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Sample records for cell size control

  1. Mechanisms of daughter cell-size control during cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyomitsu, Tomomi

    2015-05-01

    Daughter cell size is tightly regulated during cell division. In animal cells, the position of the anaphase spindle specifies the cell cleavage site to dictate the relative size of the daughter cells. Although spindle orientation is regulated by dynein-dependent cortical pulling forces exerted on astral microtubules in many cell types, it was unclear how these forces are precisely regulated to center or displace the spindle. Recently, intrinsic signals derived from chromosomes or spindle poles have been demonstrated to regulate dynein-dependent pulling forces in symmetrically dividing cells. Unexpectedly, myosin-dependent contractile forces have also been shown to control spindle position by altering the cellular boundaries during anaphase. In this review, I discuss how dynein- and myosin-dependent forces are coordinately regulated to control daughter cell size. PMID:25548067

  2. Cell size checkpoint control by the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Chiung Fang

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Size control is essential for all proliferating cells, and is thought to be regulated by checkpoints that couple cell size to cell cycle progression. The aberrant cell-size phenotypes caused by mutations in the retinoblastoma (RB tumor suppressor pathway are consistent with a role in size checkpoint control, but indirect effects on size caused by altered cell cycle kinetics are difficult to rule out. The multiple fission cell cycle of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii uncouples growth from division, allowing direct assessment of the relationship between size phenotypes and checkpoint function. Mutations in the C. reinhardtii RB homolog encoded by MAT3 cause supernumerous cell divisions and small cells, suggesting a role for MAT3 in size control. We identified suppressors of an mat3 null allele that had recessive mutations in DP1 or dominant mutations in E2F1, loci encoding homologs of a heterodimeric transcription factor that is targeted by RB-related proteins. Significantly, we determined that the dp1 and e2f1 phenotypes were caused by defects in size checkpoint control and were not due to a lengthened cell cycle. Despite their cell division defects, mat3, dp1, and e2f1 mutants showed almost no changes in periodic transcription of genes induced during S phase and mitosis, many of which are conserved targets of the RB pathway. Conversely, we found that regulation of cell size was unaffected when S phase and mitotic transcription were inhibited. Our data provide direct evidence that the RB pathway mediates cell size checkpoint control and suggest that such control is not directly coupled to the magnitude of periodic cell cycle transcription.

  3. Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Di Talia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle.

  4. Systematic analysis of embryonic stem cell differentiation in hydrodynamic environments with controlled embryoid body size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Melissa A.; Saeed, Rabbia; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of stem cells to environmental perturbations has prompted many studies which aim to characterize the influence of mechanical factors on stem cell morphogenesis and differentiation. Hydrodynamic cultures, often employed for large scale bioprocessing applications, impart complex fluid shear and transport profiles, and influence cell fate as a result of changes in media mixing conditions. However, previous studies of hydrodynamic cultures have been limited in their ability to distinguish confounding factors that may affect differentiation, including modulation of embryoid body size in response to changes in the hydrodynamic environment. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to control and maintain embryoid body (EB) size using a combination of forced aggregation formation and rotary orbital suspension culture, in order to assess the impact of hydrodynamic cultures on ESC differentiation, independent of EB size. Size-controlled EBs maintained at different rotary orbital speeds exhibited similar morphological features and gene expression profiles, consistent with ESC differentiation. The similar differentiation of ESCs across a range of hydrodynamic conditions suggests that controlling EB formation and resultant size may be important for scalable bioprocessing applications, in order to standardize EB morphogenesis. However, perturbations in the hydrodynamic environment also led to subtle changes in differentiation toward certain lineages, including temporal modulation of gene expression, as well changes in the relative efficiencies of differentiated phenotypes, thereby highlighting important tissue engineering principles that should be considered for implementation in bioreactor design, as well as for directed ESC differentiation. PMID:22609810

  5. The control of cell growth and body size in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Simon

    2014-02-01

    One of the most important ways in which animal species vary is in their size. Individuals of the largest animal ever thought to have lived, the blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus), can reach a weight of 190 t and a length of over 30 m. At the other extreme, among the smallest multicellular animals are males of the parasitic wasp, Dicopomorpha echmepterygis, which even as adults are just 140 μm in length. In terms of volume, these species differ by more than 14 orders of magnitude. Since size has such profound effects on an organism's ecology, anatomy and physiology, an important task for evolutionary biology and ecology is to account for why organisms grow to their characteristic sizes. Equally, a full description of an organism's development must include an explanation of how its growth and body size are regulated. Here I review research on how these processes are controlled in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Analyses of small and long mutants have revealed that in the worm, DBL-1, a ligand in the TGFβ superfamily family, promotes growth in a dose-dependent manner. DBL-1 signaling affects body size by stimulating the growth of syncytial hypodermal cells rather than controlling cell division. Signals from chemosensory neurons and from the gonad also modulate body size, in part, independently of DBL-1-mediated signaling. Organismal size and morphology is heavily influenced by the cuticle, which acts as the exoskeleton. Finally, I summarize research on several genes that appear to regulate body size by cell autonomously regulating cell growth throughout the worm. PMID:24262077

  6. Molecular control of brain size: Regulators of neural stem cell life, death and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proper development of the brain and other organs depends on multiple parameters, including strictly controlled expansion of specific progenitor pools. The regulation of such expansion events includes enzymatic activities that govern the correct number of specific cells to be generated via an orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell cycle exit, differentiation, cell death etc. Certain proteins in turn exert direct control of these enzymatic activities and thus progenitor pool expansion and organ size. The members of the Cip/Kip family (p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2) are well-known regulators of cell cycle exit that interact with and inhibit the activity of cyclin-CDK complexes, whereas members of the p53/p63/p73 family are traditionally associated with regulation of cell death. It has however become clear that the roles for these proteins are not as clear-cut as initially thought. In this review, we discuss the roles for proteins of the Cip/Kip and p53/p63/p73 families in the regulation of cell cycle control, differentiation, and death of neural stem cells. We suggest that these proteins act as molecular interfaces, or 'pilots', to assure the correct assembly of protein complexes with enzymatic activities at the right place at the right time, thereby regulating essential decisions in multiple cellular events.

  7. Antagonistic control of muscle cell size by AMPK and mTORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, Rémi; Lantier, Louise; Leclerc, Jocelyne; Sotiropoulos, Athanassia; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit

    2011-08-15

    Nutrition and physical activity have profound effects on skeletal muscle metabolism and growth. Regulation of muscle mass depends on a thin balance between growth-promoting and growth-suppressing factors. Over the past decade, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase has emerged as an essential factor for muscle growth by mediating the anabolic response to nutrients, insulin, insulin-like growth factors and resistance exercise. As opposed to the mTOR signaling pathway, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is switched on during starvation and endurance exercise to upregulate energy-conserving processes. Recent evidence indicates that mTORC1 (mTOR Complex 1) and AMPK represent two antagonistic forces governing muscle adaption to nutrition, starvation and growth stimulation. Animal knockout models with impaired mTORC1 signaling showed decreased muscle mass correlated with increased AMPK activation. Interestingly, AMPK inhibition in p70S6K-deficient muscle cells restores cell growth and sensitivity to nutrients. Conversely, muscle cells lacking AMPK have increased mTORC1 activation with increased cell size and protein synthesis rate. We also demonstrated that the hypertrophic action of MyrAkt is enhanced in AMPK-deficient muscle, indicating that AMPK acts as a negative feedback control to restrain muscle hypertrophy. Our recent results extend this notion by showing that AMPKα1, but not AMPKα2, regulates muscle cell size through the control of mTORC1 signaling. These results reveal the diverse functions of the two catalytic isoforms of AMPK, with AMPKα1 playing a predominant role in the control of muscle cell size and AMPKα2 mediating muscle metabolic adaptation. Thus, the crosstalk between AMPK and mTORC1 signaling is a highly regulated way to control changes in muscle growth and metabolic rate imposed by external cues. PMID:21799304

  8. Control of cell proliferation, endoreduplication, cell size, and cell death by the retinoblastoma-related pathway in maize endosperm

    KAUST Repository

    Sabelli, Paolo A.

    2013-04-22

    The endospermof cereal grains is one of the most valuable products of modern agriculture. Cereal endosperm development comprises different phases characterized by mitotic cell proliferation, endoreduplication, the accumulation of storage compounds, and programmed cell death. Although manipulation of these processes could maximize grain yield, how they are regulated and integrated is poorly understood. We show that the Retinoblastoma-related (RBR) pathway controls key aspects of endosperm development in maize. Down-regulation of RBR1 by RNAi resulted in up-regulation of RBR3-type genes, as well as the MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE 2-7 gene family and PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN, which encode essential DNA replication factors. Both the mitotic and endoreduplication cell cycles were stimulated. Developing transgenic endosperm contained 42-58% more cells and ~70% more DNA than wild type, whereas there was a reduction in cell and nuclear sizes. In addition, cell death was enhanced. The DNA content of mature endosperm increased 43% upon RBR1 downregulation, whereas storage protein content and kernel weight were essentially not affected. Down-regulation of both RBR1 and CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE A (CDKA);1 indicated that CDKA;1 is epistatic to RBR1 and controls endoreduplication through an RBR1- dependent pathway. However, the repressive activity of RBR1 on downstream targets was independent from CDKA;1, suggesting diversification of RBR1 activities. Furthermore, RBR1 negatively regulated CDK activity, suggesting the presence of a feedback loop. These results indicate that the RBR1 pathway plays a major role in regulation of different processes during maize endosperm development and suggest the presence of tissue/organlevel regulation of endosperm/seed homeostasis.

  9. Tuning the Properties of Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells by Adjusting Fullerene Size to Control Intercalation

    KAUST Repository

    Cates, Nichole C.

    2009-12-09

    We demonstrate that intercalation of fullerene derivatives between the side chains of conjugated polymers can be controlled by adjusting the fullerene size and compare the properties of intercalated and nonintercalated poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (pBTTT):fullerene blends. The intercalated blends, which exhibit optimal solar-cell performance at 1:4 polymer:fullerene by weight, have better photoluminescence quenching and lower absorption than the nonintercalated blends, which optimize at 1:1. Understanding how intercalation affects performance will enable more effective design of polymer:fullerene solar cells. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  10. Does Ploidy Level Directly Control Cell Size? Counterevidence from Arabidopsis Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    Ploidy level affects cell size in many organisms, and ploidy-dependent cell enlargement has been used to breed many useful organisms. However, how polyploidy affects cell size remains unknown. Previous studies have explored changes in transcriptome data caused by polyploidy, but have not been successful. The most naïve theory explaining ploidy-dependent cell enlargement is that increases in gene copy number increase the amount of protein, which in turn increases the cell volume. This hypothes...

  11. The Homeodomain Iroquois Proteins Control Cell Cycle Progression and Regulate the Size of Developmental Fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Barrios

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available During development, proper differentiation and final organ size rely on the control of territorial specification and cell proliferation. Although many regulators of these processes have been identified, how both are coordinated remains largely unknown. The homeodomain Iroquois/Irx proteins play a key, evolutionarily conserved, role in territorial specification. Here we show that in the imaginal discs, reduced function of Iroquois genes promotes cell proliferation by accelerating the G1 to S transition. Conversely, their increased expression causes cell-cycle arrest, down-regulating the activity of the Cyclin E/Cdk2 complex. We demonstrate that physical interaction of the Iroquois protein Caupolican with Cyclin E-containing protein complexes, through its IRO box and Cyclin-binding domains, underlies its activity in cell-cycle control. Thus, Drosophila Iroquois proteins are able to regulate cell-autonomously the growth of the territories they specify. Moreover, our results provide a molecular mechanism for a role of Iroquois/Irx genes as tumour suppressors.

  12. Sized controlled synthesis, purification, and cell studies with silicon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiohara, Amane; Prabakar, Sujay; Faramus, Angelique; Hsu, Chia-Yen; Lai, Ping-Shan; Northcote, Peter T.; Tilley, Richard D.

    2011-08-01

    This article describes the size control synthesis of silicon quantum dots with simple microemulsion techniques. The silicon nanocrystals are small enough to be in the strong confinement regime and photoluminesce in the blue region of the visible spectrum and the emission can be tuned by changing the nanocrystal size. The silicon quantum dots were capped with allylamine either a platinum catalyst or UV-radiation. An extensive purification protocol is reported and assessed using 1H NMR to produce ultra pure silicon quantum dots suitable for biological studies. The highly pure quantum dots were used in cellular uptake experiments and monitored using confocal microscopy. The results showed that the amine terminated silicon nanocrystals accumulated in lysosome but not in nuclei and could be used as bio-markers to monitor cancer cells over long timescales.This article describes the size control synthesis of silicon quantum dots with simple microemulsion techniques. The silicon nanocrystals are small enough to be in the strong confinement regime and photoluminesce in the blue region of the visible spectrum and the emission can be tuned by changing the nanocrystal size. The silicon quantum dots were capped with allylamine either a platinum catalyst or UV-radiation. An extensive purification protocol is reported and assessed using 1H NMR to produce ultra pure silicon quantum dots suitable for biological studies. The highly pure quantum dots were used in cellular uptake experiments and monitored using confocal microscopy. The results showed that the amine terminated silicon nanocrystals accumulated in lysosome but not in nuclei and could be used as bio-markers to monitor cancer cells over long timescales. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10458f

  13. Does ploidy level directly control cell size? Counterevidence from Arabidopsis genetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Tsukaya

    Full Text Available Ploidy level affects cell size in many organisms, and ploidy-dependent cell enlargement has been used to breed many useful organisms. However, how polyploidy affects cell size remains unknown. Previous studies have explored changes in transcriptome data caused by polyploidy, but have not been successful. The most naïve theory explaining ploidy-dependent cell enlargement is that increases in gene copy number increase the amount of protein, which in turn increases the cell volume. This hypothesis can be evaluated by examining whether any strains, mutants, or transgenics show the same cell size before and after a tetraploidization event. I performed this experiment by tetraploidizing various mutants and transgenics of Arabidopsis thaliana, which show a wide range in cell size, and found that the ploidy-dependent increase in cell volume is genetically regulated. This result is not in agreement with the theory described above.

  14. Lateral inhibition-induced pattern formation controlled by the size and geometry of the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-09-01

    Pattern formation in development biology is one of the fundamental processes by which cells change their functions. It is based on the communication of cells via intra- and intercellular dynamics of biochemicals. Thus, the cell is directly involved in biochemical interactions. However, many theoretical approaches describing biochemical pattern formation have usually neglected the cell's role or have simplified the subcellular process without considering cellular aspects despite the cell being the environment where biochemicals interact. On the other hand, recent experimental observations suggest that a change in the physical conditions of cell-to-cell contact can result in a change in cell fate and tissue patterning in a lateral inhibition system. Here we develop a mathematical model by which biochemical dynamics can be directly observed with explicitly expressed cell structure and geometry in higher dimensions, and reconsider pattern formation by lateral inhibition of the Notch-Delta signaling pathway. We explore how the physical characteristic of cell, such as cell geometry or size, influences the biochemical pattern formation in a multi-cellular system. Our results suggest that a property based on cell geometry can be a novel mechanism for symmetry breaking inducing cell asymmetry. We show that cell volume can critically influence cell fate determination and pattern formation at the tissue level, and the surface area of the cell-to-cell contact can directly affect the spatial range of patterning. PMID:27229622

  15. Cell Size Regulation in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ariel

    2014-05-01

    Various bacteria such as the canonical gram negative Escherichia coli or the well-studied gram positive Bacillus subtilis divide symmetrically after they approximately double their volume. Their size at division is not constant, but is typically distributed over a narrow range. Here, we propose an analytically tractable model for cell size control, and calculate the cell size and interdivision time distributions, as well as the correlations between these variables. We suggest ways of extracting the model parameters from experimental data, and show that existing data for E. coli supports partial size control, and a particular explanation: a cell attempts to add a constant volume from the time of initiation of DNA replication to the next initiation event. This hypothesis accounts for the experimentally observed correlations between mother and daughter cells as well as the exponential dependence of size on growth rate.

  16. Synthesis and activation of Pt nanoparticles with controlled size for fuel cell electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhufang; Reichert, W. Matthew; Nikles, David E. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0336 (United States); Shamsuzzoha, Mohammad; Ada, Earl T. [Central Analytical Facility, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0336 (United States)

    2007-02-10

    Well-dispersed Pt nanoparticles with controlled size and narrow size distribution were prepared by polyalcohol reduction of platinum acetylacetonate, using oleylamine as a capping agent. The particle size was varied from 3.5 nm to 11.5 nm by decreasing the amount of oleylamine added in the synthesis. Size selection of the as-prepared particles by solvent fractionation yielded nearly monodispersed Pt particles. The as-prepared particles were loaded on a carbon support by physical deposition, but showed no electrocatalytic activity due to the oleylamine bound to the particle surface. The particles were activated for electrocatalysis after heating the particles in air at 185 C for 5 h, conditions that gave no particle-sintering and no oxidation. Cyclic voltammetry showed that the particles after the heat treatment in air were electrocatalytically active for methanol oxidation. The smaller 3.5 nm and 4.0 nm Pt particles had a higher intrinsic activity for methanol oxidation, but a lower tolerance to CO poisoning, compared with 6.0 nm, 9.5 nm and 11.5 nm particles. CO-stripping results suggest that CO is more easily oxidized on larger Pt particles. (author)

  17. Fission yeast Nod1 is a component of cortical nodes involved in cell size control and division site placement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Jourdain

    Full Text Available Most cells enter mitosis once they have reached a defined size. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, mitotic entry is orchestrated by a geometry-sensing mechanism that involves the Cdk1/Cdc2-inhibiting Wee1 kinase. The factors upstream of Wee1 gather together in interphase to form a characteristic medial and cortical belt of nodes. Nodes are also considered to be precursors of the cytokinesis contractile actomyosin ring (CAR. Here we describe a new component of the interphase nodes and cytokinesis rings, which we named Nod1. Consistent with its role in cell size control at division, nod1Δ cells were elongated and epistatic with regulators of Wee1. Through biochemical and localisation studies, we placed Nod1 in a complex with the Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor Gef2. Nod1 and Gef2 mutually recruited each other in nodes and Nod1 also assembles Gef2 in rings. Like gef2Δ, nod1Δ cells showed a mild displacement of their division plane and this phenotype was severely exacerbated when the parallel Polo kinase pathway was also compromised. We conclude that Nod1 specifies the division site by localising Gef2 to the mitotic cell middle. Previous work showed that Gef2 in turn anchors factors that control the spatio-temporal recruitment of the actin nucleation machinery. It is believed that the actin filaments originated from the nodes pull nodes together into a single contractile ring. Surprisingly however, we found that node proteins could form pre-ring helical filaments in a cdc12-112 mutant in which nucleation of the actin ring is impaired. Furthermore, the deletion of either nod1 or gef2 created an un-expected situation where different ring components were recruited sequentially rather than simultaneously. At later stages of cytokinesis, these various rings appeared inter-fitted rather than merged. This study brings a new slant to the understanding of CAR assembly and function.

  18. Systematic analysis of embryonic stem cell differentiation in hydrodynamic environments with controlled embryoid body size

    OpenAIRE

    Kinney, Melissa A.; Saeed, Rabbia; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of stem cells to environmental perturbations has prompted many studies which aim to characterize the influence of mechanical factors on stem cell morphogenesis and differentiation. Hydrodynamic cultures, often employed for large scale bioprocessing applications, impart complex fluid shear and transport profiles, and influence cell fate as a result of changes in media mixing conditions. However, previous studies of hydrodynamic cultures have been limited in their ability to dis...

  19. A systematic analysis of cell cycle regulators in yeast reveals that most factors act independently of cell size to control initiation of division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Hoose

    Full Text Available Upstream events that trigger initiation of cell division, at a point called START in yeast, determine the overall rates of cell proliferation. The identity and complete sequence of those events remain unknown. Previous studies relied mainly on cell size changes to identify systematically genes required for the timely completion of START. Here, we evaluated panels of non-essential single gene deletion strains for altered DNA content by flow cytometry. This analysis revealed that most gene deletions that altered cell cycle progression did not change cell size. Our results highlight a strong requirement for ribosomal biogenesis and protein synthesis for initiation of cell division. We also identified numerous factors that have not been previously implicated in cell cycle control mechanisms. We found that CBS, which catalyzes the synthesis of cystathionine from serine and homocysteine, advances START in two ways: by promoting cell growth, which requires CBS's catalytic activity, and by a separate function, which does not require CBS's catalytic activity. CBS defects cause disease in humans, and in animals CBS has vital, non-catalytic, unknown roles. Hence, our results may be relevant for human biology. Taken together, these findings significantly expand the range of factors required for the timely initiation of cell division. The systematic identification of non-essential regulators of cell division we describe will be a valuable resource for analysis of cell cycle progression in yeast and other organisms.

  20. Size-controlled anatase titania single crystals with octahedron-like morphology for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Jia-Wei; Lan, Chi-Ming; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Wu, Hui-Ping; Huang, Wei-Kai; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang

    2012-12-21

    A simple hydrothermal method with titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as a precursor and triethanolamine (TEOA) as a chelating agent enabled growth in the presence of a base (diethylamine, DEA) of anatase titania nanocrystals (HD1-HD5) of controlled size. DEA played a key role to expedite this growth, for which a biphasic crystal growth mechanism is proposed. The produced single crystals of titania show octahedron-like morphology with sizes in a broad range of 30-400 nm; a typical, extra large, octahedral single crystal (HD5) of length 410 nm and width 260 nm was obtained after repeating a sequential hydrothermal treatment using HD3 and then HD4 as a seed crystal. The nanocrystals of size ~30 nm (HD1) and ~300 nm (HD5) served as active layer and scattering layer, respectively, to fabricate N719-sensitized solar cells. These HD devices showed greater V(OC) than devices of conventional nanoparticle (NP) type; the overall device performance of HD attained an efficiency of 10.2% power conversion at a total film thickness of 28 μm, which is superior to that of a NP-based reference device (η = 9.6%) optimized at a total film thickness of 18-20 μm. According to results obtained from transient photoelectric and charge extraction measurements, this superior performance of HD devices relative to their NP counterparts is due to the more rapid electron transport and greater TiO(2) potential. PMID:23116194

  1. Migration Speed of Cajal-Retzius Cells Modulated by Vesicular Trafficking Controls the Size of Higher-Order Cortical Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Melissa; Arai, Yoko; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Vigier, Lisa; Causeret, Frédéric; Borello, Ugo; Ledonne, Fanny; Coppola, Eva; Contremoulins, Vincent; Pfrieger, Frank W; Tissir, Fadel; Govindan, Subashika; Jabaudon, Denis; Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Galli, Thierry; Pierani, Alessandra

    2015-10-01

    In the neocortex, higher-order areas are essential to integrate sensory-motor information and have expanded in size during evolution. How higher-order areas are specified, however, remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the migration and distribution of early-born neurons, the Cajal-Retzius cells (CRs), controls the size of higher-order areas in the mouse somatosensory, auditory, and visual cortex. Using live imaging, genetics, and in silico modeling, we show that subtype-specific differences in the onset, speed, and directionality of CR migration determine their differential invasion of the developing cortical surface. CR migration speed is cell autonomously modulated by vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP3), a classically non-neuronal mediator of endosomal recycling. Increasing CR migration speed alters their distribution in the developing cerebral cortex and leads to an expansion of postnatal higher-order areas and congruent rewiring of thalamo-cortical input. Our findings thus identify novel roles for neuronal migration and VAMP3-dependent vesicular trafficking in cortical wiring. PMID:26387718

  2. The BAR Domain Protein PICK1 Controls Vesicle Number and Size in Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Pinheiro, Paulo César; Jansen, Anna M; de Wit, Heidi;

    2014-01-01

    Protein Interacting with C Kinase 1 (PICK1) is a Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain protein involved in AMPA receptor trafficking. Here, we identify a selective role for PICK1 in the biogenesis of large, dense core vesicles (LDCVs) in mouse chromaffin cells. PICK1 colocalized with syntaxin-6, a......, consistent with an upstream role for PICK1. Disrupting lipid binding of the BAR domain (2K-E mutation) or of the PDZ domain (CC-GG mutation) was sufficient to reproduce the secretion phenotype of the null mutant. The same mutations are known to eliminate PICK1 function in receptor trafficking, indicating...

  3. Cell number regulator genes in Prunus provide candidate genes for the control of fruit size in sweet and sour cherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franceschi, P; Stegmeir, T; Cabrera, A; van der Knaap, E; Rosyara, U R; Sebolt, A M; Dondini, L; Dirlewanger, E; Quero-Garcia, J; Campoy, J A; Iezzoni, A F

    2013-01-01

    Striking increases in fruit size distinguish cultivated descendants from small-fruited wild progenitors for fleshy fruited species such as Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Prunus spp. (peach, cherry, plum, and apricot). The first fruit weight gene identified as a result of domestication and selection was the tomato FW2.2 gene. Members of the FW2.2 gene family in corn (Zea mays) have been named CNR (Cell Number Regulator) and two of them exert their effect on organ size by modulating cell number. Due to the critical roles of FW2.2/CNR genes in regulating cell number and organ size, this family provides an excellent source of candidates for fruit size genes in other domesticated species, such as those found in the Prunus genus. A total of 23 FW2.2/CNR family members were identified in the peach genome, spanning the eight Prunus chromosomes. Two of these CNRs were located within confidence intervals of major quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously discovered on linkage groups 2 and 6 in sweet cherry (Prunus avium), named PavCNR12 and PavCNR20, respectively. An analysis of haplotype, sequence, segregation and association with fruit size strongly supports a role of PavCNR12 in the sweet cherry linkage group 2 fruit size QTL, and this QTL is also likely present in sour cherry (P. cerasus). The finding that the increase in fleshy fruit size in both tomato and cherry associated with domestication may be due to changes in members of a common ancestral gene family supports the notion that similar phenotypic changes exhibited by independently domesticated taxa may have a common genetic basis. PMID:23976873

  4. Molecular mechanism of size control in development and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolong Yang; Tian Xu

    2011-01-01

    How multicellular organisms control their size is a fundamental question that fascinated generations of biologists.In the past 10 years, tremendous progress has been made toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying size control. Original studies from Drosophila showed that in addition to extrinsic nutritional and hormonal cues, intrinsic mechanisms also play important roles in the control of organ size during development. Several novel signaling pathways such as insulin and Hippo-LATS signaling pathways have been identified that control organ size by regulating cell size and/or cell number through modulation of cell growth, cell division, and cell death. Later studies using mammalian cell and mouse models also demonstrated that the signaling pathways identified in flies are also conserved in mammals. Significantly, recent studies showed that dysregulation of size control plays important roles in the development of many human diseases sucha as cancer,diabetes,and hypertrophy.

  5. A Systematic Analysis of Cell Cycle Regulators in Yeast Reveals That Most Factors Act Independently of Cell Size to Control Initiation of Division

    OpenAIRE

    Scott A Hoose; Jeremy A Rawlings; Kelly, Michelle M.; M Camille Leitch; Ababneh, Qotaiba O; Robles, Juan P.; David Taylor; Hoover, Evelyn M.; Bethel Hailu; McEnery, Kayla A.; S Sabina Downing; Deepika Kaushal; Yi Chen; Alex Rife; Kirtan A Brahmbhatt

    2012-01-01

    Upstream events that trigger initiation of cell division, at a point called START in yeast, determine the overall rates of cell proliferation. The identity and complete sequence of those events remain unknown. Previous studies relied mainly on cell size changes to identify systematically genes required for the timely completion of START. Here, we evaluated panels of non-essential single gene deletion strains for altered DNA content by flow cytometry. This analysis revealed that most gene dele...

  6. Control of lipid storage and cell size between adipocytes by vesicle-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Günter

    2011-02-01

    Adipose tissue mass in mammals is expanding by increasing the average cell volume as well as the total number of the adipocytes. Up-regulation of lipid storage in fully differentiated adipocytes resulting in their enlargement is well documented and thought to be a critical mechanism for the expansion of adipose tissue depots during the growth of both lean and obese animals and human beings. A novel molecular mechanism for the regulation of lipid storage and cell size in rat adipocytes has recently been elucidated for the physiological stimuli, palmitate and hydrogen peroxide, the anti-diabetic sulfonylurea drug, glimepiride, and insulin-mimetic phosphoinositolglycans. It encompasses (i) the release of small vesicles, so-called adiposomes, harbouring the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (c)AMP-degrading phosphodiesterase Gce1 and 5'-nuceotidase CD73 from large donor adipocytes, (ii) the transfer of the adiposomes and their interaction with detergent-insoluble glycolipid-enriched microdomains of the plasma membrane of small acceptor adipocytes, (iii) the translocation of Gce1 and CD73 from the adiposomes to the intracellular lipid droplets of the acceptor adipocytes and (iv) the degradation of (c)AMP at the lipid droplet surface zone by Gce1 and CD73 in the acceptor adipocytes. In concert, this sequence of events leads to up-regulation of esterification of fatty acids into triacylglycerol and down-regulation of their release from triacylglycerol. This apparent mechanism for shifting the triacylglycerol burden from large to small adipocytes may provide novel strategies for the therapy of metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:20883086

  7. Influence of cell size on cellular uptake of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinlong; Hu, Xiaohong; Li, Jingchao; Russe, Adriana C Mulero; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yang, Yingnan; Chen, Guoping

    2016-06-24

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have shown great potential for biomedical applications because of their unique physical and structural properties. A critical aspect for their clinical applications is cellular uptake that depends on both particle properties and the cell mechanical state. Despite the numerous studies trying to disclose the influencing factors, the role of cell size on cellular uptake remains unclear. In this study, poly(vinyl alcohol) was micropatterned on tissue culture polystyrene surfaces using UV photolithography to control the cell size, and the influence of cell size on the cellular uptake of gold NPs was investigated. Cells with a large size had a high total cellular uptake, but showed a low average uptake per unit area of cells. Cells with a small size showed opposite behaviors. The results were related to both cell/NP contacting area and membrane tension. A large cell size was beneficial for a high total cellular uptake due to the large contact area with the NPs. On the other hand, the large cell size resulted in high membrane tension that required high wrapping energy for engulfing of NPs and thus reduced the uptake. The two oppositely working effects decided the cellular uptake of NPs. The results would shed light on the influence of the cellular microenvironment on cellular uptake behavior. PMID:27095054

  8. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Lee, Elizabeth (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Kallam, Alekhya (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Majumdar, Partha (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J. (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  9. On size and growth of cells

    CERN Document Server

    Boudaoud, A

    2002-01-01

    Understanding how growth induces form is a longstanding biological question. Many studies concentrated on the shapes of plant cells, fungi or bacteria. Some others have shown the importance of the mechanical properties of bacterial walls and plant tissues in pattern formation. Here I sketch a simple physical picture of cell growth. The study is focussed on isolated cells that have walls. They are modeled as thin elastic shells containing a liquid, which pressure drives the growth as generally admitted for bacteria or plant cells. Requiring mechanical equilibrium leads to estimations of typical cell sizes, in quantitative agreement with compiled data including bacteria, cochlear outer hair, fungi, yeast, root hair and giant alga cells.

  10. Heat engines and heat pumps in a hydrostatic atmosphere: How surface pressure and temperature control wind power output and circulation cell size

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, A M; Nefiodov, A V; Sheil, D; Nobre, A D; Shearman, P L; Li, B -L

    2015-01-01

    The gross spatial features of the atmospheric kinetic energy budget are analytically investigated. Kinetic energy generation is evaluated in a hydrostatic atmosphere where the axisymmetric circulation cells are represented by Carnot cycles. The condition that kinetic energy generation is positive in the lower atmosphere is shown to limit the poleward cell extension via a relationship between the meridional differences in surface pressure and temperature $\\Delta p_s$ and $\\Delta T_s$: an upper limit to cell size exists when $\\Delta p_s$ increases sublinearly with $\\Delta T_s$. This is the case for the Hadley cells as demonstrated here using data from MERRA re-analysis. The limited cell size necessitates the appearance of heat pumps -- circulation cells with negative work output where the low-level air moves towards colder areas. These cells consume the positive work output of heat engines -- cells where the low-level air moves towards the warmer areas -- and can in principle drive the global efficiency of atmo...

  11. What Controls Shallow Landslide Size Across Landscapes?

    OpenAIRE

    Bellugi, Dino

    2012-01-01

    AbstractWhat Controls Shallow Landslide Size Across Landscapes?by Dino Bellugi Doctor of Philosophy in Earth and Planetary Science and the Designated Emphasis in Computational Science and EngineeringUniversity of California, Berkeley Professor William E. Dietrich, Chair Shallow landslides that usually involve only the colluvial soil mantle, are a widespread phenomenon in the United States and the world. Often triggered by extreme precipitation events, they can be the primary sources of deb...

  12. Bilayer thickness mismatch controls domain size in biomimetic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Petruzielo, Robin S.; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kučerka, Norbert; Standaert, Robert F.; Feigenson, Gerald W.; Katsara, John

    2013-03-01

    In order to promote functionality, cells may alter the spatial organization of membrane lipids and proteins, including separation of liquid phases into distinct domains. In model membranes, domain size and morphology depend strongly on composition and temperature, but the physicochemical mechanisms controlling them are poorly understood. Theoretical work suggests a role for interfacial energy at domain boundaries, which may be driven in part by thickness mismatch between a domain and its surrounding bilayer. However, no direct evidence linking thickness mismatch to domain size in free-standing bilayers has been reported. We describe the use of Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) to detect domains in simplified lipid-only models that mimic the composition of plasma membrane. We find that domain size is controlled by the degree of acyl chain unsaturation of low-melting temperature lipids, and that this size transition is correlated to changes in the thickness mismatch between coexisting liquid phases.

  13. Advanced Attitude Control af Pico Sized Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper A.; Amini, Rouzbeh; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2005-01-01

    The AAU-Cubesat project started in 2001 and led to the launch of the rst AAU-Cubesat and followed up with the second Cubesat project, AAUSAT-II, which carries a combined gamma and X-Ray detector. Due to the precision pointing requirement in the X-Ray sensor it is necessary to realize a pointing...... accuracy of better than 5 degrees. Cost, size, weight and power requirements, on the other hand, impose selecting relative simple sensors and actuators which leads to an attitude control requirement of less than 1 degree. This precision is obtained by a combination of magnetorquers and momentum wheels. The...

  14. Cell control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This extensive report provides an essential overview of cells and their use as factory automation building blocks. The following issues are discussed in depth: Cell integration Cell software and standards Future technologies applied to cells Plus Cell control applications including: - rotary parts manufacturing - diesel engine component development - general cell control development at the General Electric Corporation - a vendor list.

  15. Hippocampal Somatostatin Interneurons Control the Size of Neuronal Memory Ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanelli, Thomas; Bertollini, Cristina; Lüscher, Christian; Muller, Dominique; Mendez, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal neurons activated during encoding drive the recall of contextual fear memory. Little is known about how such ensembles emerge during acquisition and eventually form the cellular engram. Manipulating the activity of granule cells (GCs) of the dentate gyrus (DG), we reveal a mechanism of lateral inhibition that modulates the size of the cellular engram. GCs engage somatostatin-positive interneurons that inhibit the dendrites of surrounding GCs. Our findings reveal a microcircuit within the DG that controls the size of the cellular engram and the stability of contextual fear memory. PMID:26875623

  16. A solvent approach to the size-controllable synthesis of ultrafine Pt catalysts for methanol oxidation in direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An ethylene glycol-based approach for the synthesis of Pt/C catalysts with uniform Pt nanoparticles. • Superior catalytic activity of Pt/C catalysts synthesized at EG/water volume ratio of 1/1 for methanol oxidation reaction. • High performance of MEA for DMFC using Pt/C catalysts synthesized at EG/water volume ratio of 1/1 at anode. - Abstract: An ethylene glycol (EG)-based approach has been developed for the synthesis of Pt/C catalysts with uniform Pt nanoparticles. A number of characterization techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electrochemical measurements are used to characterize the as-prepared Pt catalysts. The well-dispersed Pt nanoparticles with average size of approximate 2 nm could be obtained in the EG/water mixture with volume ratio of 1/1, which display higher activity for methanol oxidation than that of the Pt/C products prepared at other EG/water volume ratios (0:1, 2:1, and 1:0). In particular, the performance of the Pt nanoparticles prepared at EG/water volume ratio of 1/1 in the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells has also been evaluated and benchmarked by commercial Pt/C catalysts. This study offers a vivid example to synthesize Pt nanoparticles with fine size and good catalytic activity by simply tuning the solvent ratio in colloidal chemistry methods

  17. MANOVA for Nested Designs with Unequal Cell Sizes and Unequal Cell Covariance Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Wen Xu

    2014-01-01

    satisfactorily for various cell sizes and parameter configurations and generally outperforms the AHT test in terms of controlling the nominal size. For the heteroscedastic cases, the PB test outperforms the AHT test in terms of power. In addition, the PB test does not lose too much power when the homogeneity assumption is actually valid.

  18. Cell Control Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1996-01-01

    The engineering process of creating cell control systems is described, and a Cell Control Engineering (CCE) concept is defined. The purpose is to assist people, representing different disciplines in the organisation, to implement cell controllers by addressing the complexity of having many systems...... in physically and logically different and changing manufacturing environments. The defined CCE concept combines state-of-the-art of commercially available enabling technologies for automation system software development, generic cell control models and guidelines for the complete engineering process....... It facilitates the understanding of the task and structure of cell controllers and uses this knowledge directly in the implementation of the system. By applying generic models CCE facilitates reuse of software components and maintenance of applications. In many enterprises, software makes up an...

  19. Sample Size Determination: A Comparison of Attribute, Continuous Variable, and Cell Size Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Philip M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes three methods of sample size determination, each having its use in investigation of social science problems: Attribute method; Continuous Variable method; Galtung's Cell Size method. Statistical generalization, benefits of cell size method (ease of use, trivariate analysis and trichotyomized variables), and choice of method are…

  20. Principles of bacterial cell-size determination revealed by cell wall synthesis perturbations

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Tropini; Timothy K. Lee; Jen Hsin; Samantha M. Desmarais; Tristan Ursell; Russell D. Monds; Kerwyn Casey Huang

    2014-01-01

    Although bacterial cell morphology is tightly controlled, the principles of size regulation remain elusive. In Escherichia coli, perturbation of cell-wall synthesis often results in similar morphologies, making it difficult to deconvolve the complex genotype-phenotype relationships underlying morphogenesis. Here we modulated cell width through heterologous expression of sequences encoding the essential enzyme PBP2 and through sublethal treatments with drugs that inhibit PBP2 and the MreB cyto...

  1. Control of Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    ZENITH, Federico

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with control of fuel cells, focusing on high-temperature proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells. Fuel cells are devices that convert the chemical energy of hydrogen, methanol or other chemical compounds directly into electricity, without combustion or thermal cycles. They are efficient, scalable and silent devices that can provide power to a wide variety of utilities, from portable electronics to vehicles, to nation-wide electric grids. Whereas studies about the design of fuel ...

  2. Control of Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    ZENITH, Federico

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with control of fuel cells, focusing on high-temperature proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells.Fuel cells are devices that convert the chemical energy of hydrogen, methanol or other chemical compounds directly into electricity, without combustion or thermal cycles. They are efficient, scalable and silent devices that can provide power to a wide variety of utilities, from portable electronics to vehicles, to nation-wide electric grids.Whereas studies about the design of fuel ce...

  3. Cell Size Breathing and Possibilities to Introduce Cell Sleep Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micallef, Gilbert; Mogensen, Preben; Scheck, Hans-Otto

    2010-01-01

    regular upgrades in the infrastructure. While network equipment is in itself becoming more efficient, these upgrades still increase the overall energy consumption of the networks. This paper investigates the energy saving potential of exploiting cell size breathing by putting low loaded cells into sleep...... investigates the possible gains of re-optimizing antenna tilting. The results show that by allowing sleep mode, over a restricted period of 12 hours, an energy saving of 33% is possible. While this energy saving comes at no expense of the overall network performance, the gain in average user data rate is noted...

  4. Scaling of number, size, and metabolic rate of cells with body size in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, M; Allen, Andrew P.; Brown, James H.; Gillooly, James F; Herman, Alexander B.; Woodruff, William H.; West, Geoffrey B.

    2007-01-01

    The size and metabolic rate of cells affect processes from the molecular to the organismal level. We present a quantitative, theoretical framework for studying relationships among cell volume, cellular metabolic rate, body size, and whole-organism metabolic rate that helps reveal the feedback between these levels of organization. We use this framework to show that average cell volume and average cellular metabolic rate cannot both remain constant with changes in body size because of the well ...

  5. Tailoring Porosity of Colloidal Boehmite Sol by Controlling Crystallite Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Myung Chul; Lee, Sung Reol; Kim, Hark; Park, In; Choy, Jin Ho [Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Boehmite sols have been prepared by crystallization of amorphous aluminum hydroxide gel obtained by hydrolysis and peptization of aluminum using acetic acid. The size of the boehmite crystallites could be controlled by Al molar concentration in amorphous gel by means of controlling grain growth at nucleation stage. The size of boehmite increases as a function of Al molar concentration. With increasing boehmite crystallite size, the d{sub (020)} spacing and the specific surface area decreases, whereas the pore volume increases along with pore size. Especially, the pore size of the boehmite sol particles is comparable to the crystallite size along the b axis, suggesting that the fibril thickness along the b axis among the crystallite dimensions of the boehmite contributes to the pore size. Therefore, the physical properties of boehmite sols can be determined by the crystallite size controlled as a function of initial Al concentration

  6. Towards colloidal size control by precipitation

    OpenAIRE

    Lebouille, J.G.J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Many active ingredients like drugs, preservatives and vitamins are hydrophobic. In most applications for food and pharma, however, they need to be functional in aqueous environments. In order to facilitate their usage in aqueous environments one needs a way to enable the dispersion of hydrophobic compounds into submicron particles in water in a controlled manner. We investigated the stabilization by surfactants and encapsulation into micelles of hydrophobic compounds using the nanoprecipitati...

  7. Signalling and the control of skeletal muscle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, Anthony [School of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Building, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, Berkshire, RG6 6UB (United Kingdom); Patel, Ketan, E-mail: ketan.patel@reading.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Building, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, Berkshire, RG6 6UB (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal muscle is highly adaptive to environmental stimuli and can alter its mass accordingly. This tissue is almost unique in that it can increase its size through two distinct mechanisms. It can grow through a cellular process mediated by cell fusion, or it can increase its size simply by increasing its protein content. Understanding how these processes are regulated is crucial for the development of potential therapies against debilitating skeletal muscle wasting diseases. Two key signalling molecules, Insulin like Growth Factor (IGF) and GDF-8/myostatin, have emerged in recent years to be potent regulators of skeletal muscle size. In this review we bring together recent data highlighting the important and novel aspects of both molecules and their signalling pathways, culminating in a discussion of the cellular and tissue phenotypic outcomes of their stimulation or antagonism. We emphasise the complex regulatory mechanisms and discuss the temporal and spatial differences that control their action, understanding of which is crucial to further their use as potential therapeutic targets.

  8. Signalling and the control of skeletal muscle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeletal muscle is highly adaptive to environmental stimuli and can alter its mass accordingly. This tissue is almost unique in that it can increase its size through two distinct mechanisms. It can grow through a cellular process mediated by cell fusion, or it can increase its size simply by increasing its protein content. Understanding how these processes are regulated is crucial for the development of potential therapies against debilitating skeletal muscle wasting diseases. Two key signalling molecules, Insulin like Growth Factor (IGF) and GDF-8/myostatin, have emerged in recent years to be potent regulators of skeletal muscle size. In this review we bring together recent data highlighting the important and novel aspects of both molecules and their signalling pathways, culminating in a discussion of the cellular and tissue phenotypic outcomes of their stimulation or antagonism. We emphasise the complex regulatory mechanisms and discuss the temporal and spatial differences that control their action, understanding of which is crucial to further their use as potential therapeutic targets.

  9. How to Calculate Sample Size in Randomized Controlled Trial?

    OpenAIRE

    ZHONG, Baoliang

    2009-01-01

    To design clinical trials, efficiency, ethics, cost effectively, research duration and sample size calculations are the key things to remember. This review highlights the statistical issues to estimate the sample size requirement. It elaborates the theory, methods and steps for the sample size calculation in randomized controlled trials. It also emphasizes that researchers should consider the study design first and then choose appropriate sample size calculation method.

  10. Controlling Laser Spot Size in Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Harold E.

    2005-01-01

    Three documents discuss a method of controlling the diameter of a laser beam projected from Earth to any altitude ranging from low orbit around the Earth to geosynchronous orbit. Such laser beams are under consideration as means of supplying power to orbiting spacecraft at levels of the order of tens of kilowatts apiece. Each such beam would be projected by use of a special purpose telescope having an aperture diameter of 15 m or more. Expanding the laser beam to such a large diameter at low altitude would prevent air breakdown and render the laser beam eyesafe. Typically, the telescope would include an adaptive-optics concave primary mirror and a convex secondary mirror. The laser beam transmitted out to the satellite would remain in the near field on the telescope side of the beam waist, so that the telescope focal point would remain effective in controlling the beam width. By use of positioning stages having submicron resolution and repeatability, the relative positions of the primary and secondary mirrors would be adjusted to change the nominal telescope object and image distances to obtain the desired beam diameter (typically about 6 m) at the altitude of the satellite. The limiting distance D(sub L) at which a constant beam diameter can be maintained is determined by the focal range of the telescope 4 lambda f(sup 2) where lambda is the wavelength and f the f/number of the primary mirror. The shorter the wavelength and the faster the mirror, the longer D(sub L) becomes.

  11. Physics of sinking and selection of plankton cell size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciascia, R., E-mail: r.sciascia@isac.cnr.it [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy); Doctorate Program in Fluid Dynamics, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); De Monte, S. [CNRS, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Institut de Biologie de l' Ecole Normale Supérieure, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Provenzale, A. [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy)

    2013-02-04

    Gravitational sinking in the water column is known to affect size composition of planktonic communities. One important driver toward the reduction of plankton size is the fact that larger cells tend to sink faster below the euphotic layer. In this work, we discuss the role of gravitational sinking in driving cell size selection, showing that the outcome of phytoplankton competition is determined by the dependence of sinking velocity on cell size, shape, and on the temporal variability associated with turbulence. This opens a question on whether regional modulations of the turbulence intensity could affect size distribution of planktonic communities.

  12. Economic Effects of Increased Control Zone Sizes in Conflict Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Koushik

    1998-01-01

    A methodology for estimating the economic effects of different control zone sizes used in conflict resolutions between aircraft is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on estimating the difference in flight times of aircraft with and without the control zone, and converting the difference into a direct operating cost. Using this methodology the effects of increased lateral and vertical control zone sizes are evaluated.

  13. Revisionist integral deferred correction with adaptive step-size control

    KAUST Repository

    Christlieb, Andrew

    2015-03-27

    © 2015 Mathematical Sciences Publishers. Adaptive step-size control is a critical feature for the robust and efficient numerical solution of initial-value problems in ordinary differential equations. In this paper, we show that adaptive step-size control can be incorporated within a family of parallel time integrators known as revisionist integral deferred correction (RIDC) methods. The RIDC framework allows for various strategies to implement stepsize control, and we report results from exploring a few of them.

  14. Particle size control of detergents in mixed flow spray dryers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Jonathan Crosby

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Particle size is a key quality parameter of a powder detergent as it determines its performance, the bulk density and the look and feel of the product. Consequently, it is essential that particle size is controlled to ensure the consistency of performance when comparing new formulations. The majority of study reported in the literature relating to particle size control, focuses on the spray produced by the atomisation technique. One approach advocated to achieve particle size control is the manipulation of the ratio of the mass slurry rate and mass flow rate of gas used for atomisation. Within this study, ratio control was compared with an automatic cascade loop approach using online measurements of the powder particle size on a small-scale pilot plant. It was concluded that cascade control of the mean particle size, based on manipulating the mass flow rate of gas, resulted in tighter, more responsive control. The effect of a ratio change varied with different formulations and different slurry rates. Furthermore, changes in slurry rate caused complications, as the impact on particle size growth in the dryer is non-linear and difficult to predict. The cascade loop enables further study into the effect of particle size on detergent performance.

  15. Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Wang, George T.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical (QSC-PEC) etching provides a new route to the precision fabrication of epitaxial semiconductor nanostructures in the sub-10-nm size regime. For example, quantum dots (QDs) can be QSC-PEC-etched from epitaxial InGaN thin films using narrowband laser photoexcitation, and the QD sizes (and hence bandgaps and photoluminescence wavelengths) are determined by the photoexcitation wavelength.

  16. Size-independent symmetric division in extraordinarily long cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Pende; N. Leisch; H.R. Gruber-Vodicka; N.R. Heindl; J. Ott; T. den Blaauwen; S. Bulgheresi

    2014-01-01

    Two long-standing paradigms in biology are that cells belonging to the same population exhibit little deviation from their average size and that symmetric cell division is size limited. Here, ultrastructural, morphometric and immunocytochemical analyses reveal that two Gammaproteobacteria attached t

  17. Reporting of sample size calculation in randomised controlled trials: review

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Pierre; Giraudeau, Bruno; Dechartres, Agnes; Baron, Gabriel; Ravaud, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To assess quality of reporting of sample size calculation, ascertain accuracy of calculations, and determine the relevance of assumptions made when calculating sample size in randomised controlled trials. Design Review. Data sources We searched MEDLINE for all primary reports of two arm parallel group randomised controlled trials of superiority with a single primary outcome published in six high impact factor general medical journals between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2006. All...

  18. Brassinosteroid perception in the epidermis controls root meristem size

    OpenAIRE

    Hacham, Yael; Holland, Neta; Butterfield, Cristina; Ubeda-Tomas, Susana; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Chory, Joanne; Savaldi-Goldstein, Sigal

    2011-01-01

    Multiple small molecule hormones contribute to growth promotion or restriction in plants. Brassinosteroids (BRs), acting specifically in the epidermis, can both drive and restrict shoot growth. However, our knowledge of how BRs affect meristem size is scant. Here, we study the root meristem and show that BRs are required to maintain normal cell cycle activity and cell expansion. These two processes ensure the coherent gradient of cell progression, from the apical to the basal meristem. In add...

  19. Size Controlled Synthesis of Starch Nanoparticles by a Microemulsion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Fun Chin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controllable particles sizes of starch nanoparticles were synthesized via a precipitation in water-in-oil microemulsion approach. Microemulsion method offers the advantages of ultralow interfacial tension, large interfacial area, and being thermodynamically stable and affords monodispersed nanoparticles. The synthesis parameters such as stirring rates, ratios of oil/cosurfactant, oil phases, cosurfactants, and ratios of water/oil were found to affect the mean particle size of starch nanoparticles. Starch nanoparticles with mean particles sizes of 109 nm were synthesized by direct nanoprecipitation method, whereas by using precipitation in microemulsion approach, starch nanoparticles with smaller mean particles sizes of 83 nm were obtained.

  20. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  1. Covariation of metabolic rates and cell size in coccolithophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisi, G.

    2015-08-01

    Coccolithophores are sensitive recorders of environmental change. The size of their coccosphere varies in the ocean along gradients of environmental conditions and provides a key for understanding the fate of this important phytoplankton group in the future ocean. But interpreting field changes in coccosphere size in terms of laboratory observations is hard, mainly because the marine signal reflects the response of multiple morphotypes to changes in a combination of environmental variables. In this paper I examine the large corpus of published laboratory experiments with coccolithophores looking for relations between environmental conditions, metabolic rates and cell size (a proxy for coccosphere size). I show that growth, photosynthesis and, to a lesser extent, calcification covary with cell size when pCO2, irradiance, temperature, nitrate, phosphate and iron conditions change. With the exception of phosphate and temperature, a change from limiting to non-limiting conditions always results in an increase in cell size. An increase in phosphate or temperature (below the optimum temperature for growth) produces the opposite effect. The magnitude of the coccosphere-size changes observed in the laboratory is comparable to that observed in the ocean. If the biological reasons behind the environment-metabolism-size link are understood, it will be possible to use coccosphere-size changes in the modern ocean and in marine sediments to investigate the fate of coccolithophores in the future ocean. This reasoning can be extended to the size of coccoliths if, as recent experiments are starting to show, coccolith size reacts to environmental change proportionally to coccosphere size. The coccolithophore database is strongly biased in favour of experiments with the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (E. huxleyi; 82 % of database entries), and more experiments with other species are needed to understand whether these observations can be extended to coccolithophores in general. I

  2. Generating size-controlled embryoid bodies using laser direct-write

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the potential to self-renew and differentiate into any specialized cell type. One common method to differentiate ESCs in vitro is through embryoid bodies (EBs), three-dimensional cellular aggregates that spontaneously self-assemble and generally express markers for the three germ layers, endoderm, ectoderm, and mesoderm. It has been previously shown that both EB size and 2D colony size each influence differentiation. We hypothesized that we could control the size of the EB formed by mouse ESCs (mESCs) by using a cell printing method, laser direct-write (LDW), to control both the size of the initial printed colony and the local cell density in printed colonies. After printing mESCs at various printed colony sizes and printing densities, two-way ANOVAs indicated that the EB diameter was influenced by printing density after three days (p = 0.0002), while there was no effect of the printed colony diameter on the EB diameter at the same timepoint (p = 0.74). There was no significant interaction between these two factors. Tukey's honestly significant difference test showed that high-density colonies formed significantly larger EBs, suggesting that printed mESCs quickly aggregate with nearby cells. Thus, EBs can be engineered to a desired size by controlling printing density, which will influence the design of future differentiation studies. Herein, we highlight the capacity of LDW to control the local cell density and colony size independently, at prescribed spatial locations, potentially leading to better stem cell maintenance and directed differentiation. (paper)

  3. Anisotropic Chemical Reactor with Correlation Spectroscopic Control of Nanoparticles Size

    OpenAIRE

    A.G. Lazarenko; A.N. Andreev; A.V. Kanaev; K. Chhor

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new kind of chemical reactor for nanoparticles synthesis with real-time control of size by correlation spectroscopy methods. The liquid pumping in the reactor is attained by a heater and / or cooler anisotropic placing in a reactor with a bath consisting of two communicating vessels connected by two tubes with transparent portion. When driving the fluid through the transparent area of the narrowed tube particle size is measured by a sensor or sensors. To increase the spe...

  4. Size Controlled Synthesis of Starch Nanoparticles by a Microemulsion Method

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Controllable particles sizes of starch nanoparticles were synthesized via a precipitation in water-in-oil microemulsion approach. Microemulsion method offers the advantages of ultralow interfacial tension, large interfacial area, and being thermodynamically stable and affords monodispersed nanoparticles. The synthesis parameters such as stirring rates, ratios of oil/cosurfactant, oil phases, cosurfactants, and ratios of water/oil were found to affect the mean particle size of starch nanoparti...

  5. Controlling Silver Nanoparticle Size and Morphology with Photostimulated Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, A K; Langlois, R; Loth, M; Schmitz, R; Taft, G; Tanke, R S; Wruck, A

    2005-01-01

    Photo-induced synthesis and control over the size and shape of colloidal silver nanoparticles is investigated in contrast to photo-stimulated aggregation of small nanoparticles into large fractal-type structures. The feasibility of light-driven nanoengineering which enables manipulation of the sizes and shapes of the isolated nanoparticles is studied by varying the amount and type of the stabilizing agent and the type of optical irradiation.

  6. Isotropic 2D quadrangle meshing with size and orientation control

    KAUST Repository

    Pellenard, Bertrand

    2011-12-01

    We propose an approach for automatically generating isotropic 2D quadrangle meshes from arbitrary domains with a fine control over sizing and orientation of the elements. At the heart of our algorithm is an optimization procedure that, from a coarse initial tiling of the 2D domain, enforces each of the desirable mesh quality criteria (size, shape, orientation, degree, regularity) one at a time, in an order designed not to undo previous enhancements. Our experiments demonstrate how well our resulting quadrangle meshes conform to a wide range of input sizing and orientation fields.

  7. Controlling Infrastructure Costs: Right-Sizing the Mission Control Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Keith; Sen-Roy, Michael; Heiman, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center is a space vehicle, space program agnostic facility. The current operational design is essentially identical to the original facility architecture that was developed and deployed in the mid-90's. In an effort to streamline the support costs of the mission critical facility, the Mission Operations Division (MOD) of Johnson Space Center (JSC) has sponsored an exploratory project to evaluate and inject current state-of-the-practice Information Technology (IT) tools, processes and technology into legacy operations. The general push in the IT industry has been trending towards a data-centric computer infrastructure for the past several years. Organizations facing challenges with facility operations costs are turning to creative solutions combining hardware consolidation, virtualization and remote access to meet and exceed performance, security, and availability requirements. The Operations Technology Facility (OTF) organization at the Johnson Space Center has been chartered to build and evaluate a parallel Mission Control infrastructure, replacing the existing, thick-client distributed computing model and network architecture with a data center model utilizing virtualization to provide the MCC Infrastructure as a Service. The OTF will design a replacement architecture for the Mission Control Facility, leveraging hardware consolidation through the use of blade servers, increasing utilization rates for compute platforms through virtualization while expanding connectivity options through the deployment of secure remote access. The architecture demonstrates the maturity of the technologies generally available in industry today and the ability to successfully abstract the tightly coupled relationship between thick-client software and legacy hardware into a hardware agnostic "Infrastructure as a Service" capability that can scale to meet future requirements of new space programs and spacecraft. This paper discusses the benefits

  8. Size control of giant unilamellar vesicles prepared from inverted emulsion droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kazuya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Toyota, Taro; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2012-06-15

    The production of giant lipid vesicles with controlled size and structure will be an important technology in the design of quantitative biological assays in cell-mimetic microcompartments. For establishing size control of giant vesicles, we investigated the vesicle formation process, in which inverted emulsion droplets are transformed into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) when they pass through an oil/water interface. The relationship between the size of the template emulsion and the converted GUVs was studied using inverted emulsion droplets with a narrow size distribution, which were prepared by microfluidics. We successfully found an appropriate centrifugal acceleration condition to obtain GUVs that had a desired size and narrow-enough size distribution with an improved yield so that emulsion droplets can become the template for GUVs. PMID:22444482

  9. Nanomaterial cytotoxicity is composition, size, and cell type dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaebuddin Syed K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive research efforts, reports of cellular responses to nanomaterials are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, relationships between the responding cell type and nanomaterial properties are not well understood. Using three model cell lines representing different physiological compartments and nanomaterials of different compositions and sizes, we have systematically investigated the influence of nanomaterial properties on the degrees and pathways of cytotoxicity. In this study, we selected nanomaterials of different compositions (TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs] with differing size (MWCNTs of different diameters 50 nm; but same length 0.5-2 μm to analyze the effects of composition and size on toxicity to 3T3 fibroblasts, RAW 264.7 macrophages, and telomerase-immortalized (hT bronchiolar epithelial cells. Results Following characterization of nanomaterial properties in PBS and serum containing solutions, cells were exposed to nanomaterials of differing compositions and sizes, with cytotoxicity monitored through reduction in mitochondrial activity. In addition to cytotoxicity, the cellular response to nanomaterials was characterized by quantifying generation of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane destabilization and mitochondrial permeability. The effect of these responses on cellular fate - apoptosis or necrosis - was then analyzed. Nanomaterial toxicity was variable based on exposed cell type and dependent on nanomaterial composition and size. In addition, nanomaterial exposure led to cell type dependent intracellular responses resulting in unique breakdown of cellular functions for each nanomaterial: cell combination. Conclusions Nanomaterials induce cell specific responses resulting in variable toxicity and subsequent cell fate based on the type of exposed cell. Our results indicate that the composition and size of nanomaterials as well as the

  10. CONTROL OF POLYMER PARTICLE SIZE USING POROUS GLASS MEMBRANE EMULSIFICATION A REVIEW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui Ma

    2003-01-01

    Much attention has in recent years been paid to fine applications of polymer particles, e.g., carrier for enzyme, separation media for protein, DNA and cell, and carrier for drug in Drug Delivery System (DDS). Control of polymer particle size is especially important in such fine applications. For instance, when the particles are used as a carrier of anti-cancer agents, the locations of particles containing anti-cancer agents also depend on the size of the particles. In this paper, various techniques of controlling polymer particle size are described, with emphasis on Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG) membrane emulsification, as carried out in our research group.

  11. SCFSAP controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-01-01

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size. PMID:27048938

  12. Combined Optimal Sizing and Control for a Hybrid Tracked Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei Peng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The optimal sizing and control of a hybrid tracked vehicle is presented and solved in this paper. A driving schedule obtained from field tests is used to represent typical tracked vehicle operations. Dynamics of the diesel engine-permanent magnetic AC synchronous generator set, the lithium-ion battery pack, and the power split between them are modeled and validated through experiments. Two coupled optimizations, one for the plant parameters, forming the outer optimization loop and one for the control strategy, forming the inner optimization loop, are used to achieve minimum fuel consumption under the selected driving schedule. The dynamic programming technique is applied to find the optimal controller in the inner loop while the component parameters are optimized iteratively in the outer loop. The results are analyzed, and the relationship between the key parameters is observed to keep the optimal sizing and control simultaneously.

  13. Role of proteins in controlling selenium nanoparticle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work investigates the potential for harnessing the association of bacterial proteins to biogenic selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) to control the size distribution and the morphology of the resultant SeNPs. We conducted a proteomic study and compared proteins associated with biogenic SeNPs produced by E. coli to chemically synthesized SeNPs as well as magnetite nanoparticles. We identified four proteins (AdhP, Idh, OmpC, AceA) that bound specifically to SeNPs and observed a narrower size distribution as well as more spherical morphology when the particles were synthesized chemically in the presence of proteins. A more detailed study of AdhP (alcohol dehydrogenase propanol-preferring) confirmed the strong affinity of this protein for the SeNP surface and revealed that this protein controlled the size distribution of the SeNPs and yielded a narrow size distribution with a three-fold decrease in the median size. These results support the assertion that protein may become an important tool in the industrial-scale synthesis of SeNPs of uniform size and properties.

  14. Sample Size Calculation for Controlling False Discovery Proportion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulian Shang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The false discovery proportion (FDP, the proportion of incorrect rejections among all rejections, is a direct measure of abundance of false positive findings in multiple testing. Many methods have been proposed to control FDP, but they are too conservative to be useful for power analysis. Study designs for controlling the mean of FDP, which is false discovery rate, have been commonly used. However, there has been little attempt to design study with direct FDP control to achieve certain level of efficiency. We provide a sample size calculation method using the variance formula of the FDP under weak-dependence assumptions to achieve the desired overall power. The relationship between design parameters and sample size is explored. The adequacy of the procedure is assessed by simulation. We illustrate the method using estimated correlations from a prostate cancer dataset.

  15. Size Controlled Synthesis of Transition Metal Nanoparticles for Catalytic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Esparza, Angel

    2011-07-07

    Catalysis offers cleaner and more efficient chemical reactions for environmental scientists. More than 90% of industrial processes are performed with a catalyst involved, however research it is still required to improve the catalyst materials. The purpose of this work is to contribute with the development of catalysts synthesis with two different approaches. First, the precise size control of non-noble metals nanoparticles. Second, a new one-pot synthesis method based on a microemulsion system was developed to synthesize size-controlled metal nanoparticles in oxide supports. The one-pot method represents a simple approach to synthesize both support and immobilized nanometer-sized non-noble metal nanoparticles in the same reaction system. Narrow size distribution nickel, cobalt, iron and cobalt-nickel nanoparticles were obtained. High metal dispersions are attainable regardless the metal or support used in the synthesis. Thus, the methodology is adaptable and robust. The sizecontrolled supported metal nanoparticles offer the opportunity to study size effects and metal-support interactions on different catalytic reactions with different sets of metals and supports.

  16. Facile synthesis of size controllable dendritic mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ye-Jun; Xing, Jun-Ling; Pang, Jun-Ling; Jiang, Shu-Hua; Lam, Koon-Fung; Yang, Tai-Qun; Xue, Qing-Song; Zhang, Kun; Wu, Peng

    2014-12-24

    The synthesis of highly uniform mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSNs) with dendritic pore channels, particularly ones with particle sizes below 200 nm, is extremely difficult and remains a grand challenge. By a combined synthetic strategy using imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) with different alkyl lengths as cosurfactants and Pluronic F127 nonionic surfactants as inhibitors of particle growth, the preparation of dendritic MSNs with controlled diameter between 40 and 300 nm was successfully realized. An investigation of dendritic MSNs using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nitrogen physisorption revealed that the synthesis of dendritic MSNs at larger size (100-300 nm) strongly depends on the alkyl lengths of cationic imidazolium ILs; while the average size of dendritic MSNs can be controlled within the range of 40-100 nm by varying the amount of Pluronic F127. The Au@MSNs can be used as a catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol by NaBH4 into 4-aminophenol and exhibit excellent catalytic performance. The present discovery of the extended synthesis conditions offers reproducible, facile, and large-scale synthesis of the monodisperse spherical MSNs with precise size control and, thus, has vast prospects for future applications of ultrafine mesostructured nanoparticle materials in catalysis and biomedicine. PMID:25454255

  17. Anisotropic Chemical Reactor with Correlation Spectroscopic Control of Nanoparticles Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. Lazarenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new kind of chemical reactor for nanoparticles synthesis with real-time control of size by correlation spectroscopy methods. The liquid pumping in the reactor is attained by a heater and / or cooler anisotropic placing in a reactor with a bath consisting of two communicating vessels connected by two tubes with transparent portion. When driving the fluid through the transparent area of the narrowed tube particle size is measured by a sensor or sensors. To increase the speed of cyclic movement and mixing of liquid the chemical rector can be supplemented with a mechanical stirrer also anisotropic in shape.

  18. Comparison of DNA loop size and super-coiled domain size in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA loop size and super-coiled domain size in HeLa cells were investigated by the nucleoid sedimentation technique as well as by analysis of the DNA-nuclearmatrix complex. After X-irradiation, the relaxation of super-coils was not correlated with the release of DNA from the nuclear matrix. The super-coiled domain size was much larger than the average DNA loop size. To explain the results, we propose that unwinding of super-coils in a DNA loop also causes unwinding in adjacent DNA loops in spite of existing attachment sites. Alternatively, the results may be explained by assuming that only very large DNA loops determine the sedimentation behaviour of nucleoids. (orig.)

  19. Feedback and Modularity in Cell Cycle Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotheim, Jan

    2009-03-01

    Underlying the wonderful diversity of natural forms is the ability of an organism to grow into its appropriate shape. Regulation ensures that cells grow, divide and differentiate so that the organism and its constitutive parts are properly proportioned and of suitable size. Although the size-control mechanism active in an individual cell is of fundamental importance to this process, it is difficult to isolate and study in complex multi-cellular systems and remains poorly understood. This motivates our use of the budding yeast model organism, whose Start checkpoint integrates multiple internal (e.g. cell size) and external signals into an irreversible decision to enter the cell cycle. We have endeavored to address the following two questions: What makes the Start transition irreversible? How does a cell compute its own size? I will report on the progress we have made. Our work is part of an emerging framework for understanding biological control circuits, which will allow us to discern the function of natural systems and aid us in engineering synthetic systems.

  20. Sonochemical synthesis of silica particles and their size control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwa-Min; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Bonghwan

    2016-09-01

    Using an ultrasound-assisted sol-gel method, we successfully synthesized very uniformly shaped, monodisperse, and size-controlled spherical silica particles from a mixture of ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of ammonia as catalyst, at room temperature. The diameters of the silica particles were distributed in the range from 40 to 400 nm; their morphology was well characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The silica particle size could be adjusted by choosing suitable concentrations of ammonium hydroxide and water, which in turn determined the nucleation and growth rates of the particles during the reaction. This sonochemical-based silica synthesis offers an alternative way to produce spherical silica particles in a relatively short reaction time. Thus, we suggest that this simple, low-cost, and efficient method of preparing uniform silica particles of various sizes will have practical and wide-ranging industrial applicability.

  1. Capabilities and Limitations of Tissue Size Control through Passive Mechanical Forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Kursawe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryogenesis is an extraordinarily robust process, exhibiting the ability to control tissue size and repair patterning defects in the face of environmental and genetic perturbations. The size and shape of a developing tissue is a function of the number and size of its constituent cells as well as their geometric packing. How these cellular properties are coordinated at the tissue level to ensure developmental robustness remains a mystery; understanding this process requires studying multiple concurrent processes that make up morphogenesis, including the spatial patterning of cell fates and apoptosis, as well as cell intercalations. In this work, we develop a computational model that aims to understand aspects of the robust pattern repair mechanisms of the Drosophila embryonic epidermal tissues. Size control in this system has previously been shown to rely on the regulation of apoptosis rather than proliferation; however, to date little work has been done to understand the role of cellular mechanics in this process. We employ a vertex model of an embryonic segment to test hypotheses about the emergence of this size control. Comparing the model to previously published data across wild type and genetic perturbations, we show that passive mechanical forces suffice to explain the observed size control in the posterior (P compartment of a segment. However, observed asymmetries in cell death frequencies across the segment are demonstrated to require patterning of cellular properties in the model. Finally, we show that distinct forms of mechanical regulation in the model may be distinguished by differences in cell shapes in the P compartment, as quantified through experimentally accessible summary statistics, as well as by the tissue recoil after laser ablation experiments.

  2. Efficiency optimized control of medium-size induction motor drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, F.; Blaabjerg, Frede; Pedersen, John Kim;

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of a variable speed induction motor drive can be optimized by adaption of the motor flux level to the load torque. In small drives (<10 kW) this can be done without considering the relatively small converter losses, but for medium-size drives (10-1000 kW) the losses can not be disr...... robustness towards load disturbances may unnecessarily be reduced. Both displacement power factor and model-based efficiency optimizing control methods perform well in medium-size drives. The last strategy is also tested on a 22 kW drive with good results.......The efficiency of a variable speed induction motor drive can be optimized by adaption of the motor flux level to the load torque. In small drives (<10 kW) this can be done without considering the relatively small converter losses, but for medium-size drives (10-1000 kW) the losses can not be...... disregarded without further analysis. The importance of the converter losses on efficiency optimization in medium-size drives is analyzed in this paper. Based on the experiments with a 90 kW drive it is found that it is not critical if the converter losses are neglected in the control, except that the...

  3. Internal Control in Swedish Small and Medium Size Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Gebramicheal, Zelalem Berhanu; Habtegiorgis, Tsegahiwot Teketel

    2009-01-01

    Small and medium size enterprises are currently the major part of economic activities through out the world. Nowadays, they represent about 99% of all types of enterprises in Sweden, with providing high job opportunities to its labour force as these enterprises need focus in their development; the internal control mechanism is a means and a way of directing, monitoring and measuring the SMEs resources. It plays an important role in preventing and detecting fraud and protecting the physical an...

  4. A Coarse Estimation of Cell Size Region from a Mesoscopic Stochastic Cell Cycle Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Ming; JIA Ya; LIU Quan; ZHU Chun-Lian; YANG Li-Jian

    2007-01-01

    Based on a deterministic cell cycle model of fission yeast, the effects of the finite cell size on the cell cycle regulation in wee1- cdc25△ double mutant type are numerically studied by using of the chemical Langevin equations. It is found that at a certain region of cell size, our numerical results from the chemical Langevin equations are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The two resettings to the G2 phase from early stages of mitosis can be induced under the moderate cell size. The quantized cycle times can be observed during such a cell size region. Therefore, a coarse estimation of cell size is obtained from the mesoscopic stochastic cell cycle model.

  5. System Size Resonance Associated with Canard Phenomenon in a Biological Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Ma; Hong-ying Li; Zhong-huai Hou; Hou-wen Xin

    2008-01-01

    The influence of internal noise on the calcium oscillations is studied. It is found that stochastic calcium oscillations occur when the internal noise is considered, while the corresponding deterministic dynamics only yields a steady state. Also, the performance of such oscillations shows two maxima with the variation of the system size, indicating the occurrence of system size resonance. This behavior is found to be intimately connected with the canard phenomenon. Interestingly, it is also found that one of the optimal system sizes matches well with the real cell size, and such a match is robust to the variation of the control parameters.

  6. Biomimetic control over size, shape and aggregation in magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerdijk, Nico

    2013-03-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a widespread magnetic iron oxide encountered in both geological and biomineralizing systems, which also has many technological applications, e.g. in ferrofluids, inks, magnetic data storage materials and as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. As its magnetic properties depend largely on the size and shape of the crystals, control over crystal morphology is an important aspect in the application of magnetite nanoparticles, both in biology and synthetic systems. Indeed, in nature organisms such as magnetotactic bacteria demonstrate a precise control over the magnetite crystal morphology, resulting in uniform and monodisperse nanoparticles. The magnetite formation in these bacteria is believed to occur through the co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, which is also the most widely applied synthetic route in industry. Synthetic strategies to magnetite with controlled size and shape exist, but involve high temperatures and rather harsh chemical conditions. However, synthesis via co-precipitation generally yields poor control over the morphology and therefore over the magnetic properties of the obtained crystals. Here we demonstrate that by tuning the reaction kinetics we can achieve biomimetic control over the size and shape of magnetite crystals but also over their organization in solution as well as their magnetic properties. We employ amino acids-based polymers to direct the formation of magnetite in aqueous media at room temperature via both the co-precipitation and the partial oxidation method. By using 2D and 3D (cryo)TEM it is shown that acidic amino acid monomers are most effective in affecting the magnetite particle morphology. By changing the composition of the polymers we can tune the morphology, the dispersibility as well as the magnetic properties of these nanoparticles.

  7. A rapid method of fruit cell isolation for cell size and shape measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Jason W

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell size is a structural component of fleshy fruit, contributing to important traits such as fruit size and texture. There are currently a number of methods for measuring cell size; most rely either on tissue sectioning or digestion of the tissue with cell wall degrading enzymes or chemicals to release single cells. Neither of these approaches is ideal for assaying large fruit numbers as both require a considerable time to prepare the tissue, with current methods of cell wall digestions taking 24 to 48 hours. Additionally, sectioning can lead to a measurement of a plane that does not represent the widest point of the cell. Results To develop a more rapid way of measuring fruit cell size we have developed a protocol that solubilises pectin in the middle lamella of the plant cell wall releasing single cells into a buffered solution. Gently boiling small fruit samples in a 0.05 M Na2CO3 solution, osmotically balanced with 0.3 M mannitol, produced good cell separation with little cellular damage in less than 30 minutes. The advantage of combining a chemical treatment with boiling is that the cells are rapidly killed. This stopped cell shape changes that could potentially occur during separation. With this method both the rounded and angular cells of the apple cultivars SciRos 'Pacific Rose' and SciFresh 'Jazz'™ were observed in the separated cells. Using this technique, an in-depth analysis was performed measuring cell size from 5 different apple cultivars. Cell size was measured using the public domain ImageJ software. For each cultivar a minimum of 1000 cells were measured and it was found that each cultivar displayed a different distribution of cell size. Cell size within cultivars was similar and there was no correlation between flesh firmness and cell size. This protocol was tested on tissue from other fleshy fruit including tomato, rock melon and kiwifruit. It was found that good cell separation was achieved with flesh

  8. Influence of texture feature size on spherical silicon solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAYASHI Shota; MINEMOTO Takashi; TAKAKURA Hideyuki; HAMAKAWA Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    The effects of surface texturing on spherical silicon solar cells were investigated. Surface texturing for spherical Si solar cells was prepared by immersing p-type spherical Si crystals in KOH solution with stirring. Two kinds of texture feature sizes (1 and 5μm pyramids) were prepared by changing stirring speed. After fabrication through our baseline processes, these cells were evaluated by solar cell performance and external quantum efficiency. The cell with 1 and 5μm pyramids shows the short circuit current density ( Jsc ) value of 31.9 and 33.2 mA·cm-2 , which is 9% and 13% relative increase compared to the cell without texturing. Furthermore, the cell with 5 μm pyramids has a higher open-circuit voltage (0.589 V) than the cell with 1 μm pyramids (0.577 V). As a result, the conversion efficiency was improved from 11.4% for the cell without texturing to 12.1% for the cell with 5 μm pyramids.

  9. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qian Peter; Du, Wanqing; Ji, Qinghua; Xue, Boxin; Jiang, Dong; Zhu, Yueyao; Lou, Jizhong; Yu, Li; Sun, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro studies also lack physiological relevance. Here, we use lysosomes and autolysosomes, whose sizes range between 100 nm and 1 μm, as model systems to study the size effects on nanotube formation both in vivo and in vitro. Single molecule observations indicate that driven by kinesin motors, small vesicles (100–200 nm) are mainly transported along the tracks while a remarkable portion of large vesicles (500–1000 nm) form nanotubes. This size effect is further confirmed by in vitro reconstitution assays on liposomes and purified lysosomes and autolysosomes. We also apply Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to measure the initiation force for nanotube formation. These results suggest that the size-dependence may be one of the mechanisms for cells to regulate cellular processes involving membrane-deformation, such as the timing of tubulation-mediated vesicle recycling. PMID:27052881

  10. Walking control of small size humanoid robot: HAJIME ROBOT 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hajime; Nakatsu, Ryohei

    2007-12-01

    HAJIME ROBOT 18 is a fully autonomous biped robot. It has been developed for RoboCup which is a worldwide soccer competition of robots. It is necessary for a robot to have high mobility to play soccer. High speed walking and all directional walking are important to approach and to locate in front of a ball. HAJIME ROBOT achieved these walking. This paper describes walking control of a small size humanoid robot 'HAJIME ROBOT 18' and shows the measurement result of ZMP (Zero Moment Point). HAJIME ROBOT won the Robotics Society of Japan Award in RoboCup 2005 and in RoboCup 2006 Japan Open.

  11. Heterotrophic free-living and particle-bound bacterial cell size in the river Cauvery and its downstream tributaries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T S Harsha; Sadanand M Yamakanamardi; M Mahadevaswamy

    2007-03-01

    This is the first comprehensive study on planktonic heterotrophic bacterial cell size in the river Cauvery and its important tributaries in Karnataka State, India. The initial hypothesis that the mean cell size of planktonic heterotrophic bacteria in the four tributaries are markedly different from each other and also from that in the main river Cauvery was rejected, because all five watercourses showed similar planktonic heterotrophic bacterial cell size. Examination of the correlation between mean heterotrophic bacterial cell size and environmental variables showed four correlations in the river Arkavathy and two in the river Shimsha. Regression analysis revealed that 18% of the variation in mean heterotrophic free-living bacterial cell size was due to biological oxygen demand (BOD) in the river Arkavathy, 11% due to surface water velocity (SWV) in the river Cauvery and 11% due to temperature in the river Kapila. Heterotrophic particle-bound bacterial cell size variation was 28% due to chloride and BOD in the river Arkavathy, 11% due to conductivity in the river Kapila and 8% due to calcium in the river Cauvery. This type of relationship between heterotrophic bacterial cell size and environmental variables suggests that, though the mean heterotrophic bacterial cell size was similar in all the five water courses, different sets of environmental variables apparently control the heterotrophic bacterial cell size in the various water bodies studied in this investigation. The possible cause for this environmental (bottom–up) control is discussed.

  12. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Qian Peter Su; Wanqing Du; Qinghua Ji; Boxin Xue; Dong Jiang; Yueyao Zhu; Jizhong Lou; Li Yu; Yujie Sun

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro st...

  13. Controlled regular locomotion of algae cell microrobots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuangxi; Jiao, Niandong; Tung, Steve; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-06-01

    Algae cells can be considered as microrobots from the perspective of engineering. These organisms not only have a strong reproductive ability but can also sense the environment, harvest energy from the surroundings, and swim very efficiently, accommodating all these functions in a body of size on the order of dozens of micrometers. An interesting topic with respect to random swimming motions of algae cells in a liquid is how to precisely control them as microrobots such that they swim according to manually set routes. This study developed an ingenious method to steer swimming cells based on the phototaxis. The method used a varying light signal to direct the motion of the cells. The swimming trajectory, speed, and force of algae cells were analyzed in detail. Then the algae cell could be controlled to swim back and forth, and traverse a crossroad as a microrobot obeying specific traffic rules. Furthermore, their motions along arbitrarily set trajectories such as zigzag, and triangle were realized successfully under optical control. Robotize algae cells can be used to precisely transport and deliver cargo such as drug particles in microfluidic chip for biomedical treatment and pharmacodynamic analysis. The study findings are expected to bring significant breakthrough in biological drives and new biomedical applications. PMID:27206511

  14. Stationary Size Distributions of Growing Cells with Binary and Multiple Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rading, M. M.; Engel, T. A.; Lipowsky, R.; Valleriani, A.

    2011-10-01

    Populations of unicellular organisms that grow under constant environmental conditions are considered theoretically. The size distribution of these cells is calculated analytically, both for the usual process of binary division, in which one mother cell produces always two daughter cells, and for the more complex process of multiple division, in which one mother cell can produce 2 n daughter cells with n=1,2,3,… . The latter mode of division is inspired by the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The uniform response of the whole population to different environmental conditions is encoded in the individual rates of growth and division of the cells. The analytical treatment of the problem is based on size-dependent rules for cell growth and stochastic transition processes for cell division. The comparison between binary and multiple division shows that these different division processes lead to qualitatively different results for the size distribution and the population growth rates.

  15. Scaffolds and cells for tissue regeneration: different scaffold pore sizes-different cell effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Bironaitė, Daiva; Bagdonas, Edvardas; Bernotienė, Eiva

    2016-05-01

    During the last decade biomaterial sciences and tissue engineering have become new scientific fields supplying rising demand of regenerative therapy. Tissue engineering requires consolidation of a broad knowledge of cell biology and modern biotechnology investigating biocompatibility of materials and their application for the reconstruction of damaged organs and tissues. Stem cell-based tissue regeneration started from the direct cell transplantation into damaged tissues or blood vessels. However, it is difficult to track transplanted cells and keep them in one particular place of diseased organ. Recently, new technologies such as cultivation of stem cell on the scaffolds and subsequently their implantation into injured tissue have been extensively developed. Successful tissue regeneration requires scaffolds with particular mechanical stability or biodegradability, appropriate size, surface roughness and porosity to provide a suitable microenvironment for the sufficient cell-cell interaction, cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. Further functioning of implanted cells highly depends on the scaffold pore sizes that play an essential role in nutrient and oxygen diffusion and waste removal. In addition, pore sizes strongly influence cell adhesion, cell-cell interaction and cell transmigration across the membrane depending on the various purposes of tissue regeneration. Therefore, this review will highlight contemporary tendencies in application of non-degradable scaffolds and stem cells in regenerative medicine with a particular focus on the pore sizes significantly affecting final recover of diseased organs. PMID:26091616

  16. Cell cycle control in Alphaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Justine

    2016-04-01

    Alphaproteobacteria include many medically and environmentally important organisms. Despite the diversity of their niches and lifestyles, from free-living to host-associated, they usually rely on very similar mechanisms to control their cell cycles. Studies on Caulobacter crescentus still lay the foundation for understanding the molecular details of pathways regulating DNA replication and cell division and coordinating these two processes with other events of the cell cycle. This review highlights recent discoveries on the regulation and the mode of action of conserved global regulators and small molecules like c-di-GMP and (p)ppGpp, which play key roles in cell cycle control. It also describes several newly identified mechanisms that modulate cell cycle progression in response to stresses or environmental conditions. PMID:26871482

  17. The effects of topographical patterns and sizes on neural stem cell behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Qi

    Full Text Available Engineered topographical manipulation, a paralleling approach with conventional biochemical cues, has recently attracted the growing interests in utilizations to control stem cell fate. In this study, effects of topological parameters, pattern and size are emphasized on the proliferation and differentiation of adult neural stem cells (ANSCs. We fabricate micro-scale topographical Si wafers with two different feature sizes. These topographical patterns present linear micro-pattern (LMP, circular micro-pattern (CMP and dot micro-pattern (DMP. The results show that the three topography substrates are suitable for ANSC growth, while they all depress ANSC proliferation when compared to non-patterned substrates (control. Meanwhile, LMP and CMP with two feature sizes can both significantly enhance ANSC differentiation to neurons compared to control. The smaller the feature size is, the better upregulation applies to ANSC for the differentiated neurons. The underlying mechanisms of topography-enhanced neuronal differentiation are further revealed by directing suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (MAPK/Erk signaling pathway in ANSC using U0126, known to inhibit the activation of Erk. The statistical results suggest MAPK/Erk pathway is partially involved in topography-induced differentiation. These observations provide a better understanding on the different roles of topographical cues on stem cell behavior, especially on the selective differentiation, and facilitate to advance the field of stem cell therapy.

  18. Graphene-Based Flexible Micrometer-Sized Microbial Fuel Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2013-10-23

    Microbial fuel cells harvest electrical energy produced by bacteria during the natural decomposition of organic matter. We report a micrometer-sized microbial fuel cell that is able to generate nanowatt-scale power from microliters of liquids. The sustainable design is comprised of a graphene anode, an air cathode, and a polymer-based substrate platform for flexibility. The graphene layer was grown on a nickel thin film by using chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure. Our demonstration provides a low-cost option to generate useful power for lab-on-chip applications and could be promising to rapidly screen and scale up microbial fuel cells for water purification without consuming excessive power (unlike other water treatment technologies).

  19. Surfactant effects in magnetite nanoparticles of controlled size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetite Fe3O4 nanoparticles of controlled size within 6 and 20 nm in diameter were synthesised by thermal decomposition of an iron organic precursor in an organic medium. Particles were coated with oleic acid. For all samples studied, saturation magnetisation Ms is size-independent, and reaches a value close to that expected for bulk magnetite, in contrast to results in small particle systems for which Ms is usually much smaller due to surface spin disorder. The coercive field for the 6 nm particles is in agreement with coherent rotation, taking the bulk magnetocrystalline anisotropy into account. Both results suggest that the oleic acid molecules covalently bonded to the nanoparticle surface yield a strong reduction in the surface spin disorder. However, although the saturated state may be similar, the approach to saturation is different and, in particular, the high-field differential susceptibility is one order of magnitude larger than in bulk materials. The relevance of these results in biomedical applications is discussed

  20. Surfactant effects in magnetite nanoparticles of controlled size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardia, P. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (IN2UB) , Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028- Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Batlle-Brugal, B. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (IN2UB) , Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028- Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Roca, A.G. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Iglesias, O. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (IN2UB) , Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028- Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Morales, M.P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Serna, C.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Labarta, A. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (IN2UB) , Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028- Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Batlle, X. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (IN2UB) , Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028- Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)]. E-mail: xavier@ffn.ub.es

    2007-09-15

    Magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles of controlled size within 6 and 20 nm in diameter were synthesised by thermal decomposition of an iron organic precursor in an organic medium. Particles were coated with oleic acid. For all samples studied, saturation magnetisation M{sub s} is size-independent, and reaches a value close to that expected for bulk magnetite, in contrast to results in small particle systems for which M{sub s} is usually much smaller due to surface spin disorder. The coercive field for the 6 nm particles is in agreement with coherent rotation, taking the bulk magnetocrystalline anisotropy into account. Both results suggest that the oleic acid molecules covalently bonded to the nanoparticle surface yield a strong reduction in the surface spin disorder. However, although the saturated state may be similar, the approach to saturation is different and, in particular, the high-field differential susceptibility is one order of magnitude larger than in bulk materials. The relevance of these results in biomedical applications is discussed.

  1. Size and concentration controlled growth of porous gold nanofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Renyun; Hummelgaard, Magnus; Olin, Haakan [Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall (Sweden)

    2012-03-15

    At an air/water interface, diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) of gold nanoparticles can form porous gold thin films. This porous film roughly consists of a network of irregular nanowires. For this air-water system, external parameters like temperature are well studied, while the influence of internal parameters, e.g., the size and concentration of the nanoparticles, have not been studied in detail. Here, we report on the growth of porous gold nanofilms for different nanoparticle sizes and concentrations to get a relationship between the morphology of the films and the internal parameters. The gold nanoparticles were synthesized by reducing HAuCl{sub 4} using sodium citrate. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization showed a linear relation between the formed gold nanowires and the concentration of HAuCl{sub 4} if the concentration of sodium citrate is unchanged. A linear dependency was also found between the wire diameter and the gold nanoparticle concentration, and between the wire diameter and volume fraction of the nanoparticles. The electrical resistance of the films was measured, showing a linear relation between resistance and the inverse of the cross-sectional area of the nanowires. This study shows the relation between the morphology and resistance of the grown porous films and the controllable internal parameters that will be useful in further exploration of this thin-film growth method. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Evidence for maternal control of seed size in maize from phenotypic and transcriptional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Hirsch, Candice N; Sekhon, Rajandeep S; de Leon, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M

    2016-04-01

    Seed size is an important component of grain yield and a key determinant trait for crop domestication. The Krug Yellow Dent long-term selection experiment for large and small seed provides a valuable resource to dissect genetic and phenotypic changes affecting seed size within a common genetic background. In this study, inbred lines derived from Krug Large Seed (KLS) and Krug Small Seed (KSS) populations and reciprocal F1 crosses were used to investigate developmental and molecular mechanisms governing seed size. Seed morphological characteristics showed striking differences between KLS and KSS inbred lines, and the reciprocal cross experiment revealed a strong maternal influence on both seed weight and seed size. Quantification of endosperm area, starchy endosperm cell size, and kernel dry mass accumulation indicated a positive correlation between seed size, endosperm cell number, and grain filling rate, and patterns of grain filling in reciprocal crosses mirrored that of the maternal parent. Consistent with the maternal contribution to seed weight, transcriptome profiling of reciprocal F1 hybrids showed substantial similarities to the maternal parent. A set of differentially expressed genes between KLS and KSS inbreds were found, which fell into a broad number of functional categories including DNA methylation, nucleosome assembly, and heat stress response. In addition, gene co-expression network analysis of parental inbreds and reciprocal F1 hybrids identified co-expression modules enriched in ovule development and DNA methylation, implicating these two processes in seed size determination. These results expand our understanding of seed size regulation and help to uncover the developmental and molecular basis underlying maternal control of seed size in maize. PMID:26826570

  3. Size-Controlled Synthesis of Sub-10 nm PtNi3 Alloy Nanoparticles and their Unusual Volcano-Shaped Size Effect on ORR Electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lin; Rudi, Stefan; Cui, Chunhua; Heggen, Marc; Strasser, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Dealloyed Pt bimetallic core-shell catalysts derived from low-Pt bimetallic alloy nanoparticles (e.g, PtNi3 ) have recently shown unprecedented activity and stability on the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) under realistic fuel cell conditions and become today's catalyst of choice for commercialization of automobile fuel cells. A critical step toward this breakthrough is to control their particle size below a critical value (≈10 nm) to suppress nanoporosity formation and hence reduce significant base metal (e.g., Ni) leaching under the corrosive ORR condition. Fine size control of the sub-10 nm PtNi3 nanoparticles and understanding their size dependent ORR electrocatalysis are crucial to further improve their ORR activity and stability yet still remain unexplored. A robust synthetic approach is presented here for size-controlled PtNi3 nanoparticles between 3 and 10 nm while keeping a constant particle composition and their size-selected growth mechanism is studied comprehensively. This enables us to address their size-dependent ORR activities and stabilities for the first time. Contrary to the previously established monotonic increase of ORR specific activity and stability with increasing particle size on Pt and Pt-rich bimetallic nanoparticles, the Pt-poor PtNi3 nanoparticles exhibit an unusual "volcano-shaped" size dependence, showing the highest ORR activity and stability at the particle sizes between 6 and 8 nm due to their highest Ni retention during long-term catalyst aging. The results of this study provide important practical guidelines for the size selection of the low Pt bimetallic ORR electrocatalysts with further improved durably high activity. PMID:27152487

  4. Size-controlled and redox-responsive supramolecular nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Mejia-Ariza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Control over the assembly and disassembly of nanoparticles is pivotal for their use as drug delivery vehicles. Here, we aim to form supramolecular nanoparticles (SNPs by combining advantages of the reversible assembly properties of SNPs using host–guest interactions and of a stimulus-responsive moiety. The SNPs are composed of a core of positively charged poly(ethylene imine grafted with β-cyclodextrin (CD and a positively charged ferrocene (Fc-terminated poly(amidoamine dendrimer, with a monovalent stabilizer at the surface. Fc was chosen for its loss of CD-binding properties when oxidizing it to the ferrocenium cation. The ionic strength was shown to play an important role in controlling the aggregate growth. The attractive supramolecular and repulsive electrostatic interactions constitute a balance of forces in this system at low ionic strengths. At higher ionic strengths, the increased charge screening led to a loss of electrostatic repulsion and therefore to faster aggregate growth. A Job plot showed that a 1:1 stoichiometry of host and guest moieties gave the most efficient aggregate growth. Different stabilizers were used to find the optimal stopper to limit the growth. A weaker guest moiety was shown to be less efficient in stabilizing the SNPs. Also steric repulsion is important for achieving SNP stability. SNPs of controlled particle size and good stability (up to seven days were prepared by fine-tuning the ratio of multivalent and monovalent interactions. Finally, reversibility of the SNPs was confirmed by oxidizing the Fc guest moieties in the core of the SNPs.

  5. Size-controlled and redox-responsive supramolecular nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Summary Control over the assembly and disassembly of nanoparticles is pivotal for their use as drug delivery vehicles. Here, we aim to form supramolecular nanoparticles (SNPs) by combining advantages of the reversible assembly properties of SNPs using host–guest interactions and of a stimulus-responsive moiety. The SNPs are composed of a core of positively charged poly(ethylene imine) grafted with β-cyclodextrin (CD) and a positively charged ferrocene (Fc)-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimer, with a monovalent stabilizer at the surface. Fc was chosen for its loss of CD-binding properties when oxidizing it to the ferrocenium cation. The ionic strength was shown to play an important role in controlling the aggregate growth. The attractive supramolecular and repulsive electrostatic interactions constitute a balance of forces in this system at low ionic strengths. At higher ionic strengths, the increased charge screening led to a loss of electrostatic repulsion and therefore to faster aggregate growth. A Job plot showed that a 1:1 stoichiometry of host and guest moieties gave the most efficient aggregate growth. Different stabilizers were used to find the optimal stopper to limit the growth. A weaker guest moiety was shown to be less efficient in stabilizing the SNPs. Also steric repulsion is important for achieving SNP stability. SNPs of controlled particle size and good stability (up to seven days) were prepared by fine-tuning the ratio of multivalent and monovalent interactions. Finally, reversibility of the SNPs was confirmed by oxidizing the Fc guest moieties in the core of the SNPs. PMID:26733345

  6. Quantifying size-dependent interactions between fluorescently labeled polystyrene nanoparticles and mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varela Juan A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanoparticles (NPs are currently used in a wide variety of fields such as technology, medicine and industry. Due to the novelty of these applications and to ensure their success, a precise characterization of the interactions between NPs and cells is essential. Findings The current study explores the uptake of polystyrene NPs by 1321N1 human astrocytoma and A549 human lung carcinoma cell lines. In this work we show for the first time a comparison of the uptake rates of fluorescently labeled carboxylated polystyrene (PS NPs of different sizes (20, 40 and 100 nm in two different cell types, keeping the number of NPs per unit volume constant for all sizes. We propose a reliable methodology to control the dose of fluorescently labeled NPs, by counting individual NPs using automated particle detection from 3D confocal microscopy images. The possibility of detecting individual NPs also allowed us to calculate the size of each nanoparticle and compare the fluorescence of single NPs across different sizes, thereby providing a robust platform for normalization of NP internalization experiments as measured by flow cytometry. Conclusions Our findings show that 40 nm NPs are internalized faster than 20 nm or 100 nm particles in both cell lines studied, suggesting that there is a privileged size gap in which the internalization of NPs is higher.

  7. Size-Dependent Photodynamic Anticancer Activity of Biocompatible Multifunctional Magnetic Submicron Particles in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyong-Hoon; Nam, Ki Chang; Malkinski, Leszek; Choi, Eun Ha; Jung, Jin-Seung; Park, Bong Joo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, newly designed biocompatible multifunctional magnetic submicron particles (CoFe₂O₄-HPs-FAs) of well-defined sizes (60, 133, 245, and 335 nm) were fabricated for application as a photosensitizer delivery agent for photodynamic therapy in cancer cells. To provide selective targeting of cancer cells and destruction of cancer cell functionality, basic cobalt ferrite (CoFe₂O₄) particles were covalently bonded with a photosensitizer (PS), which comprises hematoporphyrin (HP), and folic acid (FA) molecules. The magnetic properties of the CoFe₂O₄ particles were finely adjusted by controlling the size of the primary CoFe₂O₄ nanograins, and secondary superstructured composite particles were formed by aggregation of the nanograins. The prepared CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited high water solubility, good MR-imaging capacity, and biocompatibility without any in vitro cytotoxicity. In particular, our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited remarkable photodynamic anticancer efficiency via induction of apoptotic death in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a particle size- and concentration-dependent manner. This size-dependent effect was determined by the specific surface area of the particles because the number of HP molecules increased with decreasing size and increasing surface area. These results indicate that our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA may be applicable for photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a PS delivery material and a therapeutic agent for MR-imaging based PDT owing to their high saturation value for magnetization and superparamagnetism. PMID:27607999

  8. Size-controlled synthesis of biodegradable nanocarriers for targeted and controlled cancer drug delivery using salting out cation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madasamy Hari Balakrishanan; Mariappan Rajan

    2016-02-01

    Research for synthesis of size-controlled carriers is currently challenging one. In this research paper, a method for size-controlled synthesis of biodegradable nanocarriers is proposed and described. Salting out method is suitable for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for the encapsulation on carriers. This synthetic method is based on polylactic acid (PLA) and non-ionic carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) composed by CaCl2 as salting out agent. This method permits size-controlled synthesis of particles between 50 and 400 nm simply by varying the concentration of salting out agents. We have prepared cisplatin (CDDP)-loaded PLA-CMC nanocarriers by salting out method, with varying salting out agent (CaCl2) concentrations as 0.05, 0.2, 0.35 and 0.5 M. The nanocarriers were characterized for their size, surface charge and morphology by atomic force microscope, zeta potential analyser and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency and in-vitro drug-releasing behaviour of the nanocarriers were investigated. The cytotoxicity effect of nanocarriers and drug-loaded nanocarriers was tested against MCF-7 breast cancer cell line.

  9. Adsorption of hematite nanoparticles onto Caco-2 cells and the cellular impairments: effect of particle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing applications of engineered nanomaterials nowadays have elevated the potential of human exposure through various routes including inhalation, skin penetration and digestion. To date there is scarce information on a quantitative description of the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and cell surfaces and the detrimental effects from the exposure. The purpose of this work was to study in vitro exposure of Caco-2 cells to hematite (α-Fe2O3) NPs and to determine the particle size effects on the adsorption behaviors. Cellular impairment was also investigated and compared. Hematite NPs were synthesized as part of this study with a discrete size distribution and uniform morphology examined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Caco-2 cells were cultured as a model epithelium to mirror human intestinal cells and used to evaluate the impacts of the exposure to NPs by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Cell surface disruption, localization and translocation of NPs through the cells were analyzed with immunocytochemical staining and confocal microscopy. Results showed that hematite NPs had mean diameters of 26, 53, 76 and 98 nm and were positively charged with minor aggregation in the buffer solution. Adsorption of the four sizes of NPs on cells reached equilibrium within approximately 5 min but adsorption kinetics were found to be size-dependent. The adsorption rates expressed as mg m-2 min-1 were greater for large NPs (76 and 98 nm) than those for small NPs (26 and 53 nm). However, adsorption rates, expressed in units of m-2 min-1, were much greater for small NPs than large ones. After the adsorption equilibrium was reached, the adsorbed mass of NPs on a unit area of cells was calculated and showed no significant size dependence. Longer exposure time (>3 h) induced adverse cellular effects as indicated by the drop in TEER compared to the control cells without the exposure to NPs

  10. Lab-size rechargeable metal hydride-air cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wei-Kang; Noreus, Dag [Department of Materials and Enviromental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Lab-size rechargeable metal hydride-air (MH-air) cells with a gas management device were designed in order to minimize the loss of electrolyte. An AB{sub 5}-type hydrogen storage alloy was used as anode materials of the MH-air. The thickness of the metal hydride electrodes was in the range of 3.0-3.4 mm. Porous carbon-based air electrodes with Ag{sub 2}O catalysts were used as bi-functional electrodes for oxygen reduction and generation. The electrodes were first examined in half-cells to evaluate their performance and then assembled into one MH-air cell. The results showed the good cycling stability of the rechargeable MH-air cell with a capacity of 1990 mAh. The discharge voltage was 0.69 V at 0.05-0.1 C. The charge efficiency was about 90%. The specific and volumetric energy densities were about 95Wh kg{sup -1} and 140 Wh L{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  11. TPC2 controls pigmentation by regulating melanosome pH and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Andrea L; Boyle, Judith A; Aradi, Al E; Christian, Keith A; Di Pietro, Santiago M

    2016-05-17

    Melanin is responsible for pigmentation of skin and hair and is synthesized in a specialized organelle, the melanosome, in melanocytes. A genome-wide association study revealed that the two pore segment channel 2 (TPCN2) gene is strongly linked to pigmentation variations. TPCN2 encodes the two-pore channel 2 (TPC2) protein, a cation channel. Nevertheless, how TPC2 regulates pigmentation remains unknown. Here, we show that TPC2 is expressed in melanocytes and localizes to the melanosome-limiting membrane and, to a lesser extent, to endolysosomal compartments by confocal fluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy. Immunomagnetic isolation of TPC2-containing organelles confirmed its coresidence with melanosomal markers. TPCN2 knockout by means of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/CRISPR-associated 9 gene editing elicited a dramatic increase in pigment content in MNT-1 melanocytic cells. This effect was rescued by transient expression of TPC2-GFP. Consistently, siRNA-mediated knockdown of TPC2 also caused a substantial increase in melanin content in both MNT-1 cells and primary human melanocytes. Using a newly developed genetically encoded pH sensor targeted to melanosomes, we determined that the melanosome lumen in TPC2-KO MNT-1 cells and primary melanocytes subjected to TPC2 knockdown is less acidic than in control cells. Fluorescence and electron microscopy analysis revealed that TPC2-KO MNT-1 cells have significantly larger melanosomes than control cells, but the number of organelles is unchanged. TPC2 likely regulates melanosomes pH and size by mediating Ca(2+) release from the organelle, which is decreased in TPC2-KO MNT-1 cells, as determined with the Ca(2+) sensor tyrosinase-GCaMP6. Thus, our data show that TPC2 regulates pigmentation through two fundamental determinants of melanosome function: pH and size. PMID:27140606

  12. An assessment of the effects of cell size on AGNPS modeling of watershed runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.-S.; Usery, E.L.; Finn, M.P.; Bosch, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the changes in simulated watershed runoff from the Agricultural NonPoint Source (AGNPS) pollution model as a function of model input cell size resolution for eight different cell sizes (30 m, 60 m, 120 m, 210 m, 240 m, 480 m, 960 m, and 1920 m) for the Little River Watershed (Georgia, USA). Overland cell runoff (area-weighted cell runoff), total runoff volume, clustering statistics, and hot spot patterns were examined for the different cell sizes and trends identified. Total runoff volumes decreased with increasing cell size. Using data sets of 210-m cell size or smaller in conjunction with a representative watershed boundary allows one to model the runoff volumes within 0.2 percent accuracy. The runoff clustering statistics decrease with increasing cell size; a cell size of 960 m or smaller is necessary to indicate significant high-runoff clustering. Runoff hot spot areas have a decreasing trend with increasing cell size; a cell size of 240 m or smaller is required to detect important hot spots. Conclusions regarding cell size effects on runoff estimation cannot be applied to local watershed areas due to the inconsistent changes of runoff volume with cell size; but, optimal cells sizes for clustering and hot spot analyses are applicable to local watershed areas due to the consistent trends.

  13. Cell size dynamics and viability of cells exposed to hypotonic treatment and electroporation for electrofusion optimization:

    OpenAIRE

    Hudej, Rosana; Kandušer, Maša; Miklavčič, Damijan; Trontelj, Katja; Ušaj, Marko

    2009-01-01

    Background. Various electrofusion parameters have to be adjusted to obtain theoptimal electrofusion efficiency. Based on published data, good electrofusion conditions can be achieved with the hypotonic treatment. However, the duration of the hypotonic treatment before electroporation and buffer hypoosmolarity have to be adjusted in order to cause cell swelling, to avoid regulatory volume decrease and to preserve cell viability. The aims of our study were to determine cell size dynamics and vi...

  14. Cell size dynamics and viability of cells exposed to hypotonic treatment and electroporation for electrofusion optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Trontelj, Katja; Kandušer, Maša; Miklavčič, Damijan; Hudej, Rosana; Ušaj, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Background. Various electrofusion parameters have to be adjusted to obtain theoptimal electrofusion efficiency. Based on published data, good electrofusion conditions can be achieved with the hypotonic treatment. However, the duration of the hypotonic treatment before electroporation and buffer hypoosmolarity have to be adjusted in order to cause cell swelling, to avoid regulatory volume decrease and to preserve cell viability. The aims of our study were to determine cell size dynamics and vi...

  15. A Cell-Free Assay Using Xenopus laevis Embryo Extracts to Study Mechanisms of Nuclear Size Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Lisa J; Levy, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental question in cell biology is how cell and organelle sizes are regulated. It has long been recognized that the size of the nucleus generally scales with the size of the cell, notably during embryogenesis when dramatic reductions in both cell and nuclear sizes occur. Mechanisms of nuclear size regulation are largely unknown and may be relevant to cancer where altered nuclear size is a key diagnostic and prognostic parameter. In vivo approaches to identifying nuclear size regulators are complicated by the essential and complex nature of nuclear function. The in vitro approach described here to study nuclear size control takes advantage of the normal reductions in nuclear size that occur during Xenopus laevis development. First, nuclei are assembled in X. laevis egg extract. Then, these nuclei are isolated and resuspended in cytoplasm from late stage embryos. After a 30 - 90 min incubation period, nuclear surface area decreases by 20 - 60%, providing a useful assay to identify cytoplasmic components present in late stage embryos that contribute to developmental nuclear size scaling. A major advantage of this approach is the relative facility with which the egg and embryo extracts can be biochemically manipulated, allowing for the identification of novel proteins and activities that regulate nuclear size. As with any in vitro approach, validation of results in an in vivo system is important, and microinjection of X. laevis embryos is particularly appropriate for these studies. PMID:27584618

  16. Effect of Particle Size in Aggregates of ZnO-Aggregate-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The crystal size in submicrometer ZnO aggregates plays an important role in the ZnO-aggregate-based dye-sensitized solar cells. Optimal crystal size in aggregates leads to balance parameters of dye absorption, electron diffusion between crystals and recombination to get higher light-to-electricity conversion efficiency. - Highlights: • A new method is developed for controlling crystal size in ZnO aggregate. • Dye adsorption, electron diffusion and recombination depend on crystal size in the aggregates. • 20-30 nm crystal size in aggregates can optimize these factors to achieve higher efficiency of DSC. - Abstract: Effect of particle size in aggregates on ZnO-aggregate-based dye-sensitized solar cells is investigated. A two-step hydrothermal method is developed for preparing submicrometer ZnO aggregates with different crystal sizes via controlling regrowth temperature. Three groups of ZnO-aggregate-based dye-sensitized solar cells with the different crystal sizes in the aggregates are fabricated for comparison of the photovoltaic properties. The results indicate that the cell made of crystal size of 25-30 nm has the highest light-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 4.54% for the dye-sensitized solar cells. According to the analysis of absorption spectra, dark current curves, photoelectron decay and electrochemical impedance spectra, we find that the aggregates with smaller crystal size have higher capability of dye adsorption, while the aggregates with larger crystal size have faster electron diffusion, and less recombination. Therefore, optimal crystal size in the aggregates for photoanode leads to balance these parameters to get higher light-to-electricity conversion efficiency. This investigation is important to the improvement of conversion efficiency for dye-sensitized solar cells

  17. RNA Control of HIV-1 Particle Size Polydispersity

    CERN Document Server

    Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Thomas, Audrey; Tartour, Kevin; Beck, Yvonne; Iazykov, Maksym; Danial, John; Lourdin, Morgane; Muriaux, Delphine; Castelnovo, Martin

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1, an enveloped RNA virus, produces viral particles that are known to be much more heterogeneous in size than is typical of non-enveloped viruses. We present here a novel strategy to study HIV-1 Viral Like Particles (VLP) assembly by measuring the size distribution of these purified VLPs and subsequent viral cores thanks to Atomic Force Microscopy imaging and statistical analysis. This strategy allowed us to identify whether the presence of viral RNA acts as a modulator for VLPs and cores size heterogeneity in a large population of particles. These results are analyzed in the light of a recently proposed statistical physics model for the self-assembly process. In particular, our results reveal that the modulation of size distribution by the presence of viral RNA is qualitatively reproduced, suggesting therefore an entropic origin for the modulation of RNA uptake by the nascent VLP.

  18. Studies on the particle size control of gelatin microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixue SUN; Jingjing SHI; Yanchuan GUO; Lijuan CHEN

    2009-01-01

    A series of gelatin microspheres (GMs) were prepared through emulsification-coacervation method in water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions. The influence of preparation parameters on particle size, surface morphology, and dispersion of GMs was examined. The studied preparation parameters include concentration of gelatin solutions, concentration of the emulsifier, w/o ratio, emulsifying time, stirring speed, and so on. The surface morphology, dispersion, and particle sizes of GMs were determined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SemAfore 4 Demo software, and particle size distribution graphic charts. The experimental results indicated that increasing the concentration of gelatin solution would increase the particle size of GMs. When the solution concentration increased from 0.050 to 0.200 g/mL gradually, the particle size increased correspondingly. The relationship between the two quantities was linear. On the contrary, increasing the concentration of the emulsifier would decrease the particle size of GMs. Furthermore, the particle size reduced quickly at initial time and slowed down latterly. With the increase of emulsifier concentration from 0 to 0.020 g/mL, the mean diameters of GMs decreased from 17.32 to 5.38 urn. However, the particle size dwindled slowly when emulsifier concentration was higher than 0.020 g/mL. The excellent result was obtained with the condition of 0.050 g/mL of emulsifier concentration, 0.100 g/mL of gelatin solution concentration, 1/5 of w/o ratio, 10 min of emulsifying time, and 900 r/min of the stirring speed. The GMs prepared at this condition had the smallest sizes, the narrowest size distribution, the best spherical shape, and fluidity. The w/o ratio has the same influence on particle size of GMs as that of gelatin solution concentration. With the increase of w/o ratio, the average particle sizes increased linearly, and the surface of microspheres become smoother as well. It is supposed that w/o ratio can be used to change the diameters

  19. Controlling class size to manage enrollment decline of secondary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Jo-zin.; 馬晉修.

    2012-01-01

    In the recent decade or so, the phenomenon of enrollment decline of secondary schools has been clearly observed in Hong Kong. The significance of this phenomenon has grown over time such that the number of public sector schools has had to be reduced. Meanwhile, an alternative to school closure is to reduce the class size of schools which is however not less controversial. On the surface, the arguments against class size reduction include perceived extra cost per student and ineffectiveness o...

  20. Size-controlled magnetic nanoparticles with lecithin for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecithin-adsorbed magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by three-step process that the thermal decomposition was combined with ultrasonication. Experimental parameters were three items-molar ratio between Fe(CO)5 and oleic acid, keeping time at decomposition temperature and lecithin concentration. As the molar ratio between Fe(CO)5 and oleic acid, and keeping time at decomposition temperature increased, the particle size increased. However, the change of lecithin concentration did not show the remarkable particle size variation

  1. Size-Controlled Dissolution of Organic-Coated Silver Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Rui; Levard, Clément; Marinakos, Stella M.; Cheng, Yingwen; Liu, Jie; Michel, F. Marc; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.; Lowry, Gregory V. (Duke)

    2012-04-02

    The solubility of Ag NPs can affect their toxicity and persistence in the environment. We measured the solubility of organic-coated silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) having particle diameters ranging from 5 to 80 nm that were synthesized using various methods, and with different organic polymer coatings including poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and gum arabic. The size and morphology of Ag NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and synchrotron-based total X-ray scattering and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis were used to determine the local structure around Ag and evaluate changes in crystal lattice parameters and structure as a function of NP size. Ag NP solubility dispersed in 1 mM NaHCO{sub 3} at pH 8 was found to be well correlated with particle size based on the distribution of measured TEM sizes as predicted by the modified Kelvin equation. Solubility of Ag NPs was not affected by the synthesis method and coating as much as by their size. Based on the modified Kelvin equation, the surface tension of Ag NPs was found to be {approx}1 J/m{sup 2}, which is expected for bulk fcc (face centered cubic) silver. Analysis of XAFS, X-ray scattering, and PDFs confirm that the lattice parameter, {alpha}, of the fcc crystal structure of Ag NPs did not change with particle size for Ag NPs as small as 6 nm, indicating the absence of lattice strain. These results are consistent with the finding that Ag NP solubility can be estimated based on TEM-derived particle size using the modified Kelvin equation for particles in the size range of 5-40 nm in diameter.

  2. The Influences of Cell Type and ZnO Nanoparticle Size on Immune Cell Cytotoxicity and Cytokine Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurber Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanotechnology represents a new and enabling platform that promises to provide a range of innovative technologies for biological applications. ZnO nanoparticles of controlled size were synthesized, and their cytotoxicity toward different human immune cells evaluated. A differential cytotoxic response between human immune cell subsets was observed, with lymphocytes being the most resistant and monocytes being the most susceptible to ZnO nanoparticle-induced toxicity. Significant differences were also observed between previously activated memory lymphocytes and naive lymphocytes, indicating a relationship between cell-cycle potential and nanoparticle susceptibility. Mechanisms of toxicity involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with monocytes displaying the highest levels, and the degree of cytotoxicity dependent on the extent of nanoparticle interactions with cellular membranes. An inverse relationship between nanoparticle size and cytotoxicity, as well as nanoparticle size and reactive oxygen species production was observed. In addition, ZnO nanoparticles induce the production of the proinflammatory cytokines, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-12, at concentrations below those causing appreciable cell death. Collectively, these results underscore the need for careful evaluation of ZnO nanoparticle effects across a spectrum of relevant cell types when considering their use for potential new nanotechnology-based biological applications.

  3. Scaffold pore size modulates in vitro osteogenesis of human adipose-derived stem/stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trabecular bone has an interconnected porous structure, which influences cellular responses, biochemical transport and mechanical strength. Appropriately mimicking this structural organization in biomaterial scaffolds can facilitate more robust bone tissue regeneration and integration by providing a native microenvironment to the cells. This study examined the effect of pore size on human adipose-derived stem/stromal cell (ASC) osteogenesis within poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds. Scaffold pore size was controlled by porogen leaching of custom-made paraffin particles with three different size ranges: P200 (< 500 µm), P500 (500–1000 µm), and P1000 (1000–1500 µm). Scaffolds produced by leaching these particles exhibited highly interconnected pores and rough surface structures that were favorable for cell attachment and ingrowth. The osteogenic response of ASCs was evaluated following 3 weeks of in vitro culture using biochemical (ALP, Ca2+/DNA content), mechanical (compression test) and histological (H and E and von Kossa staining) analyses. It was observed that while the total number of cells was similar for all scaffolds, the cell distributions and osteogenic properties were affected by the scaffold pore size. ASCs were able to bridge smaller pores and grow uniformly within these scaffolds (P200) while they grew as a layer along the periphery of the largest pores (P1000). The cell-biomaterial interactions specific to the latter case led to enhanced osteogenic responses. The ALP activity and Ca2+ deposition were doubled in P1000 scaffolds as compared to P200 scaffolds. A significant difference was observed between the compressive strength of unseeded and seeded P1000 scaffolds. Therefore, we demonstrated that the use of scaffolds with pores that are in the range of 1 mm enhances in vitro ASC osteogenesis, which may improve their performance in engineered bone substitutes. (paper)

  4. Synthesis of size-controlled Bi particles by electrochemical deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C N Tharamani; H C Thejaswini; S Sampath

    2008-06-01

    Small sized bismuth particles are prepared by an electrochemical method using a triple voltage pulse technique. The bath composition and electrochemical parameters are optimized to yield monodisperse particles. The particles have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. The particles, as deposited, are highly crystalline in nature and the particle size and shape get tuned depending on the conditions of deposition.

  5. A genomics approach to understanding the role of auxin in apple (Malus x domestica fruit size control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devoghalaere Fanny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Auxin is an important phytohormone for fleshy fruit development, having been shown to be involved in the initial signal for fertilisation, fruit size through the control of cell division and cell expansion, and ripening related events. There is considerable knowledge of auxin-related genes, mostly from work in model species. With the apple genome now available, it is possible to carry out genomics studies on auxin-related genes to identify genes that may play roles in specific stages of apple fruit development. Results High amounts of auxin in the seed compared with the fruit cortex were observed in 'Royal Gala' apples, with amounts increasing through fruit development. Injection of exogenous auxin into developing apples at the start of cell expansion caused an increase in cell size. An expression analysis screen of auxin-related genes involved in auxin reception, homeostasis, and transcriptional regulation showed complex patterns of expression in each class of gene. Two mapping populations were phenotyped for fruit size over multiple seasons, and multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs were observed. One QTL mapped to a region containing an Auxin Response Factor (ARF106. This gene is expressed during cell division and cell expansion stages, consistent with a potential role in the control of fruit size. Conclusions The application of exogenous auxin to apples increased cell expansion, suggesting that endogenous auxin concentrations are at least one of the limiting factors controlling fruit size. The expression analysis of ARF106 linked to a strong QTL for fruit weight suggests that the auxin signal regulating fruit size could partially be modulated through the function of this gene. One class of gene (GH3 removes free auxin by conjugation to amino acids. The lower expression of these GH3 genes during rapid fruit expansion is consistent with the apple maximising auxin concentrations at this point.

  6. Regional variations in HDL metabolism in human fat cells: effect of cell size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdominal obesity is related to reduced plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and both are associated with cardiovascular disease risk. The authors have observed that plasma membranes from abdominal subcutaneous adipocytes have a greater HDL binding capacity than omental fat cell plasma membranes. The present study examined whether these binding characteristics could be due to differences in fat cell size or cholesterol concentration between the two adipose depots. Abdominal subcutaneous and deep omental fat were obtained from massively obese patients at surgery. Subcutaneous abdominal fat cells were significantly larger and their cellular cholesterol content greater than omental adipocytes. The uptake of HDL by collagenase-isolated fat cells was studied by incubating the cells for 2 h at 370C with 10 μg/ml 125I-HDL2 or 125I-HDL3. In both depots, the cellular uptake of 125I-HDL2 and 125I-HDL3 was specifically inhibited by addition of 25-fold excess unlabeled HDL and a close correlation was observed between the cellular uptake of 125I-HDL2 and 125I-HDL3. In obese patients, the uptake of 125I-HDL was higher in subcutaneous cells than in omental cells. The cellular 125I-HDL uptake was significantly correlated with adipocyte size and fat cell cholesterol content but not with adipocyte cholesterol concentration. These results suggest that the higher HDL uptake observed in subcutaneous cells compared with omental cells in obesity is the result of differences in adipocyte size rather than differences in the cholesterol concentration (cholesterol-to-triglyceride ratio). The increased interaction of HDL with hypertrophied abdominal adipocytes may play an important role in determining the lipid composition of HDL in obesity

  7. Regional variations in HDL metabolism in human fat cells: effect of cell size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Despres, J.; Fong, B.S.; Julien, P.; Jimenez, J.; Angel, A.

    1987-05-01

    Abdominal obesity is related to reduced plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and both are associated with cardiovascular disease risk. The authors have observed that plasma membranes from abdominal subcutaneous adipocytes have a greater HDL binding capacity than omental fat cell plasma membranes. The present study examined whether these binding characteristics could be due to differences in fat cell size or cholesterol concentration between the two adipose depots. Abdominal subcutaneous and deep omental fat were obtained from massively obese patients at surgery. Subcutaneous abdominal fat cells were significantly larger and their cellular cholesterol content greater than omental adipocytes. The uptake of HDL by collagenase-isolated fat cells was studied by incubating the cells for 2 h at 37/sup 0/C with 10 ..mu..g/ml /sup 125/I-HDL/sub 2/ or /sup 125/I-HDL/sub 3/. In both depots, the cellular uptake of /sup 125/I-HDL/sub 2/ and /sup 125/I-HDL/sub 3/ was specifically inhibited by addition of 25-fold excess unlabeled HDL and a close correlation was observed between the cellular uptake of /sup 125/I-HDL/sub 2/ and /sup 125/I-HDL/sub 3/. In obese patients, the uptake of /sup 125/I-HDL was higher in subcutaneous cells than in omental cells. The cellular /sup 125/I-HDL uptake was significantly correlated with adipocyte size and fat cell cholesterol content but not with adipocyte cholesterol concentration. These results suggest that the higher HDL uptake observed in subcutaneous cells compared with omental cells in obesity is the result of differences in adipocyte size rather than differences in the cholesterol concentration (cholesterol-to-triglyceride ratio). The increased interaction of HDL with hypertrophied abdominal adipocytes may play an important role in determining the lipid composition of HDL in obesity.

  8. Reversible Size Control of Silver Nanoclusters via Ligand-exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2015-05-21

    The properties of atomically monodisperse noble metal nanoclusters (NCs) are intricately intertwined with their precise molecular formula. The vast majority of size-specific NC syntheses start from the reduction of the metal salt and thiol ligand mixture. Only in gold was it recently shown that ligand-exchange could induce the growth of NCs from one atomically precise species to another; a process of yet unknown reversibility. Here, we present a process for the ligand-exchange-induced growth of atomically precise silver NCs, in a biphasic liquid-liquid system, which is particularly of interest because of its complete reversibility and ability to occur at room temperature. We explore this phenomenon in-depth using Ag35(SG)18 [SG= glutathionate] and Ag44(4-FTP)30 [4-FTP= 4-fluorothiophenol] as model systems. We show that the ligand-exchange conversion of Ag35(SG)18 into Ag44(4-FTP)30 is rapid (< 5 min) and direct, while the reverse process proceeds slowly through intermediate cluster sizes. We adapt a recently developed theory of reverse Ostwald ripening to model the NCs’ interconvertibility. The model’s predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations, and they highlight the importance of small changes in the ligand-metal binding energy in determining the final equilibrium NC size. Based on the insight provided by this model, we demonstrated experimentally that by varying the choice of ligands, ligand-exchange can be used to obtain different sized NCs. The findings in this work establish ligand-exchange as a versatile tool for tuning cluster sizes.

  9. Personal computer control system for small size tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the analysis apparatus using tandem accelerator has a lot of control parameter, numbers of control parts set on control panel are so many to make the panel more complex and its operativity worse. In order to improve these faults, development and design of a control system using personal computer for the control panel mainly constituted by conventional hardware parts were tried. Their predominant characteristics are shown as follows: 1) To make the control panel construction simpler and more compact, because the hardware device on the panel surface becomes the smallest limit as required by using a personal computer for man-machine interface. 2) To make control speed more rapid, because sequence control is closed within each block by driving accelerator system to each block and installing local station of the sequencer network at each block. 3) To make expandability larger, because of few improvement of the present hardware by interrupting the sequencer local station into the net and correcting image of the computer when increasing a new beamline. And, 4) to make control system cheaper, because of cheaper investment and easier programming by using the personal computer. (G.K.)

  10. Methotrexate intercalated layered double hydroxides with different particle sizes: structural study and controlled release properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Qing; Zeng, Mei-Gui; Li, Shu-Ping; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2014-05-01

    To study the influence of particle size on release properties, drug efficacy and other properties, a series of methotrexate intercalated layered double hydroxides (MTX/LDHs) nanohybrids with different particle sizes were synthesized through traditional coprecipitation method, by using the mixture of water and polyethylene glycol (volume ratio is 3:1) as solvent. The relationship between particle size and hydrothermal treatment conditions (i.e., time and temperature) had been systematically investigated, and the results indicate that the particle size can be precisely controlled between 70 and 300 nm. Elemental C/H/N and inductive coupled plasma (ICP) analysis indicated that different hydrothermal treatment almost has no effect on compositions of the nanohybrids. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) investigations manifested the successful intercalation of MTX anions. MTX/LDHs particles exhibited hexagonal platelet morphology with round corner, due to the adsorption of MTX anions on positively charged LDHs surface. In addition, the crystallinity of MTX/LDHs increased with the particle diameters and the thermal stability of MTX anions was enhanced by holding together with LDHs layers. The in vitro release showed that bigger particles have much longer release duration, and the bioassay tests indicated that bigger particles are more efficient in the suppression of the tumor cells. PMID:24632036

  11. Size-controllable polypyrrole nanospheres synthesized in the presence of phosphorylated chitosan and their size effect in different applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The size-controllable polypyrrole (PPy) nanospheres are successfully synthesized by oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using N-methylene phosphonic chitosan (NMPC) as a structure-directing agent. By simply changing the amount of NMPC, the size of the PPy nanospheres can be adjusted from 190 to 50 nm in diameter. The spectrometric results suggest that the electrostatic interactions of phosphate groups in NMPC molecule with pyrrole ring might be a driving force for formation of the uniform and size-controllable PPy nanospheres. The PPy nanospheres with the diameter of 100 nm exhibit the largest capacity and a good cycling stability as electrode materials of supercapacitors. The as-prepared PPy nanospheres also can be combined with carbon dots to form composite nanospheres presenting enhanced fluorescence intensity, which show potential application in fluorescence detection

  12. Size-controllable polypyrrole nanospheres synthesized in the presence of phosphorylated chitosan and their size effect in different applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Cao, Yi; Lu, Yun, E-mail: yunlu@nju.edu.cn [Nanjing University, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Key Laboratory of High Performance Polymer Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2015-05-15

    The size-controllable polypyrrole (PPy) nanospheres are successfully synthesized by oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using N-methylene phosphonic chitosan (NMPC) as a structure-directing agent. By simply changing the amount of NMPC, the size of the PPy nanospheres can be adjusted from 190 to 50 nm in diameter. The spectrometric results suggest that the electrostatic interactions of phosphate groups in NMPC molecule with pyrrole ring might be a driving force for formation of the uniform and size-controllable PPy nanospheres. The PPy nanospheres with the diameter of 100 nm exhibit the largest capacity and a good cycling stability as electrode materials of supercapacitors. The as-prepared PPy nanospheres also can be combined with carbon dots to form composite nanospheres presenting enhanced fluorescence intensity, which show potential application in fluorescence detection.

  13. Effects of meal size and composition on incretin, alpha-cell, and beta-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M; McQuarrie, Kelly; Girman, Cynthia J; Stein, Peter P; Mari, Andrea; Holst, Jens J; Nijpels, Giel; Dekker, Jacqueline M

    2010-04-01

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate postprandial insulin release from the beta-cells. We investigated the effects of 3 standardized meals with different caloric and nutritional content in terms of postprandial glucose, insulin, glucagon, and incretin responses. In a randomized crossover study, 18 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 6 healthy volunteers underwent three 4-hour meal tolerance tests (small carbohydrate [CH]-rich meal, large CH-rich meal, and fat-rich meal). Non-model-based and model-based estimates of beta-cell function and incremental areas under the curve of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP were calculated. Mixed models and Friedman tests were used to test for differences in meal responses. The large CH-rich meal and fat-rich meal resulted in a slightly larger insulin response as compared with the small CH-rich meal and led to a slightly shorter period of hyperglycemia, but only in healthy subjects. Model-based insulin secretion estimates did not show pronounced differences between meals. Both in healthy individuals and in those with diabetes, more CH resulted in higher GLP-1 release. In contrast with the other meals, GIP release was still rising 2 hours after the fat-rich meal. The initial glucagon response was stimulated by the large CH-rich meal, whereas the fat-rich meal induced a late glucagon response. Fat preferentially stimulates GIP secretion, whereas CH stimulates GLP-1 secretion. Differences in meal size and composition led to differences in insulin and incretin responses but not to differences in postprandial glucose levels of the well-controlled patients with diabetes. PMID:19846181

  14. Control rod studies in small and medium sized fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control rods are the primary safety mechanism in the operation of fast reactors. Neutronic parameters associated with the control rods have to be evaluated precisely for studying the behaviour of the reactor under various operating conditions. Control rods are strong neutron absorbers discretely distributed in the reactor core. Accurate estimation of control rod parameters demand, in principle transport theory solutions in exact geometry. But computer codes for such evaluations usually consume exorbitantly large computer time and memory for even a single parameter evaluation. During the design of reactors, evaluation of these parameters will be required for many configurations of control rods. In this paper, the method used at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research for estimating the parameters associated with control rods is presented. Diffusion theory solutions were used for computations. A scheme using three dimensional geometry represented by triangular meshes and diffusion theory solutions in few energy groups for control rod parameter evaluation is presented. This scheme was employed in estimating the control rod parameters in a 500 Mw(e) fast reactor. Error due to group collapsing is estimated by comparing with 25 group calculations in three dimensions for typical cases. (author). 5 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  15. Regulation of lipid droplet size in mammary epithelial cells by remodeling of membrane lipid composition-a potential mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bat-Chen Cohen

    Full Text Available Milk fat globule size is determined by the size of its precursors-intracellular lipid droplets-and is tightly associated with its composition. We examined the relationship between phospholipid composition of mammary epithelial cells and the size of both intracellular and secreted milk fat globules. Primary culture of mammary epithelial cells was cultured in medium without free fatty acids (control or with 0.1 mM free capric, palmitic or oleic acid for 24 h. The amount and composition of the cellular lipids and the size of the lipid droplets were determined in the cells and medium. Mitochondrial quantity and expression levels of genes associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and polar lipid composition were determined. Cells cultured with oleic and palmitic acids contained similar quantities of triglycerides, 3.1- and 3.8-fold higher than in controls, respectively (P 3 μm and phosphatidylethanolamine concentration was higher by 23 and 63% compared with that in the control and palmitic acid treatments, respectively (P < 0.0001. In the presence of palmitic acid, only 4% of the cells contained large lipid droplets and the membrane phosphatidylcholine concentration was 22% and 16% higher than that in the control and oleic acid treatments, respectively (P < 0.0001. In the oleic acid treatment, approximately 40% of the lipid droplets were larger than 5 μm whereas in that of the palmitic acid treatment, only 16% of the droplets were in this size range. Triglyceride secretion in the oleic acid treatment was 2- and 12-fold higher compared with that in the palmitic acid and control treatments, respectively. Results imply that membrane composition of bovine mammary epithelial cells plays a role in controlling intracellular and secreted lipid droplets size, and that this process is not associated with cellular triglyceride content.

  16. Size controlled near-infrared high-quality PbSe quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein, we report the size controlled preparation of PbSe quantum dots (QDs) by non coordinating solvent route using oleic acid as surfactant molecules. The particles size is controlled by varying temperature and time of reaction. The present method of synthesis gives highly stable colloids, spherical in shape, better size tunability, narrow size distribution, extremely small size, monodisperse and exhibit strong near-infrared emission. The estimated particles sizes are in the range of 2 to 8 nm. These PbSe quantum dots are used for applications in optoelectronics and biological imaging

  17. Size controlled near-infrared high-quality PbSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalasad, M. N., E-mail: mnkalasad@gmail.com [Dept. of Physics, SDM College of Engineering & Technology, Dharwad-580003 (India); Rabinal, M. K.; Mulimani, B. G. [Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad-580003 (India); Greenham, N. C. [Cavendish Laboratory, Dept. of Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHE United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-24

    Herein, we report the size controlled preparation of PbSe quantum dots (QDs) by non coordinating solvent route using oleic acid as surfactant molecules. The particles size is controlled by varying temperature and time of reaction. The present method of synthesis gives highly stable colloids, spherical in shape, better size tunability, narrow size distribution, extremely small size, monodisperse and exhibit strong near-infrared emission. The estimated particles sizes are in the range of 2 to 8 nm. These PbSe quantum dots are used for applications in optoelectronics and biological imaging.

  18. Size control synthesis of starch capped-gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic gold nanoparticles have been synthesized by the reduction of chloroaurate anions [AuCl4]- solution with hydrazine in the aqueous starch and ethylene glycol solution at room temperature and at atmospheric pressure. The characterization of synthesized gold nanoparticles by UV-vis spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that average size of pure gold nanoparticles is 3.5 nm, they are spherical in shape and are pure metallic gold. The concentration effects of [AuCl4]- anions, starch, ethylene glycol, and hydrazine, on particle size, were investigated, and the stabilization mechanism of Au nanoparticles by starch polymer molecules was also studied by FT-IR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA analysis shows that hydroxyl groups of starch are responsible of capping and stabilizing gold nanoparticles. The UV-vis spectrum of these samples shows that there is blue shift in surface plasmon resonance peak with decrease in particle size due to the quantum confinement effect, a supporting evidence of formation of gold nanoparticles and this shift remains stable even after 3 months.

  19. Preparation of size-controlled nanoparticles of magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Angela L., E-mail: angelaleao@iceb.ufop.br [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, Aveiro P-3810193 (Portugal); Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Ouro Preto, 35400-000 Ouro Preto, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Valente, Manuel A. [Department of Physics, I3N, University of Aveiro, Aveiro P-3810193 (Portugal); Ferreira, Jose M.F. [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, Aveiro P-3810193 (Portugal); Fabris, Jose D. [Federal University of Jequitinhonha and Mucuri Valleys (UFVJM), 39100-000 Diamantina, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    Samples of ferrofluids containing chemically stabilized nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) were prepared by a direct reduction-precipitation method. The influences of aging time and temperature on the size and monodispersion characteristics of the produced nanoparticles were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared, and magnetization measurements with applied magnetic field up to 2 T were used to characterize the synthesized iron oxides. Raising the temperature of the synthesized material in autoclave affects positively the monodispersion of the nanoparticles, but it was not found to significantly influence the size itself of individual particles. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer From report protocols, chemical synthesis of magnetite with FeCl{sub 3} (stable in air) instead of FeCl{sub 2} or Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical reduction with Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3} provides an additional advantage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As any eventual reformation of Fe{sup 3+} from reoxidization of produced Fe{sup 2+} may be sequestered by remaining SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} in the medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles are stably individualized with tetramethylammonium hydroxide that acts as a surface-active agent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal treatment reduces further the mean sizes of particles, as required for many medical uses.

  20. Relationship between Microcellular Foaming Injection Molding Process Parameters and Cell Size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Guang-hong; JIANG Chao-dong; CUI Zhen-shan

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the relationship between the main process parameters and the cell size, the mathematical model of cell growth of microcellular foaming injection process is built. Then numeric simulation is employed as experimental method, and the Taguchi method is used to analyze significance of effect of process parameters on the cell size. At last the process parameters are focused on melt temperature, injection time, mold temperature and pre- filled volume. The significance order from big to small of the effect of each process parameters on cell size is melt temperature, pre-filled volume, injection time, and mold temperature. On the basis of above research, the effect of each process parameter on cell size is further researched.Appropriate reduction of the melt temperature and increase of the we-filled volume can optimize the cell size effectively, while the effects of injection time and mold temperature on cell size are less significant.

  1. Optimization and Evaluation of a Novel Size Based Circulating Tumor Cell Isolation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Mao, Xueying; Imrali, Ahmet; Syed, Ferrial; Mutsvangwa, Katherine; Berney, Daniel; Cathcart, Paul; Hines, John; Shamash, Jonathan; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from peripheral blood has the potential to provide a far easier "liquid biopsy" than tumor tissue biopsies, to monitor tumor cell populations during disease progression and in response to therapies. Many CTC isolation technologies have been developed. We optimized the Parsortix system, an epitope independent, size and compressibility-based platform for CTCs isolation, making it possible to harvest CTCs at the speed and sample volume comparable to standard CellSearch system. We captured more than half of cancer cells from different cancer cell lines spiked in blood samples from healthy donors using this system. Cell loss during immunostaining of cells transferred and fixed on the slides is a major problem for analyzing rare cell samples. We developed a novel cell transfer and fixation method to retain >90% of cells on the slide after the immunofluorescence process without affecting signal strength and specificity. Using this optimized method, we evaluated the Parsortix system for CTC harvest in prostate cancer patients in comparison to immunobead based CTC isolation systems IsoFlux and CellSearch. We harvested a similar number (p = 0.33) of cytokeratin (CK) positive CTCs using Parsortix and IsoFlux from 7.5 mL blood samples of 10 prostate cancer patients (an average of 33.8 and 37.6 respectively). The purity of the CTCs harvested by Parsortix at 3.1% was significantly higher than IsoFlux at 1.0% (p = 0.02). Parsortix harvested significantly more CK positive CTCs than CellSearch (p = 0.04) in seven prostate cancer patient samples, where both systems were utilized (an average of 32.1 and 10.1 respectively). We also captured CTC clusters using Parsortix. Using four-color immunofluorescence we found that 85.8% of PC3 cells expressed EpCAM, 91.7% expressed CK and 2.5% cells lacked both epithelial markers. Interestingly, 95.6% of PC3 cells expressed Vimentin, including those cells that lacked both epithelial marker expression

  2. Optimization and Evaluation of a Novel Size Based Circulating Tumor Cell Isolation System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    Full Text Available Isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs from peripheral blood has the potential to provide a far easier "liquid biopsy" than tumor tissue biopsies, to monitor tumor cell populations during disease progression and in response to therapies. Many CTC isolation technologies have been developed. We optimized the Parsortix system, an epitope independent, size and compressibility-based platform for CTCs isolation, making it possible to harvest CTCs at the speed and sample volume comparable to standard CellSearch system. We captured more than half of cancer cells from different cancer cell lines spiked in blood samples from healthy donors using this system. Cell loss during immunostaining of cells transferred and fixed on the slides is a major problem for analyzing rare cell samples. We developed a novel cell transfer and fixation method to retain >90% of cells on the slide after the immunofluorescence process without affecting signal strength and specificity. Using this optimized method, we evaluated the Parsortix system for CTC harvest in prostate cancer patients in comparison to immunobead based CTC isolation systems IsoFlux and CellSearch. We harvested a similar number (p = 0.33 of cytokeratin (CK positive CTCs using Parsortix and IsoFlux from 7.5 mL blood samples of 10 prostate cancer patients (an average of 33.8 and 37.6 respectively. The purity of the CTCs harvested by Parsortix at 3.1% was significantly higher than IsoFlux at 1.0% (p = 0.02. Parsortix harvested significantly more CK positive CTCs than CellSearch (p = 0.04 in seven prostate cancer patient samples, where both systems were utilized (an average of 32.1 and 10.1 respectively. We also captured CTC clusters using Parsortix. Using four-color immunofluorescence we found that 85.8% of PC3 cells expressed EpCAM, 91.7% expressed CK and 2.5% cells lacked both epithelial markers. Interestingly, 95.6% of PC3 cells expressed Vimentin, including those cells that lacked both epithelial marker

  3. Radiolytic control of the size of colloidal gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solutions containing KAu(CN)2 (∼5 x 10-4 M) methanol (0.3 M), and nitrous oxide (2.5 x 10-2 M) are γ-irradiated in the presence of colloidal gold (∼6 x 10-5 M; mean particle size, 15 nm). The hydroxymethyl radicals, sm-bulletCH2OH, which are generated in these solutions, reduce Au(I) in Au(CN)2-, and the reduced gold is completely deposited on the gold seeds to yield larger particles. The particle growth is followed spectrophotometrically and by electron microscopy. A mechanism is proposed in which the radicals transfer electrons to the gold particles and Au(CN)2- is subsequently reduced by the stored electrons directly at the surface of the particles. In further steps of particle enlargement, Au(CN)2- is reduced in solutions in which the gold particles synthesized in the preceding step serve as seeds, the result being larger and larger gold particles up to 120 nm. The reduction yield is discussed with respect to side reactions of the radicals, such as mutual deactivation and gold-catalyzed H2 formation. The radiation chemical method makes it possible to enlarge gold particles to any desired size. The reduction of Au(CN)2- in the absence of seeds is also described

  4. Factors controlling the population size of microbes in groundwater from AECL's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial populations in groundwaters from AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) range from 103 to 105 cells/mL. Based on the total dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrate and phosphate content of these waters, populations of about 105 to 107 cells/mL should be possible. Upon storage of groundwater samples, total cell counts generally increase and viable cell counts always increase. A study was undertaken to determine what controls the in situ microbial population size in groundwater and what causes this population to grow upon sampling. Fresh URL groundwater was filter-sterilized, inoculated with small quantities of the unaltered water and incubated in the absence and presence of added nutrients (nitrate, phosphate and glucose). Unfiltered groundwater and R2A growth medium inoculated with unaltered groundwater, were also incubated. Microbial changes over time were followed by total and viable (on R2A medium) cell counts. Results showed that in the absence of any nutrient addition, populations grew to between 5 x 105 to 4 x 106 cells/mL, regardless of the initial size of the population (∼101 to 104 cells/mL), suggesting that nutrients for growth were available in the unamended groundwater. It was hypothesized that the original groundwater population was in 'equilibrium' with the underground environment, which likely included a large population of sessile cells in biofilms on fracture surfaces. Sampling of the groundwater removed the large demand on nutrient supplies by the sessile population which subsequently allowed the planktonic population to grow to a new 'equilibrium' with the available nutrients in the sample bottles. Addition of single nutrients (C, N or P) did not increase cell numbers, suggesting that more than one nutrient is limiting growth. Glucose was used very efficiently aerobically in the presence of both added N and P, but somewhat less under anaerobic conditions. Similar effects were observed in R2A. This confirms a more efficient use of

  5. Positive correlation between size at initiation of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli and size at initiation of cell constriction.

    OpenAIRE

    Koppes, L J; Nanninga, N.

    1980-01-01

    The variability of (i) the length (size) at which cells initiate chromosome replication, (ii) the length at which they initiate cell constriction, and (iii) the time interval between these events has been estimated for Escherichia coli B/r K at two different slow growth rates. Steady-state cultures were pulse-labeled with [3H]thymidine and, after fixation, analyzed by electron microscopic radioautography. The coefficient of variation of length at initiation of chromosome replication was found...

  6. Interspecies avian brain chimeras reveal that large brain size differences are influenced by cell-interdependent processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chun; Balaban, Evan; Jarvis, Erich D

    2012-01-01

    Like humans, birds that exhibit vocal learning have relatively delayed telencephalon maturation, resulting in a disproportionately smaller brain prenatally but enlarged telencephalon in adulthood relative to vocal non-learning birds. To determine if this size difference results from evolutionary changes in cell-autonomous or cell-interdependent developmental processes, we transplanted telencephala from zebra finch donors (a vocal-learning species) into Japanese quail hosts (a vocal non-learning species) during the early neural tube stage (day 2 of incubation), and harvested the chimeras at later embryonic stages (between 9-12 days of incubation). The donor and host tissues fused well with each other, with known major fiber pathways connecting the zebra finch and quail parts of the brain. However, the overall sizes of chimeric finch telencephala were larger than non-transplanted finch telencephala at the same developmental stages, even though the proportional sizes of telencephalic subregions and fiber tracts were similar to normal finches. There were no significant changes in the size of chimeric quail host midbrains, even though they were innervated by the physically smaller zebra finch brain, including the smaller retinae of the finch eyes. Chimeric zebra finch telencephala had a decreased cell density relative to normal finches. However, cell nucleus size differences between each species were maintained as in normal birds. These results suggest that telencephalic size development is partially cell-interdependent, and that the mechanisms controlling the size of different brain regions may be functionally independent. PMID:22860132

  7. Interspecies avian brain chimeras reveal that large brain size differences are influenced by cell-interdependent processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Like humans, birds that exhibit vocal learning have relatively delayed telencephalon maturation, resulting in a disproportionately smaller brain prenatally but enlarged telencephalon in adulthood relative to vocal non-learning birds. To determine if this size difference results from evolutionary changes in cell-autonomous or cell-interdependent developmental processes, we transplanted telencephala from zebra finch donors (a vocal-learning species into Japanese quail hosts (a vocal non-learning species during the early neural tube stage (day 2 of incubation, and harvested the chimeras at later embryonic stages (between 9-12 days of incubation. The donor and host tissues fused well with each other, with known major fiber pathways connecting the zebra finch and quail parts of the brain. However, the overall sizes of chimeric finch telencephala were larger than non-transplanted finch telencephala at the same developmental stages, even though the proportional sizes of telencephalic subregions and fiber tracts were similar to normal finches. There were no significant changes in the size of chimeric quail host midbrains, even though they were innervated by the physically smaller zebra finch brain, including the smaller retinae of the finch eyes. Chimeric zebra finch telencephala had a decreased cell density relative to normal finches. However, cell nucleus size differences between each species were maintained as in normal birds. These results suggest that telencephalic size development is partially cell-interdependent, and that the mechanisms controlling the size of different brain regions may be functionally independent.

  8. Size Control of Alloyed Cu-In-Zn-S Nanoflowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Kempken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniform, alloyed Cu-In-Zn-S nanoflowers with sizes of 11.5±2.1 nm and 31±5 nm composed of aggregated 4.1 nm and 5.6 nm primary crystallites, respectively, were obtained in a one-pot, heat-up reaction between copper, indium, and zinc acetate with tert-dodecanethiol in the presence of trioctylphosphine oxide. Larger aggregates were obtained by diluting tert-dodecanethiol with oleylamine, which lowered the reactivity of the indium and zinc precursors and led to the formation of copper rich particles. The thermal decomposition of tert-dodecanethiol stabilizing the primary crystallites induced their agglomeration, while the presence of trioctylphosphine oxide on the surface of the nanoflowers provided them with colloidal stability and prevented them from further aggregation.

  9. Luminance controlled pupil size affects Landolt C task performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, S.M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Fein, G. (Neurobehavioral Lab. Software, San Rafael, CA (United States)); Jewett, D.L.; Ashford, F. (ABRATech Corp., Mill Valley, CA (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Subjects judged the orientation of a 2 min. gap Landolt C located at a distance of 2.4 m. The stimuli were presented in central vision on a CRT, at low to medium contrast. The effects of varying the spectrum and luminance of surround lighting were assessed on both pupil size (measured using infrared pupillometry during task performance) and task accuracy. The task display was protected from the surround lighting, so that its luminance and contrast could be varied independently of the changes in the surround lighting. Indirect surround illumination was provided by either two illuminants of very different scotopic spectral content but with the same photopic luminance (Experiments 1 and 3), or by using the same illuminant at two different luminance levels (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, the effect of changing surround spectrum was compared to the effect of varying task background luminance between 12 cd/m[sup 2] and 73 cd/m[sup 2]. In all experiments, scotopically enhanced surround lighting produced pupil areas which were reduced by almost 50% in comparison with surround lighting with relatively less scotopic luminance. Concomitantly there was improvement in Landolt C task performance with the scotopically enhanced surround lighting at all contrast and luminance levels. In these experiments, smaller pupil sizes were associated with significantly better visual-task performance in spite of lower task retinal illuminance when compared to the condition with larger pupils. These results suggest that changes in surround spectrum can compensate for the effect on task performance of a reduction in task luminance and supports the hypothesis that lighting energy savings could accrue in the workplace by shifting lamp spectra to obtain greater scotopic efficacy.

  10. Luminance controlled pupil size affects Landolt C task performance. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, S.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fein, G. [Neurobehavioral Lab. Software, San Rafael, CA (United States); Jewett, D.L.; Ashford, F. [ABRATech Corp., Mill Valley, CA (United States)

    1993-02-01

    Subjects judged the orientation of a 2 min. gap Landolt C located at a distance of 2.4 m. The stimuli were presented in central vision on a CRT, at low to medium contrast. The effects of varying the spectrum and luminance of surround lighting were assessed on both pupil size (measured using infrared pupillometry during task performance) and task accuracy. The task display was protected from the surround lighting, so that its luminance and contrast could be varied independently of the changes in the surround lighting. Indirect surround illumination was provided by either two illuminants of very different scotopic spectral content but with the same photopic luminance (Experiments 1 and 3), or by using the same illuminant at two different luminance levels (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, the effect of changing surround spectrum was compared to the effect of varying task background luminance between 12 cd/m{sup 2} and 73 cd/m{sup 2}. In all experiments, scotopically enhanced surround lighting produced pupil areas which were reduced by almost 50% in comparison with surround lighting with relatively less scotopic luminance. Concomitantly there was improvement in Landolt C task performance with the scotopically enhanced surround lighting at all contrast and luminance levels. In these experiments, smaller pupil sizes were associated with significantly better visual-task performance in spite of lower task retinal illuminance when compared to the condition with larger pupils. These results suggest that changes in surround spectrum can compensate for the effect on task performance of a reduction in task luminance and supports the hypothesis that lighting energy savings could accrue in the workplace by shifting lamp spectra to obtain greater scotopic efficacy.

  11. INCREMENT OF EFFICIENCY OF SOLAR CELL, WITH CHANGE SHAPE AND SIZE OF SOLAR PENNAL

    OpenAIRE

    S.K. Yadav; K.L. Yadav

    2014-01-01

    -To increase the efficiency of solar system with the help of change shape and size of solar pennal and arrangement of solar cell. And falling of light energy absorbed by solar cells and also dependence of solar energy, efficiency of solar cell on the multireflections of light on the solar cells. We formed different-different shape and size of solar pennal efficiency of solar cell, the internal and external reflections of light occurs many times with high energetic beam of ligh...

  12. Rapid formation of size-controllable multicellular spheroids via 3D acoustic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kejie; Wu, Mengxi; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Chan, Chung Yu; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Sixing; Ren, Liqiang; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-07-01

    The multicellular spheroid is an important 3D cell culture model for drug screening, tissue engineering, and fundamental biological research. Although several spheroid formation methods have been reported, the field still lacks high-throughput and simple fabrication methods to accelerate its adoption in drug development industry. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) based cell manipulation methods, which are known to be non-invasive, flexible, and high-throughput, have not been successfully developed for fabricating 3D cell assemblies or spheroids, due to the limited understanding on SAW-based vertical levitation. In this work, we demonstrated the capability of fabricating multicellular spheroids in the 3D acoustic tweezers platform. Our method used drag force from microstreaming to levitate cells in the vertical direction, and used radiation force from Gor'kov potential to aggregate cells in the horizontal plane. After optimizing the device geometry and input power, we demonstrated the rapid and high-throughput nature of our method by continuously fabricating more than 150 size-controllable spheroids and transferring them to Petri dishes every 30 minutes. The spheroids fabricated by our 3D acoustic tweezers can be cultured for a week with good cell viability. We further demonstrated that spheroids fabricated by this method could be used for drug testing. Unlike the 2D monolayer model, HepG2 spheroids fabricated by the 3D acoustic tweezers manifested distinct drug resistance, which matched existing reports. The 3D acoustic tweezers based method can serve as a novel bio-manufacturing tool to fabricate complex 3D cell assembles for biological research, tissue engineering, and drug development. PMID:27327102

  13. Electronic structure and size of TiO sub 2 nanoparticles of controlled size prepared by aerosol methods

    CERN Document Server

    Soriano, L; Sanchez-Agudo, M; Sanz, J M; Ahonen, P P; Kauppinen, E I; Palomares, F J; Bressler, P R

    2002-01-01

    A complete characterization of nanostructures has to deal both with electronic structure and dimensions. Here we present the characterization of TiO sub 2 nanoparticles of controlled size prepared by aerosol methods. The electronic structure of these nanoparticles was probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), the particle size by atomic force microscopy (AFM). XAS spectra show that the particles crystallize in the anatase phase upon heating at 500 sup o C, whereas further annealing at 700 sup o C give crystallites of 70 % anatase and 30 % rutile phases. Raising the temperature to 900 sup o C results in a complete transformation of the particles to rutile. AFM images reveal that the mean size of the anatase particles formed upon heating at 500 sup o C is 30 nm, whereas for the rutile particles formed upon annealing at 900 sup o C 90 nm were found. The results obtained by these techniques agree with XRD data. (author)

  14. Production of large numbers of size-controlled tumor spheroids using microwell plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razian, Golsa; Yu, Yang; Ungrin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Tumor spheroids are increasingly recognized as an important in vitro model for the behavior of tumor cells in three dimensions. More physiologically relevant than conventional adherent-sheet cultures, they more accurately recapitulate the complexity and interactions present in real tumors. In order to harness this model to better assess tumor biology, or the efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, it is necessary to be able to generate spheroids reproducibly, in a controlled manner and in significant numbers. The AggreWell system consists of a high-density array of pyramid-shaped microwells, into which a suspension of single cells is centrifuged. The numbers of cells clustering at the bottom of each microwell, and the number and ratio of distinct cell types involved depend only on the properties of the suspension introduced by the experimenter. Thus, we are able to generate tumor spheroids of arbitrary size and composition without needing to modify the underlying platform technology. The hundreds of microwells per square centimeter of culture surface area in turn ensure that extremely high production levels may be attained via a straightforward, nonlabor-intensive process. We therefore expect that this protocol will be broadly useful to researchers in the tumor spheroid field. PMID:24300192

  15. Exploiting Packet Size in Uncertain Nonlinear Networked Control Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Greco, Luca; Chaillet, Antoine; Bicchi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of stabilizing uncertain nonlinear plants over a shared limited-bandwidth packet-switching network. While conventional control loops are designed to work with circuit-switching networks, where dedicated communication channels provide almost constant bit rate and delay, many networks, such as Ethernet, organize data transmission in packets, carrying larger amount of information at less predictable rates. To avoid the bandwidth waste due to the relatively large ...

  16. Scattering properties of microalgae: the effect of cell size and cell wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensen, Øyvind; Frette, Øyvind; Rune Erga, Svein

    2007-08-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate how the cell size and the presence of a cell wall influence the scattering properties of the green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The growth cycle of two strains, one with a cell wall and one without, was synchronized to be in the same growth phase. Measurements were conducted at two different phases of the growth cycle on both strains of the algae. It was found that the shape of the scattering phase function was very similar for both strains at both growth phases, but the regular strain with a cell wall scatters more strongly than the wall-less mutant. It was also found that the mutant strain has a stronger increase in scattering than the regular strain, as the algae grow, and that the scattering from the regular strain is more wavelength dependent than from the mutant strain.

  17. Low Temperature and Polyploidy Result in Larger Cell and Body Size in an Ectothermic Vertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermaniuk, Adam; Rybacki, Mariusz; Taylor, Jan R E

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported that low temperatures result in increases in both cell size and body size in ectotherms that may explain patterns of geographic variation of their body size across latitudinal ranges. Also, polyploidy showed the same effect on body size in invertebrates. In vertebrates, despite their having larger cells, no clear effect of polyploidy on body size has been found. This article presents the relationship between temperature, cell size, growth rate, and body size in diploid and polyploid hybridogenetic frog Pelophylax esculentus reared as tadpoles at 19° and 24°C. The size of cells was larger in both diploid and triploid tadpoles at 19°C, and triploids had larger cells at both temperatures. In diploid and triploid froglets, the temperature in which they developed as tadpoles did not affect the size of their cells, but triploids still had larger cells. Triploid tadpoles grew faster than diploids at 19°C and had larger body mass; there was no clear difference between ploidies in growth rate at 24°C. This indicates better adaptation of triploid tadpoles to cold environment. This is the first report on the increase of body mass of a polyploid vertebrate caused by low temperature, and we showed relationship between increase in cell size and increased body mass. The large body mass of triploids may provide a selective advantage, especially in colder environments, and this may explain the prevalence of triploids in the northern parts of the geographic range of P. esculentus. PMID:27082722

  18. [Problems in the ascertainment of sizes of the control areas of natural gas industrial projects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrykh, V V

    2009-01-01

    The paper reviews the problems in the ascertainment of sizes of the control areas of industrial projects, including those of natural gas industry, and analyzes discrepancies in the normative-legal base. The historical aspects and results of substantiating the safe sizes of control areas for the projects of the Orenburg oil-gas condensate field are presented. PMID:19802941

  19. Three-Dimensional Tissue Models Constructed by Cells with Nanometer- or Micrometer-Sized Films on the Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Yen; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-04-01

    Living tissues or organ modules consist of different types of highly organized cells and extracellular matrices (ECMs) in a hierarchical manner, such as the multilayered structure of blood vessels and the radial structures of hepatic lobules. Due to animal examinations being banned in the EU since 2013 and a shortage in the demand for tissue repair or organ transplantation, the creation of artificial 3D tissues possessing specific structures and functions similar to natural tissues are key challenges in tissue engineering. To date, we have developed a simple but unique bottom-up approach, a hierarchical cell manipulation technique, with a nanometer-sized ECM matrix consisting of fibronectin (FN) and gelatin (G) on cell surfaces. About 10 nm thick FN/G ECM films on cell surfaces were coated successfully by using layer-by-layer coating methodology. Various 3D constructs with higher cell density with different types of cells were successfully constructed. In addition to the construction of tissues with higher cell densities, other tissues, such as cartilage or skin tissues, with different cell densities are also important tissue models for tissue engineering and pharmaceutical industries. Thus, we recently developed other methodologies, the collagen coating method and multiple coating method, to fabricate micrometer-sized level ECM layers on cell surfaces. Various micro- or millimeter-sized 3D constructs with lower cell densities were constructed successfully. By using these two methods, cell distances in 2D or 3D views can be controlled by different thicknesses of ECM layers on cell surfaces at the single-cell level. Both FN/G and the collagen coating method resulted in homogenous 3D tissues with a controlled layer numbers, cell type, cell location, and properties; these will be promising to achieve different goals in tissue engineering. PMID:26924465

  20. Size and shape control in the overgrowth of gold nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, Fulvio; Matteini, Paolo; Rossi, Francesca; Pini, Roberto, E-mail: r.pini@ifac.cnr.i [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    We report on a new sustainable approach to manipulate the optical behaviour and geometrical properties of gold nanorods in aqueous solutions by fine control of their overgrowth. In our approach, the overgrowth is realized by modulation of the reduction of the gold ions which are left as Au{sup 1+} after the primary step of the synthesis (typically as much as {approx}80% of the gold ions available in the growth solution). The progress of the reduction requires the gradual addition of ascorbic acid, which transforms the Au{sup 1+} into Au{sup 0} and may be performed in the original growth solution with no need for any further manipulation. By control of the total amount and rate of administration of the ascorbic acid, we prove the possibility to realize a systematic modulation of the average lengths, diameters, shapes (rod or dog-bone like), and light extinction of the nanoparticles. A slow overgrowth leads to a gradual enlargement of the lengths and diameters at almost constant shape. In contrast, a faster overgrowth results into a more complex modification of the overall shape of the gold nanorods.

  1. Sorting of cells of the same size, shape, and cell cycle stage for a single cell level assay without staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomo Tetsuya

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell level studies are being used increasingly to measure cell properties not directly observable in a cell population. High-performance data acquisition systems for such studies have, by necessity, developed in synchrony. However, improvements in sample purification techniques are also required to reveal new phenomena. Here we assessed a cell sorter as a sample-pretreatment tool for a single-cell level assay. A cell sorter is routinely used for selecting one type of cells from a heterogeneous mixture of cells using specific fluorescence labels. In this case, we wanted to select cells of exactly the same size, shape, and cell-cycle stage from a population, without using a specific fluorescence label. Results We used four light scatter parameters: the peak height and area of the forward scatter (FSheight and FSarea and side scatter (SSheight and SSarea. The rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, a neuronal cell line, was used for all experiments. The living cells concentrated in the high FSarea and middle SSheight/SSarea fractions. Single cells without cell clumps were concentrated in the low SS and middle FS fractions, and in the higher FSheight/FSarea and SSheight/SSarea fractions. The cell populations from these viable, single-cell-rich fractions were divided into twelve subfractions based on their FSarea-SSarea profiles, for more detailed analysis. We found that SSarea was proportional to the cell volume and the FSarea correlated with cell roundness and elongation, as well as with the level of DNA in the cell. To test the method and to characterize the basic properties of the isolated single cells, sorted cells were cultured in separate wells. The cells in all subfractions survived, proliferated and differentiated normally, suggesting that there was no serious damage. The smallest, roundest, and smoothest cells had the highest viability. There was no correlation between proliferation and differentiation. NGF increases

  2. NiPt hollow nanocatalyst: Green synthesis, size control and electrocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aixian Shan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nearly monodispersed hollow nanospheres of bimetallic NiPt have been synthesized by a one-pot wet chemical method at room temperature with a precursor Ni nanocompound as a sacrificial template. The size control is carried out via the sacrificial template, from about 35 nm to nearly 100 nm in diameter. The shell thickness of the NiPt hollow sphere reaches down to as thin as 2–3 nm slightly larger than a single layer of alloyed NiPt nanocrystallites. The product with the citric acid as surfactant exhibits enhanced oxygen reduction activities compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst and the hollow nanospheres coated with PVP. It has potential applications in fuel cells, biotechnology and environmental chemistry with the facile synthesis, low cost and excellent electrocatalytic activity.

  3. NiPt hollow nanocatalyst:Green synthesis, size control and electrocatalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aixian Shan; Ming Cheng; Hongsheng Fan; Zhichao Chen; Rongming Wang; Chinping Chen

    2014-01-01

    Nearly monodispersed hollow nanospheres of bimetallic NiPt have been synthesized by a one-pot wet chemical method at room temperature with a precursor Ni nanocompound as a sacrificial template. The size control is carried out via the sacrificial template, from about 35 nm to nearly 100 nm in diameter. The shell thickness of the NiPt hollow sphere reaches down to as thin as 2-3 nm slightly larger than a single layer of alloyed NiPt nanocrystallites. The product with the citric acid as surfactant exhibits enhanced oxygen reduction activities compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst and the hollow nanospheres coated with PVP. It has potential applications in fuel cells, biotechnology and environmental chemistry with the facile synthesis, low cost and excellent electrocatalytic activity.

  4. Fuel cell with internal flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Venkiteswaran, Arun

    2012-06-12

    A fuel cell stack is provided with a plurality of fuel cell cassettes where each fuel cell cassette has a fuel cell with an anode and cathode. The fuel cell stack includes an anode supply chimney for supplying fuel to the anode of each fuel cell cassette, an anode return chimney for removing anode exhaust from the anode of each fuel cell cassette, a cathode supply chimney for supplying oxidant to the cathode of each fuel cell cassette, and a cathode return chimney for removing cathode exhaust from the cathode of each fuel cell cassette. A first fuel cell cassette includes a flow control member disposed between the anode supply chimney and the anode return chimney or between the cathode supply chimney and the cathode return chimney such that the flow control member provides a flow restriction different from at least one other fuel cell cassettes.

  5. Effect of Porosity and Cell Size on the Dynamic Compressive Properties of Aluminum Alloy Foams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties of open-cell aluminum alloy foams with different relative densities and cell sizeshave been investigated by compressive tests. The strain rates varied from 700 s-1 to 2600 s-1. The experimentalresults showed that the dynamic compressive stress-strain curves exhibited a typical three-stage behavior: elastic,plateau and densification. The dynamic compressive strength of foams is affected not only by the relative densitybut also by the strain rate and cell size. Aluminum alloy foams with higher relative density or smaller cell size aremore sensitive to the strain rate than foams with lower relative density or larger cell size.

  6. Development of an Autonomous Flight Control System for Small Size Unmanned Helicopter Based on Dynamical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It is devoted to the development of an autonomous flight control system for small size unmanned helicopter based on dynamical model. At first, the mathematical model of a small size helicopter is described. After that simple but effective MTCV control algorithm was proposed. The whole flight control algorithm is composed of two parts:orientation controller based on the model for rotation dynamics and a robust position controller for a double integrator. The MTCV block is also used to achieve translation velocity control. To demonstrate the performance of the presented algorithm, simulation results and results achieved in real flight experiments were presented.

  7. A cell-counting factor regulating structure size in Dictyostelium

    OpenAIRE

    Brock, Debra A; Gomer, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    Developing Dictyostelium cells form large aggregation streams that break up into groups of 0.2 × 105 to 1 × 105 cells. Each group then becomes a fruiting body. smlA cells oversecrete an unknown factor that causes aggregation streams to break up into groups of ∼5 × 103 cells and thus form very small fruiting bodies. We have purified the counting factor and find that it behaves as a complex of polypeptides with an effective molecular mass of 450 kD. One of the polypeptides is a 40-kD hydrophili...

  8. Selective Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Deprivation Affects Cell Size and Number in Kitten Locus Coeruleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Shaffery

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cells in the locus coeruleus (LC constitute the sole source of norepinephrine (NE in the brain, and change their discharge rates according to vigilance state. In addition to its well established role in vigilance, NE affects synaptic plasticity in the postnatal critical period (CP of development. One form of CP synaptic plasticity affected by NE results from monocular occlusion, which leads to physiological and cytoarchitectural alterations in central visual areas. Selective suppression of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS in the CP kitten enhances the central effects of monocular occlusion. The mechanisms responsible for heightened cortical plasticity following REMS deprivation (REMSD remain undetermined. One possible mediator of an increase in plasticity is continuous NE outflow, which presumably persists during extended periods of REMSD. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of NE and serves as a marker for NE-producing cells. We selectively suppressed REMS in kittens for one week during the CP. The number and size of LC cells expressing immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-ir was assessed in age-matched REMS-deprived (RD-, treatment-control (TXC-, and home cage-reared (HCC animals. Sleep amounts and slow wave activity (SWA were also examined relative to baseline. Time spent in REMS during the study was lower in RD compared to TXC animals, and RD kittens increased SWA delta power in the latter half of the REMSD period. The estimated total number of TH-ir cells in LC was significantly lower in the RD- than in the TXC kittens and numerically lower than in HCC animals. The size of LC cells expressing TH-ir was greatest in the HCC group. They were significantly larger than the cells in the RD kittens. These data are consistent with a possible reduction in NE in forebrain areas, including visual cortex, caused by one week of REMSD.

  9. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound features relation to tumor size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To analyze the contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) features of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) in relation to tumor size. Materials and methods: The CEUS appearance of 92 CCRCCs confirmed pathologically were retrospectively analyzed. Tumor size was stratified into six groups with a 1 cm interval. For each lesion, the degree of enhancement, the homogeneity of enhancement and the presence of pseudocapsule sign were evaluated and compared with the pathologic findings. Results: The tumors of groups I-VI were counted for 13, 26, 21, 11, 10 and 11, respectively. All the CCRCCs mainly showed a marked enhancement, and there was no statistically significance between the degree of enhancement and tumor size (P > 0.05). However, both homogeneity of enhancement and frequency of pseudocapsule correlated well with the tumor size (P 3 cm (9%; P 5 cm (66%, 23%, 24%, respectively; P < 0.01). On the pathologic examinations, the mean MVD was significantly higher in marked enhancement tumors than slight enhancement tumors (46.0 ± 15.9, 27.5 ± 8.3, respectively; P < 0.01). Any tumors with a heterogeneous enhancement pattern were accompanied by intratumoral necrosis or cysts on histologic specimen. A pseudocapsule was seen at pathology in all the 46 cases with perilesional enhancement and 4 of 46 tumors without perilesional enhancement at CEUS. Conclusion: CEUS features of CCRCCs vary with the size of the tumor, especially in the homogeneity of enhancement and the presence of pseudocapsule sign. CEUS is effective in demonstrating the sonographic visualization of tumoral characteristics.

  10. Estimation of the detonation cell size in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinskii, V. V.; Onosov, I. I.

    2011-06-01

    A simple method to calculate the parameters of a shock wave in a space between the shock wave front and the Chapman-Jouguet plane is considered. Solving a velocity equation, one can calculate the pressure, density, and temperature of the gas, as well as determine the size of a detonation region in a one-dimensional approximation. The dependences of the detonation region size on input parameters are derived. From these dependences, one can estimate the run of the same curves in the real situation.

  11. Optimal Sizing and Control Strategy Design for Heavy Hybrid Electric Truck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complexity of the hybrid powertrain, the control is highly involved to improve the collaborations of the different components. For the specific powertrain, the components' sizing just gives the possibility to propel the vehicle and the control will realize the function of the propulsion. Definitely the components' sizing also gives the constraints to the control design, which cause a close coupling between the sizing and control strategy design. This paper presents a parametric study focused on sizing of the powertrain components and optimization of the power split between the engine and electric motor for minimizing the fuel consumption. A framework is put forward to accomplish the optimal sizing and control design for a heavy parallel pre-AMT hybrid truck under the natural driving schedule. The iterative plant-controller combined optimization methodology is adopted to optimize the key parameters of the plant and control strategy simultaneously. A scalable powertrain model based on a bilevel optimization framework is built. Dynamic programming is applied to find the optimal control in the inner loop with a prescribed cycle. The parameters are optimized in the outer loop. The results are analysed and the optimal sizing and control strategy are achieved simultaneously.

  12. Recrystallization Behavior Design for Controlling Grain Size in Strip Rolling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Guo-hui; S V Subramanian

    2008-01-01

    To promote effectively dynamic recrystallization and obtain a homogeneous distribution of ultrafine grain size in strip finish rolling process, the behavior of static and dynamic recrystallization must be appropriately designed to provide an ultrafine austenite microstructure without mixed grain size. The design of rolling schedule was analyzed based on the control of the recrystallization behavior to achieve ultrafine grain size in the strip rolling process of niobium microalloyed steel. The experimental simulations were presented to validate the twice dynamic recrystallization design to achieve ultrafine grain size control.

  13. Small-Size Resonant Photoacoustic Cell of Inclined Geometry for Gas Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Gorelik, A. V.; Ulasevich, A. L.; Nikonovich, F. N.; Zakharich, M. P.; Chebotar, A. I.; V. A. Firago; Stetsik, V. M.; Kazak, N. S.; Starovoitov, V. S.

    2009-01-01

    A photoacoustic cell intended for laser detection of trace gases is represented. The cell is adapted so as to enhance the gas-detection performance and, simultaneously, to reduce the cell size. The cell design provides an efficient cancellation of the window background (a parasite response due to absorption of laser beam in the cell windows) and acoustic isolation from the environment for an acoustic resonance of the cell. The useful photoacoustic response from a detected gas, window backgrou...

  14. Optimal Inspection Policy for Three-state Systems Monitored by Variable Sample Size Control Charts

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shaomin

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the expected long-run cost per unit time for a system monitored by an adaptive control chart with variable sample sizes: if the control chart signals that the system is out of control, the sampling which follows will be conducted with a larger sample size. The system is supposed to have three states: in-control, out-of-control, and failed. Two levels of repair are applied to maintain the system. A minor repair will be conducted if an assignable cause is c...

  15. Design of assembly control algorithm based on burst-size feedback for optical burst switching network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minglei Fu; Zichun Le

    2009-01-01

    A novel assembly control algorithm named burst-size feedback adaptive assembly period(BFAAP)is proposed.The major difference between BFAAP and other similar adaptive assembly algorithms is that the control curve of BFAAP is dynamically adjusted according to the feedback of outgoing burst size.BFAAP is compared with two typical algorithms fixed assembly period(FAP)aild min-burst length max assembly period(MBMAP)in simulation in terms of burst size distribution and assembly period.Moreover,the transmission control protocol(TCP)performance over BFAAP is also considered and simulated.

  16. Crystal form control and particle size control of RG3487, a nicotinic α7 receptor partial agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shanming; Zhang, Pingsheng; Dong, Eric Z; Jennings, Geremia; Zhao, Baoshu; Pierce, Michael

    2016-07-11

    This paper describes solid form control and particle size control of RG3487, a nicotinic receptor partial agonist. Four crystal forms were identified by polymorph screen under ∼100 varying conditions. Form A and Form B are anhydrates, while Forms C and D are solvates. Forms A, which is enantiotropically related to Form B, is the more thermodynamically stable form under ambient conditions and the desired form selected for clinical development. The crystal form control of Form A was achieved by crystallization solvent selection which consistently produced the desired form. Several process parameters impacting particle size of Form A in the final crystallization step were identified and investigated through both online and offline particle size measurement. The investigation results were utilized to control crystallization processes which successfully produced Form A with different particle size in 500g scale. PMID:27167333

  17. Experimental Investigation of the Transition to Spatiotemporal Chaos with a System-Size Control Parameter

    OpenAIRE

    Spiegel, Daniel R.; Johnson, Elliot R.

    2008-01-01

    Using a localized laser-heating method to allow the use of system size as a control parameter, we experimentally investigate, using liquid-crystal electroconvection with soft boundary conditions, the onset of spatial temporal chaos (STC) with increasing system size. We find that temporal periodicity is significantly quenched as the system size increases. The increase of the fourth moment (kurtosis) of the temporal Fourier transform provides a very useful quantitative measure of the loss of te...

  18. UNICS - An Unified Instrument Control System for Small/Medium Sized Astronomical Observatories

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Mudit K; Burse, Mahesh P; Chordia, Pravin A; Chillal, Kalpesh S; Mestry, Vilas B; Das, Hillol K; Kohok, Abhay A

    2009-01-01

    Although the astronomy community is witnessing an era of large telescopes, smaller and medium sized telescopes still maintain their utility being larger in numbers. In order to obtain better scientific outputs it is necessary to incorporate modern and advanced technologies to the back-end instruments and to their interfaces with the telescopes through various control processes. However often tight financial constraints on the smaller and medium size observatories limit the scope and utility of these systems. Most of the time for every new development on the telescope the back-end control systems are required to be built from scratch leading to high costs and efforts. Therefore a simple, low cost control system for small and medium size observatory needs to be developed to minimize the cost and efforts while going for the expansion of the observatory. Here we report on the development of a modern, multipurpose instrument control system UNICS (Unified Instrument Control System) to integrate the controls of vari...

  19. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe;

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled...... later for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and...

  20. Toxicity of nano- and micro-sized silver particles in human hepatocyte cell line L02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengpeng; Guan, Rongfa; Ye, Xingqian; Jiang, Jiaxin; Liu, Mingqi; Huang, Guangrong; Chen, Xiaoting

    2011-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) previously classified as antimicrobial agents have been widely used in consumers and industrial products, especially food storage material. Ag NPs used as antimicrobial agents may be found in liver. Thus, examination of the ability of Ag NPs to penetrate the liver is warranted. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal viability assay for using with Ag NPs in order to assess their toxicity to liver cells. For toxicity evaluations, cellular morphology, mitochondrial function (3-(4, 5-dimethylazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, MTT assay), membrane leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH release assay), Oxidative stress markers (malonaldehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)), DNA damage (single cell gel eletrophoresis, SCGE assay), and protein damage were assessed under control and exposed conditions (24 h of exposure). The results showed that mitochondrial function decreased significantly in cells exposed to Ag NPs at 25 μg·mL-1. LDH leakage significantly increased in cells exposed to Ag NPs (>= 25 μg mL-1) while micro-sized silver particles tested displayed LDH leakage only at higher doses (100 μg·mL-1). The microscopic studies demonstrated that nanoparticle-exposed cells at higher doses became abnormal in size, displaying cellular shrinkage, and an acquisition of an irregular shape. Due to toxicity of silver, further study conducted with reference to its oxidative stress. The results exhibited significant depletion of GSH level, increase in SOD levels and lead to lipid peroxidation, which suggested that cytotoxicity of Ag NPs in liver cells might be mediated through oxidative stress. The results demonstrates that Ag NPs lead to cellular morphological modifications, LDH leakage, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cause increased generation of ROS, depletion of GSH, lipid peroxidation, oxidative DNA damage and protein damage. Though the exact mechanism behind Ag NPs

  1. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound features relation to tumor size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Jun [Department of ultrasound, Sixth People' s Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200233 (China)], E-mail: tenine@163.com; Chen Yaqing [Department of ultrasound, Xinhua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China)], E-mail: joychen1266@126.com; Zhou Yongchang [Department of ultrasound, Sixth People' s Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200233 (China)], E-mail: zhouyongchang1130@163.com; Zhang Huizhen [Department of pathology, Sixth People' s Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200233 (China)], E-mail: h_z_zhang@163.com

    2010-01-15

    Objectives: To analyze the contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) features of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) in relation to tumor size. Materials and methods: The CEUS appearance of 92 CCRCCs confirmed pathologically were retrospectively analyzed. Tumor size was stratified into six groups with a 1 cm interval. For each lesion, the degree of enhancement, the homogeneity of enhancement and the presence of pseudocapsule sign were evaluated and compared with the pathologic findings. Results: The tumors of groups I-VI were counted for 13, 26, 21, 11, 10 and 11, respectively. All the CCRCCs mainly showed a marked enhancement, and there was no statistically significance between the degree of enhancement and tumor size (P > 0.05). However, both homogeneity of enhancement and frequency of pseudocapsule correlated well with the tumor size (P < 0.01). Homogeneous enhancement was shown in 85%, 65%, 19%, 9%, 0% and 0% of the tumors in the six groups, respectively. In tumors {<=}3 cm the frequency (72%) of homogeneity was significantly higher than in tumors >3 cm (9%; P < 0.01). The detection rate of pseudocapsule sign in the six group was 23%, 62%, 71%, 64%, 50% and 0%, respectively. The frequency of pseudocapsule sign was significantly higher in tumors 2.1-5 cm than <2 cm and >5 cm (66%, 23%, 24%, respectively; P < 0.01). On the pathologic examinations, the mean MVD was significantly higher in marked enhancement tumors than slight enhancement tumors (46.0 {+-} 15.9, 27.5 {+-} 8.3, respectively; P < 0.01). Any tumors with a heterogeneous enhancement pattern were accompanied by intratumoral necrosis or cysts on histologic specimen. A pseudocapsule was seen at pathology in all the 46 cases with perilesional enhancement and 4 of 46 tumors without perilesional enhancement at CEUS. Conclusion: CEUS features of CCRCCs vary with the size of the tumor, especially in the homogeneity of enhancement and the presence of pseudocapsule sign. CEUS is effective in demonstrating the

  2. Robust organelle size extractions from elastic scattering measurements of single cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannaday, Ashley E.; Draham, Robert; Berger, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this project is to estimate non-nuclear organelle size distributions in single cells by measuring angular scattering patterns and fitting them with Mie theory. Simulations have indicated that the large relative size distribution of organelles (mean:width≈2) leads to unstable Mie fits unless scattering is collected at polar angles less than 20 degrees. Our optical system has therefore been modified to collect angles down to 10 degrees. Initial validations will be performed on polystyrene bead populations whose size distributions resemble those of cell organelles. Unlike with the narrow bead distributions that are often used for calibration, we expect to see an order-of-magnitude improvement in the stability of the size estimates as the minimum angle decreases from 20 to 10 degrees. Scattering patterns will then be acquired and analyzed from single cells (EMT6 mouse cancer cells), both fixed and live, at multiple time points. Fixed cells, with no changes in organelle sizes over time, will be measured to determine the fluctuation level in estimated size distribution due to measurement imperfections alone. Subsequent measurements on live cells will determine whether there is a higher level of fluctuation that could be attributed to dynamic changes in organelle size. Studies on unperturbed cells are precursors to ones in which the effects of exogenous agents are monitored over time.

  3. Particle size dependence of hit probability for lung cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The macroscopic quantity 'absorbed dose' loses its validity to interpret the radiation-induced biological effects in the lung inhaled with particulate α-emitters like transuranic elements, because the doses to individual cells differ more widely than the range of doses over which the dose-response relationship can be regarded as linear. We intend to make up a three-dimensional model of parenchymal lung using a stack of actual histological sections in order to computer microscopic dose distribution around particulate α-emitters. This theoretical dosimetric approach will provide a scientific basis to the extrapolation of results of animal experiments utilizing high doses to man exposed to low level radioactivity and also to the understanding of biological effects associated with high LET radiations. Lung cells which survive α-particle hits were calculated, which will be a significant index of potential risk. Three models were assumed for the structure of parenchymal lung, which were 1) structureless lung of uniform density, 2) lattice of honeycomb pattern and 3) digital image of actual histological section of rat lung. The result shows that the survival cells decrease exponentially with the diameter of inhaled particles in any models. But the slope of the curve for the structureless lung is much greater than those for any other two models. This result suggests the validity of the dosimetric approach using actual histological section to estimate the inhalation risk of particulate α-emitters. (author)

  4. Do glial cells control pain?

    OpenAIRE

    Suter, Marc R; Wen, Yeong-Ray; Decosterd, Isabelle; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2007-01-01

    Management of chronic pain is a real challenge, and current treatments focusing on blocking neurotransmission in the pain pathway have only resulted in limited success. Activation of glia cells has been widely implicated in neuroinflammation in the central nervous system, leading to neruodegeneration in many disease conditions such as Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis. The inflammatory mediators released by activated glial cells, such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β can not onl...

  5. Control of Robotic Welding Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Zabukovec, Andraž

    2013-01-01

    Industrial robots are common place in most modern manufacturing plants because the people running these factories are interested in reducing the plants’ dependence on a human workforce and to simultaneously improve productivity and quality. The thesis presents the operation of a robot welding cell project, which was developed at YASKAWA Ristro d.o.o. for the customer Akrapovič. The sub systems of the robot welding cell will be detailed in the thesis including the following topics; safety c...

  6. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M; Nguyen, Nguyen H P; Bishop, Kyle J M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-08-25

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core-shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble-crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier-Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  7. Vertical distribution of the prokaryotic cell size in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferla, R.; Maimone, G.; Azzaro, M.; Conversano, F.; Brunet, C.; Cabral, A. S.; Paranhos, R.

    2012-12-01

    Distributions of prokaryotic cell size and morphology were studied in different areas of the Mediterranean Sea by using image analysis on samples collected from surface down to bathypelagic layers (max depth 4,900 m) in the Southern Tyrrhenian, Southern Adriatic and Eastern Mediterranean Seas. Distribution of cell size of prokaryotes in marine ecosystem is very often not considered, which makes our study first in the context of prokaryotic ecology. In the deep Mediterranean layers, an usually-not-considered form of carbon sequestration through prokaryotic cells has been highlighted, which is consistent with an increase in cell size with the depth of the water column. A wide range in prokaryotic cell volumes was observed (between 0.045 and 0.566 μm3). Increase in cell size with depth was opposed to cell abundance distribution. Our results from microscopic observations were confirmed by the increasing HNA/LNA ratio (HNA, cells with high nucleic acid content; LNA, cells with low nucleic acid content) along the water column. Implications of our results on the increasing cell size with depth are in the fact that the quantitative estimation of prokaryotic biomass changes along the water column and the amount of carbon sequestered in the deep biota is enhanced.

  8. Construct hepatic analog by cell-matrix controlled assembly technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Haixia; YAN Yongnian; WANG Xiaohong; CHENG Jie; LIN Feng; XIONG Zhuo; Wu Rendong

    2006-01-01

    A mixture of hepatic cells and chitosan/gelatin solution was deposited to construct a hepatic analog by way of layer-by-layer deposition technique using a home-made devise. The size and cell concentration of the analogs can be controlled freely. Approximately 90% of the hepatic cells remained viable under 0.2 Mpa extrusion pressure. Cultured in vitro 8 weeks before animal test, hepatic cells in structure maintained their phenotype and kept proliferating, and albumin and other secretion of the cells increased. Cords and hepaton-like structures were observed after culture for 20 d. These results indicate that hepatic cells could be assembled directly into a 3D viable structure and expanded to form a hepatic organoid. This accomplishment is considered to be an interesting means for the fabrication of liver replacements.

  9. Size and shape controllable preparation of graphene sponge by freezing, lyophilizing and reducing in container

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO LianQin; YU BaoWei; ZHANG XiaoLiang; WU RuiHan; LIU XiaoYang; LIAO Rong; YANG ShengTao

    2016-01-01

    Graphene sponge (GS) is a porous 3D structure of graphene.Although hydrothermal reduction,chemical vapor deposition,solution reduction and high temperature annealing could be used for the preparation of GS,the size and shape cannot be well controlled.Herein,we reported a facile method to prepare GS under mild condition in a size and shape controllable way.Graphene oxide was lyophilized to form the spongy structure and reduced by steamy hydrazine hydrate to produce GS.The size and shape of GS prepared were nearly identical to that of the container.The reduction degree of GS could be regulated by the reduction temperature and time.

  10. Relevant parameters in models of cell division control

    CERN Document Server

    Grilli, Jacopo; Kennard, Andrew S; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2016-01-01

    A recent burst of dynamic single-cell growth-division data makes it possible to characterize the stochastic dynamics of cell division control in bacteria. Different modeling frameworks were used to infer specific mechanisms from such data, but the links between frameworks are poorly explored, with relevant consequences for how well any particular mechanism can be supported by the data. Here, we describe a simple and generic framework in which two common formalisms can be used interchangeably: (i) a continuous-time division process described by a hazard function and (ii) a discrete-time equation describing cell size across generations (where the unit of time is a cell cycle). In our framework, this second process is a discrete-time Langevin equation with a simple physical analogue. By perturbative expansion around the mean initial size (or inter-division time), we show explicitly how this framework describes a wide range of division control mechanisms, including combinations of time and size control, as well a...

  11. Bacteria cell properties and grain size impact on bacteria transport and deposition in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hongjuan; Cochet, Nelly; Pauss, André; Lamy, Edvina

    2016-03-01

    The simultaneous role of bacteria cell properties and porous media grain size on bacteria transport and deposition behavior was investigated in this study. Transport column experiments and numerical HYDRUS-1D simulations of three bacteria with different cell properties (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Rhodococcus rhodochrous) were carried out on two sandy media with different grain sizes, under saturated steady state flow conditions. Each bacterium was characterized by cell size and shape, cell motility, electrophoretic mobility, zeta potential, hydrophobicity and potential of interaction with the sand surface. Cell characteristics affected bacteria transport behavior in the fine sand, but similar bacteria breakthroughs and retardation factors observed in the coarse sand, indicated that bacteria transport was more depended on grain size than on bacteria cell properties. Retention decreased with increasing hydrophobicity and increased with increasing electrophoretic mobility of bacteria for both sand. The increasing sand grain size resulted in a decrease of bacteria retention, except for the motile E. coli, indicating that retention of this strain was more dependent on cell motility than on the sand grain size. Bacteria deposition coefficients obtained from numerical simulations of the retention profiles indicated that straining was an important mechanism affecting bacteria deposition of E. coli and Klebsiella sp., in the fine sand, but the attachment had the same importance as straining for R. rhodochrous. The results obtained in the coarse sand did not permit to discriminate the predominant mechanism of bacteria deposition and the relative implication of bacteria cell properties of this process. PMID:26705829

  12. Size-controllable synthesis of bare gold nanoparticles by femtosecond laser fragmentation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a size-controllable synthesis of stable aqueous solutions of ultrapure low-size-dispersed Au nanoparticles by methods of femtosecond laser fragmentation from preliminary formed colloids. Such approach makes possible the tuning of mean nanoparticle size between a few nm and several tens of nm under the size dispersion lower than 70% by varying the fluence of pumping radiation during the fragmentation procedure. The efficient size control is explained by 3D geometry of laser fragmentation by femtosecond laser-induced white light super-continuum and plasma-related phenomena. Despite the absence of any protective ligands, the nanoparticle solutions demonstrate exceptional stability due to electric repulsion effect associated with strong negative charging of formed nanoparticles. Stable aqueous solutions of bare gold nanoparticles present a unique object with a variety of potential applications in catalysis, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, photovoltaics, biosensing and biomedicine. (paper)

  13. The Organization of Nanoporous Structure Using Controlled Micelle Size from MPEG-b-PDLLA Block Copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selected MPEG-b-PDLLA block copolymers have been synthesized by ring-opening polymerization with systematic variation of the chain lengths of the resident hydrophilic and hydrophobic blocks. The size and shape of the micelles that spontaneously form in solution are then controlled by the characteristics of the block copolymer template. All the materials prepared in this study showed the tunable pore size of 20-80 A with the increase of hydrophobic chain lengths and up to 660 m2/g of specific surface area. The formation mechanism of these nanoporous structures obtained by controlling the micelle size has been confirmed using both liquid and solid state 13C and 29Si NMR techniques. This work verifies the formation mechanism of nanoporous structures in which the pore size and wall thickness are closely dependent on the size of hydrophobic cores and hydrophilic shells of the block copolymer templates

  14. Adaptive Constant Modulus Blind Equalization with Variable Step-Size Control by Error Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xiao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A variable step-size control by error power was proposed to improve the performance of adaptive constant modulus blind equalization algorithm based on the analysis of the cost function. In the Constant Modulus Algorithm (CMA, large step-size can achieve faster convergence rate, but the steady-state residual error is big, on the contrary, small step-size can achieve higher convergence precision, but the convergence rate is slow. A triangle inequality can be set up according to the cost function of CMA and the power of error and signal can be estimated by exponential decay window, then the attenuation function can be obtained to control the step-size change. Meanwhile, the threshold is set to reset the step-size to ensure the tracking performance when the channel has burst interference. Computer simulation results prove the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  15. Cell size, number and density in the retina ganglion cell layer of Pekin duck retina at different embryonic age

    OpenAIRE

    ZUO Shi-Feng; CHEN Yao-Xing; WANG Zi-Xu; Cao, Jing; Dong, Yu-lan

    2008-01-01

    Changes in cell size, number and density of the ganglion cell layer(GCL)of the Pekin duck retina were studied by using the methods of Nissl-staining and Scion Image picture processing at embryonic age day-11,14,17,20,23 and 26. The result indicated that the cells in GCL were small and round uniformly at E11 and E14. The large cells were first found at E17. From E11 to E26, cell size was increased 1.97-fold in the central area (CA) and 3.1-fold in the temple periphery (TP), and there was si...

  16. Optimal sizing and control strategy of isolated grid with wind power and energy storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An energy storage sizing scheme for wind powered isolated grid is developed. • A bi-level control strategy for wind-battery isolated grid is proposed. • The energy storage type selection method for Nan’ao island grid is presented. • The sizing method and the control strategy are verified based on the Nan’ao island. • The wind-battery demonstration system has great benefit for remote areas. - Abstract: Integrating renewable energy and energy storage system provides a prospective way for power supply of remote areas. Focused on the isolated grids comprising renewable energy generation and energy storage, an energy storage sizing method for taking account of the reliability requirement and a bi-level control strategy of the isolated grids are presented in this paper. Based on comparative analysis of current energy storage characteristics and practicability, Sodium–sulfur battery is recommended for power balance control in the isolated grids. The optimal size of the energy storage system is determined by genetic algorithm and sequential simulation. The annualized cost considering the compensation cost of curtailed wind power and load is minimized when the reliability requirement can be satisfied. The sizing method emphasizes the tradeoff between energy storage size and reliability of power supply. The bi-level control strategy is designed as upper level wide area power balance control in dispatch timescale and lower level battery energy storage system V/f control in real-time range for isolated operation. The mixed timescale simulation results of Nan’ao Island grid verify the effectiveness of the proposed sizing method and control strategy

  17. Cell responses to two kinds of nanohydroxyapatite with different sizes and crystallinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei SC

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaochen Liu1, Minzhi Zhao1, Jingxiong Lu2, Jian Ma4, Jie Wei2, Shicheng Wei1,31Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing, 2Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, 3Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing, 4Hospital of Stomatology, Tongji University, Shanghai, ChinaIntroduction:Hydroxyapatite (HA is the principal inorganic constituent of human bone. Due to its good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, all kinds of HA particles were prepared by different methods. Numerous reports demonstrated that the properties of HA affected its biological effects.Methods: Two kinds of nanohydroxyapatite with different sizes and crystallinities were obtained via a hydrothermal treatment method under different temperatures. It was found that at a temperature of 140°C, a rod-like crystal (n-HA1 with a diameter of 23 ± 5 nm, a length of 47 ± 14 nm, and crystallinity of 85% ± 5% was produced, while at a temperature of 80°C, a rod-like crystal (n-HA2 with a diameter of 16 ± 3 nm, a length of 40 ± 10 nm, and crystallinity of 65% ± 3% was produced. The influence of nanohydroxyapatite size and crystallinity on osteoblast viability was studied by MTT, scanning electron microscopy, and flow cytometry.Results: n-HA1 gave a better biological response than n-HA2 in promoting cell growth and inhibiting cell apoptosis, and also exhibited much more active cell morphology. Alkaline phosphatase activity for both n-HA2 and n-HA1 was obviously higher than for the control, and no significant difference was found between n-HA1 and n-HA2. The same trend was observed on Western blotting for expression of type I collagen and osteopontin. In addition, it was found by transmission electron microscopy that large quantities of n-HA2 entered into the cell

  18. Parkinson's disease and the control of size and speed in handwriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gemmert, A W; Teulings, H L; Contreras-Vidal, J L; Stelmach, G E

    1999-06-01

    This experiment investigated whether Parkinson's disease (PD) patients experience problems in producing stroke size, stroke duration or both, in a handwriting task. Thirteen PD patients and 15 elderly controls wrote four patterns of varying complexity on a digitizer tablet. The participants were instructed to execute the writing movements: at a normal size and speed; as fast as possible; two times larger than normal; and two times larger and as fast as possible. PD patients had no difficulty increasing speed while maintaining size and had no difficulty increasing size while maintaining speed. However, they showed significantly smaller size increases in the two times larger condition as compared to the elderly controls. The conditions were also simulated by a neural network model of normal and PD movement control that produced a stroke pattern that approximated the experimental data. For the instructions used, the results suggest that when patients scale speed, they have no difficulty controlling force amplitude, but when they scale stroke size, they have a problem controlling force amplitude. Thus, PD patients may have reduced capability to maintain a given force level for the stroke time periods tested with the instructions. PMID:10390030

  19. Controlling the Fluctuations of Wind Power By SMES Using Optimized Coil Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Saini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid power system that solely depends on the intermittent renewable energy sources will generate a fluctuating output power that leads to damage to the machines that operates on a stable supply. Therefore, an energy storage system Super Conducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES is introduced with function to reduce the output power fluctuation problems. SMES systems are efficient devices of storing large electrical energy but they are quite costly. Thus this paper suggests an Optimization method of optimizing the controller parameters, SMES current and Coil Size of the SMES thereby controls the power fluctuation. In controller PI controller is used to control Active and Reactive power of the Tie-line. Based on the minimization of variance active and reactive power fluctuation is reduced. The controller parameters, Coil Size and Initial SMES current are tuned by Particle Swarm Optimization and compared the results by Genetic Algorithm. This optimization and Controller model is realized by using MATLAB.

  20. Co-variation of metabolic rates and cell-size in coccolithophores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Aloisi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Coccolithophores are sensitive recorders of environmental change. The size of their coccosphere varies in the ocean along gradients of environmental conditions and provides a key for understanding the fate of this important phytoplankton group in the future ocean. But interpreting field changes in coccosphere size in terms of laboratory observations is hard, mainly because the marine signal reflects the response of multiple morphotypes to changes in a combination of environmental variables. In this paper I examine the large corpus of published laboratory experiments with coccolithophores looking for relations between environmental conditions, metabolic rates and cell size (a proxy for coccosphere size. I show that growth, photosynthesis, and to a lesser extent calcification, co-vary with cell size when pCO2, irradiance, temperature, nitrate, phosphate and iron conditions change. With the exception of phosphate and temperature, a change from limiting to non-limiting conditions always results in an increase in cell size. An increase in phosphate or temperature produces the opposite effect. The magnitude of the coccosphere size changes observed in the laboratory is comparable to that observed in the ocean. If the biological reasons behind the environment-metabolism-size link are understood, it will be possible to use coccosphere size changes in the modern ocean and in marine sediments to investigate the fate of coccolithophores in the future ocean. This reasoning can be extended to the size of coccoliths if, as recent experiments are starting to show, coccolith size reacts to environmental change proportionally to coccosphere size. I introduce a simple model that simulates the growth rate and the size of cells forced by nitrate and phosphate concentrations. By considering a simple rule that allocates the energy flow from nutrient acquisition to cell structure (biomass and cell maturity (biological complexity, eventually leading to cell division

  1. Control points within the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence of the temporal order of chromosomal DNA replication argues favorably for the view that the cell cycle is controlled by genes acting in sequence whose time of expression is determined by mitosis and the amount of nuclear DNA (2C vs 4C) in the cell. Gl and G2 appear to be carbohydrate dependent in that cells starved of either carbohydrate of phosphate fail to make these transitions. Cells deprived of nitrate, however, fail only at Gl to S transition indicating that the controls that operate in G1 differ from those that operate in G2. 46 references, 5 figures

  2. Control points within the cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence of the temporal order of chromosomal DNA replication argues favorably for the view that the cell cycle is controlled by genes acting in sequence whose time of expression is determined by mitosis and the amount of nuclear DNA (2C vs 4C) in the cell. Gl and G2 appear to be carbohydrate dependent in that cells starved of either carbohydrate of phosphate fail to make these transitions. Cells deprived of nitrate, however, fail only at Gl to S transition indicating that the controls that operate in G1 differ from those that operate in G2. 46 references, 5 figures.

  3. Controllability analysis of decentralised linear controllers for polymeric fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Maria; Aguado, Joaquin; Ansede, Xavier; Riera, Jordi [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C. Llorens i Artigas 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-10-10

    This work deals with the control of polymeric fuel cells. It includes a linear analysis of the system at different operating points, the comparison and selection of different control structures, and the validation of the controlled system by simulation. The work is based on a complex non linear model which has been linearised at several operating points. The linear analysis tools used are the Morari resiliency index, the condition number, and the relative gain array. These techniques are employed to compare the controllability of the system with different control structures and at different operating conditions. According to the results, the most promising control structures are selected and their performance with PI based diagonal controllers is evaluated through simulations with the complete non linear model. The range of operability of the examined control structures is compared. Conclusions indicate good performance of several diagonal linear controllers. However, very few have a wide operability range. (author)

  4. Optical separation and controllable delivery of cells from particle and cell mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuchao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell separation and delivery have recently gained significant attention in biological and biochemical studies. In thiswork, an optical method for separation and controllable delivery of cells by using an abruptly tapered fiber probe is reported. By launching a laser beam at the wavelength of 980 nm into the fiber, a mixture of cells with sizes of ~5 and ~3 μm and poly(methyl methacrylate particles with size of 5 μm are separated into three chains along the direction of propagation of light. The cell and particle chains are delivered in three dimensions over 600 μm distance. Experimental results are interpreted by numerical simulations. Optical forces and forward migration velocities of different particles and cells are calculated and discussed.

  5. Small size transformer provides high power regulation with low ripple and maximum control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, R.; Ulrich, B. R.

    1971-01-01

    Single, variable, transformer/choke device does work of several. Technique reduces drawer assembly physical size and design and manufacturing cost. Device provides power, voltage current and impedance regulation while maintaining maximum control of linearity and ensuring extremely low ripple. Nulling is controlled to very fine degree.

  6. Floral organ size control: Interplay between organ identity, developmental compartments and compensation mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado-Benarroch, Luciana; Weiss, Julia; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2009-01-01

    Growth of lateral organs is a complex mechanism that starts with formation of lateral primordia.Basal developmental programs like polarity, organ identity and environmental cues influence the final organ size achieved via coordinated cell division and expansion. recent evidence shows that the precise balance between these two processes, known as compensation mechanisms, seems to be influenced by the identity of the organ. Furthermore, studies of mutants affected in floral organ size suggest t...

  7. Size-controllable fabrication of Cu nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes by simple heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chun; Wu, Shujing; Zheng, He; Cao, Fan; Sheng, Huaping; Zhao, Dongshan; Wang, Jianbo

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Cu nanoparticles were synthesized on the surface of carbon nanotubes by heating. • The particle size could be tuned by controlling the temperature and duration. • The possible nucleation and growth mechanisms of nanoparticles were discussed. - Abstract: In this paper, employing simple heating inside the transmission electron microscope, we demonstrated the decoration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by Cu nanoparticles (NPs). More significantly, the particle sizes could be effectively controlled by simply controlling the temperature and duration. It is believed that the nucleation and growth of NPs results from the deposition of generated Cu vapor as well as the surface diffusion of Cu on the CNTs at elevated temperature.

  8. Size-controllable fabrication of Cu nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes by simple heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cu nanoparticles were synthesized on the surface of carbon nanotubes by heating. • The particle size could be tuned by controlling the temperature and duration. • The possible nucleation and growth mechanisms of nanoparticles were discussed. - Abstract: In this paper, employing simple heating inside the transmission electron microscope, we demonstrated the decoration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by Cu nanoparticles (NPs). More significantly, the particle sizes could be effectively controlled by simply controlling the temperature and duration. It is believed that the nucleation and growth of NPs results from the deposition of generated Cu vapor as well as the surface diffusion of Cu on the CNTs at elevated temperature

  9. Scattering pulse of label free fine structure cells to determine the size scale of scattering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Kaixing; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Scattering pulse is sensitive to the morphology and components of each single label-free cell. The most direct detection result, label free cell's scattering pulse is studied in this paper as a novel trait to recognize large malignant cells from small normal cells. A set of intrinsic scattering pulse calculation method is figured out, which combines both hydraulic focusing theory and small particle's scattering principle. Based on the scattering detection angle ranges of widely used flow cytometry, the scattering pulses formed by cell scattering energy in forward scattering angle 2°-5° and side scattering angle 80°-110° are discussed. Combining the analysis of cell's illuminating light energy, the peak, area, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of label free cells' scattering pulses for fine structure cells with diameter 1-20 μm are studied to extract the interrelations of scattering pulse's features and cell's morphology. The theoretical and experimental results show that cell's diameter and FWHM of its scattering pulse agree with approximate linear distribution; the peak and area of scattering pulse do not always increase with cell's diameter becoming larger, but when cell's diameter is less than about 16 μm the monotone increasing relation of scattering pulse peak or area with cell's diameter can be obtained. This relationship between the features of scattering pulse and cell's size is potentially a useful but very simple criterion to distinguishing malignant and normal cells by their sizes and morphologies in label free cells clinical examinations.

  10. Plasmon-Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting with Size-Controllable Gold Nanodot Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, HJ; Lee, SH; Upadhye, AA; Ro, I; Tejedor-Tejedor, MI; Anderson, MA; Kim, WB; Huber, GW

    2014-10-01

    Size-controllable Au nanodot arrays (50, 63, and 83 nm dot size) with a narrow size distribution (+/- 5%) were prepared by a direct contact printing method on an indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate. Titania was added to the Au nanodots using TiO2 sols of 2-3 nm in size. This created a precisely controlled Au nanodot with 110 nm of TiO2 overcoats. Using these precisely controlled nanodot arrays, the effects of Au nanodot size and TiO2 overcoats were investigated for photoelectrochemical water splitting using a three-electrode system with a fiber-optic visible light source. From UV-vis measurement, the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak energy (ELSPR) increased and the LSPR line width (G) decreased with decreasing Au nanodot size. The generated plasmonic enhancement for the photoelectrochemical water splitting reaction increased with decreasing Au particle size. The measured plasmonic enhancement for light on/off experiments was 25 times for the 50 nm Au size and 10 times for the 83 nm Au nanodot size. The activity of each catalyst increased by a factor of 6 when TiO2 was added to the Au nanodots for all the samples. The activity of the catalyst was proportional to the quality factor (defined as Q = E-LSPR/Gamma) of the plasmonic metal nanostructure. The enhanced water splitting performance with the decreased Au nanodot size is probably due to more generated charge carriers (electron/hole pair) by local field enhancement as the quality factor increases.

  11. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D.; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, pe...

  12. Bone cell-materials interaction on alumina ceramics with different grain sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to study adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast cells (OPC1) on alumina ceramic, a bio-inert material. Alumina ceramic with different average grain sizes, 1 μm and 12 μm, respectively, were used in as-prepared condition without any grinding and polishing to understand the influence of grain size on cell-material interactions. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal imaging were used to study attachment, adhesion and differentiation of OPC1 cells. Cells attached, proliferated and differentiated well on both the substrates. Adhesion of cells, as assessed by observing the production of vinculin, was found to be a consistent phenomenon on both the substrates. On day 5 of cell culture, significant cell-attachment was observed and vinculin was detected throughout cytoplasm. MTT assay showed that proliferation of OPC1 cells was consistently higher in the case of 12 μm-alumina. Cells of different morphology, nodular, plate-like as well as elongated, were found to get anchored at grains, grain boundaries as well as pores. On day 16, there were clear signs of mineralization as well. Over all, alumina with average grain size of 12 μm showed better cell-attachment, growth and differentiation compared to 1 μm grain size samples.

  13. The Influence of Genome and Cell Size on Brain Morphology in Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Gerhard; Walkowiak, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    In amphibians, nerve cell size is highly correlated with genome size, and increases in genome and cell size cause a retardation of the rate of development of nervous (as well as nonnervous) tissue leading to secondary simplification. This yields an inverse relationship between genome and cell size on the one hand and morphological complexity of the tectum mesencephali as the main visual center, the size of the torus semicircularis as the main auditory center, the size of the amphibian papilla as an important peripheral auditory structure, and the size of the cerebellum as a major sensorimotor center. Nervous structures developing later (e.g., torus and cerebellum) are more affected by secondary simplification than those that develop earlier (e.g., the tectum). This effect is more prominent in salamanders and caecilians than in frogs owing to larger genome and cells sizes in the former two taxa. We hypothesize that because of intragenomic evolutionary processes, important differences in brain morphology can arise independently of specific environmental selection. PMID:26261281

  14. Immunological control of adult neural stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs only in discrete regions of adult central nervous system: the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone. These areas are populated by adult neural stem cells (aNSC) that are regulated by a number of molecules and signaling pathways, which control their cell fate choices, survival and proliferation rates. For a long time, it was believed that the immune system did not exert any control on neural proliferative niches. However, it has been observed that many patholog...

  15. Tooth Size in Patients with Mild, Moderate and Severe Hypodontia and a Control Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare tooth size between subjects with mild, moderate and severe hypodontia and a control group. Material and Methods: The study comprised 120 patients with hypodontia divided into three groups of 40 mild (≤2 teeth congenitally missing), 40 moderate (3-5 teeth congenitally missing) and 40 severe (≥6 teeth congenitally missing) hypodontia; and 40 age and sex matched controls. Tooth size was recorded by measuring the mesiodistal and buccolingual dimensions of all fully erupted teeth on study models using digital callipers and compared between all hypodontia and control groups using Two-way ANOVA and Post Hoc Tests of subgroup comparison. Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed patients with hypodontia had significantly smaller mesiodistal and buccolingual tooth dimensions compared with controls (p<0.05). Furthermore patients with more severe hypodontia demonstrated significantly smaller tooth dimensions than those in the mild and moderate hypodontia subgroups (p<0.05). The most affected tooth in terms of tooth size reduction was the maxillary lateral incisor and the least affected tooth was the mandibular first molar. Conclusion: Patients with hypodontia have smaller tooth dimensions than control. Tooth size appears to be affected by the degree of hypodontia, with severe hypodontia having a greater effect on tooth size reduction. The findings of this study may contribute to understanding the aetiology of hypodontia and aid the multidisciplinary management of this complex condition.

  16. Overexpression of PhEXPA1 increases cell size, modifies cell wall polymer composition and affects the timing of axillary meristem development in Petunia hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Dal Santo, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; de Groot, Peter; Sordo, Sara; Citterio, Sandra; Monti, Francesca; Pezzotti, Mario

    2011-08-01

    • Expansins are cell wall proteins required for cell enlargement and cell wall loosening during many developmental processes. The involvement of the Petunia hybrida expansin A1 (PhEXPA1) gene in cell expansion, the control of organ size and cell wall polysaccharide composition was investigated by overexpressing PhEXPA1 in petunia plants. • PhEXPA1 promoter activity was evaluated using a promoter-GUS assay and the protein's subcellular localization was established by expressing a PhEXPA1-GFP fusion protein. PhEXPA1 was overexpressed in transgenic plants using the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and chemical analysis were used for the quantitative analysis of cell wall polymers. • The GUS and GFP assays demonstrated that PhEXPA1 is present in the cell walls of expanding tissues. The constitutive overexpression of PhEXPA1 significantly affected expansin activity and organ size, leading to changes in the architecture of petunia plants by initiating premature axillary meristem outgrowth. Moreover, a significant change in cell wall polymer composition in the petal limbs of transgenic plants was observed. • These results support a role for expansins in the determination of organ shape, in lateral branching, and in the variation of cell wall polymer composition, probably reflecting a complex role in cell wall metabolism. PMID:21534969

  17. Cell size, number and density in the retina ganglion cell layer of Pekin duck retina at different embryonic age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZUO Shi-Feng

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in cell size, number and density of the ganglion cell layer(GCL)of the Pekin duck retina were studied by using the methods of Nissl-staining and Scion Image picture processing at embryonic age day-11,14,17,20,23 and 26. The result indicated that the cells in GCL were small and round uniformly at E11 and E14. The large cells were first found at E17. From E11 to E26, cell size was increased 1.97-fold in the central area (CA and 3.1-fold in the temple periphery (TP, and there was significant difference among all embryonic ages. During the growth and development of embryo, the total number of cells in GCL was increased to 2.03×106 cells at E17, and then decreased significantly with age. Differentiation of the central-peripheral gradient in cell density has been performed at E11. Cell density in CA was up to the maximal value (2.54×104 cells/mm2 at E17 and then decreased. However, cell density was decreased constantly in the peripheral area, especially in TP. In conclusion, E17 is the most important point for the retina during the embryonic developmental of Pekin duck, accompanying changes in cell size, number and density in GCL [Acta Zoologica Sinica 54(6: 1082 – 1088, 2008].

  18. Size control of monodisperse nonporous silica particles by seed particle growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beibei Zhao; Caihua Tian; Yan Zhang; Tao Tang; Fengyun Wang

    2011-01-01

    Monodisperse nonporous silica particles were prepared by sol-precipitation via seed particle growth method, and the particle size, which varied from 1.0 to 4.7 μm, was strictly controlled in our experiment.The formation of secondary particles, which resulted in a multimodal distribution of particle size, was suppressed by changing tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) concentration and reaction temperature. Furthermore,the effect of adding small amounts of electrolyte to the hydrolysis mixture was examined.

  19. Shape and size controlled synthesis of uniform iron oxide nanocrystals through new non-hydrolytic routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlu; Lee, Seung Soo; Wu, Jiewei; Hinton, Carl H; Fortner, John D

    2016-08-12

    New, non-hydrolytic routes to synthesize highly crystalline iron oxide nanocrystals (8-40 nm, magnetite) are described in this report whereby particle size and morphology were precisely controlled through reactant (precursor, e.g. (FeO(OH)) ratios, co-surfactant and organic additive, and/or reaction time. Particle size, with high monodispersivity (materials synthesized/purified in organic solvents are broadly water dispersible through a variety of phase (aqueous) transfer method(s). PMID:27354334

  20. Environmental and biotic controls on the evolutionary history of insect body size

    OpenAIRE

    Clapham, Matthew E.; Karr, Jered A.

    2012-01-01

    Giant insects, with wingspans as large as 70 cm, ruled the Carboniferous and Permian skies. Gigantism has been linked to hyperoxic conditions because oxygen concentration is a key physiological control on body size, particularly in groups like flying insects that have high metabolic oxygen demands. Here we show, using a dataset of more than 10,500 fossil insect wing lengths, that size tracked atmospheric oxygen concentrations only for the first 150 Myr of insect evolution. The data are best e...

  1. Magnetophoresis behaviour at low gradient magnetic field and size control of nickel single core nanobeads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic separation of organic compounds, proteins, nucleic acids and other biomolecules, and cells from complex reaction mixtures is becoming the most suitable solution for large production in bioindustrial purification and extraction processes. Optimal magnetic properties can be achieved by the use of metals. However, they are extremely sensitive to oxidation and degradation under atmospheric conditions. In this work Ni nanoparticles are synthesised by conventional solution reduction process with the addition of a non-ionic surfactant as a surface agent. The nanoparticles were surfacted in citric acid and then coated with silica to form single core Ni nanobeads. A magnetophoresis study at different magnetic field gradients and at the different steps of synthesis route was performed using Horizontal Low Gradient Magnetic Field (HLGMF) systems. The reversible aggregation times are reduced to a few seconds, allowing a very fast separation process. - Research highlights: → Monodispersed single core Ni-silica core-shell structures were prepared. → Control of Ni nanoparticles size was achieved using a non-ionic surfactant. → Magnetophoresis at different magnetic field gradients was monitored. → Magnetophoresis at different steps of synthesis route was performed. → Attractive magnetic interactions overcome electrostatic repulsions.

  2. Deformability and size-based cancer cell separation using an integrated microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Long; Shen, Shaofei; Ma, Chao; Ma, Tongtong; Zhang, Rui; Tian, Chang; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Wenming; Wang, Jinyi

    2015-11-01

    Cell sorting by filtration techniques offers a label-free approach for cell separation on the basis of size and deformability. However, filtration is always limited by the unpredictable variation of the filter hydrodynamic resistance due to cell accumulation and clogging in the microstructures. In this study, we present a new integrated microfluidic device for cell separation based on the cell size and deformability by combining the microstructure-constricted filtration and pneumatic microvalves. Using this device, the cell populations sorted by the microstructures can be easily released in real time for subsequent analysis. Moreover, the periodical sort and release of cells greatly avoided cell accumulation and clogging and improved the selectivity. Separation of cancer cells (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and MDA231-LM2) with different deformability showed that the mixture of the less flexible cells (MCF-7) and the flexible cells (MDA-MB-231 and MDA231-LM2) can be well separated with more than 75% purity. Moreover, the device can be used to separate cancer cells from the blood samples with more than 90% cell recovery and more than 80% purity. Compared with the current filtration methods, the device provides a new approach for cancer cell separation with high collection recovery and purity, and also, possesses practical potential to be applied as a sample preparation platform for fundamental studies and clinical applications. PMID:26366443

  3. In vitro culture and oxygen consumption of NSCs in size-controlled neurospheres of Ca-alginate/gelatin microbead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kedong, E-mail: Kedongsong@dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian R and D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yang, Yanfei; Li, Shixiao; Wu, Meiling; Wu, Yixing [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian R and D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Lim, Mayasari [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Liu, Tianqing, E-mail: liutq@dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian R and D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) forming neurospheres in a conventional culture tend to develop necrotic/apoptotic centers due to mass transport limitations. In this study, the internal pore structure of calcium-alginate/gelatin (CAG) microbeads was tuned and controlled to provide a suitable three-dimensional environment supporting NSC proliferation. Direct impact of three-dimensional space availability was quantified by oxygen consumption rates of NSCs and cells were cultured in three different methods: neurospheres, single cell suspension of NSCs, and encapsulated NSCs in microbeads. Our results showed that encapsulated NSCs in CAG microbeads maintained higher cell viability than in conventional culture. In addition, NSCs encapsulated in CAG microbeads preserved their original stemness and continued to express nestin, CNPase, GFAP and β-tubulin-III post-encapsulation. Oxygen consumption rates of encapsulated NSCs in CAG microbeads were the lowest as compared to the other two culture methods. The optimal cell density supporting high cell proliferation in CAG microbeads was found to be 1.5 × 10{sup 5} cells/mL. The glucose consumption curve suggests that encapsulated NSCs in microbeads had a slower growth profile. This study presents an alternative method in hybrid microbead preparation to generate a highly favorable three-dimensional cell carrier for NSCs and was successfully applied for its effective in vitro expansion. - Highlights: • CAG microbeads effectively restricted the size of neurospheres.

  4. In vitro culture and oxygen consumption of NSCs in size-controlled neurospheres of Ca-alginate/gelatin microbead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) forming neurospheres in a conventional culture tend to develop necrotic/apoptotic centers due to mass transport limitations. In this study, the internal pore structure of calcium-alginate/gelatin (CAG) microbeads was tuned and controlled to provide a suitable three-dimensional environment supporting NSC proliferation. Direct impact of three-dimensional space availability was quantified by oxygen consumption rates of NSCs and cells were cultured in three different methods: neurospheres, single cell suspension of NSCs, and encapsulated NSCs in microbeads. Our results showed that encapsulated NSCs in CAG microbeads maintained higher cell viability than in conventional culture. In addition, NSCs encapsulated in CAG microbeads preserved their original stemness and continued to express nestin, CNPase, GFAP and β-tubulin-III post-encapsulation. Oxygen consumption rates of encapsulated NSCs in CAG microbeads were the lowest as compared to the other two culture methods. The optimal cell density supporting high cell proliferation in CAG microbeads was found to be 1.5 × 105 cells/mL. The glucose consumption curve suggests that encapsulated NSCs in microbeads had a slower growth profile. This study presents an alternative method in hybrid microbead preparation to generate a highly favorable three-dimensional cell carrier for NSCs and was successfully applied for its effective in vitro expansion. - Highlights: • CAG microbeads effectively restricted the size of neurospheres

  5. Fuzzy Control of Polymer Fuel Cell for Attract Maximum Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Nejati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer fuel cell is one of the most attractive of fuel cell from point of the design and operation and also in comparison with other types of fuel cell, for a weight and size, polymer fuel cell produces more power. But however, one of the problems to use of this system is its low efficiency .To overcome the low efficiency of the fuel cell polymer in this paper is tried to used from maximum power point tracking. According to the characteristic of the flow –power the fuel cell, which is a non-linear curve and has a maximum point and use of the fuzzy controller and the proper selection of input and output membership functions trying to the System always works at maximum power. For this purpose, a chopper is used between the fuel cell and the load and to adjust the duty cycle of the applied signal to it is applied the fuzzy-TSK type controller that Its inputs are stream slope and slope changes. The results show that this controller has a good performance and that is faster compared with the perturbation and observation method.

  6. Trends vs. reactor size of passive reactivity shutdown and control performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In LMR [liquid metal reactor] concepts, favorable passive reactivity shutdown performance in response to ATWS [anticipated transient without scram] events has been shown to be achievable when measurable, integral reactivity parameters satisfy certain requirements. The trends in the integral reactivity parameters with reactor size for both oxide and metal fuel have been developed based on a data base of about two dozen reactor designs in the range 400 to 3,600 MWth. The general conclusion is that the favorable passive reactivity control features which accrue to the metallic-fueled reactors in the modular size range can be achieved as well in the larger commercial sizes

  7. Size-Dependent Shifts of Plasmon Resonance in Silver Nanoparticle Films Using Controlled Dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kneipp, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    A study of the size dependent blue- and red-shift of the plasmon band of silver nanoparticle films in aqueous solution is reported. A detection scheme, where the particle size is continuously decreased by means of controlled dissolution, while measuring the plasmon band position by UV......, resulting in a corrected electron density. The reported results have potential for developing nanosensors based on small nanoparticles below 5 nm in size by using their intrinsic response to adsorbed analytes. This detection scheme suggests a potential increase in the sensitivity of up to 3×, particularly...

  8. Size-controlled fluorescent nanodiamonds: A facile method of fabrication and color-center counting

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Remi

    2013-01-01

    We present a facile method for the production of fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (DNCs) of different sizes and efficiently quantify the concentration of emitting defect color centers (DCCs) of each DNC size. We prepared the DNCs by ball-milling commercially available micrometer-sized synthetic (high pressure, high temperature (HPHT)) diamonds and then separated the as-produced DNCs by density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) into size-controlled fractions. A protocol to enhance the uniformity of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in the diamonds was devised by depositing the DNCs as a dense monolayer on amino-silanized silicon substrates and then subjecting the monolayer to He+ beam irradiation. Using a standard confocal setup, we analyzed the average number of NV centers per crystal, and obtained a quantitative relationship between the DNC particle size and the NV number per crystal. This relationship was in good agreement with results from previous studies that used more elaborate setups. Our findings suggest that nanocrystal size separation by DGU may be used to control the number of defects per nanocrystal. The efficient approaches described herein to control and quantify DCCs are valuable to researchers as they explore applications for color centers and new strategies to create them. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Shape and size control of nano dispersed Mg/Al layered double hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, H S; Srivastava, R; Bahadur, D

    2008-08-01

    Controlling the shape and size of the layered inorganic-organic hybrid particles is a challenge with conventional methods of synthesis. The co-precipitation method has been modified to synthesize Mg/Al Layered double hydroxide by controlling the particle growth using ultrasonic wave at the time of nucleation. In this project, magnesium and aluminum ions were considered as model systems with carbonate anion as intercalating agent. The resulting particles are compared with those of LDHs produced by conventional co-precipitation method at constant pH. Powder X-ray diffraction confirmed formation of the layered double hydroxide phases having crystallite size 19-20 nm in both 'a' and 'c' crystallographic directions. Transmission electron microscope and dynamic light scattering revealed nano disperse hexagonal platelets with narrow size distribution and average size was around 48 nm. The modified method reduces the particle size, increases the surface charge, narrows down the size distribution and also reduces the aspect ratio of the particles. Therefore, it is suggested that low amplitude ultrasonic wave prevents the aggregation of the nuclei, thus restricting the particle growth and results in uniform size particles. PMID:19049206

  10. Kinetic effect in the size-control of CdS nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建军; 张顺利; 张治军; 杜祖亮; 张军; 金振声

    1999-01-01

    A new method of size control for CdS nanoparticles, called common cation coprecipitation, is reported. In the course of coprecipitation, both CdS and CdSt2(cadmium stearate) formations are diffusion-controlled and their rates are quite different. The size of CdS nanoparticles depends on the ratio of initial concentrations of S2- to St- (stearate ion). Characterized by UV-Vis absorption, XRD, TEM, fluorescence and XPS, the results obtained show that the coprecipitate is a composite, i. e. CdS particle inserts in the CdSt2 molecular layers to form a sandwich-like structure. The method reported for size control of CdS nanoparticles might be called kinetic self-assembling.

  11. In vitro toxicity of different-sized ZnO nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tianshu; Guan, Rongfa; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Song, Yijuan; Jiang, Han; Zhao, Jin

    2013-11-01

    There has been rapid growth in nanotechnology in both the public and private sectors worldwide, but concern about nanosafety exists. To assess size-dependent cytotoxicity on human cancer cells, we studied the cytotoxic effect of three kinds of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, distribution, and intensity. Multiple assays have been adopted to measure the cell activity and oxidative stress. The cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs was time dependent and dose dependent. The 24-h exposure was chosen to confirm the viability and accessibility of the cells and taken as the appropriate time for the following test system. The IC50 value was found at a low concentration. The oxidative stress elicited a significant reduction in glutathione with increase in reactive oxygen species and lactate dehydrogenase. The toxicity resulted in a deletion of cells in the G1 phase and an accumulation of cells in the S and G2/M phases. One type of metallic oxide (ZnO) exerted different cytotoxic effects according to different particle sizes. Data from the previous experiments showed that 26-nm ZnO NPs appeared to have the highest toxicity to Caco-2 cells. The study demonstrated the toxicity of ZnO NPs to Caco-2 cells and the impact of particle size, which could be useful in the medical applications.

  12. On the stability of receding horizon control based on horizon size for linear discrete systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, stability conditions of receding horizon control (RHC) based on a horizon size are proposed for linear discrete systems. The proposed stability conditions present a relevant horizon size which can guarantee the stability of RHC even though a final state weighting matrix does not satisfy non-increasing monotonicity of optimal cost. Therefore, the possible range of the final state weighting matrix ensuring the stability of RHC is extended to zero and also it can be applied to the stability problems of other forms of model predictive control like the conventional stability conditions

  13. Support for the initial attachment, growth and differentiation of MG-63 cells: a comparison between nano-size hydroxyapatite and micro-size hydroxyapatite in composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filová, Elena; Suchý, Tomáš; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Supová, Monika; Zaloudková, Margit; Balík, Karel; Lisá, Věra; Slouf, Miroslav; Bačáková, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is considered to be a bioactive material that favorably influences the adhesion, growth, and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts. To optimize the cell response on the hydroxyapatite composite, it is desirable to assess the optimum concentration and also the optimum particle size. The aim of our study was to prepare composite materials made of polydimethylsiloxane, polyamide, and nano-sized (N) or micro-sized (M) HA, with an HA content of 0%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% (v/v) (referred to as N0-N25 or M0-M25), and to evaluate them in vitro in cultures with human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. For clinical applications, fast osseointegration of the implant into the bone is essential. We observed the greatest initial cell adhesion on composites M10 and N5. Nano-sized HA supported cell growth, especially during the first 3 days of culture. On composites with micro-size HA (2%-15%), MG-63 cells reached the highest densities on day 7. Samples M20 and M25, however, were toxic for MG-63 cells, although these composites supported the production of osteocalcin in these cells. On N2, a higher concentration of osteopontin was found in MG-63 cells. For biomedical applications, the concentration range of 5%-15% (v/v) nano-size or micro-size HA seems to be optimum. PMID:25125978

  14. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, S.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-04-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The function control allows unattended quality assurance experiments at remote air quality monitoring or research stations under field conditions. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter while removing diffusive particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. Another feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The performance of the function control is illustrated with the aid of a 1-year data set recorded at Annaberg-Buchholz, a station in the Saxon air quality monitoring network. During the period of concern, the total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer slightly overestimated the particle number concentration recorded by the condensation particle counter by 2 % (grand average). Based on our first year of experience with the function control, we developed tolerance criteria that allow a performance evaluation of a tested mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the total particle number concentration. We conclude that the automated function control enhances the quality and reliability of unattended long-term particle number size distribution measurements. This will have beneficial effects for intercomparison studies involving different measurement sites, and help provide a higher

  15. Small- and Medium-Sized Commercial Building Monitoring and Controls Needs: A Scoping Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Underhill, Ronald M.; Goddard, James K.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Piette, M. A.; Granderson, J.; Brown, Rich E.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; Kuruganti, T.

    2012-10-31

    Buildings consume over 40% of the total energy consumption in the U.S. A significant portion of the energy consumed in buildings is wasted because of the lack of controls or the inability to use existing building automation systems (BASs) properly. Much of the waste occurs because of our inability to manage and controls buildings efficiently. Over 90% of the buildings are either small-size (<5,000 sf) or medium-size (between 5,000 sf and 50,000 sf); these buildings currently do not use BASs to monitor and control their building systems from a central location. According to Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), about 10% of the buildings in the U.S. use BASs or central controls to manage their building system operations. Buildings that use BASs are typically large (>100,000 sf). Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were asked by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP) to identify monitoring and control needs for small- and medium-sized commercial buildings and recommend possible solutions. This study documents the needs and solutions for small- and medium-sized buildings.

  16. Dermal papilla cell number specifies hair size, shape and cycling and its reduction causes follicular decline

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Woo; Wu, Eleanor; Morgan, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Although the hair shaft is derived from the progeny of keratinocyte stem cells in the follicular epithelium, the growth and differentiation of follicular keratinocytes is guided by a specialized mesenchymal population, the dermal papilla (DP), that is embedded in the hair bulb. Here we show that the number of DP cells in the follicle correlates with the size and shape of the hair produced in the mouse pelage. The same stem cell pool gives rise to hairs of different sizes or types in successiv...

  17. Coherent population trapping on 87Rb atoms in small-size absorption cells with buffer gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermak, S. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) on 87Rb atoms in neon atmosphere has been studied in small-size glass absorption cells under conditions of pumping with narrow-band laser radiation at the D2 line of the main doublet. Parameters of the absorption signal have been measured in 3-mm-diameter cells at buffer gas (Ne) pressures varied within 200-400 Torr, cell temperatures within 65-120°C, and pumping radiation power densities within 30-400 μW/cm2. Optimum values of the buffer gas pressures, cell temperature, and pumping power are determined at which the short-term instability of the resonance line is at minimum. Orientational shifts of the CPT resonance signal in gas-filled cells and small-size cells with antirelaxation coating have been compared.

  18. Correlation of Red Blood Cell Aggregate Size with Transmitted Light Intensity Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Darren L.

    1998-11-01

    Under sufficiently low shear rates, such as those encountered in the microcirculation, human red blood cells are known to form aggregate structures (`rouleaux'). These aggregates may range in size from a simple chain containing only a few cells to complex three-dimensional structures containing tens of cells. Previous studies have attempted to characterize the aggregate size by examining the spatial distribution of transmitted light intensity resulting from transillumination of the blood flow. For experiments performed in vitro and in vivo, spectral analysis of the transmitted light intensities has shown that the presence of aggregates in the flow can linked with an increase in the spectral power at small wavenumbers. The magnitudes of the affected wavenumbers correspond to structures considerably larger than individual cells. A precise numerical correlation, however, is difficult to establish. In this work, computer simulations of aggregating blood flow are used along with statistical considerations in an attempt to better correlate the observed spectral trends with actual aggregate size.

  19. What is more important for radiated power from cells - Size or geometry?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havelka, D.; Cifra, Michal; Vrba, J.

    Vol. 329. Bristol: IOP, 2011 - (Cifra, M.; Pokorny, J.; Kučera, O.), 012014 ISSN 1742-6588. [9th International Frohlich's Symposium on Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells - Including Microtubule Coherent Modes and Cancer Cell Physics. Praha (CZ), 01.07.2011-03.07.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP102/11/0649 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Cell size * Cytoskeletons * Comparative analysis Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  20. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bolkhovskaya, Olesya V.; Daniil Yu Zorin; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V.

    2014-01-01

    Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing d...

  1. Heteronanojunctions with atomic size control using a lab-on-chip electrochemical approach with integrated microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunca Popa, P.; Dalmas, G.; Faramarzi, V.; Dayen, J. F.; Majjad, H.; Kemp, N. T.; Doudin, B.

    2011-05-01

    A versatile tool for electrochemical fabrication of heteronanojunctions with nanocontacts made of a few atoms and nanogaps of molecular spacing is presented. By integrating microfluidic circuitry in a lab-on-chip approach, we keep control of the electrochemical environment in the vicinity of the nanojunction and add new versatility for exchanging and controlling the junction's medium. Nanocontacts made of various materials by successive local controlled depositions are demonstrated, with electrical properties revealing sizes reaching a few atoms only. Investigations on benchmark molecular electronics material, trapped between electrodes, reveal the possibility to create nanogaps of size matching those of molecules. We illustrate the interest of a microfluidic approach by showing that exposure of a fabricated molecular junction to controlled high solvent flows can be used as a reliability criterion for the presence of molecular entities in a gap.

  2. Heteronanojunctions with atomic size control using a lab-on-chip electrochemical approach with integrated microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunca Popa, P; Dalmas, G; Faramarzi, V; Dayen, J F; Majjad, H; Doudin, B [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS-UdS, 23 rue du Loess, BP 43, 67034 Strasbourg (France); Kemp, N T, E-mail: petpo@ifm.liu.se, E-mail: bernard.doudin@ipcms.u-strasbg.fr [Department of Physics, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Kingston-upon-Hull, HU6 7RX (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-27

    A versatile tool for electrochemical fabrication of heteronanojunctions with nanocontacts made of a few atoms and nanogaps of molecular spacing is presented. By integrating microfluidic circuitry in a lab-on-chip approach, we keep control of the electrochemical environment in the vicinity of the nanojunction and add new versatility for exchanging and controlling the junction's medium. Nanocontacts made of various materials by successive local controlled depositions are demonstrated, with electrical properties revealing sizes reaching a few atoms only. Investigations on benchmark molecular electronics material, trapped between electrodes, reveal the possibility to create nanogaps of size matching those of molecules. We illustrate the interest of a microfluidic approach by showing that exposure of a fabricated molecular junction to controlled high solvent flows can be used as a reliability criterion for the presence of molecular entities in a gap.

  3. Modeling size controlled nanoparticle precipitation with the co-solvency method by spinodal decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keßler, Simon; Schmid, Friederike; Drese, Klaus

    2016-09-14

    The co-solvency method is a method for the size controlled preparation of nanoparticles like polymersomes, where a poor co-solvent is mixed into a homogeneous copolymer solution to trigger precipitation of the polymer. The size of the resulting particles is determined by the rate of co-solvent addition. We use the Cahn-Hilliard equation with a Flory-Huggins free energy model to describe the precipitation of a polymer under changing solvent quality by applying a time dependent Flory-Huggins interaction parameter. The analysis focuses on the characteristic size R of polymer aggregates that form during the initial spinodal decomposition stage, and especially on how R depends on the rate s of solvent quality change. Both numerical results and a perturbation analysis predict a power law dependence R∼s(-⅙), which is in agreement with power laws for the final particle sizes that have been reported from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. Hence, our model results suggest that the nanoparticle size in size-controlled precipitation is essentially determined during the spinodal decomposition stage. PMID:27502026

  4. Dynamic template size control in digital image correlation based strain measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koljonen, Janne; Kanniainen, Olli; Alander, Jarmo T.

    2007-09-01

    Image matching is a common procedure in computer vision. Usually the size of the image template is fixed. If the matching is done repeatedly, as e.g. in stereo vision, object tracking, and strain measurements, it is beneficial, in terms of computational cost, to use as small templates as possible. On the other hand larger templates usually give more reliable matches, unless e.g. projective distortions become too great. If the template size is controlled locally dynamically, both computational efficiency and reliability can be achieved simultaneously. Adaptive template size requires though that a larger template can be sampled anytime. This paper introduces a method to adaptively control the template size in a digital image correlation based strain measurement algorithm. The control inputs are measures of confidence of match. Some new measures are proposed in this paper, and the ones found in the literature are reviewed. The measures of confidence are tested and compared with each other as well as with a reference method using templates of fixed size. The comparison is done with respect to computational complexity and accuracy of the algorithm. Due to complex inter-actions of the free parameters of the algorithm, random search is used to find an optimal parameter combination to attain a more reliable comparison. The results show that with some confidence measures the dynamic scheme outperforms the static reference method. However, in order to benefit from the dynamic scheme, optimization of the parameters is needed.

  5. Control of differentiation of melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop the method to induce the appearance of differentiation in amelanotic melanoma, experimental control of differentiation in B-16 melanoma cells of mice was discussed. Human melanoma cells and yellow melanin pigment cells useful for a fundamental study of radiotherapy for cancer were cultured and were differentiated into some lines. Melanotic B-16 cells and amelanotic B-16 cells were irradiated with thermal neutron (neutron: 2.7 x 1012, γ-dose: 32.3 rad) after they were cultured in culture solution containing 10 γ/ml of 10B-dopa for 13 hours. A fine structure 5 hours after the irradiation in one of 5 experimental cases showed aggregated disintegration of melanin pigment particles, markedly deformed and fragmentized nucleus, and structural changes in cell membrane. (Tsunoda, M.)

  6. Size-controllable Ni5TiO7 nanowires as promising catalysts for CO oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Yanan Jiang; Baodan Liu; Lini Yang; Bing Yang; Xiaoyuan Liu; Lusheng Liu; Christian Weimer; Xin jiang

    2015-01-01

    Ni5TiO7 nanowires with controllable sizes are synthesized using PEO method combined with impregnation and annealing at 1050oC in air, with adjustment of different concentrations of impregnating solution to control the dimension of nanowires. The resulting nanowires are characterized in details using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. In addition, the CO catalytic oxidation performance of the Ni5TiO7 nanowires...

  7. Modeling, analysis and control of fuel cell hybrid power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Kyung Won

    due to the conflicting objectives. The compromise can be mitigated by augmenting the fuel cell power system with an energy buffer such as a battery. We consider two different and popular ways of connecting the battery and the fuel cell to the load and we refer to them as electric architectures. Various controller gains are used to span the fuel cell operation from load-following to load-leveling, and hence, to determine adequate fuel cell-battery sizing (hybridization level) and the associated trends in the system efficiency.

  8. Particle size and crystallographic orientation controlled electrodeposition of platinum nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Particle size controlled electrodeposition of platinum on carbon nanotubes. • Control on crystallographic orientation of platinum surface is demonstrated. • Catalytic activity shows considerable dependence on crystallographic orientation. - Abstract: Platinum-coated carbon nanotubes (Pt/CNTs) with desired particle size and preferred surface crystallographic orientations have a variety of applications in diverse fields. Pt/CNTs having uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles are synthesized via electrodeposition route using CNT coated carbon fiber as the working electrode and H2PtCl6.6H2O as Pt precursor. Particle size and crystallographic orientation of Pt nanoparticles are controlled by using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as the protecting agent during electrodeposition in H2SO4 or HCl containing coating baths. Cyclic voltammetric study and X-ray diffraction analysis suggest Pt(100) surface enrichment of Pt nanoparticles in presence of PVP, which increases with increasing PVP concentration. Although the Pt deposition rate decreases significantly in presence of Cl− ions, the enrichment effect is observed both in the H2SO4 as well as the HCl containing baths. The Pt/CNT synthesized in presence of PVP exhibit higher oxygen reduction reaction activity (acidic media) and methanol oxidation activity compared to that synthesized without PVP. The process may be utilized to synthesize Pt based electrocatalysts with controlled particle size and preferred surface orientation

  9. An efficient step-size control method in numerical integration for astrodynamical equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. Z.; Cui, D. X.

    2002-11-01

    Using the curvature of the integral curve, a step-size control method is introduced in this paper. This method will prove to be the efficient scheme in the sense that it saves computation time and improve accuracy of numerical integration.

  10. Size-controlled synthesis of monodisperse nickel nanoparticles and investigation of their magnetic and catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yuan; Jia, Rongrong; Zhao, Jinchong; Liang, Jilei; Liu, Yunqi, E-mail: liuyq@upc.edu.cn; Liu, Chenguang

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Monodisperse nickel nanoparticles (NPs) with different size were synthesized via the thermal decomposition approach. • The size of nickel NPs can easily be controlled by changing synthetic conditions. • The possible growth mechanism of nickel NPs was proposed. • The as-synthesized nickel NPs exhibited superparamagnetism characteristics at room temperature, and the saturation magnetization increased significantly with increasing size of the nickel NPs. • The dehydrogenation reaction of cyclohexane on nickel NPs was structure sensitive reaction. - Abstract: Monodisperse nickel nanoparticles (NPs) with different size were synthesized via the thermal decomposition approach using nickel acetylacetonate as precursors and trioctylphosphine as surfactant in oleylamine. The structure and morphology of as-synthesized nickel NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The surface states of as-synthesized nickel NPs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra. The textural properties of as-synthesized nickel NPs were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption. The size of as-synthesized nickel NPs was found to be easily controlled by changing synthetic conditions, including P:Ni precursor ratio, reaction temperature, reaction time and oleylamine quantity, and the possible growth mechanism of nickel NPs was proposed. In addition, the magnetic measurements showed that the as-synthesized nickel NPs exhibited superparamagnetism characteristics at room temperature, and the saturation magnetization increased significantly with the increase in nickel NPs’ size. Finally, the size-dependent catalytic properties of nickel NPs for cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction were studied. The results demonstrated that the catalytic activity can be enhanced by decreasing the size of NPs, which indicated that the dehydrogenation

  11. Control of cell volume in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A; Huang, Christopher L-H; Fraser, James A

    2009-02-01

    Regulation of cell volume is a fundamental property of all animal cells and is of particular importance in skeletal muscle where exercise is associated with a wide range of cellular changes that would be expected to influence cell volume. These complex electrical, metabolic and osmotic changes, however, make rigorous study of the consequences of individual factors on muscle volume difficult despite their likely importance during exercise. Recent charge-difference modelling of cell volume distinguishes three major aspects to processes underlying cell volume control: (i) determination by intracellular impermeant solute; (ii) maintenance by metabolically dependent processes directly balancing passive solute and water fluxes that would otherwise cause cell swelling under the influence of intracellular membrane-impermeant solutes; and (iii) volume regulation often involving reversible short-term transmembrane solute transport processes correcting cell volumes towards their normal baselines in response to imposed discrete perturbations. This review covers, in turn, the main predictions from such quantitative analysis and the experimental consequences of comparable alterations in extracellular pH, lactate concentration, membrane potential and extracellular tonicity. The effects of such alterations in the extracellular environment in resting amphibian muscles are then used to reproduce the intracellular changes that occur in each case in exercising muscle. The relative contributions of these various factors to the control of cell volume in resting and exercising skeletal muscle are thus described. PMID:19133959

  12. Iso-acoustic focusing of cells for size-insensitive acousto-mechanical phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustsson, Per; Karlsen, Jonas T.; Su, Hao-Wei; Bruus, Henrik; Voldman, Joel

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical phenotyping of single cells is an emerging tool for cell classification, enabling assessment of effective parameters relating to cells' interior molecular content and structure. Here, we present iso-acoustic focusing, an equilibrium method to analyze the effective acoustic impedance of single cells in continuous flow. While flowing through a microchannel, cells migrate sideways, influenced by an acoustic field, into streams of increasing acoustic impedance, until reaching their cell-type specific point of zero acoustic contrast. We establish an experimental procedure and provide theoretical justifications and models for iso-acoustic focusing. We describe a method for providing a suitable acoustic contrast gradient in a cell-friendly medium, and use acoustic forces to maintain that gradient in the presence of destabilizing forces. Applying this method we demonstrate iso-acoustic focusing of cell lines and leukocytes, showing that acoustic properties provide phenotypic information independent of size.

  13. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-08-31

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, peripheral T cells expressing a TCR with low avidity for self-antigens were strongly reduced, whereas an overall impairment of T-cell activation by weak antigenic stimulation was observed. Mechanistically, Nck deletion resulted in a significant decrease in calcium mobilization and ERK phosphorylation upon TCR engagement. Taken together, our findings unveil a crucial role for the Nck adaptors in shaping the T-cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage and optimal T cell excitability. PMID:20709959

  14. Comparison of Cell Viability and Embryoid Body Size of Two Embryonic Stem Cell Lines After Different Exposure Times to Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehleh Zarei Fard

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 signaling pathway in embryonic stem (ES cells plays an important role in controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adverse effects of BMP4 occur in a time dependent manner; however, little is known about the effect of different time exposure of this growth factor on cell number in culture media. In this study, we investigated the role of two different exposure times to BMP4 in cell viability, embryoid body (EB, size, and cavitation of ES cells. Methods: Embryonic stem cells (R1 and B1 lines were released from the feeder cell layers and were cultured using EBs protocol by using the hanging drop method and monolayer culture system. The cells were cultured for 5 days with 100 ng/mL BMP4 from the beginning (++BMP4 or after 48 h (+BMP4 of culture and their cell number were counted by trypan blue staining. The data were analyzed using non-parametric two-tailed Mann-Whitney test. P<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: In EB culture protocol, cell number significantly decreased in +BMP4 culture condition with greater cavity size compared to the ++BMP4 condition at day 5 (P=0.009. In contrast, in monolayer culture system, there was no significant difference in the cell number between all groups (P=0.91. Conclusion: The results suggest that short-term exposure of BMP4 is required to promote cavitation in EBs according to lower cell number in +BMP4 condition. Different cell lines showed different behavior in cavitation formation.

  15. Flow perfusion culture of human mesenchymal stem cells on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with various pore sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Lea; Bünger, Cody; Baatrup, Anette;

    2011-01-01

    study was to obtain a clinically relevant substitute size using a direct perfusion culture system. Human bone marrowderived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with 200 μm or 500 μm pores, and resulting constructs were cultured in a perfusion bioreactor or in static...... μm ones. Adhesion and proliferation of the cells was seen on both scaffold sizes, but the vitality and morphology of cells changed unfavorably during perfusion culture. In contrast to previous studies using spinner flask that show increased cellularity and osteogenic properties of cells when cultured...... scaffolds. Our conclusion is that the specific scaffold surface microstructure and culturing system flow dynamics has a great impact on cell distribution and proliferation and on osteogenic differentiation, and the data presented warrant careful selection of in vitro culture settings to meet the specific...

  16. Cellular size as a means of tracking mTOR activity and cell fate of CD4+ T cells upon antigen recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Pollizzi

    Full Text Available mTOR is a central integrator of metabolic and immunological stimuli, dictating immune cell activation, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we demonstrate that within a clonal population of activated T cells, there exist both mTORhi and mTORlo cells exhibiting highly divergent metabolic and immunologic functions. By taking advantage of the role of mTOR activation in controlling cellular size, we demonstrate that upon antigen recognition, mTORhi CD4+ T cells are destined to become highly glycolytic effector cells. Conversely, mTORlo T cells preferentially develop into long-lived cells that express high levels of Bcl-2, CD25, and CD62L. Furthermore, mTORlo T cells have a greater propensity to differentiate into suppressive Foxp3+ T regulatory cells, and this paradigm was also observed in human CD4+ T cells. Overall, these studies provide the opportunity to track the development of effector and memory T cells from naïve precursors, as well as facilitate the interrogation of immunologic and metabolic programs that inform these fates.

  17. Analysis of Particle Size Control in the Preparation of Nano-size CaCO3 Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹维良; 王泽; 张敬畅

    2003-01-01

    Cubic shaped CaCO3 particles with mean size of 30-40nm were prepared by intermittent carbonation process without any additives. It was found that the flow rate of CO2 has no distinct influence on the particle size in the range of 30 120ml·min-1 under conditions of 13℃ and stirring rate of 680r·min-1. A further increase of flow rate makes the particles larger. When CO2 flow rate is 70ml·min-1, a high agitation rate is in favor of the reduction of the crystal size in the range of 70-680 r·min-1. When flow rate is 120 ml·min-1, the particles prepared at agitation rates of 680r·min-1 and 280r·min-1 have similar sizes, while products prepared at 90r·min-1 have larger size.

  18. Elevator Sizing, Placement, and Control-Relevant Tradeoffs for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickeson, Jeffrey J.; Rodriguez, Armando A.; Sridharan, Srikanth; Korad, Akshay

    2010-01-01

    Within this paper, control-relevant vehicle design concepts are examined using a widely used 3 DOF (plus flexibility) nonlinear model for the longitudinal dynamics of a generic carrot-shaped scramjet powered hypersonic vehicle. The impact of elevator size and placement on control-relevant static properties (e.g. level-flight trimmable region, trim controls, Angle of Attack (AOA), thrust margin) and dynamic properties (e.g. instability and right half plane zero associated with flight path angle) are examined. Elevator usage has been examine for a class of typical hypersonic trajectories.

  19. Cell shape regulation through mechanosensory feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Krithika; Luo, Tianzhi; Robinson, Douglas N; Iglesias, Pablo A

    2015-08-01

    Cells undergo controlled changes in morphology in response to intracellular and extracellular signals. These changes require a means for sensing and interpreting the signalling cues, for generating the forces that act on the cell's physical material, and a control system to regulate this process. Experiments on Dictyostelium amoebae have shown that force-generating proteins can localize in response to external mechanical perturbations. This mechanosensing, and the ensuing mechanical feedback, plays an important role in minimizing the effect of mechanical disturbances in the course of changes in cell shape, especially during cell division, and likely in other contexts, such as during three-dimensional migration. Owing to the complexity of the feedback system, which couples mechanical and biochemical signals involved in shape regulation, theoretical approaches can guide further investigation by providing insights that are difficult to decipher experimentally. Here, we present a computational model that explains the different mechanosensory and mechanoresponsive behaviours observed in Dictyostelium cells. The model features a multiscale description of myosin II bipolar thick filament assembly that includes cooperative and force-dependent myosin-actin binding, and identifies the feedback mechanisms hidden in the observed mechanoresponsive behaviours of Dictyostelium cells during micropipette aspiration experiments. These feedbacks provide a mechanistic explanation of cellular retraction and hence cell shape regulation. PMID:26224568

  20. Wnt signaling and stem cell control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roel Nusse

    2008-01-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in the control over various types of stem cells and may act as a niche factor to maintain stem cells in a self-renewing state.As currently understood,Wnt proteins bind to receptors of the Frizzled and LRP families on the cell surface.Through several cytoplasmic relay components,the signal is transduced to B-catenin,which then enters the nucleus and forms a complex with TCF to activate transcription of Wnt target genes.Wnts can also signal through tyrosine kinase receptors,in particular the ROR and RYK receptors,leading to alternative modes of Wnt signaling.During the growth of tissues,these ligands and receptors are dynamically expressed,often transcriptionally controlled by Wnt signals themselves,to ensure the right balance between proliferation and differentiation.Isolated Wnt proteins are active on a variety of stem cells,including neural,mammary and embryonic stem cells.In general,Wnt proteins act to maintain the undifferentiated state of stem cells,while other growth factors instruct the cells to proliferate.These other factors include FGF and EGF,signaling through tyrosine kinase pathways.

  1. Syringe and Needle Size, Syringe Type, Vacuum Generation, and Needle Control in Aspiration Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Syringes are used for diagnostic fluid aspiration and fine-needle aspiration biopsy in interventional procedures. We determined the benefits, disadvantages, and patient safety implications of syringe and needle size on vacuum generation, hand force requirements, biopsy/fluid yield, and needle control during aspiration procedures. Materials and Methods: Different sizes (1, 3, 5, 10, and 20 ml) of the conventional syringe and aspirating mechanical safety syringe, the reciprocating procedure device, were studied. Twenty operators performed aspiration procedures with the following outcomes measured: (1) vacuum (torr), (2) time to vacuum (s), (3) hand force to generate vacuum (torr-cm2), (4) operator difficulty during aspiration, (5) biopsy yield (mg), and (6) operator control of the needle tip position (mm). Results: Vacuum increased tissue biopsy yield at all needle diameters (P < 0.002). Twenty-milliliter syringes achieved a vacuum of −517 torr but required far more strength to aspirate, and resulted in significant loss of needle control (P < 0.002). The 10-ml syringe generated only 15% less vacuum (−435 torr) than the 20-ml device and required much less hand strength. The mechanical syringe generated identical vacuum at all syringe sizes with less hand force (P < 0.002) and provided significantly enhanced needle control (P < 0.002). Conclusions: To optimize patient safety and control of the needle, and to maximize fluid and tissue yield during aspiration procedures, a two-handed technique and the smallest syringe size adequate for the procedure should be used. If precise needle control or one-handed operation is required, a mechanical safety syringe should be considered.

  2. Size effects of potato waste on its treatment by microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Haixia; Li, Fusheng

    2016-05-01

    The performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC) in treating potato cubes with different sizes (the edge size of 3, 5 and 7 mm) was investigated. Current density was found lower as the size of potato cubes increased, even if the differences in their removal were less apparent. At the end of MFC operation for 81 days, both total and soluble chemical oxygen demand reached nearly identical values, irrespective of the potato sizes; and citrate and isobutyrate were two major organic acids remaining in the solutions. Bacterial community analysis using polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing indicated that bacterial species on the anode and in the anodic solution were similar and did not change obviously with potato sizes, and that, in similarity with previous studies on potato-processing wastewater treatment, Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were two dominating phyla. Geobacter was found richer on the anode than in the anodic solutions. PMID:26583755

  3. Small-Size Resonant Photoacoustic Cell of Inclined Geometry for Gas Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelik, A V; Nikonovich, F N; Zakharich, M P; Chebotar, A I; Firago, V A; Stetsik, V M; Kazak, N S; Starovoitov, V S

    2009-01-01

    A photoacoustic cell intended for laser detection of trace gases is represented. The cell is adapted so as to enhance the gas-detection performance and, simultaneously, to reduce the cell size. The cell design provides an efficient cancellation of the window background (a parasite response due to absorption of laser beam in the cell windows) and acoustic isolation from the environment for an acoustic resonance of the cell. The useful photoacoustic response from a detected gas, window background and noise are analyzed in demonstration experiments as functions of the modulation frequency for a prototype cell with the internal volume ~ 0.5 cm^3. The minimal detectable absorption for the prototype is estimated to be ~ 1.2 10^{-8} cm^{-1} W Hz^{-1/2}.

  4. Austenite grain size control of a hot working tool steel by addition of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The substitution of vanadium by niobium for controlling the austenite grain size of a hot working tool steel was studied, using the addition of the same atomic percentage as a criterion. The austenitising temperatures ranged from 850 to 1.2000C. At low austenitising temperature, both vanadium and niobium are effective in producing small grain size. At high austenitising temperatures, niobium was more effective than vanadium. Possible causes of this difference and the occurrence of coarse niobium carbide in the niobium steel are discussed on the basis of the difference in solubility between niobium and vanadium carbides

  5. Preparation of size-controlled tungsten oxide nanoparticles and evaluation of their adsorption performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study investigated the effects of particle size on the adsorption performance of tungsten oxide nanoparticles. Nanoparticles 18-73 nm in diameter were prepared by evaporation of bulk tungsten oxide particles using a flame spray process. Annealing plasma-made tungsten oxide nanoparticles produced particles with diameters of 7-19 nm. The mechanism of nanoparticle formation for each synthetic route was examined. The low-cost, solid-fed flame process readily produced highly crystalline tungsten oxide nanoparticles with controllable size and a remarkably high adsorption capability. These nanoparticles are comparable to those prepared using the more expensive plasma process.

  6. Measurement and chemical kinetic model predictions of detonation cell size in methanol-oxygen mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, R.; Zhang, B.; Bergthorson, J. M.; Ng, H. D.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, detonation cell sizes of methanol-oxygen mixtures are experimentally measured at different initial pressures and compositions. Good agreement is found between the experiment data and predictions based on the chemical length scales obtained from a detailed chemical kinetic model. To assess the detonation sensitivity in methanol-oxygen mixtures, the results are compared with those of hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures. Based on the cell size comparison, it is shown that methanol-oxygen is more detonation sensitive than methane-oxygen but less sensitive than hydrogen-oxygen.

  7. Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE into a bilayer. The ...

  8. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.;

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that coll...... cell wall insertion to produce curved growth. Our study suggests that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology......The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that...

  9. Replicon sizes in mammalian cells as estimated by an x-ray plus bromodeoxyuridine photolysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method is described for estimating replicon sizes in mammalian cells. Cultures were pulse labeled with [3H]thymidine ([3H]TdR) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrDUrd) for up to 1 h. The lengths of the resulting labeled regions of DNA, L/sub obs/, were estimated by a technique wherein the change in molecular weight of nascent DNA strands, induced by 313 nm light, is measured by velocity sedimentation in alkaline sucrose gradients. If cells are exposed to 1,000 rads of x rays immediately before pulse labeling, initiation of replicon operation is blocked, although chain elongation proceeds almost normally. Under these conditions L/sub obs/ continues to increase only until operating replicons have completed their replication. This value for L/sub obs/ then remains constant as long as the block to initiation remains and represents an estimate for the average size of replicons operating in the cells before x irradiation. For human diploid fibroblasts and human HeLa cells this estimated average size is approximately 17 μM, whereas for Chinese hamster ovary cells, the average replicon size is about 42 μM

  10. Distributed Active Traction Control System Applied to the RoboCup Middle Size League

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Almeida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the problem of traction control in mobile wheeled robots in the particular case of the RoboCup Middle Size League (MSL. The slip control problem is formulated using simple friction models for ISePorto Team Robots with a differential wheel configuration. Traction was also characterized experimentally in the MSL scenario for relevant game events. This work proposes a hierarchical traction control architecture which relies on local slip detection and control at each wheel, with relevant information being relayed to a higher level responsible for global robot motion control. A dedicated one axis control embedded hardware subsystem allowing complex local control, high frequency current sensing and odometric information procession was developed. This local axis control board is integrated in a distributed system using CAN bus communications. The slipping observer was implemented in the axis control hardware nodes integrated in the ISePorto Robots and was used to control and detect loss of traction. An external vision system was used to perform a qualitative analysis of the slip detection and observer performance results are presented.

  11. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzold, Julia; Conradt, Barbara

    2008-04-01

    Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death) are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well. PMID:18399720

  12. Evaluating the control software for CTA in a medium size telescope prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array) is one of the largest ground-based astronomy projects being pursued and will be the largest facility for ground-based γ-ray observations ever built. CTA will consist of two arrays (one in the Northern hemisphere and one in the Southern hemisphere) composed of telescopes of several sizes. A prototype for the Medium Size Telescope (MST) of a diameter of 12 m will be installed in Berlin by the end of 2012. This MST prototype will be composed of the mechanical structure, drive system and mirror facets mounted with powered actuators to enable active control. Five Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) cameras and a weather station will allow the measurement of the performance of the instrument. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Common Software (ACS) distributed control framework is currently being considered by the CTA consortium to serve as the array control middleware. In order to evaluate the ACS software, it has been decided to implement an ACS-based readout and control system for the MST prototype. The design of the control software is following the concepts and tools under evaluation within the CTA consortium, like the use of a Unified Modeling Language (UML) based code generation framework for ACS component modeling, and the use of OPen Connectivity-Unified Architecture (OPC UA) for hardware access. In this contribution, the progress in the implementation of the control system for this CTA prototype telescope is described.

  13. Controlled synthesis and size-dependent thermal conductivity of Fe3O4 magnetic nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baodui; Wang, Baogang; Wei, Pengfei; Wang, Xiaobo; Lou, Wenjing

    2012-01-21

    The effect of nanoparticle size (4~44 nm) on the thermal conductivities of heat transfer oils has been systematically examined using iron oxide nanoparticles. Such Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple one-pot pyrolysis method. The size (16~44 nm), shape and assembly patterns of monodisperse Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were modulated by only controlling the amount of Fe(acac)(3). After the as-prepared Fe(3)O(4) NPs were dispersed in heat transfer oils, the prepared magnetic nanofluids exhibit higher thermal conductivity than heat transfer oils, and the enhanced values increase with a decrease in particle size. In addition, the viscosities of all nanofliuids are remarkably lower than that of the base fluid, which has been found for the first time in the nanofluid field. The promising features offer potential application in thermal energy engineering. PMID:22086086

  14. Nanoscaffold matrices for size-controlled, pulsatile transdermal testosterone delivery: nanosize effects on the time dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsatile transdermal testosterone (T) has applications in hormone supplementation and male contraception. Pulsatile T delivery was achieved by assembling crystalline and nanoparticulate T in nucleation-inhibiting polymer matrices of controlled porosity. Different interference patterns observed from various polymeric films containing T were due to the various particle sizes of T present in the polymer matrices. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the size and shape of T crystals. Skin-adherent films containing T nanoparticles of any size between 10-500 nm could be prepared using pharmaceutically acceptable vinylic polymers. Drug release and skin permeation profiles were studied. The dissolution-diffusion behavior of nanoparticles differed from crystalline and molecular states. Nanosize may thus be used to engineer chronopharmacologically relevant drug delivery.

  15. Controlling Pore Size and its Distribution of γ-Al2O3 Nanofiltration Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Chun XIONG; Xiao Dong LEI; Gang WEI

    2003-01-01

    The preparation process of γ-Al2O3 nanofiltration membranes were studied by N2absorption and desorption test and retention rate vs thickness gradient curve method. It was foundthat template and thermal treatment were key factors for controlling pore size and its distribution.Under the optimized experimental conditions, the BJH (Barret-Joyner-Halenda) desorption averagepore diameter, BJH desorption cumulative volume of pores and BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller)surface area of obtained membranes were about 3.9 nm, 0.33 cm3/g and 245 m2/g respectively, thepore size distribution was very narrow. Pore size decreased with the increasing of thickness andno evident change after the dense top layer was formed. The optimum thickness can becontrolled by retention rate vs thickness gradient curve method.

  16. Size controlled biogenic silver nanoparticles as antibacterial agent against isolates from HIV infected patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganya, K. S. Uma; Govindaraju, K.; Kumar, V. Ganesh; Dhas, T. Stalin; Karthick, V.; Singaravelu, G.; Elanchezhiyan, M.

    2015-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are synthesized using biological sources due to its high specificity in biomedical applications. Herein, we report the size and shape controlled synthesis of AgNPs using the aqueous extract of blue green alga, Spirulina platensis. Size, shape and elemental composition of AgNPs were characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy, FT-IR (Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy), FT-RS (Fourier Transform-Raman Spectroscopy), SEM-EDAX (Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis) and HR-TEM (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy). AgNPs were stable, well defined and monodispersed (spherical) with an average size of 6 nm. The synthesized AgNPs were tested for its antibacterial potency against isolates obtained from HIV patients.

  17. Controlling DNA Bundle Size and Spatial Arrangement in Self-assembled Arrays on Superhydrophobic Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriele Ciasca; Luca Businaro; Marco De Spirito; Massimiliano Papi; Valentina Palmieri; Michela Chiarpotto; Simone Di Claudio; Adele De Ninno; Ennio Giovine; Gaetano Campi; Annamaria Gerardino

    2015-01-01

    The use of superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) is now emerging as an attractive platform for the realization of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with potential applications in many nanotechnological and biotechnological fields. To this purpose, a strict control of the nanostructures size and their spatial arrangement is highly required. However, these parameters may be strongly dependent on the complex evaporation dynamics of the sessile droplet on the SHS. In this work, we investigated the effect of the evaporation dynamics on the size and the spatial arrangement of self-assembled 1D DNA bundles. Our results reveal that different arrangements and bundle size distributions may occur depending on droplet evaporation stage. These results contribute to elucidate the formation mechanism of 1D nanostructures on SHSs.

  18. Microstructural study and size control of iron oxide nanoparticles produced by microemulsion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutzarova, T.; Kolev, S.; Ghelev, Ch.; Paneva, D.; Nedkov, I.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper we study the possibility to control the size of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles by the microemulsion technique. We used a water-in-oil reverse microemulsion system with n-hexadecil trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a cationic surfactant, n-butanol as a co-surfactant, n-hexanol as a continuous oil phase, and aqueous phase. The magnetite nanopowders were synthesized by a single microemulsion technique in which the aqueous phase contains only metal ions (Fe2+ and Fe3+). The particle size of the powders varied in the range of 14-36 nm depending on the preparation conditions. We studied the influence of changing the water/surfactant ratio (W 0 = 5, 10, 15, 20) and the metallic ion (Fe2+ and Fe3+) concentration on the particle size distribution and crystallinity of Fe3O4.

  19. Shape-controlled synthesis of highly monodisperse and small size gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU YunZhi; DU YuKou; YANG Ping; LI JinRu; JIANG Long

    2007-01-01

    We describe here that fine control of nanoparticle shape and size can be achieved by systematic variation of experimental parameters in the seeded growth procedure in aqueous solution. Cubic and spherical gold nanoparticles are obtained respectively. In particularly, the Au cubes are highly monodisperse in 33±2 nm diameter. The experimental methods involve the preparation of Au seed particles and the subsequent addition of an appropriate quantity of Au seed solution to the aqueous growth solutions containing desired quantities of CTAB and ascorbic acid (AA). Here, AA is a weak reducing agent and CTAB is not only a stable agent for nanoparticles but also an inductive agent for leading increase in the face of nanoparticle. Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to characterize the nanoparticles. The results show that the different size gold nanoparticles displayed high size homogenous distribution and formed mono-membrane at the air/solid interface.

  20. A Concept for the Control of Pore Size in Superalloy Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Rösler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method to adjust the pore size in superalloy membranes is shown, utilizing controlled cooling from solution heat treatment of the solid superalloy. Hereby, the nucleation rate and, thus, the size of the γ'-precipitates can be varied to a large extent. This leads to a corresponding variation in the pore size once the membrane material is produced by directional coarsening of the γ'-phase to an interconnected network and subsequent selective extraction of the γ-phase. Furthermore, it was found that coherent and incoherent γ'-precipitates can be used alike to fabricate superalloy membranes, and yet, result in vastly different pore morphologies. The findings widen the application range of this novel material class.

  1. Dendritic field size and morphology of midget and parasol ganglion cells of the human retina.

    OpenAIRE

    Dacey, D M; Petersen, M R

    1992-01-01

    The visual system of the macaque monkey has provided a useful model for understanding the neural basis of human vision, yet, there are few detailed comparisons of neural populations other than photoreceptors for the two species. Using intracellular staining in an in vitro preparation of the isolated and intact human retina, we have characterized the relationship of dendritic field size to retinal eccentricity for the two major ganglion cell classes, the midget and the parasol cells. We report...

  2. Optimization and Evaluation of a Novel Size Based Circulating Tumor Cell Isolation System

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Xu; Xueying Mao; Ahmet Imrali; Ferrial Syed; Katherine Mutsvangwa; Daniel Berney; Paul Cathcart; John Hines; Jonathan Shamash; Yong-Jie Lu

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from peripheral blood has the potential to provide a far easier "liquid biopsy" than tumor tissue biopsies, to monitor tumor cell populations during disease progression and in response to therapies. Many CTC isolation technologies have been developed. We optimized the Parsortix system, an epitope independent, size and compressibility-based platform for CTCs isolation, making it possible to harvest CTCs at the speed and sample volume comparable to st...

  3. Plasmonic nanoparticle films for solar cell applications fabricated by size-selective aerosol deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, T.V.; Ortiz Gonzalez, J.; Santbergen, R.; Tan, H.; Schmidt-Ott, A.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    A soft deposition method for incorporating surface plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles within photovoltaic devices was studied. This self-assembly method provides excellent control over both nanoparticle size and surface coverage. Films of spherical Ag nanoparticles with diameter of ∼100 nm were fabricated by depositing size-selected aerosols on various substrates using electrophoresis. This novel deposition method opens the route to embed plasmonic nanoparticles in the intermediate reflecto...

  4. Optimal synthesis and magnetic properties of size-controlled nickel phosphide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A pulse discharge method was used to synthesize noncrystalline Ni-P nanoparticles. • Size controlled nanoparticles were prepared through adjustment of reaction parameters. • Local structures both centered around Ni and P atoms were investigated including coordinated atoms and bondlengths. • Magnetic properties of the nickel phosphide nanoparticles are found to be ferromagnetic and size-dependent. - Abstract: Pulse discharge method was used in liquid phase to prepare nickel phosphide nanoparticles. The size and morphology of the as-prepared nanoparticles were found to be easily controlled through changing reaction parameters such as temperature, reactants concentration, reactants molar ratio, pulse discharge number, and pulse discharge voltage. The optimal reaction parameters have been obtained by single-factor experiments. X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure spectra, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope, and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrum were used to characterize the as-prepared Ni–P nanoparticles. Vibrating Sample Magnetometer was used as magnetic measurements of the Ni–P nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the as-prepared Ni–P nanoparticles are in amorphous phase, and consist of Ni and P elements. The P-content in the as-prepared Ni–P nanoparticles increases with the increasing of Ni–P particle size, and is independent on the initial concentration of P-concentration in the reaction solution. The Ni–P nanoparticles have totally about 12 near-neighbors of Ni–Ni and Ni–P around center Ni. The Ni–Ni distance increases with the increasing particle size. The as-prepared Ni–P nanoparticles present paramagnetic nature. Their saturated magnetizations are also size-dependent. The larger Ni–P particles has lower saturated magnetization, which can be attributed to the entrance of P into Ni lattice, causing a larger Ni–Ni separation and a looser, distorted local atomic structure

  5. TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  6. Effect of hydroxyapatite particle size, morphology and crystallinity on proliferation of colon cancer HCT116 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present work is to chemically and physically characterize the synthesized Hydroxyapatite (HAp) micro and nanoparticles and to explore the inhibitory effect of nano-HAps on the in vitro growth of human colon cancerous cells HCT116. HAp powder was synthesized using three different routes to achieve micro and nanosized powders, with different morphologies and crystallinity. The synthesized powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the average crystallite size of HAp powder varies from 11 nm to 177 nm and respective crystallinity of powder found to be in the range of 0.12 and 0.92. The effect of these physico-chemical properties of HAp powders on human colon cancer HCT116 cells inhibition was determined in vitro. It was found that decreasing the HAp powder crystallite size between 11 nm and 22 nm significantly increases the HCT116 cell inhibition. Our results demonstrate that apart from HAp powder size their crystallinity and morphology also play an important role in cellular inhibition of human colon cancer cells. - Highlights: • Chemically synthesized hydroxyapatite micro and nano-particles with different morphologies and crystallinity. • In vitro cell–material interaction showed that hydroxyapatite nano-particles inhibit colon cancer cells. • Human colon cancer cell inhibition also depends on crystallinity and morphology of HAp powder

  7. Effect of hydroxyapatite particle size, morphology and crystallinity on proliferation of colon cancer HCT116 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Sangeeta; Das, Mitun, E-mail: mitun@cgcri.res.in; Balla, Vamsi Krishna

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to chemically and physically characterize the synthesized Hydroxyapatite (HAp) micro and nanoparticles and to explore the inhibitory effect of nano-HAps on the in vitro growth of human colon cancerous cells HCT116. HAp powder was synthesized using three different routes to achieve micro and nanosized powders, with different morphologies and crystallinity. The synthesized powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the average crystallite size of HAp powder varies from 11 nm to 177 nm and respective crystallinity of powder found to be in the range of 0.12 and 0.92. The effect of these physico-chemical properties of HAp powders on human colon cancer HCT116 cells inhibition was determined in vitro. It was found that decreasing the HAp powder crystallite size between 11 nm and 22 nm significantly increases the HCT116 cell inhibition. Our results demonstrate that apart from HAp powder size their crystallinity and morphology also play an important role in cellular inhibition of human colon cancer cells. - Highlights: • Chemically synthesized hydroxyapatite micro and nano-particles with different morphologies and crystallinity. • In vitro cell–material interaction showed that hydroxyapatite nano-particles inhibit colon cancer cells. • Human colon cancer cell inhibition also depends on crystallinity and morphology of HAp powder.

  8. Design of polymeric stabilizers for size-controlled synthesis of monodisperse gold nanoparticles in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenxin; Tan, Bien; Hussain, Irshad; Schaeffer, Nicolas; Wyatt, Mark F; Brust, Mathias; Cooper, Andrew I

    2007-01-16

    A new methodology is described for the one-step aqueous preparation of highly monodisperse gold nanoparticles with diameters below 5 nm using thioether- and thiol-functionalized polymer ligands. The particle size and size distribution was controlled by subtle variation of the polymer structure. It was shown that poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) were the most effective stabilizing polymers in the group studied and that relatively low molar mass ligands (approximately 2500 g/mol) gave rise to the narrowest particle size distributions. Particle uniformity and colloidal stability to changes in ionic strength and pH were strongly affected by the hydrophobicity of the ligand end group. "Multidentate" thiol-terminated ligands were produced by employing dithiols and tetrathiols as chain-transfer agents, and these ligands gave rise to particles with unprecedented control over particle size and enhanced colloidal stability. It was found throughout that dynamic light scattering (DLS) is a very useful corroboratory technique for characterization of these gold nanoparticles in addition to optical spectroscopy and TEM. PMID:17209648

  9. Carbon-coated NiPt, CoPt nanoalloys: size control and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gendy, A.A. [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden (Germany); Hampel, S.; Leonhardt, A.; Khavrus, V.; Buechner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden (Germany); Klingeler, R. [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Controlled synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles with well-defined size and composition is always a challenge in material-based nanoscience. Here, we apply the high pressure chemical vapour deposition technique (HPCVD) to obtain carbon-shielded magnetic alloy nanoparticles under control of the particle size. Carbon encapsulated NiPt, CoPt (NiPt rate at C, CoPt rate at C) nanoalloys were synthesized by means of HPCVD starting from sublimating appropriate metal-organic precursors. Structural characterization by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffraction indicated the formation of coated bimetallic Ni{sub x}Pt{sub 100-x} and CoxPt{sub 100-x} nanoparticles. Adjusting the sublimation temperature of the different precursors allowed tuning the core sizes with small size distribution. In addition, detailed studies of the magnetic properties are presented. AC magnetic heating studies imply the potential of the coated nanoalloys for hyperthermia therapy.

  10. Mechanobiological induction of long-range contractility by diffusing biomolecules and size scaling in cell assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasbiswas, K.; Alster, E.; Safran, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanobiological studies of cell assemblies have generally focused on cells that are, in principle, identical. Here we predict theoretically the effect on cells in culture of locally introduced biochemical signals that diffuse and locally induce cytoskeletal contractility which is initially small. In steady-state, both the concentration profile of the signaling molecule as well as the contractility profile of the cell assembly are inhomogeneous, with a characteristic length that can be of the order of the system size. The long-range nature of this state originates in the elastic interactions of contractile cells (similar to long-range “macroscopic modes” in non-living elastic inclusions) and the non-linear diffusion of the signaling molecules, here termed mechanogens. We suggest model experiments on cell assemblies on substrates that can test the theory as a prelude to its applicability in embryo development where spatial gradients of morphogens initiate cellular development. PMID:27283037

  11. Mechanobiological induction of long-range contractility by diffusing biomolecules and size scaling in cell assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasbiswas, K; Alster, E; Safran, S A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanobiological studies of cell assemblies have generally focused on cells that are, in principle, identical. Here we predict theoretically the effect on cells in culture of locally introduced biochemical signals that diffuse and locally induce cytoskeletal contractility which is initially small. In steady-state, both the concentration profile of the signaling molecule as well as the contractility profile of the cell assembly are inhomogeneous, with a characteristic length that can be of the order of the system size. The long-range nature of this state originates in the elastic interactions of contractile cells (similar to long-range "macroscopic modes" in non-living elastic inclusions) and the non-linear diffusion of the signaling molecules, here termed mechanogens. We suggest model experiments on cell assemblies on substrates that can test the theory as a prelude to its applicability in embryo development where spatial gradients of morphogens initiate cellular development. PMID:27283037

  12. Mechanobiological induction of long-range contractility by diffusing biomolecules and size scaling in cell assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasbiswas, K.; Alster, E.; Safran, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Mechanobiological studies of cell assemblies have generally focused on cells that are, in principle, identical. Here we predict theoretically the effect on cells in culture of locally introduced biochemical signals that diffuse and locally induce cytoskeletal contractility which is initially small. In steady-state, both the concentration profile of the signaling molecule as well as the contractility profile of the cell assembly are inhomogeneous, with a characteristic length that can be of the order of the system size. The long-range nature of this state originates in the elastic interactions of contractile cells (similar to long-range “macroscopic modes” in non-living elastic inclusions) and the non-linear diffusion of the signaling molecules, here termed mechanogens. We suggest model experiments on cell assemblies on substrates that can test the theory as a prelude to its applicability in embryo development where spatial gradients of morphogens initiate cellular development.

  13. Size controllable synthesis of ultrafine spherical gold particles and their simulation of plasmonic and SERS behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and reproducible way was explored to synthesize quasi-spherical gold particles with different size distributions in water by rapidly adding a mixture solution of HAuCl4, sodium citrate, and a trace amount of silver nitrate. By careful tuning of the reaction parameters, mono-disperse gold particles with the diameter of 5–220 nm can be obtained controllably. The particle size of 130 nm for the particles film showed the highest SERS activity with the 632.8 nm excitation. The theoretical calculations of the UV–vis extinction spectra can be directly compared with experiments by using the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA). Control of nanostructure shape allows optimization of plasmon resonance for molecular detection and spectroscopy.

  14. A Method of MPPT Control Based on Power Variable Step-size in Photovoltaic Converter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Hui-xiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the disadvantage of traditional MPPT algorithms of variable step-size, proposed power tracking based on variable step-size with the advantage method of the constant-voltage and the perturb-observe (P&O[1-3]. The control strategy modify the problem of voltage fluctuation caused by perturb-observe method, at the same time, introducing the advantage of constant-voltage method and simplify the circuit topology. With the theoretical derivation, control the output power of photovoltaic modules to change the duty cycle of main switch. Achieve the maximum power stabilization output, reduce the volatility of energy loss effectively, and improve the inversion efficiency[3,4]. Given the result of experimental test based theoretical derivation and the curve of MPPT when the prototype work.

  15. Control of Alginate Core Size in Alginate-Poly (Lactic-Co-Glycolic) Acid Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Daniel; Yeo, David; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-12-01

    Core-shell alginate-poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microparticles are potential candidates to improve hydrophilic drug loading while facilitating controlled release. This report studies the influence of the alginate core size on the drug release profile of alginate-PLGA microparticles and its size. Microparticles are synthesized through double-emulsion fabrication via a concurrent ionotropic gelation and solvent extraction. The size of alginate core ranges from approximately 10, 50, to 100 μm when the emulsification method at the first step is homogenization, vortexing, or magnetic stirring, respectively. The second step emulsification for all three conditions is performed with magnetic stirring. Interestingly, although the alginate core has different sizes, alginate-PLGA microparticle diameter does not change. However, drug release profiles are dramatically different for microparticles comprising different-sized alginate cores. Specifically, taking calcein as a model drug, microparticles containing the smallest alginate core (10 μm) show the slowest release over a period of 26 days with burst release less than 1 %. PMID:26745977

  16. Simultaneous phase and size control of upconversion nanocrystals through lanthanide doping

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Feng

    2010-02-25

    Doping is a widely applied technological process in materials science that involves incorporating atoms or ions of appropriate elements into host lattices to yield hybrid materials with desirable properties and functions. For nanocrystalline materials, doping is of fundamental importance in stabilizing a specific crystallographic phase, modifying electronic properties, modulating magnetism as well as tuning emission properties. Here we describe a material system in which doping influences the growth process to give simultaneous control over the crystallographic phase, size and optical emission properties of the resulting nanocrystals. We show that NaYF 4 nanocrystals can be rationally tuned in size (down to ten nanometres), phase (cubic or hexagonal) and upconversion emission colour (green to blue) through use of trivalent lanthanide dopant ions introduced at precisely defined concentrations. We use first-principles calculations to confirm that the influence of lanthanide doping on crystal phase and size arises from a strong dependence on the size and dipole polarizability of the substitutional dopant ion. Our results suggest that the doping-induced structural and size transition, demonstrated here in NaYF 4 upconversion nanocrystals, could be extended to other lanthanide-doped nanocrystal systems for applications ranging from luminescent biological labels to volumetric three-dimensional displays. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  17. Control of Alginate Core Size in Alginate-Poly (Lactic-Co-Glycolic) Acid Microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Daniel; Yeo, David; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-01-01

    Core-shell alginate-poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microparticles are potential candidates to improve hydrophilic drug loading while facilitating controlled release. This report studies the influence of the alginate core size on the drug release profile of alginate-PLGA microparticles and its size. Microparticles are synthesized through double-emulsion fabrication via a concurrent ionotropic gelation and solvent extraction. The size of alginate core ranges from approximately 10, 50, to 100 μm when the emulsification method at the first step is homogenization, vortexing, or magnetic stirring, respectively. The second step emulsification for all three conditions is performed with magnetic stirring. Interestingly, although the alginate core has different sizes, alginate-PLGA microparticle diameter does not change. However, drug release profiles are dramatically different for microparticles comprising different-sized alginate cores. Specifically, taking calcein as a model drug, microparticles containing the smallest alginate core (10 μm) show the slowest release over a period of 26 days with burst release less than 1 %.

  18. Size and composition-controlled fabrication of VO2 nanocrystals by terminated cluster growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Slack, Jonathan

    2013-05-14

    A physical vapor deposition-based route for the fabrication of VO2 nanoparticles is demonstrated, consisting of reactive sputtering and vapor condensation at elevated pressures. The oxidation of vanadium atoms is an efficient heterogeneous nucleation method, leading to high nanoparticle throughtput. Fine control of the nanoparticle size and composition is obtained. Post growth annealing leads to crystalline VO2 nanoparticles with optimum thermocromic and plasmonic properties.

  19. The Wurst protein: A novel endocytosis regulator involved in airway clearance and respiratory tube size control

    OpenAIRE

    Wingen, Christian; Aschenbrenner, Anna C; Stümpges, Birgit; Hoch, Michael; Behr, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian lung and the Drosophila airways are composed of an intricate network of epithelial tubes that transports fluids or gases and converts during late embryogenesis from liquid- to air-filling. Conserved growth factor pathways have been characterized in model organisms such as Drosophila or the mouse that control patterning and branching of tubular networks. In contrast, knowledge of the coordination of respiratory tube size and physiology is still limited. Latest studies have shown ...

  20. Control of poly(styrene) particles size by in-situ polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styrene (St) was polymerized in mixed solvents of ethanol/n-hexane as good-poor solvents for matrix polymers such as poly (methylvinylether) (PMVE) in solution. Conformational change of the matrix polymer from extended to random coil structures provided different dimensional fields for in-situ polymerization of St, resulting in control of particle size and distribution of poly(St) (PSt). Neutron scattering of St solution suggested the formation of St monomer clusters in matrix polymer solution. (author)

  1. Reciprocal control of cell proliferation and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Donatis Alina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In adult tissue the quiescent state of a single cell is maintained by the steady state conditions of its own microenvironment for what concern both cell-cell as well as cell-ECM interaction and soluble factors concentration. Physiological or pathological conditions can alter this quiescent state through an imbalance of both soluble and insoluble factors that can trigger a cellular phenotypic response. The kind of cellular response depends by many factors but one of the most important is the concentration of soluble cytokines sensed by the target cell. In addition, due to the intrinsic plasticity of many cellular types, every single cell is able, in response to the same stimulus, to rapidly switch phenotype supporting minimal changes of microenviromental cytokines concentration. Wound healing is a typical condition in which epithelial, endothelial as well as mesenchymal cells are firstly subjected to activation of their motility in order to repopulate the damaged region and then they show a strong proliferative response in order to successfully complete the wound repair process. This schema constitute the leitmotif of many other physiological or pathological conditions such as development vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as well as cancer outgrowth and metastasis. Our review focuses on the molecular mechanisms that control the starting and, eventually, the switching of cellular phenotypic outcome in response to changes in the symmetry of the extracellular environment.

  2. Electric field control of the cell orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Christopher; Sabirianov, Renat

    2008-03-01

    Many physiological processes depend on the response of biological cells to external forces. The natural electric field at a wound controls the orientation of the cell and its division.[1] We model the cell as an elongated elliptical particle with given Young's modulus with surface charge distribution in the external electric field. Using this simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to electrostatics and the elasticity of cells, we calculated analytically the response of the cell orientation and its dynamics in the presence of time varying electric field. The calculations reflect many experimentally observed features. Our model predicts the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied electric field as a function of frequency similar to recent stress-induced effects.[2] *Bing Song, Min Zhao, John V. Forrester, and Colin D. McCaig, ``Electrical cues regulate the orientation and frequency of cell division and the rate of wound healing in vivo'', PNAS 2002, vol. 99 , 13577-13582. *R. De, A. Zemel, and S.A. Safran, ``Dynamics of cell orientation'', Nature Physics 2007, vol.3, 655.

  3. Determining the optimum cell size of digital elevation model for hydrologic application

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arabinda Sharma; K N Tiwari; P B S Bhadoria

    2011-08-01

    Scale is one of the most important but unsolved issues in various scientific disciplines that deal with spatial data. The arbitrary choice of grid cell size for contour interpolated digital elevation models (DEM) is one of the major sources of uncertainty in the hydrologic modelling process. In this paper, an attempt was made to identify methods for determining an optimum cell size for a contour interpolated DEM in prior to hydrologic modelling. Twenty-meter interval contour lines were used to generate DEMs of five different resolutions, viz., 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 m using TOPOGRID algorithm. The obtained DEMs were explored for their intrinsic quality using four different methods, i.e., sink analysis, fractal dimension of derived stream network, entropy measurement and semivariogram modelling. These methods were applied to determine the level artifacts (interpolation error) in DEM surface as well as derived stream network, spatial information content and spatial variability respectively. The results indicated that a 90 m cell size is sufficient to capture the terrain variability for subsequent hydrologic modelling in the study area. The significance of this research work is that it provides methods which DEM users can apply to select an appropriate DEM cell size in prior to detailed hydrologic modelling.

  4. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl2 affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl2 (first dose 4.6 mg kg−1, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg−1 day−1, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl2 (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl2 decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl2: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl2. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl2-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl2 exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl2 induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl2 induces MAPK activation, oxidative stress and COX-2 expression. ► Inhibition of

  5. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R. [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Redondo, Santiago [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Peçanha, Franck [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Martín, Angela [Departamento de Bioquímica, Fisiología y Genética Molecular, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922, Alcorcón (Spain); Fortuño, Ana [Área de Ciencias Cardiovasculares, Centro de Investigación Médica Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31008, Pamplona (Spain); Cachofeiro, Victoria [Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Tejerina, Teresa [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Salaices, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.salaices@uam.es [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  6. Consultation for Small-Sized Penis in the Egyptian Males: A Case Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Nader

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to report penile dimensions in adult Egyptian males consulting for small-sized penis (SSP) and describe their demographics and andrological profile. A case control study was designed through retrospective data analysis of patients (n = 239) seeking advice for SSP and a control group (n = 59). This included sociodemographics, other andrological complaints, and penile dimensions (pendulous length [PL], penopubic or total length [TL], and circumference [CF]) at flaccid and erect states and the size of the prepubic fatty pad. The results reported that most patients were single, students, and smokers and had not completed a university education. Several patients reported falsely premature ejaculation (PE), penile curvature (PC), and small-sized testes. Most penile dimensions of the patients (mean, cm) were significantly lower than those of the controls, whether in flaccid (PL: 7.4 vs. 8.05, p = .008; CF: 8.7 vs. 8.98, p = .026) or erect state (PL: 11.8 vs. 13, p = .000; TL: 14.2 vs. 15, p = .000; CF: 11.3 vs. 11.8, p = .003). However, no patient presented with a pendulous penile length <4 cm in flaccid or <7 cm in erect state. In conclusion, Egyptian men consulting for SSP did not have true small organs, but their penile dimensions were slightly smaller than those of men without such complaint. The proper sexual education program is highly advisable in these situations to avoid the myths and misconceptions about sexuality. PMID:25563384

  7. Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, J. M.; Telling, N. D.; Coker, V. S.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Laan, G. van der; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2011-08-02

    The bioproduction of nano-scale magnetite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria offers a potentially tunable, environmentally benign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the size of magnetite nanoparticles produced by Geobacter sulfurreducens, by adjusting the total biomass introduced at the start of the process. The particles have a narrow size distribution and can be controlled within the range of 10-50 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that controlled production of a number of different biominerals is possible via this method including goethite, magnetite and siderite, but their formation is strongly dependent upon the rate of Fe(III) reduction and total concentration and rate of Fe(II) produced by the bacteria during the reduction process. Relative cation distributions within the structure of the nanoparticles has been investigated by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and indicates the presence of a highly reduced surface layer which is not observed when magnetite is produced through abiotic methods. The enhanced Fe(II)-rich surface, combined with small particle size, has important environmental applications such as in the reductive bioremediation of organics, radionuclides and metals. In the case of Cr(VI), as a model high-valence toxic metal, optimised biogenic magnetite is able to reduce and sequester the toxic hexavalent chromium very efficiently in the less harmful trivalent form.

  8. Comparison of two methods for short circuit current measurement of large size solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuebo; Quan, Chenggen; Kng, Jerald

    2015-07-01

    The differential spectral responsivity (DSR) measurement and the solar simulator based current to voltage characterisation methods are two accurate methods for measuring the short circuit current, a critical parameter, of a solar cell under standard testing conditions. For the calibration of World Photovoltaic Scale (WPVS) reference solar cell with small size (20 mm x 20 mm), the measurement results using these two methods are agreed well within 1%. But for the calibration of large size (e.g. 156 mm x 156 mm) of solar cell, the measurement results using two methods are not agreed well and their deviation could be more than 10 %. In DSR method, the short circuit current of a solar cell is determined through measuring its relative irradiance spectral responsivity in spectral range from 280 nm to 1200 nm and its absolute irradiance responsivity at wavelength of 650 nm by reference standard photodiodes. As the detective area of large size solar cell (detective area: 156 mm x 156 mm) is much bigger than that of standard photodiodes (detective area: 12.56 mm2), the spatial uniformity of irradiance of modulated monochromatic probe beam on the test solar cell and the standard photodiode is critical for calculation of absolute irradiance responsivity of the test solar cell. The correction for the calculation must be done according to the measured spatial uniformity of probe beam and the detective areas of the test solar cell and standard photodiodes. The experiment showed the correction factor and its uncertainty are smaller if the detective areas difference between the test solar cell and the standard is smaller. Based on this observation, a standard solar cell (detective area: 20 mm x 20 mm) instead of standard photodiodes was used to calibrate absolute irradiance responsivity of the test solar cell (detective area: 156 mm x 156 mm) at wavelength of 650 nm. After such improvement, measurement results using two different methods agree well about 3 % for the large size

  9. Control of pore size in L-lactide/epsilon-caprolactone copolymer foams for tissue regeneration by the freeze-drying method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Hiroyuki; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Matsumoto, Takuya; Takahashi, Junzo

    2003-09-01

    In the regeneration and repair of missing tissues, synthetic polymer scaffolds need many pores to involve cells and to supply cells with nutrients. The control of the pore size of biodegradable L-lactide/epsilon-caprolactone copolymer foams was studied by changing the polymer concentration and the cooling temperature in the freeze-drying method. The mixtures of polymer and 1, 4-dioxane solution were poured into an 18-8 stainless steel Petri dish and frozen. The pore size of a polymer foam tends to increase from the bottom towards the top of a Petri dish. The pore size decreased to one-half with increasing polymer concentration (1 to 10 wt%). The mean pore size in foams of 8% polymer concentration decreased from 100 microm to 20 microm as cooling temperature was lowered. This suggests that the higher cooling rate due to lower cooling temperature can produce smaller ice-crystals and result in smaller pores. PMID:14620993

  10. Organometallic synthesis of size-controlled polycrystalline ruthenium nanoparticles in the presence of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruthenium nanoparticles of controlled size have been prepared by decomposition of the organometallic precursor Ru(cod)(cot) (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene, cot=1,3,5-cyclooctatriene) under an H2 atmosphere in either a pure alcohol or an alcohol/THF mixture as solvent and in the absence of further stabilizer. The particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The colloidal solutions are stable for long periods of time, in some cases longer than one year. TEM images reveal in most cases the presence of polycrystalline sponge-like particles of regular spherical shape and homogeneous size or, in some cases, the presence of isolated and well-dispersed monocrystalline particles, depending upon the alkyl chain length of the alcohol used. In all cases the size distributions are relatively narrow. WAXS and XRD analyses indicate the exclusive presence of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) ruthenium in these materials. The size of the particles can be controlled by adjusting the reaction temperature or the composition of the solvent mixture. In case of MeOH/THF mixtures, a linear correlation was established between the solvent composition and the size of the particles in the range of 4-85 nm. In the absence of stirring, small individual monocrystalline Ru particles are formed inside superstructures that assemble in some cases into monolayers. Finally, these materials are promising in catalytic hydrogenation of arenes under mild conditions. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Rapid and size-controlled preparation of highly concentrated silver nanoparticle colloids under microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The processing of nanosized silver particles can be briefly divided into several regimes: (1) the classical Turkevich preparation of metal colloids, (2) the reversed micelle processes, (3) photoreduction, (4) ultrasonic radiation, and (5) 60Co g-irradiation. In the above-mentioned processes, nanosized metal silver particles are synthesized with different morphologies (nanoparticulate, nanowire, and nanoprism) and sizes but only in low concentrations of silver colloids (a few millimoles per liter or less) and in the presence of surfactants as stabilizers. Microwave (MW) dielectric heating is fast emerging as a widely accepted new processing technology for variety of inorganic syntheses due to its penetration and rapid heating. In the MW-assisted syntheses of nanosized nickel and CdS particles, we found that MW heating can effectively control the size distribution of the nanosized nickel and CdS in a narrower range than the conventional heating by thermal convection, and that the effects of MW heating on the morphological structures of the nickel and CdS nanocrystallites are remarkable and attractive. Therefore, we used MW irradiation as a heating source to take advantages of the rapid, selective, and homogeneous, i.e., molecular level, heating in the reaction system for rapid and size-controlled preparation of nanosized metal silver in high concentrations. The as-prepared metal silver was indexed as cubic Ag (JCPDS card, No. 4 - 783) under MW irradiation or by conventional heating. SEM images of samples Al - A6 show that nanosized metal silver particles were formed. Figure 1 graphically expresses the detailed particle size distributions of samples Al - A6. The data of the particle size distributions and average particle sizes of samples A1 - A6 are also listed. When trisodium citrate (1.5 M) and silver nitrate (0.002 or 0.1 M) (A1 - A3) were mixed together, precipitated silver citrate (Ag3C6H5O7) was immediately formed, which was identified by powder XRD

  12. Limitations of mRNA amplification from small-size cell samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myklebost Ola

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global mRNA amplification has become a widely used approach to obtain gene expression profiles from limited material. An important concern is the reliable reflection of the starting material in the results obtained. This is especially important with extremely low quantities of input RNA where stochastic effects due to template dilution may be present. This aspect remains under-documented in the literature, as quantitative measures of data reliability are most often lacking. To address this issue, we examined the sensitivity levels of each transcript in 3 different cell sample sizes. ANOVA analysis was used to estimate the overall effects of reduced input RNA in our experimental design. In order to estimate the validity of decreasing sample sizes, we examined the sensitivity levels of each transcript by applying a novel model-based method, TransCount. Results From expression data, TransCount provided estimates of absolute transcript concentrations in each examined sample. The results from TransCount were used to calculate the Pearson correlation coefficient between transcript concentrations for different sample sizes. The correlations were clearly transcript copy number dependent. A critical level was observed where stochastic fluctuations became significant. The analysis allowed us to pinpoint the gene specific number of transcript templates that defined the limit of reliability with respect to number of cells from that particular source. In the sample amplifying from 1000 cells, transcripts expressed with at least 121 transcripts/cell were statistically reliable and for 250 cells, the limit was 1806 transcripts/cell. Above these thresholds, correlation between our data sets was at acceptable values for reliable interpretation. Conclusion These results imply that the reliability of any amplification experiment must be validated empirically to justify that any gene exists in sufficient quantity in the input material. This

  13. Sexual Functioning and Behavior of Men with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Concerning Penis Size Compared with Men Anxious about Penis Size and with Controls: A Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Read, Julie; Troglia, Andrea; Wylie, Kevan; Muir, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Little is known about the sexual functioning and behavior of men anxious about the size of their penis and the means that they might use to try to alter the size of their penis.AIM: To compare sexual functioning and behavior in men with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) concerning penis size and in men with small penis anxiety (SPA without BDD) and in a control group of men who do not have any concerns.METHODS: An opportunistic sample of 90 men from the community were recruited and...

  14. Size-controlled nickel oxide nanoparticle synthesis using mesoporous silicon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fain, Joshua S., E-mail: joshua.s.fain@vanderbilt.edu; Mares, Jeremy W.; Weiss, Sharon M. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (United States)

    2015-08-15

    A process for chemically synthesizing size-controllable nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles (NPs) within the interior of mesoporous silicon (PSi) thin films is presented. The method is demonstrated to provide control of the average NP size over an order of magnitude, from 9 nm to 128 nm diameter, by fabricating PSi films with mean pore diameters ranging from 32 to 140 nm and annealing at temperatures between 300 and 1100 °C. NiO NPs are readily detached from the PSi films through electrolytic dissolution of the PSi host matrix. Nanocomposite films and NPs are characterized through x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Optical absorbance measurements of free NiO NPs in aqueous suspension indicate that the optical bandgap is tuned from 3.65 to 3.9 eV, as expected from the effects of quantum confinement. This synthesis process is amenable to the batch fabrication of a wide variety of metal oxide NPs at temperatures up to 1000 °C with sizes below 100 nm. The method is advantageous over conventional chemical synthesis techniques as it facilitates control of the resulting NP size across a wide range and also permits high-temperature annealing while precluding extended crystallite formation. Furthermore, the use of a PSi template enables direct integration of nanoparticulate metal oxide into Si-based, on-chip applications. NiO was selected here as the model system to demonstrate this technique due to its numerous applications including energy storage and memristor technologies.

  15. Size-controlled nickel oxide nanoparticle synthesis using mesoporous silicon thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for chemically synthesizing size-controllable nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles (NPs) within the interior of mesoporous silicon (PSi) thin films is presented. The method is demonstrated to provide control of the average NP size over an order of magnitude, from 9 nm to 128 nm diameter, by fabricating PSi films with mean pore diameters ranging from 32 to 140 nm and annealing at temperatures between 300 and 1100 °C. NiO NPs are readily detached from the PSi films through electrolytic dissolution of the PSi host matrix. Nanocomposite films and NPs are characterized through x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Optical absorbance measurements of free NiO NPs in aqueous suspension indicate that the optical bandgap is tuned from 3.65 to 3.9 eV, as expected from the effects of quantum confinement. This synthesis process is amenable to the batch fabrication of a wide variety of metal oxide NPs at temperatures up to 1000 °C with sizes below 100 nm. The method is advantageous over conventional chemical synthesis techniques as it facilitates control of the resulting NP size across a wide range and also permits high-temperature annealing while precluding extended crystallite formation. Furthermore, the use of a PSi template enables direct integration of nanoparticulate metal oxide into Si-based, on-chip applications. NiO was selected here as the model system to demonstrate this technique due to its numerous applications including energy storage and memristor technologies

  16. Fusion Pore Size Limits 5-HT Release From Single Enterochromaffin Cell Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghupathi, Ravinarayan; Jessup, Claire F; Lumsden, Amanda L; Keating, Damien J

    2016-07-01

    Enterochromaffin cells are the major site of serotonin (5-HT) synthesis and secretion providing ∼95% of the body's total 5-HT. 5-HT can act as a neurotransmitter or hormone and has several important endocrine and paracrine roles. We have previously demonstrated that EC cells release small amounts of 5-HT per exocytosis event compared to other endocrine cells. We utilized a recently developed method to purify EC cells to demonstrate the mechanisms underlying 5-HT packaging and release. Using the fluorescent probe FFN511, we demonstrate that EC cells express VMAT and that VMAT plays a functional role in 5-HT loading into vesicles. Carbon fiber amperometry studies illustrate that the amount of 5-HT released per exocytosis event from EC cells is dependent on both VMAT and the H(+)-ATPase pump, as demonstrated with reserpine or bafilomycin, respectively. We also demonstrate that increasing the amount of 5-HT loaded into EC cell vesicles does not result in an increase in quantal release. As this indicates that fusion pore size may be a limiting factor involved, we compared pore diameter in EC and chromaffin cells by assessing the vesicle capture of different-sized fluorescent probes to measure the extent of fusion pore dilation. This identified that EC cells have a reduced fusion pore expansion that does not exceed 9 nm in diameter. These results demonstrate that the small amounts of 5-HT released per fusion event in EC cells can be explained by a smaller fusion pore that limits 5-HT release capacity from individual vesicles. PMID:26574734

  17. Carbon nanotubes for stem cell control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Stout

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, two major advancements have transformed the world of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine—stem cells and carbon nano-dimensional materials. In the past, stem cell therapy seemed like it may present a cure for all medical ailments, but problems arose (i.e., immune system clearance, control of differentiation in the body, etc. that have hindered progress. But, with the synergy of carbon nano-dimensional materials, researchers have been able to overcome these tissue engineering and regenerative medicine obstacles and have begun developing treatments for strokes, bone failure, cardiovascular disease, and many other conditions. Here, we briefly review research involving carbon nanotubes which are relevant to the tissue engineering and regenerative medicine field with a special emphasis on carbon nanotube applications for stem cell delivery, drug delivery applications, and their use as improved medical devices.

  18. Gold nanoparticle size and shape influence on osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingchao; Li, Jia'en Jasmine; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xinlong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored for biomedical applications due to their advantages of facile synthesis and surface functionalization. Previous studies have suggested that AuNPs can induce differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts. However, how the size and shape of AuNPs affect the differentiation response of stem cells has not been elucidated. In this work, a series of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated Au nanospheres, Au nanostars and Au nanorods with different diameters of 40, 70 and 110 nm were synthesized and their effects on osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were investigated. All the AuNPs showed good cytocompatibility and did not influence proliferation of hMSCs at the studied concentrations. Osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was dependent on the size and shape of AuNPs. Sphere-40, sphere-70 and rod-70 significantly increased the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition of cells while rod-40 reduced the ALP activity and calcium deposition. Gene profiling revealed that the expression of osteogenic marker genes was down-regulated after incubation with rod-40. However, up-regulation of these genes was found in the sphere-40, sphere-70 and rod-70 treatment. Moreover, it was found that the size and shape of AuNPs affected the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs through regulating the activation of Yes-associated protein (YAP). These results indicate that the size and shape of AuNPs had an influence on the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, which should provide useful guidance for the preparation of AuNPs with defined size and shape for their biomedical applications.Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored for biomedical applications due to their advantages of facile synthesis and surface functionalization. Previous studies have suggested that AuNPs can induce differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts. However, how the size and shape of AuNPs affect the

  19. Molecular behavior of DNA in a cell-sized compartment coated by lipids

    CERN Document Server

    Hamada, T; Shimobayashi, S F; Ichikawa, M; Takagi, M

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of long DNA molecules in a cell-sized confined space was investigated. We prepared water-in-oil droplets covered by phospholipids, which mimic the inner space of a cell, following the encapsulation of DNA molecules with unfolded coil and folded globule conformations. Microscopic observation revealed that the adsorption of coiled DNA onto the membrane surface depended on the size of the vesicular space. Globular DNA showed a cell-size-dependent unfolding transition after adsorption on the membrane. Furthermore, when DNA interacted with a two-phase membrane surface, DNA selectively adsorbed on the membrane phase, such as an ordered or disordered phase, depending on its conformation. We discuss the mechanism of these trends by considering the free energy of DNA together with a polyamine in the solution. The free energy of our model was consistent with the present experimental data. The cooperative interaction of DNA and polyamines with a membrane surface leads to the size-dependent behavior of molec...

  20. Particle Size Affects Concentration-Dependent Cytotoxicity of Chitosan Nanoparticles towards Mouse Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Sarah Omar Zaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan nanoparticles (CSNPs have been extensively applied in medical and pharmaceutical fields as promising drug delivery systems. Despite that, the safety of CSNPs remains inadequate and needs further investigation, particularly on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. CSNPs were prepared by ionic gelation method and later were characterized for their physical characteristics (particle size and zeta potential. Cytotoxicity of CSNPs was assessed by MTT assay. Particle size was highly influenced by chitosan concentration and molecular weight (medium and high molecular weight (MMW and HMW. Higher chitosan concentration and molecular weight produced larger nanoparticles. Zeta potential of CSNPs was not significantly affected by chitosan concentrations and molecular weights used in the present study. MMW had a better stability than HMW CSNPs as their particle size and zeta potential were not significantly altered after autoclaving. Cytotoxicity of CSNPs was influenced by zeta potential and particle size. On the other hand, chitosan concentration and molecular weight indirectly influenced cytotoxicity by affecting particle size and zeta potential of CSNPs. In conclusion, cytotoxicity of CSNPs was mainly attributed to their physical characteristics and this opens a strategy to ensure the safety of CSNPs applications in stem cell technology.

  1. Role of polyphenols in cell death control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Claudio; Masella, Roberta

    2012-05-01

    Dietary consumption of fruit, vegetables, fish, and olive oil has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on human health. This finding may be due to the high content of antioxidant compounds including polyphenols. Current evidence strongly supports a contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of several chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, central nervous system disorders, as well as aging. Apoptosis is a genetically controlled and evolutionarily conserved form of cell death of critical importance for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis in the adult organism. The malfunction of the death machinery may play a primary role in various pathologic processes, leading to proliferative or degenerative diseases. Polyphenols can interact with specific steps and/or proteins regulating the apoptotic process in different ways depending on their concentration, the cell system, the type or stage of the pathological process. Because of their ability to modulate cell death, polyphenols have been proposed as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents. This paper reviews and discusses the last 3-year findings related to the principal molecular mechanisms involved in the control of the balance between apoptosis and cell proliferation exerted by polyphenols. PMID:22584012

  2. Gold nanoparticle assemblies of controllable size obtained by hydroxylamine reduction at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal nanoparticle assemblies (NPAs) were obtained in a one-step procedure, by reduction of HAuCl4 by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, at room temperature, without the use of any additional nucleating agent. By changing the order of the reactants, NPAs with mean size of ∼20 and ∼120 nm were obtained. Because of their size and irregular popcorn like shape, the larger size NPAs show absorption in the NIR spectral region. The building blocks of the resulted nanoassemblies are spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 4–8 and 10–30 nm, respectively. Moreover, by stabilizing the colloid with bovine serum albumin at different time moments after synthesis, NPAs of controlled size between 20 and 120 nm, could be obtained. The NPAs were characterized using UV–Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM electron microscopies. In addition, the possibility of using the here proposed NPAs as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was assessed and found to provide a higher enhancement compared to conventional citrate-reduced nanoparticles

  3. Gold nanoparticle assemblies of controllable size obtained by hydroxylamine reduction at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tódor, István Sz.; Szabó, László; Marişca, Oana T.; Chiş, Vasile; Leopold, Nicolae, E-mail: nicolae.leopold@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics (Romania)

    2014-12-15

    Colloidal nanoparticle assemblies (NPAs) were obtained in a one-step procedure, by reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, at room temperature, without the use of any additional nucleating agent. By changing the order of the reactants, NPAs with mean size of ∼20 and ∼120 nm were obtained. Because of their size and irregular popcorn like shape, the larger size NPAs show absorption in the NIR spectral region. The building blocks of the resulted nanoassemblies are spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 4–8 and 10–30 nm, respectively. Moreover, by stabilizing the colloid with bovine serum albumin at different time moments after synthesis, NPAs of controlled size between 20 and 120 nm, could be obtained. The NPAs were characterized using UV–Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM electron microscopies. In addition, the possibility of using the here proposed NPAs as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was assessed and found to provide a higher enhancement compared to conventional citrate-reduced nanoparticles.

  4. Sexual Functioning and Behavior of Men with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Concerning Penis Size Compared with Men Anxious about Penis Size and with Controls: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Veale, MD, FRCPsych

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Men with BDD are more likely to have erectile dysfunction and less satisfaction with intercourse than controls but maintain their libido. Further research is required to develop and evaluate a psychological intervention for such men with adequate outcome measures. Veale D, Miles S, Read J, Troglia A, Wylie K, and Muir G. Sexual functioning and behavior of men with body dysmorphic disorder concerning penis size compared with men anxious about penis size and with controls: A cohort study. Sex Med 2015;3:147–155.

  5. Self-assembly of size-controlled liposomes on DNA nanotemplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Jing; Shigematsu, Hideki; Xu, Weiming; Shih, William M; Rothman, James E; Lin, Chenxiang

    2016-05-01

    Artificial lipid-bilayer membranes are valuable tools for the study of membrane structure and dynamics. For applications such as the study of vesicular transport and drug delivery, there is a pressing need for artificial vesicles with controlled size. However, controlling vesicle size and shape with nanometre precision is challenging, and approaches to achieve this can be heavily affected by lipid composition. Here, we present a bio-inspired templating method to generate highly monodispersed sub-100-nm unilamellar vesicles, where liposome self-assembly was nucleated and confined inside rigid DNA nanotemplates. Using this method, we produce homogeneous liposomes with four distinct predefined sizes. We also show that the method can be used with a variety of lipid compositions and probe the mechanism of templated liposome formation by capturing key intermediates during membrane self-assembly. The DNA nanotemplating strategy represents a conceptually novel way to guide lipid bilayer formation and could be generalized to engineer complex membrane/protein structures with nanoscale precision. PMID:27102682

  6. Self-assembly of size-controlled liposomes on DNA nanotemplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Jing; Shigematsu, Hideki; Xu, Weiming; Shih, William M.; Rothman, James E.; Lin, Chenxiang

    2016-05-01

    Artificial lipid-bilayer membranes are valuable tools for the study of membrane structure and dynamics. For applications such as the study of vesicular transport and drug delivery, there is a pressing need for artificial vesicles with controlled size. However, controlling vesicle size and shape with nanometre precision is challenging, and approaches to achieve this can be heavily affected by lipid composition. Here, we present a bio-inspired templating method to generate highly monodispersed sub-100-nm unilamellar vesicles, where liposome self-assembly was nucleated and confined inside rigid DNA nanotemplates. Using this method, we produce homogeneous liposomes with four distinct predefined sizes. We also show that the method can be used with a variety of lipid compositions and probe the mechanism of templated liposome formation by capturing key intermediates during membrane self-assembly. The DNA nanotemplating strategy represents a conceptually novel way to guide lipid bilayer formation and could be generalized to engineer complex membrane/protein structures with nanoscale precision.

  7. Carbon dots with tunable emission, controllable size and their application for sensing hypochlorous acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhaoxia; Lin, Feng; Hu, Ming; Li, Chunxiang; Xu, Ting; Chen, Chuan; Guo, Xiangqun, E-mail: xqguo@xmu.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    Optically tunable carbon dots (CDs) were fabricated through a simple one-step microwave-assisted procedure. These carbonaceous nanoparticles exhibited tunable emission under a single wavelength excitation, controllable size without any tedious separation process and stabilities towards photobleaching and high ionic strength. The effects of size difference and surface property on the fluorescence behaviors of CDs were explored through a post-reduction/oxidation method. Experimental results also demonstrated the fluorescence of CDs could be tuned when exposed to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/AcOH solutions. Moreover, the use of as-synthesized CDs as a chemical sensor for the quantification of hypochlorous acid (HClO) has been preliminarily tested, showing high sensitivity and selectivity towards HClO over other common ions. The superior optical properties would enable the use of CDs in multiplexed optical coding of biomolecules, light-emitting devices and biological applications. - Highlights: • Carbon dots exhibited multiple colors under a single wavelength excitation. • Microwave or post-oxidation methods were employed to tune the emission wavelengths. • The as-prepared particles had controllable size without tedious separation process. • High sensitivity and selectivity towards hypochlorous acid were demonstrated.

  8. Controlling the particle size of nanobrookite TiO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arier, Umit Ozlem Akkaya, E-mail: oarier@msgsu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University, Besiktas, Istanbul 34349 (Turkey); Department of Physics, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey); Tepehan, Fatma Zehra [Department of Physics, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey)

    2011-08-11

    Highlights: > Nanobrookite TiO{sub 2} films were deposited on glass substrates by spin-coating method. > We produced the pure nanobrookite films using titanium butoxide and acetic acid. > Particle size of the TiO{sub 2} films was controlled by volume ratios of water:acid. > We determined that it is possible to obtain the films with single orientation. > Particle sizes of the TiO{sub 2} films decrease with the decreasing water:AcAc volume ratio. > It has been found that the spectrum red-shifts with increasing water concentration. - Abstract: In this study, pure nanobrookite TiO{sub 2} thin films were successfully deposited on glass substrates with the spin-coating method using titanium butoxide and acetic acid. The particle size of TiO{sub 2} films was controlled by the water:AcAc volume ratio. This study shows that it is possible to obtain single oriented pure brookite films. The structural and optical properties of the nanobrookite TiO{sub 2} thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), spectrophotometer (NKD), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR).

  9. Controlling the particle size of nanobrookite TiO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Nanobrookite TiO2 films were deposited on glass substrates by spin-coating method. → We produced the pure nanobrookite films using titanium butoxide and acetic acid. → Particle size of the TiO2 films was controlled by volume ratios of water:acid. → We determined that it is possible to obtain the films with single orientation. → Particle sizes of the TiO2 films decrease with the decreasing water:AcAc volume ratio. → It has been found that the spectrum red-shifts with increasing water concentration. - Abstract: In this study, pure nanobrookite TiO2 thin films were successfully deposited on glass substrates with the spin-coating method using titanium butoxide and acetic acid. The particle size of TiO2 films was controlled by the water:AcAc volume ratio. This study shows that it is possible to obtain single oriented pure brookite films. The structural and optical properties of the nanobrookite TiO2 thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), spectrophotometer (NKD), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR).

  10. Controlling micro-sized droplet generation using electrical pulses for studying liquid-liquid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandino, M.; La Forgia, N.; Vera, A. J.; Bjerknes, J.; Dorao, C. A.

    2014-04-01

    Water droplets removal from oil is a critical process in several industries, in particular in the oil and gas industry. Water/oil separation is commonly done in large gravitational sedimentation tanks, which are over dimensioned due to the lack of accurate models to allow for optimization. This can become challenging for off-shore and subsea processing installations. One of the bottlenecks to study droplet dynamics in the micron range, is the generation of droplets with less than 100μm in diameter. In this regard, one of the most promising techniques for controlling the generated droplet size is based on the use of a high voltage electrical signal or electro-hydrodynamic technique (EHD). Although much work on EHD and droplet generation can been found in the literature, many challenges still remain. One of this is the generation of droplets smaller than 100μm in diameter in a controllable, on-demand manner. In this work, the effect of the meniscus shape and the electric pulse characteristics on the size of the generated droplet is investigated. Both the meniscus height and width help to determine the droplet size, with the latter having a stronger effect. No significant influence of the pulse amplitude and pulse width was observed for the tested conditions.

  11. Cell culture arrays using micron-sized ferromagnetic ring-shaped thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell patterning has become an important technology for tissue engineering. In this research, domain walls are formed at the two ends of a ferromagnetic ring thin film after applying a strong external magnetic field, which can effectively attract magnetically labeled cells and control the position for biological cell. Magnetophoresis experiment was conducted to quantify the magnetic nanoparticle inside the cells. A ring-shaped magnetic thin films array was fabricated through photolithography. It is observed that magnetically labeled cells can be successfully attracted to the two ends of the ring-shaped magnetic thin film structure and more cells were attracted and further attached to the structures. The cells are co-cultured with the structure and kept proliferating; therefore, such ring thin film can be an important candidate for in-vitro biomedical chips or tissue engineering

  12. Cell culture arrays using micron-sized ferromagnetic ring-shaped thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang, E-mail: wei@pme.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China); Lai, Mei-Feng; Ger, Tzong-Rong [Institute of NanoEngineering and MicroSystems, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-07

    Cell patterning has become an important technology for tissue engineering. In this research, domain walls are formed at the two ends of a ferromagnetic ring thin film after applying a strong external magnetic field, which can effectively attract magnetically labeled cells and control the position for biological cell. Magnetophoresis experiment was conducted to quantify the magnetic nanoparticle inside the cells. A ring-shaped magnetic thin films array was fabricated through photolithography. It is observed that magnetically labeled cells can be successfully attracted to the two ends of the ring-shaped magnetic thin film structure and more cells were attracted and further attached to the structures. The cells are co-cultured with the structure and kept proliferating; therefore, such ring thin film can be an important candidate for in-vitro biomedical chips or tissue engineering.

  13. Plasmonic nanoparticle films for solar cell applications fabricated by size-selective aerosol deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, T.V.; Ortiz Gonzalez, J.; Santbergen, R.; Tan, H.; Schmidt-Ott, A.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    A soft deposition method for incorporating surface plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles within photovoltaic devices was studied. This self-assembly method provides excellent control over both nanoparticle size and surface coverage. Films of spherical Ag nanoparticles with diameter of ∼100 nm were fa

  14. Size-dependence of volatile and semi-volatile organic carbon content in phytoplankton cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eRuiz-Halpern

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The content of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOC and SOC, measured as exchangeable dissolved organic carbon (EDOC, was quantified in 9 phytoplanktonic species that spanned 4 orders of magnitude in cell volume, by disrupting the cells and quantifying the gaseous organic carbon released. EDOC content varied 4 orders of magnitude, from 0.0015 to 14.12 pg C cell-1 in the species studied and increased linearly with increasing phytoplankton cell volume following the equation EDOC (pg C cell-1 = -2.35 x cellular volume (CV, µm3 cell-1 0.90 (± 0.3, with a slope (0.90 not different from 1 indicating a constant increase in volatile carbon as the cell size of phytoplankton increased. The percentage of EDOC relative to total cellular carbon was small but varied 20 fold from 0.28 % to 5.17 %, and no obvious taxonomic pattern in the content of EDOC was appreciable for the species tested. The cell release rate of EDOC is small compared to the amount of carbon in the cell and difficult to capture. Nonetheless, the results point to a potential flux of volatile and semivolatile phytoplankton-derived organic carbon to the atmosphere that has been largely underestimated and deserves further attention in the future.

  15. Development of Small-sized Fluid Control Valve with Self-holding Function Using Permanent Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Tetsuya; Dohta, Shujiro; Ueda, Hirofumi

    Recently, force feedback devices in virtual reality and power assisted nursing care systems have received much attention and active research. In such a control system, an actuator and a driving device such as a control valve are mounted on the human body. In this condition, the size and weight of the control valve become serious problems. At the same time, the valve should be operated with lower energy consumption because of using a limited electrical power. The typical electro magnetic solenoid valve drives its spool using a larger solenoid to open the valve. The complex construction of the valve for sealing makes its miniaturization and the fabrication of a low cost valve more difficult. In addition, the solenoid in the valve consumes more electrical power while the valve is kept opening. The purpose of our study is to develop a small-sized, lightweight, lower energy consumption and flexible control valve that can be safe enough to mount on the human body at a lower cost. In our pervious study, we proposed and tested the control valve that can open using a vibration motor. In this study, we propose and test a new type of fluid control valve with a self-holding function. The new valve uses a permanent magnet ball. It has a cylindrical magnet and two solenoids. The self-holding function of the valve is done as follows. When one side of the solenoid is stimulated by the current momentarily, the solenoid gives a repulsive force to the cylindrical magnet. The magnet moves toward the opposite side of the solenoid and is attracted to the iron core. Then, the magnet ball moves toward the cylindrical magnet and opens the orifice. The valve can keep open without electrical energy. As a result, the valve with the extremely lower energy consumption can be developed.

  16. Evaluation of growth, cell size and biomass of Isochrysis aff. galbana (T-ISO with two LED regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Victor Cordoba-Matson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to crops, there are fewer studies using LED-based light with green microalgae and none cultivating the microalga Isochrysis aff. galbana (T-ISO even though of its importance in marine aquaculture. The objective was to evaluate of white and red LEDs as an alternative source of light to cultivate I. aff. galbana (T-ISO. In order to carry this out white and red LEDs were used with a laboratory built Erlenmeyer-type photobioreactor to determine productivity, cell number and size and biomass composition. Results were compared with standard fluorescent lights of the same light intensity. The culture system consisted of 3 flasks for applying red LEDs and three for white LEDs and 3 control group flasks illuminated with the normal fluorescent lighting at the similar light intensity of ~60 mM m–2 s–1. It was found that the population cell density did not significantly increase with either red LEDs or white LEDs (p > 0.05, if at all. Standard fluorescent lighting (control group showed significant increases in population cell number (p < 0.05. Through microscopic observation cell size was found to be smaller for white LEDS and even smaller for red LEDs compared to fluorescent lighting. Biochemical composition of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids was similar for all light regimes. The authors suggest that the unexpected non-growth I. aff. galbana (T-ISO, a haptophyte microalga, with white and red LEDs is possibly due to fact that to initiate cell growth this microalgae requires other wavelengths (possibly green besides red and blue, to allow other pigments, probably fucoxanthin, to capture light

  17. Determination of the pore size of cell walls of living plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpita, N.; Sabularse, D.; Montezinos, D.; Delmer, D.P.

    1979-09-14

    The limiting diameter of pores in the walls of living plant cells through which molecules can freely pass has been determined by a solute exclusion technique to be 35 to 38 angstroms for hair cells of Raphanus sativus roots and fibers of Gossypium hirsutum, 38 to 40 angstroms for cultured cells of Acer pseudoplatanus, and 45 to 52 angstroms for isolated palisade parenchyma cells of the leaves of Xanthium strumarium and Commelina communis. These results indicate that molecules with diameters larger than these pores would be restricted in their ability to penetrate such a cell wall, and that such a wall may represent a more significant barrier to cellular communication than has been previously assumed.

  18. Volumetric MR-HIFU ablation of uterine fibroids: Role of treatment cell size in the improvement of energy efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the energy efficiency of differently sized volumetric ablations in MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) treatment of uterine fibroids. Materials and methods: This study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained from all participants. Ten symptomatic uterine fibroids (mean diameter 8.9 cm) in 10 women (mean age 42.2) were treated by volumetric MR-HIFU ablation under binary feedback control. The energy efficiency (mm3/J) of each sonication was calculated as the volume of lethal thermal dose (240 equivalent minutes at 43 °C) per unit acoustic energy applied. Operator-controllable parameters and signal intensity ratio of uterine fibroid to skeletal muscle on T2-weighted MR images were tested with univariate and multivariate analyses to discern which parameters significantly correlated with the ablation energy efficiency. Results: We analyzed a total of 236 sonications. The energy efficiency of the ablations was 0.42 ± 0.25 mm3/J (range 0.004–1.18) with energy efficiency improving with the treatment cell size (4 mm, 0.06 ± 0.06 mm3/J; 8 mm, 0.29 ± 0.12 mm3/J; 12 mm, 0.58 ± 0.18 mm3/J; 16 mm, 0.91 ± 0.17 mm3/J). Treatment cell size (r = 0.814, p < 0.001), distance of ultrasound propagation (r = −0.151, p = 0.020), sonication frequency (1.2 or 1.45 MHz; p < 0.001), and signal intensity ratio (r = −0.205, p = 0.002) proved to be significant by univariate analysis, while multivariate analysis revealed treatment cell size (B = 0.075, p < 0.001), US propagation distance (B = −6.928, p < 0.001), and signal intensity ratio (B = −0.024, p = 0.001) to be independently significant. Conclusion: Energy efficiency in volumetric MR-HIFU ablation of uterine fibroids improves with increased treatment cell size, independent of other significant contributors such as distance of ultrasound propagation or signal intensity of the tumor on T2-weighted MR imaging.

  19. Volumetric MR-HIFU ablation of uterine fibroids: Role of treatment cell size in the improvement of energy efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-sun [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Keserci, Bilgin [Philips Healthcare, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Partanen, Ari [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rhim, Hyunchul, E-mail: rhimhc@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyo K.; Park, Min Jung [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koehler, Max O. [Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the energy efficiency of differently sized volumetric ablations in MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) treatment of uterine fibroids. Materials and methods: This study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained from all participants. Ten symptomatic uterine fibroids (mean diameter 8.9 cm) in 10 women (mean age 42.2) were treated by volumetric MR-HIFU ablation under binary feedback control. The energy efficiency (mm{sup 3}/J) of each sonication was calculated as the volume of lethal thermal dose (240 equivalent minutes at 43 Degree-Sign C) per unit acoustic energy applied. Operator-controllable parameters and signal intensity ratio of uterine fibroid to skeletal muscle on T2-weighted MR images were tested with univariate and multivariate analyses to discern which parameters significantly correlated with the ablation energy efficiency. Results: We analyzed a total of 236 sonications. The energy efficiency of the ablations was 0.42 {+-} 0.25 mm{sup 3}/J (range 0.004-1.18) with energy efficiency improving with the treatment cell size (4 mm, 0.06 {+-} 0.06 mm{sup 3}/J; 8 mm, 0.29 {+-} 0.12 mm{sup 3}/J; 12 mm, 0.58 {+-} 0.18 mm{sup 3}/J; 16 mm, 0.91 {+-} 0.17 mm{sup 3}/J). Treatment cell size (r = 0.814, p < 0.001), distance of ultrasound propagation (r = -0.151, p = 0.020), sonication frequency (1.2 or 1.45 MHz; p < 0.001), and signal intensity ratio (r = -0.205, p = 0.002) proved to be significant by univariate analysis, while multivariate analysis revealed treatment cell size (B = 0.075, p < 0.001), US propagation distance (B = -6.928, p < 0.001), and signal intensity ratio (B = -0.024, p = 0.001) to be independently significant. Conclusion: Energy efficiency in volumetric MR-HIFU ablation of uterine fibroids improves with increased treatment cell size, independent of other significant contributors such as distance of ultrasound propagation or signal intensity of the tumor on T2-weighted MR

  20. Genetic deletion of Rab27B in pancreatic acinar cells affects granules size and has inhibitory effects on amylase secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Lentz, Stephen I; Williams, John A

    2016-03-18

    Small G protein Rab27B is expressed in various secretory cell types and plays a role in mediating secretion. In pancreatic acinar cells, Rab27B was found to be expressed on the zymogen granule membrane and by overexpression to regulate the secretion of zymogen granules. However, the effect of Rab27B deletion on the physiology of pancreatic acinar cells is unknown. In the current study, we utilized the Rab27B KO mouse model to better understand the role of Rab27B in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Our data show that Rab27B deficiency had no obvious effects on the expression of major digestive enzymes and other closely related proteins, e.g. similar small G proteins, such as Rab3D and Rab27A, and putative downstream effectors. The overall morphology of acinar cells was not changed in the knockout pancreas. However, the size of zymogen granules was decreased in KO acinar cells, suggesting a role of Rab27B in regulating the maturation of secretory granules. The secretion of digestive enzymes was moderately decreased in KO acini, compared with the WT control. These data indicate that Rab27B is involved at a different steps of zymogen granule maturation and secretion, which is distinct from that of Rab3D. PMID:26845357

  1. Synthesis of supported bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size and composition distributions for active site elucidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim, Sikander H.; Sener, Canan; Alba Rubio, Ana C.; Gostanian, Thomas M.; O' neill, Brandon J; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Dumesic, James A

    2015-08-01

    Elucidation of active sites in supported bimetallic catalysts is complicated by the high level of dispersity in the nanoparticle size and composition that is inherent in conventional methods of catalyst preparation. We present a synthesis strategy that leads to highly dispersed, bimetallic nanoparticles with uniform particle size and composition by means of controlled surface reactions. We demonstrate the synthesis of three systems, RhMo, PtMo, and RhRe, consisting of a highly reducible metal with an oxophilic promoter. These catalysts are characterized by FTIR, CO chemisorption, STEM/EDS, TPR, and XAS analysis. The catalytic properties of these bimetallic nanoparticles were probed for the selective CO hydrogenolysis of (hydroxymethyl)tetrahydropyran to produce 1,6 hexanediol. Based on the characterization results and reactivity trends, the active sites in the hydrogenolysis reaction are identified to be small ensembles of the more noble metal (Rh, Pt) adjacent to highly reduced moieties of the more oxophilic metal (Mo, Re).

  2. One-pot size and shape controlled synthesis of DMSO capped iron oxide nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debanjan Guin; Sunkara V Manorama; S Radha; A K Nigam

    2006-11-01

    We report here the capping of iron oxide nanoparticles with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to make chloroform soluble iron oxide nanoparticles. Size and shape of the capped iron oxide nanoparticles are well controlled by simply varying the reaction parameters. The synthesized nanocrystallites were characterized by thermal analysis (TG–DTA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for evaluating phase, structure and morphology. 1H NMR spectra of the synthesized samples confirm DMSO, and the capping of DMSO on the ferrite samples. Shift of the S=O stretching frequency in Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectra indicates that the bonding between DMSO and ferrite is through an oxygen moiety. The magnetic measurements of all the synthesized samples were investigated with a SQUID magnetometer which shows that the magnetic properties are strongly dependent on the size as well as shape of the iron oxide.

  3. Control and optimization in fuel cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel cells are electrochemical energy converters. They convert the chemical energy contained in the fuel into electricity while producing water and heat. Compared to the traditional energy converters, such as batteries and internal combustion engines, fuel cells are marked by high conversion efficiency and very low emissions.This work contains a computer study of optimization and control of fuel cells systems. An analytical study of the fuel (Hydrogen and air) supply system was performed taking into account compressor, cooling and humidification subsystems. In addition, the stack system, which consists of a lot of cells, was analyzed using the experimental equations of Nafion 117 membrane. The model of the whole system was then implemented in MATLAB/Simulink environment. The effect of the cathode pressure and the membrane water content on the polarization curves of the cell was examined. To validate the model, the responses of the model to step changes in the compressor voltage and the current drawn from the stack, were used. More attention was given to the net power which can be provided by the system, taking into account the power wasted by the compressor. (author)

  4. Modeling the Control of Planar Cell Polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Jeffrey D.; Tomlin, Claire J.

    2016-01-01

    A growing list of medically important developmental defects and disease mechanisms can be traced to disruption of the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway. The PCP system polarizes cells in epithelial sheets along an axis orthogonal to their apical-basal axis. Studies in the fruitfly, Drosophila, have led to the concept of a modular system controlling PCP. The components of the PCP signaling modules, and the effector systems with which they interact, function together to produce emergent patterns. Experimental methods allow the manipulation of individual PCP signaling molecules in specified groups of cells; these interventions not only perturb the polarization of the targeted cells at a subcellular level, but also perturb patterns of polarity at the multicellular level, often affecting nearby cells in characteristic ways. These kinds of experiments should, in principle, allow one to infer the architecture within and between modules, but the relationships between molecular interactions and tissue-level pattern are sufficiently complex that they defy intuitive understanding. Mathematical modeling has been an important tool to address these problems. This review explores the emergence of a local signaling hypothesis, and describes how a local intercellular signal, coupled with a directional cue, can give rise to global pattern. We will discuss the critical role mathematical modeling has played in guiding and interpreting experimental results, and speculate about future roles for mathematical modeling of PCP. Mathematical models at varying levels of abstraction have and are expected to continue contributing in distinct ways to understanding the regulation of PCP signaling. PMID:21755606

  5. Size and nanocrystallinity controlled gold nanocrystals: synthesis, electronic and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubet, N.; Tempra, I.; Yang, J.; Soavi, G.; Polli, D.; Cerullo, G.; Pileni, M. P.

    2015-02-01

    The influence of nanocrystallinity on the electronic and mechanical properties of metal nanoparticles is still poorly understood, due to the difficulty in synthesizing nanoparticles with a controlled internal structure. Here, we report on a new method for the selective synthesis of Au nanoparticles in either a single-domain or a polycrystalline phase maintaining the same chemical environment. We obtain quasi-spherical nanoparticles whose diameter is tunable from 6 to 13 nm with a resolution down to ~0.5 nm and narrow size distribution (4-5%). The availability of such high-quality samples allows the study of the impact of the particle size and nanocrystallinity on a number of parameters, such as plasmon dephasing time, electron-phonon coupling, period and damping time of the radial breathing modes.The influence of nanocrystallinity on the electronic and mechanical properties of metal nanoparticles is still poorly understood, due to the difficulty in synthesizing nanoparticles with a controlled internal structure. Here, we report on a new method for the selective synthesis of Au nanoparticles in either a single-domain or a polycrystalline phase maintaining the same chemical environment. We obtain quasi-spherical nanoparticles whose diameter is tunable from 6 to 13 nm with a resolution down to ~0.5 nm and narrow size distribution (4-5%). The availability of such high-quality samples allows the study of the impact of the particle size and nanocrystallinity on a number of parameters, such as plasmon dephasing time, electron-phonon coupling, period and damping time of the radial breathing modes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Diameter distributions, XRD profiles, parameters of XRD fitting, circularity distributions, fit of the plasmon spectra and acoustic oscillations, diameter standard deviation determined from TEM and acoustic oscillations. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06513a

  6. Size-controlled hydroxyapatite nanoparticles as self-organized organic-inorganic composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Viorel Marin; Ng, Chuen-How; Wilke, Max; Tiersch, Brigitte; Fratzl, Peter; Peter, Martin G

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents some results concerning the size-controlled hydroxyapatite nanoparticles obtained in aqueous media in a biopolymer matrix from soluble precursors salts. Taking the inspiration from nature, where composite materials made of a polymer matrix and inorganic fillers are often found, e.g. bone, shell of crustaceans, shell of eggs, etc., the feasibility on making composite materials containing chitosan and nanosized hydroxyapatite was investigated. A stepwise co-precipitation approach was used to obtain different types of composites by means of different ratio between components. The synthesis of hydroxyapatite was carried out in the chitosan matrix from calcium chloride and sodium dihydrogenphosphate in alkaline solutions at moderate pH of 10-11 for 24 h. Our research is focused on studying and understanding the structure of this class of composites, aiming at the development of novel materials, controlled at the nanolevel scale. The X-ray diffraction technique was employed in order to study the kinetic of hydroxyapatite formation in the chitosan matrix as well as to determine the HAp crystallite sizes in the composite samples. The hydroxyapatite synthesized using this route was found to be nano-sized (15-50 nm). Moreover, applying an original approach to analyze the (002) XRD diffraction peak profile of hydroxyapatite by using a sum of two Gauss functions, the bimodal distribution of nanosized hydroxyapatite within the chitosan matrix was revealed. Two types of size distribution domains such as cluster-like (between 200 and 400 nm), which are the habitat of ''small'' hydroxyapatite nanocrystallites and scattered-like, which are the habitat of ''large'' hydroxyapatite nanocrystallites was probed by TEM and CSLM. The structural features of composites suggest that self-assembly processes might be involved. The composites contain nanosized hydroxyapatite with structural features close to those of biological apatites that make them attractive for bone

  7. Control of size and density of InAs/(Al,Ga)As self-organized islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the influence of the chemical composition of the (Al,Ga)As surface on the formation of strain induced three-dimensional (3D) InAs islands. The experiments have been carried out using a molecular beam epitaxy facility combined with a scanning tunneling microscope enabling in situ surface characterization. The evolution of the density and morphology of these islands is investigated as a function of the Al composition. The InAs deposition, substrate temperature, and annealing time effects on the island formation and morphology are studied. The morphologies of the (Al,Ga)As surface as well as that of the reconstructed InAs 'wetting layer' are also described. Results indicate that there are major differences between the InAs/GaAs and the InAs/AlAs systems despite the same lattice mismatch. We observe these differences varying the aluminum content in the starting (Al,Ga)As surface. We show that control of the Al fraction leads to control of the size and density of the 3D islands. The control of island density and size as well as the growth mode of these islands is explained by considering the difference in surface mobility and cation intermixing between these two systems. Our observation is that strain energy is not the only parameter governing the formation of 3D islands but the chemical nature of the different layers involved is proved to significantly affect island properties. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  8. A microchip to analyze single crystal growth and size-controllability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A microfluidic device to control single crystallization on the micron scale has been developed. The salt solution was stored in the nano-volume gaps between the arrays of protrudent circular plots in the microchip. The mixed organic solvent was injected into the chip as the counter diffusion phase for crystallization forming. This device provides a liquid-liquid interface through which only one phase flows while the other stays at the fixed plot. Therefore, it is possible to control the position of crystallization on the fixed plot. We can control the size and the uniformity of single crystals from 5 to 50 μm in length by adjusting the relative factors, such as interface lifetime, breeds of the mix-organic solvents and injecting velocities. The longer interface lifetime and lower organic solvent injecting velocities can bring up larger and more asymmetric crystals, which nearly shows the same trend compared with the macroscopic crystallization. Finally, the effect of the surfactant on the crystallization in the microdevice was studied. By adding the surfactant into the liquid-liquid interface, smaller sizes of crystals can be obtained without changing the crystal configuration.

  9. A hybrid mathematical model for controlling particle size, particle size distribution, and color properties of toner particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataeefard, Maryam; Shadman, Alireza; Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Mohammadi, Yousef

    2016-08-01

    A mathematical modeling approach was proposed combining the capabilities of response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF) and implemented successfully in production of printing toner particles. Toner powders were systematically synthesized through suspension copolymerization process. Applying RSM, a series of experiments were designed and toner particles were prepared and the effects of monomer ratio, colorant and surfactant content on the particle size (PS), particle size distribution (PSD), thermal and colorimetric properties (∆ E) of the resulting toner were monitored and discussed. The second-order models corresponding to each target characteristic, i.e., PS, PSD, and ∆ E of different types of toner powders, were obtained by individual optimization to express variation of each property in terms of polymerization parameters. Applying statistical calculations, the best reduced models were identified to be fed in the second step of optimization. Since toners with appropriate PS, PSD, and CP were needed, we applied multi-objective optimization based on DF approach. The results show that exact tuning of toner properties is closely possible with the aid of hybrid mathematical model developed in this work. Noticeably, desirabilities are very close to 100 %.

  10. Nanostructured titanium dioxide: a control of crystallite size and content of polymorphic phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TiO2 (titanium dioxide) powders and nanoparticles have been largely used in toners and cosmetics. Nowadays, they are mainly focused in photocatalysis, antibacterial coatings, dye-sensitized solar cells, etc. The efficiency is related to photocatalytic properties of TiO2 nanoparticles, such as crystallite size and phase (anatasio/rutile). In this research, flame aerosol method was used to synthesize TiO2 nanoparticles by hydrolysis and oxidation of TiCl4 (titanium tetrachloride). The oxy-hydrogen flame was provided by a five concentric nozzle silica burner. X-ray diffraction was used to identify each TiO2 nanoparticles phase and scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the size and morphology of nanoparticles. Pure anatase was obtained with H2/O2 ratio ≤ 1.0, and up to 52 wt% of rutile was obtained with H2/O2 ratio > 2.0. Anatase crystal grain size varied from 25 to 38 nm, estimated by Scherrer formula.(author)

  11. Continuous medium exchange and cell isolation by size-selective passage through slanted micro-obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to isolate cells from contaminant particles such as cellular debris and simultaneously exchange the carrier medium of the cells is important for obtaining experimental integrity and optimal cell health. Although microfluidic manipulation techniques have demonstrated their ability to exchange the carrier medium of cells, they still require large device footprint (typically several cm2) that makes it difficult for them to be integrated into microfluidic systems. Here, we report a microfluidic device that overcomes the limitation by utilizing size-selective passage through slanted obstacles. A gap formed underneath the obstacles allows passage of small contaminant particles, while directing larger cells along the periphery of the obstacles. We demonstrated the utility of our device in a small device footprint of 0.05 mm2 for efficient exchange of the carrier medium of mammalian cells, and achieved isolation of the cells from 1 µm diameter contaminant particles in 4.4 ms with an enrichment factor of 834, an isolation purity of ≈70%, and a throughput of 465 cells min−1. (paper)

  12. Analysis of a Stochastic Model for Bacterial Growth and the Lognormality of the Cell-Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ken; Wakita, Jun-ichi

    2016-07-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell division and the linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We find that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values that give a good lognormal approximation; thus, the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  13. Analysis of a stochastic model for bacterial growth and the lognormality in the cell-size distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell divisions and linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We derive that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values which give good lognormal approximation, so the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  14. Colloidal synthesis of greigite nanoplates with controlled lateral size for electrochemical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Li, Huanhuan; Wu, Zhennan; Hao, Hongxia; Liu, Jiale; Huang, Tingting; Sun, Haizhu; Zhang, Jingping; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Zuoxing

    2015-02-01

    The excellent electrochemical performance of greigite (Fe3S4) coupled with its vast abundance and low toxicity make it a good prospect as an anode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). In this research, a simple and feasible approach for producing pure phase, small sized, shape-controllable, and stable Fe3S4 nanoplates (NPs) through hot injection of sulfur solution into Fe(iii) solution was demonstrated. The growth of Fe3S4 NPs involves the primary formation of a pyrite (FeS2) nucleus and subsequent Fe(iii) doping. The lateral size of the Fe3S4 NPs was controlled further by tuning the experimental variable-dependent reactivity of Fe sources in the nucleation and growth stage. The Fe3S4 NPs embedded in LIBs present a low electrochemical resistance and are highly active in lithiation/delithiation processes.The excellent electrochemical performance of greigite (Fe3S4) coupled with its vast abundance and low toxicity make it a good prospect as an anode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). In this research, a simple and feasible approach for producing pure phase, small sized, shape-controllable, and stable Fe3S4 nanoplates (NPs) through hot injection of sulfur solution into Fe(iii) solution was demonstrated. The growth of Fe3S4 NPs involves the primary formation of a pyrite (FeS2) nucleus and subsequent Fe(iii) doping. The lateral size of the Fe3S4 NPs was controlled further by tuning the experimental variable-dependent reactivity of Fe sources in the nucleation and growth stage. The Fe3S4 NPs embedded in LIBs present a low electrochemical resistance and are highly active in lithiation/delithiation processes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: AFM images, EDX measurements, TEM images, XRD pattern, absorption spectra, EIS profile, and CV curves of the as-synthesized iron sulfide nanocrystals. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06927g

  15. Size-controlled growth of colloidal gold nanoplates and their high-purity acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A facile while flexible approach to size-controllable high-purity colloidal gold nanoplates has been presented. By adjusting the quantity of seeds and I- through a seed-mediated, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr)-assisted synthetic system, the edge length of the gold nanoplates can be adjusted from 140 to 30 nm without changing their thickness or crystal structure. By simply increasing the ion concentration of the reaction solution, the as-prepared gold nanoplates can be deposited due to the different electrostatic aggregation effects between nanoplates and spherical nanoparticles. Effective storage methods to keep the structural and optical stability of these gold nanoplates are also proposed.

  16. Synthesis of titanium-oxide nanoparticles with size and stoichiometry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ti–O nanoparticles have been synthesized via hollow cathode sputtering in an Ar–O2 atmosphere using high power pulsing. It is shown that the stoichiometry and the size of the nanoparticles can be varied independently, the former through controlling the O2 gas flow and the latter by the independent biasing of two separate anodes in the growth zone. Nanoparticles with diameters in the range of 25–75 nm, and with different Ti–O compositions and crystalline phases, have been synthesized

  17. Synthesis of titanium-oxide nanoparticles with size and stoichiometry control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnarsson, Rickard, E-mail: ricgu@ifm.liu.se; Helmersson, Ulf [Linköping University, Plasma & Coatings Physics Division, IFM-Material Science (Sweden); Pilch, Iris [Linköping University, Thin Film Physics Division, IFM-Material Science (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    Ti–O nanoparticles have been synthesized via hollow cathode sputtering in an Ar–O{sub 2} atmosphere using high power pulsing. It is shown that the stoichiometry and the size of the nanoparticles can be varied independently, the former through controlling the O{sub 2} gas flow and the latter by the independent biasing of two separate anodes in the growth zone. Nanoparticles with diameters in the range of 25–75 nm, and with different Ti–O compositions and crystalline phases, have been synthesized.

  18. Brood-cell size has no influence on the population dynamics of Varroa destructor mites in the native western honey bee, Apis mellifera mellifera

    OpenAIRE

    Coffey, Mary F.; Breen, John; Brown, Mark J.F.; Mcmullan, John B.

    2010-01-01

    The varroa mite (Varroa destructor) is an ectoparasite of the western honeybee Apis mellifera that reproduces in the brood cells. The mite will generally kill colonies unless treatment is given, and this almost universally involves the use of chemicals. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of small cell size on the reproductive success of the mite, as a method of non-chemical control in the Northern European honeybee Apis mellifera mellifera. Test colonies with alternating small an...

  19. Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Hase, M; Hamada, T; Yoshikawa, K; Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE into a bilayer. The lipid vesicle can then be transported back into the oil phase. This novel experimental procedure may be a useful tool for creating a model cellular system, which, together with a microreactor, is applicable as a micrometer-scale biochemical reaction field.

  20. Toxicity of nano- and micro-sized ZnO particles in human lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first comprehensive study to evaluate the cytotoxicity, biochemical mechanisms of toxicity, and oxidative DNA damage caused by exposing human bronchoalveolar carcinoma-derived cells (A549) to 70 and 420 nm ZnO particles. Particles of either size significantly reduced cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner within a rather narrow dosage range. Particle mass-based dosimetry and particle-specific surface area-based dosimetry yielded two distinct patterns of cytotoxicity in both 70 and 420 nm ZnO particles. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulted in intracellular oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, cell membrane leakage, and oxidative DNA damage. The protective effect of N-acetylcysteine on ZnO-induced cytotoxicity further implicated oxidative stress in the cytotoxicity. Free Zn2+ and metal impurities were not major contributors of ROS induction as indicated by limited free Zn2+ cytotoxicity, extent of Zn2+ dissociation in the cell culture medium, and inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry metal analysis. We conclude that (1) exposure to both sizes of ZnO particles leads to dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity reflected in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, cell membrane damage, and oxidative DNA damage, (2) ZnO particles exhibit a much steeper dose-response pattern unseen in other metal oxides, and (3) neither free Zn2+ nor metal impurity in the ZnO particle samples is the cause of cytotoxicity.

  1. The CTA medium size telescope prototype, a test bench for the array control software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array) will be the largest ground-based gamma-ray observatory ever built. Two arrays are foreseen to be build, one in the Southern and one in the Northern hemisphere. A prototype for the Medium Size Telescope (MST) type (diameter: 12 m) will be installed in Berlin in early 2012. This MST prototype will be composed of the mechanical structure, drive system and mirror facets with an active mirror control system. The stability of the mechanical structure will be investigated with CCD cameras and a weather station. Furthermore the ALMA Common Software (ACS) distributed control framework will used as readout and control system for the MST, allowing to evaluate the software with the future use for the whole CTA array in mind. The design of the control software is following the concepts and tools under evaluation within the CTA consortium, like the use of a UML based code generation framework for ACS component modeling, and the use of OPC Unified Architecture (OPC UA) for hardware access. In this contribution the progress in the implementation of the control system for this CTA prototype telescope is described.

  2. A polarised population of dynamic microtubules mediates homeostatic length control in animal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigio Picone

    Full Text Available Because physical form and function are intimately linked, mechanisms that maintain cell shape and size within strict limits are likely to be important for a wide variety of biological processes. However, while intrinsic controls have been found to contribute to the relatively well-defined shape of bacteria and yeast cells, the extent to which individual cells from a multicellular animal control their plastic form remains unclear. Here, using micropatterned lines to limit cell extension to one dimension, we show that cells spread to a characteristic steady-state length that is independent of cell size, pattern width, and cortical actin. Instead, homeostatic length control on lines depends on a population of dynamic microtubules that lead during cell extension, and that are aligned along the long cell axis as the result of interactions of microtubule plus ends with the lateral cell cortex. Similarly, during the development of the zebrafish neural tube, elongated neuroepithelial cells maintain a relatively well-defined length that is independent of cell size but dependent upon oriented microtubules. A simple, quantitative model of cellular extension driven by microtubules recapitulates cell elongation on lines, the steady-state distribution of microtubules, and cell length homeostasis, and predicts the effects of microtubule inhibitors on cell length. Together this experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that microtubule dynamics impose unexpected limits on cell geometry that enable cells to regulate their length. Since cells are the building blocks and architects of tissue morphogenesis, such intrinsically defined limits may be important for development and homeostasis in multicellular organisms.

  3. Systematic Modelling and Crystal Size Distribution Control for Batch Crystallization Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Samad, Noor Asma Fazli; Singh, Ravendra; Sin, Gürkan;

    Analytical Technology (PAT) system needs to be available. That is, the design of process control and product monitoring system that will obtain the desired end-product properties is also needed. The generic multi-dimensional model-based framework of batch cooling crystallization processes has been developed...... desired CSD is achieved, an appropriate Process Analytical Technology (PAT) system needs to be available. That is, the design of process control and product monitoring system that will obtain the desired end-product properties is also needed.......Crystallization processes form an important class of separation methods that are frequently used in the chemical, the pharmaceutical and the food industry. The specifications of the crystal product are usually given in terms of crystal size, shape and purity. In order to predict the desired crystal...

  4. JNK1 Controls Dendritic Field Size in L2/3 and L5 of the Motor Cortex, Constrains Soma Size and Influences Fine Motor Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia eKomulainen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic anomalies on the JNK pathway confer susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia and intellectual disability. The mechanism whereby a gain or loss of function in JNK signaling predisposes to these prevalent dendrite disorders, with associated motor dysfunction, remains unclear. Here we find that JNK1 regulates the dendritic field of L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons of the mouse motor cortex (M1, the main excitatory pathway controlling voluntary movement. In Jnk1-/- mice, basal dendrite branching of L5 pyramidal neurons is increased in M1, as is cell soma size, whereas in L2/3, dendritic arborization is decreased. We show that JNK1 phosphorylates rat HMW-MAP2 on T1619, T1622 and T1625 (Uniprot P15146 corresponding to mouse T1617, T1620, T1623, to create a binding motif, that is critical for MAP2 interaction with and stabilization of microtubules, and dendrite growth control. Targeted expression in M1 of GFP-HMW-MAP2 that is pseudo-phosphorylated on T1619, T1622 and T1625 increases dendrite complexity in L2/3 indicating that JNK1 phosphorylation of HMW-MAP2 regulates the dendritic field. Consistent with the morphological changes observed in L2/3 and L5, Jnk1-/- mice exhibit deficits in limb placement and motor coordination, while stride length is reduced in older animals. In summary, JNK1 phosphorylates HMW-MAP2 to increase its stabilization of microtubules while at the same time controlling dendritic fields in the main excitatory pathway of M1. Moreover, JNK1 contributes to normal functioning of fine motor coordination. We report for the first time, a quantitative sholl analysis of dendrite architecture, and of motor behavior in Jnk1-/- mice. Our results illustrate the molecular and behavioral consequences of interrupted JNK1 signaling and provide new ground for mechanistic understanding of those prevalent neuropyschiatric disorders where genetic disruption of the JNK pathway is central.

  5. Segmented Polyurethane Nanocomposites: Impact of Controlled Particle Size Nanofillers on the Morphological Response to Uniaxial Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnigan, Bradley; Jack, Kevin; Campbell, Kayleen; Halley, Peter; Truss, Rowan; Casey, Phil; Cookson, David; King, Stephen; Martin, Darren (Rutherford); (ASRP); (Queensland); (CSIRO)

    2008-10-03

    A series of TPU nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating organically modified layered silicates with controlled particle size. To our knowledge, this is the first study into the effects of layered silicate diameter in polymer nanocomposites utilizing the same mineral for each size fraction. The tensile properties of these materials were found to be highly dependent upon the size of the layered silicates. A decrease in disk diameter was associated with a sharp upturn in the stress-strain curve and a pronounced increase in tensile strength. Results from SAXS/SANS experiments showed that the layered silicates did not affect the bulk TPU microphase structure and the morphological response of the host TPU to deformation or promote/hinder strain-induced soft segment crystallization. The improved tensile properties of the nanocomposites containing the smaller nanofillers resulted from the layered silicates aligning in the direction of strain and interacting with the TPU sequences via secondary bonding. This phenomenon contributes predominantly above 400% strain once the microdomain architecture has largely been disassembled. Large tactoids that are unable to align in the strain direction lead to concentrated tensile stresses between the polymer and filler, instead of desirable shear stresses, resulting in void formation and reduced tensile properties. In severe cases, such as that observed for the composite containing the largest silicate, these voids manifest visually as stress whitening.

  6. Shape-controlled synthesis of highly monodisperse and small size gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We describe here that fine control of nanoparticle shape and size can be achieved by systematic varia-tion of experimental parameters in the seeded growth procedure in aqueous solution. Cubic and spherical gold nanoparticles are obtained respectively. In particularly, the Au cubes are highly mono-disperse in 33±2 nm diameter. The experimental methods involve the preparation of Au seed particles and the subsequent addition of an appropriate quantity of Au seed solution to the aqueous growth solutions containing desired quantities of CTAB and ascorbic acid (AA). Here, AA is a weak reducing agent and CTAB is not only a stable agent for nanoparticles but also an inductive agent for leading increase in the face of nanoparticle. Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to characterize the nanoparticles. The results show that the different size gold nanoparticles displayed high size homogenous distribution and formed mono-membrane at the air/solid interface.

  7. Finite element analysis of micropipette aspiration considering finite size and compressibility of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YongSheng; Chen, WeiYi

    2013-11-01

    Micropipette aspiration (MA) is widely applied in cell mechanics, however, at small deformations a common model corresponding to the MA is the half-space model wherein the finite cell size and cell compressibility are neglected. This study extends the half-space model by accounting for the influence of cell geometry and compressibility (sphere model). Using a finite element analysis of cell aspiration into a micropipette, an elastic approximation formula of the aspirated length was derived for the sphere model. The approximation formula includes the geometry parameter ξ of the sphere model ( ξ= R/ a, R is the radius of the cell, and a is the inner radius of the micropipette) and the Poisson's ratio v of the cell. The results indicate that the parameter ξ and Poisson's ratio v markedly affect the aspirated length, particularly for small ξ and v. When ξ→∞ and v→0.5, the approximation formula tends to the analytical solution for the half-space model. In the incompressible case ( v = 0.5), within the general experimental range ( ξ varying from 2 to 4), the difference between the analytical solution and the approximate one is significant, and is up to 29% of the approximation solution when ξ = 2. Additionally, parametere was introduced to evaluate the error of elastic moduli between the half-space model and sphere model. Based on the approximation formula, the ξ thresholds, beyond which e becomes larger than 10% and 20%, were derived.

  8. Experimental study of commercial size proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial sized (16 x 16 cm2 active surface area) proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells with serpentine flow chambers are fabricated. The GORE-TEX (registered) PRIMEA 5621 was used with a 35-μm-thick PEM with an anode catalyst layer with 0.45 mg cm-2 Pt and cathode catalyst layer with 0.6 mg cm-2 Pt and Ru or GORE-TEX (registered) PRIMEA 57 was used with an 18-μm-thick PEM with an anode catalyst layer at 0.2 mg cm-2 Pt and cathode catalyst layer at 0.4 mg cm-2 of Pt and Ru. At the specified cell and humidification temperatures, the thin PRIMEA 57 membrane yields better cell performance than the thick PRIMEA 5621 membrane, since hydration of the former is more easily maintained with the limited amount of produced water. Sufficient humidification at both the cathode and anode sides is essential to achieve high cell performance with a thick membrane, like the PRIMEA 5621. The optimal cell temperature to produce the best cell performance with PRIMEA 5621 is close to the humidification temperature. For PRIMEA 57, however, optimal cell temperature exceeds the humidification temperature.

  9. Size-dependent cytotoxicity of europium doped NaYF{sub 4} nanoparticles in endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shizhu; Zhang, Cuimiao; Jia, Guang; Duan, Jianlei; Wang, Shuxiang, E-mail: wsx@hbu.edu.cn; Zhang, Jinchao, E-mail: jczhang6970@163.com

    2014-10-01

    Lanthanide-doped sodium yttrium fluoride (NaYF{sub 4}) nanoparticles exhibit novel optical properties which make them be widely used in various fields. The extensive applications increase the chance of human exposure to these nanoparticles and thus raise deep concerns regarding their riskiness. In the present study, we have synthesized europium doped NaYF{sub 4} (NaYF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+}) nanoparticles with three diameters and used endothelial cells (ECs) as a cell model to explore the potential toxic effect. The cell viability, cytomembrane integrity, cellular uptake, intracellular localization, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), apoptosis detection, caspase-3 activity and expression of inflammatory gene were studied. The results indicated that these nanoparticles could be uptaken into ECs and decrease the cell viability, induce the intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, increase the ROS level, and decrease the cell MMP in a size-dependent manner. Besides that, the cells were suffered to apoptosis with the caspase-3 activation, and the inflammation specific gene expressions (ICAM1 and VCAM1) were also increased. Our results suggest that the damage pathway may be related to the ROS generation and mitochondrial damage. The results provide novel evidence to elucidate their toxicity mechanisms and may be helpful for more rational applications of these compounds in the future. - Highlights: • NaYF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticles with three diameters have been synthesized. • NaYF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticles could be uptaken by endothelial cells (ECs). • NaYF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticles show a significant cytotoxicity on ECs. • The size of NaYF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticles may be important to their toxicology effect.

  10. Anodic aluminum oxide with fine pore size control for selective and effective particulate matter filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su; Wang, Yang; Tan, Yingling; Zhu, Jianfeng; Liu, Kai; Zhu, Jia

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution is widely considered as one of the most pressing environmental health issues. Particularly, atmospheric particulate matters (PM), a complex mixture of solid or liquid matter suspended in the atmosphere, are a harmful form of air pollution due to its ability to penetrate deep into the lungs and blood streams, causing permanent damages such as DNA mutations and premature death. Therefore, porous materials which can effectively filter out particulate matters are highly desirable. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate that anodic aluminum oxide with fine pore size control fabricated through a scalable process can serve as effective and selective filtering materials for different types of particulate matters (such as PM2.5, PM10). Combining selective and dramatic filtering effect, fine pore size control and a scalable process, this type of anodic aluminum oxide templates can potentially serve as a novel selective filter for different kinds of particulate matters, and a promising and complementary solution to tackle this serious environmental issue.

  11. Large 2D-arrays of size-controllable silver nanoparticles prepared by hybrid deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieu Thuy Ung, Thi; Hoa Nguyen, Thi; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2016-09-01

    Two main results are presented in this paper. (i) Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with uniform size-distribution and controllability in the range of 20–50 nm were synthesized by seeding and growing at ambient conditions. The single-crystal Ag nano-seeds were created by reduction of AgNO3 in presence of citrate surfactant at 70 °C. Then, importantly, the fresh AgCl precursor was used in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone to adjust the reaction rate with ascorbic acid to generate Ag for growing on the surface of single-crystal Ag nano-seeds. The AgNPs size could be well-controlled by varying the amount of Ag nano-seeds while keeping the AgCl precursor concentration to be constant. (ii) The large 2D-arrays with homogeneous and dense monolayers of AgNPs were prepared on ITO substrates by hybrid method, in which the key technological point is the surface functionalization of AgNPs using mixed alkanethiols (dodecanethiol:octadecanethiol = 6:1). We have used the fabricated 2D-arrays from the 50 nm AgNPs as a surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate to take the Raman scattering spectra of rhodamine B (RhB), glucose and viral pathogen (H5N1) at very low concentrations of 10‑10 M, 10‑12 M and 4 ng μl‑1, respectively.

  12. Paramagnetic properties of size-controlled squid ink particles dispersed in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paramagnetic properties of size-controlled ink particles isolated from the ink sacs of squid were studied by electron spin resonance (ESR). ESR spectra of the large and small ink particles dispersed in water were successfully observed at room temperature. Both the ink particles in aqueous suspensions seemingly indicated similar ESR spectra consisting of a singlet with a slightly asymmetrical signal. The linewidth below saturation was almost the same in both the ink particles, but the linewidth of the small ink particle was obviously broadened with an increase in microwave power. On the other hand, the progressive microwave power saturation revealed a clear difference between the paramagnetic behaviors of the ink particles in aqueous suspensions and in solid states. In comparison with dehydrated samples, the ESR signals of the ink particles dispersed in water showed the inhomogeneous broadening and faster spin-lattice relaxation processes. The fundamental characteristics of size-controlled ink particles would serve as basic information for various applications. (author)

  13. Replicon sizes in non-transformed and SV40-transformed cells, as estimated by a bromodeoxyuridine photolysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Replicon sizes were measured in Simian Virus 40 (SV40)-transformed and untransformed normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and mouse 3T3 cells with an x-ray plus bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) photolysis method. Replicon sizes in SV40-transformed cells were at least twice those in untransformed counterparts, but DNA fork displacement rates were only slightly increased

  14. Cell size distribution in a random tessellation of space governed by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model: Grain size distribution in crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Farjas Silva, Jordi; Roura Grabulosa, Pere

    2008-01-01

    The space subdivision in cells resulting from a process of random nucleation and growth is a subject of interest in many scientific fields. In this paper, we deduce the expected value and variance of these distributions while assuming that the space subdivision process is in accordance with the premises of the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model. We have not imposed restrictions on the time dependency of nucleation and growth rates. We have also developed an approximate analytical cell size ...

  15. Effects of meal size and composition on incretin, alpha-cell, and beta-cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M; McQuarrie, Kelly; Girman, Cynthia J;

    2009-01-01

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate postprandial insulin release from the beta-cells. We investigated the effects of 3 standardized meals with different caloric and nutritional content in terms of postprandial glucose, insu...

  16. Epigenetic control of cell identity and plasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Orlando, Valerio

    2014-04-02

    The DNA centered dogma for genetic information and cell identity is now evolving into a much more complex and flexible dimension provided by the discovery of the Epigenome. This comprises those chromosome structural and topological components that complement DNA information and contribute to genome functional organization. Current concept is that the Epigenome constitutes the dynamic molecular interface allowing the Genome to interact with the Environment. Exploring how the genome interacts with the environment is a key to fully understand cellular and complex organism mechanisms of adaptation and plasticity. Our work focuses on the role of an essential, specialized group or chromatin associated proteins named Polycomb (PcG) that control maintenance of transcription programs during development and in adult life. In particular PcG proteins exert epigenetic “memory” function by modifying chromosome structures at various levels to maintain gene silencing in particular through cell division. While in the past decade substantial progress was made in understanding PcG mechanisms acting in development and partially during cell cycle, very little is known about their role in adult post-mitotic tissues and more in general the role of the epigenome in adaptation. To this, we studied the role of PcG in the context of mammalian skeletal muscle cell differentiation. We previously reported specific dynamics of PRC2 proteins in myoblasts and myotubes, in particular the dynamics of PcG Histone H3 K27 Methyl Transferases (HMT), EZH2 and EZH1, the latter apparently replacing for EZH2 in differentiated myotubes. Ezh1 protein, although almost identical to Ezh2, shows a weak H3K27 HMT activity and its primary function remains elusive. Recent ChIPseq studies performed in differentiating muscle cells revealed that Ezh1 associates with active and not repressed regulatory regions to control RNA pol II elongation. Since H3K27 tri-methylation levels are virtually steady in non

  17. Support for the initial attachment, growth and differentiation of MG-63 cells: a comparison between nano-size hydroxyapatite and micro-size hydroxyapatite in composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filová E

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Elena Filová,1 Tomáš Suchý,2,3 Zbynek Sucharda,2 Monika Šupová,2 Margit Žaloudková,2 Karel Balík,2 Vera Lisá,1 Miroslav Šlouf,4 Lucie Bacáková11Department of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Institute of Physiology, 2Department of Composite and Carbon Materials, Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 3Laboratory of Biomechanics, Department of Mechanics, Biomechanics and Mechatronics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, CTU in Prague, 4Department of Morphology and Rheology of Polymer Materials, Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech RepublicAbstract: Hydroxyapatite (HA is considered to be a bioactive material that favorably influences the adhesion, growth, and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts. To optimize the cell response on the hydroxyapatite composite, it is desirable to assess the optimum concentration and also the optimum particle size. The aim of our study was to prepare composite materials made of polydimethylsiloxane, polyamide, and nano-sized (N or micro-sized (M HA, with an HA content of 0%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% (v/v (referred to as N0–N25 or M0–M25, and to evaluate them in vitro in cultures with human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. For clinical applications, fast osseointegration of the implant into the bone is essential. We observed the greatest initial cell adhesion on composites M10 and N5. Nano-sized HA supported cell growth, especially during the first 3 days of culture. On composites with micro-size HA (2%–15%, MG-63 cells reached the highest densities on day 7. Samples M20 and M25, however, were toxic for MG-63 cells, although these composites supported the production of osteocalcin in these cells. On N2, a higher concentration of osteopontin was found in MG-63 cells. For biomedical applications, the concentration range of 5%–15% (v/v nano-size or micro-size HA seems to be optimum

  18. Ecological effects of cell-level processes: genome size, functional traits and regional abundance of herbaceous plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herben, Tomáš; Suda, Jan; Klimešová, Jitka; Mihulka, Stanislav; Říha, Pavel; Šímová, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Genome size is known to be correlated with a number of phenotypic traits associated with cell sizes and cell-division rates. Genome size was therefore used as a proxy for them in order to assess how common plant traits such as height, specific leaf area and seed size/number predict species regional abundance. In this study it is hypothesized that if there is residual correlation between genome size and abundance after these traits are partialled out, there must be additional ecological effects of cell size and/or cell-division rate. Methods Variation in genome size, plant traits and regional abundance were examined in 436 herbaceous species of central European flora, and relationships were sought for among these variables by correlation and path analysis. Key Results Species regional abundance was weakly but significantly correlated with genome size; the relationship was stronger for annuals (R2 = 0·145) than for perennials (R2 = 0·027). In annuals, genome size was linked to abundance via its effect on seed size, which constrains seed number and hence population growth rate. In perennials, it weakly affected (via height and specific leaf area) competitive ability. These relationships did not change qualitatively after phylogenetic correction. In both annuals and perennials there was an unresolved effect of genome size on abundance. Conclusions The findings indicate that additional predictors of regional abundance should be sought among variables that are linked to cell size and cell-division rate. Signals of these cell-level processes remain identifiable even at the landscape scale, and show deep differences between perennials and annuals. Plant population biology could thus possibly benefit from more systematic use of indicators of cell-level processes. PMID:22628380

  19. Changes in the number and size of nucleoli of Chara vulgaris L. antheridial filament cells during the period preceding light-induced re-initiation of cell divisions following a mitodepressive effect of darkness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kwiatkowska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The changes in number and size of nucleoli of Chara vulgaris antheridial filament cells were monitored with the use of Howell and Black's silver staining method. After a 3-day mitodepressive treatment with darkness the cells were exposed to light which reactivated mitotic activity after 18-20 hours. Eight-celled antheridial filaments were observed. In the period preceding light-induced re-initiation of mitoses a gradual reconstruction of the number and size of nucleoli characteristic of control, as well as their total area per nucleus appeared. The obtained results indicate that one of the important conditions for a cell to be able to divide is accumulation of nucleolus components characteristic of a given developmental stage and this controls nucleologenesis of the subsequent cell cycle.

  20. Arrays of size and distance controlled platinum nanoparticles fabricated by a colloidal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzke, Achim; Vogel, Nicolas; Weiss, Clemens K.; Ziener, Ulrich; Plettl, Alfred; Landfester, Katharina; Ziemann, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Based on emulsion polymerization in the presence of a Pt complex, polystyrene (PS) particles were prepared exhibiting a well defined average diameter with narrow size-distribution. Furthermore, the colloids contain a controlled concentration of the Pt precursor complex. Optimized coating of Si substrates with such colloids leads to extended areas of hexagonally ordered close-packed PS particles. Subsequent application of plasma etching and annealing steps allows complete removal of the PS carriers and in parallel nucleation and growth of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) which are located at the original center of the PS colloids. In this way, hexagonally arranged spherical Pt NPs are obtained with controlled size and interparticle distances demonstrating variability and precision with so far unknown parameter scalability. This control is demonstrated by the fabrication of Pt NP arrays at a fixed particle distance of 185 nm while systematically varying the diameters between 8 and 15 nm. Further progress could be achieved by seeded emulsion polymerization. Here, Pt loaded PS colloids of 130 nm were used as seeds for a subsequent additional emulsion polymerization, systematically enlarging the diameter of the PS particles. Applying the plasma and annealing steps as above, in this way hexagonally ordered arrays of 9 nm Pt NPs could be obtained at distances up to 260 nm. To demonstrate their stability, such Pt particles were used as etching masks during reactive ion etching thereby transferring their hexagonal pattern into the Si substrate resulting in corresponding arrays of nanopillars.Based on emulsion polymerization in the presence of a Pt complex, polystyrene (PS) particles were prepared exhibiting a well defined average diameter with narrow size-distribution. Furthermore, the colloids contain a controlled concentration of the Pt precursor complex. Optimized coating of Si substrates with such colloids leads to extended areas of hexagonally ordered close-packed PS particles

  1. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkhovskaya, Olesya V; Zorin, Daniil Yu; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity. PMID:25275470

  2. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya V Bolkhovskaya

    Full Text Available Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity.

  3. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide with a long-range order and tunable cell sizes by phosphoric acid anodization on pre-patterned substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawathanawises, Krissada; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2014-01-01

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) has been explored for various applications due to its regular cell arrangement and relatively easy fabrication processes. However, conventional two-step anodization based on self-organization only allows the fabrication of a few discrete cell sizes and formation of small domains of hexagonally packed pores. Recent efforts to pre-pattern aluminum followed with anodization significantly improve the regularity and available pore geometries in AAO, while systematic study of the anodization condition, especially the impact of acid composition on pore formation guided by nanoindentation is still lacking. In this work, we pre-patterned aluminium thin films using ordered monolayers of silica beads and formed porous AAO in a single-step anodization in phosphoric acid. Controllable cell sizes ranging from 280 nm to 760 nm were obtained, matching the diameters of the silica nanobead molds used. This range of cell size is significantly greater than what has been reported for AAO formed in phosphoric acid in the literature. In addition, the relationships between the acid concentration, cell size, pore size, anodization voltage and film growth rate were studied quantitatively. The results are consistent with the theory of oxide formation through an electrochemical reaction. Not only does this study provide useful operational conditions of nanoindentation induced anodization in phosphoric acid, it also generates significant information for fundamental understanding of AAO formation. PMID:24535886

  4. ALFY-Controlled DVL3 Autophagy Regulates Wnt Signaling, Determining Human Brain Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotem Kadir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary microcephaly is a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder of reduced head circumference and brain volume, with fewer neurons in the cortex of the developing brain due to premature transition between symmetrical and asymmetrical cellular division of the neuronal stem cell layer during neurogenesis. We now show through linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing, that a dominant mutation in ALFY, encoding an autophagy scaffold protein, causes human primary microcephaly. We demonstrate the dominant effect of the mutation in drosophila: transgenic flies harboring the human mutant allele display small brain volume, recapitulating the disease phenotype. Moreover, eye-specific expression of human mutant ALFY causes rough eye phenotype. In molecular terms, we demonstrate that normally ALFY attenuates the canonical Wnt signaling pathway via autophagy-dependent removal specifically of aggregates of DVL3 and not of Dvl1 or Dvl2. Thus, autophagic attenuation of Wnt signaling through removal of Dvl3 aggregates by ALFY acts in determining human brain size.

  5. Size-dependent cytotoxicity of europium doped NaYF ₄ nanoparticles in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shizhu; Zhang, Cuimiao; Jia, Guang; Duan, Jianlei; Wang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2014-10-01

    Lanthanide-doped sodium yttrium fluoride (NaYF4) nanoparticles exhibit novel optical properties which make them be widely used in various fields. The extensive applications increase the chance of human exposure to these nanoparticles and thus raise deep concerns regarding their riskiness. In the present study, we have synthesized europium doped NaYF4 (NaYF4:Eu(3+)) nanoparticles with three diameters and used endothelial cells (ECs) as a cell model to explore the potential toxic effect. The cell viability, cytomembrane integrity, cellular uptake, intracellular localization, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), apoptosis detection, caspase-3 activity and expression of inflammatory gene were studied. The results indicated that these nanoparticles could be uptaken into ECs and decrease the cell viability, induce the intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, increase the ROS level, and decrease the cell MMP in a size-dependent manner. Besides that, the cells were suffered to apoptosis with the caspase-3 activation, and the inflammation specific gene expressions (ICAM1 and VCAM1) were also increased. Our results suggest that the damage pathway may be related to the ROS generation and mitochondrial damage. The results provide novel evidence to elucidate their toxicity mechanisms and may be helpful for more rational applications of these compounds in the future. PMID:25175221

  6. Structure Sensitivity Study of Waterborne Contaminant Hydrogenation Using Shape- and Size-Controlled Pd Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2013-03-01

    Catalytic reduction with Pd has emerged as a promising technology to remove a suite of contaminants from drinking water, such as oxyanions, disinfection byproducts, and halogenated pollutants, but low activity is a major challenge for application. To address this challenge, we synthesized a set of shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles and evaluated the activity of three probe contaminants (i.e., nitrite, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and diatrizoate) as a function of facet type (e.g., (100), (110), (111)), ratios of low- to high-coordination sites, and ratios of surface sites to total Pd (i.e., dispersion). Reduction results for an initial contaminant concentration of 100 μM show that initial turnover frequency (TOF0) for nitrite increases 4.7-fold with increasing percent of (100) surface Pd sites (from 0% to 95.3%), whereas the TOF0 for NDMA and for diatrizoate increases 4.5- and 3.6-fold, respectively, with an increasing percent of terrace surface Pd sites (from 79.8% to 95.3%). Results for an initial nitrite concentration of 2 mM show that TOF0 is the same for all shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles. Trends for TOF0 were supported by results showing that all catalysts but one were stable in shape and size up to 12 days; for the exception, iodide liberation in diatrizoate reduction appeared to be responsible for a shape change of 4 nm octahedral Pd nanoparticles. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations for the free energy change of hydrogen (H2), nitrite, and nitric oxide (NO) adsorption and a two-site model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism suggest that competition of adsorbates for different Pd sites can explain the TOF0 results. Our study shows for the first time that catalytic reduction activity for waterborne contaminant removal varies with the Pd shape and size, and it suggests that Pd catalysts can be tailored for optimal performance to treat a variety of contaminants for drinking water. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Adaptive Step Size Control of LMS-based Interference Cancellationfor ICS Repeater in Wibro Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeong-gon KIM; Won-geon BAE; Won-seok CHOI

    2010-01-01

    The use of repeater for the support of high rate data transmission and the extension of cell coverage is imperative for the Wibrc system,which based on the IEEE 8M.16e standardization.Generally,if the separation between transmitting and receiving antennas isnot sufficient,the oscillation of repeater and the interference due to the feedback signals from original transmitted signal may be ocerur.Hence,the Interference Cancellation System(ICS)should be implemented as the important part of the repeater system far the mobile cellular systems in order to eliminate unwanted signals from the corruptW signals in the receiver.In this paper,we propose an adaptive technique for the Least Mean Square(LMS)-based interference cancellation methods by changing the step size according to the variation of channel environment in order to improve the performance degradation which oceuurs by using the fixed step size approach.Simrlatim results show that the proposed sclxme attains a little lower Berafor Rate(BER)performance and much faster convergence speed compared to the conventional LMS-based interference cancellation techniques.The proposed scheme can be applied to other Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple(OFDM)-based cellular systems and also be expected to achieve a similar performance improvement to W17-advanced system,which is called as the next generation mobile communication standards.

  8. Energy harvesting from organic liquids in micro-sized microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, J.E.

    2014-03-07

    Micro-sized microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are miniature energy harvesters that use bacteria to convert biomass from liquids into usable power. The key challenge is transitioning laboratory test beds into devices capable of producing high power using readily available fuel sources. Here, we present a pragmatic step toward advancing MFC applications through the fabrication of a uniquely mobile and inexpensive micro-sized device that can be fueled with human saliva. The 25-ll MFC was fabricated with graphene, a two-dimensional atomic crystal-structured material, as an anode for efficient current generation and with an air cathode for enabling the use of the oxygen present in air, making its operation completely mobile and free of the need for laboratory chemicals. With saliva as a fuel, the device produced higher current densities (1190 Am-3) than any previous aircathode micro-sized MFCs. The use of the graphene anode generated 40 times more power than that possible using a carbon cloth anode. Additional tests were performed using acetate, a conventional organic material, at high organic loadings that were comparable to those in saliva, and the results demonstrated a linear relationship between the organic loading and current. These findings open the door to saliva-powered applications of this fuel cell technology for Lab-on-a-Chip devices or portable point-of-care diagnostic devices. 2014 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved 1884-4057/14.

  9. 40 CFR 141.81 - Applicability of corrosion control treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems. 141.81 Section 141.81 Protection of... review the system's installation of treatment and designate optimal water quality control parameters... WATER REGULATIONS Control of Lead and Copper § 141.81 Applicability of corrosion control treatment...

  10. Hyperbranched polymer mediated size-controlled synthesis of gadolinium phosphate nanoparticles: colloidal properties and particle size-dependence on MRI relaxivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangville, Camille; Gallois, Maylis; Li, Yichen; Nguyen, Hong Hanh; Lauth-de Viguerie, Nancy; Talham, Daniel R.; Mingotaud, Christophe; Marty, Jean-Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Hyperbranched polymers based on the poly(amidoamine), HyPAM, were used to synthesize gadolinium phosphate nanowires under mild conditions. Control of the average particle size was obtained by adjusting polymer concentration. Proton relaxivity measurements reveal an optimum particle size, reaching relaxivity values as high as 55 +/- 9 mM-1 s-1 for r1 and 67 +/- 11 mM-1 s-1 for r2. The colloidal stability of these hybrid systems were optimized through the use of functionalized core-shell polymers containing PEG segments and C18-PEG segments, structures which also offer the possibility of imparting additional function into the polymer-particle hybrids.Hyperbranched polymers based on the poly(amidoamine), HyPAM, were used to synthesize gadolinium phosphate nanowires under mild conditions. Control of the average particle size was obtained by adjusting polymer concentration. Proton relaxivity measurements reveal an optimum particle size, reaching relaxivity values as high as 55 +/- 9 mM-1 s-1 for r1 and 67 +/- 11 mM-1 s-1 for r2. The colloidal stability of these hybrid systems were optimized through the use of functionalized core-shell polymers containing PEG segments and C18-PEG segments, structures which also offer the possibility of imparting additional function into the polymer-particle hybrids. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: NMR spectra and integrations versus gadolinium concentration; TEM pictures and corresponding sizes with size dispersions for GdPO4/HyPAM and functionalized core-shell hybrids; EDS elemental mapping measurement; relaxation rate plots; DLS correlogram for NaCl addition; Nile Red fluorescence excitation and emission spectra, cytotoxicity. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05064b

  11. Shape-and size-controlled Ag nanoparticles stabilized by in situ generated secondary amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ag nanoparticles were generated from Ag amido complexes AgNiPr2 and AgN(SiMe3)2. • Ag nanoparticles were stabilized by in situ generated HNiPr2 or HN(SiMe3)2. • 1 or 5 equiv. of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent decreases the average size of the particles. • Ethylenediamine favor the formation of spherical particles. - Abstract: Silver amides such as AgNiPr2 and AgN(SiMe3)2 have been employed successfully as precursors for the yield synthesis of silver nanoparticles under mild conditions of dihydrogen gas reduction (2 atm) in organic media. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of silver nanoparticles with FCC structure, variously sized from 26 to 35 nm for AgNiPr2 and from 14 to 86 nm for AgN(SiMe3)2, the synthesis could take place in absence of added stabilizers due to the in situ formation of secondary amines from the reaction of dihydrogen gas with the amide ligands of the silver precursor. Indeed, the presence of HNR2 (R = iPr2, N(SiMe3)2) on the surface of the nanoparticle was confirmed by spectroscopic means. Finally, the addition of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent allowed not only the control of the structural characteristics of the resulting Ag nanoparticles (well-dispersed with spherical shape), but that regarding the nanoparticle size as it inhibited overgrowth, limiting it to ca. 25 nm

  12. Shape-and size-controlled Ag nanoparticles stabilized by in situ generated secondary amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Meneses, E., E-mail: esther.ramirez@ibero.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongación Paseo de la Reforma 880, Lomas de Santa Fe, Distrito Federal C.P. 01219 (Mexico); Montiel-Palma, V. [Centro de Investigaciones Químicas, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001 Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Morelos C.P. 62209 (Mexico); Domínguez-Crespo, M.A.; Izaguirre-López, M.G. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada-IPN, Unidad Altamira. Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial, 89600 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Palacios-Gonzalez, E. [Laboratorio de Microscopia de Ultra alta Resolución, Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas No. 152, C.P. 07730 México D.F. (Mexico); Dorantes-Rosales, H. [Departamento de Metalurgia, E.S.I.Q.I.E.-I.P.N., Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Zacatenco, Delegación. Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ag nanoparticles were generated from Ag amido complexes AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • Ag nanoparticles were stabilized by in situ generated HN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} or HN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • 1 or 5 equiv. of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent decreases the average size of the particles. • Ethylenediamine favor the formation of spherical particles. - Abstract: Silver amides such as AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2} have been employed successfully as precursors for the yield synthesis of silver nanoparticles under mild conditions of dihydrogen gas reduction (2 atm) in organic media. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of silver nanoparticles with FCC structure, variously sized from 26 to 35 nm for AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and from 14 to 86 nm for AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, the synthesis could take place in absence of added stabilizers due to the in situ formation of secondary amines from the reaction of dihydrogen gas with the amide ligands of the silver precursor. Indeed, the presence of HNR{sub 2} (R = iPr{sub 2}, N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}) on the surface of the nanoparticle was confirmed by spectroscopic means. Finally, the addition of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent allowed not only the control of the structural characteristics of the resulting Ag nanoparticles (well-dispersed with spherical shape), but that regarding the nanoparticle size as it inhibited overgrowth, limiting it to ca. 25 nm.

  13. Fine Adjustment of Interfacial Potential between pH-Responsive Hydrogels and Cell-Sized Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzel, Cornelia; Veschgini, Mariam; Madsen, Jeppe; Lewis, Andrew L; Armes, Steven P; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-08-11

    We quantitatively determined interfacial potentials between cell-sized particles and stimulus-responsive hydrogels using a microinterferometer. The hydrogel is based on physically interconnected ABA triblock copolymer micelles comprising an inner biocompatible PMPC block and two outer pH-responsive PDPA blocks. The out-of-plane temporal fluctuation in the position of the cell-sized particles was calculated from changes in the interference pattern measured by Reflection Interference Contrast Microscopy (RICM), thus yielding the particle-substrate interaction potential V (Δh). Measurements in pH buffers ranging from 7.0 to 7.8 resulted in a systematic reduction in height of the potential minima ⟨Δh⟩ and a concomitant increase in the potential curvature V″ (Δh). The experimental data were analyzed by applying the modified Ross and Pincus model for polyelectrolytes, while accounting for gravitation, lubrication and van der Waals interactions. Elastic moduli calculated from V″ (Δh) were in good agreement with those measured by Atomic Force Microscopy. The ability to fine-tune both the gel elasticity and the interfacial potential at around physiological pH makes such triblock copolymer hydrogels a promising biocompatible substrate for dynamic switching of cell-material interactions. PMID:26190346

  14. Pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 is a glycolytic sensor differentially regulating cell proliferation, cell size and apoptotic cell death dependent on glucose supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoden, Gilles A. [Department of Cell Metabolism and Differentiation, Institute for Biomedical Aging Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Rennweg 10, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Tumorvirology Research Group, Tyrolean Cancer Research Institute, Medical University Innsbruck, Innrain 66, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Rostek, Ursula; Lechner, Stefan; Mitterberger, Maria [Department of Cell Metabolism and Differentiation, Institute for Biomedical Aging Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Rennweg 10, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mazurek, Sybille [Department for Biochemistry and Endocrinology, Veterinary Faculty, University of Giessen, 35392 Giessen (Germany); ScheBo Biotech AG, Netanyastrasse 3, 35394 Giessen (Germany); Zwerschke, Werner, E-mail: werner.zwerschke@oeaw.ac.at [Department of Cell Metabolism and Differentiation, Institute for Biomedical Aging Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Rennweg 10, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Tumorvirology Research Group, Tyrolean Cancer Research Institute, Medical University Innsbruck, Innrain 66, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2009-10-01

    The glycolytic key regulator pyruvate kinase M2 (M2-PK or PKM2) can switch between a highly active tetrameric and an inactive dimeric form. The transition between the two conformations regulates the glycolytic flux in tumor cells. We developed specific M2-PK-binding peptide aptamers which inhibit M2-PK, but not the 96% homologous M1-PK isoenzyme. In this study we demonstrate that, at normal blood glucose concentrations, peptide aptamer-mediated inhibition of M2-PK induces a significant decrease of the population doubling (PDL rate) and cell proliferation rate as well as an increase in cell size, whereas under glucose restriction an increase in PDL and cell proliferation rates but a decrease in cell size was observed. Moreover, M2-PK inhibition rescues cells from glucose starvation-induced apoptotic cell death by increasing the metabolic activity. These findings suggest that M2-PK is a metabolic sensor which regulates cell proliferation, cell growth and apoptotic cell death in a glucose supply-dependent manner.

  15. Surfactant-Assisted Nanocrystalline Zinc Coordination Polymers: Controlled Particle Sizes and Synergistic Effects in Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Wang, Huarui; Wang, Xiaolu; Gao, Kuan; Wu, Jie; Hou, Hongwei; Fan, Yaoting

    2016-04-25

    Different morphologies and particle sizes of two crystalline zinc-based coordination polymers (CPs), [Zn(pytz)H2 O]n (1; H2 pytz=2,6-bis(tetrazole)pyridine) and [Zn2 (pytz)2 4 H2 O] (2), from the bulk scale to the nanoscale, could be obtained under solvothermal conditions with different surfactants (polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or polyethylene glycol (PEG) 2000) as templates. PVP and PEG 2000 could act as capping and structure-directing agents, respectively, to influence the growth of crystalline particles and control their sizes. CP 1 exhibits a two-dimensional framework with window-like units and 2 shows a bimetallic structure. Nanocrystalline 1 and 2 were used as heterogeneous catalysts to study how adjacent catalytic active sites synergistically effected their catalytic reactivities in the direct catalytic conversion of aromatic dinitriles into oxazolines. The results showed that 1 produced bis-oxazolines as the sole products, whereas 2 gave the mono-oxazolines as the major products under the same reaction conditions. PMID:26997347

  16. Control of the kerf size and microstructure in Inconel 738 superalloy by femtosecond laser beam cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, J.; Ye, Y.; Sun, Z.; Liu, L.; Zou, G.

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond laser beam cutting is becoming widely used to meet demands for increasing accuracy in micro-machining. In this paper, the effects of processing parameters in femtosecond laser beam cutting on the kerf size and microstructure in Inconel 738 have been investigated. The defocus, pulse width and scanning speed were selected to study the controllability of the cutting process. Adjusting and matching the processing parameters was a basic enhancement method to acquire well defined kerf size and the high-quality ablation of microstructures, which has contributed to the intensity clamping effect. The morphology and chemical compositions of these microstructures on the cut surface have been characterized by a scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Additionally, the material removal mechanism and oxidation mechanism on the Inconel 738 cut surface have also been discussed on the basis of the femtosecond laser induced normal vaporization or phase explosion, and trapping effect of the dangling bonds.

  17. Increased monolayer domain size and patterned growth of tungsten disulfide through controlling surface energy of substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Kyle; Kang, Kyungnam; Fu, Shichen; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2016-08-01

    We report a surface energy-controlled low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of WS2 monolayers on SiO2 using pre-growth oxygen plasma treatment of substrates, facilitating increased monolayer surface coverage and patterned growth without lithography. Oxygen plasma treatment of the substrate caused an increase in the average domain size of WS2 monolayers by 78%  ±  2% while having a slight reduction in nucleation density, which translates to increased monolayer surface coverage. This substrate effect on growth was exploited to grow patterned WS2 monolayers by patterned plasma treatment on patterned substrates and by patterned source material with resolutions less than 10 µm. Contact angle-based surface energy measurements revealed a dramatic increase in polar surface energy. A growth model was proposed with lowered activation energies for growth and increased surface diffusion length consistent with the range of results observed. WS2 samples grown with and without oxygen plasma were similar high quality monolayers verified through transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, Raman, and photoluminescence measurements. This technique enables the production of large-grain size, patterned WS2 without a post-growth lithography process, thereby providing clean surfaces for device applications.

  18. Gripe water as reducing and stabilizing agent for synthesis of size controlled gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirubha, E; Palanisamy, P K

    2013-03-01

    Green synthesis techniques are emerging as more facile and eco-friendly approach for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles compared to chemical reduction methods. Herein we report a new approach to synthesize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using gripe water as a reducing as well as stabilizing agent. Good control over the size of the nanoparticles from 3.2 nm to 25 nm has been achieved with this method by simply varying the experimental conditions. The Surface Plasmon Resonance bands of tunable gold nanospheres with high monodispersity and polydispersity have been obtained by this technique and monitored using UV-Visible spectrum. The morphology and the size of these AuNPs are determined using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HR-TEM). X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis confirms the crystalline nature and the phase of the AuNPs. The as-synthesized AuNPs exhibit good optical nonlinearity. The nonlinear optical studies have been carried out by Z-scan technique to demonstrate its optical limiting property. The threshold limit of the AuNPs is obtained at a input intensity of 30 mW. The nonlinear refractive index of the nanoparticles is in the order of 10(-9) cm2/W and the third-order nonlinearity is estimated to be 7 x 10(-5) esu. PMID:23755681

  19. Size control in production and freeze-drying of poly-ε-caprolactone nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenková, Tereza; Fissore, Davide; Marchisio, Daniele L; Barresi, Antonello A

    2014-06-01

    This work is focused on the control of poly-ε-caprolactone nanoparticle characteristics, notably size and size distribution, in both the production and preservation (by using freeze-drying) stages. Nanoparticles were obtained by employing the solvent displacement method in a confined impinging jets mixer. The effect of several operating conditions, namely, initial polymer concentration and solvent-to-antisolvent flow rate ratio, and the influence of postprocessing conditions, such as final dilution and solvent evaporation, on nanoparticle characteristics was investigated. Further addition of antisolvent (water) after preparation was demonstrated to be effective in obtaining stable nanoparticles, that is, avoiding aggregation that would result in larger particles. On the contrary, solvent (acetone) evaporation was shown to have a small effect on the final nanoparticle characteristics. Eventually, freeze-drying of the solutions containing nanoparticles, after solvent evaporation, was also investigated. To ensure maximum nanoparticles stability, lyoprotectants (e.g., sucrose and mannitol) and steric stabilizers (e.g., Cremophor EL and Poloxamer 388) had to be added to the suspensions. The efficacy of the selected lyoprotectants, in the presence (or absence) of steric stabilizers, and in various concentrations, to avoid particle aggregation during the freeze-drying process was investigated, thus pointing to the optimal formulation. PMID:24737658

  20. Preparation of Size-Controlled Silver Nanoparticles and Chitin-Based Composites and Their Antimicrobial Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method for the preparation of size-controlled spherical silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) was reported for their generation by autoclaving a mixture of silver-containing glass powder and glucose. The particle size is regulated by the glucose concentration, with concentrations of 0.25, 1.0, and 4.0 wt % glucose providing small (3.48±1.83 nm in diameter), medium (6.53±1.78 nm), and large (12.9 ±2.5 nm) particles, respectively. In this study, Ag NP/chitin composites were synthesized by mixing each of these three Ag NP suspensions with a <5% deacetylated (DAc) chitin powder (ph 7.0) at room temperature. The Ag NPs were homogeneously dispersed and stably adsorbed onto the chitin. The Ag NP/chitin composites were obtained as yellow or brown powders. Approximately 5, 15, and 20 μg of the small, medium, and large Ag NPs, respectively, were estimated to maximally adsorb onto 1 mg of chitin. The bactericidal and antifungal activities of the Ag NP/chitin composites increased as the amount of Ag NPs in the chitin increased. Furthermore, smaller Ag NPs (per weight) in the chitin composites provided higher bactericidal and anti-fungal activities.

  1. Stress-controlled fatigue behaviour of micro-sized polycrystalline copper wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-sized polycrystalline copper wires with diameters of 30 μm and 50 μm and mean grain sizes of 12 μm and 20.5 μm respectively were cyclically loaded under stress control over a life range of 1 x 102-4.7 x 105 cycles using a recently developed fibre tensile loading frame at frequencies of 2-9.9 Hz. This frame fits into a scanning electron microscope for in situ deformation and fatigue studies. The fatigue life of the thicker wires, compared to that of the thinner ones, was found to be longer at higher applied stress amplitude range, but shorter at lower applied stress amplitude range. The measurements of the elongation versus the number of cycles revealed three distinct regimes with different slopes, corresponding to different microstructural changes. The total elongation of the wire during the cyclic loading with a low applied stress amplitude was analysed with respect to microstructural changes observed in situ in a scanning electron microscope.

  2. The effect of particle size distribution on the design of urban stormwater control measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.; Fienen, Michael N.; Horwatich, Judy A.; Bannerman, Roger T.

    2016-01-01

    An urban pollutant loading model was used to demonstrate how incorrect assumptions on the particle size distribution (PSD) in urban runoff can alter the design characteristics of stormwater control measures (SCMs) used to remove solids in stormwater. Field-measured PSD, although highly variable, is generally coarser than the widely-accepted PSD characterized by the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program (NURP). PSDs can be predicted based on environmental surrogate data. There were no appreciable differences in predicted PSD when grouped by season. Model simulations of a wet detention pond and catch basin showed a much smaller surface area is needed to achieve the same level of solids removal using the median value of field-measured PSD as compared to NURP PSD. Therefore, SCMs that used the NURP PSD in the design process could be unnecessarily oversized. The median of measured PSDs, although more site-specific than NURP PSDs, could still misrepresent the efficiency of an SCM because it may not adequately capture the variability of individual runoff events. Future pollutant loading models may account for this variability through regression with environmental surrogates, but until then, without proper site characterization, the adoption of a single PSD to represent all runoff conditions may result in SCMs that are under- or over-sized, rendering them ineffective or unnecessarily costly.

  3. Particle size control of silver nanoparticles prepared by pulsed wire discharge in liquid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver nanoparticles were prepared by pulsed wire discharge (PWD) using silver wire in deionized water at various relative energy (K) from 10 to 98, which is ratio of the charged energy of the capacitor in the electrical circuit to the vaporization energy of the wire. From energy deposition calculated by the measured voltage and current waveforms, deposited energy of the wire was increased with increasing K. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, prepared nanoparticles were phase identified as silver. From transmission electron microscopy observations, the shape of prepared silver nanoparticles were spherical and the median particle diameter (D50) and the geometric standard deviation (σg) were calculated from the particle distribution. D50 was decreased from 34 to 19 nm with increasing K. The particle size in prepared by PWD in liquid media can be controlled by K.

  4. Position-, size-, and shape-controlled highly crystalline ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Azusa N; Ono, Atsushi; Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: a-hattori@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center, Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1, Mihoga-oka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2011-10-14

    Highly ordered ZnO nanoboxes and nanowire structures with a width of {approx} 20 nm have been successfully fabricated by the combination of nanoimprint lithography and pulsed laser deposition utilizing a glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique. The periodicity, size, and shape of the ZnO nanoboxes and nanobelts can be easily controlled over a large area by changing the molds and deposition conditions. At the initial stage of growth by GLAD, nanonucleation led to nanopillar structures, which agglomerated to form nanobox and nanobelt structures at room temperature (RT). The ZnO nanostructures have a c-axis orientation along the nanopillar direction after postannealing and exhibit an intense cathodoluminescence peak around 380 nm at RT.

  5. Adaptive Traffic Control Systems in a medium-sized Scandinavian city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Niels; Olesen, Anne Vingaard

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive Traffic Control Systems (ATCS) are aimed at reducing congestion. ATCS adapt to approaching traffic to continuously optimise the traffic flows in question. ATCS have been implemented in many locations, including the Scandinavian countries, with various effects. Due to congestion problems......, ATCS were installed in the eight signalised intersections of a 1.7 km stretch of the ring road in the medium-sized Danish city of Aalborg. To measure the effect of ATCS a with/without study was carried out. GPS data from a car following the traffic, recorded transportation times for buses in service...... morning peak and midday off-peak. The effect on crossing and turning traffic was slight, and while reduced transportation time was found in one part of the ring road in another part transportation time was seen to increase. The benefit to the ring road was partly gained at the cost of slightly increased...

  6. Rapid Synthesis of Size-controlled Gold Nanoparticles by Complex Intramolecular Photoreduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Shou-an; YANG Sheng-chun; TANG Chun

    2007-01-01

    A rapid synthesis of size-controlled gold nanoparticles was proposed. The method is based on the sensitive intramolecular photoreduction reaction of Fe( Ⅲ )-EDTA complex in chloroacetic acid-sodium acetate buffer solution,where Fe(Ⅱ)-EDTA complex generated by photo-promotion acts as a reductant of AuCl4- ions. Gold nanoparticles formed were stabilized by EDTA ligand or other protective agents added. As a result, well-dispersed gold nanoparticles with an average diameter range of 6.7 to 50. 9 nm were obtained. According to the characterizations by the UV spectrum and TEM, the intramolecular charge transfer of the excited states of complex Fe(Ⅲ) -EDTA and the mechanism of forming gold nanoparticles were discussed in detail.

  7. The synthesis of size-controlled 3C-SiC nanoflakes and their photoluminescent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiujun; Ye, Ruquan; Peng, Zhiwei; Wang, Juanjuan; Fan, Ailing; Guo, Xia

    2016-06-01

    Size-controlled and high-purity 3C-SiC nanoflakes (NFs) are synthesized on the tips of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) carpets with a hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) method. The average diameter and height of SiC NFs can be tuned by changing the thickness of per-deposited Si and growth conditions. The growth process of the SiC NFs is suggested to be dominated by a vapor–solid (VS) mechanism. The prepared SiC NFs exhibit quantum-confinement effects, emitting strong violet-blue photoluminescence (PL) under ultraviolet excitation. The PL peak position changes from 410 to 416 nm as the excitation line increases from 290 to 400 nm. This result opens the possibility for the application of the luminescent solid-state freestanding 3C-SiC NFs in photonics as well as photonics/electronics integration.

  8. The synthesis of size-controlled 3C-SiC nanoflakes and their photoluminescent properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiujun; Ye, Ruquan; Peng, Zhiwei; Wang, Juanjuan; Fan, Ailing; Guo, Xia

    2016-06-24

    Size-controlled and high-purity 3C-SiC nanoflakes (NFs) are synthesized on the tips of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) carpets with a hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) method. The average diameter and height of SiC NFs can be tuned by changing the thickness of per-deposited Si and growth conditions. The growth process of the SiC NFs is suggested to be dominated by a vapor-solid (VS) mechanism. The prepared SiC NFs exhibit quantum-confinement effects, emitting strong violet-blue photoluminescence (PL) under ultraviolet excitation. The PL peak position changes from 410 to 416 nm as the excitation line increases from 290 to 400 nm. This result opens the possibility for the application of the luminescent solid-state freestanding 3C-SiC NFs in photonics as well as photonics/electronics integration. PMID:27184338

  9. Size-controlled synthesis of transition metal nanoparticles through chemical and photo-chemical routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangeysh, Behzad

    The central objective of this work is developing convenient general procedures for controlling the formation and stabilization of nanoscale transition metal particles. Contemporary interest in developing alternative synthetic approaches for producing nanoparticles arises in large part from expanding applications of the nanomaterials in areas such as catalysis, electronics and medicine. This research focuses on advancing the existing nanoparticle synthetic routes by using a new class of polymer colloid materials as a chemical approach, and the laser irradiation of metal salt solution as a photo-chemical method to attain size and shape selectivity. Controlled synthesis of small metal nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 1 to 5nm is still a continuing challenge in nanomaterial synthesis. This research utilizes a new class of polymer colloid materials as nano-reactors and protective agents for controlling the formation of small transition metal nanoparticles. The polymer colloid particles were formed from cross-linking of dinegatively charged metal precursors with partially protonated poly dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (PDMAEMA). Incorporation of [PtCl6]2- species into the colloidal particles prior to the chemical reduction was effectively employed as a new strategy for synthesis of unusually small platinum nanoparticles with narrow size distributions (1.12 +/-0.25nm). To explore the generality of this approach, in a series of proof-of-concept studies, this method was successfully employed for the synthesis of small palladium (1.4 +/-0.2nm) and copper nanoparticles (1.5 +/-0.6nm). The polymer colloid materials developed in this research are pH responsive, and are designed to self-assemble and/or disassemble by varying the levels of protonation of the polymer chains. This unique feature was used to tune the size of palladium nanoparticles in a small range from 1nm to 5nm. The procedure presented in this work is a new convenient room temperature route for synthesis of

  10. Engineering models and methods for industrial cell control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1997-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the engineering, i.e. the designing and making, of industrial cell control systems. The focus is on automated robot welding cells in the shipbuilding industry. The industrial research project defines models and methods for design and implemen-tation of computer based....... Further, an engineering methodology is defined. The three elements enablers, architecture and methodology constitutes the Cell Control Engineering concept which has been defined and evaluated through the implementation of two cell control systems for robot welding cells in production at ODENSE STEEL...... SHIPYARD.It is concluded that cell control technology provides for increased performance in production systems, and that the Cell Control Engineering concept reduces the effort for providing and operating high quality and high functionality cell control solutions for the industry....

  11. Size-controlled synthesis of near-monodisperse gold nanoparticles in the 1-4 nm range using polymeric stabilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Irshad; Graham, Susan; Wang, Zhenxin; Tan, Bien; Sherrington, David C; Rannard, Steven P; Cooper, Andrew I; Brust, Mathias

    2005-11-30

    We report here a simple one-step protocol for the preparation of near-monodisperse gold hydrosols in the small size regime (<5 nm). The particle size can be controlled by varying the concentration of the stabilizing polymer, which can be readily displaced by thiol ligands to yield monolayer protected clusters of the usual type. PMID:16305218

  12. Two thresholds determine climatic control of forest-fire size in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Loepfe

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Fire weather indices predict fire extent from meteorological conditions assuming a monotonic function; this approach is frequently used to predict future fire patterns under climate change scenarios using linear extrapolation. However, the relationship between weather and fire extent may potentially depend on the existence of fuel humidity thresholds above which this relationship changes dramatically, challenging this statistical approach. Here we combine the continuous and the threshold approaches to analyze satellite-detected fires in Europe during 2001–2010 in relation to meteorological conditions, showing that fire size response to increasing dryness follows a ramp function, i.e. with two plateaus separated by a phase of monotonic increase. This study confirms that at a continental and a high-resolution temporal scales, large fires are very unlikely to occur under moist conditions, but it also reveals that fire size stops to be controlled by fuel humidity above a given threshold of dryness. Thus, fuel humidity control only applies when fire is not limited by other factors such as fuel load, as large fires are virtually absent in dry regions with less than 500 mm of average annual rainfall, i.e. where fuel amount is insufficient. In regions with sufficient fuel, other factors such as fire suppression or fuel discontinuity can impede large fires even under very dry weather conditions. These findings are relevant under current climatic trends in which the fire season length, in terms of number of days with DC (drought code values above the observed thresholds (break points, is increasing in many parts of the Mediterranean, while it is decreasing in Eastern Europe and remains unchanged in Central Europe.

  13. Structure and Control Strategies of Fuel Cell Vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋建国; 张承宁; 孙逢春; 钟秋海

    2004-01-01

    The structure and kinds of the fuel cell vehicle (FCV) and the mathematical model of the fuel cell processor are discussed in detail. FCV includes many parts: the fuel cell thermal and water management, fuel supply, air supply and distribution, AC motor drive, main and auxiliary power management, and overall vehicle control system. So it requires different kinds of control strategies, such as the PID method, zero-pole method, optimal control method, fuzzy control and neural network control. Along with the progress of control method, the fuel cell vehicle's stability and reliability is up-and-up. Experiment results show FCV has high energy efficiency.

  14. Adaptation of handwriting size under distorted visual feedback in patients with Parkinson's disease and elderly and young controls

    OpenAIRE

    Teulings, H; Contreras-Vidal, J; Stelmach, G; Adler, C.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The ability to use visual feedback to control handwriting size was compared in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), elderly people, and young adults to better understand factors playing a part in parkinsonian micrographia.

  15. Size-controlled synthesis of SnO2 quantum dots and their gas-sensing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The gas-sensing property of quantum dots is related to their sizes. SnO2 quantum dots (TQDs) were synthesized and the sizes were controlled by a simple strategy. The results show that controlling QDs size is efficient to detect low-concentration hazardous volatile compounds selectively. - Highlights: • SnO2 quantum dots with controllable size were synthesized by hydrothermal route. • The sizes of SnO2 quantum dots (TQDs) were controlled by a simple strategy. • The responses to volatile chemicals strongly depend on the size of quantum dots. • Small-size TQDs exhibit a good selectivity and response to triethylamine. • Controlling size is efficient to detect low-concentration toxic gases selectively. - Abstract: Tin dioxide quantum dots (TQDs) with controllable size were synthesized by changing the amount of alkaline reagent in the hydrothermal process. The gas-sensing properties were investigated by operating chemoresistor type sensor. The morphology and structure were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning/transmission electron microscopy, UV–vis and Raman spectrometry. The as-synthesized SnO2 shows the characteristics of quantum dots and the narrowest size distribution is about 2–3 nm. The gas-sensing results indicate that the responses are strongly dependent on the size of quantum dots. TQDs with different sizes exhibit different sensitivities and selectivities to volatile toxic chemicals such as aldehyde, acetone, methanol, ethanol and amine. Especially, when the sensors are exposed to 100 ppm triethylamine (TEA), the sensing response value of TQDs with small size is two times higher than that of the large-size TQDs. The maximum response values of TQDs to 1 ppm and 100 ppm TEA are 15 and 153, respectively. The response time is 1 s and the recovery time is 47 s upon exposure to 1 ppm TEA. The results suggest that it is an effective method by regulating the size of SnO2 quantum dots to detect low-concentration hazardous

  16. Size-controlled synthesis of SnO{sub 2} quantum dots and their gas-sensing performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jianping, E-mail: dujp518@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, Shanxi (China); Zhao, Ruihua [Shanxi Kunming Tobacco Limited Liability Company, Taiyuan 030012, Shanxi (China); Xie, Yajuan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, Shanxi (China); Li, Jinping, E-mail: jpli211@hotmail.com [Research Institute of Special Chemicals, Taiyuan University of Technology, Shanxi, 030024 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The gas-sensing property of quantum dots is related to their sizes. SnO{sub 2} quantum dots (TQDs) were synthesized and the sizes were controlled by a simple strategy. The results show that controlling QDs size is efficient to detect low-concentration hazardous volatile compounds selectively. - Highlights: • SnO{sub 2} quantum dots with controllable size were synthesized by hydrothermal route. • The sizes of SnO{sub 2} quantum dots (TQDs) were controlled by a simple strategy. • The responses to volatile chemicals strongly depend on the size of quantum dots. • Small-size TQDs exhibit a good selectivity and response to triethylamine. • Controlling size is efficient to detect low-concentration toxic gases selectively. - Abstract: Tin dioxide quantum dots (TQDs) with controllable size were synthesized by changing the amount of alkaline reagent in the hydrothermal process. The gas-sensing properties were investigated by operating chemoresistor type sensor. The morphology and structure were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning/transmission electron microscopy, UV–vis and Raman spectrometry. The as-synthesized SnO{sub 2} shows the characteristics of quantum dots and the narrowest size distribution is about 2–3 nm. The gas-sensing results indicate that the responses are strongly dependent on the size of quantum dots. TQDs with different sizes exhibit different sensitivities and selectivities to volatile toxic chemicals such as aldehyde, acetone, methanol, ethanol and amine. Especially, when the sensors are exposed to 100 ppm triethylamine (TEA), the sensing response value of TQDs with small size is two times higher than that of the large-size TQDs. The maximum response values of TQDs to 1 ppm and 100 ppm TEA are 15 and 153, respectively. The response time is 1 s and the recovery time is 47 s upon exposure to 1 ppm TEA. The results suggest that it is an effective method by regulating the size of SnO{sub 2} quantum dots to detect low

  17. Fast contact of solid-liquid interface created high strength multi-layered cellulose hydrogels with controllable size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meng; Zhao, Yanteng; Duan, Jiangjiang; Wang, Zhenggang; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Lina

    2014-02-12

    Novel onion-like and multi-layered tubular cellulose hydrogels were constructed, for the first time, from the cellulose solution in a 7% NaOH/12% urea aqueous solvent by changing the shape of the gel cores. In our findings, the contacting of the cellulose solution with the surface of the agarose gel rod or sphere loaded with acetic acid led to the close chain packing to form immediately a gel layer, as a result of the destruction of the cellulose inclusion complex by acid through inducing the cellulose self-aggregation. Subsequently, multi-layered cellulose hydrogels were fabricated via a multi-step interrupted gelation process. The size, layer thickness and inter-layer space of the multi-layered hydrogels could be controlled by adjusting the cellulose concentrations, the gel core diameter and the contacting time of the solid-liquid interface. The multi-layered cellulose hydrogels displayed good architectural stability and solvent resistance. Moreover, the hydrogels exhibited high compressive strength and excellent biocompatibility. L929 cells could adhere and proliferate on the surface of the layers and in interior space, showing great potential as tissue engineering scaffolds and cell culture carrier. This work opens up a new avenue for the construction of the high strength multi-layered cellulose hydrogels formed from inner to outside via a fast contact of solid-liquid interface. PMID:24405277

  18. Excellent endurance of MWCNT anode in micro-sized Microbial Fuel Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2012-08-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) are a sustainable technology for energy production using bioelectrochemical reactions from bacteria. Microfabrication of micro-sized MFCs allows rapid and precise production of devices that can be integrated into Lab-on-a-chip or other ultra low power devices. We show a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) integrated anode in a biocompatible and high power and current producing device. Long term testing of the MWCNT anode also reveals a high endurance and durable anode material that can be adapted as a long-lasting power source. © 2012 IEEE.

  19. System-level design of bacterial cell cycle control

    OpenAIRE

    McAdams, Harley H.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the cell cycle control logic in Caulobacter has progressed to the point where we now have an integrated view of the operation of an entire bacterial cell cycle system functioning as a state machine. Oscillating levels of a few temporally-controlled master regulator proteins in a cyclical circuit drive cell cycle progression. To a striking degree, the cell cycle regulation is a whole cell phenomenon. Phospho-signaling proteins and proteases dynamically deployed to specific loc...

  20. One size does not fit all: developing a cell-specific niche for in vitro study of cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinkovic, Milos; Block, Travis J; Rakian, Rubie; Li, Qihong; Wang, Exing; Reilly, Matthew A; Dean, David D; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    .g. collagen and fibronectin) were found at equivalent levels in both BM- and AD-ECM, the architecture (i.e. fiber orientation; surface roughness) and physical properties (storage modulus, surface energy) of each were unique. These results, demonstrating differences in cell behavior when cultured on the three different substrates (BM- and AD-ECM and TCP) with differences in chemical and physical properties, provide evidence that the two ECMs may recapitulate specific elements of the native stem cell niche for bone marrow and adipose tissues. More broadly, it could be argued that ECMs, elaborated by cells ex vivo, serve as an ideal starting point for developing tissue-specific culture environments. In contrast to TCP, which relies on the "one size fits all" paradigm, native tissue-specific ECM may be a more rational model to approach engineering 3D tissue-specific culture systems to replicate the in vivo niche. We suggest that this approach will provide more meaningful information for basic research studies of cell behavior as well as cell-based therapeutics. PMID:26780725

  1. Redefinition of cell size classification of phytoplankton – a potential tool for improving the quality and assurance of data interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    L. IGNATIADES

    2014-01-01

    To date, phytoplankton cell size classification is based on linear metrics (nano: 2-20 μm; micro: 20-200 μm; macro: >200 μm) although three-dimensional metrics are used for cell or body size descriptions of all terrestrial and aquatic organisms. This study proposes a redefinition of phytoplankton size classification expressed in terms of cell volume (μm3) metrics by analyzing statistically a data set of 397 species from three major groups of eukaryotic taxa (diatoms, dinoflagellates, cocc...

  2. Size Control and Growth Process Study of Au@Cu2O Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuyuan; Zheng, Min; Liu, Shengnan; Wang, Zuoshan

    2016-12-01

    Au@Cu2O cuboctahedron with gold triangular nanoplate core and Cu2O shell was synthesized by a chemical method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests demonstrated that the as-synthesis samples were consisted of gold triangular nanoplate core and Cu2O shell, and both of them were in good crystallization. The effective size control of the particles could be realized by controlling the amount of Au cores added in the synthetic process and Au@Cu2O particles with different shell thickness could be synthesized. The decrease of Cu2O shell thickness had a great difference in the optical performance, including blue shift of the resonant peaks and enhanced absorption intensity. The growth process from rough sheet structure to cuboctahedron was also explored. The results of photocatalytic degradation experiment showed that Au@Cu2O particles showed much better photocatalytic performance than that of pure Cu2O. The improved photocatalytic property of the Au@Cu2O particles was attributed to the comprehensive effect of the enhanced visible-light absorption and high separation rate of electron-hole pairs. PMID:27613067

  3. Controlled emission and coupling of small-size YAG:Ce3+ nanocrystals to gold nanowire

    CERN Document Server

    Birowosuto, M D; Donega, C de Mello; Meijerink, A

    2015-01-01

    We report a controlled emission of Ce3+ ions inside single Yttrium Aluminum Gar- net Y3Al5O12 (YAG:Ce3+) nanocrystals with a diameter of 22 +- 10 nm as a result of a coupling of a surface plasmon mode propagating along single gold nanowire (NW). From the PL images, the intensity for single YAG:Ce3+ nanocrystals in the proximity of the single gold NW increases by a factor of two in comparison with that without the NW. Also, we observe a maximum of 3.8-fold emission rate en- hancements for the single nanocrystal close to the single gold NW. The emission rate enhancements of YAG:Ce3+ nanocrystals are two folds the enhancements of 100-nm fluorescent nanospheres. This value is in agreement with the calculation of a combi- nation from the analytical scattering model and boundary element method (BEM). We also confirm that the small size light sources are more efficient for the emission rate enhancements. Thus, the controlled emission of small YAG:Ce3+ nanocrystals with the perfect photostabilities will pave the way ...

  4. Development of Slow Control Boards for the Large Size Telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The camera of the Large Size Telescopes (LSTs) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) consists of 265 photosensor modules, each of them containing 7 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), a slow control board (SCB), a readout board, and a trigger logic. We have developed the SCB, which is installed between the 7 PMTs and the readout board. The main task for SCBs is the controlling of the high voltages for the PMTs and the monitoring of their anode currents. In addition, the SCB provides the functionality to create test pulses that can be injected at the input of the PMT preamplifier in order to emulate a PMT signal without the need of setting a high voltage, or even without the PMT itself. The test pulses have a very similar width as the PMT pulses (less than 3 ns FWHM) and their amplitude can be adjusted in a wide dynamic range. These features allow us not only to test the functionality of the camera modules but also to fully characterize these. We report on the design and the functions of the SCB together with the r...

  5. Mutations in Traf3ip1 reveal defects in ciliogenesis, embryonic development, and altered cell size regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbari, Nicolas F; Kin, Nicholas W; Sharma, Neeraj; Michaud, Edward J; Kesterson, Robert A; Yoder, Bradley K

    2011-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha receptor 3 interacting protein 1 (Traf3ip1), also known as MIPT3, was initially characterized through its interactions with tubulin, actin, TNFR-associated factor-3 (Traf3), IL-13R1, and DISC1. It functions as an inhibitor of IL-13-mediated phosphorylation of Stat6 and in sequestration of Traf3 and DISC1 to the cytoskeleton. Studies of the Traf3ip1 homologs in C. elegans (DYF-11), Zebrafish (elipsa), and Chlamydomonas (IFT54) revealed that the protein localizes to the cilium and is required for ciliogenesis. Similar localization data has now been reported for mammalian Traf3ip1. This raises the possibility that Traf3ip1 has an evolutionarily conserved role in mammalian ciliogenesis in addition to its previously indicated functions. To evaluate this possibility, a Traf3ip1 mutant mouse line was generated. Traf3ip1 mutant cells are unable to form cilia. Homozygous Traf3ip1 mutant mice are not viable and have both neural developmental defects and polydactyly, phenotypes typical of mouse mutants with ciliary assembly defects. Furthermore, in Traf3ip1 mutants the hedgehog pathway is disrupted, as evidenced by abnormal dorsal-ventral neural tube patterning and diminished expression of a hedgehog reporter. Analysis of the canonical Wnt pathway indicates that it was largely unaffected; however, specific domains in the pharyngeal arches have elevated levels of reporter activity. Interestingly, Traf3ip1 mutant embryos and cells failed to show alterations in IL-13 signaling, one of the pathways associated with its initial discovery. Novel phenotypes observed in Traf3ip1 mutant cells include elevated cytosolic levels of acetylated microtubules and a marked increase in cell size in culture. The enlarged Traf3ip1 mutant cell size was associated with elevated basal mTor pathway activity. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Traf3ip1 function is highly conserved in ciliogenesis and is important for proper regulation of a number of essential

  6. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways. PMID:27590152

  7. Indium oxide nanocrystals: Capping-agent-free synthesis, size-control mechanism, and high gas-sensing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium oxide nanocrystals with size of 8-20 nm have been synthesized by annealing the precursor particles at ambient pressure. No surfactants or capping agents were used in the synthesis. Depending on the ripening time of the precursor particles in their mother solution, rough control of the crystal size of the annealed indium oxide was achieved. It is interesting that the size of the annealed indium oxide crystals decreases with prolonging the ripening time of the precursor particles, which is the opposite as expected. We proposed a possible mechanism, that is the pre-disintegrating of the precursor particles happened during the ripening process, to explain the rough control of the crystal size. Promoted by attributes of the crystals such as small size, free of surfactant, and abundant defects, we fabricated indium oxide gas sensors and found that these sensors had good response to NO2 gas and can achieve a detection limit as low as 20 ppb.

  8. Structural Transition of Actin Filament in a Cell-Sized Water Droplet with a Phospholipid Membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Hase, M

    2005-01-01

    Actin filament, F-actin, is a semiflexible polymer with a negative charge, and is one of the main constituents on cell membranes. To clarify the effect of cross-talk between a phospholipid membrane and actin filaments in cells, we conducted microscopic observations on the structural changes in actin filaments in a cell-sized (several tens of micrometers in diameter) water droplet coated with a phospholipid membrane such as phosphatidylserine (PS; negatively-charged head group) or phosphatidylethanolamine (PE; neutral head group) as a simple model of a living cell membrane. With PS, actin filaments are distributed uniformly in the water phase without adsorption onto the membrane surface between 2 and 6 mM Mg2+, while between 6 and 12 mM Mg2+, actin filaments are adsorbed onto the inner membrane surface. With PE, actin filaments are uniformly adsorbed onto the inner membrane surface between 2 and 12 mM Mg2+. With both PS and PE membranes, at Mg2+ concentrations higher than 12 mM, thick bundles are formed in the...

  9. Investigation of Low-Cost Surface Processing Techniques for Large-Size Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Hsyung Chang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the present work is to develop a simple and effective method of enhancing conversion efficiency in large-size solar cells using multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si wafer. In this work, industrial-type mc-Si solar cells with area of 125×125 mm2 were acid etched to produce simultaneously POCl3 emitters and silicon nitride deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD. The study of surface morphology and reflectivity of different mc-Si etched surfaces has also been discussed in this research. Using our optimal acid etching solution ratio, we are able to fabricate mc-Si solar cells of 16.34% conversion efficiency with double layers silicon nitride (Si3N4 coating. From our experiment, we find that depositing double layers silicon nitride coating on mc-Si solar cells can get the optimal performance parameters. Open circuit (Voc is 616 mV, short circuit current (Jsc is 34.1 mA/cm2, and minority carrier diffusion length is 474.16 μm. The isotropic texturing and silicon nitride layers coating approach contribute to lowering cost and achieving high efficiency in mass production.

  10. Simplified Load-Following Control for a Fuel Cell System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    A simplified load-following control scheme has been proposed for a fuel cell power system. The scheme could be used to control devices that are important parts of a fuel cell system but are sometimes characterized as parasitic because they consume some of the power generated by the fuel cells.

  11. Cell size dependence of additive versus synergetic effects of UV radiation and PAHs on oceanic phytoplankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echeveste, Pedro, E-mail: pecheveste@imedea.uib-csic.es [Department of Global Change Research, IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB) Instituto Mediterraneo de Estudios Avanzados, Miquel Marques 21, 07190 Esporles, Illes Balears (Spain); Agusti, Susana [Department of Global Change Research, IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB) Instituto Mediterraneo de Estudios Avanzados, Miquel Marques 21, 07190 Esporles, Illes Balears (Spain); Dachs, Jordi [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research, IDAEA-CSIC, Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)

    2011-05-15

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons' (PAHs) toxicity is enhanced by the presence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which levels have arisen due to the thinning of the ozone layer. In this study, PAHs' phototoxicity for natural marine phytoplankton was tested. Different concentrations of a mixture of 16 PAHs were added to natural phytoplankton communities from the Mediterranean Sea, Atlantic, Arctic and Southern Oceans and exposed to natural sunlight received in situ, including treatments where the UVR bands were removed. PAHs' toxicity was observed for all the phytoplankton groups studied in all the waters and treatments tested, but only for the pico-sized group a synergetic effect of the mixture and UVR was observed (p = 0.009). When comparing phototoxicity in phytoplankton from oligotrophic and eutrophic waters, synergy was only observed at the oligotrophic communities (p = 0.02) where pico-sized phytoplankton dominated. The degree of sensitivity was related to the trophic degree, decreasing as Chlorophyll a concentration increased. - Highlights: > The smallest picocyanobacteria were the most sensitive to PAHs and UVR. > PAHs-UVR synergism for the picophytoplankton and the oligotrophic communities. > PAHs-UVR additivity for the nanophytoplankton and the eutrophic communities. > An irradiance threshold is suggested to determine the joint action of UVR and PAHs. - Cell size and UVR levels determine additive/synergetic effects of PAHs and UVR to oceanic phytoplankton.

  12. Cell size dependence of additive versus synergetic effects of UV radiation and PAHs on oceanic phytoplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons' (PAHs) toxicity is enhanced by the presence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which levels have arisen due to the thinning of the ozone layer. In this study, PAHs' phototoxicity for natural marine phytoplankton was tested. Different concentrations of a mixture of 16 PAHs were added to natural phytoplankton communities from the Mediterranean Sea, Atlantic, Arctic and Southern Oceans and exposed to natural sunlight received in situ, including treatments where the UVR bands were removed. PAHs' toxicity was observed for all the phytoplankton groups studied in all the waters and treatments tested, but only for the pico-sized group a synergetic effect of the mixture and UVR was observed (p = 0.009). When comparing phototoxicity in phytoplankton from oligotrophic and eutrophic waters, synergy was only observed at the oligotrophic communities (p = 0.02) where pico-sized phytoplankton dominated. The degree of sensitivity was related to the trophic degree, decreasing as Chlorophyll a concentration increased. - Highlights: → The smallest picocyanobacteria were the most sensitive to PAHs and UVR. → PAHs-UVR synergism for the picophytoplankton and the oligotrophic communities. → PAHs-UVR additivity for the nanophytoplankton and the eutrophic communities. → An irradiance threshold is suggested to determine the joint action of UVR and PAHs. - Cell size and UVR levels determine additive/synergetic effects of PAHs and UVR to oceanic phytoplankton.

  13. From Solution to Biointerface: Graphene Self-Assemblies of Varying Lateral Sizes and Surface Properties for Biofilm Control and Osteodifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhaojun; Shi, Yuying; Xiong, Pan; Zhou, Wenhao; Cheng, Yan; Zheng, Yufeng; Xi, Tingfei; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-07-13

    Bringing multifunctional graphene out of solution through facile self-assembly to form 2D surface nanostructures, with control over the lateral size and surface properties, would be an intriguing accomplishment, especially in biomedical fields where biointerfaces with functional diversity are in high demand. Guided by this goal, in this work, we built such graphene-based self-assemblies on orthopedic titanium, attempting to selectively regulate bacterial activities and osteoblastic functions, which are both crucial in bone regeneration. Briefly, large-area graphene oxide (GO) sheets and functionalized reduced GO (rGO) micro-/nanosheets were self-assembled spontaneously and controllably onto solid Ti, through an evaporation-assisted electrostatic assembly process and a mussel-inspired one-pot assembly process, respectively. The resultant layers were characterized in terms of topological structure, chemical composition, hydrophilicity, and protein adsorption properties. The antibacterial efficacies of the assemblies were examined by challenging them with pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria that produce biofilms, whereby around 50% antiadhesion effects and considerable antibiofilm activities were observed for both layer types but through dissimilar modes of action. Their cytocompatibility and osteogenic potential were also investigated. Interfaced with MC3T3-E1 cells, the functionalized rGO sheets evoked better cell adhesion and growth than GO sheets, whereas the latter elicited higher osteodifferentiation activity throughout a 28-day in vitro culture. In this work, we showed that it is technically possible to construct graphene interface layers of varying lateral dimensions and surface properties and confirmed the concept of using the obtained assemblies to address the two major challenges facing orthopedic clinics. In addition, we determined fundamental implications for understanding the surface-biology relationship of graphene biomaterials, in

  14. An optimization of robust SMES with specified structure H∞ controller for power system stabilization considering superconducting magnetic coil size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is the smart stabilizing device in electric power systems, the installation cost of SMES is very high. Especially, the superconducting magnetic coil size which is the critical part of SMES, must be well designed. On the contrary, various system operating conditions result in system uncertainties. The power controller of SMES designed without taking such uncertainties into account, may fail to stabilize the system. By considering both coil size and system uncertainties, this paper copes with the optimization of robust SMES controller. No need of exact mathematic equations, the normalized coprime factorization is applied to model system uncertainties. Based on the normalized integral square error index of inter-area rotor angle difference and specified structured H∞ loop shaping optimization, the robust SMES controller with the smallest coil size, can be achieved by the genetic algorithm. The robustness of the proposed SMES with the smallest coil size can be confirmed by simulation study.

  15. The MT pool size ratio and the DTI radial diffusivity may reflect the myelination in shiverer and control mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Xiawei; Sun, Shu-Wei; Liang, Hsiao-Fang; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Gochberg, Daniel F.

    2010-01-01

    A quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) technique was employed to quantify the ratio of the sizes of the bound and free water proton pools in ex vivo mouse brains. The goal was to determine the pool size ratio sensitivity to myelin. Fixed brains from both shiverer mice and control littermates were imaged. The pool size ratio in the corpus callosum of shiverer mice was substantially lower than that in the control mice, while there was no distinguishable difference in the pool size ratio in the gray matter. These results correlate with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) derived radial diffusivity which previously was shown to reflect myelin integrity in this animal model. Histological study reveals the presence of myelin in control mice white matter and the absence of myelin in shiverer mice white matter, supporting the qMT and DTI results. Our findings support the view that qMT may be used for estimating myelin integrity. PMID:19123230

  16. ELISPOTs Produced by CD8 and CD4 Cells Follow Log Normal Size Distribution Permitting Objective Counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Y. Karulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Each positive well in ELISPOT assays contains spots of variable sizes that can range from tens of micrometers up to a millimeter in diameter. Therefore, when it comes to counting these spots the decision on setting the lower and the upper spot size thresholds to discriminate between non-specific background noise, spots produced by individual T cells, and spots formed by T cell clusters is critical. If the spot sizes follow a known statistical distribution, precise predictions on minimal and maximal spot sizes, belonging to a given T cell population, can be made. We studied the size distributional properties of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-17 spots elicited in ELISPOT assays with PBMC from 172 healthy donors, upon stimulation with 32 individual viral peptides representing defined HLA Class I-restricted epitopes for CD8 cells, and with protein antigens of CMV and EBV activating CD4 cells. A total of 334 CD8 and 80 CD4 positive T cell responses were analyzed. In 99.7% of the test cases, spot size distributions followed Log Normal function. These data formally demonstrate that it is possible to establish objective, statistically validated parameters for counting T cell ELISPOTs.

  17. Control of cell morphology of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus for enhanced cell stability during industrial processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senz, Martin; van Lengerich, Bernhard; Bader, Johannes; Stahl, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The viability of bacteria during industrial processing is an essential quality criterion for bacterial preparations, such as probiotics and starter cultures. Therefore, producing stable microbial cultures during proliferation is of great interest. A strong correlation between the culture medium and cellular morphology was observed for the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, which is commonly used in the dairy industry as a probiotic supplement and as a starter culture. The cell shapes ranged from single short rods to long filamentous rods. The culture medium composition could control this phenomenon of pleomorphism, especially the use of peptone in combination with an adequate heating of the medium during preparation. Furthermore, we observed a correlation between the cell size and stability of the microorganisms during industrial processing steps, such as freeze-drying, extrusion encapsulation and storage following dried preparations. The results revealed that short cells are more stable than long cells during each of the industrially relevant processing steps. As demonstrated for L. acidophilus NCFM, the adaptation of the medium composition and optimized medium preparation offer the possibility to increase the concentration of viable cells during up- and survival rate during down-stream processing. PMID:25305442

  18. Size-controlled, magnetic, and core-shell nanoparticles synthesized by inert-gas condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koten, Mark A.

    Interest in nanoparticles (2 to 100 nm in diameter) and clusters of atoms (0.5 to 2 nm in diameter) has heightened over the past two and a half decades on both fundamental and functional levels. Nanoparticles and clusters of atoms are an exciting branch of materials science because they do not behave like normal bulk matter, nor do they act like molecules. They can have shockingly different physical, chemical, optical, or magnetic properties from the same material at a larger scale. In the case of nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio can change fundamental properties like melting temperature, binding energy, or electron affinity. The definitions of markers used to distinguish between metallic, semiconducting, and insulating bulk condensed matter, such as the band gap and polarizability, can even be blurred or confused on the nanoscale. Similarly, clusters of atoms can form in structures that are only stable at finite sizes, and do not translate to bulk condensed matter. Thermodynamics of finite systems changes dramatically in nanovolumes such as wires, rods, cubes, and spheres, which can lead to complex core-shell and onion-like nanostructures. Consequently, these changes in properties and structure have led to many new possibilities in the field of materials engineering. Inert-gas condensation (IGC) is a well-established method of producing nanoparticles that condense from the gas phase. Its first use dates back to the early 1990s, and it has been used to fabricate nanoparticles both commercially and in research and development for applications in magnetism, biomedicine, and catalysts. In this dissertation, IGC was used to produce a wide variety of nanoparticles. First, control over the size distributions of Cu nanoparticles and how it relates to the plasma properties inside the nucleation chamber was investigated. Next, the formation of phase pure WFe2 nanoparticles revealed that this Laves phase is ferromagnetic instead of non-magnetic. Finally, core

  19. Chemo-mechanical control of neural stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geishecker, Emily R.

    Cellular processes such as adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled in part by cell interactions with the microenvironment. Cells can sense and respond to a variety of stimuli, including soluble and insoluble factors (such as proteins and small molecules) and externally applied mechanical stresses. Mechanical properties of the environment, such as substrate stiffness, have also been suggested to play an important role in cell processes. The roles of both biochemical and mechanical signaling in fate modification of stem cells have been explored independently. However, very few studies have been performed to study well-controlled chemo-mechanotransduction. The objective of this work is to design, synthesize, and characterize a chemo-mechanical substrate to encourage neuronal differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells. In Chapter 2, Polyacrylamide (PA) gels of varying stiffnesses are functionalized with differing amounts of whole collagen to investigate the role of protein concentration in combination with substrate stiffness. As expected, neurons on the softest substrate were more in number and neuronal morphology than those on stiffer substrates. Neurons appeared locally aligned with an expansive network of neurites. Additional experiments would allow for statistical analysis to determine if and how collagen density impacts C17.2 differentiation in combination with substrate stiffness. Due to difficulties associated with whole protein approaches, a similar platform was developed using mixed adhesive peptides, derived from fibronectin and laminin, and is presented in Chapter 3. The matrix elasticity and peptide concentration can be individually modulated to systematically probe the effects of chemo-mechanical signaling on differentiation of C17.2 cells. Polyacrylamide gel stiffness was confirmed using rheological techniques and found to support values published by Yeung et al. [1]. Cellular growth and differentiation were assessed by cell counts

  20. Improved Light Conversion Efficiency Of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell By Dispersing Submicron-Sized Granules Into The Nano-Sized TiO2 Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song S.A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, TiO2 nanoparticles and submicron-sized granules were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and spray pyrolysis, respectively. Submicron-sized granules were dispersed into the nano-sized TiO2 layer to improve the light conversion efficiency. Granules showed better light scattering, but lower in terms of the dye-loading quantity and recombination resistance compared with nanoparticles. Consequently, the nano-sized TiO2 layer had higher cell efficiency than the granulized TiO2 layer. When dispersed granules into the nanoparticle layer, the light scattering was enhanced without the loss of dye-loading quantities. The dispersion of granulized TiO2 led to increase the cell efficiency up to 6.51%, which was about 5.2 % higher than that of the electrode consisting of only TiO2 nanoparticles. Finally, the optimal hydrothermal temperature and dispersing quantity of granules were found to be 200°C and 20 wt%, respectively.

  1. Comparative effects of macro-sized aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide nanoparticles on erythrocyte hemolysis: influence of cell source, temperature, and size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al2O3 is the most abundantly produced nanomaterial and has been used in diverse fields, including the medical, military, and industrial sectors. As there are concerns about the health effects of nanoparticles, it is important to understand how they interact with cells, and specifically with red blood cells. The hemolysis induced by three commercial nano-sized aluminum oxide particles (nanopowder 13 nm, nanopowder <50 nm, and nanowire 2–6 × 200–400 nm) was compared to aluminum oxide and has been studied on erythrocytes from humans, rats, and rabbits, in order to elucidate the mechanism of action and the influence of size and shape on hemolytic behavior. The concentrations inducing 50 % hemolysis (HC50) were calculated for each compound studied. The most hemolytic aluminum oxide particles were of nanopowder 13, followed by nanowire and nanopowder 50. The addition of albumin to PBS induced a protective effect on hemolysis in all the nano-forms of Al2O3, but not on Al2O3. The drop in HC50 correlated to a decrease in nanomaterial size, which was induced by a reduction of aggregation. Aluminum oxide nanoparticles are less hemolytic than other oxide nanoparticles and behave differently depending on the size and shape of the nanoparticles. The hemolytic behavior of aluminum oxide nanoparticles differs from that of aluminum oxide

  2. Comparative effects of macro-sized aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide nanoparticles on erythrocyte hemolysis: influence of cell source, temperature, and size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinardell, M. P., E-mail: mpvinardellmh@ub.edu; Sordé, A. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisiologia, Facultat de Farmàcia (Spain); Díaz, J. [Universitat de Barcelona CCiT, Scientific and Technological Centers (Spain); Baccarin, T.; Mitjans, M. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisiologia, Facultat de Farmàcia (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the most abundantly produced nanomaterial and has been used in diverse fields, including the medical, military, and industrial sectors. As there are concerns about the health effects of nanoparticles, it is important to understand how they interact with cells, and specifically with red blood cells. The hemolysis induced by three commercial nano-sized aluminum oxide particles (nanopowder 13 nm, nanopowder <50 nm, and nanowire 2–6 × 200–400 nm) was compared to aluminum oxide and has been studied on erythrocytes from humans, rats, and rabbits, in order to elucidate the mechanism of action and the influence of size and shape on hemolytic behavior. The concentrations inducing 50 % hemolysis (HC{sub 50}) were calculated for each compound studied. The most hemolytic aluminum oxide particles were of nanopowder 13, followed by nanowire and nanopowder 50. The addition of albumin to PBS induced a protective effect on hemolysis in all the nano-forms of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, but not on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The drop in HC{sub 50} correlated to a decrease in nanomaterial size, which was induced by a reduction of aggregation. Aluminum oxide nanoparticles are less hemolytic than other oxide nanoparticles and behave differently depending on the size and shape of the nanoparticles. The hemolytic behavior of aluminum oxide nanoparticles differs from that of aluminum oxide.

  3. Hilar mossy cell circuitry controlling dentate granule cell excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichiro Jinde

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutamatergic hilar mossy cells of the dentate gyrus can either excite or inhibit distant granule cells, depending on whether their direct excitatory projections to granule cells or their projections to local inhibitory interneurons dominate. However, it remains controversial whether the net effect of mossy cell loss is granule cell excitation or inhibition. Clarifying this controversy has particular relevance to temporal lobe epilepsy, which is marked by dentate granule cell hyperexcitability and extensive loss of dentate hilar mossy cells. Two diametrically opposed hypotheses have been advanced to explain this granule cell hyperexcitability – the “dormant basket cell” and the “irritable mossy cell” hypotheses. The “dormant basket cell” hypothesis proposes that mossy cells normally exert a net inhibitory effect on granule cells and therefore their loss causes dentate granule cell hyperexcitability. The “irritable mossy cell” hypothesis takes the opposite view that mossy cells normally excite granule cells and that the surviving mossy cells in epilepsy increase their activity, causing granule cell excitation. The inability to eliminate mossy cells selectively has made it difficult to test these two opposing hypotheses. To this end, we developed a transgenic toxin-mediated, mossy cell-ablation mouse line. Using these mutants, we demonstrated that the extensive elimination of hilar mossy cells causes granule cell hyperexcitability, although the mossy cell loss observed appeared insufficient to cause clinical epilepsy. In this review, we focus on this topic and also suggest that different interneuron populations may mediate mossy cell-induced translamellar lateral inhibition and intralamellar recurrent inhibition. These unique local circuits in the dentate hilar region may be centrally involved in the functional organization of the dentate gyrus.

  4. Methods to recover the narrow Dicke sub-Doppler feature in evacuated wall-coated cells without restrictions on cell size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    The hyperfine resonance observed in evacuated wall-coated cells with dimensions lambda/2 (lambda is the hyperfine resonance wavelength) consists of a narrow Dicke sub-Doppler linewidth feature, the spike, superimposed on a broad pedestal. The hydrogen maser provides a classic example of this lineshape. As cell size is increased, an effect unique to evacuated wall-coated cells occurs. Certain combinations of microwave field distribution and cell size result in a lineshape having a pedestal with a small spike feature or only the broad pedestal with no spike. Such conditions are not appropriate for atomic frequency standard applications. The cause of the evacuated wall-coated cell lineshape is reviewed and methods to recover the narrow spike feature without restrictions on cell size is discussed. One example is a cell with dimensions having equal volumes of exposure to opposite phases of the microwave magnetic field.

  5. Realization of high performance silicon nanowire based solar cells with large size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the realization of high performance silicon nanowire (SiNW) based solar cells with a conversion efficiency of 17.11% and a large size of 125 × 125 mm2. The key factor for success lies in an efficient approach of dielectric passivation to greatly enhance the electrical properties while keeping the advantage of excellent light trapping of the SiNW structure. The suppression of carrier recombination has been demonstrated through the combination of the SiO2/SiNx stack, which exhibits a good passivation effect on heavily doped SiNWs via reducing both the Shockley–Read–Hall recombination and near surface Auger recombination. We have examined in detail the effects of different passivations and SiNW lengths on the effective minority carrier lifetime, reflectance and carrier recombination characteristics, as well as cell performance. The proposed passivation techniques can be easily adapted to conventional industrial manufacturing processes, providing a potential prospect of SiNW based solar cells in mass production. (paper)

  6. MODELING, SIMULATON AND SIZING OF PHOTOVOLTAIC/WIND/FUEL CELL HYBRID GENERATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.S.LATHA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The depleting fossil fuel reserves and increasing concern towards global warming have created the need to surge for the alternative power generation options. Renewable energy sources like Wind, Solar-PV, Biomass and fuel cells are gaining prominence nowadays, as they are more energy efficient, reduce pollution and also they serveas a promising solution to the toughest energy crisis faced during the recent years. This paper focuses on the modeling and simulation of solar – photovoltaic, wind and fuel cell hybrid energy systems using MATLAB/Simulink software. The intermittent nature of solar and wind energy sources make them unreliable. Hence Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT is used to extract maximum power from the wind and sunwhen it is available. The standard perturb and observe method of MPPT is used for the PV system and for the wind generation system. The simulation results of the PV/Wind /Fuel cell hybrid system are presented in graph showing the effectiveness of the proposed system model. Also, hardware implementation of microcontroller based MPPT for solar-PV alone and unit sizing of the hybrid system for the PG simulation lab in EEE Dept. of Thiagarajar College of Engineering is depicted in the paper.

  7. Size, Shape, and Arrangement of Cellulose Microfibril in Higher Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) are imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the sub-nanometer resolution. We found that the size and shape of fundamental cellulose elementary fibril (CEF) is essentially identical in different cell wall types, i.e., primary wall (PW), parenchyma secondary wall (pSW), and sclerenchyma secondary wall (sSW), which is consistent with previously proposed 36-chain model (Ding et al., 2006, J. Agric. Food Chem.). The arrangement of individual CEFs in these wall types exhibits two orientations. In PW, CEFs are horizontally associated through their hydrophilic faces, and the planar faces are exposed, forming ribbon-like macrofibrils. In pSW and sSW, CEFs are vertically oriented, forming layers, in which hemicelluloses are interacted with the hydrophobic faces of the CEF and serve as spacers between CEFs. Lignification occurs between CEF-hemicelluloses layers in secondary walls. Furthermore, we demonstrated quantitative analysis of plant cell wall accessibility to and digestibility by different cellulase systems at real-time using chemical imaging (e.g., stimulated Raman scattering) and fluorescence microscopy of labeled cellulases (Ding et al., 2012, Science, in press).

  8. Understanding CrRLK1L Function: Cell Walls and Growth Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Karen S; Willats, William G T; Malinovsky, Frederikke G

    2016-06-01

    To develop successfully in an ever-changing environment, it is essential for plants to monitor and control their growth. Therefore, cell expansion is carefully regulated to establish correct cell shape and size. In this review, we explore the role of the Catharanthus roseus receptor-like kinase (CrRLK1L) subfamily as regulators of cell expansion. Recently, the downstream signalling events of individual CrRLK1L pathways were discovered, implicating known modulators of cell expansion, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, Ca(2+) dynamics, and exocytosis of cell wall material. Based on these intriguing new insights, we propose a model for a common pathway of CrRLK1L signalling that enables spatial and temporal control of cell wall extensibility throughout the plant. PMID:26778775

  9. Shaken, and stirred: oscillatory segmented flow for controlled size-evolution of colloidal nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Milad; Oskooei, Ali; Klinkova, Anna; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Günther, Axel

    2014-07-01

    We introduce oscillatory segmented flow as a compact microfluidic format that accommodates slow chemical reactions for the solution-phase processing of colloidal nanomaterials. The strategy allows the reaction progress to be monitored at a dynamic range of up to 80 decibels (i.e., residence times of up to one day, equivalent to 720-14,400 times the mixing time) from only one sensing location. A train of alternating gas bubbles and liquid reaction compartments (segmented flow) was initially formed, stopped and then subjected to a consistent back-and-forth motion. The oscillatory segmented flow was obtained by periodically manipulating the pressures at the device inlet and outlet via square wave signals generated by non-wetted solenoid valves. The readily implementable format significantly reduced the device footprint as compared with continuous segmented flow. We investigated mixing enhancement for varying liquid segment lengths, oscillation amplitudes and oscillation frequencies. The etching of gold nanorods served as a case study to illustrate the utility of the approach for dynamic characterization and precise control of colloidal nanomaterial size and shape for 5 h. Oscillatory segmented flows will be beneficial for a broad range of lab-on-a-chip applications that require long processing times. PMID:24828153

  10. Controlled size, structure, and morphology of nanowires produced by single particle nano-fabrication technique (SPNT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross-linking reaction of the polymers was firstly promoted by charged particle irradiation to the thin films in the present study. Non-homogeneous cross-linking reaction in the polymers gives clear nanowires whose size, length, and number density are fairly controlled by selecting particles, molecular weights, etc. Electronic conductive nanowires were produced by the present technique, as well as achieving the formation of SiC ceramic nanowires by the combined processes of SPNT and subsequent sintering at ultra-high temperature. It is also demonstrated that the morphology of the final nanostructure is customized by appropriate selection of the ion fluence, combination of polymers, and the solvent employed for development. Octopus-like nanostructures consisting of a tangled hydrophilic polymer core and splayed hydrophobic polymer segments are successfully produced as an example of the process. The present technique provides universal feasibility for the formation of nanostructures based on 'any' polymer materials in which radiations induce crosslinking reactions. (author)

  11. Control of crystallite orientation and size in Fe and FeCo nanoneedles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uniform magnetic nanoneedles have been prepared by hydrogen reduction of elongated nanoarchitectures. These precursors are as-prepared or cobalt-coated aggregates of highly oriented haematite nanocrystals (∼5 nm). The final materials are flattened nanoneedles formed by chains of assembled Fe or FeCo single-domain nanocrystals. The microstructural properties of such nanoneedles were tailored using renewed and improved synthetic strategies. In this fashion, the needle elongation and composition, the crystallite size (from 15 up to 30 nm), the nanocrystal orientation (with the 〈110〉 or 〈001〉 directions roughly along the long axis of the nanoneedle) and their type of arrangement (single chains, frustrated double chains and double chains) were controlled by modifying the reduction time, the axial ratio of the precursor haematite and the presence of additional coatings of aluminum or yttrium compounds. The values of the coercivity HC found for these nanoneedles are compared with the values predicted by the chain of spheres model assuming a symmetric fanning mechanism for magnetization reversal. (paper)

  12. An automatic controlled field size of a γ-ray irradiation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We constructed a γ-ray irradiation system with a commercial irradiation instrument, Sangyo Kagaku Co. Ltd., Model SK-951. The system is composed of an irradiator mounted with 60Co (3.7 GBq) and 137Cs (11.1 GBq and 111 GBq), and a mobile exposure deck having a lead shield sandwiched with iron (1200 mm(W) x 1200 mm(H) x 50 mm(D)) at back side. This shield provides low exposure rate at wall, floor and ceiling in the present room. To limit irradiation field size within dimension of the shield, three kinds of square collimator (6.03deg, 9.27deg and 20.02deg) were equipped around the irradiator beam exit. The selection of collimators is automatically controlled. The abilities of shield and collimator were evaluated by calculation and measurement of exposure rate at points on the wall. By these improvements, exposure rate was lowered to the dose-equivalent limit in law. (author)

  13. Biological cell controllable patch-clamp microchip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penmetsa, Siva; Nagrajan, Krithika; Gong, Zhongcheng; Mills, David; Que, Long

    2010-12-01

    A patch-clamp (PC) microchip with cell sorting and positioning functions is reported, which can avoid drawbacks of random cell selection or positioning for a PC microchip. The cell sorting and positioning are enabled by air bubble (AB) actuators. AB actuators are pneumatic actuators, in which air pressure is generated by microheaters within sealed microchambers. The sorting, positioning, and capturing of 3T3 cells by this type of microchip have been demonstrated. Using human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 as the model, experiments have been demonstrated by this microchip as a label-free technical platform for real-time monitoring of the cell viability.

  14. A novel method for evaluating microglial activation using ionized calcium-binding adaptor protein-1 staining: cell body to cell size ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Bertha Hovens

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to validate a newly developed methodology of semi-automatic image analysis to analyze microglial morphology as marker for microglial activation in ionized calcium-binding adaptor protein-1 (IBA-1 stained brain sections. Methods: The novel method was compared to currently used analysis methods, visual characterization of activation stage and optical density measurement, in brain sections of young and aged rats that had undergone surgery or remained naοve. Results: The cell body to cell size ratio of microglia was strongly correlated to the visual characterization activation stage. In addition, we observed specific surgery and age-related changes in cell body size, size of the dendritic processes and cell body to cell size ratio. Conclusion: The novel analysis method provides a sensitive marker for microglial activation in the rat brain, which is quick and easy to perform and provides additional information about microglial morphology.

  15. Large Size Color-tunable Electroluminescence from Cationic Iridium Complexes-based Light-emitting Electrochemical Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qunying; Li, Fushan; Guo, Tailiang; Shan, Guogang; Su, Zhongmin

    2016-06-01

    Solution-processable light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) with simple device architecture have become an attractive candidate for application in next generation lighting and flat-panel displays. Herein, single layer LECs employing two cationic Ir(III) complexes showing highly efficient blue-green and yellow electroluminescence with peak current efficiency of 31.6 cd A‑1 and 40.6 cd A‑1, respectively, have been reported. By using both complexes in the device, color-tunable LECs with a single spectral peak in the wavelength range from 499 to 570 nm were obtained by varying their rations. In addition, the fabrication of efficient LECs was demonstrated based on low cost doctor-blade coating technique, which was compatible with the roll to roll fabrication process for the large size production. In this work, for the first time, 4 inch LEC devices by doctor-blade coating were fabricated, which exhibit the efficiencies of 23.4 cd A‑1 and 25.4 cd A‑1 for the blue-green and yellow emission, respectively. The exciting results indicated that highly efficient LECs with controllable color could be realized and find practical application in large size lighting and displays.

  16. Mitotic Control of Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Venere, Monica; Miller, Tyler E.; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are self-renewing, tumorigenic cells at the apex of tumor hierarchies, and postulated to be quiescent in many tumor types. This issue of Cancer Discovery highlights a study that links the presentation of kinetochores within mitosis to an essential requirement for BUB1B/BubR1, broadening our understanding of the cell-cycle machinery in cancer stem cells.

  17. Generalized power series method with step size control for neutron kinetics equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Yasser Mohamed, E-mail: hoooorgrk@yahoo.com [Department of Computer Science, Delmon University for Science and Technology, P.O. Box 2990, Manama (Bahrain)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > We devolope the traditional power series method. > We apply the new technique to solve the point kinetics equations. > The method helps reduction the number of iterations and computational times. > The method provides results with high accuracy for most applications. > Comparisions confirm the superiority of the developed method. - Abstract: Based on the power series method (PWS), a generalized power series method (GPWS) has been introduced for solving the point reactor kinetics equations. The stiffness of the kinetics equations restricts the time interval to a small increment, which in turn restricts the PWS method within a very small constant step size. The traditional PWS method has been developed using a new formula that can control the time step at each step while transient proceeds. Two solvers of the PWS method using two successive orders have been used to estimate the local truncation errors. The GPWS method has employed these errors and some other constraints to produce the largest step size allowable at each step while keeping the error within a specific tolerance. The proposed method has resolved the stiffness point kinetics equations in a very simple way with step, ramp and zigzag ramp reactivities. The generalized method has turned out to represent a fast and accurate computational technique for most applications. The method is seemed to be valid for a time interval that is much longer than the time interval used in the conventional numerical integration, and is thus useful in reducing computing time. The method constitutes an easy-to-implement algorithm that provides results with high accuracy for most applications where, the reactor kinetics equations are reduced to a differential equation in a matrix form convenient for explicit power series solution. Results obtained by GPWS method: attest the power of the theoretical analysis, they demonstrate that the convergence of the iteration scheme can be accelerated, and the resulting

  18. Flexible and elastic metamaterial absorber for low frequency, based on small-size unit cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a planar and flexible metamaterial (MM), we obtained the low-frequency perfect absorption even with very small unit-cell size in snake-shape structure. These shrunken, deep-sub-wavelength and thin MM absorbers were numerically and experimentally investigated by increasing the inductance. The periodicity/thickness (the figure of merit for perfect absorption) is achieved to be 10 and 2 for single-snake-bar and 5-snake-bar structures, respectively. The ratio between periodicity and resonance wavelength (in mm) is close to 1/12 and 1/30 at 2 GHz and 400 MHz, respectively. The absorbers are specially designed for absorption peaks around 2 GHz and 400 MHz, which can be used for depressing the electromagnetic noise from everyday electronic devices and mobile phones.

  19. Quantum dot-sized organic fluorescent dots for long-term cell tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence techniques have been extensively employed to develop non-invasive methodologies for tracking and understanding complex biological processes both in vitro and in vivo, which is of high importance in modern life science research. Among a variety of fluorescent probes, inorganic semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have shown advantages in terms of better photostability, larger Stokes shift and more feasible surface functionalization. However, their intrinsic toxic heavy metal components and unstable fluorescence at low pH greatly impede the applications of QDs in in vivo studies. In this work, we developed novel fluorescent probes that can outperform currently available QD based probes in practice. Using conjugated oligomer with aggregation-induced emission characteristics as the fluorescent domain and biocompatible lipid-PEG derivatives as the encapsulation matrix, the obtained organic dots have shown higher brightness, better stability in biological medium and comparable size and photostability as compared to their counterparts of inorganic QDs. More importantly, unlike QD-based probes, the organic fluorescent dots do not blink, and also do not contain heavy metal ions that could be potentially toxic when applied for living biosubstrates. Upon surface functionalization with a cell-penetrating peptide, the organic dots greatly outperform inorganic quantum dots in both in vitro and in vivo long-term cell tracing studies, which will be beneficial to answer crucial questions in stem cell/immune cell therapies. Considering the customized fluorescent properties and surface functionalities of the organic dots, a series of biocompatible organic dots will be developed to serve as a promising platform for multifarious bioimaging tasks in future.

  20. Genetic control of cowpea seed sizes Controle genético do tamanho das sementes de caupi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Cláudio da Conceição Lopes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.] is one of the most widely adapted grain legumes in hot regions of Africa, Asia and the Americas. In the semiarid Northeast of Brazil, it is the main subsistence crop, an excellent protein source of low cost, for the poor population. The objective of this work was to estimate genetic parameters to understand the inheritance of seed sizes in cowpea. The parents P1 and P2 and the generations, F1, F2, BC1 and BC2 of the cross TVx5058-09C X Manteiguinha formed the genetic material for this study. These six generates (P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1 and BC were evaluated in a completely randomized block-design with six replications, in Teresina - PI, Brazil, in 1998. The genetic parameters estimated were: phenotypic and total genetic variance, additive and dominance genetic components of variance and the variance attributed to the environment, heritability in the broad and narrow senses, average degree of dominance and the number of genes controlling the character. The additive - dominance model fitted the data for 100-seeds weight in as much as the midparental value and the additive effect were the more important genetic parameters for the determination of this character. The number of genes that control its expression is five. The occurrence of high values for narrow sense heritability indicates that the selection for seed size can be made in early generations.Caupi [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.] é uma das leguminosas mais adaptadas às regiões quentes da África, Ásia e das Américas. No semi-árido do nordeste do Brasil é a principal cultura de subsistência, por ser uma excelente fonte de proteína de baixo custo para a população mais carente. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estimar parâmetros genéticos que podem explicar a herança do tamanho das sementes de caupi. Os genótipos parentais P1 e P2 e as gerações F1, F2, RC1 e RC2 do cruzamento TVx5058-09C X Manteiguinha, constituíram o material genético utilizado

  1. A qualitative study of psychological, social and behavioral barriers to appropriate food portion size control

    OpenAIRE

    Spence, Michelle; Livingstone, M. Barbara E.; Hollywood, Lynsey E; Gibney, Eileen R; O'Brien, Sinéad A; Pourshahidi, L Kirsty; Dean, Moira

    2013-01-01

    Background: Given the worldwide prevalence of overweight and obesity, there is a clear need for meaningful practical healthy eating advice - not only in relation to food choice, but also on appropriate food portion sizes. As the majority of portion size research to date has been overwhelmingly quantitative in design, there is a clear need to qualitatively explore consumers’ views in order to fully understand how food portion size decisions are made. Using qualitative methodology this present ...

  2. Mesoporous Silica Supported Au Nanoparticles with Controlled Size as Efficient Heterogeneous Catalyst for Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of Au catalysts with different sizes were synthesized and employed on amine group functionalized ordered mesoporous silica solid supports as catalyst for the aerobic oxidation of various alcohols. The mesoporous silica of MCM-41 supported Au nanoparticles (Au-1 exhibited the smallest particle size at ~1.8 nm with superior catalytic activities owing to the confinement effect of the mesoporous channels. Au-1 catalyst is also very stable and reusable under aerobic condition. Therefore, this presented work would obviously provide us a platform for synthesizing more size-controlled metal catalysts to improve the catalytic performances.

  3. WHAT CONTROLS STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT-- CELL POTENTIAL OR LOCAL ENVIRONMENT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In H. virescens, as in M. sexta and other lepidoptera, midgut development proceeds through the sequential proliferation and differentiation of the midgut stem cells. In larvae,the stem cells repeatedly differentiatiate to goblet, columnar, and to a lesser extent endocrine cells of the midgut; a res...

  4. Stromal control of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seke Etet PF

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Paul Faustin Seke Etet,1 Armel Herve Nwabo Kamdje,2 Jeremie Mbo Amvene,2 Yousef Aldebasi,3 Mohammed Farahna,1 Lorella Vecchio41Department of Basic Health Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Qassim University, Buraydah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Medicine, University of Ngaoundere, Ngaoundere, Cameroon; 3Department of Optometry, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Qassim University, Buraydah, Saudi Arabia; 4Laboratory of Cytometry, Institute of Molecular Genetics, CNR, University of Pavia, Pavia, ItalyAbstract: In the ongoing efforts to develop therapies against chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, stromal factors allowing malignant cells to escape spontaneous and chemotherapy-mediated apoptosis, giving way to relapses, have been abundantly investigated. Bone marrow adherent cell types, collectively referred to as stromal cells, appear to be key players in such escape, mainly because CLL malignant cells, which rapidly undergo spontaneous apoptosis when cultured in vitro, survive, migrate, and resist cytotoxic agents in co-culture with bone marrow stromal cells. CLL displays variable clinical courses according to well-defined prognostic factors induced on malignant B-cells (CLL cells or expressed by the transformed bone marrow stromal microenvironment. Particularly, a critical pathogenic role is played by proinflammatory factors, adhesion molecules, and signaling molecules involved in cell fate and stemness, such as Notch, Wnt, sonic Hedgehog, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, protein kinase B (Akt, and the B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 family of regulator proteins. As herein discussed, these molecules probably form a complex network favoring CLL cell survival, proliferation, and chemoresistance to anticancer therapy. Characterizing the sets of signaling pathways involved in the interactions between stromal cells and CLL cells may provide new tools for CLL clinical phenotyping and for re-sensitizing chemotherapy resistant cells

  5. Topographical control of cell-cell interaction in C6 glioma by nanodot arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Hui; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Huang, G. Steven

    2014-05-01

    Nanotopography modulates the physiological behavior of cells and cell-cell interactions, but the manner of communication remains unclear. Cell networking (syncytium) of astroglia provides the optimal microenvironment for communication of the nervous system. C6 glioma cells were seeded on nanodot arrays with dot diameters ranging from 10 to 200 nm. Cell viability, morphology, cytoskeleton, and adhesion showed optimal cell growth on 50-nm nanodots if sufficient incubation was allowed. In particular, the astrocytic syncytium level maximized at 50 nm. The gap junction protein Cx43 showed size-dependent and time-dependent transport from the nucleus to the cell membrane. The transport efficiency was greatly enhanced by incubation on 50-nm nanodots. In summary, nanotopography is capable of modulating cell behavior and influencing the cell-cell interactions of astrocytes. By fine-tuning the nanoenvironment, it may be possible to regulate cell-cell communications and optimize the biocompatibility of neural implants.

  6. The Size of Activating and Inhibitory Killer Ig-like Receptor Nanoclusters Is Controlled by the Transmembrane Sequence and Affects Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oszmiana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution microscopy has revealed that immune cell receptors are organized in nanoscale clusters at cell surfaces and immune synapses. However, mechanisms and functions for this nanoscale organization remain unclear. Here, we used super-resolution microscopy to compare the surface organization of paired killer Ig-like receptors (KIR, KIR2DL1 and KIR2DS1, on human primary natural killer cells and cell lines. Activating KIR2DS1 assembled in clusters two-fold larger than its inhibitory counterpart KIR2DL1. Site-directed mutagenesis established that the size of nanoclusters is controlled by transmembrane amino acid 233, a lysine in KIR2DS1. Super-resolution microscopy also revealed two ways in which the nanoscale clustering of KIR affects signaling. First, KIR2DS1 and DAP12 nanoclusters are juxtaposed in the resting cell state but coalesce upon receptor ligation. Second, quantitative super-resolution microscopy revealed that phosphorylation of the kinase ZAP-70 or phosphatase SHP-1 is favored in larger KIR nanoclusters. Thus, the size of KIR nanoclusters depends on the transmembrane sequence and affects downstream signaling.

  7. The effect of alcohols on red blood cell mechanical properties and membrane fluidity depends on their molecular size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Sonmez

    Full Text Available The role of membrane fluidity in determining red blood cell (RBC deformability has been suggested by a number of studies. The present investigation evaluated alterations of RBC membrane fluidity, deformability and stability in the presence of four linear alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol using ektacytometry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy. All alcohols had a biphasic effect on deformability such that it increased then decreased with increasing concentration; the critical concentration for reversal was an inverse function of molecular size. EPR results showed biphasic changes of near-surface fluidity (i.e., increase then decrease and a decreased fluidity of the lipid core; rank order of effectiveness was butanol > propanol > ethanol > methanol, with a significant correlation between near-surface fluidity and deformability (r = 0.697; p<0.01. The presence of alcohol enhanced the impairment of RBC deformability caused by subjecting cells to 100 Pa shear stress for 300 s, with significant differences from control being observed at higher concentrations of all four alcohols. The level of hemolysis was dependent on molecular size and concentration, whereas echinocytic shape transformation (i.e., biconcave disc to crenated morphology was observed only for ethanol and propanol. These results are in accordance with available data obtained on model membranes. They document the presence of mechanical links between RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity, chain length-dependence of the ability of alcohols to alter RBC mechanical behavior, and the biphasic response of RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity to increasing alcohol concentrations.

  8. Thermal modeling and temperature control of a PEM fuel cell system for forklift applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen;

    2014-01-01

    Temperature changes in PEM fuel cell stacks are considerably higher during load variations and have a negative impact as they generate thermal stresses and stack degradation. Cell hydration is also of vital importance in fuel cells and it is strongly dependent on operating temperature. A combinat......Temperature changes in PEM fuel cell stacks are considerably higher during load variations and have a negative impact as they generate thermal stresses and stack degradation. Cell hydration is also of vital importance in fuel cells and it is strongly dependent on operating temperature. A...... combination of high temperature and reduced humidity increases the degradation rate. Stack thermal management and control are, thus, crucial issues in PEM fuel cell systems especially in automotive applications such as forklifts. In this paper we present a control–oriented dynamic model of a liquid–cooled PEM...... designers in choosing the required coolant mass flow rate and radiator size to minimize the stack temperature gradients....

  9. Effect of cell size and shear stress on bacterium growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadlallah, Hadi; Jarrahi, Mojtaba; Herbert, Éric; Peerhossaini, Hassan; PEF Team

    2015-11-01

    Effect of shear stress on the growth rate of Synechocystis and Chlamydomonas cells is studied. An experimental setup was prepared to monitor the growth rate of the microorganisms versus the shear rate inside a clean room, under atmospheric pressure and 20 °C temperature. Digital magnetic agitators are placed inside a closed chamber provided with airflow, under a continuous uniform light intensity over 4 weeks. In order to study the effect of shear stress on the growth rate, different frequencies of agitation are tested, 2 vessels filled with 150 ml of each specie were placed on different agitating system at the desired frequency. The growth rate is monitored daily by measuring the optical density and then correlate it to the cellular concentration. The PH was adjusted to 7 in order to maintain the photosynthetic activity. Furthermore, to measure the shear stress distribution, the flow velocity field was measured using PIV. Zones of high and low shear stress were identified. Results show that the growth rate is independent of the shear stress magnitude, mostly for Synechocystis, and with lower independency for Chlamydomonas depending on the cell size for each species.

  10. The stealthy nano-machine behind mast cell granule size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, Ilan; Meilijson, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    The classical model of mast cell secretory granule formation suggests that newly synthesized secretory mediators, transported from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex, undergo post-transitional modification and are packaged for secretion by condensation within membrane-bound granules of unit size. These unit granules may fuse with other granules to form larger granules that reside in the cytoplasm until secreted. A novel stochastic model for mast cell granule growth and elimination (G&E) as well as inventory management is presented. Resorting to a statistical mechanics approach in which SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) REceptor (SNARE) components are viewed as interacting particles, the G&E model provides a simple 'nano-machine' of SNARE self-aggregation that can perform granule growth and secretion. Granule stock is maintained as a buffer to meet uncertainty in demand by the extracellular environment and to serve as source of supply during the lead time to produce granules of adaptive content. Experimental work, mathematical calculations, statistical modeling and a rationale for the emergence of nearly last-in, first out inventory management, are discussed. PMID:24629227

  11. Size control of rhodium particles of silica-supported catalysts using water-in-oil microemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Masahiro; Hanaoka, Toshiaki; Kim, Won Young; Nagata, Hideo; Wakabayashi, Katsuhiko

    1997-11-01

    Effects of components of water-in-oil microemulsions on rhodium particle sizes of silica-supported rhodium catalysts were investigated in the catalyst preparation method using microemulsion. In the case of the microemulsion of polyoxyethylene(23)dodecyl ether/ n-alcohols/RhCl 3 aq., the rhodium particle size increased from 3.4 to 5.0 nm as the specific permittivity of the organic solvent increased. The chain length of hydrophilic group of polyoxyethylene- p-nonylphenyl ether ( n = 5 to 15) employed as surfactants had an effect on the rhodium particle size where the rhodium size ranged between 2.0 and 3.6 nm. The rhodium particle size was 1.5 nm in the case of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfocuccinate and this value was found to be the smallest. These results could be interpreted in terms of the adsorption of the surfactant on rhodium-hydrazine particle surface.

  12. Controls on benthic biomass size spectra in shelf and deep-sea sediments – a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kelly-Gerreyn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Factors controlling biomass distributions in marine benthic organisms (meio- to macro-fauna, 1 μg–32 mg wet weight were investigated through observations and allometric modelling. Biomass (and abundance size spectra were measured at three locations: the Faroe-Shetland Channel in the north-east Atlantic (FSC, water depth 1600 m, September 2000; the Fladen Ground in the North Sea (FG, 150 m, September 2000; and the hypoxic Oman Margin (OM, 500 m, September 2002 in the Arabian Sea. Biomass increased with body size through a power law at FG (allometric exponent, b = 0.16 and at FSC (b = 0.32, but less convincingly at OM (b was not significantly different from −1/4 or 0. Our results question the assumption that metazoan biomass spectra are bimodal in marine sediments.

    The model incorporated 16 metazoan size classes, as derived from the observed spectra, all reliant on a common detrital food pool. All physiological (ingestion, mortality, assimilation and respiration parameters scaled to body size following optimisation to the data at each site, the resulting values being consistent within expectations from the literature. For all sites, body size related changes in mortality played the greatest role in determining the trend of the biomass size spectra. The body size trend in the respiration rate was most sensitive to allometry in both mortality and ingestion, and the trend in body size spectra of the production: biomass ratio was explained by the allometry in ingestion.

    Our results suggest that size-scaling mortality and ingestion are important factors determining the distribution of biomass across the meiofauna to macrofauna size range in marine sedimentary communities, in agreement with the general observation that biomass tends to accumulates in larger rather than smaller size classes in these environments.

  13. High-speed counting and sizing of cells in an impedance flow microcytometer with compact electronic instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo-Fernandez, Oscar; Rodriguez-Trujíllo, Romén; Gomila, Gabriel;

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a high-throughput impedance flow cytometer on a chip. This device was built using compact and inexpensive electronic instrumentation. The system was used to count and size a mixed cell sample containing red blood cells and white blood cells. It demonstrated a counting capacity of...... up to ~500 counts/s and was validated through a synchronised high-speed optical detection system. In addition, the device showed excellent discrimination performance under high-throughput conditions....

  14. Application of thermal lens response to monitor health status of red blood cells: A quantitative study of the cell death process by extracting thermal diffusivity and size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Srivathsan; Chen, George Chung Kit; Andika, Marta

    2010-03-01

    We explore monitoring the death process of individual red blood cells (RBC) quantitatively by using thermal lens (TL) response. TL response is a noninvasive excitation/probe technique that reflects photothermal parameters (e.g., absorption, thermal diffusivity, size, etc.). Since these parameters of cells change significantly during certain biological processes, real-time TL response was performed to monitor RBC death process when incubated with ionomycin. Theoretical model developed was applied to curve-fit the TL response for extracting thermal diffusivity and size of cells. Thermal diffusivity of dying RBC is found increased by 1.7 times in comparison with healthy cell.

  15. Lipid Droplets Characterization in Adipocyte Differentiated 3T3-L1 Cells: Size and Optical Density Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    V. Rizzatti; F. Boschi; Pedrotti, M.; E. Zoico; A. Sbarbati; Zamboni, M.

    2013-01-01

    The 3T3-L1 cell line, derived from 3T3 cells, is widely used in biological research on adipose tissue. 3T3-L1 cells have a fibroblast-like morphology, but, under appropriate conditions, they differentiate into an adipocyte-like phenotype. During the differentiation process, 3T3-L1 cells increase the synthesis of triglycerides and acquire the behavior of adipose cells. In particular, triglycerides accumulate in lipid droplets (LDs) embedded in the cytoplasm. The number and the size distributio...

  16. Insulin/IGF-regulated size scaling of neuroendocrine cells expressing the bHLH transcription factor Dimmed in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangnan Luo

    Full Text Available Neurons and other cells display a large variation in size in an organism. Thus, a fundamental question is how growth of individual cells and their organelles is regulated. Is size scaling of individual neurons regulated post-mitotically, independent of growth of the entire CNS? Although the role of insulin/IGF-signaling (IIS in growth of tissues and whole organisms is well established, it is not known whether it regulates the size of individual neurons. We therefore studied the role of IIS in the size scaling of neurons in the Drosophila CNS. By targeted genetic manipulations of insulin receptor (dInR expression in a variety of neuron types we demonstrate that the cell size is affected only in neuroendocrine cells specified by the bHLH transcription factor DIMMED (DIMM. Several populations of DIMM-positive neurons tested displayed enlarged cell bodies after overexpression of the dInR, as well as PI3 kinase and Akt1 (protein kinase B, whereas DIMM-negative neurons did not respond to dInR manipulations. Knockdown of these components produce the opposite phenotype. Increased growth can also be induced by targeted overexpression of nutrient-dependent TOR (target of rapamycin signaling components, such as Rheb (small GTPase, TOR and S6K (S6 kinase. After Dimm-knockdown in neuroendocrine cells manipulations of dInR expression have significantly less effects on cell size. We also show that dInR expression in neuroendocrine cells can be altered by up or down-regulation of Dimm. This novel dInR-regulated size scaling is seen during postembryonic development, continues in the aging adult and is diet dependent. The increase in cell size includes cell body, axon terminations, nucleus and Golgi apparatus. We suggest that the dInR-mediated scaling of neuroendocrine cells is part of a plasticity that adapts the secretory capacity to changing physiological conditions and nutrient-dependent organismal growth.

  17. Controlled Delivery of Human Cells by Temperature Responsive Microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.C. Mak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy is one of the most promising areas within regenerative medicine. However, its full potential is limited by the rapid loss of introduced therapeutic cells before their full effects can be exploited, due in part to anoikis, and in part to the adverse environments often found within the pathologic tissues that the cells have been grafted into. Encapsulation of individual cells has been proposed as a means of increasing cell viability. In this study, we developed a facile, high throughput method for creating temperature responsive microcapsules comprising agarose, gelatin and fibrinogen for delivery and subsequent controlled release of cells. We verified the hypothesis that composite capsules combining agarose and gelatin, which possess different phase transition temperatures from solid to liquid, facilitated the destabilization of the capsules for cell release. Cell encapsulation and controlled release was demonstrated using human fibroblasts as model cells, as well as a therapeutically relevant cell line—human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. While such temperature responsive cell microcapsules promise effective, controlled release of potential therapeutic cells at physiological temperatures, further work will be needed to augment the composition of the microcapsules and optimize the numbers of cells per capsule prior to clinical evaluation.

  18. Mitochondrial Dynamics Controls T Cell Fate through Metabolic Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Michael D; O'Sullivan, David; Klein Geltink, Ramon I; Curtis, Jonathan D; Chang, Chih-Hao; Sanin, David E; Qiu, Jing; Kretz, Oliver; Braas, Daniel; van der Windt, Gerritje J W; Chen, Qiongyu; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; O'Neill, Christina M; Edelson, Brian T; Pearce, Edward J; Sesaki, Hiromi; Huber, Tobias B; Rambold, Angelika S; Pearce, Erika L

    2016-06-30

    Activated effector T (TE) cells augment anabolic pathways of metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis, while memory T (TM) cells engage catabolic pathways, like fatty acid oxidation (FAO). However, signals that drive these differences remain unclear. Mitochondria are metabolic organelles that actively transform their ultrastructure. Therefore, we questioned whether mitochondrial dynamics controlscell metabolism. We show that TE cells have punctate mitochondria, while TM cells maintain fused networks. The fusion protein Opa1 is required for TM, but not TE cells after infection, and enforcing fusion in TE cells imposes TM cell characteristics and enhances antitumor function. Our data suggest that, by altering cristae morphology, fusion in TM cells configures electron transport chain (ETC) complex associations favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and FAO, while fission in TE cells leads to cristae expansion, reducing ETC efficiency and promoting aerobic glycolysis. Thus, mitochondrial remodeling is a signaling mechanism that instructs T cell metabolic programming. PMID:27293185

  19. Dynamical mechanism for coercivity tunability in the electrically controlled FePt perpendicular films with small grain size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Chun, E-mail: fengchun@ustb.edu.cn; Li, Xujing; Jiang, Yong; Yu, Guanghua [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Yang, Meiyin [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); The Center for Micromagnetics and Information Technologies (MINT) and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, 200 Union St SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Gong, Kui [Centre for the Physics of Materials and Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A2T8 (Canada); Li, Baohe [Department of Physics, School of Sciences, Beijing Technology and Business University, Beijing 100048 (China)

    2014-01-14

    This article reports property manipulations and related dynamical evolution in electromigration controlled FePt perpendicular films. Through altering voltage and treatment time of the power supply applied on the films, electronic momentum was fleetly controlled to manipulate the kinetic energy of Fe and Pt atoms based on momentum exchanges. The electromigration control behavior was proven to cause steerable ordering degree and grain growth in the films without thermal treatment. Processed FePt films with small grain size, high magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and controllable coercivity can be easily obtained. The results provide a novel method for tuning magnetic properties of other L1{sub 0} structured films.

  20. Dynamical mechanism for coercivity tunability in the electrically controlled FePt perpendicular films with small grain size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports property manipulations and related dynamical evolution in electromigration controlled FePt perpendicular films. Through altering voltage and treatment time of the power supply applied on the films, electronic momentum was fleetly controlled to manipulate the kinetic energy of Fe and Pt atoms based on momentum exchanges. The electromigration control behavior was proven to cause steerable ordering degree and grain growth in the films without thermal treatment. Processed FePt films with small grain size, high magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and controllable coercivity can be easily obtained. The results provide a novel method for tuning magnetic properties of other L10 structured films

  1. The Role of Surfactant and Costabilizer in Controlling Size of Nanocapsules Containing TEGDMA in Miniemulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jinxin; PAN Qiuhua; HUANG Cui; ZHAO Yanbing; OUYANG Xiaobai; HUO Yonghong; DUAN Sansan

    2009-01-01

    Nanocapsules with triethylene glycol dimethacrylate(TEGDMA)as core material and polyurethane as wall material used for self-healing bonding resin were prepared by interfacial polycondensation in miniemulsion.The influence of surfactant and costabilizer concentration on nanocapsules size and stability of nanocapsules was investigated.The size and its polydispersity of the nanocapsules were measured by light-scattering particle size analyzer.When the concentration of SDS were increased from 2.5wt%to 10wt%,the size decreases from 340.5 nm to 258.3 nm,PDI decreased from 0.210 to 0.111.As the concentration of HD increased,the size and PDI were both decreased,When reaching 10wt%,the size was 258.0 nm,PDI was 0.130.SDS and HD play important effect in synthesis of Nanocapsules containing TEGDMA.By changing the surfactant and costabilizer concen-tration it was possible to synthesize a wide variety of nanocapsules sizes.The performance and tech-nical parameters of nanocapsules had been researched preliminarily,which built the solid foundation for the application to the self-repairing bonding resin.

  2. Energy, control and DNA structure in the living cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijker, J.E.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Gomes, A. Vaz;

    1995-01-01

    directly or via “storage” in an intermediate high energy form, i.e., highATPADP ratio or H+ ion gradient. Although maintenance of a sufficiently high ATPADP ratio is essential to overcome the thermodynamic burden of uphill processes, it is not clear to what degree enzymes that control this ratio also...... control cell physiology. Indeed, in the living cell homeostatic control mechanisms might exist for the free-energy transduction pathways so as to prevent perturbation of cellular function when the Gibbs energy supply is compromised. This presentation addresses the extent to which the intracellular ATP...... level is involved in the control of cell physiology, how the elaborate control of cell function may be analyzed theoretically and quantitatively, and if this can be utilized selectively to affect certain cell types....

  3. Controling stem cell proliferation - CKIs at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeman, SWM; van Lohuizen, M

    2006-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors or CKIs are well recognized as intrinsic regulators of the cell cycle. Here, we discuss recent data implicating their activity in restraining adult stem cell self-renewal, and the role that proteins regulating CKI expression play in this process.

  4. Control of cell proliferation by Myc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchard, C; Staller, P; Eilers, M

    1998-01-01

    Myc proteins are key regulators of mammalian cell proliferation. They are transcription factors that activate genes as part of a heterodimeric complex with the protein Max. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding how Myc stimulates cell proliferation and how this might contribute to...

  5. Study on the Architecture of Control System for Manufacturing Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The depiction of the agile manufacturing cell includes a synopsis of some of the change proficiencies obtained by the configuration. To achieve agile configuration, the cell control system for agile manufacturing must be rapidly and efficiently generated or modified. In this paper, the object-oriented architecture is defined that supports design and implementation of highly reconfigurable control systems for agile manufacturing cells, which is composed of database objects, control objects, and resource objects, so as to reduce costs and to increase the control system's agility with respect to changing environment.

  6. Organic Based Solar Cells with Morphology Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Rieks

    Microscopy and as solar cells in a blend with PCBM. It was concluded that these particles did not show a potential large enough for continuous work due to a high material loss and low efficiency when applied in solar cells. The second method to achieve was preparation of pre-arranged morphology organic......The field of organic solar cells has in the last years gone through an impressive development with efficiencies reported up to 12 %. For organic solar cells to take the leap from primarily being a laboratory scale technology to being utilized as renewable energy source, several issues need to be...... nanoparticles consisting of a blend of donor and acceptor in an aqueous dispersion, thereby addressing two of the issues remaining in the field of organic solar cells. This approach was used on six different polymers, which all had the ability to prepare aqueous nanoparticle inks. The morphology of the...

  7. Transcriptional control of stem cell maintenance in the Drosophila intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Bardin, Allison J.; Perdigoto, Carolina N.; Southall, Tony D.; Brand, Andrea H; Schweisguth, François

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis by controlling the proper balance of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. The adult midgut of Drosophila contains multipotent intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that self-renew and produce differentiated progeny. Control of ISC identity and maintenance is poorly understood. Here we find that transcriptional repression of Notch target genes by a Hairless-Suppressor of Hairless complex is required for ISC maintenance, and identify genes of the Enhan...

  8. A parallel control architecture for industrial robot cells

    OpenAIRE

    Henrich, Dominik; Abegg, Frank; Wurll, Christian; Wörn, Heinz

    1998-01-01

    We present a parallel control architecture for industrial robot cells. It is based on closed functional components arranged in a flat communication hierarchy. The components may be executed by different processing elements, and each component itself may run on multiple processing elements. The system is driven by the instructions of a central cell control component. We set up necessary requirements for industrial robot cells and possible parallelization levels. These are met by the suggested ...

  9. Size limitation on zebra mussels consumed by freshwater drum may preclude the effectiveness of drum as a biological controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, John R. P., III; Love, Joy G.

    1995-01-01

    The septa lengths of bivalve shells were used to estimate shell lengths of the largest zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) crushed and consumed by freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) to determine if size limitation could preclude the effectiveness of drum as a biological controller of the zebra mussel. We examined gut samples of drum (273 to 542 mm long) collected from western Lake Erie in 1991, found the largest mussel (shell length = 21.4 mm) in the 11th largest drum (TL = 405 mm), and observed a reduction of mussel size in larger drum. The lack of a relationship between mussel size and drum size for larger specimens suggests that either drum prefer smaller mussels or the gape between the upper and lower pharyngeal teeth restricts drum feeding to zebra mussels of limited size. Although drum may reduce zebra mussel populations, because of the apparent size limitation of prey it is unlikely that drum would be fully effective as a biological controller; thus, this fish should not be introduced beyond its native range for that purpose.

  10. Interrelated influence of iron, light and cell size on marine phytoplankton growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunda, William G.; Huntsman, Susan A.

    1997-11-01

    The sub-optimal growth of phytoplankton and the resulting persistence of unutilized plant nutrients (nitrate and phosphate) in the surface waters of certain ocean regions has been a long-standing puzzle,. Of these regions, the Southern Ocean seems to play the greatest role in the global carbon cycle,, but controversy exists as to the dominant controls on net algal production. Limitation by iron deficiency,, light availability,, and grazing by zooplankton have been proposed. Here we present the results from culture experiments showing that the amount of cellular iron needed to support growth is higher under lower light intensities, owing to a greater requirement for photosynthetic iron-based redox proteins by low-light acclimatized algae. Moreover, algal iron uptake varies with cell surface area, such that the growth of small cells is favoured under iron limitation, as predicted theoretically. Phytoplankton growth can therefore be simultaneously limited by the availability of both iron and light. Such a co-limitation may be experienced by phytoplankton in iron-poor regions in which the surface mixed layer extends below the euphotic zone-as often occurs in the Southern Ocean,-or near the bottom of the euphotic zone in more stratified waters. By favouring the growth of smaller cells, iron/light co-limitation should increase grazing by microzooplankton, and thus minimize the loss of fixed carbon and nitrogen from surface waters in settling particles,.

  11. Effect of Graphene and Fullerene Nanofillers on Controlling the Pore Size and Physicochemical Properties of Chitosan Nanocomposite Mesoporous Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene S. Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CS nanocomposite mesoporous membranes were fabricated by mixing CS with graphene (G and fullerene (F nanofillers, and the diffusion properties through CS membranes were studied. In addition, in order to enhance the binding between the internal CS chains, physical cross-linking of CS by sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP was carried out. F and G with different weight percentages (0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt.% were added on physically cross-linked chitosan (CLCS and non-cross-linked chitosan (NCLCS membranes by wet mixing. Permeability and diffusion time of CLCS and NCLCS membranes at different temperatures were investigated. The results revealed that the pore size of all fabricated CS membranes is in the mesoporous range (i.e., 2–50 nm. Moreover, the addition of G and F nanofillers to CLCS and NCLCS solutions aided in controlling the CS membranes’ pore size and was found to enhance the barrier effect of the CS membranes either by blocking the internal pores or decreasing the pore size. These results illustrate the significant possibility of controlling the pore size of CS membranes by cross-linking and more importantly the careful selection of nanofillers and their percentage within the CS membranes. Controlling the pore size of CS membranes is a fundamental factor in packaging applications and membrane technology.

  12. Effect of Salinity on the Composition, Number and Size of Epidermal Cells along the Mature Blade of Wheat Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Salinity inhibits leaf growth in association with changes in cell size. The objective of this study was to determine the spatial distributions of the composition, number and dimensions of epidermal cells in the mature blades of leaf four of wheat seedlings under saline conditions. Plants were grown in loamy soil either with or without 120 mmol/L NaCl in a growth chamber, and harvested after leaf four was fully developed. The results of the spatial distribution analyses of width along the blade showed that salinity not only reduced the width of the leaf blade, but that it also altered the distribution pattern of blade width along the leaf axis. The reduction in the final size of the leaf blade was associated with a reduction in the total number of epidermal cells and in their widths and lengths. This study also revealed the spatial effects of salinity on the blade and epidermal cell dimensions along the leaf axis. In particular, salinity inhibited the total cell number for interstomatal, sister and elongated cells, implying that cell division in wheat leaves is inhibited by salinity. However, the lengths of interstomatal cells were not affected by salinity (unlike those for the sister and elongated cells), suggesting the relative contributions of cell length and numbers to the reduction in the final length of the blade under salinity is dependent on cell type.

  13. Controlled Aloin Release from Crosslinked Polyacrylamide Hydrogels: Effects of Mesh Size, Electric Field Strength and a Conductive Polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Anuvat Sirivat; Amornrat Niansiri; Sumonman Niamlang; Tawansorn Buranut

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of hydrogel mesh size, a conductive polymer, and electric field strength on controlled drug delivery phenomena using drug-loaded polyacrylamide hydrogels prepared at various crosslinking ratios both with and without a conductive polymer system. Poly(p-phenylene vinylene), PPV, as the model conductive polymer, was used to study its ability to control aloin released from aloin-doped poly(p-phenylene vinylene)/polyacrylamide hydrogel (aloin-dop...

  14. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and staining of cancer cells using ferrimagnetic H-ferritin nanoparticles with increasing core size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yao; Cao, Changqian; He, Xiaoqing; Yang, Caiyun; Tian, Lanxiang; Zhu, Rixiang; Pan, Yongxin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study is to demonstrate the nanoscale size effect of ferrimagnetic H-ferritin (M-HFn) nanoparticles on magnetic properties, relaxivity, enzyme mimetic activities, and application in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and immunohistochemical staining of cancer cells. Materials and methods M-HFn nanoparticles with different sizes of magnetite cores in the range of 2.7–5.3 nm were synthesized through loading different amounts of iron into recombinant human H chain ferritin (HFn) shells. Core size, crystallinity, and magnetic properties of those M-HFn nanoparticles were analyzed by transmission electron microscope and low-temperature magnetic measurements. The MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were incubated with synthesized M-HFn nanoparticles for 24 hours in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium. In vitro MRI of cell pellets after M-HFn labeling was performed at 7 T. Iron uptake of cells was analyzed by Prussian blue staining and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemical staining by using the peroxidase-like activity of M-HFn nanoparticles was carried out on MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue paraffin sections. Results The saturation magnetization (Ms), relaxivity, and peroxidase-like activity of synthesized M-HFn nanoparticles were monotonously increased with the size of ferrimagnetic cores. The M-HFn nanoparticles with the largest core size of 5.3 nm exhibit the strongest saturation magnetization, the highest peroxidase activity in immunohistochemical staining, and the highest r2 of 321 mM−1 s−1, allowing to detect MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells as low as 104 cells mL−1. Conclusion The magnetic properties, relaxivity, and peroxidase-like activity of M-HFn nanoparticles are size dependent, which indicates that M-HFn nanoparticles with larger magnetite core can significantly enhance performance in MRI and staining of cancer cells. PMID:25878496

  15. Control of the size of the coherence area in entangled twin beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtfrerich, M. W.; Marino, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the effect of a change in size and spatial profile of the pump beam in an atomic-based four-wave mixing process on the size of the coherence area of the generated entangled twin beams. We perform experiments and develop a theoretical model to obtain a measure of the linear extent or "radius" of the coherence area from noise measurements of the twin beams as a function of transmission through a variable size slit. Our results show that an increase in the size of the pump reduces the size of the coherence area. More interestingly, we find that the use of a flat-top pump beam of the same size as a Gaussian pump beam leads to a reduction by a factor of more than 2 in the linear extent of the coherence area. This in turn leads to an increase by a factor of more than 4 in the number of spatial modes that make up the twin beams and a resolution enhancement of the entangled images that can be generated with the four-wave mixing process.

  16. Maternal retinoids control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and set the offspring immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pavert, Serge A.; Ferreira, Manuela; Domingues, Rita G.; Ribeiro, Hélder; Molenaar, Rosalie; Moreira-Santos, Lara; Almeida, Francisca F.; Ibiza, Sales; Barbosa, Inês; Goverse, Gera; Labão-Almeida, Carlos; Godinho-Silva, Cristina; Konijn, Tanja; Schooneman, Dennis; O'Toole, Tom; Mizee, Mark R.; Habani, Yasmin; Haak, Esther; Santori, Fabio R.; Littman, Dan R.; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Dzierzak, Elaine; Simas, J. Pedro; Mebius, Reina E.; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2014-04-01

    The impact of nutritional status during fetal life on the overall health of adults has been recognized; however, dietary effects on the developing immune system are largely unknown. Development of secondary lymphoid organs occurs during embryogenesis and is considered to be developmentally programmed. Secondary lymphoid organ formation depends on a subset of type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) named lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. Here we show that mouse fetal ILC3s are controlled by cell-autonomous retinoic acid (RA) signalling in utero, which pre-sets the immune fitness in adulthood. We found that embryonic lymphoid organs contain ILC progenitors that differentiate locally into mature LTi cells. Local LTi cell differentiation was controlled by maternal retinoid intake and fetal RA signalling acting in a haematopoietic cell-autonomous manner. RA controlled LTi cell maturation upstream of the transcription factor RORγt. Accordingly, enforced expression of Rorgt restored maturation of LTi cells with impaired RA signalling, whereas RA receptors directly regulated the Rorgt locus. Finally, we established that maternal levels of dietary retinoids control the size of secondary lymphoid organs and the efficiency of immune responses in the adult offspring. Our results reveal a molecular link between maternal nutrients and the formation of immune structures required for resistance to infection in the offspring.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis and humidity sensing properties of size-controlled Zirconium Oxide (ZrO2) nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuyi; Lu, Yi; Yuan, Shuai; Shi, Liyi; Zhao, Yin; Zhang, Meihong; Deng, Wei

    2013-04-15

    Size-controlled ZrO2 nanorods were prepared via a facile hydrothermal treatment approach in the presence of NH4F as mineralizer. The effects of the type and concentration of mineralizers on the particle size and dispersibility of ZrO2 nanorods were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption-desorption measurements (BET), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), confirming the essential role of F(-) in tuning the particle size. Humidity sensors based on ZrO2 nanorods with different sizes exhibit different sensitivity depending on their proportion of surface adsorbed oxygen. High sensitivity, linear response, small hysteresis, and rapid response-recovery behavior (5s for adsorption and 38s for desorption) make ZrO2 prepared by our method a good candidate for application in humidity sensor. The complex impedance spectra were used to elucidate its humidity sensing mechanism in detail. PMID:23411357

  18. Size-controlled synthesis of ZrO2-TiO2 nanoparticles prepared via reverse micelle method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium-titanium mixed oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized using microreactors made of bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/water/n-hexane microemulsions. The control of particle size was achieved by varying the process variables, such as water-to-surfactant molar ratio and reagent concentration. Their sizes, appearances, crystal structures, pore diameter and surface area were characterized by TEM, XRD, N2 adsorption/desorption methods. The results revealed that samples prepared in reverse micelles had no crystalline phase. The Beckmann rearrangement of cyclohexanone oxime on ZrO2-TiO2 nanoparticles was carried out in a fixed-bed down flow reactor to investigate the effect of particle size on catalytic activity and selectivity. Samples synthesized in reverse micelles had better reaction performance than samples prepared via sol-gel method. A parallel relationship could be drawn between the catalytic activity and the particle size as well as the selectivity of the catalyst

  19. Size-controlled synthesis of SnO2 quantum dots and their gas-sensing performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianping; Zhao, Ruihua; Xie, Yajuan; Li, Jinping

    2015-08-01

    Tin dioxide quantum dots (TQDs) with controllable size were synthesized by changing the amount of alkaline reagent in the hydrothermal process. The gas-sensing properties were investigated by operating chemoresistor type sensor. The morphology and structure were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning/transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis and Raman spectrometry. The as-synthesized SnO2 shows the characteristics of quantum dots and the narrowest size distribution is about 2-3 nm. The gas-sensing results indicate that the responses are strongly dependent on the size of quantum dots. TQDs with different sizes exhibit different sensitivities and selectivities to volatile toxic chemicals such as aldehyde, acetone, methanol, ethanol and amine. Especially, when the sensors are exposed to 100 ppm triethylamine (TEA), the sensing response value of TQDs with small size is two times higher than that of the large-size TQDs. The maximum response values of TQDs to 1 ppm and 100 ppm TEA are 15 and 153, respectively. The response time is 1 s and the recovery time is 47 s upon exposure to 1 ppm TEA. The results suggest that it is an effective method by regulating the size of SnO2 quantum dots to detect low-concentration hazardous volatile compounds.

  20. Muscle Stem Cell Fate Is Controlled by the Cell-Polarity Protein Scrib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ono

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cells are resident skeletal muscle stem cells that supply myonuclei for homeostasis, hypertrophy, and repair in adult muscle. Scrib is one of the major cell-polarity proteins, acting as a potent tumor suppressor in epithelial cells. Here, we show that Scrib also controls satellite-cell-fate decisions in adult mice. Scrib is undetectable in quiescent cells but becomes expressed during activation. Scrib is asymmetrically distributed in dividing daughter cells, with robust accumulation in cells committed to myogenic differentiation. Low Scrib expression is associated with the proliferative state and preventing self-renewal, whereas high Scrib levels reduce satellite cell proliferation. Satellite-cell-specific knockout of Scrib in mice causes a drastic and insurmountable defect in muscle regeneration. Thus, Scrib is a regulator of tissue stem cells, controlling population expansion and self-renewal with Scrib expression dynamics directing satellite cell fate.