells. Performing these measurements on a portable device presents opportunities for field-testing of food quality, process monitoring, and medical diagnosis.

  18. Role of nano and micron-sized inclusions on the oxygen controlled preform optimized infiltration growth processed YBCO superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan Kumar Naik, S.; Bai, V. Seshu

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, with the aim of improving the local flux pinning at the unit cell level in the YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) bulk superconductors, 20 wt% of nanoscale Sm2O3 and micron sized (Nd, Sm, Gd)2BaCuO5 secondary phase particles were added to YBCO and processed in oxygen controlled preform optimized infiltration growth process. Nano Dispersive Sol Casting method is employed to homogeneously distribute the nano Sm2O3 particles of 30-50 nm without any agglomeration in the precursor powder. Microstructural investigations on doped samples show the chemical fluctuations as annuli cores in the 211 phase particles. The introduction of mixed rare earth elements at Y-site resulted in compositional fluctuations in the superconducting matrix. The associated lattice mismatch defects have provided flux pinning up to large magnetic fields. Magnetic field dependence of current density (Jc(H)) at different temperatures revealed that the dominant pinning mechanism is caused by spatial variations of critical temperatures, due to the spatial fluctuations in the matrix composition. As the number of rare earth elements increased in the YBCO, the peak field position in the scaling of the normalized pinning force density (Fp/Fp max) significantly gets shifted towards the higher fields. The curves of Jc(H) and Fp/Fp max at different temperatures clearly indicate the LRE substitution for LRE' or Ba-sites for δTc pinning.

  19. Large Size Color-tunable Electroluminescence from Cationic Iridium Complexes-based Light-emitting Electrochemical Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qunying; Li, Fushan; Guo, Tailiang; Shan, Guogang; Su, Zhongmin

    2016-06-01

    Solution-processable light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) with simple device architecture have become an attractive candidate for application in next generation lighting and flat-panel displays. Herein, single layer LECs employing two cationic Ir(III) complexes showing highly efficient blue-green and yellow electroluminescence with peak current efficiency of 31.6 cd A‑1 and 40.6 cd A‑1, respectively, have been reported. By using both complexes in the device, color-tunable LECs with a single spectral peak in the wavelength range from 499 to 570 nm were obtained by varying their rations. In addition, the fabrication of efficient LECs was demonstrated based on low cost doctor-blade coating technique, which was compatible with the roll to roll fabrication process for the large size production. In this work, for the first time, 4 inch LEC devices by doctor-blade coating were fabricated, which exhibit the efficiencies of 23.4 cd A‑1 and 25.4 cd A‑1 for the blue-green and yellow emission, respectively. The exciting results indicated that highly efficient LECs with controllable color could be realized and find practical application in large size lighting and displays.

  20. Optimizing the electrode size and arrangement in a microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Carrera, L; Mehta, P; Escapa, A; Morán, A; García, V; Guiot, S R; Tartakovsky, B

    2011-10-01

    This study investigates the influence of anode and cathode size and arrangement on hydrogen production in a membrane-less flat-plate microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Protein measurements were used to evaluate microbial density in the carbon felt anode. The protein concentration was observed to significantly decrease with the increase in distance from the anode-cathode interface. Cathode placement on both sides of the carbon felt anode was found to increase the current, but also led to increased losses of hydrogen to hydrogenotrophic activity leading to methane production. Overall, the best performance was obtained in the flat-plate MEC with a two-layer 10 mm thick carbon felt anode and a single gas-diffusion cathode sandwiched between the anode and the hydrogen collection compartments.

  1. Interaction of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with human red blood cell membranes: size and surface effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Guannan; Trewyn, Brian G; Slowing, Igor I; Lin, Victor S-Y

    2011-02-22

    The interactions of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) of different particle sizes and surface properties with human red blood cell (RBC) membranes were investigated by membrane filtration, flow cytometry, and various microscopic techniques. Small MCM-41-type MSNs (∼100 nm) were found to adsorb to the surface of RBCs without disturbing the membrane or morphology. In contrast, adsorption of large SBA-15-type MSNs (∼600 nm) to RBCs induced a strong local membrane deformation leading to spiculation of RBCs, internalization of the particles, and eventual hemolysis. In addition, the relationship between the degree of MSN surface functionalization and the degree of its interaction with RBC, as well as the effect of RBC-MSN interaction on cellular deformability, were investigated. The results presented here provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of RBC-MSN interaction and the hemolytic activity of MSNs and will assist in the rational design of hemocompatible MSNs for intravenous drug delivery and in vivo imaging.

  2. Effect of Silver Nanoparticle Size on Efficiency Enhancement of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanu Photiphitak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide/silver (TiO2/Ag composite films were prepared by incorporating Ag in pores of mesoporous TiO2 films using a photoreduction method. The Ag nanoparticle sizes were in a range of 4.36–38.56 nm. The TiO2/Ag composite films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The TiO2 and TiO2/Ag composite films were then sensitized by immersing in a 0.3 mM N719 dye solution and fabricated for conventional dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs. J-V characteristics of the TiO2/Ag DSCs showed that the Ag nanoparticle size of 19.16 nm resulted in the short circuit current density and efficiency of 8.12 mA/cm2 and 4.76%.

  3. Remote Control of T Cell Activation Using Magnetic Janus Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwahun; Yi, Yi; Yu, Yan

    2016-06-20

    We report a strategy for using magnetic Janus microparticles to control the stimulation of T cell signaling with single-cell precision. To achieve this, we designed Janus particles that are magnetically responsive on one hemisphere and stimulatory to T cells on the other side. By manipulating the rotation and locomotion of Janus particles under an external magnetic field, we could control the orientation of the particle-cell recognition and thereby the initiation of T cell activation. This study demonstrates a step towards employing anisotropic material properties of Janus particles to control single-cell activities without the need of complex magnetic manipulation devices.

  4. A Modified Thermal Treatment Method for the Up-Scalable Synthesis of Size-Controlled Nanocrystalline Titania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysar Sabah Keiteb

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Considering the increasing demand for titania nanoparticles with controlled quality for various applications, the present work reports the up-scalable synthesis of size-controlled titanium dioxide nanocrystals with a simple and convenient thermal treatment route. Titanium dioxide nanocrystals with tetragonal structure were synthesized directly from an aqueous solution containing titanium (IV isopropoxide as the main reactant, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP as the capping agent, and deionized water as a solvent. With the elimination of the drying process in a thermal treatment method, an attempt was made to decrease the synthesis time. The mixture directly underwent calcination to form titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanocrystalline powder, which was confirmed by FT-IR, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The control over the size and optical properties of nanocrystals was achieved via variation in calcination temperatures. The obtained average sizes from XRD spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM images showed exponential variation with increasing calcination temperature. The optical properties showed a decrease in the band gap energy with increasing calcination temperature due to the enlargement of the nanoparticle size. These results prove that direct calcination of reactant solution is a convenient thermal treatment route for the potential large-scale production of size-controlled Titania nanoparticles.

  5. Yap tunes airway epithelial size and architecture by regulating the identity, maintenance, and self-renewal of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui; Fallon, Timothy R; Saladi, Srinivas Vinod; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Villoria, Jorge; Mou, Hongmei; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Gonzalez-Celeiro, Meryem; Nunna, Naveen; Hariri, Lida P; Camargo, Fernando; Ellisen, Leif W; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2014-07-28

    Our understanding of how stem cells are regulated to maintain appropriate tissue size and architecture is incomplete. We show that Yap (Yes-associated protein 1) is required for the actual maintenance of an adult mammalian stem cell. Without Yap, adult airway basal stem cells are lost through their unrestrained differentiation, resulting in the simplification of a pseudostratified epithelium into a columnar one. Conversely, Yap overexpression increases stem cell self-renewal and blocks terminal differentiation, resulting in epithelial hyperplasia and stratification. Yap overexpression in differentiated secretory cells causes them to partially reprogram and adopt a stem cell-like identity. In contrast, Yap knockdown prevents the dedifferentiation of secretory cells into stem cells. We then show that Yap functionally interacts with p63, the cardinal transcription factor associated with myriad epithelial basal stem cells. In aggregate, we show that Yap regulates all of the cardinal behaviors of airway epithelial stem cells and determines epithelial architecture.

  6. Control of cell morphology of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus for enhanced cell stability during industrial processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senz, Martin; van Lengerich, Bernhard; Bader, Johannes; Stahl, Ulf

    2015-01-02

    The viability of bacteria during industrial processing is an essential quality criterion for bacterial preparations, such as probiotics and starter cultures. Therefore, producing stable microbial cultures during proliferation is of great interest. A strong correlation between the culture medium and cellular morphology was observed for the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, which is commonly used in the dairy industry as a probiotic supplement and as a starter culture. The cell shapes ranged from single short rods to long filamentous rods. The culture medium composition could control this phenomenon of pleomorphism, especially the use of peptone in combination with an adequate heating of the medium during preparation. Furthermore, we observed a correlation between the cell size and stability of the microorganisms during industrial processing steps, such as freeze-drying, extrusion encapsulation and storage following dried preparations. The results revealed that short cells are more stable than long cells during each of the industrially relevant processing steps. As demonstrated for L. acidophilus NCFM, the adaptation of the medium composition and optimized medium preparation offer the possibility to increase the concentration of viable cells during up- and survival rate during down-stream processing.

  7. Simplified Load-Following Control for a Fuel Cell System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    A simplified load-following control scheme has been proposed for a fuel cell power system. The scheme could be used to control devices that are important parts of a fuel cell system but are sometimes characterized as parasitic because they consume some of the power generated by the fuel cells.

  8. Controls on benthic biomass size spectra in shelf and deep-sea sediments – a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kelly-Gerreyn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Factors controlling biomass distributions in marine benthic organisms (meio- to macro-fauna, 1 μg–32 mg wet weight were investigated through observations and allometric modelling. Biomass (and abundance size spectra were measured at three locations: the Faroe-Shetland Channel in the north-east Atlantic (FSC, water depth 1600 m, September 2000; the Fladen Ground in the North Sea (FG, 150 m, September 2000; and the hypoxic Oman Margin (OM, 500 m, September 2002 in the Arabian Sea. Biomass increased with body size through a power law at FG (allometric exponent, b = 0.16 and at FSC (b = 0.32, but less convincingly at OM (b was not significantly different from −1/4 or 0. Our results question the assumption that metazoan biomass spectra are bimodal in marine sediments.

    The model incorporated 16 metazoan size classes, as derived from the observed spectra, all reliant on a common detrital food pool. All physiological (ingestion, mortality, assimilation and respiration parameters scaled to body size following optimisation to the data at each site, the resulting values being consistent within expectations from the literature. For all sites, body size related changes in mortality played the greatest role in determining the trend of the biomass size spectra. The body size trend in the respiration rate was most sensitive to allometry in both mortality and ingestion, and the trend in body size spectra of the production: biomass ratio was explained by the allometry in ingestion.

    Our results suggest that size-scaling mortality and ingestion are important factors determining the distribution of biomass across the meiofauna to macrofauna size range in marine sedimentary communities, in agreement with the general observation that biomass tends to accumulates in larger rather than smaller size classes in these environments.

  9. Chemo-mechanical control of neural stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geishecker, Emily R.

    Cellular processes such as adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled in part by cell interactions with the microenvironment. Cells can sense and respond to a variety of stimuli, including soluble and insoluble factors (such as proteins and small molecules) and externally applied mechanical stresses. Mechanical properties of the environment, such as substrate stiffness, have also been suggested to play an important role in cell processes. The roles of both biochemical and mechanical signaling in fate modification of stem cells have been explored independently. However, very few studies have been performed to study well-controlled chemo-mechanotransduction. The objective of this work is to design, synthesize, and characterize a chemo-mechanical substrate to encourage neuronal differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells. In Chapter 2, Polyacrylamide (PA) gels of varying stiffnesses are functionalized with differing amounts of whole collagen to investigate the role of protein concentration in combination with substrate stiffness. As expected, neurons on the softest substrate were more in number and neuronal morphology than those on stiffer substrates. Neurons appeared locally aligned with an expansive network of neurites. Additional experiments would allow for statistical analysis to determine if and how collagen density impacts C17.2 differentiation in combination with substrate stiffness. Due to difficulties associated with whole protein approaches, a similar platform was developed using mixed adhesive peptides, derived from fibronectin and laminin, and is presented in Chapter 3. The matrix elasticity and peptide concentration can be individually modulated to systematically probe the effects of chemo-mechanical signaling on differentiation of C17.2 cells. Polyacrylamide gel stiffness was confirmed using rheological techniques and found to support values published by Yeung et al. [1]. Cellular growth and differentiation were assessed by cell counts

  10. Cell density monitoring and control of microencapsulated CHO cell cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Harriet Emma

    2015-01-01

    Though mammalian cells play a key role in the manufacturing of recombinant glycosylated proteins, cell cultures and productivity are limited by the lack of suitable systems to enable stable perfusion culture. Microencapsulation, or entrapping cells within a semi-permeable membrane, offers the potential to generate high cell density cultures and improve the productivity by mimicking the cells natural environment. However, the cells being secluded by the microcapsules membrane are difficult to ...

  11. Nuclei size in relation to nuclear status and aneuploidy rate for 13 chromosomes in donated four cells embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, I.E.; Hnida, C.; Cruger, D.G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The aim was to elucidate if the nuclear size and number are indicative of aberrant chromosome content in human blastomeres and embryos. Methods The number of nuclei and the nucleus and blastomere size were measured by a computer controlled system for multilevel analysis. Then the nuclei...

  12. Specific Approach for Size-Control III-V Quantum/Nano LED Fabrication for Prospective White Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-10

    The Final Report Title: Specific approach for size-control III-V based quantum/nano LED fabrication for prospective white ...COVERED 14-06-2005 to 14-12-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Size controlled GaN based quantum dot LED for the prospective white light source 5a. CONTRACT...structure LED The physical model of the PC LED for optical simulation is shown in Figure 10. The LED are composed with p-type GaN/ MQW of InGaN /GaN/ n

  13. Precise Morphology Control and Continuous Fabrication of Perovskite Solar Cells Using Droplet-Controllable Electrospray Coating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung Chan; Lee, Gunhee; Ha, Kyungyeon; Yoon, Jungjin; Ahn, Namyoung; Cho, Woohyung; Park, Mincheol; Choi, Mansoo

    2017-03-08

    Herein, we developed a novel electrospray coating system for continuous fabrication of perovskite solar cells with high performance. Our system can systemically control the size of CH3NH3PbI3 precursor droplets by modulating the applied electrical potential, shown to be a crucial factor for the formation of perovskite films. As a result, we have obtained pinhole-free and large grain-sized perovskite solar cells, yielding the best PCE of 13.27% with little photocurrent hysteresis. Furthermore, the average PCE through the continuous coating process was 11.56 ± 0.52%. Our system demonstrates not only the high reproducibility but also a new way to commercialize high-quality perovskite solar cells.

  14. The Size of Activating and Inhibitory Killer Ig-like Receptor Nanoclusters Is Controlled by the Transmembrane Sequence and Affects Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oszmiana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution microscopy has revealed that immune cell receptors are organized in nanoscale clusters at cell surfaces and immune synapses. However, mechanisms and functions for this nanoscale organization remain unclear. Here, we used super-resolution microscopy to compare the surface organization of paired killer Ig-like receptors (KIR, KIR2DL1 and KIR2DS1, on human primary natural killer cells and cell lines. Activating KIR2DS1 assembled in clusters two-fold larger than its inhibitory counterpart KIR2DL1. Site-directed mutagenesis established that the size of nanoclusters is controlled by transmembrane amino acid 233, a lysine in KIR2DS1. Super-resolution microscopy also revealed two ways in which the nanoscale clustering of KIR affects signaling. First, KIR2DS1 and DAP12 nanoclusters are juxtaposed in the resting cell state but coalesce upon receptor ligation. Second, quantitative super-resolution microscopy revealed that phosphorylation of the kinase ZAP-70 or phosphatase SHP-1 is favored in larger KIR nanoclusters. Thus, the size of KIR nanoclusters depends on the transmembrane sequence and affects downstream signaling.

  15. Lithium-Ion Cell Charge-Control Unit Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Buton, Robert M.; Gemeiner, Russel

    2005-01-01

    A lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell charge-control unit was developed as part of a Li-ion cell verification program. This unit manages the complex charging scheme that is required when Li-ion cells are charged in series. It enables researchers to test cells together as a pack, while allowing each cell to charge individually. This allows the inherent cell-to-cell variations to be addressed on a series string of cells and reduces test costs substantially in comparison to individual cell testing.

  16. Set-size procedures for controlling variations in speech-reception performance with a fluctuating masker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joshua G W; Summers, Van; Iyer, Nandini; Brungart, Douglas S

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) tracking is often used to measure speech reception in noise. Because SNR varies with performance using this method, data interpretation can be confounded when measuring an SNR-dependent effect such as the fluctuating-masker benefit (FMB) (the intelligibility improvement afforded by brief dips in the masker level). One way to overcome this confound, and allow FMB comparisons across listener groups with different stationary-noise performance, is to adjust the response set size to equalize performance across groups at a fixed SNR. However, this technique is only valid under the assumption that changes in set size have the same effect on percentage-correct performance for different masker types. This assumption was tested by measuring nonsense-syllable identification for normal-hearing listeners as a function of SNR, set size and masker (stationary noise, 4- and 32-Hz modulated noise and an interfering talker). Set-size adjustment had the same impact on performance scores for all maskers, confirming the independence of FMB (at matched SNRs) and set size. These results, along with those of a second experiment evaluating an adaptive set-size algorithm to adjust performance levels, establish set size as an efficient and effective tool to adjust baseline performance when comparing effects of masker fluctuations between listener groups.

  17. Rates of microbial sulfate reduction control the sizes of biogenic iron sulfide aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Q.

    2005-12-01

    Sulfide minerals occur widely in freshwater and marine sediments as byproducts of microbial sulfate reduction and as end products of heavy metal bioremediation. They form when metals in the environments combine with sulfide produced from the metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria. We used chemostat bioreactors to study sizes and crystal structures of iron sulfide (FeS) minerals produced by Desulfovibrio vulgaris, D. desulfuricans strain G20, and subspecies desulfuricans. FeS nanoparticles and their aggregates are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). FeS nanoparticles produced by sulfate reducing bacteria are extremely small, usually less than around 10 nm in diameter. Nanoparticles do not occur as individual nanoparticles, but as aggregates. The sizes of FeS aggregates are affected by sulfate reduction rates, Fe(II) concentration, pH, ionic strength, organic matter concentration, bacterial species, etc. Aggregate size ranges from about 500 nm at very large sulfate reduction rates to about 1,500 nm at very small rates. Variations in Fe(II) concentration also lead to a difference up to 500 nm in FeS aggregate size. Different bacterial species produce nanoparticle aggregates of different sizes under similar growth conditions. For example, D. vulgaris produces FeS aggregates with sizes 500 nm smaller than those by strain G20. The inverse relationship between FeS ag